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art culture of Palm Beach County

Fall 2012

ship shape Exhibit celebrates yacht racing during the Gilded Age by John Loring

from glitz to gold Trabert & Hoeffer-Mauboussin cast a stylish spell on 1930s Palm Beach

healing art physicians can be skilled practitioners of art and medicine

PLUS Florida’s leading arts advocate, arts integration in the classroom, Dina Merrill and more


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JEWELLERY DESIGNERS SINCE 1954


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it may last forever but you don’t

have to

keep it that long

Sell the fine jewelry, diamonds and watches you no longer wear to CIRCA. Whether selling a one-carat diamond or an entire estate, CIRCA provides trusted expertise, the best value and immediate payment for your items.

PA L M B E AC H | PA L M B E AC H T OW E RS | 4 4 C O C OA N U T, R OW S U I T E L101 8 5 5.73 9.78 70 | C I R CA J E W E L S .C O M

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{contents}

features

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hollywood style comes to palm beach, 1938-1949 The glittering legacy of legendary jeweler William Howard Hoeffer. By Frederic A. Sharf with Beth Ram

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capturing the cup An exhibit at the Flagler Museum evokes the history and artistry of yacht racing in the Gilded Age. By John Loring

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open wide and say, ‘art!’ Local physicians express their creativity through a variety of artistic pursuits. By David Lawrence

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education grant enables palm beach county school district to move “full STEAM ahead” Science, technology, engineering and mathematics education get a boost from the arts. By Amy Woods

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fall 2012

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N I C O L A S I M B A R I ( B . 1927) Z I N G A R A , 39

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27

INCHES

OIL

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133720

ART WALLY FINDLAY

EST. 1870

Wally Findlay_Fall 12:Layout 1

60 YEARS OF REPRESENTATION NOW ON VIEW IN PALM BEACH

A UNIQUE EXHIBITION OF REPRESENTATIONAL ART BY WORLD RENOWN ARTISTS:

ANDRE HAMBOURG ANDRE VIGNOLES NICOLA SIMBARI GASTON SEBIRE VU CAO DAM JEAN DUFY LE PHO

:257+$9(18(‡3$/0%($&+)/‡7  )   W W W . WA L LY F I N D L AY . C O M


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{contents} departments 16

welcome letter Introducing... the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County! By Rena Blades

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editor’s note The arts are an integral part of our daily lives. By Christina Wood

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upfront • Find one-of-a-kind gifts, intriguing exhibits and exciting adventures in art at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s Lake Worth headquarters. • art&culture earns top honors in statewide competition – again! • A graceful bell tower crowns the new Centennial Plaza in West Palm Beach. • The dynamic role the arts play in our economy was center stage at this year’s SmARTBiz Summit. • Local organizations celebrate major milestones. • The Art of Video Games moves from the Smithsonian to the Boca Raton Museum of Art. • Lake Worth eateries team up to make your next visit to the Cultural Council even tastier. • An exhibit of Bruce Helander’s collages is on the calendar at Art House 429, Old Northwood’s newest gallery. • Palm Beach County pioneer artist Laura Woodward to be inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame.

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art works! The arts not only nourish the soul, they put food on the table. By Christina Wood

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profile Sherron Long battles tirelessly for the arts. By Leon M. Rubin

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portrait Happy memories infuse Dina Merrill’s whimsical watercolors with joy. By Anne Rodgers

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calendar The temperatures are cooling down and the season is heating up, fueled by a sizzling lineup of entertaining events, exhibits and live performances.

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inside culture A new season of Culture & Cocktails will have people talking; the Norton Museum of Art acquires photos by Annie Leibovitz; Delray Beach’s Old School Square evolves into Delray Beach Center for the Arts; and much more insider news.

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Cover Image: Palm Beach Trail by Laura Woodward, watercolor, circa 1900, collection of Edward and Deborah Pollack

fall 2012

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L I V E in the moment HUBLOT RACK’S

VAN CLEEF & ARPELS

MAX’S GRILLE

THE DUBLINER

TANZY

Coming Soon:

JAEGER - LE COULTRE

UNCLE JULIO’S TRULUCK’S SUR LA TABLE

VILLAGIO

Z GALLERIE

RUTH’S CHRIS JAZZIZ

)(-FbWpWH[WbIk_j[)'+"8eYWHWjedšc_pd[hfWha$Yec

TOMMY BAHAMA YARD HOUSE

iPIC THEATERS

LORD & TAYLOR

SPIN


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Patrick Hughes, “The space merchant” hand painted acrylic on wood, 2007, Lelia Mordoch Gallery, Miami+Paris

ArtPalmBeach celebrates its 16th Anniversary at the Palm Beach County Convention Center from January 25th-28th, 2013 with a Preview evening January 24th. ArtPalmBeach is considered one of the most influential contemporary art fairs on Florida’s Gold Coast by both critics and art enthusiasts since its opening in 1997. This year the fair will debut the most extensive program in its history by encompassing premiere events, special exhibitions, topical lectures, special museum tours, site specific art installations, art performances and exclusive VIP programs.

edition www.artpalmbeach.com +1 239 495 9834


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GALLERY

JAVIER BOHORQUEZ 437 Northwood Rd. West Palm Beach, FL 33407

561 313 2404 jabogallery.com | jabo-gallery-2.myshopify.com | jabophotography.com


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THE POINT IS... 3 minutes to ocean, 10 minutes to private airport, 45 minutes to the Palm Beaches, 60 miles to the Bahamas.

sailfish point Hutchinson Island, Florida

Miles of Atlantic shoreline • Nicklaus Signature Golf • Oceanfront Country Club Fitness Complex • Spa/Salon • Yacht Club and Marina minutes to the ocean • North of Palm Beach INQUIRE ABOUT GUEST OPPORTUNITIES

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The Sailfish Point Club is a private facility. Sailfish Point Sotheby’s International Realty is a licensed Real Estate Broker. Each office is Independently Owned & Operated. Equal Housing Opportunity.


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Š 2013 - The Franck Muller Group, All rights reserved

trintytime@aol.com


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...dive into our february show...

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601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460 | 561-471-2901 | www.palmbeachculture.com President & Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Vice President, Marketing & Government Affairs

Bill Nix

561-687-8727 bnix@palmbeachculture.com

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Mary Lewis

561-472-3340 mlewis@palmbeachculture.com

Shawn Berry

561-472-3347 sberry@palmbeachculture.com

Debbie Calabria

561-472-3330 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Kristen Smiley

561-472-3342 ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com

Nichole Hickey

561-471-3336 nhickey@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

Laura Tingo

561-471-1602 ltingo@palmbeachculture.com

Lawrence Jean-Louis

561-472-3334 ljeanlouis@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Contributing Writer/Editor

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Visitor Services Coordinator

Marlon Foster

561-472-3338 mfoster@palmbeachculture.com

Autumn Oliveras

561-471-2901 aoliveras@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance Director of Grants Director of Development Manager of Arts and Cultural Education Membership & Special Projects Manager Development Associate Manager of Artists Services Grants Manager Public Relations Coordinator Marketing Coordinator Bookkeeper

Administrative Assistant Volunteer Bruce Helander, Diver, 2012, 12.25 x 4.75 in. Original

Cultural Council Board of Directors

paper collage on museum board (also available as limited edition print).

Bruce Helander new works

Collages, Paintings & Prints For information on our opening, artists reception and to join our mailing list, please go to: WWW.ARTHOUSE429.COM

or call (561) 231- 0429 429 25TH ST. WEST PALM BEACH, FL

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Pat Thorne

Officers Berton E. Korman, Chairman Craig Grant, Vice Chairman Michael D. Simon, Secretary Michael J. Bracci, Treasurer

Bradford A. Deflin Cecile Draime Shirley Fiterman Roe Green Christopher E. Havlicek Herbert S. Hoffman Irene J. Karp Raymond E. Kramer, III Beverlee Miller Bill Parmalee Jean Sharf

Directors Bruce A. Beal Carole Boucard Howard Bregman Christopher D. Canales

Kelly Sobolewski Dom A. Telesco Ethel I. Williams Ex Officios Jennifer Prior Brown Paulette Burdick Cheryl Reed

Cultural Council Founder Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Steven L. Abrams, Chairperson Priscilla A. Taylor, Vice Chair

Mary Lou Berger Paulette Burdick Jess R. Santamaria

Hal R. Valeche Shelley Vana


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art&culture of Palm Beach County

fall 2012 - volume 7, issue 1

publisher publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

561.472.8769 robert@passportpublications.com

editorial staff managing editor business editor editorial coordinator

christina wood

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com 561.472.8768 westlund@passportpublications.com 561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

richard westlund bradley j. oyler

cultural council editorial staff editorial director

Charming... Intimate... Historic...

rena blades

executive editor

bill nix

managing editor

leon m. rubin

contributing writers m.m. cloutier, jan engoren, sheryl flatow, david lawrence, john loring, anne rodgers, leon m. rubin, frederic a. sharf, thom smith, jean tailer, don vaughan, christina wood, amy woods

contributing photographers harry benson, steven caras, jim fairman, christopher fay, jacek gancarz, barry kinsella, michael price, robert stevens, corby kaye’s studio palm beach

Experience our traditional values in hospitality blended with an original

art & design art & production director

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

rebecca m. lafita

561.472.8762 art@passportpublications.com

expression of the past and the present. 32 spacious guest rooms and suites, full

graphic designer

kitchens and luxury amenities. Relax in advertising sales

style in our tropical courtyard with gourmet delights from C’est Si Bon or enjoy Trevini Ristorante, an upscale Italian Bistro with an artful approach to classic Italian cuisine. For pleasure or business,

director of advertising national advertising manager signature publications

richard s. wolff

561.472.8767 richard@passportpublications.com

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

richard kahn

561.906.7355 rich@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

you will be pleasantly surprised with our first class accommodations and personalized attention. The Bradley Park Hotel, the Best Kept Secret in Palm Beach!

280 Sunset Avenue, Palm Beach, Florida 33480 561/832-7050 | 800/822-4116 www.bradleyparkhotel.com info@bradleyparkhotel.com

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senior advertising manager contract administrator

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the County Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.


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Call, click, or stop by to start a conversation today. W E L L S FA R G O . C O M

|

1 - 8 0 0 -T O - W E L L S

Š 2012 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (738938_06563)


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WELCOME TO

art&culture

fromtheceo

What’s in a name? William Shakespeare posed the question memorably in Romeo and Juliet, of course, and it’s one that began to cross our minds more than two years ago as we contemplated our move to our new home in Lake Worth. This organization came into being in 1978 as the Palm Beach County Council of the Arts and, in 1992, took on the name with which it’s been known for two decades: the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. While the name served us well, a few issues surfaced over the years that convinced us the time was right for a change. First and foremost, people sometimes assumed that we were a county agency rather than an independent non-profit organization. Since our ability to raise private funds is critical to our success, our board felt that it would be advisable to clarify what we are – and what we’re not. From a practical standpoint, people generally referred to us as simply “the Cultural Council” anyway. And so, this summer, we proudly announced our new name and brand: the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. While the difference might appear at first glance to be small, it’s huge philosophically. By this I mean that our new name puts “culture” first. As an organization that is dedicated to enhancing the cultural community and the creative industries, this makes an incredibly important statement. We are the Cultural Council that serves Palm Beach County’s professional artists, nonprofit cultural groups and arts educators, as well as the visitors and residents and children who

Michael Price

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enjoy all that Florida’s Cultural Capital has to offer. Our new name makes this point with remarkable clarity. As you will see on this page and elsewhere in this magazine, we’ve introduced a new logo to go along with our name. This process, too, required a great deal of thought and creative energy. Our board played a key role through a task force spearheaded by the late Geoffrey Neuhoff, while our own marketing team also was integrally involved. For the design, we are deeply indebted to Passport Publications and Angelo LoPresti, its art and production director, who worked through numerous iterations to get it just right. We believe that the logo perfectly captures the personality of the Cultural Council while honoring the history and spirit of our new headquarters in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building. As we approach our 35th anniversary, it is exciting that we’re continuing to grow and evolve in serving the cultural community. This commitment is reflected in our name, our logo, our building and the many services we provide. We are grateful to everyone who helped us through this transition and look forward to building our new brand in the months and years ahead.

