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above board Form and function come together on the water

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of Palm Beach County

breaking ground New works in the performing arts explore uncharted territory

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PLUS John Loring’s curious life,

Celebrated jewelry designer David Webb made his mark on Palm Beach

The Florida Room, a parade of art shows at the Palm Beach County Convention Center and more


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Zawaza wa Zu dod on Shupin Shupin,

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HYON GYON PARK (B.1979) KOREAN

WALLY F IN D L AY G A L L E RIE S

N E W Y O R K • PA L M B E A C H • B A R C E L O N A

165 WORTH AVENUE • PALM BEACH FL 33480 • T: (561) 655 2090 F: (561) 655 1493 W W W . WA L LY F I N D L AY . C O M


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HENRIK SIMONSEN (B.1974) DANISH

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EST. 1870

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{contents}

features

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all decked out Outstanding boat design combines form and function along Palm Beach County’s shores. By David Lawrence

66

50

the florida room An upcoming exhibition mounted by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County celebrates the art of interior design. By Joseph Pubillones

56

society’s jeweler Celebrated jewelry designer David Webb made an indelible mark on Palm Beach. By Frederic A. Sharf

62

it’s show time The Palm Beach County Convention Center is set to host four major art shows that stimulate economic and artistic activity. By Amy Woods

56 66

beautiful letters Calligraphy is an ancient art form that blends artistic and literal expression. By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

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the best is yet to be New works in the performing arts challenge – and reward – artists, administrators and audiences. By Christina Wood

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welcome letter Let’s all celebrate synergy in the cultural community. By Rena Blades

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publisher’s note Art infuses our lives in surprising ways – and in surprising places. By Robert Kirschner

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Upfront • Pan’s Garden, Palm Beach State College’s Eissey Campus Theatre and the Delray String Quartet celebrate birthdays. • Florida Atlantic University students and alumni are featured on new CD. • Itzhak Perlman takes the stage at this year’s Festival of the Arts Boca. • Read all about it! The 2014 Read Together Palm Beach County campaign is under way. • Lake Worth shows its true colors as hundreds of artists come together for the Lake Worth Street Painting Festival. • Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, on display at the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium, tells the human stories behind the headlines. • The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County offers a full calendar of exhibits and encourages voters to advocate for the arts.

32 28

art works! Dalhia Patrice Perryman reminds us that we are the arts. By Christina Wood

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profile The focus is on John Loring’s voracious curiosity and continuing creativity. By Marilyn Bauer

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portrait Roger Culbertson keeps popping up. By Thom Smith

38 40

calendar From an exhibition exploring the origins of pop art to a comic drama called The Last Schwartz, our calendar gives you a taste of the Palm Beach County’s deliciously entertaining and intriguing cultural offerings.

77

inside culture William I. Koch discusses philanthropy at the 2013 SmARTbiz Summit, Culture & Cocktails keeps the conversation going into the New Year, the Norton Museum of Art announces a major expansion and much more insider news.

77 Cover Image: David Webb’s Coral Seahorse Brooch (1966), which will be included in the exhibition David Webb: Society’s Jeweler at the Norton Museum of Art. Photo by Ilan Rubin.

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MILES AWAY FROM MAINSTREAM

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magine a place wh m where here the allure of Palm Beach meets carefree bliss. Where the intimacyy of a private beach fuses wit with th the war warmth mth of the staff. Where luxur luxuryy and sophistication s blend with laid laid-back d-back per perfection. fection. We W e invite you to enjoy en njoy a Palm Beach retreat exp experience perience unlike any other other..

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YOU’R E NOT DR EA MING.

With the best of everything all in one place, life never looked so good! Loblolly is a gated, private community with 275 homes in a variety of styles and sizes. Club membership, separate from homeownership, affords the opportunity for members and their families to enjoy a wide variety of amenities and services not often found within one club. Homes and homesites from $400,000 to over $3,500,000. Please call for an appointment. Jill Christu, Broker 772.545.2531 | loblollyinfo.com Loblolly Realty/Licensed Real Estate Broker

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601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460 | 561-471-2901 | www.palmbeachculture.com

Featuring artifacts Featuring artifacts that that hhave ave nnever ever bbefore efore bbeen een exhibited! ex hibited!

OF F PEOPLE O PEOPLE the the W WATER ATER

President & Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Director, Marketing & Government Affairs

Marilyn Bauer

561-687-8727 mbauer@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Mary Lewis

561-472-3340 mlewis@palmbeachculture.com

Shawn Berry

561-472-3347 sberry@palmbeachculture.com

Debbie Calabria

561-472-3330 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Kristen Smiley

561-472-3342 ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com

Nichole Hickey

561.472.3336 nhickey@palmbeachculture.com

Dan Boudet

561-471-2902 dboudet@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

Bebe Novick-Brodigan

561-471-1602 bbrodigan@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Contributing Writer/Editor

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Visitor Services Coordinator

Marlon Foster

561-472-3338 mfoster@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Grants Director of Development Manager of Arts and Cultural Education

SSeptember t b 3 - JJune 2288

Membership & Special Events Manager Development Associate Manager of Artist Services Website and Online Marketing Manager Grants Manager Public Relations Coordinator Bookkeeper

Admission Adm ission n is is Free! Free! 300 N North orth Dixie Dixie Highway, Highway, Downtown D owntown West West PPalm alm BBeach each Tues. Tues. - Sat. Sat. 10am-5pm 10am-5pm (Closed (C l os e d m major ajor hholidays) olidays)

561.832.4164 561.832.4 4164 www.historicalsocietypbc.org www.historicals societypbc.org

Cultural Council Board of Directors Officers Berton E. Korman, Chairman Craig Grant, Vice Chairman Christopher E. Havlicek, Secretary Bradford A. Deflin, Treasurer Directors Bruce A. Beal Carole Boucard Michael J. Bracci

Howard Bregman Christopher D. Canales Cecile Draime Shirley Fiterman Roe Green Herbert S. Hoffman Irene J. Karp Raymond E. Kramer, III Suzanne Niedland Bill Parmalee

Jean Sharf Michael D. Simon Dom A. Telesco Ethel I. Williams Ex Officios Mary Lou Berger Daniel Biaggi Jennifer Prior Brown Glenn Jergensen

Audrey Audr ey and M Martin artin Gruss G Foundatio Foundationn The Marshall Marshall EE.. R Rinker inker SSr.r. FFoundation, oundation, IInc. nc . Cultural Council Founder Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Priscilla A. Taylor, Mayor Paulette Burdick, Vice Mayor

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Steven L. Abrams Mary Lou Berger Jess R. Santamaria

Hal R. Valeche Shelley Vana


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art&culture of Palm Beach County

Winter 2014 - volume 8, issue 2

publisher publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

561.472.8769 robert@passportpublications.com

editorial staff managing editor business editor editorial coordinator

christina wood

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com

richard westlund

561.472.8768 westlund@passportpublications.com

bradley j. oyler

561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

cultural council editorial staff editorial director contributing editor

rena blades leon m. rubin

contributing writers john loring, allegra nagler, rich pollack, anne rodgers, leon m. rubin, frederic a. sharf, thom smith, jenifer mangione vogt, christina wood, amy woods

contributing photographers harry benson, steven caras, jim fairman, jacek gancarz, michael price, robert stevens

art & design art & production director

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

graphic designer

rebecca m. lafita

561.472.8762 art@passportpublications.com

advertising sales director of advertising national advertising manager signature publications senior advertising manager contract administrator

richard s. wolff

561.472.8767 richard@passportpublications.com

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

richard kahn

561.906.7355 rich@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the County Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.

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Celedinas Insurance Group is committed to providing clients with the advice, insight, and analysis of one of America’s leading privately held insurance brokerages. Our unwavering goal is to provide our valued clients the most creative, comprehensive, and cost-effective insurance programs custom tailored to meet their individual needs. Celedinas Insurance Group excels in the following areas: • Marine & Luxury Yacht • Equine, Farm & Ranch • Life Insurance & Advanced Estate Planning Solutions • Private Aviation • Kidnap & Ransom

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WELCOME TO

art&culture

“Synergy” is one of those words that just sounds good when you say it. To paraphrase Shakespeare, it rolls trippingly off the tongue.

fromtheceo

Look it up on the Internet, and the first definitions that pop up talk about “combined effect that is greater than the sum of individual effects” and “cooperative interaction.” In my mind, it suggests action, progress and collaboration. In Palm Beach County’s cultural community, we’re fortunate to find synergy all around us. One of the best current examples is Art Synergy, an initiative designed to introduce patrons of the season’s four major international art shows in West Palm Beach to the exceptionally wide range of cultural opportunities that exist outside the walls of the Palm Beach County Convention Center. With support from the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, the organizers of Art Synergy are reaching out to the thousands of people attending ArtPalmBeach, inviting people to six distinct arts districts where special arts events will be taking place. It is our hope at the Council that similar synergistic events will ultimately be organized around other fairs such as the American International Fine Art Fair, the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show and the Palm Beach Fine Craft Show. The fundamental message is that whether you live here or you’re visiting from out of town, we encourage you to explore, sample and taste the ® arts throughout Florida’s Cultural Capital. Visit www.palmbeachculture.com/artsynergy for details. We see synergy in action even closer to home, of course – right here in our Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in Lake Worth. Remarkably, as we begin 2014 we are marking our second anniversary in our new headquarters. It’s impossible to list all of the terrific things that we have been able to accomplish thanks to our centralized location

Michael Price

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and the wonderful spaces we have within this building, but all of them make us very proud. As we envisioned, we now mount exhibitions by local artists on an ongoing basis. We host professional development sessions for cultural organizations and events for the community. Our Cultural Information Center and Uniquely Palm Beach Store bring people through our doors who might otherwise have no exposure to art and culture in Palm Beach County. This truly is a dream come true – and we continue to be grateful to the Montgomery family and everyone else who made it possible! As we move into the new year, we’ll be looking at many more opportunities to create synergies for the Cultural Council and the larger community. For example, we’re developing a number of exciting new marketing concepts that will build awareness of the vast array of cultural opportunities that exist here and help visitors to understand how to tap into them. We know that we have the largest and most sophisticated cultural offerings in the southeast. We’re going to spread that word more aggressively and creatively than ever before. Much of the credit for the Cultural Council’s success in encouraging and achieving synergy belongs to all of you. We are grateful for your generous support and active participation. We’re looking forward to another great year ahead – and we wish the same for you!

Rena Blades President and CEO Cultural Council of Palm Beach County


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E XC E E D I N G Y O U R E X P E C TAT I O N S . . .

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publisher

EVERYWHERE YOU GO Looking for inspired art in Palm Beach County? You could browse notable museum collections, get a front row seat for a spellbinding show or take in an outdoor concert. Then again, you could find a comfortable spot at the marina or do a little window shopping outside a Worth Avenue jeweler. Art infuses our lives in surprising ways – and in surprising places – as you’ll see in this issue of art&culture. Many of the artists in our midst are busy working in a variety of trades, as Joseph Pubillones, guest curator of an upcoming exhibition at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County dedicated to interior design, reminds us. The exhibition explores the work of eight interior designers through multiple interpretations of the Florida Room. The story – on page 50 – explores the inspiration behind their art.

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Some of the finest examples of the boat designer’s art can be found in the waters off our shores. In “All Decked Out” on page 46, we’ll see how form and function blend on the water. We continue on from the sparkling waters of the Atlantic to the sparkling jewels that turn heads on Palm Beach as Frederic A. Sharf introduces us to David Webb in “Society’s Jeweler” on page 56. Calligraphers have the power to transform a simple phrase or solitary word into a work of art. In “Beautiful Letters” on page 66, we take a look at the ancient art of calligraphy. Roger Culbertson, on the other hand, has the power to make entire books pop. You’ll meet him in our Portrait on page 38.

Studio Palm Beach

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Of course, the fine arts are also well represented in Palm Beach County – and in art&culture. On page 70, Managing Editor Christina Wood introduces us to the challenges and rewards associated with presenting new plays, ballets, musicals and musical compositions in “The Best Is Yet to Be.” “It’s Show Time” on page 62 explores the impact and evolution of a season of art shows that begins at the Palm Beach County Convention Center and spreads out into the community from there. You’ll even find a poem – “We Are the Arts” by Dalhia Patrice Perryman on page 28 – in this issue of art&culture. The arts are everywhere. In our homes, on our roadways, in our hearts. They inspire us, comfort us, transport us. A life well lived is a work of art in and of itself as you’ll see in “Voracious Curiosity: The Life and Times of John Loring” by Marilyn Bauer on page 32. Make your life a masterpiece. Explore the arts in Palm Beach County – from our marinas to our museums. Invite the arts into your home and visit them at the home of the Cultural Council in Lake Worth. Wander through sculpture gardens, take unexpected turns. And savor every minute you spend in the world of art&culture. Enjoy!

Robert S. C. Kirschner Publisher


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at PBIEC

ART See beautiful artwork ranging from sculptures and paintings to multimedia artwork and photography at the Palm Beach International Equestrian Center. Selected works from South Florida’s New River Fine Art Gallery as well as curated exhibitions from independent artists are on display and available for purchase. Visit us during the FTI Consulting Winter Equestrian Festival’s “Saturday Night Lights” and the Adequan Global Dressage Festival’s “Friday Night Stars” from January 10 to March 29 to see more.

Main Grounds at PBIEC 3400 Equestrian Club Drive, Wellington, FL 33414 www.equestriansport.com 561.793.JUMP

The Stadium at PBIEC 13500 South Shore Blvd, Wellington , FL 33414 www.globaldressagefestival.com 561.793.5867


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{contributors} art&culture’s managing editor, Christina Wood, is not afraid to get her hands dirty in pursuit of a good story. Although you’re more likely to find her in the audience at Palm Beach Dramaworks or happily wandering through the Norton Museum of Art, the award-winning freelance writer and editor has been known to roll up her sleeves (and, on occasion, her pant legs) to wade through swamps, explore the world of animal behavior or go head-to-head with military leaders.

Marilyn Bauer is an award-winning critic, writer and two-time National Endowment for the Arts fellow in arts journalism. She has written for most major newspapers and numerous magazines including Art & Antiques, ARTnews, Art in America, National Geographic Traveler, Self and Harper’s Bazaar. She is the director of marketing and government affairs for the Cultural Council and resides in West Palm Beach.

CHRIS C HRIS GUSTIN GUSTIN

“Talking Th “Talking Through rough Th The he VVessel” essel” EExhibition xhibition NNov. ov. 114, 4, 22013013- FFeb. eb. 115, 5, 22014 014 Vessels aand nd DDrawings rawings Vessels Workshop Workshop January January 24-25, 24-25, 2014 2014

SPOTLIGHT S POTLIGHT ON O N NEW NEW T TALENT ALENT CCurated urated by Bruce He Bruce Helander lander NNov. ov. 114, 4, 22013 013 to to Fe eb. 115, 5, 22014 014 Feb.

LighthouseArts.org LighthouseArts.org Museum: Mu seum: 373 373 TTequesta equesta Drive Drive Tequesta, Tequesta, FL FL (561) (561) 746-3101 746-3101 School School ooff AArt: rt: 395 395 Seabrook Seabrook Road Road Tequesta, Tequesta, FL FL (561) (561) 748-8737 748-8737 Open M onday - FFriday, riday, 1100 aa.m. .m. ttoo 4 pp.m. .m. Open Monday Saturday, 10 10 aa.m. .m. ttoo 2 pp.m. .m. Saturday,

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During more than three decades at The Palm Beach Post, Thom Smith covered popular music, movies, television and the courts, served as the paper’s “Listening Post” (ombudsman) and produced a consumer column. For 20 years he wrote columns about people, places and events in the Palm Beaches culminating with the “Palm Beach Social Diary.” These days he freelances for international publications and writes the “On the Avenues” column for The Coastal Star, a monthly newspaper that covers Lake Worth to Boca Raton. He and his wife, Diane, live in Boca Raton.

Davidoff Studios, Palm Beach

M aster Artist Artist Master

Joseph Pubillones is an award-winning architect and interior designer who studied in the U.S. and in Europe. In addition to his 15-plus years of experience in residential interior design creating interiors that are elegant, well-structured and rooted in classic designs, he has also worked on commercial projects and yacht interiors. Joseph has been featured on HGTV’s Designer’s Challenge and on Open House. He is also a syndicated columnist.

Before launching her freelance career, Amy Woods worked as the society editor of Palm 2 Jupiter and as the editor of Notables at The Palm Beach Post, a position she held for 11 years. An experienced editor, columnist, writer and reporter, Amy’s goal is to use her experience as a journalist and skills in public relations for the benefit of our local nonprofit community.

Jenifer Mangione Vogt is a writer and publicist who specializes in art, finance and Italian culture. She writes about art for many publications, including JetSet Magazine and Artlog. Jenifer also has more than 20 years of experience in corporate and nonprofit marketing, serving art organizations such as the Friends of the Uffizi Gallery, Metropolitan Museum of Art and Christie’s, as well as Fortune 500 companies, including MasterCard International and The Bank of New York.

David Lawrence, a freelance writer based in South Florida, has written Florida travel books for National Geographic and Knopf/Random House, as well as feature stories for National Geographic Adventure, Writer's Digest and City & Shore magazines.


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{upfront}

Spotlight On U N S I N K A B L E | The perfume samples created by a man hoping to make his dreams come true in New York are among the personal effects included in Titanic: The Artifact Exhibition, on display through April 20 at the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium in West Palm Beach. Designed with a focus on the compelling human stories behind the headlines, the blockbuster exhibit features authentic artifacts – such as a cigar holder, toothpaste jar and even a calling card as well as china etched with the logo of the elite White Star Line – that provide a powerful link to lives abruptly ended or forever altered. Extensive room re-creations help set the stage for a journey that leads from the ship’s construction and historic launch through its sinking and on to the amazing efforts to rescue artifacts and preserve the memories of those who sailed with such high hopes.

