Page 1

a&c Spring 2015_Bell Cover_FINAL_Robert:Layout 1

5/29/15

2:35 PM

Page 1

art&culture Spring Summer 2015

street smarts

murals give urban landscapes a bold new look

you are here

art lets Palm Beach County visitors know they’ve arrived

in tune

Tony Award-winner Tommy Tune talks

PLUS girls’ night out, art’s healing touch, 25 years of Shakespeare by the Sea and more

of Palm Beach County


Smith Architectural Group_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:11 AM

Page 1


Kaufmann_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:12 AM

Page 1

Diamond Necklace Capture the magic of your dreams with the Dream Catcher Diamond Necklace. A weaving diamond motif intertwines with white gold, promoting the flow of positive energy through its loops. Renew your mind, body and spirit with this alluring piece and surrender yourself to the power of rejuvenation.

JEWELRY DESIGNERS SINCE 1954

PALM BEACH 路 210 Worth Avenue 路 561.832.4918

www.kaufmanndesuisse.com

MONTREAL 路 2195 Crescent Street 路 514.848.0595


Wally Findlay_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:13 AM

Page 1

SPR S P R IING NG EXH E X H IBITION I BI T ION GALLERY COLLECTION ON VIEW

A I Z P I R I | B R A G U I N | D U F Y | G E N PA U L | G R E N V I L L E | H E I N E | M I H A N OV I C | N E L S O N


5/28/15

9:13 AM

Page 2

ART A RT WALLY FINDLAY W A ALL LY FINDL LA AY

WALLY W AL LY FINDL F IN D L A AY Y GALLER RIE IES PA P ALM BEACH • NEW YORK

165 WO 165 ORTH RTH AV VENUE ENUE, PA ALM LM BE EACH ACH, FL FL 33480 33480 • T: T: (561) (561) 655 655 2090 2090 F: F: (561) (561) 655 655 1493 1493 124 EA AST ST 57 57TTH H ST TREET REET, NE EW W YO ORK RK NY NY 10022 10022 • T: T: ((212) 212) 4421 21 55390 390 F: F: ((212) 212) 8838 38 22460 460 124 WWW.W WA A L LY LY F I N D L AY AY . C O M

EST. EST T. 1870

Wally Findlay_A Spring 15:Layout 1


TOC_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

3:43 PM

Page 4

{contents}

F E AT U R E S

Spring Summer 2015

34 40 44 50 56 60 The Art of Hospitality At a number of Palm Beach County’s leading hotels and resorts, art is as much a part of the experience as the palm trees. By Joann Plockova

Summer in Palm Beach County Sounds Good

Juried Exhibition Spotlights County Talent

Enjoy a unique take on the sounds of the season through the eyes – and ears – of prominent local musicians.

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County showcases the professional vision and flair of local artists.

By Bill Meredith

By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

4

|

art&culture

The Big Picture Palm Beach County’s murals make a bold statement. By Lucy Lazarony

Step by Step Audiences seemingly hold their breath while a dancer defies gravity but it is the choreographer who crafts her steps. By Tara Mitton Catao

Dancing to the Beat of a Therapeutic Drum Discover the healing power of the arts. By Amy Woods


First Republic Bank_a Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:13 AM

Page 1

“Banking with First Republic is a wonderful experience – I forgot this level of service existed anywhere.” P A U L TA Y L O R ’ S A M E R I C A N M O D E R N D A N C E

Paul Taylor, Choreographer

241 Royal Palm Way, Palm Beach (561) 835-8829 (855) 886-4824 or visit www.firstrepublic.com New York Stock Exchange Symbol: FRC Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender

PalmBchArtCulture Winter 15 Taylor ND2015.indd 1

11/20/14 12:50:12 PM


TOC_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

{contents}

3:43 PM

Page 6

DEPARTMENTS Spring Summer 2015

12 28

welcome letter Summer in the Palm Beaches is a great time for all of our cultural organizations to get busy planning. By Rena Blades

14

publisher’s note In our own backyard. By Robert S.C. Kirschner

21

Boca Raton Museum of Art explores the power of beauty. Summer nights sizzle at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts. The Norton Museum of Art debuts a high-flying exhibition. Palm Beach County beaches attract discerning visitors. The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium will get under your skin. Special-effects makeup artist Emily Serpico creates amazing works of living art. The CANstruction® Sculpture Competition at the Gardens Mall is a testament to good taste. The Palm Beach Shakespeare Festival celebrates 25 years. The Cultural Council welcomes summer in Palm Beach County.

27

67

21

Upfront

27

most wanted

28

profile

32

calendar

65

inside culture

88

collectible quotes

Get creative when making plans for your next girls’ night out.

Tony Award-Winner Tommy Tune lifts the curtain on his life in the theater.

Palm Beach County’s array of cultural organizations fill the long days and nights of summer with fascination, fun and beauty.

The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts honors Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades, underwater sculptures greet snorkelers at Phil Foster Park, the Palm Beach International Film Festival finds a new home and more insider news

Cover Image: The Spirit of Communication by Tristan Eaton, Alexander Lofts apartments, 326 Fern Street, West Palm Beach, commissioned by Ram Reality Partners III LP

spring summer 2015 6

|

art&culture

art&culture magazine of Palm Beach County, Volume 9, Issue 3, spring summer 2015, is published three times a year by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, for the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, 601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460.


Gardens Mall_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

11:01 AM

Page 1


Mast Head_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

Sometimes it’s all about how others see you.

11:28 AM

Page 8

601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460 | (561) 471-2901 | palmbeachculture.com President and Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

(561) 471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Director, Marketing and Government Affairs

Marilyn Bauer

(561) 687-8727 mbauer@palmbeachculture.com

Chief Financial Officer

Kathleen Alex

(561) 471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

(561) 471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Mary Lewis

(561) 472-3340 mlewis@palmbeachculture.com

Trish Halverson

(561) 472-3347 thalverson@palmbeachculture.com

Debbie Calabria

(561) 472-3330 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Kristen Daniel

(561) 472-3342 kdaniel@palmbeachculture.com

Nichole Hickey

(561) 472.3336 nhickey@palmbeachculture.com

Website and Online Marketing Manager

Dan Boudet

(561) 471-2902 dboudet@palmbeachculture.com

Visitor Services and Music Coordinator

Marlon Foster

(561) 472-3338 mfoster@palmbeachculture.com

Bama Lutes Deal

(561) 214-8082 blutesdeal@palmbeachculture.com

Bebe Novick-Brodigan

(561) 471-1602 bbrodigan@palmbeachculture.com

Victoria Van Dam

(561) 472-3334 vvandam@palmbeachculture.com

Alexandra Gitelman

(561) 214-8087 agitelman@palmbeachculture.com

Bookkeeper

Jean Brasch

(561) 471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Administrative Assistant

Helen Hood

(561) 214-8085 hhood@palmbeachculture.com

Shani Simpson

(561) 471-2901 ssimpson@palmbeachculture.com

Gloria Rose

(561) 471-2901 grose@palmbeachculture.com

Cheif Grants Officer Director of Development Manager of Arts and Cultural Education Membership and Special Events Manager Manager of Annual Giving and Corporate Relations Manager of Artist Services

Once again, in the annual U.S.News & World Report survey on America’s Best Hospitals, ophthalmologists from around the country ranked Bascom Palmer Eye Institute the best eye hospital in the United States. This honor is a great testimony to our experience and technology. More importantly, if any member of their families needed a procedure, the best eye doctors in the world would tell them to travel long distances to get here. And that makes you very lucky. Because you don’t have to.

Cultural Concierge Public Relations Coordinator Marketing Coordinator Grants Coordinator

Executive Assistant and Administrative Support Bookkeeper

Cultural Council Board of Directors Officers Berton E. Korman, Chairman Irene J. Karp, Vice Chairman Bruce A. Beal, Vice Chairman Bill Parmalee, Secretary Christopher D. Caneles, Treasurer Jean Sharf, Event Chair Michael J. Bracci, Immediate Past Chair

Donald M. Ephraim Shirley Fiterman Roe Green Peg Greenspon Herbert S. Hoffman Raymond E. Kramer, III Robin E. Martin Jo Anne Rioli Moeller Suzanne Niedland Sue Patterson Kelly W. Rooney

Directors Howard Bregman Cressman Bronson

8

Nathan Slack Christina Stiller Dom A. Telesco Ethel Isaacs Williams Ex Officio Members Mary Lou Berger Daniel Biaggi Glenn Jergensen Sylvia Moffett Erica Whitfield

Palm Beach – (561) 515-1500

Cultural Council Founder

7101 Fairway Dr., Palm Beach Gardens

Alexander W. Dreyfoos

0LDPL‡1DSOHV‡3ODQWDWLRQ bascompalmer.org

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners

|

art&culture

Shelley Vana, Mayor Mary Lou Berger, Vice Mayor

Steven L. Abrams Paulette Burdick Melissa McKinlay

Priscilla A. Taylor Hal R. Valeche


Eau Palm Beach_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:17 AM

Page 1


Mast Head_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

Lighthouse ArtCenter presents selections from

The Manoogian Collection

11:28 AM

Page 10

art&culture of Palm Beach County

Spring Summer 2015 - volume 9, issue 3

Two Centuries of American Art

November 19, 2015 to March 5, 2016

publisher publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

561.472.8778 robert@passportpublications.com

editorial staff managing editor

christina wood

business editor

richard westlund

copy editor

wendy bernstein

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com 561.472.8768 westlund@passportpublications.com 561.472.8769 wendy@passportpublications.com

cultural council editorial staff editorial director

rena blades

executive editor

marilyn bauer

contributing writers tara mitton catao, lucy lazarony, john loring, allegra nagler, joann plockova, rich pollack, Portrait of Caroline Allport, William Merritt Chase, 1897

anne rodgers, hilary geary ross, frederic a. sharf, andrea richard, thom smith, jenifer mangione vogt, christina wood, amy woods

contributing photographers harry benson, jim fairman, jacek gancarz, robert holland, corby kaye, michael price, robert stevens

art & design art & production director graphic designer

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

rebecca m. lafita

561.472.8762 art@passportpublications.com

advertising & media sales director of advertising national advertising manager Sea Birds, Jamie Wyeth, 1995

“One of the most significant private collections of American art.” Docent tours, lectures and children’s programs will complement the exhibition.

senior advertising manager advertising manager

marketing director

10

|

art&culture

561.472.8767 richard@passportpublications.com

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

katherine hortenstine

561.472.8774 katherine@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

administration contract administrator

373 Tequesta Drive Tequesta, FL 33469 (561) 746-3101 LighthouseArts.org

richard s. wolff

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

alexandra h.c. kirschner

561.472.8761 allie@passportpublications.com

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.


Cultual Council ad_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:17 AM

Page 1


Welcome Rena _Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:34 AM

Page 12

WELCOME TO

art&culture

fromtheceo

Summer in the Palm Beaches is a great time for all of our cultural organizations to get busy planning. At the Cultural Council, we use the long, hot summer days to formulate the details of the exciting work we plan to accomplish during the coming year. We use the time to gather as a staff and calculate timelines, establish collaborations among departments and outside organizations and set priorities. This summer, the Council is working on an important initiative – the Cultural Industry Assessment. Over the course of six months, we will be learning about the health and growth of our nonprofit cultural institutions. Our approach entails three activities: assessment, research and capacity building. Assessment. Through individual conversations with cultural leaders and four large “Listening Sessions,” we will ask cultural leaders to provide details about plans for growth, issues related to stability and analysis of needs going forward. These four sessions will be held in different locations throughout the county with the goal of hearing from as many people as possible. We are casting the nest wide so we can learn as much as possible. By summer’s end, the Council will have compiled a report delineating the anticipated growth and the elements required to achieve it. Research. The Council measures the impact and scale of the cultural industry in our county in two main ways: a biennial Audience Survey and an Economic Impact Study completed every five to seven years. The Audience Survey, conducted by major and mid-level cultural

institutions, measures the size and impact of the audiences at museums, performances and events in art and culture. Last year, more than 3.4 million people attended cultural events in Palm Beach County and onethird were tourists. A new methodology is now being employed and those updated results will be available in November. The Economic Impact Study is done with the Americans for the Arts at the time they conduct the study in cities and counties throughout the United States. A new study begins later this year. Research conducted in 2010 found that the nonprofit cultural industry in Palm Beach County supports 6,000 jobs and the annual impact is $250 million – making this the largest cultural industry per capita in the State of Florida and one of the largest and most sophisticated in the Southeast. Capacity Building. Training and education are major components of the Council’s mission, and we are about to up the ante decisively. A thriving cultural industry benefits the people of this county, and cultural organizations thrive in part when they are well-run, efficient businesses whose financial house is in order. The Council offers important training and educational opportunities for cultural executives and, through some new programs under consideration, work in this area will increase. I look forward to reporting back to you in an upcoming issue of art&culture to let you know what we’ve learned and share the exciting changes going on in our museums, theaters and historical sites. Our great arts resources offer visitors a cool way to beat the heat this summer.

Rena Blades President and CEO Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

Michael Price

12

|

art&culture


Sailfish Pointe_a Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:17 AM

Page 1

THE POINT IS... Surrounded by water, 10 minutes to a private airport, 45 minutes to the Palm Beaches, 60 miles to the Bahamas.

sailfish point Hutchinson Island, Florida

1MPIWSJ%XPERXMGWLSVIPMRI•2MGOPEYW7MKREXYVI+SPJ•3GIERJVSRX'SYRXV]'PYF ,IPMTEH•*MXRIWW'SQTPI\•7TE7EPSR•4VMZEXI=EGLX'PYFERH1EVMRE -259-6)%&398+9)7834436892-8-)7

7EMP½WL4SMRXGSQ7)7EMP½WL4SMRX&PZH7XYEVX*0 8LI7EMP½WL4SMRX'PYFMWETVMZEXIJEGMPMX]7EMP½WL4SMRX6IEPX]MWEPMGIRWIH6IEP)WXEXI&VSOIV)UYEP,SYWMRK3TTSVXYRMX]


Welcome Publisher_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

3:56 PM

Page 14

publisher

IN OUR OWN BACKYARD

Palm Beach County is blessed with a backyard that stretches from Jupiter to Boca Raton and from Belle Glade to the beaches of Lake Worth. During the summer months, it’s filled with a busy hum of activities, laughter and applause. For Avery Sommers, one of the talented musicians featured in “The Sounds of Summer,” the sweetest sounds of the season can be heard, quite literally, in her backyard. To see what perks up the ears of doo-wop, rock and blues icon Dion, jazz pianist Copeland Davis and other top area performers, turn to page 40.

from

With the sun shining down and temperatures soaring high, summer is an ideal time to explore the many museums, galleries and air-conditioned theaters that can be found right in our own backyard. Turn to page 21 in the Upfront section for information on intriguing exhibitions at the Boca Raton Museum of Art and the N orton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. “Juried Exhibition Spotlights County Talent” on page 44 will give you an idea of what you’ll find if a visit to the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters in Lake Worth is on your agenda. For even more cool ideas, check out the calendar on pages 32 and 33. Of course, Palm Beach County offers a year-round appeal to visitors. In “The Art of Hospitality” on page 34, we’ll show you how some of the area’s leading hotels and resorts use art to make them feel welcome. Among the many visitors drawn to our shores this year was Tommy Tune. The 10-time Tony Award winner chatted with Rob Russell, entertainment director for the Royal Room Cabaret, in front of a crowd of 175

Studio Palm Beach

14

|

art&culture

during Culture & Cocktails at The Colony Hotel in Palm Beach. In the Profile on page 28, we invite you to enjoy highlights from the conversation. Ladies know that Palm Beach County is a great place to get together with their gal pals any time of year. Turn to page 27, where you’ll find some creative suggestions for your next outing in “Most Wanted: A Girls’ Night Out.” The healing properties of the arts aren’t limited by the calendar, either. On page 60, regular art&culture contributor Amy Woods will introduce you to some of the organizations that are tapping the healing power of the arts in “Dancing to the Beat of a Therapeutic Drum.” On page 56 in “Step by Step,” we’ll introduce you to the intricacies of the choreographer’s craft. “The Big Picture” on page 50 celebrates the murals that are making a bold statement on city streets across the county. We hope this issue of art&culture will entice you to personally experience all that Palm Beach County has to offer, right here in our own backyard. Enjoy!