Rena Blades

Rena Blades President and CEO Cultural Council of Palm Beach County


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Sargent Architectural Photography

Smith Architectural group, Inc.

Palm beach • 561.832.0202 www.smitharchitecturalgroup.com


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ONE DAY AT A TIME Your day may start with a song on the radio coaxing you awake and end with the entertaining escape offered by a good book or movie. In between, you might drink in the refreshing palette of a painting while sitting in a lobby waiting for your next appointment or rely on a line from Shakespeare to make a point. On the drive home, a piece of sculpture commissioned by your hometown might perk up your commute and a ringing guitar riff might alert you to an important call on your cell phone.

fromthe

As Randy Cohen, vice president of research and policy at Americans for the Arts, pointed out during the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s recent SmARTbiz Summit in West Palm Beach, the arts are a fundamental part of life. He was talking about the significance of the arts and culture on a societal level but it’s easy to see that the arts are equally important on a very basic and very personal level. In this issue of art&culture, you’ll find examples of the many ways the arts and artists in Palm Beach County enliven, enrich and enhance your life – and the lives of those around you. In “Full STEAM Ahead” on page 66, we’ll show you how the arts can take STEM education – which involves the left-brain, logic-driven skills associated with science, technology, engineering and math – to the next level by incorporating activities that stimulate the right brain and foster what might be the most essential component of innovation – creativity. Of course, we’re talking about the potential for success when music, visual arts, drama and dance enter the classroom. Creativity and artistic expression are essential to the physicians you’ll meet in “Open Wide and Say, ‘Art’” on page 62. From pianists and photographers to painters and playwrights, they express

Jacek Gancarz

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themselves creatively and draw intriguing parallels between the healing arts and the fine arts. In “Art Works!” on page 30, you’ll find evidence of the powerful impact the arts industry has as an economic generator. In our portrait of the sublime Dina Merrill on page 36, you’ll see how the arts can shape a single life. And, in Leon Rubin’s profile of dedicated arts advocate Sherron Long on page 32, you’ll see how a single life can shape the arts. Regular contributor John Loring turns to an exhibit at the Flagler Museum for evidence of the contribution artists and artisans have made to the sporting world in “Capturing the Cup” on page 50. Frederic A. Sharf and Beth Ram, on the other hand, find stylish evidence of artistic trends in fashion in the historic record. Their look at the legacy of legendary jeweler William Howard Hoeffer in “Hollywood Style Comes to Palm Beach, 1938-1949” is on page 44. The arts nurture our souls and delight our eyes. They create jobs and they entertain us after a long day at work. They even provide memorable gifts that tell the people on our holiday lists how much we really care (see page 28 for one-of-a-kind suggestions from the Uniquely Palm Beach Store!). In fact, I challenge you to envision a day, any day, untouched by art. The arts are simply essential. And this is the season to celebrate them with art&culture. Imagine!

Christina Wood Managing Editor


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Miami OfďŹ ce The Design Square Building 2 NE 40th Street, Suite 401, Miami, FL 33137 (305) 572-1111

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James W. Fairman

{contributors} John Loring was a contributing writer and New York Bureau Chief at Architectural Digest. He served as the design director of Tiffany & Co. for 30 years and has written numerous books on style and social history. John graduated from Yale University, completed four years of graduate studies at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris and has an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts degree from Pratt Institute.

Before launching her freelance career, Amy Woods worked as the society editor of Palm 2 Jupiter and as the editor of Notables at The Palm Beach Post, a position she held for 11 years. An experienced editor, columnist, writer and reporter, Amy’s goal is to use her experience as a journalist and skills in public relations for the benefit of our local non-profit community.

With a lifelong interest in the arts inspired largely by his highly creative parents, Leon Rubin has been writing about arts and culture for 35 years. A former Boca Raton resident, he helped to establish the Boca Raton Cultural Consortium and was actively involved in children’s theater. He now contributes to art&culture virtually from the home that he and his wife, Suzi, share in the mountains above Dahlonega, Georgia.

Anne Rodgers is an author and freelance journalist who lives in West Palm Beach. She was a writer and columnist at The Palm Beach Post for seven years. She has just completed her first book, Kiss and Tell: Secrets of Sexual Desire from Women of all Ages, which will be published in the spring.

Frederic A. Sharf is a collector, scholar and author. His interests lie in publishing and exhibiting original material which illuminates 20thcentury events and in exploring the evolution of 20th-century design.

David Lawrence, a freelance writer based in South Florida, has written Florida travel books for National Geographic and Knopf/Random House, as well as feature stories for National Geographic Adventure, Writer’s Digest and City & Shore magazines.

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S o m e t h i n g To N i b b l e O n Satisfy your Appetite for Value The next time you attend an event at the Cultural Council, you can satisfy your appetite for Palm Beach County’s delicious homegrown culture and sink your teeth into some tasty savings. When you participate in an artist-led tour, community meeting or engaging lecture at the Cultural Council’s headquarters at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth, you’ll be eligible to pick up a Restaurant Club Card and enjoy delicious offers from Lake Worth eateries while you’re in the area attending Council events. The Council’s Restaurant Club allows you to take advantage of exclusive same-day discounts and special offers from local restaurants, such as Dave’s Last Resort & Raw Bar, Kilwin’s Chocolate & Ice Cream, La Bonne Bouche, Paradiso, Rotelli, South Shores Tavern & Patio Bar, visit www.palmbeachculture.com The Cottage, Toojay’s and more!

FOR

more information

P e r s o n a l To u c h Pioneering Ar tist Enters Hall of Fame

The Envelope Please

Palm Beach County pioneer artist Extra! Extra! Laura Woodward (1834-1926) has been selected for induction into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame, where she will join For the second time in its relatively brief luminaries such as Martin Johnson lifespan, art&culture received the coveted Heade, Zora Neale Hurston, Gloria “Charlie Award” for “Best Overall Magazine” in Estefan, Ernest Hemingway and Addison the association category of the Florida Mizner. Magazine Association’s statewide competition Woodward came to Florida in the to recognize publishing excellence. art&cul1880s and, according to Deborah Pollack, ture previously won the “Charlie” in 2007 folauthor of Laura Woodward: The Artist lowing its debut year. The magazine also Behind the Innovator Who Developed received a Bronze Award for “Best Use of Palm Beach, became one of the most Photography” this year. extensively traveled artists in the state, Since 2006, art&culture has been recogbraving the alligator-, panther- and bearnized 10 times in the Charlie Awards cominfused landscape to depict Florida’s natu- Palm Beach Trail by Laura Woodward, petition – three “Charlies,” two silvers and watercolor, circa 1900, collection of Edward ral beauty in colorful watercolors and oils. and Deborah Pollack five bronze. “That’s no small feat – and it One of the first professional women artists makes us all very proud,” says Rena Blades, to paint in the Everglades and Miami, Woodward is said to have inspired Henry president and chief executive officer of the Morrison Flagler. “Palm Beach County can be proud of the woman artist who led to Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. its development and first showed and promoted its natural beauty to the world,” “We’re grateful to our colleagues at Pollack says. Passport Publications, our own staff and Pollack’s biography of the artist, published the many contributors who work so hard with the Historical Society of Palm Beach County, to produce this outstanding publication.” is available at the Johnson History Museum gift shop in West Palm Beach and online. visit www.LauraWoodwardArtist.com

FOR

more information

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{upfront}

Spotlight On Art House 429 Ups the Creative Energy in Old Northwood Following in the footsteps of Manhattan galleries in SoHo and Chelsea that took advantage of large, affordable exhibition spaces away from the mainstream, Art House 429 is opening its doors in the heart of West Palm Beach’s historic Old Northwood business district. The new venture by interior designer and sculptor William Halliday, which opens at 429 25th St. in January, will have an exquisite exterior design that complements the interior spaces – including Halliday’s working studio. A landscaped courtyard will serve as a sculpture space for large-scale works and open-air receptions. The gallery will present an eccentric mix of nationally recognized artists, such as Robert Zakanitch who has exhibited at the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney in New York, as well as local mid-career talent, such as sculptors Susie Phipps Cochran and Edwina Sandys, painters Donna Long and Raul Vega and the young art star Asif Hoque. “This new innovative gallery is a very positive sign for the continued creative energy and business growth that is exploding in this historic neighborhood and I am proud to be a part of it,” says acclaimed collage artist and Palm Beach resident Bruce Helander, who will have a oneman show at Art House 429 in February.

FOR

more information call (561) 231-0429 or visit www.arthouse429.com

On The Map The Arts Mean Business PNC and the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County teamed up once again to present the second annual SmARTBiz Summit 2012. The day-long conference highlighted the results of the Arts & Economic Prosperity IV Study by Americans for the Arts, which reveals the powerful economic impact of non-profit arts and cultural organizations. “PNC and the Cultural Council are very excited about collaborating for our second SmARTBiz Summit, to assist bringing the business community and arts and cultural organizations together,” Rena Blades, president and chief executive officer of the Deputy County Administrator Verdenia Baker Cultural Council, says. (left) and Palm Beach County Commissioner Shelley Vana at the SmARTBiz Summit Special guest presenter Randy I. Cohen, vice president of research and policy for Americans for the Arts, opened the summit by speaking about the results from the Arts & Economic Prosperity Study IV that show the quarter-billion-dollar impact of the cultural industry in Palm Beach County. Katherine Oliver, commissioner of the New York City Mayor’s Office of Media and Entertainment – who made a virtual appearance as a result of Hurricane Sandy – spoke on “New York City: A Model for Growth” during the lunch program. Attendees at the conference also participated in a series of professional development workshops for non-profit cultural and community leaders on strategies for successful and sustainable businesses. With the PNC Foundation’s generous contribution of more than $40,000 this year, the Cultural Council was also able to award nine SmARTBiz grants to arts and cultural organizations in Palm Beach County to help improve operations and build capacity. The 2012 SmARTBiz grant recipients are the Arthur R. Marshall Foundation, Artists Showcase of the Palm Beaches, Centre for the Arts at Mizner Park, Historical Society of Palm Beach County, Loggerhead MarineLife Center, Palm Beach Photographic Centre, Puppetry Arts Center of the Palm Beaches, Schoolhouse Children’s Museum & Learning Center, and The Children’s Museum.