FOR

more information call (561) 832-1988 or visit www.sfsciencecenter.org

Next Generation

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Itzhak Perlman

A

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U P | Florida Atlantic University’s student-

run/faculty-supervised record label, Hoot/Wisdom Recordings, has released the third installment in an album series featuring the talents of FAU students and alumni. More than 100 aspiring performers, producers and music industry professionals from the university’s commercial music program collaborated on the project, which features 20 talented bands, rappers and singer-songwriters. Proceeds from the sale of CompOWLation Vol. 3 will be used to fund student scholarships.

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more information

visit www.compowlation.com

B R E A T H O F F R E S H A I R | This year’s Festival of the Arts Boca will open on March 6 as Itzhak Perlman takes the stage at the Mizner Park Amphitheater to perform with the Festival Orchestra under the direction of maestro Constantine Kitsopoulos. Ten days later, operatic tenor trio Forte will bring the annual event to a rousing close on March 15. In between, audiences will be treated to a parade of entertaining and engaging performers and speakers, including jazz trumpeter Arturo Sandoval, the Bill T. Jones/Arnie Zane Dance Company, Cirque de la Symphonie, acclaimed presidential historian Doris Kearns Goodwin, actress Anna Deavere Smith and best-selling author of This Is Your Brain on Music Daniel call (561) 368-8445 Levitin. or visit www.festivalboca.org

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Outside The Box, Yet Inside The Lines C H A L K U P A N O T H E R O N E | This year, in honor of its 20th anniversary, the Lake Worth Street Painting Festival is rolling out the red carpet – with a movie theme! On February 22 and 23, the city’s streets will fill with vivid color as a cast of more than 400 artists creates vibrant images depicting scenes or characters from their favorite films. The event, which well may be the largest street painting festival in the country, draws on a proud artistic tradition that can be traced back to 16th-century Italy, where itinerant artists used their chalks to transform pavement into a makeshift canvas. As in ages past, happy crowds will gather to watch as works of art emerge on the streets of Lake Worth. The “paintings” will last only until the next rain but the lively spirit and accessibility of the exhibition are sure to inspire lasting memories.

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more information call (561) 582-4401 or visit www.streetpaintingfestivalinc.org

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Literary Devices B E T Y O U C A N ’ T R E A D J U S T O N E | It’s time for the 2014 Read Together Palm Beach County campaign! Five books have been selected as finalists for the event, organized by the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County. Vote for your favorite online or at ballot boxes located at Starbucks and other locations throughout the county by February 7. The winning title will be announced on February 24. Pages will then be turning as individuals and groups read “The Book” and discuss it in libraries, clubs, office break rooms and grocery store checkout lines as well as at a variety of special events scheduled up to and including the Read Together finale on April 9. 2014 Read Together Palm Beach County Finalists: The Language of Flowers by Vanessa Diffenbaugh The Last Runaway by Tracy Chevalier The Last Policeman by Ben Winters Life Is So Good by George Dawson and Richard Glaubman The Light Between Oceans by M. L. Stedman

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more information visit http://readtogether.palmbeachpost.com

By The Numbers A B S O L U T E L Y B L O O M I N G | The

Eissey Campus Theatre

Pan’s Garden

Delray String Quartet

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Preservation Foundation of Palm Beach has two good reasons to celebrate. Pan’s Garden, the botanical garden the organization established just one block north of Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, is celebrating its 20th anniversary this year. On top of that, the half-acre site, which features more than 300 species of trees, shrubs, grasses and wild flowers native to Florida – as well as an exquisite bronze of Pan – has been named to USA TODAY Travel’s 10 best Palm Beach County parks and attractions. Palm Beach State College’s Eissey Campus Theatre in Palm Beach Gardens is also turning 20 this year. Since the curtain first went up on March 18, 1994, the theater has presented more than 3,700 events and opened its doors to more than 100 schools and cultural, civic and governmental groups in the community. Also celebrating a birthday is the Delray String Quartet. The group’s 10th anniversary season continues through March with performances at the Colony Hotel in Delray Beach and in Fort Lauderdale.


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I Thought My Dancing Days Were Over Until The Orthopedic & Spine Program at Jupiter Medical Center Got Me Back Into The “Swing of Things.” Beth Popp led a very active lifestyle: golf, tennis, lots of outdoor activities. She was also an avid ballroom dancer. Over the years, Beth’s knee pain forced her to give up the activities she loved, including dancing. Beth knew she needed help.

“It’s a miracle! I never thought I’d be able to dance again.” –Beth Popp

She had MAKOplasty® partial knee resurfacing at the Orthopedic & Spine Center of Excellence at Jupiter Medical Center. Beth was so impressed with the care she received throughout her stay, she recommended this surgery to several of her friends. Today, Beth is pain-free and back on the dance floor. From Pre-hab to Re-hab, Nobody Does Orthopedics Better Than JMC. To learn more about our comprehensive orthopedic and spine program, visit jupitermed.com/ortho, or please call Judy Dellosa, Orthopedic & Spine Nurse Navigator, at (561) 263-3633. To find an orthopedic or spine surgeon who’s just right for you, call our Physician Referral Service at (561) 263-5737. Certified by the Joint Commission for Total Joint Replacement for Hips, Knees and Shoulders

The Anderson Family Orthopedic & Spine Center of Excellence 1210 South Old Dixie Highway, Jupiter, Florida 33458 • jupitermed.com/ortho Total Shoulder • Hip & Knee Replacement • Sports Medicine • MAKOplasty® Partial Knee Resurfacing Spine Surgery • Arthroscopic Shoulder Repair • hana® Table for Anterior Hip Replacement

So Much More Than Medicine


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The 411 On 601

Looking for information on the exhibits, events and excitement brewing at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth? We’ve got it!

Going Solo

One of the stops on last season’s Art on the Road schedule was the Holden Luntz Gallery in Palm Beach.

On the Road Again Like a pot of gold at the end of the rainbow, myriad treasures await participants in the Cultural Council’s new season of Art on the Road bus tours. These exclusive excursions are designed to bring you to art through visits to galleries, studios and other venues. The first trip of the season was scheduled to visit Artists Alley in Delray Beach’s Pineapple Grove Arts District in early January. Next up, on Feb. 18, is a Palm Beach itinerary with stops at Liman Gallery, Gallery Biba and the Jackie Rogers boutique. Finally, on March 18, participants will travel to the Boca Raton Resort & Club, a Waldorf Astoria Resort, for a private tour focused on the landmark’s history, architecture and art and a visit to the on-site Baker Sponder Gallery. Art on the Road excursions depart from the Cultural Council in Lake Worth. For details, contact Kristen Smiley in the development department at (561) 472-3342.

When the Cultural Council took up residence in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in Lake Worth, it achieved a longstanding goal: It finally had the ability to showcase local artists on a regular basis in exhibition spaces all its own. This year, the Council is presenting a busy schedule of solo exhibitions by professional artists working in a wide range of disciplines. Generously funded by the JP Morgan Chase Foundation, the exhibitions take place in the Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation Artist Resource Center. In November and December, works by artists Curtis Kelly and Judith Shah were featured. Current and upcoming exhibitions include: Deborah Stern and Joel Cohen − Jan. 11 to Feb. 8 Steve Horan and Ben Georgia − Feb. 15 to March 15 Cynthia Maronet and Barbara Macklowe − March 22 to April 19 Leora K. Stewart and Raymond Neubert − April 26 to May 24 As each new exhibition is mounted, information about the artists can be found on the Cultural Council website at www.palmbeachculture.com.

Curtis Kelly, Mobius House, 2010, oil on canvas, 36 x 48 inches

Writing a Dif ferent Story Although the average person on the street might not know it, Florida’s cultural organizations and agencies are keenly aware that state funding for the arts has declined by almost 75 percent in the past eight years. State appropriations for art and culture have dropped dramatically from $34.4 million in 2006-2007 to just $9.3 million in the current budget year. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is committed to doing what it can to reverse this trend through its advocacy efforts with local legislators and government officials in Tallahassee. This year’s legislative wish list includes the restoration of at least $16 million in funding for the Florida Department of State Division of Cultural Affairs’ key grant

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programs, which – if fully funded – would assist more than 400 cultural organizations across the state. “We urge Florida voters to get involved in advocacy and let their legislators know how they feel about support for the arts,” notes Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council. “With a concerted effort to make our feelings known, we believe that the story of state funding for art and culture in the current legislative session can have a happier ending.” For up-to-the-minute news about the status of the funding process and legislative deliberations about the state budget, visit the Florida Cultural Alliance website at www.flca.net.


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Facing Up By Christina Wood

Dalhia Patrice Perryman volunteers for a long list of organizations, including the Veterans Administration and the American Red Cross. She has tutored adults with limited literacy skills, helped to rebuild homes in St. Bernard Parish, La., after Hurricane Katrina and walked the runway in a fashion show to benefit Dress for Success of the Palm Beaches. She is a member of American Mensa and bakes a mean sweet potato pie. And she is an artist. The arts generate $249.9 million in economic activity in Palm Beach County. George Washington’s face may be on the front of those dollars but it is the face of artists like Perryman that is behind each and every one of them. “Artists in this community are nationally and internationally shown, exhibited and sold. They are published and have been on national television shows and have performed overseas. They are philanthropic, supporting causes such as AIDS, domestic violence, breast cancer, hunger and homelessness,” Perryman told a crowd of almost 200 at the recent SmARTbiz Summit in West Palm Beach, a collaboration of PNC and the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. “These are the people you should support because they are bettering your community through their artistic gifts!” Actors lure patrons to the theater – after they’ve picked their kids up from school. Photographers and potters sell their wares in studios and at street fairs. They’re also standing in the checkout line next to you at the grocery store. Perryman, a visual and performance artist whose work was featured on CBS New Sunday Morning, lives and works in West Palm Beach. At the SmARTbiz Summit, she served not only as the face of Palm Beach County artists but as their voice, performing an original poem titled “We Are the Arts” and encouraging the business and community leaders in the audience to see themselves as part of the artistic life of the community. “When you think of arts in Palm Beach County, you should not only think of local artists but yourself,” she said in a clear, vibrant voice. “It takes people from all facets of this county to impact and improve arts within our community.”

art rt works!

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WE ARE THE ARTS By Dalhia Patrice Perryman I stand here representing my countless friends; those who don’t use bullets, but who EDUCATE using paintbrushes, microphones and pens. Those who make it their personal mission to make sure that their art is deeper than…. those who see their art as an ‘artistic means to an end.’ We teach children how to drum and rhyme, Teach dance in two step time, Sell t-shirts in multiples at a time, And sisters like me… We like to put our belief systems in our rhymes. I represent those who create art shows in back alleyways, Poetry slams at coffee houses, and ‘beat battles’ at spots other folk might not… Because WE are EXTRAORDINARY! We create opportunities for the geniuses that Mensa forgot! WE ARE THE ARTS! We are published and have been on TV, We have sung on the X-Factor and have been in documentaries. We’re in Art Basel and in magazines of your choice And when we represent you, you may call us SOOOOOOOUUUUUULLLLLLL Force! We’re on boards and panels drawing epic crowds! We’re making noise in this community And we did it without having to get rowdy or loud! WE ARE PUTTING PALM BEACH ON THE MAP, AND bringing international credentials to the same! We are business minded and serious about what we do And not a single one of us takes this “calling” as a game. WE ARE THE ARTS! So the next time you encounter an artist And ask: “What is it again that you do?” How about you turn that question around and ask YOURSELF: “What kind of artist are you?” Because with ALL of the talent in the world, And maybe a golden heart that’s true Even within the heart of a thriving artistic community like this one… The reality is: There IS no ME… without YOU! WE…ARE…THE…ARTS!


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The Perfect Match Polo and Brunch

Experience the energy of world-class polo and brunch at the International Polo Club. Delicious food, champagne, celebrity sightings, music, fashion and, of course, polo. Every Sunday at 3 p.m. through April 20 The Pavilion opens at 2 p.m.

Join us at The Pavilion for the after-party from 5 p.m. to 8 p.m.

ickeet o ptions, please please visit visit InternationalPoloClub.com InternationalPoloClu ub.com or call call 561.204.5687. 56 61.204.5687. For tticket options,

33667 667 1120th 20 t h A Avenue venue South Sout h W Wellington, elling ton, Florida Florida 33414 33414

Photography by LILA PHOTO


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Creative Writing • Dance • Motion Picture Arts • Music • Theatre • Visual Arts FINE ARTS BOARDING HIGH SCHOOL Grades 9-12 Offering the highest quality artistic training combined with comprehensive college-preparatory academics.

Dance Audition Tour coming to Miami! Visit www.interlochen.org/Miami for more information or to register

SUMMER ARTS PROGRAMS Grades 3-12 The world’s premier summer arts program for aspiring artists in grades 3 through 12.

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‘Voracious Curiosity’ The Life and Times of

John Loring By Marilyn Bauer

The panoramic penthouse view of West Palm Beach pales in comparison to what lies inside the apartment. Home to designer, author, artist and connoisseur John Loring, it is filled with precious items collected throughout a lifetime. Rotund, melon-shaped Danish ceramics range across an 18thcentury Russian table of burnished wood. Photographs by Robert Mapplethorpe and Harry Benson crawl up walls and sink back into bookcase cubbyholes. An oil painting of Marie Antoinette’s sister hangs only steps away from a number of exquisite prints Loring has done during his more than 50-year career. There are other photographs, too, interspersed between Lalique lamps, Japanese porcelain and French pottery. Here Loring looks out from frames with Jackie O on a New York street, with Peggy Guggenheim in Venice, at a party with Diana Vreeland and with Paloma Picasso at the introduction of her designs at Tiffany & Co. Loring is best known for the more than 30 years he worked with Tiffany designing hundreds of items for the prestigious blue-box jeweler. He retired four years ago but continues as design director emeritus traveling the world and speaking at special events. He is leaving in less than a week for a quick trip to New York and then on to San Francisco where he will be a keynote speaker in celebrations surrounding the 50th anniversary of the Post Street store. “Every time I walk into a Tiffany store, it’s like the first time,” he says. “I never think, ‘I have done this before.’ The rush of excitement is still there.” Advertisements for his Atlas design for watches and jewelry are still running in The New York Times and Wall Street Journal and his crystal candlesticks remain best sellers three decades after they were first introduced.

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Harry Benson

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Gert Cramer, Hotel Cipriani, Venice, September 1968

 John Loring, Envy, Archival Pigment Photograph, 2012, 20 x 16 inches

 John Loring modeling a double-breasted, cotton velvet, leopard print suit from Ken Sotts' 1968 Milan collection

“What John has brought to art&culture magazine and the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County are his broad knowledge of the world, his amazing connections to a variety of people who have been helpful to the magazine and the Council, his generosity of time and talent and critical advice on design. Neither the Council nor I could ask for a better friend.” — Rena Blades, president and CEO, Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

While in New York, Loring will be meeting with his publisher Harry Abrams submitting the manuscript for an autobiography he has been working on. This will be book 24. And, it won’t be long before he leaves for Copenhagen, where he works every year on the Tivoli Gardens. Loring’s retirement is hardly retirement. He has embraced his new homes in West Palm – the downtown pied a terre and a 1920s Spanish-style cottage in Sunshine Park – encouraged support of the arts among his philanthropic connections and worked on the Tiffany and Joseph Urban shows for the Flagler Museum. He is a frequent contributor to this magazine.

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“I write,” he says, “and I try to make things happen here.” His photographs can be found at Holden Luntz Gallery and his collages at Gavlak Gallery, both on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach. “I’ve been coming to Florida since 1941,” he remembers. “Our neighbors Ruth and Eddie Arcaro, the jockey and his wife, asked my parents if they could borrow their little boy to take over to Al Capone’s house on Star Island. At two years old I was bounced on Capone’s knee. He liked having children around and my parents were thrilled to get rid of me.” Interacting with the American gangster, however, was not a watershed moment for Loring. That took place 20 years later on July 5, 1962.


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Marina Garnier

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 John Loring, On the Beach, 2011, mixed media collage on paper, 19 x 12 inches  Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis with John Loring

John Loring, No, Archival Pigment Photograph, 2013, 20 x 16 inches 

Loring had graduated from Yale in 1960 with a B.A. in English and moved to Paris to attend L’Ecole des Beaux Arts. “Suddenly I got a second college education,” he says. “I was considered uneducated even with a Yale diploma. A whole new world opened up for me – a world of literature, design, lifestyle and history.” One summer afternoon, Loring was invited to a birthday party

for the 11-year-old daughter of French architect Emile Aillaud. “It seemed like a perfectly innocuous thing to do,” he says. “Everyone was giggling about who was going to be there. I thought ‘Okay, fine.’ When we arrived there was Francoise Sagan – I had just been reading Bonjour Tristesse – and Yves St. Laurent and James Jones and John Ashbury – everybody in the world, you know. And here I was a clumsy, 22-year-old American guy.