Robert S.C. Kirschner President/Publisher Passport Publications & Media Corporation


Classical So Fla_a Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

11:01 AM

Page 1


Contributors Page_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:35 AM

Page 16

{contributors} art&culture’s senior editor, Christina Wood, is not afraid to get her hands dirty in pursuit of a good story. Although you’re more likely to find her at the theater, enjoying a concert or happily wandering through a museum, the award-winning freelance writer and editor has been known to roll up her sleeves (and, on occasion, her pant legs) to wade through swamps, explore the world of animal behavior or go head-to-head with military leaders.

Before launching her freelance career, Amy Woods worked as the society editor of Palm 2 Jupiter and as the editor of Notables at The Palm Beach Post. An experienced editor, columnist, writer and reporter, Amy’s goal is to use her experience as a journalist and skills in public relations for the benefit of our local nonprofit community.

Jacek Gancarz is a freelance and fine art photographer based in South Florida. Plucked from the confines of the Iron Curtain at an early age, he found himself in the U.S. poring over the pages of National Geographic and Life magazines, which fueled his passion for photography. At age 12, he received a camera from his father and his passion began. Many travels – and a B.S. from FAU – later, he went to work as a photojournalist, spending seven years with the Palm Beach Daily News. Jenifer Mangione Vogt is a writer and publicist who specializes in art, finance and Italian culture. She writes about art for many publications, including JetSet Magazine and Artlog. Jenifer also has more than 20 years of experience in corporate and nonprofit marketing, serving art organizations such as the Friends of the Uffizi Gallery, Metropolitan Museum of Art and Christie’s, as well as Fortune 500 companies, including MasterCard International and The Bank of New York.

Freelance writer Joann Plockova specializes in design, architecture and culture writing – often with a social or environmental focus. Her curious nature and broad list of interests always has her on the hunt for new and important topics to cover. Among other publications, she’s written for Conde N ast Traveller UK, the Christian Science Monitor and Green Building & Design. She has one foot in South Florida and the other in Prague, Czech Republic.

After dancing professionally, Tara Mitton Catao founded an acclaimed touring company dedicated to presenting new choreography. In addition to writing, she is an award-winning choreographer who currently coaches, teaches and designs costumes. Tara travels regularly as a judge for an international ballet competition and is the dance critic for the Palm Beach ArtsPaper.

Lucy Lazarony is a freelance writer and journalist living in South Florida. In addition to art&culture magazine, her articles on the arts appear in Art Hive Magazine, the Palm Beach ArtsPaper and The Coastal Star.

16

|

art&culture


Rosetta Stone_a Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:20 AM

Page 1


WP DDA_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

11:19 AM

Page 1


WP DDA_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

11:19 AM

Page 2


Jupiter Medical Center_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:20 AM

Page 1

State-of-the-art technology and personalized care have been our hallmark for 25 years. Yet what really sets our cancer center apart, is the compassion and empathy our patients feel when their treatment journey is experienced woman-to-woman. Drs. Pinelli and Leary are two of only a few women gynecologic oncologists in the state of Florida. They treat women facing cervical, vulvar, uterine and ovarian cancer. Let them guide your mind and body through your recovery process, right here in Jupiter.

Ella Milbank Foshay Cancer Center 1240 S. Old Dixie Highway, Jupiter, FL 33458

Antonella Leary, MD

Donna Pinelli, MD

Medical Director Gynecologic Oncology Program

Medical Director Walsh Robotic Surgery

;VĂ„UKV\[HIV\[[OLN`ULJVSVNPJVUJVSVN`WYVNYHT H[[OL-VZOH`*HUJLY*LU[LYJHSS VY]PZP[MVZOH`JHUJLYJLU[LYJVT


Upfront_Spring 15_2.0:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:36 AM

Page 21

{upfront} HOT TIMES

LOOKING SMART Helena Rubinstein commissioned Salvador Dalí to design packaging for her compacts and, while he was at it, to paint her portrait. A collector of people as well as art, the cosmetics maven also had Picasso, Man Ray and Warhol immortalize her beauty. Those portraits are included in Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power, an exhibition organized by the Jewish Museum, New York, that is on display at the Boca Raton Museum of Art through July 12. The show features paintings by Miró and Chagall as well as selections from Rubinstein’s fine jewelry and couture clothing collections that showcase her exquisite taste. Vintage advertisements and photographs of her residences in N ew York, Paris and London, along with her spas and salons, highlight her business acumen.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION BocaMuseum.org

Having five Friday nights in a single month is cause for celebration. In July, the party will be at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts, which is introducing Hot Summer Nights at the Pavilion, a series of free outdoor concerts. When the sun goes down, the food trucks will gather and the music will heat up as some of the area’s most entertaining dance bands take the stage on Friday nights at 8 p.m. from July 3 through 31.

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N DelrayArts.org

ARE WE THERE YET?

Aeronautical Exhibition Aero Congress Air Institute Veiled Prophet Designer: Carl Walter American, 1923 Color lithograph Overall: 53.3 x 35.6 cm (21 x 14 in.) Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection

Going Places: Transportation Designs from the Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection will be on view at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach from June 25 through January 3. Featuring more than 100 items – including models of trains, planes and automobiles as well as design drawings, concept sketches, renderings, advertising art and posters plus period newsreels and clips from classic films and television programs – this exhibition examines how we arrived. Evoking the excitement that once accompanied the simple act of getting from point A to point B, the show highlights the designers who created the look of the 20th-century vehicles that transported us and transformed the way we travel. Families have even more reason to visit the N orton. Thanks to a generous gift made by Damon and Katherine Mezzacappa, the museum will be providing free admission to all Palm Beach County residents every Saturday for two years, beginning June 6.

FOR ADDITION AL IN FORMATION Norton.org

art&culture

|

21


Upfront_Spring 15_2.0:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:36 AM

Page 22

{upfront} PALM BEACH COUNTY BEACHES ATTRACT DISCERNING VISITORS It’s official – tourists aren’t the only ones who love Palm Beach County’s sandy beaches. According to researchers at the Loggerhead MarineLife Center in Juno Beach, a particular stretch of the county’s coastline is one of only a handful of leatherback sea turtle nesting “hot spots” in the world. For more than 20 years, the team at LMC has studied the local leatherback sea turtle population. The Leatherback Project has resulted in one of the world’s most robust leatherback sea turtle data sets. LMC research data manager Sarah Hirsch recently shared some of the project’s findings at a symposium hosted by the International Sea Turtle Society.

 The leatherback is the largest sea turtle living in our oceans. Unfortunately, it is also one of the most threatened. Nesting season for these visitors to Florida’s shores runs from April through July.  Leatherback sea turtles, which can weigh in at 2,000 pounds, eat their body weight in jellyfish every day. Alan C. Egan

 Leatherback sea turtles are unique in that they have a soft shell covered with a “leathery” skin. Because of its soft shell, the leatherback’s body can compress and withstand extreme pressure, allowing it to dive to extreme ocean depths.

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N MarineLife.org

OUT WITH THE OLD, IN WITH THE EWW ! The summer exhibit at the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium in West Palm Beach is sure to get under your skin. Eww! What’s Eating You? explores the personal relationship we have with parasites. Journey through a forest of enlarged human hairs and see who you may meet. Pull on an elongated hookworm to view its amazing journey through the human body. Spin the vintage wheel-of-fortune to see what your chances of hosting a parasitic disease might be. The exhibition is a veritable carnival of creatures, so step right this way, ladies and gentlemen – and be sure to bring the kids with you.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION SFScienceCenter.org

22

|

art&culture

SCARY GOOD

Emily Serpico was one of three finalists in season eight of the Syfy channel’s critically acclaimed reality competition series Face Off, which explores the world of special-effects makeup artists and the unlimited imagination that allows them to create amazing works of living art. The Wellington resident got her start at the G-Star School of the Arts for Film, Animation and Performing Arts in West Palm Beach, which lays claim to being the only high school in the country with a professional special effects makeup department. For four years, she headed up the makeup department for the charter school’s annual XScream Halloween project, populating the school’s haunted house with a convincing cast of nightmare-inducing creatures. The youngest contestant in Face Off history, Serpico outlasted 13 of the original 16 contestants to finish in the top three, impressing a bevy of Academy and Emmy Award-winning special effects judges along the way. This summer, she will be paying it forward by offering a series of workshops at her alma mater.

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N GStarSchool.org


JFed_Full_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

11:16 AM

Page 1

Jewish Federation Federation touches to ouches

more mo ore Jewish Jewissh lives tthan han any an ny other other organization organ nization

in the world. worlld. ld With Federation With Federattion and its partner agencies, agen ncies, you make an impact impa act in our comm unityy, Israel and 70 countries countries around around the the world. community,


Upfront_Spring 15_2.0:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:36 AM

Page 24

{upfront}

A

CAN-DO

Approach to Art

Tracey Benson Photography

Lila Photo

Lila Photo

What do modern art and canned food have in common? Both are helping to eradicate hunger in South Florida as the stars of the third annual CAN struction® Sculpture Competition. Presented by the Palm Beach County Food Bank, the event kicks off June 8 and runs through June 21 at The Gardens Mall in Palm Beach Gardens. CAN struction draws a talented mix of local architects, engineers and construction firms, who create giant sculptures made entirely from nonperishable canned and packaged food items. The theme for this year’s competition is “CAN nes International Film Festival.” Competing teams include Hedrick Brothers; Kast Construction and Currie Sowards Aguila Architects; Leo A. Daly and The Weitz Company; architecture students from Palm Beach State College; Roger Dean Stadium and The Wantman Group; and Suffolk Construction. When the exhibition concludes, the canned food used to create the works of art will be donated to the Palm Beach County Food Bank. Lila Photo

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N TheGardensMall.com or PBCFoodBank.org

TO BE 25 OR NOT TO BE The Palm Beach Shakespeare Festival celebrates its 25th anniversary July 9-12 and 16-19 with a presentation of Hamlet at the Seabreeze Amphitheatre in Jupiter. Adapted and directed by Trent Stephens, who teaches theater in Lexington, Ky., the free Shakespeare by the Sea XXV production caps a full season of performances that has ranged from Shakespearean classics to radio dramas. As is fitting with an event presented in partnership with Palm Beach County Parks & Recreation, beach chairs, blankets and picnic baskets are welcome.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION PBShakespeare.org

24

|

art&culture


Upfront_Spring 15_2.0:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:36 AM

Page 25

{upfront}

411 601

the IT’S HERE!

Looking for information on the exhibits, events and excitement brewing at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth? We’ve got it!

on

SUMMER COLORS

Lynn Holland, Seed Pods, 2014, Watercolor, 26 x 35 inches

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County has published its 2015 Cultural Camp Guide – a comprehensive online listing of dozens of art and cultural summer programs for kids in the Palm Beaches. Future film directors, ballet dancers, creative writers, actors, concert pianists, environmentalists and well-rounded happy members of society can ask their parents to click on PalmBeachCulture.com/camps to research and select arts programs that will make summer a colorful and creative experience.

Solo exhibitions usually fill the walls of the Lawrence A. Sanders Gallery. This summer, the Cultural Council is using this dynamic space to showcase the talents of the Palm Beach Watercolor Society, which was founded in 1982 and supports community watercolor education and appreciation. Through August 1, work by members of the society will be featured in an exhibition juried by Chris Lopez, an internationally published painter, graphic designer and photographer who teaches at the Boca Raton Museum Art School.

FRIDAY NIGHT LIVE The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County keeps the doors open late for its increasingly popular Open Mic Night, hosted by Wayne Perry, Vanessa Diaz and Kyle DJ Thought. Whether you want to let your voice be heard or enjoy the talents of area performers, stop by and join the fun. Visit palmbeachculture.com for event dates and times.

art&culture

|

25


BHOP_Seaside_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

11:17 AM

Page 1


Most Wanted:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:29 AM

Page 27

{upfront – most wanted}

MOST WANTED: A GIRLS’ NIGHT OUT Get creative. Palm Beach County’s enticing cultural community provides inspiration aplenty for a memorable night on the town.

Animal Trainer Callie Coxson with Chiquita, a sulfur-crested cockatoo

FOLLOW THE PATH OF LEAST RESISTANCE Experience the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach during Sushi & Stroll Summer Walks. Indulge in Pan-Asian cuisine from Morikami’s Cornell Café and enjoy incredible drum performances by Fushu Daiko. You can even do a little shopping at the gift shop. Friday, June 12, July 10, August 14 and September 11 | 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. Morikami.org

THIS IS SO COOL Art After Dark at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach is not only air-conditioned, it’s free for Florida residents during the summer months (June 4 – September 3). Culture is gently shaken not stirred during this eclectic weekly event, which serves up a mix of music, conversations with curators, docent-led tours, art activities, film, dance, wine tastings, chef demos and more. Beverages are available in the lobby; the museum’s restaurant also stays open late. Thursdays | 5 to 9 p.m. Norton.org

Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

Courtesy Norton Museum of Art, Photo by Tom Tracy

TAKE A WALK ON THE WILD SIDE Head to the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society in West Palm Beach for Roar & Pour, featuring live music from some of South Florida’s hottest tribute bands, fun food and cold beverages served up around the zoo’s Interactive Play Fountain. Expect up-close animal encounters while you’re on the prowl, entertaining zookeeper talks and a Tap Takeover by a local brewery. Saturday, June 13, July 11, August 8 | 5 to 9 p.m. PalmBeachZoo.org

GIRL POWER Acclaimed South Florida jazz vocalist Nicole Henry brings a potent combination of vocal abilities, impeccable phrasing and powerful emotional resonance to the stage. When she performs at the Arts Garage in Delray Beach this summer, you can bring everything else – including your beverage of choice and nibbles to share with your gal pals. July 25 | 8 p.m. ArtsGarage.org

AND BY THE WAY… Little ladies can enjoy a night out, too. The GEMS Club at the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium offers girls in grades 3 through 8 an opportunity to discover the exciting world of math, science, engineering and technology. Summer sessions of GEMS – which stands for Girls Excelling in Math & Science – will cover topics ranging from Chemical Concoctions to Wicked Weather. Last Tuesday of every month | 5 to 7 p.m. SFScienceCenter.org

art&culture

|

27


Profile_Tommy Tunes:Layout 1

28

|

art&culture

5/28/15

9:27 AM

Page 28


Profile_Tommy Tunes:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:27 AM

Page 29

{upfront-profile}

Tommy Tune 10-Time Tony Winner Dazzles at Culture & Cocktails Finale For 10 seasons, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County has been presenting the popular series Culture & Cocktails, featuring lively, often amusing, interviews with leading figures from the worlds of art, fashion, theatre and music. Just four days before headlining this season’s fifth and final Culture & Cocktails Conversation on April 6, Broadway legend Tommy Tune learned that he would receive his 10th Tony Award — for Lifetime Achievement in the Theatre, celebrating 50 years as a successful actor, dancer, director and choreographer. A native Texan who won Tonys for such Broadway hits as Seesaw, My One and Only, Grand Hotel, Nine, The Will Rogers Follies and more, Tune also is a recipient of eight Drama Desk Awards, three Astaire Awards, The National Medal of Arts and his own star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame. The elegant and lanky (he’s 6’6”) Tune dazzled nearly 170 Cultural Council members and supporters at The Colony Hotel’s Pavilion in Palm Beach, as he shared anecdotes in response to questions posed by Rob Russell, Entertainment Director of The Colony’s Royal Room Cabaret.

Photo by Corby Kaye’s Studio Palm Beach

art&culture

|

29


Profile_Tommy Tunes:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:27 AM

Page 30

So how does it feel to be a 10-time Tony Award winner? It’s very hard to surprise me, but this was something I never even contemplated. I have nine Tony Awards, and the number nine has been very, very good to me in my life. Number 10 just came out of the blue, so it’s the best kind of award because I didn’t have to do anything except stay alive.

The relationship between Walter Matthau and Barbra Streisand was not good. We were on set the morning after Barbra had appeared on the Academy Awards, where she wore a vintage dress and big frizzy hair, and Walter asked if her gown had come out of her grandmother’s attic and said the hairdo made her look like Harpo Marx. I didn’t make that up, I heard it with my own little right ear.