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girls weekend just got better

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{upfront}

On The Map

Outside The Box

C e n t e n n i a l B e l l To l l s for Palm Beach County

The Boca Raton Museum of Art Scores Innovative Exhibit

Robin Hill

We, the people of Palm Beach County have a new place to gather – a public assembly plaza situated between the restored 1916 Courthouse and the County Governmental Center in downtown West Palm Beach. Artist Barbara Grygutis’ design for the plaza pays homage to the area’s native coastal hammock environment. In her research, Grygutis encountered the concept of the “green wall” − the difficult-to-penetrate vegetation that covered this land. The plaza’s landscape and hardscape develop “The Green Wall” concept into a sculptural environment that draws on imagery, form and color from the region’s native plants. The luminous green tile on the pavilion wall is a metaphor for the beads of light that sift through the native landscape canopy. The plaza’s trees, shrubs and perennials are native to this region. The Sabal Palm inspired the shade canopy and bell tower. Like town squares of old, one of the plaza’s central features is a bell tower – and in this case, the bell has a special history all its own. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County raised private funds to design and construct the bell tower and install the suitably massive bronze bell that commemorates the centennial of the county, which was established in 1909. The donors, each of whom contributed $1,909 to this portion of the project, are recognized on a granite plaque beneath the tower. The centennial plaza was developed under the auspices of the county’s Art in Public Places Program. The new Palm Beach County Centennial Plaza

FOR

more information visit http://pbcgov.com/fdo/art/ completed/centennialplaza/

The Boca Raton Museum of Art will be the first museum in the nation to host the Smithsonian American Art Museum’s groundbreaking exhibition The Art of Video Games following its enormously successful presentation in Washington. Running through January 13, the exhibit explores the 40-year evolution of video games as an artistic medium, focusing on striking graphics, creative storytelling and player interactivity. During its stay in South Florida, the Boca Raton Museum of Art will offer a variety of associated programs and educational opportunities for visitors of all ages and interests. “Video games are a prevalent and increasingly expressive medium within modern society,” says Chris Melissinos, curator of the exhibit and former chief gaming officer for Sun Microsystems. “In the 40 years since the introduction of the first home video game, the field has attracted exceptional artiscall (561) 392-2500 tic talent.”

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more information

or visit www.bocamuseum.org

BY THE NUMBERS Every year brings more to celebrate WXEL TV, the area’s public television station, first signed on the air in 1982. This year marks not only 30 years of service to the community for the PBS affiliate but also the beginning of a promising new chapter in the station’s life following its sale to a local management group. Now under the control of a dynamic local non-profit board, WXEL is being re-born as a community-based non-profit educational television station serving the Palm Beaches and Treasure Coast. A dedicated group of artists, art teachers and community activists was responsible for the formation of the Armory Art Center in 1986. As the West Palm Beach landmark marks its 25th anniversary, there’s much to celebrate. Over the years, countless students have been educated and works of art have been exhibited in more than 400 shows. Visiting Master Artists from all over the United States have taught special classes; the opportunity to hone their artistic skills has been made available to more than 30 Artists-In-Residence – promising young artists given the opportunity to create a body of work while teaching. Here’s to the next 25! Congratulations also go out to the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, which is celebrating its 10th season. In its short life, the Maltz has made a name for itself among Florida’s professional theaters as well as local audiences. A member of the prestigious League of Resident Theatres, the Maltz has earned numerous Carbonell Awards, South Florida’s highest honor for artistic excellence.

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The 411 On 601 Looking for information on the exhibits, events and excitement brewing at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth? We’ve got it!

The Art of Gift Giving This year, give gifts from the heart… of Palm Beach County! The Cultural Council’s “Uniquely Palm Beach Store” features distinctive artist-made jewelry, handbags, accessories and books. Every item in the store is produced in the county – either by professional artists who live and work here or by the cultural organizations that call Palm Beach County home. To date, 60 professional artists and cultural organizations are represented on the shelves, walls and display cases of the “Uniquely Palm Beach Store,” which boasts more than 1,200 items ranging in price from a few dollars to a few hundred dollars. Best of all, anything purchased at the “Uniquely Palm Beach Store” will not only make an impression, but will also help support the Cultural Council’s artist programs.

Tom Otterness, Battle of the Sexes (detail), 1982; Cast plaster and paint

Do You See What I See? Hit the Road

A whimsical collection of drawings and sculptures by internationally recognized artist Tom Otterness will be on display at the Cultural Council’s Following successful outings to Lake Worth headquarters through March 2. Known primarily as a public artist – his work and West Palm Beach, the first season of the adorns parks, plazas, subway stations and museums in New York and other Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s “Art cities around the world – Otterness displays a more intimate approach to art on the Road” bus tours will wrap up with a in exhibits that have been seen in New York, Indianapolis, Beverly Hills, the journey to artist studios and galleries in Palm Hague, Munich, Paris, Valencia, Venice – and now, Lake Worth! Beach on January 23. “These events provide a The Cultural Council is the proud owner of a major work of art by unique, up-close chance for members of the Otterness: Battle of the Sexes, a large frieze installed in the lobby of its community to meet collectors, artists and headquarters in 1982. Paying homage to this frieze, the free exhibition owners of some of the most well-known venwill showcase the work of this acclaimed visual artist in the Cultural ues in Palm Beach County,” says Rena Council’s expansive gallery space and Blades, president and chief executive officer emphasize the process he utilizes to create of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach. The his drawings, sculptures and major public art January tour, which originates at the installations. Visitors will also enjoy a video Cultural Council’s headquarters, will visit call (561) 471-2901 that features Otterness speaking about his the Holden Luntz and Gavlak Gallery as or visit creative process. well as a private collection on the island.

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www.palmbeachculture.com

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Painting a Brighter Economic Picture By Christina Wood

art rt

works! There are more people working for non-profit arts and culture organizations in the U.S. than there are lawyers. “The arts are a fundamental part of our society,” says Randy Cohen, vice president of research and policy at Americans for the Arts, the nation’s leading arts advocacy organization and publisher of the recently released study, Arts & Economic Prosperity IV. “They inspire and delight us. They also contribute to our economy.” In fact, according to Arts & Economic Prosperity IV – the most comprehensive study of the economic impact of the non-profit arts and culture industry ever conducted – the industry supports 4.1 million jobs nationally. In Palm Beach County alone, non-profit arts and cultural organizations are responsible for the equivalent of 5,782 full-time jobs. In other words, the arts represent a deliciously juicy slice of Palm Beach County’s economic pie. Every day, while those outnumbered lawyers are racking up their billable hours, canvases are coming to life, stages are being lit, arias are soaring – and paychecks are being cashed. “The arts are not just food for the soul, they put food on the table,” Cohen recently told a group of cultural executives, business leaders and government officials gathered for the annual SmARTbiz Summit presented by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County and PNC Foundation in West Palm Beach. “When we invest in the arts, we’re investing in local jobs.” Palm Beach County was one of 182 communities across the country – small and large, representing all 50 states – that participated in the Arts & Economic Prosperity IV study. If you were to take into account our local film industry, our commercial galleries and our for-profit concert venues, the data would be even more impressive. Either way, it’s clear that our arts and cultural organizations attract audiences, spur business development, generate government revenue, pro-

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vide the cornerstone for tourism… and create jobs. “We understand the valuable return that investing in the arts and cultural industry can deliver,” says Craig Grant, regional president of PNC Bank for Florida and a driving force behind the SmARTbiz Summit. “Today more than ever, the businesses we attract, the jobs we create and the visitors who extend their stay are drawn by what Palm Beach County has to offer. We must continue creating partnerships with the non-profit arts and cultural community to help strengthen the economic vitality of the region.” Arts & Economic Prosperity IV backs up that argument with data, revealing that America’s non-profit arts and culture industry generates $135.2 billion in economic activity every year – $61.1 billion in direct spending by organizations plus $74.1 billion in event-related spending by audiences. (Think about it: dinner and a show absolutely go hand-in-hand.) In fact, the study shows that an average arts attendee spends $24.60 per event in addition to the cost of admission. The numbers also show that non-local attendees spend twice as much as local attendees ($39.96 versus $17.42), which clearly indicates that when a community attracts cultural tourists – as Palm Beach County undeniably does – it harnesses significant economic rewards. The rewards for Palm Beach County amount to $249.9 million in economic activity annually. Our local non-profit arts and cultural organizations spend $138.9 million each year. They also leverage a remarkable $111.1 million in additional spending by arts and cultural audiences, spending that pumps vital revenue into local restaurants, hotels, retail stores, parking garages and other businesses. The conclusion, Cohen says, is simple: “The arts are not a luxury worthy of supporting only when economic times are good. The arts mean business.”

For more information on Arts & Economic Prosperity IV, including information on downloading and purchasing all study reports, go to www.AmericansForTheArts.org/EconomicImpact or, for study details, visit www.PalmBeachCulture.com.


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happy warrior

Sherron Long Battles Tirelessly for the Arts By Leon M. Rubin

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Sherron Long has never held public office. It’s a pretty safe bet, though, that she’s made a bigger difference in Tallahassee than a host of elected officials who have come and gone in the past 30 years.

Sherron Long speaks to a group in Tallahassee during the annual Arts and Culture Day.

As president of the Florida Cultural Alliance (FCA), Long organizes, educates and inspires a virtual battalion of foot soldiers who are passionate about the essential roles that art and culture play in our state. Representing local arts agencies, non-profit cultural organizations and the population at large, they share a common goal: to protect, preserve and – whenever possible – pump up Florida’s investments for arts and culture. “The longer I do this, the more I realize it never gets easy,” observes Long, who lives in West Palm Beach. “Policymakers are constantly changing. It’s an ongoing educational process to make sure policymakers see how valuable these resources are − to provide the economic argument, the tourism argument, the downtown-revitalization argument… to explain that arts and culture are part of the solution.” She rattles off facts and figures to support this case with ease: For every dollar the state invests in arts and culture, $5 is returned to local and state treasuries. Florida is home to 52,869 arts-related businesses that employ 184,708 people. In 2008, Florida’s arts and culture not-for-profit industry generated more than $3.1 billion in local economic activity − $1.4 billion spent by the not-for-profit arts and cultural organizations themselves and $1.7 billion in event-related spending by their audiences. And these are just the beginning. In the state of Florida and at the national level, arts advocacy requires constant vigilance, unflagging energy and the ability to recognize that, despite everyone’s best efforts,

outcomes frequently fall short of expectations. Indeed, according to FCA, funding by the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs of state appropriations for arts-related grants is down 73 percent since 2006-2007. But Long never seems to lose hope – and, in fact, funding has been modestly restored in the last two budget years. “There is state support for the arts and culture in Florida today principally because of the force of Sherron’s indefatigable determination and her lifelong commitment to making Florida a better place for families, business, tourism and artists,” observes Michael Spring, chair of the Florida Cultural Alliance and director of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs. “Her ability to mobilize facts, figures and people – at the leadership and grassroots levels – is complemented by her unparalleled ability to advocate passionately and persuasively. It is simply impossible to say ‘no’ to anything that Sherron asks,” Spring says.

another place Long’s passion for the arts began at an early age. “I used to love to just get up and dance when I heard music. It put me in another state of mind, another place,” she recalls. Everything became clear during her senior year in high school, when she and her classmates took a trip to New York to experience culture in a way that wasn’t possible in Jacksonville, Fla., in 1967.

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unsung hero

Sherron Long talks with Florida legislators in Tallahassee.