“John Loring puts his very sophisticated design and artistic sensibilities to work in creating a kind of photographic montage that is uniquely his and compellingly fresh and energetic. He has developed an inventive way of editing a picture outside the camera and has created a body of work that is very contemporary in its feeling and full of visual surprises. “John has worked in different directions and produced an early book of his own black-and-white photography. This is a photographic essay that is an impressionistic look at a young man’s daily travels through Paris. The work is a kind of synthesis between French humanism and New York School urban photography. We love it when John brings new pictures into the gallery. They have a rare combination of visual intelligence, mixed metaphors and a street vernacular edge.” — Holden Luntz, director and principal, Holden Luntz Gallery

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"It is easy to see why John Loring is an icon. With his incredible sense of style and elegance, no one compares. As the design director emeritus of Tiffany & Co., his Atlas collection of watches designed in 1981 have become sought-after classics around the world. We first met when I photographed John for a story on Tiffany & Co. in the 1980s and have since collaborated on two books: one on the Tivoli Gardens in Copenhagen – John designs their gardens and Christmas lighting each year – and on Tiffany Style (Abrams 2008). “Although John is ever-so-adept at dodging the spotlight, his influence on Palm Beach style through his lectures on the history of art and style and his books Tiffany’s Palm Beach (Abrams 2005) and Joseph Urban (Abrams 2010) and his many feature articles for art&culture magazine shine out and influence how we see our community in a brighter light.” — Renowned Photographer Harry Benson And just wow. I thought I am really above my head here.” Charlotte Aillaud and her sister, the singer and actress Juliette Greco, took Loring under their wings. “They told me I was completely lost and adrift in life and they were going to help,” he says. “They told me to come to Sunday dinners at 10 Rue du Dragon.” What followed Loring refers to as l’Ecole du Dragon. The women gave him a list of 35 books they felt he must read and quizzed him on their contents. “They said, ‘you are insortable – you cannot be taken out in public,’” Loring remembered. “My entire life changed. If I hadn’t met Charlotte, I would be covered in tattoos and in prison.” Fifty-one years later, they are still having family dinners and Loring’s life continues to be populated by tout le monde. “I fell into a pot of gold. I never really understood why,” he says. “I asked her this year, what was it about. She said, ‘Life is like that. You were right for us at the time, and we were right for you. Your voracious curiosity impressed us. That got our attention.’” That hasn’t changed. Loring’s curiosity takes him in many directions. He bought the seven-room home in Sunshine Park in 2003 and spent the next six years fixing it up. He filled it with African textiles, 1940s French side chairs, a vintage lamp by Jean Royere, an 18th-century Indian panel mounted to the ceiling and a 1950s seahorse lamp that sits atop a streamlined teak desk. Walls are filled with his prints and paintings and those by his father and many of his friends. Loring has bought and renovated seven more bungalows, enticing friends to invest in the area. A feature on his home in Architectural Digest sealed the deal for A-list New Yorkers who have become his neighbors. “You just find every way you can to contribute to your community – whether it is restoring houses, writing about Antique Row, working on shows at the Flagler Museum or writing about how great Palm Beach County is for art&culture or other publications,” he says. “That improves the community and brings interesting people in.”

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 John Loring's sketches, dated 30 April 1994, for Tiffany “Atlas” jewelry shown with an original "Atlas" watch (1980) and travel clock.

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Round and round in Culbertson’s mind, reality chases concepts; Roger thinks it’s all in fun…

o P P

goes the next book. By Thom Smith Culbertson and Pop Wisdom, one of his mini-pop-up books.

Henry Flagler enjoying a wheelchair ride with his dog Delos on the Lake Trail, from Our Town, An In-Depth Pictorial History of Palm Beach.

FOR SIX DECADES, AMAZING IDEAS HAVE POPPED from Roger Culbertson’s head. With a twist here, a tug there, they ultimately become reality – a high-rise tree house, theatrical sound systems and especially books. His work literally pops off the page. Not the words, mind you, but the images. Culbertson is a “paper engineer.” For more than three decades, he has designed pop-up books. Some are tiny, such as the hand-sized Boy Who Cried Wolf, with a screaming urchin’s face rising from the page, mouth agape. Some aren’t. Twice Culbertson held Guinness world records for the largest pop-up book. Aesop’s Fables – 4 feet by 2½ feet, 28½ pounds – was certified in 2002. Seven years later he broke that record with The Pop-Up Story of Delray Beach: The All-American Village by the Sea – at 35 by 43 inches. (The current record, measuring a monstrous 13 by 19-plus feet, was a prop for a Belgian TV commercial.) Open the 3-D Kid and a 4-foot tall body with torso, rib cage, pelvis and internal organs pops up. Pictorial histories of Palm Beach and Delray Beach include multilayer images of the towns a century ago; a quick flip reveals how they’ve changed. Culbertson has been fascinated by the potential of paper and mechanics since childhood in Jackson, Miss., when his father, a geologist, rigged a trash can lid to rise when the cabinet

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door opened. “I thought that was a miracle,” Culbertson says. He and the neighborhood kids built an eight-story tree house and his 6-foot mobile of the number system wowed his math teachers but still most thought he would follow his mother into the newspaper business. Indeed, at Mississippi State Culbertson wrote for the college paper – but he also learned the ink-and-lead side of publishing. After college he covered sports for the Jackson Clarion-Ledger. Seeking more, he then headed to California to act and write plays. Bit parts, production work: he did it all. One memorable night he walked playwright Eugene Ionesco and his wife, Edith Piaf, to their apartment… in the rain… silently. Ionesco spoke French, Culbertson only English – but it was memorable, nonetheless. The autographed playbill hangs prominently in Culbertson’s home. Since most aspiring actors and screenwriters make livings elsewhere, Culbertson hooked up with The Los Angeles Times – in production, not writing – and was introduced to pop-up packaging. He landed a job assembling children’s books and moved on to what is now Intervisual Books, troubleshooting production problems at facilities around the globe. He began making the fixes, which led to improving the designs so they wouldn’t need fixing. Pop-up books can be traced to movables of the 13th cen-


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All photos by Thom Smith

Roger Culbertson with some of his pop-up books

tury such as Chronica Major, a book with rotating discs used to calculate holy days. Culbertson took inspiration from Lothar Meggendorfer, a 19th-century German illustrator who is considered the father of the modern pop-up. Over the years, Culbertson has worked with many at the top of their game including Jim Diaz, owner of White Heat, a pop-up operation in Santa Fe, N. M.; artist Jane McTeigue; and packager and former partner Claudia Bennett. From White Heat, Culbertson struck out on his own, forming Designimation with Bennett and moving to Philadelphia. In 1995, Philadelphia Business Journal ranked the company among the 12 fastest growing privately held companies in the area but the industry was changing. Culbertson moved Designimation to South Florida because of its proximity to Colombia, where most assembly work was being done. In 1997, he settled in Winston Trails, a Lake Worth golf community. That’s right. In addition to all his other talents, Culbertson is a decent golfer. He had won the Mississippi State Open, beating the members of the school’s golf team. If his class schedule hadn’t conflicted with practice, who knows? The move to Lake Worth allowed Culbertson and wife Linda to provide opportunities to promising young international golfers.

The whale from Pinocchio

The first was Jude Eustaquio, a student from the Philippines. He attended Cardinal Newman High School and, in 2004, was Florida’s junior golfer of the year. Ultimately, Eustaquio returned to the Philippines, which freed up a bed in the Culbertson’s house for Shosei Inokawa, a promising young Japanese golfer who attends American Heritage School in Delray Beach. Culbertson still plays golf but the pop-up business has faded. Much of the work – the tiny rivets, strings, wires – can be done only by hand, so production of even the simplest book often isn’t cost-effective. Culbertson puts out a book a year. He’s also devised a paper version of the Wright Brothers first airplane – seven pieces and no glue – plus a 36-insect mobile. And he’s found another rewarding occupation that helps pay the bills. He became a medical assistant and now supervises the office at the Outpatient Center of Boynton Beach. He makes sure patients are treated well. “I’m performing the whole time, everybody’s laughing. I make people feel good, that’s what I do and, in a sense, it’s what I’ve done my entire life,” he says. “I’ve always liked the word renaissance. That’s sort of what I am. I may not have really specialized in one significant field but I’ve done a lot of things that I enjoyed doing and that entertained other people.”

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February

Deborah Zoe Laufer’s The Last Schwartz is the story of a family on its last legs. The father has died and their Catskills home is going up for sale – providing the backdrop for a comic drama described by one critic as “rollicking, sad, shocking, goofy and thoughtful.” Presented by Parade Productions through Feb. 23. Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, Studio Theatre, 201 Plaza Real, Boca Raton; (866) 811-4111 or www.paradeproductions.org.

VSA Florida-Palm Beach County’s VSA West Festival offers 250 elementary school students with disabilities from the western communities the opportunity to participate in performances, visual art activities and a student exhibit at the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center in Belle Glade. VSA’s mission is to create an inclusive community where people with disabilities can learn through, participate in and enjoy the arts. (561) 966-7015 or www.vsapbc.com.

Paul Green and Klezmer East are back by audience demand! Enjoy exciting renditions of traditional favorites by these Klezmer masters. Dedicated to performing both traditional Klezmer classics from Europe and contemporary Jewish pieces from the U.S, Klezmer East brings pulsating energy and boundless spirit as it celebrates the heart and soul of this irrepressible genre. FAU University Theatre, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton; (800) 564-9539 or www.fauevents.com.

Let the sun shine in! The “Age of Aquarius” comes to the Crest Theatre from Feb. 14-16 with high spirits and irresistible appeal. Creating a major stir when it opened on Broadway in 1968, HAIR’s energetic and exuberant social misfits are not afraid to tell the world how they feel about everything! Delray Beach Center for the Arts, 51 N. Swinton Ave.; (561) 243-7922 or DelrayCenterForTheArts.org.

Gotta sing! Gotta dance! The Adolph and Rose Jewish Community Center brings to life the music made famous by the beloved entertainers of Hollywood and the Silver Screen. Tap your feet to the songs of Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers, Judy Garland, Gene Kelly, Kander and Ebb, Disney and more. Directed by Shari Upbin; Feb. 15-16, Zinman Hall, 21050 95th Ave. South, Boca Raton; (561) 558-2520 or www.levisjcc.org.

The 14th Annual Flagler Museum Music Series brings acclaimed classical and chamber musicians from around the world to historic Whitehall this winter. The Atos Trio, founded in 2003 by violinist Annette von Hehn, cellist Stefan Heinemeyer and pianist Thomas Hoppe, strives to convey the spirit of string quartet playing through a trio. Cocoanut Row and Whitehall Way, Palm Beach; (561) 655-2833 or www.flaglermuseum.us.

Kick up your heels with Rhythm of the Dance – the Irish dance spectacular with 22 dancers, a live band and three tenors. The National Dance Company of Ireland marries the contemporary with the ancient in a richly costumed production that’s rated as one of the most popular Irish step dance shows in the world. Eissey Campus Theatre, 11051 Campus Drive, Palm Beach Gardens; (561) 207-5900 or www.eisseycampustheatre.org.

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{upfront-calendar}

March

As Andy Warhol’s first and most glamorous superstar, as well as a lifelong intimate, Jane Holzer holds a singular role in the understanding of Warhol as a prescient artist, media star and focus of the 1960s cult of personality. This exhibition explores the rise of “Baby Jane” as an internationally known model and reveals her enduring friendship with Warhol. Feb. 2 to May 25; Norton Museum, 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach; (561) 832-5196 or www.norton.org.

The City of Palm Beach Gardens visual arts series,

Rita Price, A Windy Day

GardensArt, features Impressions and Expressions – mixed media works by Nadine Saitlin and Rita Price – from March 3 to April 3. Saitlin explores themes around “The Good Earth” using natural materials while Price shares her love of image making through painting, printmaking and monotypes. Opening reception March 8. City Hall Lobby, 10500 N. Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens; www.pbgfl.com.

New York City Ballet Principal Dancer Daniel Ulbricht, founder of Stars of American Ballet, brings his troupe to join forces with Boca Ballet Theatre to showcase top-notch choreography. Joining Ulbricht are fellow New York City Ballet dancers Megan Fairchild, Robert Fairchild, Tiler Peck, Andrew Veyette and Lauren Lovette. Countess de Hoernle Theatre, Spanish River High School, 5100 Jog Road, Boca Raton; (561) 995-0709 or www.bocaballet.org.

Florida’s best high school and college filmmakers will showcase their stuff in six film categories at the 19th annual Student Showcase of Films – a prelude to the Palm Beach International Film Festival on April 3-10. Through a juried competition, more than $10,000 in scholarships and awards are presented during a sizzling live awards show. Wold Performing Arts Center. Lynn University, Boca Raton; (561) 233-1000 or www.pbfilm.com.

A familiar figure is back on the podium as Guest Conductor James Judd leads the SYMPHONIA, Boca Raton and violin soloist Elmar Oliveira in a program featuring Barber, Serenade for Strings, op. 1; Haydn, Symphony No. 94, Surprise; and Beethoven, Violin Concerto in D major, op. 61. Roberts Theatre at Andrews Hall, Saint Andrew’s School, 3900 Jog Road, Boca Raton; (561) 376-3848 or www.bocasymphonia.org.

Violinist Rachel Barton Pine will be featured in an evening of Franck and Prokofiev sonatas along with some heartfelt lullabies from her latest CD. Pine has appeared as a soloist with many of the world’s most prestigious orchestras. Palm Beach Atlantic University Distinguished Artist Series, Helen K. Persson Recital Hall, Vera Lea Rinker Hall, 326 Acacia Road, West Palm Beach; (561) 803-2970 or www.pba.edu/das-calendar.

The sensitive poet Hoffmann would do anything to find the perfect woman but he’s so unlucky in love. Jacques Offenbach’s The Tales of Hoffman features sumptuous music and a fantastical story that are sure to make you smile through your tears. Featuring tenor Giuseppe Filianoti and baritone Mark Delavan in their Palm Beach Opera debuts. March 21-23, Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, West Palm Beach; (561) 833-7888 or www.pbopera.org.

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{upfront-calendar} Palm Beach Dramaworks’ new Dramalogue Series offers Author, Author – a conversation with Israel Horovitz, one of our most prolific, eclectic and widely produced playwrights. He’s written more than 70 plays, including Park Your Car in Harvard Yard, The Primary English Class and The Indian Wants the Bronx. He’ll be interviewed by Sheryl Flatow. Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; (561) 514-4042 or www.palmbeachdramaworks.org.

The origins of the Pop art movement and its influence

The Big Mouth, Crash (John Matos), 1984, spray paint on canvas, 70” x 124¾”

on contemporary art can be observed from Jan. 12 to April 23 in Pop Culture: Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation. Works by Andy Warhol, James Rosenquist, Roy Lichtenstein, Tom Wesselmann, Edward Ruscha, Keith Haring, Gilbert and George and others fill the Boca Museum of Art’s first floor galleries; 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton; (561) 392-2500 or www.bocamuseum.org.

Embark on a journey of philosophy, mass movements and morality in Eugene Ionesco’s classic play Rhinoceros. Over the course of three acts, the inhabitants of a small, provincial French town turn into rhinoceroses and, in the end, only one survives. Directed by Richard Gamble, the production runs from April 4-13. Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton; (800) 564-9539 or www.fauevents.com.

There is no one quite like the Doo-Wah Riders. For more than 30 years, they’ve been riding the musical range with what they describe as “high-energy country with a Cajun twist.” Their tight musicianship and powerful arrangements of classic and original songs make them audience favorites wherever they go. Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center, 1977 College Drive, Belle Glade; (561) 993-1160 or www.dollyhand.org.

The Chamber Music Society of Palm Beach concludes its inaugural season with Trio Les Amies. Carol Wincenc, flute; Cynthia Phelps, viola; and Nancy Allen, harp, perform selections by Debussy and Ravel. The society’s mission is to sponsor performances and educational programs of the highest merit, promote appreciation of chamber music and enhance cultural life. Mar-a-Lago Club, 1100 S. Ocean Blvd., Palm Beach; (561) 379-6773 or www.cmspb.org.

Bringing the Duncan Theatre’s Uncommon Grounds singer/songwriter series to a close is North Carolina-bred, New York-based singercomposer-guitarist Becca Stevens. Her intimate vocals communicate both warmth and effortless urgency, while her music draws on elements of pop, jazz and folk without being limited to the rules of any particular genre. 4200 Congress Ave., Lake Worth; (561) 868-3309 or www.duncantheatre.org.

Classical Prodigies: Mozart and More! presents works written by Mendelssohn, Schubert and Mozart in their youth. The Master Chorale of South Florida is joined by 25-year-old soprano Nadine Sierra, a Palm Beach Opera favorite and the youngest singer ever to win the Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. Wold Performing Arts Center, Lynn University, Boca Raton; (954) 418-6232 or www.MasterChoraleofSouthFlorida.org.

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Dates are subject to change. For an up-to-the-minute, searchable calendar of cultural events, please visit the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County's website at www.palmbeachculture.com. For more information about individual organizations' schedules, please visit the websites noted in each item.


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All Decked Out By David Lawrence

Designed for serious blue water fishing, American Custom Yacht’s 90’ C’est La Vie features a beautifully finished teak mezzanine with abundant seating and a soaring custom tuna tower designed by affiliate Bausch-American Towers. Photo by AMG Creative.

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“Life is too short to build ugly boats.” – Michael Rybovich

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Flow Control, American Custom Yacht’s first 58-footer, launched in 1994. Photo by AMG Creative.

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The Rybovich Superyacht Marina in West Palm Beach comfortably accommodates the 240’ Laurel. Photo courtesy of William Carroll.

The Lizzy Bee, a 54' express fisherman at cruise. Photo courtesy of Michael Rybovich.

Drawing: C’est La Vie. Image by AMG Creative.

“Life is too short to build ugly boats,” says Michael Rybovich, the grandson of John “Pop” Rybovich, who founded the iconic marine company that bears the family name. “Simplicity is the definition of excellent boat design – or any other design – as far as I’m concerned. The more complex a design, the more a boat is prone to problems with form and function.” According to Rybovich, who founded Michael Rybovich & Sons Boat Works in Palm Beach Gardens in 2010, when it comes to creating effective designs for the powerful and poised boats that navigate the waters in and around Palm Beach County, function is the catalyst. Form, he says, is generally both the challenge and the solution. Some boaters in Palm Beach County take to the water in search of fish – in the flats or the deep blue. Some are interested in getting from point A to point B. Others like to live large while on the water, relaxing in vessels that are as luxurious as their homes on land. So what makes for outstanding boat design? “It means something different to each person,” says Jim Bronstein, the former president of West Palm Beach-based Rybovich. “But for me, it means a boat has a natural look. Some designs

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are chunky or choppy and not well thought through. You need form and function – inside and outside the boat – to match up.” From the waterline up, Rybovich’s design has evolved since the 1950s with subtle changes in the rake of the stem, shear break and deckhouse windshield as well as the shape of the windows. “The bottom design has been the object of much more experimentation and modification to accommodate the ever-increasing speeds from available horsepower,” Michael Rybovich says. “The challenge is getting a boat to safely ride well in rough water while running at 30 to 40 knots.” “It needs to float right, not shake and rattle. It needs to make its range but the form is also important,” says Francois van Well, vice president of business development at Rybovich and a naval architect by education. “A boat has an aesthetic nature. Some people want a high-end, expensive yacht with a design statement that is unique.” Some people like to be in the sun and some don’t. Some like to be close to the water and some don’t. “The excellence is in understanding the customer and how they want to use the boat.” While at the helm of Rybovich, which at the time included a


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A pair of 78' flybridge sport fishermen recently crafted by Michael Rybovich & Sons Boat Works. Photo courtesy of Michael Rybovich.