How did all this start for a boy in Texas? When you were young, did you know what you wanted to be? My mother said that I danced before I was born. I would get very active in the “rehearsal womb” when she was listening to Irving Berlin, and my parents swear that I danced before I walked. I would be crawling through the house and get up on my hind legs and dance when music came on the radio. When the music would go off, I would get back on all fours and start crawling again.

You co-starred with Twiggy twice – first, in the movie version of The Boyfriend and later on Broadway in My One and Only. What can you tell us about Twiggy? The first time I saw her was when we were making the movie The Boyfriend in London with director Ken Russell. I recognized her name but didn’t know much about her because I wasn’t into the fashion thing yet. I was stunned the first time I saw her. She had a magic face and was absolutely beautiful. When we did The Boyfriend, we were both with other people but we had crushes on each other. Ten years later, I had the idea to do a show with Twiggy on Broadway, but she was concerned that she had never danced on stage until this show, My One and Only. I talked her into doing it, and then we fell in love.

How did you get to the Great White Way? I arrived on St. Patrick’s Day in 1961 or ’62 and went to an audition – and got a job my first day in New York. My dream was to dance in the chorus of a Broadway show, and it came true for me three times over, so I was blessed. I felt like I could just do this for the rest of my life. Dancing in a show is like a great team sport, but instead of a locker room you have a dressing room. Instead of uniforms, you have costumes. Instead of cleats, you have taps. You go out as a team and you have got to win every night. You can’t lose. The audience is there, they’re in their seats, they paid their money and you have to all go out and dance together. And I loved every minute of it.

Fox, and I was flown out and tested for the movie of Hello, Dolly! starring Barbra Streisand and Walter Matthau and directed by Gene Kelly. They tested 20 guys and I got the part. They wanted Judy Garland to play Dolly in the movie, but she was not in good shape so they couldn’t take a chance. Then they went to Mae West, but she had passed the point of believability – so Barbra got it by default, even though she was really too young and totally unproven as a movie star, because Funny Girl hadn’t yet been released.

30

|

art&culture

Corby Kaye’s Studio Palm Beach

Speaking of My One and Only, another of your co-stars was Charles “Honi” Coles. Any memories you can share? He was the best dancer I ever worked with, and I have worked with some great people. He was tall and slender and handsome – a gentleman of color who didn’t get the breaks that I got because it was more of a segregated world then. He was smooth as glass, and passed on a lot of wonderful steps to me. We had a number together in the second act of My One and Only and we Is it true that Broadway legend Carol Rob Russell interviews Tommy Tune at Culture & Cocktails both won Tony Awards for that show. We Channing is one of your mentors? danced that number more than a thousand times when, during a She’s my spiritual mother. I’ve known her since I was 17, and before matinee performance in Grand Rapids, he was sitting on stage and I make any decision about my show business life or my personal life, I missed his line. I said my line to him and he just sat there. I glanced consult with Carol. She taught me about the importance of touring. down at the music director for help, who took it as a cue and began She said, “Tommy Tune, if it is your desire to pursue a career in the playing the vamp. Coles heard it and rose up very slowly, skipping the theatrical arts, you must tour your shows to the capitals of the world.” scene and the song entirely. He drifted downstage to the edge and When I asked her to name one, she said, “Minneapolis.” She’s the went directly into the dance. He did not miss a beat, but when it was funniest woman I know. over he just gestured to me and sat down. I took that to mean no I later played 900 performances at the MGM Grand in Las Vegas. encore, because we always got an encore for that number, and they slid It was an enormous $45 million spectacle and I was never off stage, him off stage. except to quickly change costumes. When I signed the contract, I called That was the last time Charles “Honi” Coles and I danced that duet Carol and asked her advice. She said to me, “Tommy Tune, to play together. In fact, it was the last time he danced at all. He had had a Vegas you must start with the finale and go up from there.” stroke on stage. He couldn’t speak and couldn’t sing, but when his dancer’s body heard the music, he rose up and he danced his last dance How did you make the transition from Broadway to Hollywood? to perfection. What a guy! I got discovered in the chorus by a talent scout from 20th Century Before we conclude the final Culture & Cocktails of our 10th anniversary season, any last thoughts about your amazing career? The show – that’s the thing, and that’s why I love live theater. There’s no retake. You do it. If something goes wrong, you make it work. In movies, you can reshoot and recut and look like you’re doing a thousand things that you really can’t. I love movies, I love television, but for me live theatre is where I live. It’s home, it’s home.


Profile_Tommy Tunes:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:28 AM

Page 31

{upfront-profile}

Photo by Corby Kaye’s Studio Palm Beach

art&culture

|

31


Calendar_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:25 AM

Page 32

C U LT U R A L E V E N T S Palm Beach County is home to more than 200 arts and cultural organizations that provide more than 42,000 offerings each year. Here's just a taste of what's available.

JUNE FOUNDER’S DAY June 5 Henry Morrison Flagler Museum, Palm Beach

LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS June 5-28 Slow Burn Theatre, Boca Raton

Eliot Porter, Cypress Slough and Mist, Cypress Lodge, Punta Gorda, Florida, January 31, 1974, 1974, Dye imbibition print 10 1/2 x 8 1/16 in.

ONGOING BAREFOOT IN THE PARK Now through June 7 Delray Beach Playhouse, Delray Beach

BLING: ART THAT SHINES Now through July 5 Delray Beach Center for the Arts Cornell Museum of Art, Delray Beach IMAGING EDEN: PHOTOGRAPHERS DISCOVER THE EVERGLADES Now through July 12 Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach SAFARI NIGHTS Every Friday night from June 5 to September 25 Palm Beach Zoo, West Palm Beach

32

|

art&culture

MARILYN MAYE June 7 Lynn University Wold Performing Arts Center, Boca Raton

THE MYSTERY OF EDWIN DROOD June 12-28 Sol Children Theatre, Boca Raton BILL MAHER June 13 Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, West Palm Beach

Astro Boy vs. Pluto, K.T. Figure Collection, Comic Version Series, Kaiyodo-Takara, Plastic, 2003, Private Collection

JAPAN’S ROBOT KINGDOM June 16-September 13 Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Delray Beach JUNETEENTH CELEBRATION June 19 Spady Museum, Delray Beach

HAIRSPRAY June 26 & 27 Maltz Jupiter Theatre, Jupiter AMERICAN SYMPHONIC JAZZWORKS KCO AARON KULA, CONDUCTOR June 28 Florida Atlantic University Carole and Barry Kaye Performing Arts Auditorium, Boca Raton


Calendar_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:25 AM

Page 33

{upfront – calendar}

C A L E N D A R AUGUST/SEPTEMBER

SUMMER SPECTACULAR, WORKS OF AMERICAN MASTERS August 1 & 2 Boca Ballet Theatre Florida Atlantic University University Theatre, Boca Raton

JULY SHE LOVES ME July 3-26 Florida Atlantic University University Theatre, Boca Raton

HIKE THROUGH HISTORY August 1 Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum, Jupiter

TOMMY July 9-26 Lake Worth Playhouse, Lake Worth

PETER PAN August 6-September 6 The Wick Theatre, Boca Raton

SAMMY FIGUEROA July 10 Arts Garage, Delray Beach PHOTOGRAPHY WORKSHOP LIGHTING IN NATURE July 11 MacArthur Beach State Park, North Palm Beach CERAMICS AND SCULPTURE STUDENT EXHIBITION July 11-August 8 Armory Art Center, West Palm Beach

THE LAST 5 YEARS July 17-August 2 Evening Star Productions Sol Theatre, Boca Raton

Brenda Hope Zappitell, Unity, 2015, acrylic, flashe and cold wax on panel, 60 x 48 in., Courtesy of the Artist

BRENDA HOPE ZAPPITELL, A JOURNEY OF GESTURES July 25-August 23 Boca Raton Museum of Art, Boca Raton

110 IN THE SHADE August 14-23 Palm Beach Dramaworks, West Palm Beach

Boca Ballet, Con Amore

SUMMER MUSIC SERIES August 21 The Symphonia, Boca Raton Mizner Park Amphitheater, Boca Raton

Photo by David Seabrooke.

2015 MEMBER’S EXHIBIT August 29-November 7 Palm Beach Photographic Centre, West Palm Beach

ENVIRONMENTALLY ENGAGED September 10-October 24 Lighthouse Arts Center, Tequesta

art&culture

|

33


Art of Hospitality:Layout 1

34

|

art&culture

5/28/15

9:39 AM

Page 34

Mediterranean Ballroom, The Breakers


Art of Hospitality:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:39 AM

Page 35

Art Hospitality The

of

By Joann Plockova

At a number of Palm Beach County’s leading hotels and resorts, art is as much a part of the experience as the palm trees. Paintings, sculptures, photographs and decorative items created by both local artists and top international talent have been carefully selected to set the tone, offer a cultural encounter and immerse guests in one-of-a-kind Palm Beach County hospitality. A recent redesign at The Colony Hotel, which has been at the center of Palm Beach society since 1947, used a variety of artworks – and art forms – to surround guests with color and local flair. “We wanted to have as many local artists represented as possible,” says Carleton Varney of Dorothy Draper & Co., who coordinated the effort.

art&culture

|

35


Art of Hospitality:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:39 AM

Page 36

Colony Hotel

Photo murals of life-size polo players by Wellington-resident Harry Benson who famously photographed the Beatles, U.S. presidents and other world figures for the likes of Life, Vanity Fair and The New Yorker inspire guests in the Polo Lounge. Local artist Bruce Helander painted the columns in the lounge to look like martinis, Cosmopolitans and Manhattans. Accenting the hotel’s traditional British Colonial style, a giclee print by part-time Palm Beacher Edwina Sandys hangs in several of the rooms and suites. The humorous piece depicts her grandfather, Winston Churchill, at work on one of his own paintings. To carry out the flower theme that runs throughout the hotel, handpainted hibiscus paintings by West Palm Beach-based artist Noelle McCarthy are featured in the bathrooms. “When you walk into the Colony you know you are in Palm Beach,” Varney says. Photos of the Colony’s “who’s who” list of visitors, ranging from European royalty and American politicians to entertainers who have performed in the Colony’s Royal Room, hang in the lobby beneath white birdcage chandeliers that were first featured at New York’s Metropolitan Museum of Art. The centerpiece of the hotel: a 1,300 – pound, tiered chandelier made from 637 hand-hung, green crystal pendants. Whether decorative pieces or fine art, all of the works play a

36

|

art&culture

Suite at Eau Palm Beach

role in immersing guests in the Old-World charm of Palm Beach culture and society while echoing the beautiful environment that’s right outside the door. At Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, renowned designer and seasonal resident Jonathan Adler is the force behind the display of art. As part of a chic redesign following the resort’s transition from a Ritz-Carlton to an independent resort in 2013, Adler and his team thoughtfully selected pieces that would share with guests Eau’s particular style story, described as a nod and a wink to classic Palm Beach style but with a twist. Inside guestrooms, an endearingly quirky photo of a family out for a drive on the water in an “Amphicar” adorns the walls. Called “Sea Drive,” the iconic image Eau Palm Beach by society photographer Slim Aarons – who was revered from the 1950s through the ’80s for his photographs of socialites, jet setters and celebrities – is just one of a variety of artworks that offer a playful nod to sophistication. Aarons’ work sets the tone. In addition to “Sea Drive,” the resort selected to hang prints of his “Beauty and The Beast,” a seductive photo of Lady Daphne Cameron sitting on top of a tiger-skin rug inside the home of Palm Beach socialite Laddie Sanford. To further evoke the feeling of a


Art of Hospitality:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:39 AM

Page 37

Lobby, The Breakers

art&culture

|

37


Art of Hospitality:Layout 1

38

|

art&culture

5/28/15

9:39 AM

Page 38


Art of Hospitality:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:39 AM

Page 39

Carole Feuerman, The Golden Mean

luxurious beachfront resort, a large-scale copy of a watercolor seahorse by Jenna Synder-Phillips hangs in guestrooms and a bright print of a neonyellow parakeet by Leila Jeffries can be found in the water closets. New York-based artist (and head of creative development at Bobbi Brown cosmetics) Donald “Drawbertson” Robertson was commissioned to create something special for the resort. The result is a painting depicting a multigenerational family in Lilly Pulitzer-esque beachwear with a bright sun and ocean in the background, copies of which can be seen in the guestrooms. The Boca Raton Resort & Club – in collaboration with Baker Sponder Gallery – goes a step further in its use of art, offering guests a museumquality experience as part of their stay. A collection of sculptures from leading international artists is on display in a surprising variety of indoor and outdoor locations. All of the pieces, which are for sale and which feature plaques with information about the artist and the work, can be viewed through a self-guided tour featuring both audio and web components. “Family” by New York-based Israeli artist Boaz Vaadia is a favorite among guests. The figures of a mother, father and child, made from layers of chiseled stone in Boaz’s signature style, sit at the entrance to the resort, as if welcoming guests. “The Golden Mean” by Carole Feuerman, who is known around the world for her startlingly life-like sculptures, is a 16-foot bronze statue of a male diver balancing on his hands. Poised,

Ernest Trova, Reverse Tableman

ready to make a splash, he is appropriately installed at the resort’s oceanfront element, the Boca Beach Club. At The Breakers in Palm Beach, it’s not at all uncommon to see guests gazing upward in awe at the ornately hand-painted ceilings in the lobby. A defining feature of the resort, the barrel-vaulted ceiling features a 200foot fresco packed with flora, fauna, gods and goddesses and freeform decorations. In the 1920s, famed architect Addison Mizner luxuriously linked the Palm Beaches with the Old World through his grand Mediterranean Revival-style buildings. In 1926, when The Breakers was rebuilt following a fire, the ItalianRenaissance style was chosen for the same reasons that the Colony is now wreathed in color. The design for the lobby was inspired by the Great Hall of the Palazzo Carrega Cataldi in Genoa, Italy; 73 Florentine artists were brought in to complete the ceiling fresco in time for the winter season. Whether reflecting the area’s legendary past or a new take on Palm Beach luxury, it comes as no surprise that exceptional works of art are also part of the hospitality experience in Florida’s Cultural Capital® – Palm Beach County. Statues, paintings, prints, photography, textiles and color add atmosphere, style and a cultural dimension to the guest experience. Above all, the art on display in the area’s leading hotels and resorts helps establish a sense of place so that visitors will know they have arrived.

The Family, Boaz Vaadia

art&culture

|

39


Sounds of Summer:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:46 AM

Page 40

SUMMER

in Palm Beach County

sounds good

From the whispering surf and the song of

By Bill Meredith

a mockingbird to the murmurings of museum goers exploring the latest exhibition, Palm Beach County’s summer soundtrack is a masterpiece. Here, several prominent area musicians weigh in on their favorite tracks.

40

|

Photo: Jacek Gancarz

art&culture


Sounds of Summer:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:38 AM

Page 41

Jeffrey Kaye

“My first summer after moving here, the Florida Philharmonic ended up playing regularly along the water with headliners like Ray Charles, Natalie Cole, Michael Feinstein and Dionne Warwick. It was so hot. I wasn’t used to that, so I learned to bring a jug of water and a towel as well as my horn. Now I’m playing the summer Sunset Music Series with the Boca Symphonia and people are listening from their lawn chairs and picnic blankets at Mizner Park Amphitheater. It’s still hot, but at the same time, just as cool.”

N ew Jersey-born trumpeter Jeffrey Kaye relocated to the warmer climes of South Florida in 1989. While others from the Garden State come to retire, Kaye came to work. A powerful player, the Boca Raton resident had earned his master’s from the Manhattan School of Music and became principal trumpeter for the Florida Philharmonic shortly after moving to Florida. In 2005, he became a founding board member of the Boca Symphonia; he has been the organization’s artistic director since 2011.

art&culture

|

41


Sounds of Summer:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:38 AM

Page 42

Dion DiMucci Inducted into the Rock & Roll Hall of Fame in 1989, Bronx, New York, native Dion DiMucci wandered down to South Florida in 1968. The Boca Raton resident has lived here ever since. A singer, guitarist and songwriter, Dion was already on a first-name basis with much of the world after hit songs like “The Wanderer” and “Runaround Sue.” Sporting a more bluesy style than could be heard in his pop heyday, he still tours and records. His latest release is “Tank Full of Blues” from 2011.