“It’s a corny story, but a true story,” she explains. “We went to see Richard Kiley in Man of La Mancha. I saw how it transformed some of the members of the audience. That’s when I decided to major in theater.” She went on to earn a B.A. in speech and drama from Valdosta State University and, later, an M.F.A. in directing from Florida State University. After a stint as a teacher, she applied for a job as a theater specialist at the Florida Division of Cultural Affairs. Over the next five years, she gained an understanding of the inner workings of state government and had the chance to wrap her arms around the breadth and depth of Florida’s cultural community. Also during that time, in 1981, she created the Florida Professional Theatres Association (FPTA) − one of three statewide associations that she now manages. In 1983, Long left Tallahassee to join the Palm Beach County Cultural Council (today’s Cultural Council of Palm Beach County). Working with former President and CEO Will Ray, she created the Cultural Council’s first grants program – an achievement that she continues to find satisfying. “I am proud that the program still exists and maintains a great relationship with the county,” she says. Also in the early ‘80s, Long and a number of other arts and cultural leaders across the state became aware of a growing national arts advocacy movement. Following an organizational meeting in Tampa in 1983, the Florida Cultural Alliance was born, with Long as one of the co-founders. She got involved with the Florida Association of Local Arts Agencies in 1998 and now manages that organization, as well.

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To say that the Florida Cultural Alliance offers resources for cultural organizations is a bit like saying that the Smithsonian Institution houses a few artifacts. “Encyclopedic” is closer to the mark. You could probably qualify for a political science degree by the time you read every page and followed every link on the FCA website. But that’s what Long does – and she does it very well. “Sherron has been a longtime advocate for state funding for the grant programs at the Division of Cultural Affairs,” says Sandy Shaughnessy, the division’s director. “This comes out of her lifelong commitment to the arts and Sherron’s discovery of her talents as an arts advocate early in her career. She is a happy warrior who trudges up to Tallahassee every session to educate our lawmakers about the benefits of public support of the arts in Florida.” Bill Hayes, producing artistic director of Palm Beach Dramaworks and FPTA’s current chair, agrees. “I have known no other person who has devoted so much personal time and energy fighting for the arts,” he says. “She also spends much of her time educating, uniting and promoting theater organizations and individual artists. During these turbulent economic times, it is imperative for the survival of the arts that we have those few unsung heroes like Sherron fighting for us and encouraging unity and community.” Long also applies her energy and expertise at the national level – and commands similar respect. For example, she is the immediate past chair of Americans for the Arts’ State Arts Action Network. Jay Dick, senior director of state and local government affairs for Americans for the Arts, calls her “a tireless arts advocate,” adding, “She is a role model to her peers and an inspiration to others. She is a great teacher, taking the time to pass on her experiences to allow younger advocates the benefit from her life’s work. She does everything with great passion, which is evident to everyone she meets.” After 30 years of fighting the good fight, Long could be forgiven if she got frustrated or discouraged – but there’s no sign that she’s ready to call it a day. “It’s constantly staying on top of what’s going on, keeping your constituencies informed and making sure that they know what they need to do,” she says. “Some people still think of the arts as nice, but not necessary. We need to shift that thinking so they think of the arts as absolutely essential. The return on the investment is astronomically large on so many levels.” What keeps her going? “I just believe that the arts are so vitally important to us,” Long continues. “I’ll keep doing this until I can’t. What it does for our souls and our individual beings; it makes us better human beings. That leads to better communities and a better world. It’s a win-win all the way around. “I can’t think of any other industry that has that kind of power,” Long says matter-of-factly. “It’s really that simple.”


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QA

sherron

&

with Sherron Long

You’ve taught at both the high school and university level. What did you enjoy about teaching?

Are you considered a lobbyist? I’m not registered as a lobbyist. I focus on the research and the analysis. I provide information and work to keep people informed and engaged in the process. Frank Meiners − our lobbyist in Tallahassee − and I work together as a team. The two of us talk almost daily during the legislative session.

Are you constantly on the road?

Florida Association of Local Arts Agencies falaa.net FALAA is a statewide service organization for Florida’s local arts agencies − including notfor-profit organizations (such as the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County) and city or county government agencies − that represent the interests of arts and cultural resources in their respective counties or cities.

Do you ever rest? I went to Italy in October. I hadn’t taken a vacation in six years. I didn’t realize how much I needed to get away from the computer and telephone.

What were some highlights of your visit? I got to tour Pompeii. It was wonderful to see the art and architecture; it reminded me how these creative forces have been a part of us as human beings for centuries and centuries. To see the remnants of paintings on the wall and the mosaics on the floor… this is part of who we’ve been since the beginning of time. The trip re-energized me to keep speaking up in today’s world for the arts, knowing they bring economic and qualitative values to all of our lives today and tomorrow.

Florida Professional Theatres Association www.fpta.net FPTA organizes annual statewide professional auditions and workshops for established and emerging actors and works to advance the interests of the state’s professional theater companies (including the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and Palm Beach Dramaworks in Palm Beach County). ABOVE: In June, Sherron Long received the 2012 Alene Valkanas State Arts Advocacy Award from the State Arts Action Network (SAAN) of Americans for the Arts. The award honors an individual whose arts advocacy efforts have dramatically affected the political landscape at the state level.

portfolio

I go to Tallahassee three to four times a year for individual meetings with key members of the Legislature, Arts and Culture Day, and committee presentations when needed. I’m in DC at least once a year for Americans for the Arts’ National Arts Advocacy Day. I work out of West Palm Beach most of the year and travel to meetings throughout the year at various locations, both within and out of the state.

Florida Cultural Alliance www.flca.net Recognized by Americans for the Arts as Florida’s official statewide arts advocacy organization, FCA is a statewide network of individuals and organizations who work to sustain and advance Florida’s diverse arts and cultural resources. Membership in the Florida Cultural Alliance is available to individuals, businesses and arts and cultural organizations. To become a member, visit www.flca.net/ pleasejoin.html.

l o n g ’s

It was a very meaningful experience for me. It reinforced in my heart and mind that the arts are really powerful − especially for young people. It teaches them to believe in themselves and to explore the creative aspects of their personalities. It changes how they think about themselves and how they interact with others. Studying and experiencing the arts help develop skills that are needed in today’s workforce. Even after all the research on the value of arts education, as arts advocates we still have to constantly fight for these arts-learning opportunities for our students.”

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DINA MERRILL Mixes Memories and

Watercolors By Anne Rodgers

Movie star Dina Merrill may be best known for her starring roles during Hollywood’s Golden Age but next month the high-society heiress turns a page in her abundant book of life with her first local artwork exhibit. As a part-time Palm Beach resident, Merrill has been studying technique for two years with Ted Matz, the chair of painting and drawing at Tequesta’s Lighthouse ArtCenter. Now she’s unveiling a collection of her colorful and whimsical watercolors, many of birds and butterflies, in an ArtCenter exhibit Jan. 17-March 13. In February, she will serve as honorary chair for the ArtCenter’s Annual Beaux Arts Ball. Though the passion is a recent one for the daughter of E.F. Hutton and Marjorie Merriweather Post, the stillglamorous Merrill draws inspiration for her paintings from the happy childhood she enjoyed before her parents’ divorce when she was 11. “As a girl I grew up on Sea Cloud, our family’s sailing yacht,” she recalls. “We traveled all around the world – to the Galapagos Islands before anyone had been there and to islands in the Pacific. I fell in love with the colors, the radiance of the birds and fish in the tropical climates; somehow that all came out as I learned to mix watercolors.” Merrill hadn’t considered art as a vocation because, even as a child, her heart was set on the stage and movies. “My crush at 10 years old was Cary Grant!” she says. “I dreamed of being in a movie with him.” That dream, incidentally, was realized in 1959, when she appeared with Grant in Operation Petticoat. Merrill’s local history is, of course, tied to her childhood home, Mar-a-Lago, and she retains fond memories of life there. “My father created it as a present to my mother and was so enraptured with it. He would

take me around that big house with all its bedrooms and corners to find things that I never could have found myself. “I’ve always thought of Palm Beach as a happy place,” she continues. “I remember as a tiny child when my mother and father’s private railroad cars would be pulled down from New York and tracked into a siding beside the Breakers Hotel. The excitement of being able to sleep in a bed on the train and then wake up and step out into our cottage on the beach made me so happy I would giggle.” Merrill and her husband, former actor and ex-pilot Ted Hartley, still love Palm Beach enough to make it their home six months of the year. They began a tradition of informal art lunches – painting class in the morning with buffet lunch to follow – a couple of years back. “I liked the idea of doing something with friends that was creative and would give us all a chance to express ourselves in a new way,” Merrill says. “As an actress, I loved the power of words on the stage and onscreen but I wanted to express myself in a new way.” “What’s remarkable is that she gives her paintings so much personality,” her teacher says. “She’s come quite far and gets a lot of joy from the work. She’s not out to impress anyone; she just loves doing them. She puts her soul into the process and it comes out in her painting.” Matz’ fondness for his famous pupil is irrepressible. “I love her. She’s one of the most delightful people I’ve ever met,” he says. “She’s a true lady, and there are not many ladies around anymore.”  Dina Merrill with her teacher, Ted Matz, and one of her paintings Photo by Katie Deits

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December

A world-class exhibition from the United States Holocaust Memorial Museum, Fighting the Fires of Hate: America and the Nazi Book Burnings, is on view through Jan. 6 at the Mandel Public Library of West Palm Beach. Foreshadowing the horrors to come, the book burnings were decried in America and helped rally support for the war effort. 411 Clematis St., 561-868-7715 or www.wpblibraryfound.org. Book burning in Opera Square. Berlin, May 10, 1933. Photo by U.S. Holocaust Memorial Museum/NARA

Your hunt for treasure has only just begun! Treasure! – a 5,000-square-foot interactive adventure at the South Florida Science Museum – features hands-on activities and actual artifacts from shipwrecks and other sites. Explore the science, technology, history and personalities of hunters as you join the expedition to uncover treasure. Through Jan 6. 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach; 561-832-1988 or www.sfsm.org.

My, how time flies! The special exhibition Claiming La Florida: On Board with Juan Ponce de León (through June 29) marks the 500th anniversary of Juan Ponce de León claiming Florida for Spain with multimedia, maps, artifacts, archival documents and more. Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach; 561-832-4164 or www.historicalsocietypbc.org.

A Delicate Balance, Edward Albee’s Pulitzer Prize-winning drama, takes the stage at Palm Beach Dramaworks’ year-old Don and Ann Brown Theatre from Dec. 7 to Jan. 6. This classic drama tells the story of a well-to-do Connecticut family whose life is upended when friends, seized by a nameless terror, come to live with them. 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-514-4042 or www.palmbeachdramaworks.org. (From left) Angie Radosh, Dennis Creaghan and Maureen Anderman Photo by Alicia Donelan

Ring in the holidays with Young Singers of the Palm Beaches’ Winter Tapestry 2012 concert. The award-winning community chorus, featuring the voices of 300 talented youngsters, will mix traditional and contemporary holiday music with humor, artistic excellence and an audience sing-along. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; 561-659-2332 or www.youngsingers.org.

For 25 years, the Harid Conservatory has set high standards for dance training in the United States; Harid alumni can be found in leading professional companies around the world. The Harid’s annual Winter Performances on Dec. 15-16 showcase classical ballet, character and modern dance and Harid’s holiday tradition: The Nutcracker, Act II. Countess de Hoernle Theatre, 5100 Jog Road, Boca Raton; 561-998-8038.

G.F. Handel’s immortal masterpiece, Messiah, elevates and enriches the soul every time it’s rediscovered. Masterworks Chorus presents the longest-running traditional performance of this moving musical experience in a spectacular way – featuring brilliant music, stellar soloists and a superb live orchestra. Royal Poinciana Chapel, 60 Cocoanut Row, Palm Beach; 561-845-9696 or www.masterworkschorusofthepalmbeaches.com.