Docked at the Sailfish Marina on Singer Island, C’est La Vie features a spacious salon upholstered by American Canvas and Interiors. Photo by AMG Creative.

marina, ship manufacturing and related industries, Bronstein worked with a number of notable clients. Most had a good idea of the design they wanted. “I did a whole boat design with Jimmy Buffet,” he says. “We introduced the concept of a walk-around sportfish boat that has now become pretty prevalent among many builders.” The creative process was a back-and-forth between the singer, an avid bluewater angler with a home in the Town of Palm Beach, and Bronstein’s team. Rybovich was known for pioneering sportfishermen in cold-molded wood. Through a united vision, they created the Rybovich 42 Express Walkaround – “The Margaritavich” – which was built of a fiberglass/foam composite. “Some boats are so luxurious that it’s almost like they should not be used,” Bronstein says. “For me, function is important. I like walk-around decks so you don’t have to go through the boat. That’s good design.” For Dominick LaCombe, president of American Custom Yachts, “Excellence in design in boatbuilding is based upon creating a formula that achieves outstanding performance while presenting a unique and highly aesthetic appeal.” ACY makes custom lightweight sportfishing yachts that are built by hand,

Albury Brothers 27 runs home after a successful day out on the fishing grounds. Photo courtesy of Albury Brothers

blending traditional cold-molded wooden boat-building techniques with ultra-light materials used in the aerospace industry. “In the world of custom boat building, form and function go hand in hand throughout the entire design and build process,” LaCombe says. “If the form of the hull is correct and well balanced, the vessel will function properly on the water. A vessel’s architecture should also be based on function, yet finished so that it is pleasing to the eye.” Jeff Lichterman, the owner of Albury Brothers Boats, which has a store in Riviera Beach, enjoys clean, simple designs. His company specializes in Bahamian skiffs, which in the 1950s were built of wood in the islands. In 1984, the company switched to fiberglass hulls. Nowadays, according to the Jupiter resident, Albury Brothers builds up to two dozen boats per year; all are semicustomized and built to order. “Our boats today follow the originals,” Lichterman says. “The magic is in that rounded bottom. It gives a soft ride. Other boats have hard edges – very angular bottoms with very hard edges – but ours are like porpoises going through water. A porpoise doesn’t have hard edges, so why should a boat?”

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the

Florida room By Joseph Pubillones

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Slip-covered furniture lends an elegant air to this Florida room by Stephen Mooney. The contrast of dark woods and sea-grass carpeting against mango-colored walls evokes the feel of a British Colonial lounge. Photo ŠKim Sargent


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My Grandfather always loved to sit in the Florida room to smoke his Cuban cigar, play dominoes with his friends and wait for my Grandmother to bring him his cafecito. Growing up, I would often hover around him after school playing some game, adjusting the antenna on the TV so I could watch Gilliganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

Island and, occasionally, even eavesdropping on the adultsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; conversations.

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 Allan Reyesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Florida room filters the sunlight with simple sheer treatments that dapple the room with light. Set among lush greenery, select pieces of painted furniture make the perfect transition between indoor and outdoor. Aptly placed by the window, the chaise longue makes for an inviting reading or napping nook.

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During holidays and family gatherings, our Florida room served as the location for the kids’ table and, as soon as the meal was over, it became the dance floor for dancing cha-cha-cha, danzones and the occasional slow boleros that made us kids scramble for cover for fear of having to dance with one of the elders. Memories like this inspired me, as an architect and interior designer, to investigate the development and décor of the Florida Room as guest curator for the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s exhibition Interior Design: The Florida Room. Palm Beach County is home to some of the most accomplished designers in the country, partly due to the affluence of the area and partly due to the whimsy inspired by the tropics. The exhibition, which opens Jan. 31, will feature the work of nine of them. They will interpret their ideas of what a Florida room should be and will demonstrate how a design professional develops a room – from an inspirational concept to design presentation and, finally, to the installation. A total of eight vignettes will be created in the Council’s galleries.

A Practical Foundation Florida architecture of the 1920s through the 1940s – in its many incarnations, from Mediterranean Revival to Mission to Monterey – embraced the concept of indoor-outdoor rooms. Architecturally, these spaces developed for the purpose of relaxation and relief and, during the summer months, sometimes even for sleeping. Some bear common names, such as patio, porch or stoop; others have exotic names that evoke an air of architectural sophistication, such as loggia, lanai, veranda, gallery and even piazza. In the days before air conditioning, these areas provided a necessary escape from the oppressive Florida heat. In order to control and mitigate bugs and other earthly creatures, these areas were generally screened or louvered. Furnishings and decorations were very light and informal; they could easily be brought in after an extended absence or packed up at the end of a season. Typical décor included wicker and iron furniture with cushions in brightly printed and striped fabrics. From the 1950s through 1970s, European-inspired architecture from another age was replaced with more modern, streamlined architecture throughout the United States. This post-war architecture was simpler and more economical than its predecessors. Its poster child was the ranch house. Styles ranged from the traditional

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Interior Design: The Florida Room on display Jan. 31 through March 29 at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth Guest Curator: Joseph Pubillones Joseph Pubillones Interiors, Palm Beach Syndicated columnist for Creators Syndicate and adjunct professor at Palm Beach State College Participating Designers: Stephen Mooney Susan Morgan Frank Randolph Allan Reyes Angela Reynold Nickie Siegel / Judy Weiss Gil Walsh William Wright Exhibition Sponsors: Stark Carpet Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Custom Cakes and More The exhibition is open to the public free of charge from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. Feb. 11 and March 11 at 3 p.m. Some of the talented designers included in the exhibition will discuss the subjects and themes broached in their work at a pair of lectures at the Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s headquarters in Lake Worth. For information, call (561) 471-2901 or visit www.palmbeachculture.com.

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colonial-influenced ranch faced with brick and extended eaves to exotic Polynesian styles faced with rocks and exposed timber rafters. Many incorporated the idea of an indoor-outdoor room. With the advent of cooling systems, some of these porches were used less and less. Over time, many have been transformed. Screened openings were replaced with windows and doors as these spaces become a part of the interior of a house.

Shedding More Light In Florida, where the weather is a blessing almost six months out of the year, this indoor-outdoor area gained so much popularity during the 1950s and ’60s that it gave way to a distinct architectural-type of space – the Florida room, a unique living space that takes advantage of natural sunlight year round while being protected from the elements. Sleeping porches served as a springboard for many Florida rooms, which became larger. With space to breathe, the Florida room soon turned out to be the favored place for casual entertaining, relegating the living room to a merely ceremonial role. Bamboo and painted-wood furniture became all the rage, as did the chaise longue and free-standing bars. What began as a fad has evolved into a staple of Florida casual furniture. Today, Florida rooms can be quite elaborate. Furniture designs have also taken a turn. Stephen Mooney, one of the nine designers we have brought together to create the exhibition Interior Design: The Florida Room for the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, once said that his major achievement lies in creating the ultimate luxury for his clients: comfort. Educated at the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design, Mooney lists the legendary Mario Buatta and Billy Baldwin – a favorite of Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis – among his influences. Another of the designers featured in the exhibition, Allan Reyes, believes design should be beautiful, appropriate and original. Influenced by Swedish Classicism, his work aims for clean, quiet and correct. But, while times have changed, I still have to agree with my abuelo; there is nothing more comfortable than having a favorite room to read, relax and even take a nap in. I love to come home, kick off my shoes and head to my Florida room to sip some iced tea or, better yet, a cocktail. Make mine a mojito.

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Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Jeweler

A selection of vintage gold and diamond jewelry from David Webb Ca. 1970s. Courtesy Richters of Palm Beach

Celebrated Jewelry Designer David Webb Made an Indelible Mark on Palm Beach By Frederic A. Sharf

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A rare collection of vintage enamel and gemstone animal bracelets by David Webb. Courtesy Richters of Palm Beach

Editor’s Note: The work and career of jewelry designer David Webb is being highlighted in a new exhibition organized by the Norton Museum of Art (see sidebar). In this article, regular art&culture contributor Frederic A. Sharf examines the sequence of events that led to the

introduction of Webb’s spectacular jewelry – and, ultimately, of Webb himself – to Palm Beach County half a century ago.

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Coral Seahorse Brooch (1966), made of carved coral, circular-cut diamonds, Cabochon emeralds, platinum and gold. Photo by Ilan Rubin.

David Webb was a well-known New York jeweler long before he became a presence in Palm Beach. Born in Asheville, N.C. in 1925, Webb went to New York in 1942 to apprentice in the jewelry trade. In 1948, he opened his own shop on 47th Street. For the next dozen years, he designed and manufactured jewelry for department stores and a handful of individual clients. In the 1950s, Webbâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s jewelry attracted the attention of George William Headley III. Headley came from a wealthy family that had subsidized his interest in becoming an artist. In 1930, Headley selected jewelry design as the branch of the arts for which he was best suited and apprenticed himself to Paul Flato in New York. Later in the 1930s he moved to Los Angeles, where he met Hollywood stars and movie moguls

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An actual seashell was used as the model for Webb's Emerald and Diamond Shell Brooch. Photo by Ilan Rubin.

while working for Laykin et Cie. In 1949, Headley gave up jewelry design and moved to the family farm in Lexington, Ky. However, he continued to receive commissions from his Hollywood friends. He would create designs and send them to David Webb in New York to be executed. In addition Headley began to create jeweled objects, known as bibelots. In December 1960, Headley married the socialite Barbara Whitney. They began to spend winter months in Palm Beach beginning with the 1961 season. Headley discovered that many fashionable Palm Beach women wore jewelry created by David Webb. He sensed there was a business that could succeed in Palm Beach by combining his interest in bibelots with Webbâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s jewelry. All he would need was a location on Worth Avenue.


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This face of this Elephant Brooch (1960s) is made out of pearl, accentuated by small emerald eyes; the headpiece consists of a large carved emerald and diamonds. Photo by Ilan Rubin.

A Palm Beach Foothold In the fall of 1962, Headley approached Florence Lustig, who operated a stylish boutique for women at 200 Worth Ave. Lustig was both a designer of couture clothing and a retailer of upscale ladies’ clothing. Her flagship shop was on 57th Street in New York and she also had a shop in Miami. Lustig decided to lease the adjacent space on Worth Avenue to enlarge her own shop and create space to house Headley’s venture. Early in 1963, Headley’s idea became reality with the announcement that on Jan. 25 the Headley-Webb Jewel Boutique would open in space adjoining the Lustig boutique. The boutique

The center of this exquisite Heraldic Maltese Cross Coral Brooch (1964) is made out of Cabochon green onyx, circular-cut diamonds and sapphires. Photo by Ilan Rubin.

would be furnished with French and Italian antiques, providing a stunning backdrop for Webb’s jewelry, which was featured alongside Headley‘s jeweled objects. In addition, women could order jewelry made to order from designs presented at the shop. The shop was a great success. On Feb. 18, the Palm Beach Daily News noted, “Headley-Webb Jewel Boutique is one of the most inviting places in town. Exquisite jewelry designed by David Webb and fantasies in jeweled bibelots by George Headley are attracting wide attention.” The same article mentioned that Webb had designed six sets of coral jewelry to be worn by six “leaders of society“ at the St. Mary‘s Hospital Jubilee Ball on March 7 at the Everglades Club. Headley wasn’t yet content. He persuaded James Russell –

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A collection of vintage black enamel and diamond cuffs by David Webb. Courtesy Richters of Palm Beach

Be Dazzled David Webb was a jewelry designer whose work was realized with technical mastery. Viewed as a high-society figure, his clientele included Jacqueline Kennedy, Doris Duke and Diana Vreeland. Some 80 extraordinary examples of his work, including necklaces, rings and other pieces rendered in hammered gold, jade, coral, enamel and precious stones, are on display at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach through April 13.

The exhibition – David Webb: Society’s Jeweler – also features preparatory drawings and special displays that offer behind-the-scenes perspectives on the making of Webb’s jewelry. Artworks, photographs, publications and advertisements in the exhibition, which was organized by the Norton, will place Webb in the context of the visual culture of the 1960s. For additional information, call (561) 832-5196 or visit www.norton.org. David Webb jewelry can be found at Richters of Palm Beach.

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Three rare coral and gemstone “chimera” bracelets by David Webb. Courtesy Richters of Palm Beach

who had been with Cartier for 16 years – to become associated with the boutique. Russell, who had managed the Cartier shop on Worth Avenue from 1957 to 1962, knew that the key to sales success lay in the combination of society ladies and the numerous benefit balls. During the season there was a succession of such events. These events were photographed and the photos published in weekly glossy magazines. It was important for the social leaders to be seen wearing Webb‘s pieces!

David Webb Pays a Visit It is unlikely that Webb came to Palm Beach during the 1963 season, as he was busy opening his own retail establishment in the best location in New York – No. 7 East 57th St. Just a few doors down, his neighbors were Tiffany on one corner of 57th and 5th Avenue, and Van Cleef & Arpels on another corner. The Headley-Webb Jewel Boutique in Palm Beach was very much Headley’s creation. It was successful enough in the 1963 season to prompt Headley to lease his own space at 240 Worth

Ave. for the 1964 season. The local newspaper described the boutique as a jewelry studio. The entrance door was spanned with a metal grill. Customers could only enter when the door was unlocked from the inside by the studio manager, Loren Lamb. Webb himself made his first visit to Palm Beach in February 1964. He had designed special colorful items for the store, “combining brilliantly colored gems with diamonds in matched sets which he made especially for this studio,” according to local news accounts. When the Palm Beach Daily News presented a roundup of what had been a busy, glamorous social season, Webb and Headley warranted special mention. Webb was now officially launched in Palm Beach. The next season, he opened his own shop in yet another location – at 215 Worth Ave. Although Webb died in 1975, his partners continued to conduct business in the shop that carried his name for several more years. Today, the beauty of the jewelry he created and the elegance of his designs live on – not only for long-time patrons of his art in our area, but for new generations of admirers around the world.

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ArtPalmBeach kicks off a season of international art shows at the Palm Beach County Convention Center.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Show Time The Palm Beach County Convention Center is set to host four major art shows that stimulate economic and artistic activity. By Amy Woods

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This winter, more than 50,000 art aficionados, collectors, dealers and designers will wander through the transformed halls of the Palm Beach County Convention Center â&#x20AC;&#x201C; which is celebrating its 10th anniversary this year â&#x20AC;&#x201C; in search of something beautiful at a powerhouse quartet of international art shows, including ArtPalmBeach, the American International Fine Art Fair, the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique 312 Clematis Street will provide a setting for one of many Art Synergy events.

Show and the Palm Beach Fine Craft Show.

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312 Clematis St. (left and center) and the Boynton Beach Art District (right) are among the diverse locations hosting Art Synergy events.

“Four shows back-to-back-to-back really have put West Palm Beach on the map,” says Dave Anderson, general manager of the convention center. “I don’t know how many people I run into when it comes to be November and December who will say to me, ‘I can’t wait for your art shows.’“ This year, ArtPalmBeach will feature more than 80 international galleries offering some of the most influential modern works on the market. The American International Fine Art Fair seeks to differentiate itself by selecting dealers who bring an element of culture for visitors to experience. The Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show always partners with a charitable organization; this year the Hope for Depression Research Foundation will benefit from a silent auction of items from participating exhibitors. The Palm Beach Fine Craft Show specializes in contemporary American art and design presented in a sophisticated format. The convention center’s four-course menu of fairs may have catapulted the county onto the world scene but it is the local economy that reaps the rewards. An estimated one million patrons have passed through the convention center’s doors and spread out across its 100,000 square feet of exhibition space

since the shows debuted there in 2004, bringing a beautiful bounty to the hotel industry, rental car business, retailers and restaurants – as well as the artists and dealers who capture the attention of a sophisticated audience of buyers and collectors. “I couldn’t even put a number on the dollar amount of business that has transpired on that floor over the past 10 years,” Anderson says. “We have really brought the buyers and the sellers together. That kind of impact is almost immeasurable, to be honest.” The introduction of a new initiative called Art Synergy will stimulate even more economic activity and interest in the area. Each night from January 23 through 27, exhibitions and other events will be held in art districts across the county. “It’s a great step,“ Anderson says. “We’ll always have people looking specifically in the building but it’s nice that after the event, they’re going to be going to these areas.“ Art Synergy aims to spread the message that art lives not only within the 100,000-square-foot hall on Okeechobee Boulevard but beyond it. Art lives around the corner. Art lives down the block. Art lives in cities and suburbs and on streets and avenues. It lives on Industrial Avenue in Boynton Beach and on Lucerne

The American International Fine Art Fair, now in its 18th season in Palm Beach County, offers a luxurious cultural experience that attracts discerning collectors.