“I like going to hear local blues artists in the summer. I love going to Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach or the Funky Biscuit in Boca Raton, whenever Rick Rossano or J.P. Soars are playing. They’re both great local guitarists. I love this area. I don’t golf, so if I’m not going out to hear music, I’m working with area ministries, going to dinner or hitting a cruise, a ballgame or a movie with my friends. Touring is still fun but I have a full and rich life here off the road.”

Avery Sommers A native Floridian, the Lake Park-based vocalist has traversed jazz, blues and R&B during a career that spans several recordings and numerous stages across the United States. After trying out locales like New York, Chicago and Los Angeles as a singer, actress and director, she returned to the sweet sounds of home.

“I’m reminded of the summer by the sound of the birds tweeting and twittering outside my house’s picture window in the morning. They’re like a symphony-of-sounds alarm clock. And there’s the comforting sound of the summer rain, the rustling of the trees in my yard and the huge sounds the bullfrogs can make. Plus walking around my neighborhood, with the sound of the kids playing basketball at the park nearby and talking to my neighbors and playing with their dogs.”

42

|

art&culture

Photo: David Vance


Sounds of Summer:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:38 AM

Page 43

Studio Palm Beach Corby Kaye

Versatile pianist Copeland Davis was born in Orlando but moved to Palm Beach County to study music at Florida Atlantic University more than 40 years ago – and our area has been a better place musically ever since. A master of jazz and popular music as well as classical, Davis teaches music at the Oxbridge Academy in West Palm Beach. He’s performed frequently in Las Vegas, sharing stages with Aretha Franklin, Gladys Knight and Sammy Davis Jr., and has also appeared on The Tonight Show and Good Morning America.

Copeland Davis

“I came down here to study classical music, so the soundtrack to my summers here would sound like that. I still also play jazz and pop music. Mostly pop gigs, because I can insert some classical and jazz elements into that genre. It’s all interconnected. I recently performed George Gershwin’s ‘Rhapsody in Blue,’ which embodies those connections and sounds like summer to me, [at the Eissey Theater in Palm Beach Gardens]. Other than music, I’d have to mention the sound of the kids running around and playing while school’s out.”

Rod MacDonald Following a successful stint on the Greenwich Village folk scene through the 1980s, Connecticut native Rod MacDonald settled in Delray Beach 20 years ago. The singer/songwriter has since become a fixture, playing gigs as both a solo acoustic artist and with a full band. He’s also a Lifelong Learning Society instructor at Florida Atlantic University and a first-time author whose new book is called The Open Mike. His latest of 11 CDs is the 2014 release “Later That Night.”

Photo: Jacek Gancarz

“Summer is partly about nostalgia, especially regarding music, since it was the time of year as a kid when we weren’t affected by the school year and actually had the time to listen. With my two young daughters home through the summer, I hear lots of Disney material! Most local gigs tend to be indoors to beat the heat, but either way, I find myself leaning more toward romantic songs in the summer.” art&culture | 43


Biennial_2.0_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

2:29 PM

Page 44

Juried Exhibition SPOTLIGHTS COUNTY TALENT Cultural Council Biennial 2015 By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

The sound of giggling toddlers weaves through Tchaikovsky’s “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairies” to create the soundtrack for West Palm Beach artist Cheryl Maeder’s whimsical short film “PLAY” and sets the tone for the Cultural Council Biennial 2015. The exhibition – a delightful mélange of 76 works – is an uplifting reflection on the scope and scale of local talent.

44

|

art&culture


Biennial_2.0_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

2:29 PM

Page 45

Nancy Brown, Balloon Over Bagan, 2014, Archival ink on canvas, 31 x 45 in.

art&culture

|

45


Biennial_2.0_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

2:29 PM

Page 46

M

aeder’s film was inspired by a visit to the shopping mall. She had been walking along the top floor and happened to look down to the lower, level where children were enthusiastically exploring a breakfast-themed play area. From her vantage point on high, Maeder says, the children looked like tiny elves and fairies jumping, laughing and happily playing in a colorful wonderland. She hurried home, grabbed her camera and, for several weeks, returned to document the children playing. “It’s about the magic that surrounds us if we open our eyes and the magic that exists in the ordinary,” she says of the film, which received the Biennial’s Best in Show award. “What others might pass by, it’s my passion to discover.” The exhibition, which is on display through Aug. 29 at the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in Lake Worth, features the work of 61 artists who live or work in Palm Beach County, including photographers, sculptors, painters, fiber artists, videographers and more. While there is no unifying theme, curator N ichole Hickey, manager of artists services for the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, found common threads, such as nature or photography, that allowed the artworks “to dialogue with each other in the space.” Artists’ statements are also on display, further highlighting commonalities and unique perspectives. The Biennial’s strength lies not only in the talent on display but also in the innovation demonstrated by works like Maeder’s, which may be cued and inspired by trends toward technology and mixed media in the broader global art market. According to Paul Fisher, who owns two galleries in West Palm Beach, being included in a juried exhibit at the Cultural Council enhances an artist’s credibility while providing them with exposure to an audience that includes blue-chip collectors like Beth Rudin DeWoody and Jane Holzer. “It’s hard for an artist to get into a gallery but at the Council an artist can have a break similar to a young filmmaker getting into Sundance,” he says. Juror Elizabeth Sobieski, a contributing writer at The Art

 Rick Newton, Kite, 2014, Pencil and collage on paper, 15 x 10 in.

46

|

art&culture

Economist, N ew York Magazine and Cosmopolitan, among other publications, selected from 400 works submitted by 127 area artists. “My choices were based upon what captivated me, rather than set specifications,” she says. “Seeing jewelry contrasted with photography, sculpture against video, paintings juxtaposed with installations, I don’t know what criteria I could have established other than seeking artworks indicating the artist’s unique eye, apparent accomplishments and technique – a certain truth and, perhaps, beauty.”


Biennial_2.0_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

2:29 PM

Page 47



Photograph by Cheryl Maeder from her film “PLAY,” 2014

art&culture

|

47


Biennial_2.0_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

2:29 PM

Page 48

Sami Makela, OMFUG, 2015, Acrylic, recycled wood and paper on wood, 60 x 48 in.

Sobieski recognized truth when she awarded Wayne Stephens of Wellington second place for Untitled, 2. The piece represents a new direction for the painter and mixedmedia artist. “I’ve been focusing on exploring with subtle grid patterns and the translucent qualities of certain materials,” he says. “The colors are strong and there are interesting juxtapositions of contrasting textures.” Stephens certainly appreciates the opportunity to exhibit at the Biennial. “The Council helps us present our work in a

48

|

art&culture

professional venue,” he says. “By having the works for sale during exhibits and providing a distinguished staff and the gallery space, the Council provides a package that helps to validate the work. The Council is important to this community in that they promote the arts not only as culture but as an important industry.” Carin Wagner of Palm Beach Gardens, who won Best in Show at the 2013 Biennial for her painting, Shelter, agrees with Stephens. “The Council works so hard to get as much


Biennial_2.0_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

2:29 PM

Page 49

exposure as possible for the artists. Everyone who works there seems to feel it’s their privilege to support the arts,” she says. Her luminescent painting, Oak Sapling in Moonlight, and the Partially Obscured series were selected by Sobieski for inclusion this year. The beauty inherent in N ancy Brown’s Balloon over Bagan, a photograph taken in Myanmar, a country the artist is enamored with, earned third place honors. Brown, a resident of Boca Raton, says, “I want others to see the country and feel its magic.” Making others see and feel is the purview of all artists. The work featured in the Biennial – ranging from the traditional to the cutting edge – elicits emotions, cascading from the joyful to the bittersweet. Ultimately, the Biennial’s most powerful statement may not be found hanging on the walls of the Cultural Council’s gallery but, rather, in the connections that are forged, the bridges that are built and the doors that are opened. The Cultural Council has managed to reduce the distance between Palm Beach County and major art markets, such as New York and Los Angeles, and to blur the lines between local and acclaimed.

Wayne Stephens, Untitled 2, 2013, Oil and mixed media on canvas, 60 x 60 in.

Inspired!! ! The works of art submitted for consideration in the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s 2015 Biennial exhibition were all created by local artists. The software used to manage the process is also homegrown. Founded in 1999, Juried Art Services relies on proprietary software developed by West Palm Beach gallerist Paul Fisher when he began working with the Smithsonian on its prestigious annual craft show. The goal was to simplify and expedite a time-consuming process involving copious paper forms and submitted slides. “I envisioned a digitized methodology where each juror was self-paced and had all images in high resolution with accompanying info available online. The Smithsonian helped with resources to create this system,” explained Fisher. “So, the Cultural Council’s Biennial was juried with the same quality review standards and technology used at the Smithsonian.”

Debbie Lee Mostel, Joyful Universe, 2014, Mixed media, 96 x 84 x 84 in.

According to Palm Beach Gardens painter Carin Wagner, “It’s an extremely easy, no-nonsense tool for uploading images and information.”

art&culture

|

49


Murals:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:31 AM

Page 50

Respectable Street Mural Artist Anthony Hernandez

50

|

art&culture


Murals:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:32 AM

Page 51

BIG picture the

Palm Beach County’s murals amaze By Lucy Lazarony

art&culture

|

51


Murals:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:32 AM

Page 52

1

T

here’s no need to step inside a gallery to look at art in Palm Beach County. Bold, bright, public murals can be found in unexpected and astonishing places. The back of a building comes alive with color, an empty alley is transformed into a beautiful, beckoning space where couples gather for wedding photos, the stairwell of a parking garage becomes a wild experiment in color. There is nothing subtle about this art. These artists work big. Their art overpowers. Subtlety is for someone else. “I love working big. For me, it’s easier than working small. Your whole body is part of it,” says Eduardo Mendieta, who has painted portraits of musicians on the wall of the Respectable Street nightclub in West Palm Beach, large banyan trees further east on Clematis Street and much, much more. “The painting sort of takes over because it’s surrounding you.” Mendieta believes in the power that murals have to connect with people. “I’ve had people tag me on their wedding pictures because my mural is in the background,” the West Palm Beach resident says. And he believes murals and public art have an important role to play in urban spaces. “I believe public art in general, whether it’s a sculpture or mural or anything, it gives art the chance to affect people in their everyday environment. When you have public art, it puts that out there and it not just helps artists and the artist community but gives something back to the community.” Art can also help to bring a community closer together. “I think art in general is a very important part of giving a place, a city, an identity,” says Raphael Clemente, executive director of the West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority. “The DDA started using murals as a means to provide some warmth and some appreciation in areas where there was really nothing going on but they were still important parts of our downtown fabric.”

Photo by Greg Dillard

52

|

art&culture


Murals:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:32 AM

Page 53

2

3

4 5 Evernia Garage Mural Artists

6

FIRST STAIRWELL 7th floor Eduardo Mendieta, photo 1 6th floor J Bellicchi 5th floor Kazilla 4th floor Trek Six 3rd floor Ruben Ubiera, photo 5 2nd floor Douglas Hoekzema 1st floor Paul Hughes SECOND STAIRWELL 7th floor Paul Hughes, photo 6 6th floor Douglas Hoekzema 5th floor Ruben Ubiera 4th floor Trek Six 3rd floor Kazilla, photo 4 2nd floor J Bellicchi, photo 3 1st floor Eduardo Mendieta, photo 2

art&culture

|

53


5/28/15

Page 54

Boynton Beach Arts District

Sargent Photography

Sargent Photography

The first murals sponsored by the DDA were in locations between CityPlace and Clematis Street. “It was just to give some energy and some life back to those places,” Clemente says. “People started asking for them and we started collaborating with more artists.” Large-scale murals can now be found on sides of buildings and inside the stairwells of parking garages throughout downtown West Palm Beach. Mendieta and a group of fellow mural artists have been commissioned to create a new work in the city’s Northwood neighborhood. For now, Clemente’s favorite is the Evernia Street parking garage with its two giant, glass-fronted stairwells. “It just explodes on the street at night. Everyone looks at it,” he says. “[With] mural art, street art, every one is a one-off creation, giving some originality and flair to a place.” In the hands of artist Sharon Koskoff, murals can be used to create colorful learning environments. “Art is visual and that is a very important sense,” the Delray Beach resident explains. “If your school is positive and happy and interesting, you’re going to have those kinds of attitudes.” Working with a team of volunteers from Art in the Alley, a group of artists who have used their art to revitalize alleyways and garbage cans in Delray Beach, Koskoff recently painted a mural in the courtyard of Delray Beach’s Pine Grove Elementary. The artists transformed the courtyard with bright and cheery murals of the sun, flowers, ocean waves, trees, manatees – there’s even a flamingo. When the students saw the results, their eyes lit up. In Lake Worth, murals are engines for community redevelopment, infusing downtown neighborhoods with art and color. The LULA Lake Worth Mural Program began in 2011 and, four years later, compelling and captivating murals can be found throughout the city’s redevelopment area. These murals create jobs for artists, revitalize blighted buildings and strengthen ties within the community. And the art remains for everyone, resident and visitor, to enjoy. In the Boynton Beach Arts District, located off West Industrial Avenue, murals sprawl across 80-foot and 20-foot walls and adorn the garage-like doors of the industrial bays that serve as artists’ studios. The murals, which are as distinct as the artists who create them, have attracted lots of attention for BBAD since it opened in 2011. MTV’s cameras have rolled there. The murals have also provided stunning backdrops for individual music videos, exercise videos, family portraits, wedding photos, even a wedding itself, and tours stop by on a regular basis. “We’ve got a lot of stuff going on here,” says artist Rolando Chang Barrero, who is also director of BBAD. Local schools hold concerts there, the Palm Beach Symphony has performed and a local high school art club came by to create their own mural. If the outside walls of the arts district were bare, would so much be happening? “I don’t think so,” Barrero says, bearing testament to the power of murals to amaze.

Sargent Photography

54

9:32 AM

Sargent Photography

Sargent Photography

Murals:Layout 1

|

art&culture


Murals:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:32 AM

Page 55

Paint Up Pine Grove! Group Artist  Collage from top to bottom, left to right: Sharon Kurlychek, Sharon Koskoff, Meg Goddard Gladys Beltran, Deborah Matsunaye, Haydee Ullfig, Sharon Koskoff, Steve Brouse and Agata Ren. The entire courtyard was painted with 15 murals.

From left to right:  Plumosa School of the Arts students, Marcos Sanchez, Madelyn Harris, David Reynolds and artist Sharon Koskoff, paint Dead Fred, Flying Lunch Boxes and the Good Luck Circle, written by Frank McKinney!

Boys & Girls Club teens collaborate with Sharon Koskoff to paint huge  mural panels in the Bill Bailey Community Center gymnasium The 80’ of finished murals installed on the exterior walls of the Bill Bailey  Community Center on Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. in Belle Glade

art&culture

|

55


Choreography:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:43 AM

Page 56

Step by Step The Choreographers’ Craft By Tara Mitton Catao

Composers rely on notes and chords when crafting the musical message that an orchestra will deliver. Playwrights create whole worlds on the stage with words. A choreographer communicates through the movement of the human body. Audiences may hold their breath while a dancer seemingly defies gravity but it is a choreographer who crafts her steps.

“How can we know the dancer from the dance?” asks W.B. Yeats in a famous line of verse. While intricately intertwined, the art of creating the dance is distinct from the art of performing it. The Greek roots of the word choreography are “dance” and “to write” but the term has evolved as dance itself has evolved from a social interaction to a theatrical presentation. Today, choreography refers to the art of creating dances.

56

|

art&culture

Miami City Ballet dancer in George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™. Choreography by George Balanchine ©The George Balanchine Trust. Photo ©Daniel Azoulay.


Choreography:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:43 AM

Page 57

Miami City Ballet dancers in George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™. Choreography by George Balanchine, ©The George Balanchine Trust. Photo ©Daniel Azoulay.

Miami City Ballet dancers in In The Upper Room. Choreography by Twyla Tharp, ©Twyla Tharp. Photo ©Daniel Azoulay.

Jerome Robbins rehearsing Steven Caras, New York City Ballet. Photograph: ©Martha Swope, Courtesy of the New York Public Library.

art&culture

|

57


Choreography:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:43 AM

Page 58

Miami City Ballet dancers in George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™. Choreography by George Balanchine ©The George Balanchine Trust. Photo ©Daniel Azoulay.