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January

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Two-time Tony Award Nominee Christine Andreas joins Music Director and Conductor Bob Lappin and the Palm Beach Pops for Here’s to the Ladies – a tribute to the great ladies of the American Songbook including Ethel Merman, Barbra Streisand, Judy Garland and more. Jan. 4-6, FAU, Boca Raton; Jan. 8, Eissey Theatre, Palm Beach Gardens; Jan. 9-10, Kravis Center, West Palm Beach; 561-832-7677 or www.palmbeachpops.org.

The wonderfully entertaining musical Singin’ in the Rain floods the Maltz Jupiter Theatre stage with splashy song-and-dance numbers, including the glorious “Good Morning,” “Make ‘Em Laugh” and the title song, during its Jan. 8-27 run. The show highlights the golden age of movie musicals as silent film actor Don Lockwood struggles to enter the world of the talkies of the late ’20s. 1001 East Indiantown Road; 561-575-2223 or www.jupitertheatre.org.

Giuseppe Verdi’s La Traviata is one of the most popular operas ever composed. Emmy Award-winning Renata Scotto returns to direct this sumptuous production featuring an outstanding cast. Set in the glittering and decadent world of 1850s Paris, it weaves the tale of the passionate Alfredo’s love for the beautiful courtesan, Violetta. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; 561-833-7888 or www.pbopera.org.

The 18th annual edition of FOTOfusion – the International Festival of Photography and Digital Imaging – comes to the Palm Beach Photographic Center from Jan. 22-26. It’s “Where Creativity and Technology Fuse,” with exhibitions, seminars and discussions, portfolio reviews, book signings, mini FOTOshoots and much more. 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-253-2600 or www.fotofusion.org. Photo by Douglas Dubler

Eight of America’s most gifted poets, including the winner of the 2012 Pulitzer Prize in Poetry, Billy Collins, will teach workshops and read their work during the Ninth Annual Palm Beach Poetry Festival from Jan. 21-26. Also featuring two extraordinary performance poets, Marty McConnell and Rives; Delray Beach Center for the Arts, 51 N. Swinton Ave.; 561-243-7922 or www.palmbeachpoetryfestival.org.

Art Palm Beach celebrates its 16th anniversary from Jan. 25-28 with the most extensive program in its history, encompassing premiere events, special exhibitions, topical lectures, museum tours, site-specific art installations, art performances and exclusive VIP programs. Preview evening Jan. 24. Palm Beach County Convention Center, 650 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; 239-495-9834 or www.artpalmbeach.com.

An as-yet-untitled world premiere ballet by Liam Scarlett headlines Miami City Ballet’s Program II. It’s a sequel to Viscera, which premiered last season. Also featuring Divertimento No. 15 (Balanchine/Mozart), Duo Concertant (Balanchine/Stravinsky) and Don Quixote Pas de Duex (after Petipa/Minkus). Jan. 25-27, Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; 877-929-7010 or www.miamicityballet.org. Didier Bramaz and Patricia Delgado in Divertimento No. 15. Choreography by George Balanchine ©The George Balanchine Trust Photo by Alexandre Dufaur

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{upfront-calendar}

February

Michael McKeever’s seemingly unlimited creativity

Michael McKeever

is on display in Parade Productions’ The Whole Caboodle – a wickedly funny collection of some of the award-winning playwright’s most celebrated short plays. Audiences will learn what Stephen Sondheim, Abe Lincoln, munchkins and ambivalent lesbians have in common! Feb. 124; the Studio at Mizner Park, 201 Plaza Real, 2nd Floor, Boca Raton; 866-811-4111 or www.paradeproductions.org.

Commemorating the sesquicentennial of the Civil War,

The Coates Brass Band

the New Gardens Band offers a musical look back at the conflict with special guests the Coates Brass Band. These outstanding musicians recreate the role of the 47th Pennsylvania Volunteer Industry Regiment, which served in Florida, with authentic uniforms and instruments. Eissey Campus Theatre, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 561-207-5900 or www.newgardensband.org.

Paper or plastic? In this case, it’s paper! Florida Atlantic University presents Papercuts – an exhibition of intriguing pieces by artists who manipulate, bend and cut paper to create unique works of art. Artists include Jaq Belcher, Béatrice Coron, Michelle Forsyth, Reni Gower, Lenka Konopasek, Lauren Scanlon and Daniella Woolf. Jan. 19 to March 2; Ritter Gallery, FAU Boca Raton; www.fauevents.com or 1-800-564-9539. Indoor Tornado by Lenka Konopasek

The ultimate African circus – Cirque Zuma Zuma – honors the cradle of all cultures and the ultimate source for all music, dance and ritual for humanity to American audiences. Unlike anything you’ve ever seen before, Cirque Zuma Zuma combines mysticism, magic and excitement in a performance filled with non-stop action. Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center, Palm Beach State College, Belle Glade; 561-993-1160 or www.dollyhand.org.

The Levis Jewish Community Center’s Cultural Arts Department offers a full schedule of literary events, concerts, comedy, theater, film and exhibits. Coming up is My Life on a Diet, a one-woman show featuring actress/comedian Renee Taylor – best known for her role as Sylvia, the mother, in the Fran Drescher sitcom The Nanny. Zinman Hall, 9901 Donna Klein Blvd, Boca Raton; 561-558-2520 or www.levisjcc.org. Renee Taylor

The Delray String Quartet’s ninth season continues with guest artist Tao Lin on the piano. Works include Hoffmeister: String Quartet in D major for viola d’amore; Sarasate: Navarra (Spanish Dance) Op. 33 for two violins and piano; Zhou Long: Chinese Folk Songs; and Franck: Piano Quintet in f minor featuring Tao Lin. Colony Hotel, 525 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach; 561-213-4138 or www.DelrayStringQuartet.com.

The 28th Annual ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival Is expected to bring together more than 275 artists and 125,000 guests on Feb. 16-18 in one of the top 50 festivals in the country. Presented by Palm Beach Gardens Medical Center, ArtiGras features a juried exhibition of fine art, live entertainment, interactive art activities for all ages, artist demonstrations and more. Abacaoa Town Center, Jupiter; 561-748-3946 or www.artigras.org.

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Dates are subject to change. For an up-to-the-minute, searchable calendar of cultural events, please visit the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County's website at www.palmbeachculture.com. For more information about individual organizations' schedules, please visit the websites noted in each item.


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Mainstreet at Midtown

The Art of Taste Questions of good taste are artfully answered on Mainstreet at Midtown, whether by fantastic meals from our diverse dining destinations, an inspired new look, unique home accessories, original artworks, or our eclectic array of cultural and entertaining special events year-round.

It’s the art of taste on Mainstreet at Midtown. And it’s just the beginning‌

MAINSTREET AT MIDTOWN WELCOMES: • Emergency Care Services at JFK Medical Center • California Closets • Cachet Nail Spa • Christopher’s Kitchen Expansion • True Mind Centers

THE ART OF BEING SOCIAL

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UPCOMING EVENTS: OCTOBER: 3rd Annual Latin American Food & Wine Festival NOVEMBER: 2nd Annual Midtown Children’s Festival DECEMBER: Luminary Night with live concert

MANY YEAR ROUND EVENTS PLENTY OF FREE PARKING DOG FRIENDLY

midtownpga.com 561.630.6110 4801 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418

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Hollywood Style Comes to Palm Beach 1938-1949 By Frederic A. Sharf with Beth Ram

William Howard Hoeffer was a man in a hurry – and in the fall of 1937 he was on a mission: to scout a location in Palm Beach for a further expansion of his jewelry business. A prominent American jeweler with a shop on Park Avenue at 55th Street in New York, Hoeffer was prosperous even in the Depression-era 1930s. He had locations Nadine Kr akov

Collection

in Detroit, Atlantic City, Los Angeles and on Lincoln Road in Miami Beach.

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Hoeffer (pronounced either Hoffer or Hayfer) had spent part of the summer in Paris, where he sourced his stones. A visit to the Paris World‘s Fair of 1937 convinced him that jewelry styles were about to change, exactly as they had a decade earlier at the 1925 Art Deco Fair in Paris.

ENTREPRENEURS AND MOVIE MOGULS Hoeffer‘s customers tended to come from two segments of 1930s America: newly rich entrepreneurs and Hollywood movie moguls. These customers came to Palm Beach in the 1930s and stayed either at the Whitehall or the Ambassador. Whitehall was built at the beginning of the century by Henry Flagler as his home. When his heirs sold the mansion in 1924, the new owners built a 12-story hotel behind the historic house. Designed by Miami architects Martin L. Hampton and E.A. Ehmann, the hotel opened for the 1926 season. The Ambassador Hotel also opened in 1926 as the Hotel Alba. It became the Ambassador in the 1930s as part of the chain whose flagship property was on Park Avenue at 51st Street in New York. The stock market crash of 1929 forced the owners of White-

hall to sell. A new group headed by Colonel Henry Doherty, a New York entrepreneur (and possible Hoeffer customer), acquired Whitehall and soon bought the Ambassador. Doherty had made his fortune in petroleum, under the name Cities Service Company (later CITGO). Within a few years the group owned the Palm Beach Country Club and built the Sun and Surf Club, so customers of the two lakefront hotels would have access to an oceanfront swimming club and a large golf club. Doherty, who already had hotel properties in South Florida, planned to open the two Palm Beach hotels early in January 1938. The mezzanine level of each hotel had room for a boutique suitable for a jewelry shop. In fact, the well-known Palm Beach jewelry retailer Greenleaf and Crosby had operated such a shop in the Whitehall. It was customary for a resort hotel to have boutiques that catered to a captive clientele. Hoeffer was very attracted to this concept and, based on the results of his scouting expedition, he leased the two hotel locations. In January 1938, Trabert & Hoeffer-Mauboussin opened boutique shops in Whitehall and the Palm Beach Biltmore. Hoeffer

© Flag ler Muse um n Collectio Krakov Nadine

n Collectio Krakov Nadine

stocked his two boutiques with merchandise from Park Avenue and with newly manufactured jewelry. He also offered table-top ornaments and clocks. The shops were identified by the company name, Trabert & Hoeffer-Mauboussin. The corporate entity, Trabert & Hoeffer, specialized in supplying glamorous high-style jewelry to movie stars and wealthy entrepreneurs as well as old families whose wealth was insulated from the Depression. In 1936, Hoeffer had created a formal arrangement with the legendary Paris firm Mauboussin.

LARGER THAN LIFE Hoeffer was a larger-than-life character. Throughout the 1930s he was often credited with providing important jewels to movie stars, who wore them in prominent scenes of the latest Hollywood productions. He was well known on the American social scene, regularly attending elegant dinner parties in New York and elsewhere. He traveled annually to Paris and listed the Mauboussin shop there as one of his locations after his 1936 alliance.