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ArtPalmBeach

Avenue in Lake Worth. It lives on South Dixie Highway and Clematis Street in West Palm Beach. It lives in Northwood Village and it lives on the island of Palm Beach. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County acted as an incubator for the project and provided funding and marketing support. Artists Rolando Barrero, Frank Batista and Craig McInnis formed a think tank dedicated to providing a forum for other artists to come together, discuss ideas and help the local arts scene grow. The result is a lively lineup of events for art lovers organized by artists. Lee Ann Lester, founder and organizer of International Fine Art Expositions, producer of both ArtPalmBeach and the American International Fine Art Fair, is supporting the movement. “In order to have an educated public about art and culture, it has to become part of everyday living,” she says. “They have to have continuous exposure. That’s why I came up with the motto ‘art lives here.’ Having galleries within blocks of these people’s homes, it’s critical that they be exposed to the arts.” The quest to promote the diversity and vibrancy of the local arts scene has resulted in an array of activities that will test the

ArtPalmBeach

Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show

bounds of creativity. “We went through a number of names and I think Art Synergy created this branding so that events could continue throughout the year, not just during the fair,” Lester says. “My premise was, ‘Where does art live?’ It’s not something that only lives in the Kravis Center. It’s something that lives everywhere.” Northwood Village gallerist Freddy Hennevelt and a consortium of artists in the historic neighborhood spent months planning their Art Synergy event – Art X – with the aim of entertaining attendees with open houses, hands-on demonstrations, music, appetizers and drinks. “As an art gallery owner, you can’t sit in the back and wait for people to come in,” Hennevelt says. “You have to be active. Art Synergy is perfect for us. Our main goal is to make Northwood Village an historic art district that is known within the county – and outside.” McInnis, an illustrator, organized downtown West Palm Beach’s Art Synergy event, Continuum. The celebration will turn the building at 312 Clematis St. into a hub of inventive sights and sounds. “We’re hoping it sets a precedent,” McInnis says. “The underlying goal is success for everybody involved. This is our little flagship this year and we’re going to build on it if we can. I’m excited to see what happens.”

Three to get ready and FOUR to GO The Palm Beach County Convention Center is the place to be this winter as art lovers convene for a quartet of world-class shows. ArtPalmBeach January 23-27 A menagerie of glass, metal, wood, ceramics, photography and modern and emerging art. With nightly Art Synergy events at locations throughout the county. www.artpalmbeach.com American International Fine Art Fair February 4-9 Featuring fine art, antiquities, tribal objects and the works of old and contemporary masters. www.aifaf.com

Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show February 14-18 A display of the collections of more than 180 renowned international art dealers. www.palmbeachshow.com Palm Beach Fine Craft Show February 28-March 2 Specializing in carved, decorative, fiber and wood-turned works. www.craftsamericashows.com

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Scroll with calligraphy in the Morikamiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Japanese Tea Ceremony Room that says, Wa Kei Sei Jaku (Harmony, Respect, Purity and Tranquility), by Sen S sa (b. 1938), Heisei Period, 1993, Collection of Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens

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Beautiful Letters by Jenifer Mangione Vogt

When people think of calligraphy, images of elegant wedding invitations often come to mind. Calligraphy, however, is an expressive art form with roots dating as far back as ancient Egypt, where examples are evident in Book of the Dead scrolls made between 1550 and 50 BCE.

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Two works by Alexandru Macovei: (L) from The Grand Inquisitor, 2013; (R) from Evangelia.

“Long Life” Japanese Calligraphy

Comprising pictures and letters, calligraphy is an interwoven blend of artistic and literal expression. The term is derived from two Greek words, kallos, which means “beautiful,” and graphe, which means “writing.” In Muslim cultures, calligraphy is considered such a high and pure form of religious expression that it’s al-

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most granted divine status. It’s also omnipresent as decorative elements on buildings and in all forms of artistic expression. Even the Al Jazeera media company’s logo is based on calligraphy. Calligraphy is also revered in both China and Japan. Striking examples of Japanese calligraphy can be found on view at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach. Works of Chinese calligraphy are included in the collection of the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach and are displayed on a rotating basis. Recently, the museum featured Yinli, Prince Guo, 1717, (China, Qing dynasty) as its work-of-the-month. As part of its annual Chinese Moon Festival, the Norton has also offered calligraphy classes in the past. “In China, there are three art forms that are known as the Three Perfections: painting, poetry and calligraphy,” says Laurie Barnes, the Norton’s Elizabeth B. McGraw Curator of Chinese Art. The art form, she says, has endured because of its beauty and ability to convey both thought and emotion. “Every cultured person in China practices calligraphy as a form of self-cultivation and expression.” “In Japan, everyone studies calligraphy,” says Veljko Dujin,


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Calligraphy in the County THE NORTON MUSEUM OF ART 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach, www.norton.org Calligraphy appears in works that are on view in the Four Princely Gentlemen exhibition, which is on display through January 26. THE MORIKAMI MUSEUM AND JAPANESE GARDENS 4000 Morikami Park Road, Delray Beach, www.morikami.org. Many works that contain calligraphy are on display at the museum, which will be hosting calligraphy workshops for children and adults in the spring. The Morikami’s library also contains reference materials pertaining to Japanese calligraphy. THE JAFFE CENTER FOR BOOK ARTS Wimberly Library, Room 350 Florida Atlantic University, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton www.library.fau.edu/depts/spc/JaffeCenter/ The center’s unique collection includes a small selection of artistic books that feature calligraphy as well as some select resource materials.

“Mazel Tov” Jewish Calligraphy

THE SOUTH FLORIDA CALLIGRAPHY GUILD southfloridacalligraphyguild.org This organization is dedicated to originating, supporting and promoting activities and communication in the field of calligraphy and the related arts.  Calligraphy classes at the Norton Museum of Art

“Without a beautiful letter there’s no book, without a beautiful book there is no culture.” – Villu Toots (Russian calligraphy artist) the Morikami’s curator of collections. “It’s a revered form of expression.” Dujin cares for and documents thousands of works in the Morikami’s collection, many of which contain calligraphy. “These are often family heirlooms that are only taken out and displayed on special occasions.” Caring for and displaying the museum’s collection of delicate scrolls adorned with calligraphy could be considered an art form itself. Dujin uses white gloves and a gentle touch when removing scrolls from the fragile wooden boxes in which they are stored. “They are mounted on silk and with elegant paper, but the person doesn’t choose the fabric or paper. They take it to an artisan who decides what will look best,” Dujin explains, adding, “Calligraphy is often done by a Buddhist priest and requested of him to mark a special occasion.”

Contemporary artists also find calligraphy to be a beautifully expressive medium. Alexandru Macovei is a skilled calligrapher who uses it to accentuate his painted works. The West Palm Beach resident, who was born in Moldova in Eastern Europe, trained extensively with masters of Japanese and Chinese calligraphy and, while this influences his work, he’s also made it his own. “Japanese and Chinese have a similar free style and concept but I’ve kept a unique European style that allowed me to define a symbiosis between Latin and Slavic languages,” he says. As Macovei’s work illustrates, all calligraphy is marked by the personality of the artist. Just as painter Franz Kline’s black-andwhite paintings are immediately recognizable, so, too, are the distinctive styles of noted calligraphers. “It’s like a fingerprint,” Dujin says. “Each artist makes it personal.” Both the visual impressions and the words – often proverbs or famous sayings – are what identify the calligrapher. “Calligraphy art is a correlation between text and image,” Macovei explains. “What identifies me is the harmony between the written text and the images created.”

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Miami City Ballet dancers in the company premiere of West Side Story Suite. Photo by: Gio Alma

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The Best Is Yet To Be New works in the performing arts have something to say By Christina Wood

T

chaikovsky’s Swan Lake failed to take flight when it debuted in 1877. In 1944, an unknown playwright named Tennessee Williams waited nervously to see how audiences in Chicago would respond to the premiere of The Glass Menagerie. “When Stravinsky’s Rite of Spring was introduced in the 1930s, people rioted and threw tomatoes,” says Jeffrey Kaye, artistic director of The Symphonia, Boca Raton. “Twenty years later it was standard repertoire.”

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The greatest challenge associated with presenting new work in the performing arts lies in the unknown. Following a novice playwright, choreographer or composer into unfamiliar territory is an act of courage – not only for artistic directors and arts administrators but for audiences as well. Those who bravely set forth, however, might discover rare treasure on the journey. After all, Beethoven, Shakespeare and Balanchine were all emerging artists at one time.

New Again

Gio Alma

Miami City Ballet dancers Chase Swatosh and Emily Bromberg in Polyphonia.

Casablanca with The Symphonia, Boca Raton

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Of course, the very definition of “new” can be relative. The stage version of John Steinbeck’s Of Mice and Men premiered on Broadway in 1937. For Palm Beach County students who saw a recent production of the play at Palm Beach Dramaworks in West Palm Beach, the show was brand new. The classics are classics for a reason. It’s not just the beauty of Shakespeare’s language; it’s his ability to tap into timeless themes that touches us. Handel’s Messiah continues to fill hearts with hope. Oscar Wilde still makes us laugh. Lourdes Lopez, artistic director for Miami City Ballet, never tires of Swan Lake or Giselle, icons of the classical ballet repertoire that speak clearly and powerfully across the distance of time and space, but she loves sitting in a theater watching the curtain rise on a new work, not knowing what will happen next. New work – whether a company premiere or a newly commissioned piece – challenges dancers to excel. “It pushes a dancer’s limits,” Lopez says. “It forces them to grow, it forces them to look at themselves differently, to move differently, to think differently or react differently.” And, she says, “I think the same is true of audiences.” Lopez has included four company premieres in Miami City Ballet’s 2013-14 season for a reason. “I want people to stop thinking of a ballet company as tutus and tiaras,” she says. The oldfashioned notion doesn’t do justice to a generation of dancers who can be as athletic, intelligent and sexy as they are graceful. “A ballet company should be an organization that uses dance to express what’s happening in society,” Lopez says. “You cannot continue to do the same ballets over and over and over again. As society changes, the arts have to change along with it.” “Plays are our opportunity to express the social, moral and political issues of our times,” says William Hayes, producing artistic director at Palm Beach Dramaworks. “You want to change the way people see the world,” says Andrew Kato, producing artistic director at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, which offers a program called the Emerging Artists Series in


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Musical Theater Playwrighting, leaving the “but” at the end of his sentence unspoken. Practical challenges abound. In the world of musical theater it can take upwards of 10 years to develop a show. Why go to such lengths? “Because the end result is glorious,” he says. “It’s like no other.”

Art speaks to us. It can also speak for us – whether you believe that art is a reflection of society or take the more muscular approach favored by Bertholt Brecht, who said, “Art is not a mirror to hold up to society but a hammer with which to shape it.” Much of our knowledge of ancient civilizations comes from the art they left behind. Each masterpiece is a snapshot. The shining moments from lives once lived are preserved in music and marble, brushstrokes and finely turned phrases, much like images in a photo album. Someone else’s photo album. “If we don’t look to the past, absorb it, learn from it and then move forward, then we’re just standing still,” Kaye says. “You have to be championing newer work.” Kaye relishes the challenge but understands that audiences may be slow to embrace unfamiliar melodies, especially in the world of classical music where the concept of “new work” often refers to 20th-century compositions. “I think you just have to present it in a way that’s balanced,” he says. Shostakovich followed by Schubert; Barber as a prelude to Beethoven. “I think the program has to be varied to keep people’s interest these days.” Variety and balance go beyond giving The Symphonia’s audience what Kaye likens to a serving of vegetables along with the hearty steak they’ve come to expect. “Between 50inch flat screen TVs, computers, smart phones and iPads, everyone’s expecting to hear more, see more, have more information,” he says. In response, The Symphonia is experimenting with ways to present work in new ways; performing music from movies such as The Wizard of Oz and Casablanca live in front of the big screen and partnering with Boca Ballet Theatre to incorporate dance and scenery into a concert scheduled for March.

Amy Pasquantonio

Singing a Different Tune

The cast of The Longing and the Short of It rehearse with the show’s composer-lyricist Daniel Maté at the Arts Garage.

Curtain Up “We’re on the cusp of a really interesting time because the delivery system for entertainment is changing,” says Lou Tyrrell, artistic director at Theatre at Arts Garage in Delray Beach, which

Constantine Kitsopoulos leads The Symphonia, Boca Raton.

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A staged reading at Palm Beach Dramaworks.

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Jeffrey Kaye

Miami City Ballet dancers Jeanette Delgado and Renan Cerdeiro in the company premiere of JardĂ­ Tancat.

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Casablanca with The Symphonia, Boca Raton

specializes in presenting new work. When it comes to the future of live performance art, he sees cause for hope in the 20- and 30somethings who are as passionate about theater today as he was at their age. “They’ll find their own way,” he predicts. “They’ll be less traditional. There will be more hole-in-the-wall kind of operations – not unlike the Arts Garage, perhaps – where they’re doing really good work at really small venues, with a hundred people in the audience, tops.” In the meantime, existing arts organizations with significantly more seats to fill must adapt. “The big challenge today is developing a new audience for new work,” Tyrrell says. In an era of self-proclaimed social media critics, contemporary audiences have been conditioned to view shows as either a hit or a flop, with no gray area in between. He encourages audience members to take a different approach. Was there a moment in the play, a character, a relationship, that might have touched them? Were the costumes stunning? Did the scenic elements help transport them to another world? He also thinks it’s important to think about what didn’t work. “You learn so much more in life from mistakes and from failures

than you do from your successes,” he says. “It should be viewed the same way in the theater – or with any art form.” “It’s truly not about whether one likes it or not,” Lopez adds. “It’s about experiences and it’s about knowledge and information and it’s about growing but it’s also about establishing a voice and an opinion.” You might love George Balanchine’s Episodes after seeing it for the first time at the Kravis Center in West Palm Beach, when Miami City Ballet presents a company premiere of the piece Feb. 28 through March 2. Or you might hate it. Either way, it will have touched you. Moved you. Possibly changed you. All for the price of a ticket.

You Never Forget your First Time Find out what new work in the performing arts has to say to you. Visit the events calendar at www.palmbeachculture.com for performance dates and times across Palm Beach County.

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a&caccommodations We wish to thank the following hotels and resorts for their support and assistance in providing art&culture magazine to you, as they assist us in our mission of sharing our diverse cultural landscape for your enjoyment. From theater and dance to museums and galleries, Palm Beach County is Florida’s Cultural Capital®.

800.863.2819 www.pgaresort.com

(561) 659-5800 www.ChesterfieldPB.com

561.340.1700 3800 North Ocean Drive Riviera Beach, FL 33404

Historic Inn & Restaurant

280 Sunset Avenue, Palm Beach 561/832-7050 | 800/822-4116 www.bradleyparkhotel.com info@bradleyparkhotel.com

(561) 655-7740 www.TheBrazilianCourt.com

106 S. Swinton Ave. Delray Beach, FL

561.272.5678 sundyhouse.com

INDULGE TRANSFORM EXPLORE PLAY Your getaway by the sea awaits! On-site dining, tropical pool, full-service spa and more! Located near boutiques, outdoor cafés, art galleries and nightlife!

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561-274-3200 | 877-389-0169 www.delraybeachmarriott.com


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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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cultural council news

Representing the new SmARTBiz grantees were (front row, from left) Pam Miller, Beth Clark, Edith Bush, Bonnie White LeMay; (back row, from left) Andrew Aiken, Lew Crampton, Bryan DeFrances, Les Deck, John Blades, Alan Sistrunk and Daniel Biaggi

SmARTBiz Summit 2013 Brings Business and Arts Communities Together In order to strengthen the connections between cultural organizations and the business community, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County hosted its third annual SmARTBiz Summit on December 10 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center. More than 190 people attended the daylong event, which was presented in collaboration with the PNC Foundation. “Arts and cultural organizations make up a significant number of the jobs in Palm Beach County,” said Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades., “As one of the largest producers of jobs, it benefits our community to make sure the arts thrive so the economy of Palm Beach County thrives.” SmARTBiz encompassed a diverse and dynamic agenda that began in the morning with a wide-ranging conversation with William I. Koch, CEO of Oxbow Carbon LLC, who discussed his personal philanthropic vision and his views on how businesses and the arts relate in an interview conducted by Blades. The afternoon session featured writer and consultant Andy Goodman, director of the

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Cara Young from Young Singers of the Palm Beaches gave a stellar performance.

Goodman Center, who talked about the role that effective storytelling plays in helping good causes reach more people. In between, participants were treated to a stirring musical performance by Cara Young from Young Singers of the Palm Beaches, poetry by Dalhia Perryman and comedy from the Jove Comedy Experience, featuring Frank Licari and Jesse Furman. Workshops and roundtable discussions included:  How to Minimize Your Organization’s Risk, CEO Roundtable presented by James F. Crystal of Crystal & Company  What’s Your Story? Creating Promo Videos with Impact, presented by Page Turner Productions  How to Prepare Your Organization to Start an Endowment, presented by Vaughn Yeager, senior vice president of PNC Bank  What Keeps You Up at Night?, CEO Roundtable moderated by Rena Blades  Cause for Change: How Millennials Connect, Involve, Give, presented by Derrick Feldmann, CEO of Achieve  Financial Wellness, presented by Marlon White and Steve Simmers, vice presidents of business banking with PNC Bank


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cultural council news

Andy Goodman, Rena Blades and James Crystal

Cultural Council Board Chair Bert Korman and Craig Grant

William I. Koch was interviewed by Rena Blades.

Also during the event, the recipients of the 2013 SmARTBiz grants were announced. Together, these organizations received a total of $54,448 in grants to help with a variety of capacity-building initiatives. The grantees included:  Center for Creative Education  Delray Beach Center for the Arts  Delray Beach Chorale  Henry M. Flagler Museum  Martin Luther King Jr. Coordinating Committee  Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens  Mounts Botanical Gardens  Palm Beach Opera

 South Florida Science Center  Young Singers of the Palm Beaches  Zoological Society of Palm Beach County SmARTBiz 2013 was sponsored by PNC Bank, Crystal & Company and Holyfield & Thomas. “We know that a vibrant arts scene improves our region by creating jobs, boosting tourism and generating revenue,” says Craig Grant, regional president of PNC Bank, which created SmARTBiz with the Cultural Council. “But access to the arts can also make a profound difference in the lives of individuals and communities, which is why SmARTBiz is such a vital resource for our continued growth.”

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{inside culture} cultural council news

Butch and Melinda Trucks, Rena Blades and Brad Deflin

Christopher Kircheisen and Steve Limpach

Scott Velozo, Marta Weinstein and Stephen Mooney

Mary Ann and Barry Seidman

Phyllis Verducci, Gisele Weisman, Deborah Pollack

Surale Phillips, Lisa Huertas and Mark Montgomery

Culture & Cocktails Series Spins Compelling Tales

al artist whose portfolio includes portraits,

Pubillones is an award-winning Cuban-

nudes and ethereal landscapes, touched

American interior designer.