Lourdes Lopez dancing ‘Dewdrop’ in George Balanchine’s The Nutcracker™ with New York City Ballet Photograph: ©Steven Caras, All Rights Reserved. Choreography depicted is copyrighted by The George Balanchine Trust.

Steven Caras dancing “Tschaikovsky Suite No. 3,” New York City Ballet. Photograph: ©Costas. Choreography depicted is copyrighted by The George Balanchine Trust.

Whether the steps are original or drawn from a set vocabulary like that in ballet, the craft of arranging them in space is the essence of choreography. The steps must then face the added challenge of being “set” on a dancer. And, just as every violinist will interpret a musical score differently, the artistic temperament and talent of any given dancer will influence the outcome. Since the art form can only be viewed through the dancer’s interpretation – which may vary from performance to performance – it is constantly in flux. Steven Caras, who has navigated the world of professional dance as a performer, photographer and lecturer, believes that the fluidity of the art form is part of its appeal. “You will see the same ballet but it will never be the same twice,” says the West Palm Beach resident, who danced with New York City Ballet for 14 years. “People generally do not flock to the theater to see choreography... but it’s what they end up remembering and loving.” Before retiring from performance in 1983, Caras worked with two iconic choreographers – Jerome Robbins and George Balanchine. He vividly remembers being able to sense the anticipation of an audience eager to experience each choreographer’s latest work pulse through the thick curtain as he took his place on stage. Caras danced during a time when choreographers typically worked

58

|

art&culture

Renato Penteado in Fancy Free. Choreography by Jerome Robbins. Photo ©Joe Gato.

for a single dance company, giving them the luxury of working with the same dancers while they developed their craft and earned a name for themselves. “Other than serious ballet lovers, the public is not coming out to see the new work of this particular choreographer or that one the way they once turned out to see something new from Robbins or Balanchine,” he says. “Good choreographers rarely get their due.” Most choreographers now work on a freelance basis. Many start off as dancers and teach themselves, gaining experience as they search for opportunities to work with bodies that can interpret their message. Some colleges, dance schools and ballet companies have developed programs for emerging choreographers. Miami City Ballet regularly presents the works of Balanchine and Robbins but, under the leadership of Artistic Director Lourdes Lopez, the company is also featuring new works by some of today’s most exciting choreographic voices. Lopez, who worked under Balanchine’s tutelage as a principal dancer with New York City Ballet, is one of the few women directing a major ballet company and she is making a strong mark with her bold choices in programming. Recently, she commissioned Justin Peck, the resident choreographer


Choreography:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:44 AM

Page 59

Jennifer Kronenberg and Carlos Guerra in Viscera. Photo ©Kyle Froman.

Miami City Ballet dancers in Bourrée Fantasque. Choreography by George Balanchine ©The George Balanchine Trust. Photo by Renato Penteado.

at New York City Ballet, to create a company-specific work for Miami City Ballet. Lopez says it is not easy to provide the right environment for creative collaboration and artistic growth during the rehearsal process but that it is essential to her artistic vision for the company. “The two [main] ingredients for me are to first establish a relationship with the choreographer and the company,” she says. “The second is to give the choreographer and dancers enough creative time to delve into the work.” Peck first worked with the dancers at Miami City Ballet in 2013, when he choreographed the duet Chutes and Ladders. Although he created Heatscape, a fast-paced work for 17 dancers, in about three weeks, he had multiple opportunities to return and rework and refine the choreography and the dancers had ample time to digest the new work. For Peck, one of the most frustrating moments in his work is “imagining some sort of choreographic step and realizing it is physically impossible [to do].” Peck often seeks out additional collaborations that will influence his work. In creating a signature ballet for Miami City Ballet, he used the music of prolific Czech composer, Bohuslav Martin , and worked with popular street-artist Shepard Fairey, while juggling additional

Patricia Delgado and Jovani Furlan in Barber Violin Concerto. Choreography by Peter Martins. Photo ©Alberto Oviedo.

elements like costumes, set and lighting design. “Choreography has always been about exploring the music... an excuse to really dive into the music,” he says. “It is a place where art, music and lighting and story can all come together and exist in one place.” For a choreographer, seeing all the pieces come together on opening night is the ultimate satisfaction. For Peck that happened in March, when Miami City Ballet presented the world premiere of Heatscape at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. “It is such a special thing to be someone who makes new dances,” says Boca Ballet Theatre Co-Artistic Director Dan Guin. Although he has choreographed a number of ballets for Boca Ballet, he does not claim the title for himself. Boca Ballet regularly stages classical full-length story ballets, inviting an array of international stars to perform with the students who train at its school. Guin tackles the formidable task of adapting highly regarded variations of famous 19th-century choreographers to the varying talents of his dancers. “I want dance to stay alive and vibrant for generations to come,” he says. “I think the way I can be the most influential in doing that is in inspiring the next generation of dancers and choreographers.”

art&culture

|

59


Art Therapies_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:07 AM

Page 60

to the

DANCING The healing power of the arts is being harnessed in colorful and creative ways all across Palm Beach County.

BEAT

of a Therapeutic Drum By Amy Woods

One of the most important musical performances of the season did not take place at the Mizner Park Amphitheater, the Delray Beach Center for the Arts or even the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts. It was standing room only in the pediatric-oncology unit of Palm Beach Children’s Hospital at St. Mary’s Medical Center in West Palm Beach when a small group of musicians with InSpirit, a nonprofit dedicated to the healing power of music, played for an appreciative audience of tiny patients, hopeful parents and dedicated caregivers.

60

|

art&culture


Art Therapies_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:07 AM

Page 61

 The staff of the Palm Beach Music Therapy Institute

art&culture

|

61


Art Therapies_RK:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:07 AM

Page 62

 A painting done by a patient at Alzheimer’s Community Care’s Phyllis & Julius Siegel Alzheimer's Care & Service Center in Boca Raton

 Susan Marks in fifth position, Boca Ballet Theater  Palm Beach Opera

A percussionist handed a small drum to an IV-tethered boy so he could play along. “At the end of the performance,” Ginny Meredith, founder and executive director of InSpirit, recalls, “the father looked at me and said, ‘I haven’t seen my son smile in a week.’” The healing that takes place through music – and through an amazing range of visual and performing arts – is as powerful as it is profound. In Palm Beach County, InSpirit is one of a number of art therapy programs that creatively touch the lives of those in need.

PAINTING A BRIGHTER FUTURE Anne Devine

 InSpirit artist Jason Colannino plays for students at Seagull Services’ Seagull Academy for Independent Living charter school in Riviera Beach.

62

|

art&culture

Putting pencil to paper or brush to canvas can unleash inner feelings and stir long-lost memories while helping to restore a sense of dignity eroded by a dreaded diagnosis. Patients at Phyllis & Julius Siegel Alzheimer’s Care & Service Center in Boca Raton participate in a popular art-therapy session once a week, creating abstracts, collages and watercolors that can often be seen on display in the building. “We’re not looking for someone to be a famous artist,” says Christina Dickhoff, the organization’s vice president of community-care services. “We’re just allowing them the opportunity to express themselves. Art affects a part of the brain that is not actually touched by Alzheimer’s.” Those who have lost loved ones may find an effective outlet for their grief at the art classes offered by Hospice of Palm Beach County in West Palm Beach as part of its bereavement-support group. “By engaging in an art-centered process, they


5/28/15

10:07 AM

Page 63

find a new way to express themselves and channel the energy of anger, sadness, sorrow, fear, etc…, into the creation of an image,” Bereavement Manager Chelsea Johnson explains. The use of art surpasses the limits of verbalization and can provide a path for someone stuck in the mourning process. Boca Ballet Theatre is reaching out to adults living with Parkinson’s disease – a chronic and progressive movement disorder – with classes that address balance, flexibility and coordination as well as the isolation and depression that can be associated with the condition. Dance for PD® classes, known locally as BBT4PD, begin with seated and standing exercises and ballet movements at the barre. After the warmup, students follow choreographed steps to an engaging mix of musical genres, ranging from country-Western to jazz. “The things that they teach in this dance class are so connected to the things that [the participants] struggle with – balance, fluidity of motion,” Cindy Surman, assistant to the director at Boca Ballet, says. “It somehow can unlock them. It can make their symptoms kind of melt away.” “The fundamentals of dancing and dance training – things like balance, movement sequencing, rhythm, spatial and aesthetic awareness and dynamic coordination – seem to address many of the things people with Parkinson’s want to work on to maintain a sense of confidence and grace in their movements,” maintains David Leventhal, Dance for PD founding teacher in Brooklyn, N .Y. “Although participants from all over the world tell us they find elements of the class therapeutic, the primary goal of our program is for people to enjoy dance for dancing’s sake in a group setting – and to explore the range of physical, artistic and creative possibilities that are still very much open to them.”

THE SOUND OF HOPE Palm Beach County’s world-class arts – and world-class artists – enrich the lives of so many in so many ways. Wanting to give children diagnosed with autism and their families the opportunity to experience that power firsthand, Palm Beach Opera staged its first sensory-friendly production in March. The cast and crew of The Daughter of the Regiment made strategic adjustments to the production so the children wouldn’t be overstimulated by bright lights, loud sounds or other possibly startling elements of the performance. Special seating on or near the aisles made it easy to slip out, if a child needed a break. Also, a designated quiet room was available. The ability of music to enhance mental, physical and social well-being is backed by more than 50 years of evidence as chronicled in The Journal of Music Therapy. More than 70 colleges and universities in the United States, including Florida Gulf Coast University, Florida State University and University of Miami, offer degrees in the discipline. “Music reaches a part of the soul that other avenues of communication don’t,” Meredith says. “It reminds us of our youth. It reminds us of our capacity for joy. People lose themselves in music.” After listening to Bree Beynon, managing partner at the Palm Beach Gardensbased Palm Beach Music Therapy Institute, strum a few songs on the guitar, a woman experiencing labored breathing and quickened respiration exhibited stable vital signs. A man with advanced Alzheimer’s disease who hadn’t uttered a word for days remembered every line to a song from the 1940s. “You have to sometimes see it to believe it but their bodies will automatically respond to the music,” Beynon says. “Music can just kind of sneak in the back door and address all of these different domains. The client may not even realize the work that’s being done as far as rehabilitation goes.”

Madeline Gray

Art Therapies_RK:Layout 1

Palm Beach Opera 

“Music reaches

soul

a part of the that other avenues of communication

don’t.”

– Ginny Meredith, founder and executive director of InSpirit

 Joy Schnall dances with instructor Natalie Parker.

art&culture

|

63


Hotel Friends_a&c Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:21 AM

Page 64

a&caccommodations We wish to thank the following hotels and resorts for their support and assistance in providing art&culture magazine to you, as they assist us in our mission of sharing our diverse cultural landscape for your enjoyment. From theater and dance to museums and galleries, Palm Beach County is Florida’s Cultural Capital®.

800.863.2819 www.pgaresort.com

(561) 659-5800 www.ChesterfieldPB.com

All Suite Oceanfront Resort 561.340.1700 www.marriott.com/pbisg

Historic Inn & Restaurant

280 Sunset Avenue, Palm Beach 561/832-7050 | 800/822-4116 www.bradleyparkhotel.com info@bradleyparkhotel.com

(561) 655-7740 www.TheBrazilianCourt.com

106 S. Swinton Ave. Delray Beach, FL

561.272.5678 sundyhouse.com

INDULGE TRANSFORM EXPLORE PLAY Your getaway by the sea awaits! On-site dining, tropical pool, full-service spa and more! Located near boutiques, outdoor cafés, art galleries and nightlife!

2842 S. Ocean Blvd. Palm Beach, FL 33480 855.523.5455 561.540.6440 tidelineresort.com

64

|

art&culture

561-274-3200 | 877-389-0169 www.delraybeachmarriott.com


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:15 AM

Page 65

INSIDE culture

C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U L T U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U L T U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U L T U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U L T U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L

art&culture

|

65


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:15 AM

Page 66

C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S The John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts Honors Rena Blades

Suzanne Niedland DeGeorge and Rena Blades

Rena Blades, the president and CEO of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, has been recognized by the Kennedy Center’s N ational Committee for the Performing Arts for her work as an advocate for the arts. The award is given twice annually to an individual in a culturally rich community who has made a significant impact as an arts advocate. Blades is the third person to receive the award. The committee is a national advisory board of the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C.

66

|

art&culture

“Rena Blades is devoted to promoting art and culture in Palm Beach County and extending arts education to every student in South Florida,” Kennedy Center President Deborah F. Rutter said. “She has overseen the Council’s unprecedented growth, strengthened their relationships with cultural organizations throughout the county, expanded services to artists and seamlessly managed a physical move to the new headquarters in Lake Worth. We are grateful to Rena for her remarkable contributions to the arts and congratulate her.”


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:15 AM

Page 67

C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S Cultural Council of Palm Beach County to Receive 2015 American Business Awards

THE LEADING ART CENTER OF THE PALM BEACHES

ADULT CLASSES & WORKSHOPS: ceramics | drawing | glass | jewelry | painting | digital media | printmaking | fiber | sculpture

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County will receive two prestigious Stevie® Awards in Chicago on June 22. As the Council’s official publication, art&culture magazine of Palm Beach County will be honored in the best house publication category. The Council will also be recognized in the category of best public relations event for a cultural mashup produced for the 2014 Governor’s Conference on Tourism held in Boca Raton that featured the Palm Beach Symphony, Ballet Palm Beach and rapper/television personality Vanilla Ice. Earlier this year, the Cultural Council also received a Bernays Award from the Gold Coast Public Relations Council in the special events category for the mashup. Considered the Oscars of the business world, the Stevies recognize the outstanding accomplishments and contributions of companies and business people from around the globe. The Cultural Council will be competing for the American Business

Awards division. More than 3,300 nominations from organizations of all sizes and in virtually every industry were submitted this year for consideration in a wide range of categories. The Council will ultimately receive a gold, silver or bronze award in each of the categories. Past Stevie winners include Apple, AT&T, Capital One Investing, Cigna, Marriott Vacations Worldwide and Toshiba. “We are thrilled to be honored with these awards for our work in cultural tourism for Palm Beach County,” said Cultural Council CEO Rena Blades. “To be selected by such a distinguished and diverse group of business people is a benchmark achievement for the Council.” “The mashup and magazine were labors of love for the Council,” said Director of Marketing and Government Affairs Marilyn Bauer. “We are so proud of our cultural organizations and their sophisticated and diverse programming.”

YOUTH: Summer Art Camp Year-round classes include middle, high school, & college prep, pop-up workshops, home school classes, preschool readiness through art, private groups, and more

Register today! armoryart.org | 561.832.1776 1700 Parker Avenue West Palm Beach, FL 33401

art&culture

|

67


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:15 AM

Page 68

{inside culture} C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S Farm-to-Table Event Highlights Artists While Raising Money for Education Programs The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County celebrated, supported and promoted art and cultural education programs, artists and the economy in the Palm Beaches with its inaugural Swank Table event in March. The al fresco feast at Swank Farms in Loxahatchee brought together artists, growers, chefs and donors for a spectacular gourmet meal in the style of “Le Grand Aioli,” a traditional banquet in the villages of Provence, France. Ticket sales helped fund the Cultural Council’s arts education programs. The food featured in the farm-to-table experience included many of the 280 varieties of vegetables grown by Swank Specialty Produce. The event, which raised more than $75,000 for the Cultural Council’s education programs, was chaired by Irene Karp, Jean Sharf and Suzanne N iedland. The Host Committee consisted of Bruce Beal and Francis Cunningham, Bert and Sallie Korman, Kelly and Joe Rooney and The Gardens Mall. Harvest Level Sponsors included Roe Green, Peter and Paula Lunder, Robin and Jocelyn Martin and Linda and Edwin Phelps. The food was prepared in front of guests by nationally recognized chefs,

including Michael Reidt, executive chef, Pilgrim Restaurant, Miami; Clayton Carnes, executive chef, The Grille Wellington; Paula DaSilva, executive chef, 3030 Ocean, Fort Lauderdale; and Carmen Padilla, pastry chef, Meat Market, Miami and Palm Beach. “It was a remarkable evening that allowed us to show off both the natural beauty of Palm Beach County and the generosity of donors, like Jodi and Darrin Swank and others, who are firm believers and supporters of the arts and our educational programs,” said Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades. In keeping with the Council’s mission to expose Palm Beach County artists to potential patrons, Aerides Design, Marie Wingate, Susan Peck and Barry Seidman presented their work in a trunk show that evening. Seidman used Swank produce in the photographic work he presented that night and at a recent exhibition at the Cultural Council’s headquarters in Lake Worth. Plans are already under way to return to Swank Farms for another fabulous event next year. For more information, please call Mary Lewis, director of development at the Cultural Council, at (561) 472-3340.