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Trabert & Hoeffer Inc. was incorporated in 1926 in New York. Randolph J. Trabert was the senior partner, whose specialty was purchasing historically significant pieces of jewelry, while Hoeffer was a brilliant strategist and promoter. When Trabert died unexpectedly early in 1930, Hoeffer not only carried on the business, but expanded it steadily. Hoeffer not only sold jewelry, but he also maintained a design studio and manufacturing presence in space behind the shop on Park Avenue. He was a large buyer of rare stones, especially diamonds and rubies. He used these stones to create very stylish and expensive jewelry of all sorts: bracelets, brooches, necklaces, earrings and finger rings. Georges Mauboussin was equally well known in international jewelry circles. After the 1925 Paris Exposition, he began to show his firm’s products in South America and the United States. He was so successful that he opened a small shop in New York and, in 1929, a shop on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach opposite the Everglades Club. Hoeffer often bought stones from


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Mauboussin, thus establishing a personal friendship. Unfortunately, Mauboussin decided to open an elegant salon in New York City at precisely the worst time – October 1929 – and the stock market crash left him very badly exposed; he finally closed the shop in 1935 and auctioned all existing stock. His 1936 alliance with Hoeffer was a convenient way for Mauboussin to keep his name active in the United States and, in 1938, would lead the new entity to create an entirely new jewelry line – the Reflection series.

TRADING GLITZ FOR GOLD When he first opened his hotel boutiques in 1938, Hoeffer was offering the glitzy jewelry for which he was known. When he opened again in January 1939, he offered the new Reflection assortment, which was aimed at a less glitzy customer. One of his inhouse designers had created a series of 14K and 18K gold castings, which could be assembled in various combinations and then set with precious or semi-precious stones. The cast pieces were much less costly than individually formed pieces so the price of a completed item dropped significantly. Hoeffer had seen the shift from glitz to gold – and from pre-

cious stones to semi-precious stones – in 1937 in Paris. He realized that his customers would want pieces that didn’t feature straight lines and patterns, but instead incorporated curves, swirls and romance. Platinum went out of style and yellow gold became the new fashion statement. Geometry was out; fantasy was in. The new series was created in anticipation that the New York World’s Fair in 1939 and 1940 would result in a boom in business. The publicity that the Fair generated was all about “new” and “modern” and “the world of tomorrow.“ Hoeffer was shrewd enough to jump on this bandwagon with his “new” and decidedly “modern” Reflection line. The New York World’s Fair attracted 26 million visitors in the first season and 19 million in the second season. As expected, the publicity was enormous and Hoeffer rode the wave. His Mauboussin jewels were on display at the popular French Pavilion, while his Reflection line was shown at his shop on Park Avenue. The New York World’s Fair was a seminal event in the history of design and style. The official guide proclaimed, “This is your Fair, built for you, and dedicated to you.” No previous World‘s Fair had ever articulated such a message. The most popular exhibits were

© Flag ler Muse um s Edward of Peter ourtesy Photo C

those that displayed consumer products. Color was important. The guide stated, “Color, glorious color is the first impression of the visitor coming into the fair, and the last one as he leaves.” Hoeffer‘s new Reflection series was absolutely in keeping with the fair’s objectives – affordable, colorful and built for ordinary people!

ON TO WORTH AVENUE After two seasons operating hotel boutiques, Hoeffer realized that he was in the wrong location. He opened a shop at 262 Worth Ave., in a space recently vacated by shoe retailer J&J Slater. John J. Slater, a New York socialite and son of the founder, likely knew Hoeffer and was a customer. Hoeffer’s move to Worth Avenue made perfect sense. A decade later, in 1948, the writer Cleveland Amory published a series of articles, ultimately gathered into a book, about the American resorts. He wrote that, “Worth Avenue is undoubtedly the most exciting resort thoroughfare in the country." He considered the three hotels (Whitehall, Biltmore, Breakers) “almost all equally

exciting” and especially attractive when lit up at night. Hoeffer’s magic pervaded the Worth Avenue shop. The Shiny Sheet (Palm Beach Daily News) published a feature story on Reflection jewelry in March 1940. He lined up historic pieces to display in the shop window. The Shiny Sheet commented in March 1942 on a suite of jewelry that supposedly had belonged to Napoleon. Unfortunately, the outbreak of World War II brought an end to the magic. Hoeffer opened the shop on schedule in January 1942, but decided to close after the 1942 season. The military had taken over Palm Beach and all of South Florida. Hoeffer remained closed for 1943 and 1944, but reopened in January 1945. The season that started in January 1949 was his final season in Palm Beach. By then his association with Mauboussin was falling apart and, within a few years, his chain of jewelry stores also was falling apart. He retired in 1956 and went into property development in New Jersey, where he created a lake called Reflection Lake with an entire community surrounding it. He never lost his touch!

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One of a Kind Fine Art

and Jewelry in Palm Beach County Equine Lines – Since its founding in 1870 Wally Findlay Galleries has represented equestrian art, including world renown artists Frederic Remington and Charles Russell. Please visit www.wallyfindlay.com or our Worth Avenue gallery to see our current collection of equestrian art. IMAGE Detail: John Leone (1929 - 2011) Second Chukka, 24 x 36 inches, Oil on canvas Wally Findlay Galleries 165 Worth Ave., Palm Beach www.wallyfindlay.com

Mystique is among the nation’s leading experts specializing in fine jewelry reproductions crafted in solid gold and platinum. Margarita stud earrings set in solid 14K gold, starting at $295.00. Mystique Created Gems 250 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-3008 www.mystiquegems.com

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Rene Lalique Green Glass “Poissons” Vase, Circa 1921. Signed. Height 9.8”24.5cm), Literature: Felix Marcilhac Reference No. 925, Page 422. A B Levy Volume XLIV, Page 14.

A.B. Levy 211 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach (561) 835.9139 www.ablevys.com


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Elegant, sporty and innovative, the Black Croco is a harmonious piece. The case and even the dial seem to be an extension of the black croco strap. Automatic movement, crocodile patterned case and dial- $13,700 The Trinity Collection 27 Via Mizner/Worth Ave Palm Beach FL (561) 659-3364

Inspired by the fluidity of nature, the Flowing Lines Collection was first introduced in 1986. Borrowing influences from Art Nouveau and Art Deco, Flowing Lines conveys a timeless beauty that is bold, feminine and utterly unique. Expressed in soft lines of 18k yellow gold and platinum, this renowned collection embodies the primordial essence of nature, designed to compliment the gentle contours of the female form. Kaufmann de Suisse 210 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 832-4918 www.kaufmanndesuisse.ca

Creativememories-favorites.com, online affordable art gallery, will highlight an exhibition, Salute to the Military, third week in January and introduce art available for sale. Creative Memories Creativememories-favorites.com

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CAPTURING

THE

CUP

Flagler Museum Exhibit Evokes the History and Artistry of Yacht Racing By John Loring

Questioned on the cost of owning a yacht such as his 241-foot Corsair purchased in 1890 for $225,000, J.P. Morgan quipped, “If you have to ask the price, you can’t afford anything!”

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 The schooner yacht America, winner in 1851 of what came to be known as the America’s Cup  Tiffany & Co. silver tankard won by the yacht Surge, (Ludington Boat Club, Lake Michigan), in 1863.

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Palm Beach County’s founding father Henry Flagler could obviously well afford the yachting habit. He owned both a famous sailing yacht, the 112-foot schooner Columbia – which had successfully defended the America’s Cup in 1871 before Flagler bought it in 1883 or 1884 – and the 180-foot steam yacht Alicia, which he occasionally brought to Florida and from which he officially patrolled the America’s Cup race of 1895 for the New York Yacht Club. When the Spanish-American War broke out in 1898, Flagler sold the Alicia to the U.S. Navy, for which it distinguished itself as the USS Hornet by being instrumental in the sinking of 10 ships of the Spanish fleet. Recalling Henry Flagler’s and his second wife Alice’s fondness for yachting, the Flagler Museum’s fall exhibition, Capturing the Cup: Yacht Racing During the Gilded Age, captures through a dazzling array of commemorative silver, yachting paintings and period photographs the spirit of American yacht racing in the second half of the 19th century, when Americans – especially those with considerable fortunes like Flagler – were avid to immortalize their sports activities. A fair number of early 20th century trophies are also included. (The 1930 Lipton Cup is not to be overlooked.) The 19th century’s mania for yacht racing was set off at the time of the 1851 London World’s Fair when Henry William Paget, First Marquess of Anglesey, purchased a tall, Greek Revival-style silver ewer off the shelf from Garrard & Co. in London for 100 pounds sterling. He gave it to the Royal Yachting Squadron for its 53rd annual race around the Isle of Wight – a race to be open to American sailing yachts. The New York Yacht Club’s 178.6-ton America, designed by George Steers and belonging to a syndicate of six, won the race to the amazement of the English – including Queen Victoria herself who was watching at the finish line. In 1857, the still unchallenged cup was given to the New York Yacht Club by the surviving members of the syndicate, where it remained until the United States’ defenders were finally defeated by the Royal Perth Yacht Club’s Australia II in 1983.

 A rare replica of the silver America’s Cup  The 18-karat-gold Lipton Presentation Cup made by Tiffany & Co.

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As the Flagler show demonstrates, the prizes awarded in American yachting were modest in the 1850s compared to the English-made America’s Cup. They tended to be silver tankards, pitchers and pails (to be used as wine coolers) – especially those with barrel stave motifs such as a “wooden” silver pitcher awarded to the America at the New Bedford Regatta in 1856. (Palm Beach resident William I. Koch – winner of an America’s Cup race – has lent his exact replica of the 1851 America’s Cup to the Flagler show.) During the Civil War there was little to no yacht racing (although the Flagler show includes a silver tankard awarded at the 1863, 1864 and 1865 regattas of the Ludington Boat Club on Lake Michigan – far from the war). Such renowned yachtsmen as James Gordon Bennett (of The New York Herald) donated their yachts to the Union Navy – in Bennett’s case his 170ton schooner Henrietta, which was part of the fleet of 28 gunships that captured Fernandina, Fla., from the Confederate States.

 The Goelet Prize for Sloops, made by Tiffany & Co.  The prestigious King’s Cup trophy presented by King Edward VII in 1905

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A pair of six-light candelabra commissioned by New York Herald publisher James Gordon Bennett, October 26, 1875 

After the war, it was back to the races with Bennett in 1866 establishing and winning (with the Henrietta) the first transatlantic ocean race from Sandy Hook, N.J., to the Isle of Wight’s Needles Lighthouse. Trophies, however, were not the young publisher’s priority until after he founded the Evening Telegraph and then, in 1871, was elected commodore of the New York Yacht Club at age 30. As commodore, he commissioned a majestic, silver Ocean Challenge Cup trophy from Tiffany & Co. – complete with Viking ship prow handles, American eagles and Columbus pointing to a globe on top. The Ocean Challenge Cup is not in the Flagler show, but a large and stunning period photograph of the most eccentric of Bennett yachting trophies is. Another Bennett yacht, the 121-foot Dauntless, won a race against William T. Garner’s 141-foot Mohawk in New York Harbor on October 26, 1875. Two massive, six-light candelabra (now lost)  Ogden Goelet and James Gordon Bennett Cup made by Tiffany & Co. in 1894

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Henry Flagler’s steam yacht Alicia, 160’ long at the waterline, built in 1890.