The ninth season of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s popular Culture & Cocktails series is well under way. The first event of the 2013-2014 season attracted approximately 130 supporters to the Colony Hotel, Palm Beach, for HITS & MRS: A Conversation with Legendary Rock Drummer Butch Trucks and his artist wife Melinda Trucks. In the wide-ranging, laugh-filled conversation, Butch, the drummer for the Allman Brothers Band and a Rock & Roll Hall of Fame inductee, and Melinda, a visuPhotos by: Corby Kaye’s Studio Palm Beach

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on a number of fascinating subjects. Brad

 March 3: THE FIRST NOËL − A

Deflin − founder and president of Total

Conversation with Barry Day, Author of

Digital Security, a diehard Allman Brothers

The Letters of Noël Coward: This con-

Band fan and longtime friend of the talent-

versation will kick off the Noël Coward

ed pair − conducted the interview.

Festival Palm Beach 2014. The interview-

Upcoming Culture & Cocktails events include:

er will be William Hayes, producing artistic director of Palm Beach Dramaworks.

 February 3: DISHING DESIGN − A

 April 7: CULTURAL ENTREPRENEUR −

Conversation between Steven Stolman

A Conversation with Milton Maltz: A

and Joseph Pubillones: Stolman is pres-

respected cultural philanthropist, Maltz

ident of Scalamandré, America’s leading

and his wife, Tamar, have been major

purveyor of exquisite decorative fabrics,

backers of the Rock and Roll Hall of

wall coverings, trims and furnishings.

Fame in Cleveland, the International Spy


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MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE PRESENTS

cultural council news

SPONSORED BY:

JOAN AND ALLEN BILDNER

JAN 14 - FEB 2, 2014 This poignant and inspiring Tony Award®- winning long-running hit musical follows the audition process of theatre “gypsies” as they try to land a job in a Broadway show.

Patricia Thorne and Marty Romeo

Dr. Maria Spinak and Dr. Henry Petraki

SPONSORED BY:

FEB 16 - MAR 2, 2014 In this Tony®- nominated nnew play, a young novelist returns hhome to Palm Springs for the holidays and announces that she is about to publish a memoir. But will her family stop her?

MASTERS OF MOTOWN

Michael and Janice Barry

JJAN 20 at 7:30PM

Lesley Hogan and Charlie Middleton

KKOAF?AF

THE BEST OF BIG BAND TH

JAN 26 at 8:00PM JA

Museum in Washington, D.C., the Maltz

level and above) and $50 per person for non-

Jupiter Theatre and the Cultural Council

members. All proceeds go to support artist

of Palm Beach County. The interviewer

programs offered by the nonprofit Cultural

will be Beth Neuhoff, president and CEO

Council of Palm Beach County.

of Neuhoff Communications.

;@JAKE9;<GF9D<K ;@

MEMORIES OF ELVIS ME

JAN 27 at 7:30PM

SPENCERS

Each event runs from 5 to 7 p.m., with regis-

January’s conversation featured ISRAEL

tration and cocktails from 5 to 5:45 p.m. and the

THROUGH MY EYES: A Conversation with Photojournalist David Rubinger. Israel’s preeminent photojournalist and for many years the primary photographer in the Mideast for TIMELIFE, Rubinger is receiving the prestigious FOTOmentor award at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre’s FOTOfusion 2014. Admission to Culture & Cocktails is free for members of the Cultural Council ($250

conversation from 5:45 to 7 p.m., including audience Q&A. Reservations are required and can be made by calling the Cultural Council at (561) 4723330. The 2013-2014 season of Culture & Cocktails is sponsored by the Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation; the Roe Green Foundation, Roe Green, founder; The Palm

Beach Post and the Palm Beach Daily News; and PR-BS, a Boca Raton-based public relations firm.

For tickets:

THEATRE OF ILLUSION FEB 4 at 7:30PM

(561) 575-2223 For group sales:

(561) 972-6117 1001 East Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33477

www.jupitertheatre.org

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cultural council news Cultural Council Celebrates Excellence through 2014 Muse Awards Shining a well-deserved spotlight on arts and cultural excellence, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County will host its 2014 Muse Awards gala event on March 13 at the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. The theme of this year’s event – the sixth Muse Awards celebration since the program began – is Muse Is Fusion: A blend of two divergent ideas to make something beautiful. The Cultural Council will announce the award honorees prior to the event. They are chosen through a competitive nomination process. The nominations are reviewed and scored by judges who are artists, community leaders, past recipients and board members of the Cultural Council. “The Cultural Council knows that Palm Beach County is rich in examples of cultural

excellence. The Muse Awards represent a great way for members of the cultural community and its patrons to help gain recognition for artists and organizations who are leading the way,” says Rena Blades, president and chief executive officer. “We have big plans for this year’s gala with an exciting, sensational theme of fusion and surprises in store on the program. It’s Palm Beach County’s version of the Academy Awards − and we invite the community to be a big part of this very special occasion.” This year, recipients will be honored in the following categories:  Excellence in Historical and Cultural Heritage  Excellence in Arts and Cultural Outreach  Excellence in Arts Integrated Education  Outstanding Festival  Outstanding Collaboration  Clyde Fyfe Award for Performing Artists

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In addition, a special Council’s Choice Award will honor an individual or institution the Council deems worthy of recognition for an effort or accomplishment not honored in another category. The chairs of the 2014 Muse Awards celebration are Sallie Korman and Bruce A. Beal. PNC Bank is the Premier Benefactor Sponsor, while Jim and Irene Karp are the Award Sponsors. Back for another year as the producing artistic director is Andrew Kato of Maltz Jupiter Theatre. Funds raised from the Muse Awards directly impact the lives of Palm Beach County students by allowing them to experience cultural field trips. For informa-

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tion about the 2014 Muse Awards, please visit www.palmbeachculture.com or contact Mary Lewis, director of development, at mlewis@palmbeachculture.com or (561) 472-3340.


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{inside culture} cultural council news Keys to the Cities Tickles the Community’s Fancy There’s no way to know how many ivories ultimately were tickled, but there were plenty of chances to do so during the recent Keys to the Cities campaign in Palm Beach County. Organized by Kathi Kretzer, founder of the Kretzer Piano Music Foundation, and patterned after similar successful campaigns in London and New York City, Keys to the Cities featured 18 baby grand and upright pianos that were decorated in unique fashion by 17 local artists. In November, the pianos were on display throughout the county – including at the Cultural Council’s headquarters in Lake Worth. Other locations where visitors could see and even play the instruments included Arts Garage in Delray Beach, Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Downtown at the Gardens in Palm Beach Gardens, Kretzer Piano in Jupiter and assorted spots in West Palm Beach, including City Center, CityPlace, Clematis Street by Palm Beach Dramaworks, the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium and the waterfront. The campaign’s kick-off event at the waterfront Lake Pavilion featured a onetime-only performance by 18 distinguished pianists − including Shawn Berry, the

The Cultural Council’s piano, created by artist Emmanuel Gonzales, beckoned passersby to play a tune outside the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in downtown Lake Worth.

Cultural Council’s manager of arts and cul-

Mendieta, Liz Brice, Caron Bowman, Karen

tural education.

Chandler, Joseph Dzwill, Silvana Frontera,

Artist Emmanuel Gonzales created the piano for the Cultural Council. Other artists

Carla Golembe, Eric Kucera, Holly Rutchey, Alicia Stamm and Amanda Turner.

who applied their creativity to the pianos

For anyone who’s counting, those 18

included art students at Watson B. Duncan

pianos had 1,584 keys! For more informa-

Middle School and their teacher Courtney

tion and a chance to see some of the pianos

Hess, Frank Navarrete, Sharon Koskoff,

and the artists who decorated them, visit

Nadia Utto, Julie Beaumont, Eduardo

www.facebook.com/KeysToTheCities.

2

Council Explores power give Fundraising Program A few months ago, the Cultural Council began discussing the possibility of launching an exciting new venture − a crowdfunding program called www.power2give − that has the potential to support our cultural organizations, increase the number and diversify the types of donors who support the arts and enhance the awareness and reach of the Cultural Council in the community. Although the initiative is still in the planning stages, the Council recently received a $100,000 grant from an anonymous donor to start power2give in Palm Beach County and match the first round of projects. The concept was developed by the Arts & Science Council of Charlotte-Mecklenburg, N.C., and launched there in August 2011.

The program now operates in 21 communities. All told, the power2give website has raised $4.5 million, processed more than 20,000 donations and supported nearly 1,900 arts and cultural projects. Laura Belcher, power2give's senior vice president and national director, presented the concept at a meeting of the Council’s Cultural Executives Committee last fall, where it was well received. Watch future issues of art&culture for further developments.

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cultural council news

Selections from the Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation

January 12 - April 23, 2014

501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton, Florida 33432 | 561.392.2500 | bocamuseum.org Roy Lichtenstein (American, 1923-1997), Foot and Hand, 1964, color offset lithograph, 16 ½ x 21 inches. Frederick R. Weisman Art Foundation, Los Angeles. © Estate of Roy Lichtenstein

Bebe Novick-Brodigan

Bebe Novick-Brodigan Joins Cultural Council in PR Role

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Part of our commitment to serving our patients includes providing information that helps them to make more informed decisions about their oral health needs. Contact us today!

A communications professional with more than 20 years of experience in television news, Bebe Novick-Brodigan is the Cultural Council’s new public relations coordinator. Novick-Brodigan spent much of her career as assistant news director and special projects manager at WPEC-TV, CBS 12 in West Palm Beach. Previously, she worked in television news in Macon, Ga., and Gainesville, Fla. Most recently, she was communications director at the Arthur I. Meyer Jewish Academy in West Palm Beach. She brings a keen awareness of the depth and quality of the cultural offerings available to both residents and visitors to the Palm Beaches. “Palm Beach County is my home and I am so proud to represent an organization like the Cultural Council, which serves our community’s artists in such a unique way,” she says. Novick-Brodigan is a native of Miami Beach and a graduate of the University of Florida’s College of Journalism and Communications.


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cultural council news

Cultural Executives Committee Gathers Great Minds To keep the cultural community on the cutting edge, the Cultural Council invites senior management staff from more than 120 nonprofit organizations to gather for monthly meetings of the Cultural Executives Committee. Opportunities for professional development, networking and collaboration abound at these sessions, most of which take place at the Cultural Council’s centrally located headquarters in downtown Lake Worth. Some CEC meetings are open to all area cultural organizations, while others are targeted specifically to larger or smaller nonprofits. Upcoming sessions include:

NOT

ALL

art

FITS IN A FRAME.

 Jan. 27 – Caroline Werth from Turnaround Arts Management will speak about customer service (all organizations).  Feb. 24 – Palm Beach County arts marketing consultant Ceci Dadisman will discuss social media (organizations with budgets less than $1 million).  March 17 – Donor relations guru Lynn Wester will talk about donor stewardship (all organizations).  April 21 – CEO Roundtable (organizations with budgets more than $1 million) with a speaker to be determined. The Cultural Executives Committee is chaired by Daniel Biaggi, general director of Palm Beach Opera. For more information, contact Debbie Calabria, membership and special events manager at (561) 472-3330.

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cultural compendium Boynton Beach Celebrates Public Art on the Avenue Visitors to downtown Boynton Beach can expect to encounter whimsical carved stone Fishsticks Flying, stainless steel Birds in Flight, a jubilant welded and painted aluminum Dream Catcher and nine other outdoor sculptures through this year’s Avenue of the Arts program. Organized by the city’s Art in Public Places Program, the year-long exhibition features a total of 12 works by eight local and national artists – Dale Rogers, Craig BerubeGray, Cecilia Leuza, Timothy Werrell, Jenn Leuza, Diversity, 2007, Garrett, Mary Angers, Cecilia urethane and aluminum Robert Cordisco and Marsha De Broske. Now in its seventh year, the Avenue of the Arts can be visited 24/7. All sites are lit and have plaques that show each sculpture’s name, artist, description and medium along with the Art in Public Places website address for more information. “The Avenue of the Arts is a proven program that stimulates cultural interaction, attracts visitors and contributes to Boynton Beach’s economic development and the area’s revitalization,” states Public Art Manager Debby Coles-Dobay. All of the art is for sale, with a portion of the proceeds benefiting Art in Public Places. To date, seven artworks have been purchased and either permanently placed throughout Boynton Beach or acquired by neighboring cities or Craig Berube-Gray, Fishsticks private collectors. Flying, 2013, carved stone Free Avenue of the Art group tours are given by the Art in Public Places program. For more information, visit www.boyntonbeacharts.org.

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{inside culture} cultural compendium Art Links Students from Haiti with Local High School A group of 10 talented young people from the Art Creation Foundation for Children (ACFFC) in Jacmel, Haiti, visited Toussaint Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ouverture High School for Arts and Social Justice (TLHS), a charter school in Delray Beach, and several other cultural venues in the county in November. As special emissaries of the Haitian People, ACFFC Team MosaĂŻque Jacmel partnered with TLHS students â&#x2C6;&#x2019; many of whom are either Haitian-American or recent immigrants from Haiti â&#x2C6;&#x2019; to create a mosaic public art installation in Boynton Beach to honor Florida residents who have provided aid to the people of Haiti after natural disasters. This public art project will be registered with the State of Florida as part of Viva Florida 500, a statewide initiative of the Florida Department of State to celebrate 500 years of Florida history and diversity of

culture. The ACFFC youth also brought with them a mosaic mural memorializing the many Haitian lives lost at sea. While in South Florida, the ACFFC students audited academic classes at TLHS and visited the Palm Beach Photographic Centre in West Palm Beach along ACFFC students explore photography and other creative disciplines. with the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County and Clay-Glass- instrumental in making the visit possible. Stone Cooperative Gallery in Lake Worth. Additional supporters included Jacmelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Some of the ACFFC team members also Offices of the Ministries of Culture and visited the Haitian Embassy and Capitol Hill Tourism, the Mayor of Jacmel, Haiti, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County and in Washington, DC. The project was sponsored by the Palm Beach Photographic Centre. To learn more about ACFFC, a nonToussaint Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Ouverture High School and the Office of Public Diplomacy, Embassy of the profit arts organization dedicated to the United States, Port au Prince Haiti. The education and personal growth of youth in Office of Congresswoman Lois Frankel was need in Jacmel, Haiti, visit www.acffc.org.

Experience One of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Great House Museums :KHQLWZDVFRPSOHWHGLQ:KLWHKDOO+HQU\)ODJOHU¡V*LOGHG :KHQLWZDVFRPSOHWHG LQ:KLWHKDOO +HQU\ )ODJOHU¡V*LOOGHG $JHHVWDWHLQ3DOP%HDFKZDVKDLOHGE\WKHNew $JH HVWDWH LQ3DOP%HDFKZDDV KDLOHG E\WKH New York Heral Heraldd as ´PRUHZRQGHUIXO WKDQDQ\SDODFH LQ (XURSH JUDQGHU DQGPRUH P ´PRUHZRQGHUIXOWKDQDQ\SDODFHLQ(XURSHJUDQGHUDQGPRUH PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQWWKDQDQ\RWKHUS SULYDWHGZHOOLQJLQWKHZRUOGÂľ PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQWWKDQDQ\RWKHUSULYDWHGZHOOLQJLQWKHZRUOGÂľ D 1DWLRQDO 1DWLRQ QDO +LVWRULF WR WKH WKH 7RGD\ :KLWHKDOO LV D +LVWRULF /DQGPDUN RSHQ WR SXEOLF DV WKH )ODJOHU SXEOLF )ODJOHU 0XVHXP P IHDWXULQJ IHDWXULQJ GRFHQW GRFHQWOHG OHG WRXUV WRXUV VHOI VVHOI SXEOLFDVWKH)ODJOHU0XVHXPIHDWXULQJGRFHQWOHGWRXUVVHOI JXLGHEURFKXUHVDXGLRWRXUVVDQGDVPDUWGHYLFHDSS JXLGHEURFKXUHVDXGLRWRXUVDQGDVPDUWGHYLFHDSS

Flagler Museum Programs â&#x20AC;&#x153;An absolute must-seeâ&#x20AC;?

([SHULHQFH FKDPEHU ([SHULHQFH FKDPEHU PXVLF PXVLF DV DV LW ZDV LQWHQGHG LQWHQGHG LQ LQ D D JUDFLRXV JUDFLLRXV DQG DQGLQWLPDWHVHWWLQJ7KHFlagler LQWLPDWH VHWWLQJ 7KH Flaagler Museum Music Series SeriesRIIHUV  RIIIHUV DXGLHQFHV DXGLHQFHVWKHUDUHRSSRUWXQLW\WRPHHWWKHPXVLFLDQVGXULQJD WKH UDUH RSSRUWXQ QLW\ WR PHHW WKH PXVLFLDQV GXULQ QJ D FKDPSDJQHDQGGHVVHUWUHFHSWLRQIROORZLQJHDFKFRQFHUW FKDPSDJQHDQGGHVVHUWUHFHS SWLRQIROORZLQJHDFKFRQFHUW

- National Geographic Traveler The Winter Exhibition Stories in i Sterling: Four Centuries of Silver in New w York York,, on exhibit January 28, to April 20,, 2014.

6KDQJKDL4XDUWHWJanuary 6KDQJKDL4XDUWHWJanuary 7 <RRQLH+DQJanuary <RRQLH+DQ January 21 Cuarteto Latinoamericano Feb. Feeb. 4 $WRV7ULRFebruary $WRV7ULR February 18 7DOLFK4XDUWHWMarch 7DOLFK4XDUWHW March 4

The Whitehall Lecture Seriess presents Ă&#x20AC;YHOHFWXUHVRQCrimes Ă&#x20AC;YHOHFWXUHVRQCrimes of the Century: Ceentury: 7KH,QYHQWRU 7KH7\FRRQFebruary 7KH,QYHQWRU 7KH7\FRRQ February F 2 $PHULFDQ/LJKWQLQJFebruary $PHULFDQ/LJKWQLQJFebruary y9 7KH'HYLO¡V*HQWOHPDQFebruary 7KH'HYLO¡V*HQWOHPDQFebru uary 16 'HSUDYHGFebruary 'HSUDYHGFebruary 23 $PHULFDQ(YHMarch $PHULFDQ(YH March 2

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m o r r i s o n

FLAGLER FLAG GLER MUSEUM MUSEUM palm pa alm b beach, each, fl florida orida

For more informati information ion and tickets call (561) ( 655-2833 or visi visit it www.FlaglerMuse www.FlaglerMuseum.us eum.us art&culture

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{inside culture} cultural compendium

Courtesy Foster + Partners

A rendering of the new grand hall at the Norton Museum of Art

Norton Museum Plans Major Expansion The Norton Museum of Art unveiled a new master plan that will nearly double the size of its galleries and add several new

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public spaces. Designed by architecture firm Foster + Partners under the direction of Pritzker Prize-winning architect Lord Norman Foster, the master plan encompasses the museum’s entire 6.3-acre campus in West Palm Beach.