HELENA RUBINSTEIN BEAUTY IS POWER Exploring the ideas, innovations, and influence of the legendary cosmetics entrepreneur Helena Rubinstein (1872 – 1965). Madame, as she was universally known, helped break down the status quo of taste by blurring boundaries between commerce, art, fashion, beauty, and design. Beauty Is Power reveals how Rubinstein’s unique style of pioneering approaches to business challenged conservative taste and heralded a modern notion of beauty, democratized and accessible to all.

Exhibition on View April 21 - July 12, 2015 Helena Rubinstein: Beauty Is Power is organized by the Jewish Museum, New York. The exhibition is made possible by The Jerome L. Greene Foundation. Presentation at the Boca Raton Museum of Art is made possible through the generous support of Dr. Nicole Edeiken, Peg Greenspon, and Saks Fifth Avenue.

in MIZNER PARK, 501 PLAZA REAL BOCA RATON, FL 33432 t. 561.392.2500 BOCAMUSEUM.ORG

68

|

art&culture

Graham Sutherland, Helena Rubinstein in a Red Brocade Balenciaga Gown, 1957. Oil on canvas, 61 ¾ x 36 ½ in. Daniel Katz Gallery, London. © Estate of Graham Sutherland.


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

12:27 PM

Page 69

C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S Summer Marketing Campaign Targets Florida’s Southwest Coast Head East for the Arts is the message behind the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s summer advertising campaign. Keeping with the vintage look of the high-performance winter initiative that targeted N ew York and Boston, Head East for the Arts focuses on Florida’s southwestern cultural hubs. More than $600,000 in media has been purchased in Tampa, St. Petersburg, Sarasota and Naples and in markets between the east and west coasts. Radio ads, billboards, digital banners, traditional print, video and geo-targeted ad networks will entice west coast cultural connoisseurs to travel to Palm Beach County for deep discounts on hotel rooms, free tickets, BOGOS and more at participating cultural organizations. “These are offers that you can only find on headeastforthearts.com,” said Marilyn Bauer, the Cultural Council’s director of marketing and government affairs. “Travel booking sites such as Expedia may help with dollars-off room rates but these deals in many cases are below the lowest published rate. And Palm Beach County’s celebrated cultural organizations are sweetening the deal with free admission and other offers from June to September.” Head East for the Arts was created by Levatas, a Palm Beach Gardens creative agency that worked with the Cultural Council on their previous campaign. “We live here, so we know what a special place Palm Beach County is for arts and culture,” said Kevin Murphy, creative director for Levatas. Participating hotels include The Breakers, Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa, Boca Raton Resort & Club and Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa. Participating cultural partners are: Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum, Norton Museum of Art, Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society, Lake Worth Playhouse, Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, Palm Beach Dramaworks, South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, John D. MacArthur Beach State Park, Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, Florida Atlantic University’s Department of Theatre and Dance, Arts Garage, Boca Ballet Theatre, Sol Children’s Theatre Troupe and Evening Star Productions.

art&culture

|

69


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

2:22 PM

Page 70

{inside culture} C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S The Palm Beaches Will be Crowned Florida’s Cultural Capital

Judy Eisinger’s winning design for the 2016 SunFest Crown the City campaign.

During SunFest 2016, the Cultural Council will seek to break the record in the Guinness Book of World Records for the number of people wearing a crown in one place. The current record stands at 1,324. To design this special crown for this challenge, the Cultural Council issued a call to artists in Palm Beach County. Looking for creative designs that would stand out in the crowd. The hashtag #ARTINPBC had to be included somewhere on the outer, visible portion of the crown. Judith Eisinger’s colorful entry was selected as the winning design. Born in Budapest, Hungary, Eisinger studied fine art at the Cleveland Institute of Art and the Cooper School of Art, which led to a four-year scholarship to Kent State University. Soon after moving to Florida, she was commissioned to create 24 paintings for the Fort Lauderdale Executive Airport. Her work now hangs in private collections throughout the United States, Europe and Israel.

Eisinger is the owner and creative lead at Yudit Design, a graphic design firm located in Wellington. She has received recognition and awards both for her paintings and for her graphic design work. The crown she designed will be distributed at next year’s SunFest in downtown West Palm Beach, with hopes that at least 10,000 people – including the performers taking the stage during the award-winning music festival – will wear them. “The focus of this project is to highlight and promote arts and culture in Palm Beach County,� said Marilyn Bauer, director of marketing and government affairs for the Cultural Council. “The intended outcome is that people who hear of this project and see images of the event will know that ‘The Palm Beaches were Crowned Florida’s Cultural Capital.’�

Experience One of America’s Great House Museums When it was completed in 1902, Whitehall, Henry Flagl Flagler’s ler’s Gilded Age estate in Palm m Beach, was hailed by the New N wond York Herald as “more wonderful derful than any palace in Europe, Euro ope, JUDQGHU PDJQ QLĂ€FHQW WKDQ DQ\ RWKHU YDWH JUDQGHU DQG DQG PRUH PRUH PDJQLĂ€FHQW RWKHU SULY SULYDWH dwelling in the world.â€? Today, Whitehall is a Nati n to National onal Historic Landmark open Museum tours, the public as the Flagler Mu useum featuring docent-led tou urs, self-guide brochures, audio o tours, and the Flagler App. App.

Flagler Museum Programs Grandparents Grandp parents Day Sunday, September 13th, 1 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p.m. Share your family history by y celebrating Grandparents Da Day ay at the Flagler g Museum. Tour Whitehall W with a Tour and Activ Activity vity y Kids DQG Guide for Kids YLVVLW WKH )ODJOHU .HQDQ DQG WKHQ WKHQ YLVLW .HQDQ 3DYLOLRQ 3DYLOLRQ Q WR WR QJ DD HQMR\ HQMR\ WKH IDPLO\IULHQGO\ DFWLYLWLHV DFWLYLWLHV LQFOXGLQJ PDNLQ PDNLQJ IDPLO\ IDPLO\ WUHH EHLQJ LQWHUYL LQWHUYLHZHG LHZHG E\ \RXU JUDQGFKLOGU JUDQGFKLOGUHQ UHQ PDNLQJDVFUDSERRNSDJHD DQGKDYHDIDPLO\SKRWRWDNHQ Q PDNLQJDVFUDSERRNSDJHDQGKDYHDIDPLO\SKRWRWDNHQ h e n r y

“An absolute ab bsolute must-see� - Nation National nal Geographic Traveler Traveler r

m o r r i s o n

FLAGLER FLAGL LER MUSE MUSEUM UM palm pa lm mb beach, each, fl florida orida

For more informati information ion and tickets call (561) ( 655-2833 or visi visit it www.FlaglerMuse www.FlaglerMuseum.us eum.us 70

|

art&culture


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:16 AM

Page 71

CULTURAL COMPENDIUM South Florida Science Center and Aquarium Unveils New Hall of Discovery

Jay and Marilyn Spechler

The award-winning South Florida Science Center and Aquarium recently opened a new Hall of Discovery with 5,000 additional square feet of space packed with more than 50 educational exhibits focused on “hands-on, minds-on” science. This is the first phase in a $1 million series of improvements to the center’s west wing. A highlight of the opening included the Science Center’s first bilingual exhibit, which explored nanoscale science such as atoms and molecules. The only nano exhibit in the state of Florida, the exhibition presented the basics of nanoscience and engineering, introducing realworld applications while exploring societal and ethical implications. “The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium is the anchor institution for informal science education in our community,” says CEO Lew Crampton. “In addition to physical improvements, we have doubled our programming for both children and adults, increased our exhibition space by 20,000 square feet, increased our annual revenue from $1.5 million to $3.5 million and our attendance is up from 100,000 to 205,000 annually.” Plans for future enhancements include an early childhood education room, improvements to the Science Center’s planetarium and observatory – the only public observatory in Palm Beach County – and an 18-hole miniature golf course, all of which are on track to open this year.

art&culture

|

71


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:16 AM

Page 72

Ignite

C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M Underwater Art: Shark Sculptures for Snorkelers

a lifelong passion for the arts

ARTS BOARDING HIGH SCHOOL SUMMER ARTS PROGRAMS

www.interlochen.org/AC Creative Writing • Dance • Motion Picture Arts Music • Theatre • Visual Arts

72

|

art&culture

Most snorkelers hope they never come eye to eye with Jaws. At the Phil Foster Park Artificial Reef and Snorkel Trail, however, a trio of hammerhead sharks is proving to be quite an attraction. The sharks lurking below the waves are sculptures created by Tom McDonald, an avid diver and underwater photographer who resides in West Palm Beach and Roanoke, Va. “I hope people visiting Palm Beach County will get a chance to experience art in a different setting. Either while diving or snorkeling, it’s not every day you get to see art underwater,” says the artist, who is already working on his next underwater sculpture project – stingrays. “These structures are designed to be a new home to marine life. They are made rough to promote growth.” The sharks were lowered into the water at Phil Foster Park in late May. Made of concrete, each is five feet long, about three feet high, and weighs approximately 1,400 pounds. The 800-foot Snorkel Trail where they now reside opened in 2012 and is easily accessible to amateur divers. With hundreds of tons of boulders and a steady inflow of fresh water from the inlet, the area is a natural habitat for numerous species of dazzling marine and plant life. “A reef is a unique opportunity for a sculptor – one where the viewer will encounter the work in a dynamic setting among otherworldly creatures and where the work itself is transformed over time by the environment. The sculpture becomes both habitat and an uncommon experience,” says Daniel Bates, deputy director of the Palm Beach County Department of Environmental Resources.


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:16 AM

Page 73

{inside culture} B R I E F LY

N O T E D

“Where I am From”

is the title of this year’s winning entry in the Palm Beach Poetry Festival’s annual High School Poetry Contest. The first-place prize (two passes to the festival and $100) went to Francisco Andres Sebastian, a 16-year-old freshman at Gold Coast Community School in West Palm Beach. The four runners-up were seniors Scott Bryant from Boca Raton Community High School, Martin Salgado from Cardinal N ewman High School, Diana S. Calderon from Dreyfoos School of the Arts and Gabrielle Harris from Wellington High School. Registered Poetry Therapist Dr. Deborah Eve Grayson reviewed 251 entries and Dr. Jeff Morgan of Lynn University selected the winner. Scott Bryant, Gabrielle Harris, Francisco Andres Stebastian, Diana S. Calderon, Martin Salgado

imagin imaging i g g e ed en n eden photographerrs photographers discover disc over the everglades evergladees

o view on vie w march mar ch c 19 - jul julyy 112, 2, 20 2015 15 145 1 S. Oliv 1451 Olivee A Avenue venue West Palm 33401 W est P alm Beach, FL 334 01

www.norton.org www .no orton.org

Organized Art. Or gan nized by by the Norton Norton Museum of A rt. This possible through generosity T his eexhibition xhibition is made pos sible thr ough the g eneerosity of muriel saltzman soter. murie el and ralph sal t zman and william and an nd sarah ross r oss so ter . With supportt pr provided byy an aaward from W ith additional a suppor ovided b ward fr o the National Endowment om Endowment for for the Arts/Art Works, William A rts/ /Art W orks, the W illiam and Sarah Sarah Ross Ross Soter Soter e Photography Photography FFund, und, the Photography Photography Committee Norton Art, The Chastain Charitable C omm mittee of the Nor ton Museum of A rt, and T h C he hastain C haritable FFoundation. oundation. With thanks The Everglades W ith special s thanks to to T he E verglades FFoundation. oundation.

art&culture

|

73


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:16 AM

Page 74

B R I E F LY

N O T E D

David Stern picks up the baton as chief conductor of Palm Beach Opera, where he will lead one major stage production in each of the next three seasons. Charged with maintaining and enhancing the musical quality of the Palm Beach Opera Orchestra, Maestro Stern recently conducted the opera’s world premiere of Enemies: A Love Story at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. He has served as founder and director of the Paris-based Opera Fuoco, director of the Shanghai Baroque Festival and director of opera at the Crested Butte Music Festival in Colorado. A graduate of Yale University and the Juilliard School, Stern has been guest conductor with orchestras in Luzerne, Moscow, Vienna, China and Mexico. Hails Palm Beach Opera Director Daniel Biaggi, “Maestro David Stern brings a wealth of musical knowledge that will help us continue to deliver artistic excellence to our audience.”

74

|

art&culture


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

B R I E F LY

5/28/15

10:16 AM

Page 75

N O T E D

Local art historian and gallery owner Deborah Pollack is the author of a new book from the University of South Carolina Press. Visual Art and the Urban Evolution of the New South recounts the influence of artists in the evolution of six southern cities – Atlanta, Charleston, N ew Orleans, Louisville, Austin and Miami – from 1865 to 1950. The book “is referenced like a doctoral dissertation, but reads like a page-turner novel,” says Florida State University’s Jay Rayburn. A recognized expert on Florida-based artist Laura Woodward, Pollack has written several artist biographies and is a contributor to the N ew Encyclopedia of Southern Culture. She and her husband own Edward and Deborah Pollack Fine Art in Palm Beach.



art&culture

|

75


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:16 AM

Page 76

Kensington Automotive Group, Inc.

B R I E F LY

N O T E D

Specializing in Rolls Royce, Bentley & European Luxury Automobiles 40 Years of Experience Centrally Located in East Boca Raton Rolls Royce & Bentley Factory-trained Personnel Engineering Rolls Royce Brake Distribution Valves Restoration of Rolls Royce & Bentleys 4201 NW Oak Circle, #47, Boca Raton, FL 33431

The Palm Beach International Film Festival has a new home. Located in the

www.KensingtonAGroup.com | kensingtonag@outlook.com

Plaza Del Mar Shopping Center in Manalapan

(561) 395-0006

across from Eau Palm Beach, PBIFF’s new headquarters, formerly the Plaza Theatre, will host movie screenings and live events year-round, including theater, concerts, lectures, art shows, comedy shows and seminars on filmmaking, costumes, editing, sound and lighting with professional actors, musicians and Hollywood film studios. Plans are also under way to offer classes for kids and teens on all aspects of the entertainment industry. The first film presented in the new location was Marriage

Material, starring “Saturday N ight Live!” veteran Victoria Jackson and actors from the Burt Reynolds Institute for Film and Television.

76

|

art&culture


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:16 AM

Page 77

{cultural cuisine guide}

Cultural Cuisine Between Food and Culture

I n s p i r a t i o n s f r o m P a l m B e a c h C o u n t y ’s F i n e s t R e s t a u r a n t s & E a t e r i e s

art&culture

|

77


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:17 AM

Page 78

{dining out} C U LT U R A L C U I S I N E

Don Ramon Restaurant

The Finest In Cuban Cuisine Since 1990

 3800 Ocean Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island, FL Beach Resort & Spa 3800 North Ocean Drive, Singer Island, FL (561) 340-1795 Discover an inspiring menu that echoes Chef Max’s dedication to simplicity, intense flavor and farm-to-table cuisine.  Blue Martini CityPlace, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 835-8601 An upscale martini bar featuring more than 20 of the hottest specialty martinis complemented by a sensational light menu.

561.547.8704 | donramonrestaurant.com 7101 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, FL

all our steaks are

served tender, juicy and

sizzling. Private Dining & Catering Available for groups up to 300 people.

 Bogart’s Bar & Grille 3200 Airport Road, Boca Raton, FL (561) 544-3044 Bogart’s Bar & Grille, located at the Premier Level at Cinemark Palace in Boca Raton, is the ultimate dinner-and-a-movie experience.  Brewzzi Glades Plaza, 2222 Glades Road, Boca Raton, FL (561) 392-2739 Italian-American Bistro with upscale-casual dining for lunch and dinner, featuring a state-of-the-art, gold medal microbrewery.  Buca di Beppo Wellington 2025 Wellington Green Drive, Wellington, FL (561) 790-3287 In the spirit of Italian culture, our dishes are served family-style and meant to be shared by everyone at the table.  Burger Bar 4650 Donald Ross Road, Palm Beach Gardens, FL (561) 630-4545 Indulge in hand-crafted signature gourmet burgers, specially fashioned from Angus beef.