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commemorating the victory featured exultant Native American warriors brandishing knives and scalps representing the Dauntless dancing above glum warriors paddling birch bark canoes representing the Mohawk below them. Native American “trophies” along with bison heads and bison hooves carry out the none-too-subtle theme. The Bennett candelabra were shown by Tiffany & Co. at both the Philadelphia Centennial Exposition of 1876 and the Paris World’s Fair of 1878. The Goelet brothers – mega-rich real estate tycoons Ogden Goelet with his ocean-going Mayflower and Robert with his 319foot Nantua – also commissioned many trophies, and several are at the Flagler. Their tastes veered more toward mermaids and tritons than warriors as seen in the 1889 mermaid-supported Goelet Prize for Sloops won by Manhattan banker C. Oliver Iselin and his

Titania and in the show-stopping Ogden Goelet and James Gordon Bennett Cup of 1894 topped with a swirling, three-dimensional, sculpted crown of seashell horn-blowing tritons. Not to be left out of the craze started in England, Kings Edward VII and George V both presented perpetual King’s Cup trophies to the New York Yacht Club, the first in 1905 and the second in 1912. Both are at the Flagler, as is the handsome, George III-style E. R. Bradley Challenge Cup. Made by English silversmith William Frisbee in 1903, it was presented by Colonel E. R. Bradley to the Palm Beach Yacht Club for use as a trophy for powerboat racing on Lake Worth during the 1920s. The winner for trophy-with-the-best-story in the exhibit is – without a second place – the solid, 18-karat gold Lipton Presentation Cup made by Tiffany & Co. and presented to Sir Thomas Lipton in 1930. Lipton, the Irish-born tea magnate, was unhappy about the America’s Cup never returning to the British Isles after 1851. In 1899, with monies from his great tea fortune, he backed the Royal Ulster Yacht Club’s challenge with his Shamrock I. Lipton didn’t win that year, nor did he win in 1901, 1903, 1920 or 1929 with his Shamrocks II, III, IV and V. To honor his tireless dedication to yachting and his unflaggingly good sportsmanship, American yachting enthusiasts banded together and, with the help of funds solicited from the American people by actor/humorist and The New York Times columnist Will Rogers, commissioned the cup. It was inscribed “a voluntary outpouring of love, admiration and esteem to the greatest loser in the world of sports” and ornamented with Irish shamrocks. When it was presented to Sir Thomas at City Hall by the mayor of New York, Jimmy Walker, on December 4, 1930, Lipton replied, “Although I have lost you make me feel as if I had won.”

The Flagler fall exhibition is open through January 6, 2013.

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“Capturing the Cup” will be on exhibition at the Flagler Museum through January 6, 2013

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Open Wide and Say,

Local Physicians Express Their Creativity By David Lawrence

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‘Art!’

Photos: Left to Right Tim Abou-Sayed (left) and 1 Flight Down perform at this year's Physicians Talent Showcase. Mark Widick, untitled (giant grouper and sardines), photograph, 2012. Mark Widick, STS-120, 2009, photograph, 62 x 59 inches Peter Salomon, Don't Block the Box II, 2011, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 61 inches

Throughout history, doctors and artists have shared common ground. Both fields require skilled practitioners. Success, however, goes beyond technical skill to require flashes of insight and creativity that elevate. That’s why many physicians refer to their work as being a healing art.

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Peter Salomon, On the Edge, 2009, acrylic on canvas, 37 x 61 inches

For many Palm Beach County physicians, channeling the muses is a way to indulge their creativity when they need to express themselves, balance their lives or just unwind. Some doctors pursue arts leisurely while others are passionate. Some are so talented they could survive professionally with their art, if they didn’t love practicing medicine so much.

PAINTING THE PICTURE “In medicine, the patient comes in with a jumble of disparate symptoms which I then put together into a coherent picture,” says Peter Salomon, an attending physician in internal medicine and gastroenterology in Boca Raton and Delray Beach. “The same occurs in painting where I take a group of random disparate paint colors and put them together into a coherent picture. It is the creation of a coherent picture out of the randomness that I get from both art and medicine.” Salomon’s paintings hang in the Home Depot and Subway corporate collections as well as Karen Lynne Gallery in Boca Raton. He paints in acrylic on canvas; his pieces are renowned for their primary colors and bold style. “I paint hyperrealism,” the Boca Raton resident explains. “Actually I call it graphic realism. It looks like posters. I paint urban scenes, New York City, mostly biographical, including the Holocaust and political stuff, because my parents are survivors.” Salomon has loved painting since childhood. After earning a bachelor’s degree, he wasn’t sure if he should continue his studies in art or medical school. “Both are creative,” the self-taught artist says. “If you’re going to do (medicine) right, you think sideways or outside the box. Much of medicine is an art.” There are also important differences. “Medicine is a very intense interaction with another person at their most vulnerable. Often there is no particular end, like with chronic issues, whereas art is solitary with a beginning, middle and end.”

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Art unburdens his soul. “I understand now why people meditate,” he says. “I cannot empty my mind voluntarily, but the intense concentration of painting empties my mind. It’s a major stress reliever, a very positive net activity.” Salomon paints daily, sometimes up to 14 hours if he has the time. Deborah Sponder runs Baker Sponder Gallery in Boca Raton. Three times the gallery has hosted an exhibition called Art & Medicine – the 2009 opening had more than 800 guests – and Salomon, who is more experienced than most of the other local physicians who have exhibited at the gallery, is one of her best sellers. She has sold 14 of his works. “Most of the ones we’ve had are emerging artists,” Sponder says. “Veterinarians, nurses, dentists, anyone in the healing arts can be included in that show.” Some of the doctors are retired and picked up painting in their golden years but many still practice medicine. Ironically, she says, most do not paint scenes from their day jobs. “We thought it’d be interesting to have more medical images but very few doctors did that. Painting is their way of relaxing and getting out, doing something else.”

TECHNICAL MASTERY Tim Abou-Sayed is a plastic surgeon and classically trained pianist who plays in a rock ‘n’ roll band on weekends. The Boca Raton resident jams on the guitar and bass and occasionally blows harmonica riffs. If needed, he can play drums and fill in at the keyboard when a bandmate can’t make a gig. The band is called 1 Flight Down and it performs classic rock covers at restaurants in Lake Worth and at benefits, like the Palm Beach County Medical Society’s annual installation gala in December. “I was tinkering with the piano when I was six years old,” Abou-Sayed admits. “I started playing the theme to Star Wars on the piano by figuring out the notes. Then I studied classical piano for 10 years.” In college he picked up the guitar. He also sings


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Mark Widick, Night Launch, 2010 , photograph, 27 x 86 inches Dr. Mark Widick, STS-120, 2009, photograph, 62 x 59 inches

and writes original music, both instrumental and with lyrics. He agrees that art and medicine share certain qualities. “They’re similar from a technical standpoint of discipline and eyehand coordination and focus on detail. There’s technical mastery in music and surgery. Surgery is creative and yet rational, a logical left-brain activity as well as artistry of the right brain.” Abou-Sayed was one of almost 20 performers at this year’s Physicians Talent Showcase, which benefited Adopt-A-Family of the Palm Beaches. The event was held at City Place in West Palm Beach and was sponsored by Kretzer Piano. “We had a doctor who has performed with Palm Beach Opera and another who sings like James Taylor,” says Kathi Kretzer, the store’s owner. “They were unbelievably talented.”

SECOND OPINION Julie Goldsmith Gilbert is a playwright who divides her time between West Palm Beach and New York’s Upper West Side. She collaborated with West Palm neurosurgeon Robert Brodner on a play about Parkinson’s disease, which is his specialty. “He’s a very vivid character. He’s quite restrained but there’s power and it’s palpable,” she recalls. “I remember thinking, ‘This is so far out of my comfort zone.’” After she watched him operate on a Parkinson’s sufferer, however, she became fascinated with the project and the pair began work on what would become an offBroadway play titled Handshake. “Bob was the information and I was the interpreter of his information,” she says. “We had a play within six months – a first draft – centered on a Parkinson’s sufferer and his family.” A director in New York led a first reading of the play, which called for a huge cast that included nurses and the whole family. That was followed by a couple of readings in West Palm. “All along, Dr. Brodner was hands on,” Gilbert says. “He said, ‘The guy wouldn’t shake like this but like this,’ and then he would show the actor.”

The show was produced in 1999 and received good reviews in Variety and other publications.

THE HEALING ART Mark Widick is an ear, nose and throat surgeon in Boca Raton as well as a photographer par excellence. For years he has captured large images in high resolution by using various panoramic techniques. “I was introduced to photography by meeting one of the most recognizable photographers [Life magazine’s Ralph Morse] when I was eight years old. My father was a NASA engineer and that photographer was covering the space program. And I was like, ‘Dad, I need a camera.’ The first pictures I took were the Apollo liftoff.” Thirty of his images are on display at Patio Delray, a restaurant on George Bush Boulevard in Delray Beach. Some are 6 feet x 6 feet. They feature wildlife, space shuttle and bridge panoramas. In the past couple of years, Widick has branched out to include underwater photography with medium-format cameras. “I shoot a lot with digital cameras in underwater housings now,” he said. “That’s my passion since the shuttle is gone.” Widick compares his passion for photographic art to his surgical work. “I’m constantly reconstructing middle ears after they were destroyed by disease, so I have to think in creative ways how to reconstruct,” he says. “That also tickles my creative side in photography; whether underwater or for the space shuttle, I have to build rigs [for the cameras]." He likes the process of creating art as well as the finished product. “Working on the body or on a camera is a discovery process. I enjoy making them work and the result is always amazing. Sometimes I’ll see a photograph and it takes my breath away – also with a patient; you restore somebody’s hearing and they haven’t been able to hear all their life and it’s exciting. Wow!”

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Education Grant Enables Palm Beach County School District to

Move

FULL

STEAM

AHEAD By Amy Woods

AS

funding cuts chip away at music and arts curricula in public schools, county, state and federal leaders have focused on

initiatives to save such subjects and integrate them into reading, writing and arithmetic classes. In Palm Beach County, the school district is moving “Full STEAM Ahead” with an initiative of the same name. The target of the three-year pilot program: Pioneer Park Elementary, a Title I school in Belle Glade. “Full STEAM Ahead” aims to establish an effective STEAM (science, technology, engineering, art and mathematics) program at the 410-student school that will serve as a model for other elementary schools within the Palm Beach County School District. “Our teachers are learning how the arts can be integrated into the science, technology and math curriculum,” says Adam Miller, Pioneer Park Elementary’s principal. “After three years, our teachers will be well-trained on how to continue to infuse the arts into their instruction.”

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“Full STEAM Ahead” receives its “fuel” from the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties and the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. In 2011, the foundation provided a grant to the council for the creation of a multiagency committee whose members would collaborate on the White House’s “Educate to Innovate” campaign. The campaign challenges public schools to strive for student excellence in the fields of science and math. Committee members found a pathway to the achievement of these goals that leads through the arts. “Basically, the more arts a child participates in, the higher they will perform academically,” explains Lavinia Draper, a teacher at U.B. Kinsey / Palmview Elementary School of the Arts and a Distinguished Fulbright Awards in Teaching Program scholar. “Students tell me over and over again that learning is actually fun in my class. The lower-performing students express their delight in ‘getting it’ through this style of teaching and they become more motivated when they experience how this methodology improves grades and standardized test scores.