When it first opened in 1941, the Norton Museum of Art − designed by architect Marion Sims Wyeth − was an elegant series of Art Deco-inspired singlestory pavilions around a central courtyard. Later expansions included the addition of a new wing and an additional parking lot to the south of the museum resulting in the relocation of the main entrance to the side of the building, which is hidden from the main thoroughfare. The Foster + Partners master plan restores the clarity and symmetry of Wyeth’s plan by relocating the main entrance to South Dixie Highway to the west − allowing visitors to once again see through the entire building, capturing views of the Intracoastal Waterway beyond the Norton via a new, transparent grand hall and refurbished glass and iron courtyard doors. Additional features of the master plan include:  Three new double-height pavilions housing a state-of-the-art auditorium, event space and a grand hall that is expected to become the social hub of the museum  A new museum shop and restaurant with al fresco garden seating  A metal roof canopy floating above the pavilions that will shade the entrance plaza and cast diffuse patterns of light in the space below  Landscaping featuring native trees and flowers, a linear series of pools with fountains and a new sculpture lawn “The Norton’s mission is to present art of the highest quality to the broadest possible audience, to champion the curatorial voice through original exhibitions and to create an outstanding visitor experience. We need the right facilities to achieve these goals: more gallery space, a new education center and larger indoor and outdoor public spaces,” says Hope Alswang, director and CEO of the museum. “This master plan will help us better serve the needs of all of our audiences and will strengthen the Norton in its role as an important cultural resource.”


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{inside culture} Documentary Film Series Debuts at Willow Theatre The Willow Theatre in Boca Ratonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Sugar Sand Park is offering a new documentary film series in partnership with the DocMiami International Film Festival. Audiences will have the opportunity to view international films and meet special guest presenters as well as local filmmakers. All films are presented by docmiami.org. The films are not yet rated. Children must be accompanied by an adult. The schedule includes:  Feb.13: 1 Giant Leap: What About Me? â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Filmmakers Jamie Catto and Duncan Bridgeman set out on a journey to record musical jewels and words of wisdom from a diverse range of thinkers, writers and entertainers around the world, including Noam Chomsky, Tim Robbins, Michael Stipe, kd Lang, Gabonese Pygmies, Tuvan throat singers

and Japanese Taiko drummers.  March 20: Ida Haendel â&#x2C6;&#x2019; This Is My Heritage â&#x2C6;&#x2019; A Jewish, Polish-born British citizen who managed to flee the Nazis right before the outbreak of the war, Ida Haendel has lived in Miami since the early 1980s. Widely considered one of the finest violinists of the 20th century, she is a flamboyant character with a sharp sense of humor who doesn't mind presenting the high and low points of her eventful life in a profoundly honest way.  April 17 â&#x2C6;&#x2019; The Lion of Judah â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Holocaust survivor Leo Zisman leads a group of young adults on a journey back

A scene from the film 1 Giant Leap: What About Me?

to Poland, where trip participants speak of their own search for answers. The filmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s powerful message encourages viewers to remember the past and use it to change the world for the better. Sugar Sand Park is located at 300 S. Military Trail in Boca Raton. For more information, visit www.SugarSandPark.org.

The Wednesday Evening Concert Series 8 p.m. OTickets: $40 (balcony) / $45 (orchestra) Jay Hunter Morris, Tenor ............................................... January 22 Q Krasnoyarsk National Dance Company of Siberia .....February 5 Q Europa Galante with Fabio Biondi ..............................February 12 Q F O U R A R T S. F O R E V E R Y O N E.

Walnut Street Theatre â&#x20AC;&#x153;Driving Miss Daisyâ&#x20AC;? ............February 19 Q Arnaldo Cohen, piano .......................................................March 12 V Flamenco Vivo Carlota Santana â&#x20AC;&#x153;A Soul of Flamencoâ&#x20AC;? ..March 19 V

The Sunday Concert Series 3 p.m. OTickets: $20 Calder Quartet .................................................................January 19 Q American Chamber Players ............................................January 26 Q Keyboard ConversationsÂŽ with JeďŹ&#x20AC; rey Siegel, ..............February 2 O â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mistresses and Masterpieces: Music of Chopin, Liszt, Schumann, and Brahmsâ&#x20AC;? Benjamin Grosvenor, piano.............................................February 9 O St. Lawrence String Quartet ........................................February 16 O Trio Solisti ......................................................................February 23 O Elias String Quartet ............................................................ March 9 O Keyboard ConversationsÂŽ with JeďŹ&#x20AC; rey Siegel, ................March 16 V â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Miracle of Mozartâ&#x20AC;? Jerusalem String Quartet ..................................................March 23 V 'PVS"SUT1MB[Bt1BMN#FBDI 'PSUJDLFUJOGPSNBUJPO DBMMPSWJTJUGPVSBSUTPSH

Dailey & Vincent ................................................................ April 13 V Tickets available:

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ourney through the nationally recognized home, studio and gardens by the visionary sculptor Ann Weaver Norton (1905-82)

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briefly noted

Tiffany Beasi’s whimsical painting A Memorable Night was featured on the Lake Worth Beach ArtFest poster.

Inspired by Lake Worth's efforts to unify the arts community and the renovated historic Lake Worth Casino and Beach Complex, Tiffany Beasi’s acrylic painting, A Memorable Night, was the winner of the inaugural Lake Worth Beach ArtFest commemorative poster contest. Beasi says her vision for the painting “is to make the sky sparkle, the trees sway and the building bright and inviting. The landmark at night entices the Lake Worth community to come out and play.” A graduate of the University of Central Florida, Beasi is an award-winning artist who has created commercial art for clients including Walt Disney World, Hard Rock International and the Orlando Magic. The Lake Worth painter, graphic designer and muralist has exhibited in galleries and outdoor shows throughout Florida. View more of her work at TiffanyBeasi.com or UnleashedArtworks.com.

T h e

h i s t o r i c

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

Plan your Journey Today! Private and Group Tours Available Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens 253 Barcelona Road West Palm Beach, FL 33401 www.ansg.org or (561) 832-5328 Wednesday - Sunday 10am - 4pm 90

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s

(From left) Rosa Lowinger, fellow of the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works and Florida Association of Museums board member, presents the Ross Merrill Award to John Blades, executive director, and Tracy Kamerer, chief curator, at the Flagler Museum.

The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum received the 2013 Ross Merrill Award for Outstanding Commitment to the Preservation and Care of Collections. Presented jointly by Heritage Preservation and the American Institute for Conservation of Historic and Artistic Works, the award recognizes the museum's sustained commitment â&#x2C6;&#x2019; spanning 54 years â&#x2C6;&#x2019; to the care of its collections and the preservation of the National Historic Landmark, Whitehall. The Flagler Museum is the first Florida organization awarded this honor since it was established in 1999. The Awards Committee was very impressed with the Museum's success and hard work in the face of challenges and adversity, including saving Whitehall from demolition, decades of restoration and object repatriation and proper preservation and collections care. Committee members commended the museum on its ability to develop and execute a long-range plan to upgrade conditions, conduct assessments and develop emergency plans and unanimously agreed that "the nomination was an excellent one and that the award is well deserved.â&#x20AC;?

db center for the arts 1/3 s

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South Florida Symphony Orchestra 2014 Season MASTERWORKS CONCERT SERIES DOUBLE SPEAK AND HIDDEN MEANINGS January 30 - February 3, 2014 Liszt: Symphonic Poem No. 10 â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hamletâ&#x20AC;? Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2018;ƤÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2DC;ÇŁÂ&#x2039;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;ǤÍ&#x2014; Christopher Taylor, piano Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;ÇŁÂ&#x203A;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x2018;ǤÍ&#x2022;Í&#x201D; A SUMMONS TO LIFE March 27-31, 2014 Â&#x2018;Â&#x153;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;ÇŁÂ&#x203A;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x2018;ǤÍ&#x2014;Í&#x2122;Dz Â&#x192;ĆĄÂ?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Çł Zwilich: Shadows for Piano and Orchestra Â&#x2021;ĆĄÂ&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2021;Â&#x17D;ÇĄÂ&#x2019;Â&#x2039;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2018; Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â?ÇŁÂ&#x203A;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x2018;ǤÍ&#x2022;Â&#x2019;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;  ǧ       MUSICAL EXCURSIONS! THE HUMANITY OF MUSIC FOLLOWED BY STARRY NIGHT, ALL IN WHITE January 10-11, 2014 Â&#x17D;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013; Piano Trio TBA Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x17D; Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2020;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â?ÇŁÂ&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â? B Flat, Opus 8 Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;ÇŁÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030; Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;ĆŹÂ&#x2039;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;

CELLO SPIRIT February 22-March 2, 2014 Arthur Cook, cello Â&#x2014;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;ĆŹÂ&#x2018;Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x203A; PASSION UNLEASHED March 11-15, 2014 Zuill Bailey, cello Natasha Paremski, piano Debussy Sonata Britten Sonata Franck Sonata        CHAMBER SERIES MURDER IN THE CHAMBER May 5-7, 2014 Bernard Hermann: Echoes Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2021;Â?ÇŁÂ&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;ǤÍ&#x2022; The Kreutzer Sonata Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x192;ÇŁÂ&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;ǤÍ&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â? E Minor THE GRAND TOUR June 15-17, 2014 Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2022;Â?Â&#x203A;ÇŁÂ&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;ǤÍ&#x2013; Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;ÇŁÂ&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013; A DISTANT SHORE July 14-16, 2014 Â&#x2014;Â&#x2030;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2C6;ÇŁ Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021; Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x2021;Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;ÇŁÂ&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â? Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2013; Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x160;Â?Â&#x2022;ÇŁÂ&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2030;Â&#x2014;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;ǤÍ&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â? C Minor

Claim Your Seats Today! Tickets Online at Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;Â&#x2122;ǤÂ&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;ĆŞÂ&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x203A;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x203A;ǤÂ&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2030; 954-522-8445 92

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Meredith Trim (left), current president, and Stephanie Pew, outgoing president of the Friends of MacArthur Beach State Park

Stephanie Pew, president of the Friends of MacArthur Beach State Park, earned the Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Call to Service Award for the more than 4,100 volunteer hours that she has dedicated to the organization. She received an official Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Volunteer Service Award Pin, a personalized certificate and a congratulatory note from President Barack Obama during a recent board meeting. Pew was elected to the organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board of directors in 2006 and became president in 2010. The parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Pew Family Natural Science Education Center was named in her honor to recognize her capital campaign contributions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is such an honor to receive this award,â&#x20AC;? Pew says. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Working with the Friends for the good of MacArthur Beach State Park has been a labor of love and I have enjoyed every minute of it.â&#x20AC;? John D. MacArthur Beach State Park, Palm Beach Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only state park, is situated on a barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and the Lake Worth Lagoon.


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The curtain has risen on the Maltz Jupiter Theatre’s newest production – a $2.5-million renovation project that created the Green Room − an upstairs club-level lounge − new space for executive offices, downstairs lobby expansion and more enhancements. Participating in a recent ribbon-cutting ceremony were (from left) Maltz Jupiter Theatre Board Chair Martin Cohen, Roe Green (founding board member and lead donor on the project, for whom the Green Room is named) and founding board member Milton Maltz.

WHITECHAPEL GALLERY AT WINDSOR

JASPER JOHNS: SHADOW AND SUBSTANCE December 8, 2013 – April 30, 2014

db center for the arts Open from 12 pm daily by appointment;

1/3closing s times vary. Closed on Tuesday. For individual reservations, group tours or special events, contact 772 388 4071 or gallery@windsorflorida.com.

3125 Windsor Boulevard Vero Beach Florida 32963 www.windsorflorida.com/gallery www.whitechapelgallery.org

Untitled (US Embassies), 1999, Intaglio, 23 in. x 31 1/2 in. (58.42 cm x 80.01 cm), Edition 50, Published by Universal Limited Art Editions, © 1999 Jasper Johns / ULAE / Licensed by VAGA, New York, NY

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Rosalie Grant (center) and friends at the Florida Renaissance Festival

Rosalie Grant, founder and

129 E Ocean Avenue | Boynton Beach, FL 33435 (561) 742-6780 | www.schoolhousemuseum.org

Open for play: Tuesday - Saturday 10 AM - 5 PM Story time, special classes, events, birthday parties and more!

Where learning is an adventure! 94

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artistic director of Sol Children Theatre in Boca Raton, received the 2013 South Florida Theatre League’s Remy Award for Outstanding Contributions to Children's Theatre. She was honored “for the dedication and many contributions that she and Sol Children Theatre have made to our next generation of theater professionals, providing them with a safe, secure and highly professional theatrical training experience. Those young people in turn provide quality theater experiences for audiences of all ages.” Grant, who has directed more than 60 plays and musicals, is the owner of Grant Studio and a lifetime member of the National Association of Teachers of Music. The Remy Awards are named in honor of Remberto Cabrera, the former Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs' senior cultural administrator and chief of cultural development.


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{cultural cuisine guide}

Cultural Cuisine Between Food and Culture

Inspirations from Palm Beach Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Finest Restaurants & Eateries

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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern Voted Best Italian 2010, 2012, 2013 Best Brunch 2012

Best Wine List 2012 Wine Spectator Award Winning Wine List 2003-2013

“The Italian Restaurant on the Beach”

561-274-9404

 3800 OCEAN Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa 3800 North Ocean Drive, Singer Island 561.340.1795 Discover an inspiring menu that echoes Chef Max’s dedication to simplicity, intense flavor and farm-to-table cuisine.

Open 7 days serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Weekend Brunch

 BB KING’S BLUES CLUB 550 Rosemary Ave., WPB 561.420.8600 Live music venue. Experience it today and “Let The Good Times Roll.”

34 South Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach, FL 33483 caffelunarosa.com facebook.com/caffelunarosa

Don Ramon Restaurant

The Finest In Cuban Cuisine Since 1990

561.547.8704 | donramonrestaurant.com 7101 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, FL

Ave Cafe

A Tapas Wine Bar ...a

friendly

We’re Romantic, We’re Hip... We’re Completely Unique

neighborhood cafe downstairs and a

casually elegant restaurant upstairs.

Summer Hours

Mon-Thurs: 12 to 10pm Fri-Sat: 12 to 11pm 561.588.4488 | bizaareavecafe.com 921 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460

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 BIZARRE AVE CAFE 921 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.588.4488 A welcoming, cozy atmosphere where one would feel at home entertaining friends with good food and fine wine.  BLUE MARTINI CityPlace, WPB 561.835.8601 An upscale martini bar featuring more than 20 of the hottest specialty martinis complemented by a sensational tapas menu.  BOGART’S BAR & GRILLE 3200 Airport Road, Boca Raton 561.544.3081 Bogart’s Bar & Grille, located at the JM Lexus Premier Level at Muvico 20 Palace in Boca Raton, is the ultimate dinner and a movie experience.  BREWZZI CityPlace, WPB 561.366.9753 Italian-American Bistro with upscalecasual dining for lunch and dinner, featuring a state-of-the-art, gold medal microbrewery. Late night patio bar.  BREWZZI Glades Plaza, 2222 Glades Road, Boca Raton 561.392.2739 Italian-American Bistro with upscalecasual dining for lunch and dinner, featuring a state-of-the-art, gold medal microbrewery. Now serving breakfast.

 BURGER BAR 4650 Donald Ross Road, PB Gardens 561.630.4545 Indulge in hand-shaped signature gourmet burgers, specially fashioned from a proprietary blend of short rib, brisket and chuck steak.  CAFÉ CHARDONNAY 4533 PGA Blvd., PB Gardens 561.627.2662 We delight you with the finest American cuisine. Chef Frank is constantly creating new foods to satify your every culinary desire.  CAFÉ LUNA ROSA 34 South Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach 561.274.9404 We offer a memorable and authentic Italian dining experience, designed on two levels with alfresco seating and an elevated open-air dining room.  CITY CELLAR WINE BAR & GRILL CityPlace, WPB 561.366.0071 A diverse menu featuring steaks, chops, fish and pasta complements a huge 10,000bottle wine collection.  CITY OYSTER 213 East Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.272.0220 A traditional American seafood restaurant. Fresh, simple and delicious seafood selections.  CORDON BLEU CATERING 213 S. Rosemary Ave., WPB 561.339.2444 Dinner parties, cocktail parties, yacht charters, wine tastings/pairings. European culinary excellence.  DECK 84 840 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.665.8484 As the Avenue’s first waterfront dining concept of its kind, Deck 84 provides a stimulating waterfront dining experience.  DON RAMON RESTAURANT 7101 S. Dixie Highway, WPB 561.547.8704 Open daily for lunch and dinner. Come with family and friends and enjoy a great atmosphere. Finest in Cuban cuisine.

 BUBBA GUMP SHRIMP CO. 1065 North A1A, Jupiter 561.744.1300 Shrimp is the specialty at Bubba Gump Shrimp Co., but in our fun, casual setting there is definitely something for everyone.

 GREASE BURGER BAR 213 Clematis St., WPB 561.651.1075 Grease Burger Bar offers a selection of fresh ground-daily, hand-shaped, 10-ounce juicy burgers.

 BUCA DI BEPPO WELLINGTON 2025 Wellington Green Drive, Wellington 561.790.3287 In the spirit of Italian culture, our dishes are served family-style and meant to be shared by everyone at the table.