Boca Raton | 561.392.6746

Voted Best Italian 2010, 2012, 2013 Best Brunch 2012

Best Wine List 2012 Wine Spectator Award Winning Wine List 2003-2013

“The Italian Restaurant on the Beach”

561-274-9404 Open 7 days serving our brunch and dinner menu daily

34 South Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach, FL 33483 caffelunarosa.com facebook.com/caffelunarosa

78

|

art&culture

 Café Chardonnay 4533 PGA Boulevard, Palm Beach Gardens, FL (561) 627-2662 We delight you with the finest American cuisine. Chef Frank is constantly creating new foods to satisfy your every culinary desire.  Caffé Luna Rosa 34 South Ocean Boulevard, Delray Beach, FL (561) 274-9404 We offer a memorable and authentic Italian dining experience, designed on two levels with alfresco seating and an elevated open-air dining room.

 City Oyster 213 East Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, FL (561) 272-0220 A traditional American seafood restaurant. Fresh, simple and delicious seafood selections.  Cordon Bleu Catering (561) 339-2444 Dinner parties, cocktail parties, yacht charters, wine tastings/pairings. European culinary excellence.  Dave’s Last Resort & Raw Bar 632 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL (561) 588-5208 Dave’s has a Key West atmosphere in the heart of the Palm Beaches. Tropical drinks, a great raw bar and fantastic service.  Deck 84 840 East Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, FL (561) 665-8484 As the Avenue’s first waterfront dining concept of its kind, Deck 84 provides a stimulating waterfront dining experience.  Don Ramon Restaurant 7101 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 547-8704 Open daily for lunch and dinner. Come with family and friends and enjoy a great atmosphere and the finest in Cuban cuisine.  Grease Burger Bar 213 Clematis Street, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 651-1075 Grease Burger Bar offers a selection of fresh grounddaily, hand-shaped, 10-ounce juicy burgers.  Henry’s 16850 Jog Road, Delray Beach, FL (561) 638-1949 The ultimate location for gourmet American comfort food in Delray Beach. Henry’s combines substance and style for lunch and dinner.  HMF at The Breakers Palm Beach One South County Road, Palm Beach, FL (561) 659-8480 Featuring an extensive menu of exceptional food, combining an innovative take on small plates, handcrafted cocktails and a carefully curated wine list.

 Charley’s Crab 456 South Ocean Boulevard, Palm Beach, FL (561) 659-1500 The only thing we overlook is the ocean.

 Ironwood Steak & Seafood PGA National Resort & Spa Palm Beach Gardens, FL (561) 627-4852 Offering classic American cuisine with contemporary influences, serving up tantalizing menu selections.

 City Cellar Wine Bar & Grill CityPlace, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 366-0071 A diverse menu featuring steaks, chops, fish and pasta complements a huge 5,000-bottle wine collection.

 La Bonne Bouche Bistro 516 Lucerne Avenue, Lake Worth, FL (561) 533-0840 Enjoy a sun-kissed lunch or a Frenchy breakfast on our outdoor patio or dinner in our cozy, très Parisian bistro-esque dining room!

Palm Beach County Location Reference  Southern |  Central |  Northern


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:17 AM

Page 79

{dining out} C U LT U R A L C U I S I N E  Lemongrass Asian Bistro 420 East Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, FL (561) 278-5050 www.lemongrassasianbistro.com Fresh Asian bites from sushi to Thai noodles in a stylish, contemporary space.  Leopard Lounge and Restaurant The Chesterfield Hotel 363 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach, FL (561) 659-5800 Eclectic, “N ew American” gourmet cuisine offered in an elegant, yet playful atmosphere, with dancing and live entertainment.  Morton’s The Steakhouse 777 South Flagler Drive, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 820-8125 USDA Prime aged beef, live Maine lobsters, fresh fish, hand-selected vegetables and elegant desserts.  Mulligan’s Beach House Bar & Grill 10 S. Ocean Boulevard, Lake Worth, FL (561) 588-4133 Open seven days a week, 365 days a year for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We offer an array of daily drink and food specials.  The Office 201 E. Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, FL (561) 276-3600 A place where whimsy and gastronomical delights go hand in hand, The Office is a modern American gastropub.

87 Via Mizner, Worth Avenue, Palm Beach www.renatospalmbeach.com 561.655.9752

Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with an intimate dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls. Culinary delights from the classics to the eclectic are complemented with an extensive wine list and fully stocked bar.

 Paddock Restaurant Palm Beach Kennel Club, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 683-2222, Ext. 199 A unique dining experience – fine dining and an exciting show in an elegant dining room with a commanding view of the track.  Paradiso Ristorante of Lake Worth 625 Lucerne Avenue, Lake Worth, FL (561) 547-2500 Fish, seafood, steaks, full bar, wine cellar, private dining rooms, wine cellar dining. Prix fixe menu and a la carte.  Polo Steakhouse Restaurant The Colony Hotel, Palm Beach, FL (561) 655-5430 Full-service restaurant specializing in prime dryaged beef. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails.  Red Brick Grille 4775 Lyons Road, Delray Beach, FL (561) 454-8002 Full-service casual dining experience featuring contemporary American cuisine featuring appetizers, gourmet pizzas, pasta, mouthwatering burgers, handcrafted sandwiches, fresh salads and more.  Renato’s 87 Via Mizner, Palm Beach, FL (561) 655-9752 Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with a dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls.

At Cafe Chardonnay we give center stage to local farm fresh foods and seafood. Chef Frank feels the flavor of every dish is dramatically improved by farm to table freshness.

4533 PGA Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens www.cafechardonnay.com 561.627.2662

art&culture

|

79


Inside Culture_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:17 AM

Page 80

{dining out} C U LT U R A L C U I S I N E  Rocco’s Tacos and Tequila Bar 224 Clematis Street, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 650-1001 Rocco’s Tacos offers a true taste of Mexico in a fun, casual environment.  River House 237 PGA Boulevard, Palm Beach Gardens, FL (561) 694-1188 www.riverhouserestaurant.com Regarded as the premier spot for waterfront dining in Palm Beach Gardens. Boat dockage and an outside tiki bar.

y Now Offering

Casual yet sophisticated, Outstanding food, expertly prepared Great wines, Live music nightly. Seasonally inspired dining... 52 weeks a year!

BOCA RATON PALM BEACH GARDENS FT LAUDERDALE

For details, visit www.seasons52.com

Casual Dining on Worth Avenue

221 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach

835.3500

80

|

art&culture

 Ta-Boó, an American Bistro & Bar 221 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach, FL (561) 835-3500 An American bistro and bar featuring casual dining on Worth Avenue since 1941. Featuring prime steaks, Dover sole, sea bass, pizza, homemade desserts and cappuccinos.

 Rotelli 701 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL (561) 296-9190 Rotelli is pure Italian food, with classic dishes from traditional spaghetti and lasagna to shrimp scampi.

 Toojays 419 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL (561) 582-8684 Corned beef piled high on freshly baked rye, classic Reubens and chicken noodle soup; more than 20 salads and much, much more.

 Royal Room Cabaret The Colony Hotel, PB 155 Hammon Avenue, Palm Beach, FL (561) 655-5430 The Royal Room features top-name cabaret performers. Enjoy dinner and a show or just the show.

 Testa’s Restaurant 221 Royal Poinciana Way, Palm Beach, FL (561) 832-0992 Testa’s serves Italian, American and seafood dishes. Breakfast, lunch or dinner. Testa’s is superb for a romantic getaway.

 Ruth’s Chris Steak House CityPlace, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 514-3544 The premier steakhouse at CityPlace in West Palm Beach. Catering service available.

 Three (III) Forks Prime Steakhouse 4645 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, FL (561) 630-3660 III Forks is one of the nation’s prime steakhouses with a savvy menu featuring USDA Prime beef, seafood and local favorites.

 Sailfish Restaurant 98 Lake Drive, Palm Beach Shores, FL (561) 844-1724, Ext. 107 This exceptionally popular seafood restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.  Seasons 52 11611 Ellison Wilson Road, Palm Beach Gardens, FL (561) 625-5852 Enjoy the taste of fresh food grilled over open wood fires, great wines and live piano music nightly in the wine bar.  South Shores Tavern & Patio Bar 502 Lucerne Avenue, Lake Worth, FL (561) 547-7656 Our moderately priced menu boasts generous portions and fresh ingredients. The cuisine is not the only thing that is fresh; so is the entertainment.  Stir Lounge Eau Palm Beach 100 South Ocean Boulevard, Manalapan, FL (561) 533-6000 Stir Lounge offers creatively blended, muddled and stirred cocktails with a twist: Stir’s lively indoor and outdoor social scene.

Open 7 days Lunch/Dinner Sunday Brunch Continuous Dining 11am - 10pm

 Suri 707 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL (561) 249-7436 Suri honors the traditional small plate “Tapas” style dining while offering a truly one of a kind American alternative cuisine.

 Sundy House Restaurant 106 S. Swinton Avenue, Delray Beach (561) 272-5678 Sundy House is a charming 150-seat, fine-dining establishment with accommodations nestled amid botanical gardens and waterfalls.

 Temple Orange Eau Palm Beach 100 South Ocean Boulevard, Manalapan, FL (561) 540-4924 Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner. Infused with Mediterranean flavors and ingredients, the menus showcase healthy options right alongside comfort foods with an Eau Palm Beach twist.  Tin Fish Restaurant 118 S. Clematis Street, West Palm Beach, FL (561) 223-2497 Fresh, delicious fish, served quickly in a casual atmosphere. Try one of our seven famous fish tacos, salmon on slaw, crab cakes, fish sandwich or popular shrimp and corn chowder. Head upstairs to our Top of the Fish bar for an impressive cocktail selection and nightly drink specials.  Tower Restaurant 44 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach, FL (561) 659-3241 Tower Restaurant takes pride in its daily specials: wiener schnitzel, stuffed cabbage, pot roast and corned beef and cabbage; and monster apple pancake á la Luchows.  Vic & Angelo’s Delray Beach 290 E. Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, FL (561) 278-9570 www.vicandangelos.com From the garden to the plate, Vic & Angelo’s specializes in ingredients that are imported fresh from Italy.

Palm Beach County Location Reference  Southern |  Central |  Northern


Social Photos Spread_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:09 AM

Page 81

{cultural council events}

C U LT U R E & C O C K TA I L S

On March 2, more than 140 members and guests attended a conversation with Charles & Clo Cohen. He is owner, chairman &

1 2 3 4

Ellen Wedner, Charles & Clo Cohen and Rena Blades Maxine Marks, Don Ephraim and Ellen Wedner Bert & Sallie Korman Pam Saba, Alex Anderson, Cloe Gibson

CEO of Cohen Media Group, which distributes independent and international films in the U.S., including most current French films and the current Oscar nominee for Best Foreign Language Film (Timbuktu), and as President & CEO of Cohen Brothers Realty, he controls more than 12 million square feet of Class A office, retail and design showroom space nationwide, including DCOTA (Design Center of the Americas) in Dania Beach. She is the former model and advertising/marketing executive who worked with designers Tom Ford and Gucci in London and Jimmy Choo in the U.S. Ellen Wedner, Director of the Donald M. Ephraim Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival, was our guest interviewer.

1

2

3

4

C U LT U R E & C O C K TA I L S 5 6 7 8

Over 175 art and entertainment

Maureen Cente and Scott Wood JoAnne Berkow and Ellen Liman Shirley Cowen, Dina Baker, Michael and Rebecca Finn Christopher Caneles, Tommy Tune & Stephen Nesbitt

lovers enjoyed an amazing conversation with Tommy Tune, ten-time Tony Award winner. Tune was interviewed by Rob Russell, Entertainment

7

Director for The Colony Hotel’s Royal Room Cabaret. The two shared anecdotes and punch lines about many of his co-stars and showbiz pals, including Barbra Streisand, Carol Channing, Walter Matthau, 5

6

Twiggy, Charles “Honi” Coles and Gwen Verdon.

8

Photos by Corby Kaye's Studio Palm Beach

art&culture

|

81


Social Photos Spread_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:09 AM

Page 82

{cultural council events}

ART ON THE ROAD Art on the Road, which takes guests to studios, galleries and private collections, promotes the purchase of local art. The program is designed to demystify the

1 2 3 4

Tour of Mister E. Studio Art on the Road guests on their way to the next gallery Tour of Arcature Fine Art Tour of Alexander Krivosheiw Studio

process of walking into a gallery and enhances that experience by introducing attendees to studio and gallery owners as well as private collectors. This experience is also educational, as gallery owners describe their creative process, types of artistic media and inspiration. 2

1

This season we visited the following galleries, studios and private collections in Delray Beach, Palm Beach and West Palm Beach:  DTR Modern  Taglialatella Galleries  Arcature Fine Art  Mister E. Studio  Alexander Krivosheiw Studio  Bruce Helander Studio

3

4

C U LT U R E & C O C K TA I L S Over 190 members and guests attended the February 2 CULTURE & COCKTAILS featuring iconic potter, designer and author Jonathan Adler, who has more than 25 stores worldwide, and writer, bon-vivant, window dresser and fashion commentator Simon Doonan, who has worked in fashion for over 35 years and is the Creative Ambassador at Large at Barneys New York. Burt Minkoff, Realtor

5

for The Corcoran Group, interviewed the entertaining couple. 5

6

Burt Minkoff, Jonathan Adler, Simon Doonan and Rena Blades Mark Jurig, Irene and Jim Karp Michael & Janice Barry

6 7

7

82

|

art&culture

Photos by Corby Kaye's Studio Palm Beach


Social Photos Spread_Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:09 AM

Page 83

{cultural council events}

C U LT U R E & C O C K TA I L S On January 12, more than 190 members and guests attended Culture & Cocktails with Harry & Gigi Benson and Wilbur & Hilary Ross. The author of 14 books, Benson is a worldfamous photojournalist who has worked for Life magazine,

People, Vanity Fair and more. Mrs. Benson has been wife, partner, editor and organizer of his photographic work for more than 30 years. Mr. Ross — a prominent American business leader known for successfully restructuring industries and leveraged buyouts — is a major art lover whose collection includes Western surrealists,contemporary Eastern sculptures and more than two

1

dozen works by artist René Magritte. Mrs. Ross is the Society 1 2

Wibur & Hilary Ross and Gigi & Harry Benson Wilbur Ross makes his wife Hilary laugh about their first date as Mr. and Mrs. Benson look on. Deborah Pollack, Dena Lyons, Bobbi Horwich, Susy Witt Roe Green, Janice Barry, Mary Anne Seidman Susan & Dom Telesco with Sydell Miller

3 4 5

Editor for Quest and Q magazines, a columnist for the website New York Social Diary and author of the new book Palm Beach

People, with photography by Harry Benson.

2

3

4

5 Photos by Corby Kaye's Studio Palm Beach

art&culture

|

83


Cultural Council_Developmental pages_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:11 AM

Page 84

SOLO EXHIBITION OPENING

Mary Anne & Barry Seidman

Jacek Gancarz

Jacek Gancarz

On March 19, more than 70 guests attended the opening reception for the solo exhibition Feast for the Eyes with photographer and author Barry Seidman.

Mary Katherine and Robert Thicke

EXHIBITION OPENING On March 5, over 125 Cultural Council members previewed the exhibition opening of “Sculpture Selections from the Studio.” Three local sculptors participated in the exhibition, Alexander Krivosheiw, GE Olsen and Jeff Whyman.

Jacek Gancarz

Gert and Sheila Olsen

Jacek Gancarz

Jacek Gancarz

Jeff and Elizabeth Whyman

Rena Blades with Alexander Krivosheiw

“The Cultural Council is really transforming Palm Beach County.” Jacek Gancarz

–Carin Wagner-Brown Artist Member

Sandra Thompson and Elaine Meier

84

|

art&culture


Cultural Council_Developmental pages_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:11 AM

Page 85

JOIN THE CULTURAL COUNCIL As a member, we will keep you informed and entertained with our award-winning publications and signature events. Enjoy these exclusive benefits that offer incredible value — all year long!

Membership Benefits     

CONTRIBUTOR $600 All benefits of the Supporter membership, plus:  One additional guest pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  VIP seating at Culture & Cocktails  VIP passes to local art fairs  Two guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine

Invitations to members-only exhibition previews Free or reduced admission to select programs and events 10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store purchases Subscription to art&culture magazine and Cultural Calendar Recognition in the Council’s Annual Report

PATRON $1,000 All benefits of the Contributor membership, plus:  Two additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails  Four guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Invitation to director’s annual event  Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building

INDIVIDUAL $65 All benefits listed above for one person HOUSEHOLD $150 Individual member benefits for two adults at the same address, plus:  CultureCard (membership discount card)

FOUNDING PATRON $2,500 AND ABOVE All the benefits of the Patron membership, plus:  Recognition on donor plaque  Private tours of special exhibitions for you and your guest upon request  Four additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails

SUPPORTER $250 All benefits of the Household membership, plus:  One pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  One guest invitation to all member exhibition previews

To join the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County or for more information on Artist and Musician Membership visit palmbeachculture.com/membership.

Business Arts Partner Membership Benefits

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is a not-for-profit agency providing artists and cultural organizations with programs and services that promote and support their individual missions. Members help us accomplish these goals and ensure our community continues to have access to quality arts programming. Our vibrant arts make our destination desirable to businesses, visitors and residents. Membership provides your business with access to valuable benefits increasing your visibility and connecting you with our donors, members and the greater community.

LEVEL OF SUPPORT

AFFILIATE STEWARD LEADER BENEFACTOR DIRECTOR CHAIRMAN $600 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000 $10,000 $25,000

Invitations to Members Only exhibition previews

Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine and Council’s Annual Report

Discounted advertising rates for art&culture magazine

Business logo with live link on Council’s website

art&culture magazine delivered to your business (up to 20 copies per issue)

10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store purchases

in Palm Beach County

2

4

6

8

10

12

Free admissions to all Culture & Cocktails programs (includes VIP reserved seating)

2

4

6

8

10

12

Culture Card – Member discount cards for cultural organizations

Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, The Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building Sponsorship of one Cultural Executives Committee Meeting* (includes four invitations) Logo included in eblasts to all Cultural Council cultural organizations Listing on donor plaque in the Alex and Renate Dreyfoos Entry into the galleries Private tours for 12 by advance arrangement Underwriting and exhibition sponsorships and partnerships

For more information, please call Debbie Calabria at (561) 472-3330.

art&culture

|

85


Cultural Council_Developmental pages_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:11 AM

Page 86

HOST AN EVENT

Jacek Gancarz

Jacek Gancarz

Entertain your guests at the Cultural Council’s beautiful headquarters – the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building. Located minutes from I-95 in the heart of downtown Lake Worth, the Cultural Council’s home is the perfect venue to host your private event. Our Gallery and the Sallie and Berton E. Korman Education and Training Center provide an elegant ambiance for any function. Whether hosting a donor reception or staff retreat, the Cultural Council’s staff will assist you in creating a memorable event. For more information or to schedule a tour, contact Debbie Calabria, Membership and Special Events Manager, at 561-472-3330.

FRANK NAVARRETE Artist member Frank Navarrete is Vice President and Creative Director of Green Sky Productions. He is a self-taught, multi-talented artist and has designed and fabricated stunning studio sets for TV, theater and events that have influenced trends in the industry at large. He works in techniques and mediums including portraits, murals, sculpting, welding, designing and building. Through his life experiences in the US, Europe, South America and the Caribbean, Frank has been able to capture the essence of many different cultures and with his unique vision transform them into vibrant and dramatic expressions of art. Recently Frank worked on the Cultural Council’s 2014 Muse Awards creating imaginative sets and table designs.

SUPPORT THE CULTURAL COUNCIL’S ANNUAL FUND TODAY! Gifts to the Cultural Council’s Annual Fund provide much-needed, unrestricted support to sustain daily operations and fund many important programs, including: field trips for K-12 students; exhibiting artwork in the Council’s galleries, which gives vital support to artists; and professional development workshops for arts educators. Donations also provide funding for An Educational Guide to Art and Culture in Palm Beach County, which creates connections to art and culture for students through field trips, access to innovative curriculum and partnerships with cultural organizations.

86

|

art&culture

Donor Spotlight

PAIGE RENSE NOLAND Paige Rense N oland has been supporting the Cultural Council for the past four years. Her recent contribution to the Council’s Annual Fund puts her in our Donor Spotlight recognizing her generosity and commitment to the arts in Palm Beach County. Ms. Rense has also generously hosted a dinner on behalf of the Council and was a guest speaker at our popular luncheon series “Its’ What You See.” Ms. Noland, the editor of Architectural Digest from 1970 to 2010, founded the cookery magazine Bon Appetite and was the editor of GEO. She currently has a gallery in Palm Beach dedicated to the paintings of her late husband, Kenneth Noland. Thank you Paige for all you do to support arts and culture in our community!


Cultural Council_Developmental pages_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

10:11 AM

Page 87

THANK YOU In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and above help us accomplish our mission. Mr. Andrew M. Aiken Audrey & Martin Gruss Foundation Mrs. Christine Aylward The Azeez Foundation B/E Aerospace Ms. Phyllis Badesch Ms. Dina Gustin Baker Bank of America Banyan Printing Mr. and Mrs. R. Michael Barry Mr. and Mrs. John T. Bartosek Mrs. Marta Batmasian Mr. and Mrs. Harold Baxter Mr. Bruce A. Beal and Mr. Francis V. Cunningham Beasley Hauser Kramer & Galardi, P.A. Mrs. JoAnne Berkow Bernstein Global Wealth Management Mr. and Mrs. Larry Beyer Mr. and Mrs. John Blades Boca Raton Resort & Club The Boston Foundation Boynton Beach Flower Market Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bracci The Breakers Palm Beach Mr. and Mrs. Howard Bregman Dr. David W. Breneman Mr. and Mrs. Cressman D. Bronson The Ann K. & Douglas S. Brown Family Foundation Business Development Board Ms. Phyllis Borak Mr. Andrzej Bytnar Mr. Christopher D. Caneles and Mr. Stephen Nesbitt Ms. Laurie Carney Ms. Rose Carpenter Celia Lipton and Victor W. Farris Foundation Charlotte Pelton & Associates Christafaro’s Catering Mr. and Mrs. David F. Click The Colony Hotel Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan Mr. and Mrs. Miles A. Coon Credit Suisse Crystal & Company Mr. and Mrs. Peter D. Cummings Ms. Kathy Daigler Mr. Gus Davis Mrs. Pamela O. Dean Dr. Richard P. D’Elia Mr. and Mrs. Richard Derbes Ms. Beth R. DeWoody Divers Direct Mrs. Edith R. Dixon Ms. Shawn Donnelley Ms. Beatrice Doone-Merena Mrs. Cecile Draime Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos Dupuytren Foundation Earle I. Mack Foundation, Inc. Mr. Timothy A. Eaton Listing as of April 23, 2015

Eau Palm Beach Resort & Spa Mrs. Harriett M. Eckstein Ms. Suzi K. Edwards Mr. George T. Elmore Mr. Donald M. Ephraim and Mrs. Maxine Marks Donald M. Ephraim Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farber Terri and Howard Fine Mr. and Mrs. Michael Finn Mrs. Shirley Fiterman Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Flack Florida Power & Light Company Dr. and Mrs. Robert Flucke Fox Rothschild LLP Ms. Linda Frankel Mrs. Jack M. Friedland Mr. Jacek Gancarz Gardens Mall/Forbes Company The GE Foundation Ms. Jane Glucksman Mr. Jerome Golden and Dr. Barbara Golden Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Graziotto Ms. Roe Green Hon. and Mrs. William Greenberg Mrs. Peg Greenspon Ms. Jacquelyn Grimm Gunster Ms. Vicki Halmos Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand Ms. Lise Heard Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation Henry L. Kimelman Family Foundation Ms. Priscilla Heublein Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman Mr. Rick Holton Holyfield & Thomas, LLC John C. & Mary Jane Howard Foundation Ms. Lisa Huertas International Society of Palm Beach J. Ira and Nicki Harris Family Foundation Ms. Melanie Jacobson Jasteka Foundation Inc. Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank Mr. Bertrand Jubert Mrs. Muriel Kaplan Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp Ms. Jacqueline Kato and Mr. Howard Smith Katz Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz Jr. Ms. Susan G. Keenan Mr. and Mrs. Christopher G. Kellogg Kohnken Family Foundation Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman Mr. and Mrs. Leonard I. Korman Mrs. Molly Foreman Kozel Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Kramer III Mrs. Emily F. Landau Mr. and Mrs. Laurence Leamer

Geo. Zoltan Lefton Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Lemongello, DDS Mr. and Mrs. Harold Lenfest Ms. Syndie T. Levien Mrs. Claire M. Levine Ms. Mindy Levine Mr. and Mrs. Melvin J. Levy Mrs. Mary G. Lewis The Liman Foundation Mrs. Susan Lloyd Ms. Leigh Lombardi Mrs. Donna Long Catherine Lowe M.D., LL.D. Ms. Adriana Luchechko Mr. and Mrs. Peter Lunder The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation The Maltz Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Robin B. Martin Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews Mr. Craig I. Menin Mr. and Mrs. Gil Messing Mr. Sheldon Berney and Ms. Florence Metzger Mrs. Sydelle Meyer Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs Mr. and Mrs. George J. Michel Jr. Mr. David Miller Sydell and Arnold Miller Foundation Ms. Nancy Miller Mrs. Sydell L. Miller Mr. Burton S. Minkoff Mr. James P. Mitchell Ms. Jane Mitchell Mrs. Tamara Morgenstern Ms. Virginia C. Mossburg Ms. Jane F. Napier and Mr. William Napier Mrs. Elizabeth Neuhoff Mr. Bruce Newman Mrs. Suzanne Niedland and Mr. Lawrence F. DeGeorge Northern Trust Office Depot Office Depot Foundation Olympusat, Inc. Mrs. Jane Osgood and Mr. Ted Hilles Oxbow Energy Solutions LLC Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches Ms. Anka Palitz Palm Beach Daily News Palm Beach Dramaworks Palm Beach Kennel Club Paradiso Restaurant Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker Mr. and Mrs. William D. Parmelee Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson PGA National Resort and Spa Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Phelps PNC Bank PNC Foundation Port of Palm Beach District Mrs. Regina Porten

PRP Wine International Dr. and Mrs. Carter Pottash Mr. and Mrs. John W. Preston Publix Super Markets Charities R.J. Zuckerberg Palm Beach Fund Mrs. Tamara Rabil Mr. Richard Reddig REG Architects Inc. Ms. Paige Rense Noland Richard & Peggy Greenfield Foundation Ms. Ruth Roberts Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Rodusky Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Rooney Ms. Bonnie Roseman Mr. and Mrs. Jay Rosenkranz Mr. Wilbur L. Ross Jr. RSB Richard S. Bernstein & Associates, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Leon Rubin Mr. and Mrs. Stanley M. Rumbough Jr. Ms. Diane Rutledge Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Saltzman Dr. Edward W. Sandall and Mrs. Marie Hale Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc. Sargent Architectural Photography Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager Mr. Gary Schweikhart Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman Mr. Eugene Shekhter and Mrs. Olivia Shandora Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf Mr. and Mrs. Nathan Slack Mr. Harold B. Smith Mr. Lawrence Sosnow Mrs. Andrea Stark Mr. and Mrs. Bob Stiller Mr. and Mrs. Duane Stiller Mr. and Mrs. Darren Swank Sydelle F. Meyer Charitable Lead Annuity Trust Tanks A Lot Aquariums Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco Telesco Family Foundation The Mary Alice Fortin Foundation, Inc. The Palm Beach Post The Park Foundation The Roe Green Foundation The Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc. Mrs. Sandra Thompson Tito’s Handmade Vodka Mr. Bruce E. Toll United Way of Palm Beach County Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio Jr. Ms. Linda Wartow Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman RADM Philip A. Whitacre Dr. Mark Hayden Widick Mrs. Janice Willinger Winston Art Group Ms. Susy Witt Mrs. Leatrice K. Wolf Mrs. Sheryl G. Wood Esq. WorldMark Entertainment Mrs. Lynda Younker

art&culture

|

87


Last Page_Spring 2015:Layout 1

5/28/15

3:53 PM

Page 88

{next issue – fall 2015}

Featuring advanced animatronics as well as authentic casts, Dinosaurs Around the World brings the world of Pangea to life like never before at the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium.

fall. in love.

While you enjoy the summer months, Palm Beach County’s diverse and distinguished arts organizations will be busily preparing for the 2015/2016 season. As the Norton Museum of Art gets ready to break ground on an expansion project designed by Foster + Partners, curators will be hanging the exhibition This Place: Israel through Photography’s Lens.

Dinosaurs Around the World: The Exhibition will be stalking the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium and Miami City Ballet will celebrate its 30th anniversary season with works by George Balanchine, Twyla Tharp, Paul Taylor, Justin Peck and Liam Scarlett. And, Boca Ballet Theatre is looking forward to celebrating its 25th anniversary. Carmen will kick off Palm Beach Opera’s 2016 season. Theater fans will be able to catch Billy Elliot the Musical, The Will Rogers Follies, Frost/Nixon and other entertaining shows at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. Blue Man Group and Motown the Musical will be among the hottest tickets at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts. The lights at Palm Beach Dramaworks will be coming up on five shows, including The History Boys, Eugene O’Neill’s Long Day’s Journey into Night and Outside Mullingar. All across Palm Beach County, fall will blend into winter amid a whirl of drama, dance, color, beauty, passion, craft, comedy, contemplation, vision and excitement as the upcoming season unfolds. There’s so much to love. And so many stories to tell in the fall issue of art&culture.

88

|

art&culture


Minto_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:57 AM

Page 1

Minto Florida Communities

Premier locations.

Inspired lifestyles. Unbeatable new home values.

Enjoy the warm Florida sunshine year-round!

Minto offers an incomparable combination of exceptional communities and new home values that you’ll cherish for years to come. Your Dream of Oceanfront Florida Living is About to Come True… Final Phase Now Selling! Villas By The Sea is a colorful, vibrant oceanside community that offers everything you’ve been dreaming of in Florida living. Residents enjoy spectacular oceanfront amenities overlooking miles of white sand beach and the blue Atlantic.

Lauderdale-By-The-Sea

Oceanside & Oceanfront Residences from the $600s to over $1 million

(888) 904-0798 ~ mintofla.com

Incredible Water View Homesites Now Included! Less than 40 Homesites Available! Enjoy an incredible Royal Palm Beach location and endless fun at the community’s clubhouse complete with every imaginable resort amenity. Located only moments away from downtown City Place, West Palm Beach and easy access to highways.

Royal Palm Beach

Single-Family & Estate Homes from the $300s to $400s

(877) 362-1950 ~ mintofla.com

Introducing Tradition’s Newest Active Adult Community Maintenance-Free Living with Brand New Home Designs This friendly neighborhood you’ve always dreamed of features small town charm and amazing resort-style amenities. You’ll also enjoy the community’s own Tradition Square town center complete with national brand retailers and popular restaurants. Almost every form of Florida outdoor recreation is close at hand, including nearby championship golf and uncrowded beaches.

Port St. Lucie

Single-Family & Villa Homes from the $180s to the mid $200s

(877) 467-4108 ~ mintofla.com

For location, hours of operation and further details about our award-winning communities throughout Florida, visit mintofla.com. © Minto Communities, LLC 2015. All rights reserved. Content may not be reproduced, copied, altered, distributed, stored or transferred in any form or by any means without express written permission. Artist’s renderings, dimensions, specifi cations, prices and features are approximate and subject to change without notice. Minto, the Minto logo, Villas by the Sea, the Villas by the Sea logo, PortoSol, the PortoSol logo, LakePark and the LakePark Logo are trademarks of Minto Communities, LLC and/or its affi liates. CGC1519880 6/2015


Frenchmans Creek_A Spring 15:Layout 1

5/28/15

9:57 AM

Page 1

art&culture magazine v9i3 Spring/Summer 2015  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you