 HENRY’S 16850 Jog Road, Delray Beach 561.638.1949 The ultimate location for gourmet American comfort food in Delray Beach. Henry’s combines substance and style for lunch and dinner.


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Brewzzi is Florida's most awarded brewery, including Gold and Silver medals at the Great American Beer Festival. Always Brewed-On-Site, our German-style lagers accent many of our recipes and complement all our fare. Our kitchen is renowned for enormous portions of quality favorites using the freshest ingredients brought in daily. While our core menu is based on old world Italian & traditional American comfort food, our selections have expanded to include an eclectic mix of global cuisines. Experience Brewzzi at the original Boca Raton location (now serving Breakfast 7 days a week) or overlooking the fountains at CityPlace, featuring our Patio Bar and Late Night Menu.

WE BREW TO PLEASE CITYPLACE 700 SOUTH ROSEMARY AVENUE • WEST PALM BEACH • 561-366-9753

BOCA RATON Now Serving Breakfast! GLADES PLAZA • 2222 GLADES ROAD • 561-392-BREW(2739) www.brewzzi.com


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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern  IRONWOOD GRILLE PGA National Resort & Spa, PB Gardens 561.627.2000 Offering classic American cuisine with contemporary influences, serving up tantalizing menu selections.  LEGAL SEA FOODS Town Center at Boca Raton, Boca Raton 561.447.2112 High-quality dining experience never goes out of style. With more than 40 varieties of fresh fish and shellfish available.

y Now Offering

Casual yet sophisticated, Outstanding food, expertly prepared Great wines, Live music nightly. Seasonally inspired dining... 52 weeks a year!

BOCA RATON PALM BEACH GARDENS FT LAUDERDALE

For details, visit www.seasons52.com

Casual Dining on Worth Avenue

Open 7 days Lunch/Dinner Sunday Brunch Continuous Dining 11am - 10pm 221 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach

835.3500

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 LEOPARD LOUNGE AND RESTAURANT The Chesterfield Hotel, PB 561.659.5800 Eclectic, “New American” gourmet cuisine offered in an elegant, yet playful atmosphere, with dancing and live entertainment.  MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 777 South Flagler Drive, WPB 561.820.8125 USDA Prime aged beef, live Maine lobsters, fresh fish, hand-selected vegetables and elegant desserts.  THE OFFICE 201 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.276.3600 A place where whimsy and gastronomical delights go hand in hand, The Office is a modern American gastropub.

 RED BRICK GRILLE 4775 Lyons Road, Delray Beach 561.454.8002 Full-service casual dining experience featuring contemporary Americana cuisine featuring appetizers, gourmet pizzas, pasta, mouth-watering burgers, handcrafted sandwiches, fresh salads and more.  RENATO’S 87 Via Mizner, PB 561.655.9752 Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with a dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls.  ROCCO’S TACOS AND TEQUILA BAR 224 Clematis St., WPB 561.650.1001 Rocco’s Tacos offers a true taste of Mexico within a fun, casual environment.  ROYAL ROOM CABARET The Colony Hotel, PB 561.655.5430 The Royal Room features top-name cabaret performers. Enjoy dinner and show or just the show.  RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE CityPlace, WPB 561.514.3544 Premier steakhouse at CityPlace in West Palm Beach. Catering service available.

 PADDOCK RESTAURANT Palm Beach Kennel Club, WPB 561.683.2222, Ext. 199 A unique dining experience – fine dining and an exciting show in an elegant dining room with a commanding view of the track.

 SAILFISH RESTAURANT 98 Lake Drive, PB Shores 561.844.1724, Ext. 107 This exceptionally popular seafood restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.

 PAMPAS GRILLE CITYPLACE 651 Okeechobee Blvd., WPB 561.791.6487 The menu at Pampas Brazilian Grille is as diverse as the Brazilian culture.

 SEASONS 52 11611 Ellison Wilson Road, PB Gardens 561.625.5852 Enjoy the taste of fresh food grilled over open wood fires, great wines and live piano music nightly in the wine bar.

 PARADISO RISTORANTE OF LAKE WORTH 625 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth 561.547.2500 Fish, seafood, steaks, full bar, wine cellar, private dining rooms, in wine cellar dining. Prix fixe menu and a la carte.

 SINCLAIRS OCEAN GRILL Jupiter Beach Resort & Spa 561.746.2511 Dine in the informal elegance of our signature Palm Beach restaurant, which provides gourmet meals in a tropical atmosphere.

 POLO STEAKHOUSE RESTAURANT The Colony Hotel, PB 561.655.5430 Full-service restaurant specializing in prime dry-aged beef. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails.

 STIR BAR & TERRACE The Ritz-Carlton, Manalapan 561.533.6000 Stir Bar offers creatively blended, muddled and stirred cocktails with a twist: Stir’s lively indoor and outdoor social scene.

 RED, THE STEAKHOUSE 1901 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton 561.353.9139 An unparalleled dining experience, RED, The Steakhouse, is touted by critics as a universal favorite.

 SUNDY HOUSE RESTAURANT 106 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach 561.272.5678 Sundy House, a charming 150-seat, finedining establishment with accommodations nestled amid botanical gardens and waterfalls.


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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern  TA-BOÓ, AN AMERICAN BISTRO & BAR 221 Worth Ave., PB 561.835.3500 An American bistro and bar featuring casual dining on Worth Avenue since 1941. Featuring prime steaks, Dover sole, sea bass, pizza, homemade desserts and cappuccinos.  TESTA’S RESTAURANT 221 Royal Poinciana Way, PB 561.832.0992 Testa’s serves Italian, American and seafood dishes. Breakfast, lunch or dinner. Testa’s is superb for a romantic getaway.

At Cafe Chardonnay we give center stage to local farm fresh foods and seafood. Chef Frank feels the flavor of every dish is dramatically improved by farm to table freshness.

 THREE (III) FORKS PRIME STEAKHOUSE PALM BEACH GARDENS 4645 PGA Blvd., PB Gardens 561.630.3660 III Forks is one of the nation’s prime steakhouses with a savvy menu featuring USDA Prime beef, seafood, and local favorites.  TIDES OCEANFRONT GRILLE Palm Beach Oceanfront Inn, PB 561.855.7575 Tides Oceanfront Grille proudly boasts being the closest restaurant to the ocean in south Florida.

4533 PGA Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens www.cafechardonnay.com 561.627.2662

 TIN FISH RESTAURANT 118 S. Clematis St., WPB 561.223.2497 Fresh, delicious fish, served quickly in a casual atmosphere. Try one of our seven famous fish tacos, salmon on slaw, crab cakes, fish sandwich or popular shrimp and corn chowder. Head upstairs to our Top of the Fish bar for an impressive cocktail selection and nightly drink specials.  TOWER RESTAURANT 44 Cocoanut Row, PB 561.659.3241 Tower Restaurant takes pride in its daily specials: wiener schnitzel, stuffed cabbage, pot roast and corned beef and cabbage; and monster apple pancake á la Luchows.  VIC & ANGELO’S DELRAY BEACH 290 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.278.9570 From the garden to the plate, Vic & Angelo’s specializes in ingredients that are imported fresh from Italy.  THE WINE DIVE 319 Clematis St., WPB 561.318.8821 Not just a wine bar and definitely not a dive – The Wine Dive is West Palm Beach’s go-to spot for live jazz, innovative menu items, hand-crafted cocktails and, of course, more than 70 wines to be enjoyed by the flight, glass or bottle.

87 Via Mizner, Worth Avenue, Palm Beach www.renatospalmbeach.com 561.655.9752

Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with an intimate dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls. Culinary delights from the classics to the eclectic are complemented with an extensive wine list and fully stocked bar.

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Deep and Shallow Members Reception

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County welcomed more than 150 members, friends and guests to a special preview event for the exhibition The Deep and the Shallow. The exhibition was generously underwritten by Loggerhead Marina, Palm Beach County Film and Television Commission, Johnson Custom Cakes and Tanks A Lot Aquarium Inc.

Tim Gersley, Marin O’Leary Debby Coles-Dubay, Glen Jergensen

Karen, David, Kelly and Robin Snyder Ray Gross, Gabriele Kraus, Tom Radca

Andrew and Khooshe Aiken Glen Jergensen, Rena Blades and Alex Dreyfoos

Kim Sargent, Diane Kisner, Brad Deflin and Joan Sargent Roger and Tammi Latham

It’s my pleasure to be part of such a great and important cultural entity.

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Join the Cultural Council As a member, we will keep you informed and entertained with our award-winning publications and signature events. Enjoy these exclusive benefits that offer incredible value — all year long!

Membership Benefits     

Invitations to members-only exhibition previews Free or reduced admission to select programs and events 10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store purchases Subscription to art&culture magazine and Cultural Calendar Recognition in the Council’s Annual Report

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CONTRIBUTOR $600 All benefits of the Supporter membership, plus:  One additional guest pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  VIP seating at Culture & Cocktails  VIP passes to local art fairs  Two guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine

PATRON $1,000

All benefits listed above for one person

All benefits of the Contributor membership, plus:  Two additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails  Four guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Invitation to director’s annual event  Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building

HOUSEHOLD $150

FOUNDING PATRON $2,500 AND ABOVE

Individual member benefits for two adults at the same address, plus:  CultureCard (membership discount card)

All the benefits of the Patron membership, plus:  Recognition on donor plaque  Private tours of special exhibitions for you and your guest upon request  Four additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails

INDIVIDUAL $65

SUPPORTER $250 All benefits of the Household membership, plus:  One pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  One guest invitation to all member exhibition previews

To join the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County or for more information on Artists’ membership www.palmbeachculture.com/jointhecouncil

Business Arts Partner Membership Benefits The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is a not-for-profit agency providing artists and cultural organizations with programs and services that promote and support their individual missions. Members help us accomplish these goals and ensure our community continues to have access to quality arts programming. Our vibrant arts make our destination desirable to businesses, visitors and residents. Membership provides your business with access to valuable benefits increasing your visibility and connecting you with our donors, members and the greater community.

LEVEL OF SUPPORT AFFILIATE STEWARD LEADER BENEFACTOR DIRECTOR CHAIRMAN $600 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000 $10,000 $25,000

Invitations to Members Only exhibition previews

Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine and Council’s Annual Report

Discounted advertising rates for art&culture magazine

Business logo with live link on Council’s website

art&culture magazine delivered to your business (up to 20 copies per issue)

10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store

Culture Card – Member discount cards for Cultural Organizations in Palm Beach County

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Tickets to attend the Council’s SmARTBiz Summit for Arts & Business leaders

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Free admissions to all Culture & Cocktails programs (includes VIP reserved seating)

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Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, The Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building Sponsorship of one Cultural Executives Committee Meeting* (Includes four invitations) Logo included in eblasts to all Cultural Council Cultural Organizations. Listing on donor plaque in the Alex and Renate Dreyfoos Entry into the galleries

Private tours for 12 by advance arrangement Underwriting and exhibition sponsorships and partnerships *Based on availability

For more information, please call Debbie Calabria 561-472-3330.

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The Cultural Council is enthusiastically living up to their mission statement of supporting the arts and the artists. I became an artist member of the Cultural Council soon after they opened in Lake Worth and I am so happy I did. As a former museum director and curator, I was impressed with how they presented the art, their gift shop and how the staff are friendly and supportive. My solo exhibit in October 2013 was far beyond what I had anticipated. The exhibit was hung extraordinarily well and my lecture was given to a full house. The Cultural Council continues to support me and my art enthusiastically. They are a jewel in the art community and I will continue my membership and do anything I can to support them as they support the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Arts & Culture.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;

â&#x20AC;?

â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Annette Rawlings

Members See It First Member Preview Dates:

 Thursday, January 30, 2014 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Interior Design: The Florida Room  Thursday, April 10, 2014 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Art Outside the Walls: En Plein Air  Thursday, June 19, 2014 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Southern Exposure: Artists from Below the 23.5° Parallel

Bruce A. Beal and Sallie Korman

'PSFTU)JMM#MWEt8FMMJOHUPO '- 1t&+FOOJGFS!+PIOTPOT$VTUPN$BLFTDPN

www.JohnsonsCustomCakes.com

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thank you.

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In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and above help us accomplish our mission.

Listing as of print date

Mrs. Pamela Acheson Myers Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson Arthur I. and Sydelle Meyer Charitable Foundation The Azeez Foundation

I have supported the Cultural Council for many

years but the last few years have been very exciting.

Seeing exhibitions, attending lectures and the ability to show work there has made my membership in the

B/E Aerospace

Cultural Council very worthwhile.

Ms. Dina Gustin Baker

− Joan Lustig

Bank of America

The Palm Beach Post Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker Mr. and Mrs. William Parmelee Passport Publications & Media Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Dr. Henry J. Petraki PGA National Resort & Spa PNC Bank PNC Foundation

Banyan Printing

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Dougherty, Jr.

Katz Family Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Carter Pottash

Mr. and Mrs. R. Michael Barry

Mrs. Cecile Draime

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz Jr.

PRP Wine International

Mrs. Marta Batmasian

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Kohnken Family Foundation Inc.

Mr. Bruce A. Beal

Earle I. Mack Foundation, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman

and Mr. Francis V. Cunningham

Publix Supermarket Charities REG Architects Inc. Richard and Peggy Greenfield Foundation

Ms. Suzi K. Edwards

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Kramer

Beasley Hauser, Kramer & Galardi

Mr. George T. Elmore

Mrs. Emily F. Landau

Mrs. JoAnne Berkow

Donald M. Ephraim Family Foundation

Geo. Zoltan Lefton Family Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Rosenberg

RSB Richard S. Bernstein and Associates, Inc.

Rose Marie and Ted J. Miller Family Foundation Inc. Mr. David Rogers

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farber

Mrs. Claire M. Levine

Mr. and Mrs. John Blades

The Fine Foundation

The Liman Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Rubin

Mr. Milton J. Block

Mrs. Shirley Fiterman

Loggerhead Marina

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley M. Rumbough Jr.

and Mrs. Leanna Landsmann

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Flack

The Boston Foundation

Florida Power & Light Company

Ms. Carole Boucard

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Flucke

Boynton Beach Flower Market

The Gardens Mall

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bracci Mr. Geoffrey Bradfield The Breakers Palm Beach Mr. and Mrs. Howard Bregman, Esq. The Ann K. and Douglas S. Brown Family Foundation

The GE Foundation Ms. Beatriz A. Ford Goldberg Foundation Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Craig D. Grant Mr. Raymond Graziotto The Roe Green Foundation

Camilla Dietz/Bergeron, Ltd.

Ms. Roe Green

Business Development Board

Greenberg Traurig, P.A.

Mr. Christopher D. Caneles

Hon. and Mrs. William Greenberg

and Mr. Stephen Nesbitt

Ms. Peg Greenspon

The Colony Hotel

Gunster

Community Foundation for Palm

Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand

Beach and Martin Counties Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan The Community Foundation of Louisville Mr. and Mrs. Miles A. Coon Crystal & Company Mr. William R. Cummings Mr. Gus Davis Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro

Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation

Ms. Susan Lloyd Catherine Lowe M.D., LL.D. The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation

Ms. Pamela Saba Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc. Scalamandré

The Maltz Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager

Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews

The Lewis Schott Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews

Mr. Gary Schweikhart

Ms. Elaine Meier

Sargent Architectural Photography

Mrs. Sydelle Meyer

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman

Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs Mr. and Mrs. George J. Michel Jr. Ms. Nancy Miller Sydell and Arnold Miller Foundation Mrs. Sydell L. Miller Ms. Jane Mitchell Mrs. Mary Montgomery Ms. Virginia C. Mossburg

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf Mr. Harold Smith Mr. Lawrence Sosnow Mrs. Andrea Stark Stark Carpet Mr. and Mrs. Bob Stiller Tanks A lot Aquarium, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco Telesco Family Foundation The Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc.

Mrs. Elizabeth Neuhoff

Ms. Patricia G. Thorne

HERlife Magazine

Mrs. Suzanne Niedland and Lawrence F. DeGeorge

Mrs. Phyllis Tick

Ms. Priscilla Heublein

Ms. Paige Noland

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman

Northern Trust

Holyfield & Thomas, LLC

Office Depot

John C. and Mary Jane Howard Foundation

Office Depot Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Havlicek

Ms. Lisa Huertas

Oxbow Carbon and Minerals LLC

Mr. Bradford A. Deflin

Jasteka Foundation Inc.

Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Dr. Richard P. D’Elia

Johnson’s Custom Cakes and More

Diver’s Direct

Palm Beach Daily News

JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank

Mrs. Edith R. Dixon

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp

Palm Beach County Film and Television Commission

William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio Jr. Baroness Jeane von Oppenheim Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman Ms. Maryanne Webber Winston Art Group Ms. Susy Witt Ms. Sheryl G. Wood, Esq. Zissu Family Foundation Ms. Anne Zuckerberg

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{next issue – spring 2014}

Soprano Alexandra Rafalo performed with the Lynn University Chamber Orchestra at the Cultural Council's last Muse Awards gala event. Photo: Jacek Gancarz

inspiration from the muses For centuries, authors, poets, playwrights and other artistic souls have turned to the Muses to inspire their creativity. “O Muses, O high genius, aid me now!” Dante Alighieri pleaded in The Inferno. The nine daughters of Zeus and Mnemosyne were celebrated in Greek mythology as the personification of knowledge and the arts, especially literature, dance and music. In our frame of reference, “Muse” signifies a different sort of celebration – the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s Muse Awards gala event, which is coming up on March 13 at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. This year, the Muse Awards will recognize organizations for excellence in historical and cultural heritage, arts and cultural outreach, arts integrated education, festivals and cultural collaboration, while one outstanding individual will receive the Clyde Fyfe Award for Performing Artists. In the next issue of art&culture, we’ll introduce you to the winners of the 2014 Muse Awards and tell you about the good work they have inspired.

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art&culture magazine v8i2 Winter 2014  

As the primary catalyst for Palm Beach County’s thriving cultural climate, art&culture magazine is the official publication for the Cultural...

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