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The above-average students stay interested because the arts involve all the senses and critical thinking.” Adrienne Howard, the arts magnet school’s principal, says parents have noticed a difference in their children because of the educational enrichment. “They see the difference that it makes with children when you’re integrating the arts in other curriculum areas and making those types of connections and how it all kind of connects in the world,” she says. “It truly makes a difference. I’ve just become such an advocate for the arts because I see what it does to children.” The Cultural Council selected Pioneer Park Elementary for the pilot program because of its limited exposure to art and culture. “Students in the Glades community have limited access to many of the rich cultural assets of the region,” notes Tina Snider, director of marketing and communications for the Community Foundation. Ninety-nine percent of the school’s students receive free or reduced-price lunches. “By bringing the arts and cultural institutions to the campus, students are afforded the opportunity to experience a rich cultural environment in their daily sur-


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roundings. We look forward to the progression of this pilot program to determine if it will be replicable for other schools.” Shawn Berry, director of education for the Cultural Council, began implementing “Full STEAM Ahead” in August, much to the delight of Pioneer Park Elementary’s faculty members. “Studies all over show that with arts integration the students learn better because it’s hands-on learning,” Berry says. “It’s evident that students learn different ways and we need to be teaching students that way.” Berry has engaged five community organizations to participate in “Full STEAM Ahead” and has hired two teaching artists, Trish Halverson and Jean Hart Howard. Once a month, students in first through fifth grades explore science concepts through programs offered by the Arthur R. Marshall Foundation, Jurassic Parts, the Palm Beach Zoo, Pine Jog Environmental Education Center and The Resource Depot. Then, Halverson and Hart Howard work with the students’ classroom teachers to create lessons that combine science and art in order to help the children interpret these experiences.

“Eighty percent of the student population will increase their knowledge of cultural organizations in Palm Beach County, 80 percent will improve their knowledge of art media and 60 percent will increase their proficiency in science,” Berry predicts. “Also, principals and administrators will become familiar with the cultural resources available in Palm Beach County. This is a model process. It will be tweaked quite a bit before we actually take it and put it into another school but that’s what this is all about.” “Life imitates art more than art imitates life,” Oscar Wilde observed in the 19th century. When “Full STEAM Ahead” completes its cycle at the end of the 2013-14 school year, it will undergo a series of tests, reviews and evaluations to determine whether Wilde’s words still ring true. “We have to really fight to keep arts in schools,” Berry insists. “It enables children to be thinkers and to have a creative side. What STEAM does is enables you to take all of these elements to learn more deeply, think more critically and to make U.S. students more competitive in the world.”

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LUXURY OCEANFRONT PENTHOUSE OPPORTUNITY!

PRIME ANITQUE ROW ART & DESIGN DISTRICT

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West Palm Beach. The 3300 Building is on a highly desirable corner property with 5200 square feet of retail space that has been divided into 4 spaces. Ten foot ceilings for excellent visibility. Convenient on-site parking. $1.495M WEB# 6252

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WEB# 6327 Paulette Koch 561.346.8639, Dana Koch 561.379.7718

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THE HAMPTONS

The Corcoran Group is a licensed real estate broker. Owned and operated by NRT incorporated. We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. We encourage and support an affirmative advertising and marketing program in which there are no barriers to obtaining housing because of race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status or national origin.


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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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{inside culture}

Lila Photo

cultural council news

Iris Apfel

Culture & Cocktails Launches 2012-2013 Season With New Slate of Stimulating Conversations The 2012-2013 season of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s popular Culture & Cocktails series has returned with three one-on-one conversations at the Colony Hotel Pavilion in Palm Beach along with several more at the Cultural Council’s new headquarters in the historic Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in downtown Lake Worth. The series began on November 5 with “CARLETON: A Conversation with Carleton Varney.” The international interior designer, author and design columnist for the Palm Beach Daily News was interviewed by Robert Janjigian, fashion editor for the Palm Beach Daily News, at the Colony Hotel Pavilion. Next up, on December 3 at the Cultural Council, was “ALL THAT GLITTERS - A Conversation between collector Fred Sharf and scholar Beth Ram about Trabert & Hoeffer-Mauboussin, the glamorous jewelers to Palm Beach society during the 1930s and ’40s”

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Gary Beach

Upcoming events (with venues) include: January 7 – “HOPE – A Conversation with Hope Alswang,” executive director and chief executive officer of the Norton Museum of Art; Interviewer: Steven Maklansky, director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art (Colony Hotel Pavilion, Palm Beach) February 4 – “IRIS – A Conversation with Iris Apfel,” International designer and fashion icon; Interviewer: Charlotte Pelton, president of Charlotte Pelton & Associates (Colony Hotel Pavilion, Palm Beach) March 4 – “GARY – A Conversation with Tony Award® Winner Gary Beach,” star of Broadway hits The Producers (he also starred in the film version), Beauty and the Beast, Les Misérables, Annie and more; appeared in numerous TV series including Cheers, Sisters, Queer as Folk and Murder, She Wrote); Interviewer: Andrew Kato, producing artistic director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre (Cultural Council, Lake Worth) Culture & Cocktails, which began in 2006, is generously sponsored by the Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation. Additional support for the series is provided by the Peter and Vicki Halmos Family

Hope Alswang

Foundation / Palm Beach Principal Players, the Palm Beach Daily News and PR-BS, a Boca Raton-based public relations firm. Admission to Culture & Cocktails programs is $50 per person and free for members of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County ($250 level and above). All proceeds go to the non-profit Cultural Council. Each event will run from 5 to 7 p.m., with registration and cocktails from 5 to 5:45 p.m., and the conversation from 5:45 to 7 p.m., including audience Q&A. The Colony Hotel will provide complimentary beverages and an array of specially prepared hors’ d’oeuvres, plus free valet parking. The Colony Hotel is located at 155 Hammon Ave., one block south of Worth Avenue and one block west of the Atlantic Ocean. Attendees at any of the three Culture & Cocktails events at the Colony Pavilion will be offered a free bottle of wine with dinner or two-for-one drinks at the hotel’s celebrated Polo Steaks & Seafoods immediately following the conversation. Anyone interested in attending Culture & Cocktails can make reservations before each event by calling the Cultural Council at 561-472-3330.


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cultural council news

In Memoriam: Geoffrey Neuhoff The entire Cultural Council family was saddened by the untimely death of Geoffrey Neuhoff in July. Neuhoff was a loyal and enthusiastic member of the Council’s Board of Directors. He chaired a task force to carry out the renaming and rebranding of the Cultural Council in concert with its move into the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building. Neuhoff was president and CEO of a thriving radio/television company, Neuhoff Communications. In 2010, he was named “Illinois Broadcaster of the Year” by the Illinois Broadcasters Association, and was honored as an NAB Crystal Award winner. He also served on the board of the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach and was an avid supporter of Loggerhead Marinelife Center, the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, the Palm Beach Infectious Disease Institute and many animal charities.

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The HARID Conservatory

2012-13 Performance Season December 15 and 16, 2012 May 24, 25, & 26, 2013

Alex Srb ©

Classical & contemporary ballets; character & modern dance. See what all the fuss is about! Call 561-998-8038 for tickets. info@harid.edu

O

www.harid.edu

Presenting a New Season of Exciting Exhibitions

Geoffrey Neuhoff

www.norton.org 1451 s. olive avenue, west palm beach, fl 33401

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cultural council news Cultural Events Complement Presidential Debate at Lynn University A wide range of cultural events and activities for students and the community took place throughout Palm Beach County in the days leading up to the October 22 presidential debate on the campus of Lynn University in Boca Raton. And on the night of the big event in the university’s Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center, other cultural venues provided virtual front-row seats. The Cultural Council was represented on the Lynn University organizing team for the debate and provided support for a number of events. The lineup of activities included a Community and Cultural Expo, American Stories as Told Through the Cultural Arts, in Boca Raton’s Mizner Park and an exhibition, Politics NOT as Usual: Quilts with Something to Say, at the Boca Raton Museum of Art (on view through January 13). There were film screenings, lectures, concerts, a “Spin the Vote” event on Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach and – on October 22 – a debate watching party and concert in Mizner Park Amphitheater and a patriotic salute and viewing party at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. On the Lynn campus, the Eugene M. and Christine E. Lynn Library continues to host an exhibit, The Front Row Seat to Presidential History, through January 21. It features more than 100 items from John Clark’s political memorabilia collection, “Presidential Campaign Trail;” artifacts from the personal collections of American Studies professor Robert Watson; items from the collections of Barbara Lucey, Susan Gillis and the Boca Raton Historical Society; a voting machine and infamous butterfly ballot from the 2000 election; and original Illustrations by Chan Lowe, awardwinning Sun-Sentinel political cartoonist. To learn more about how Lynn University and the county at large rallied around the presidential debate, visit http://debate2012.lynn.edu/.

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{inside culture} cultural council news County’s Artists Detail Need for Support Professional artists who live and work in Palm Beach County had the opportunity to speak candidly about their needs earlier this year through a Workforce Development for Artists project conducted by the Cultural Council. More than 200 individuals made their feelings known via an online survey and a series of four conversations around the county. As a result, the Cultural Council has a much clearer sense of how it can provide the support they need to grow and succeed. The process came about in conjunction with the Council’s move to its new headquarters. While it has actively supported artists since the late 1970s, its principal focus has been the development of arts organizations rather than the needs of individual artists. The assessment project was designed to answer a wide-ranging question: “What is the specific role the Cultural Council could play to make Palm Beach County more artist-

friendly to both enrich its cultural vitality and economically advance artists as part of the county’s creative economy?” According to the study report, the top needs reported by artists who responded to the online survey are for more exhibit space, development of an artists’ community – a virtual or actual way for artists to share resources, ideas and the like – and marketing resources. Through the four conversations, the artists expressed interest in networking and joining groups and organizations that can help them communicate more effectively with other artists. They are interested in a database that would provide specific information about upcoming events in which they could participate. And they would like to explore the creation of an “artists as entrepreneurs” program, which teaches artists about business skills and practices. The study resulted in a series of nine recommendations for consideration by the Cultural Council, including development of a central information clearinghouse for

artists, promoting strategic partnerships between artists and key non-artist communities, increasing local training opportunities and creating an artist advisory council within the Council. “Artists throughout Palm Beach County want to be connected to one another as a vibrant ‘community of artists,’” the study report concluded. “The Cultural Council is ideally poised through its services, partnerships…and new facilities to help artists to fully realize such a community in Palm Beach County. All of the citizens of Palm Beach County will benefit from the cultural and economic impacts.” The Workforce Development for Artists project was underwritten by J.P. Morgan, while members of the Leadership Palm Beach County Class of 2012 took on the project as a special initiative. Partners included Art and Culture Group, Artists of Palm Beach County, Boynton Beach Art in Public Places Program, the Duncan Theatre, LULA-Lake Worth Arts and Palm Beach County Art in Public Places.

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Cosmetic, Restorative & General Dentistry American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry Fellow of the International Academy of Dental Facial Aesthetics

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cultural council news

SPONSORED BY

PRISCILLA HEUBLEIN

OCT. 30 - NOV. 11, 2012

SPONSORED BY

PEGGY AND RICK KATZ

NOV. 27 - DEC. 16, 2012

SPONSORED BY

JANUARY UARY U ARY RY 8 - 2 27, 7, 2 2013 01 13

FEBRUARY 5 - 17, 2013

SPONSORED BY

JOAN AND ALLEN BILDNER

KATHY AND JOE SAVARESE

MARCH CH 5 - 24, 2013 For tickets: ts:

(561) 575-2223 For group sales:

(561) 972-6117 1001 East Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33477

www.jupitertheatre.org

Sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Council on Arts and Culture

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Phillip Estlund

Philip Estlund, Intramixed, 2008, Collage on illustration board, 14” x 8.5,” Courtesy of the artist and Gavlak Gallery.

FAU Exhibition Features South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship Recipients Through December 15, Florida Atlantic University’s University Galleries in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters in Boca Raton are hosting the exhibition New Art: South Florida Cultural Consortium Visual and Media Artists Fellowship in both the Schmidt Center Gallery and the Ritter Art Gallery on FAU’s Boca Raton campus. The exhibition presents 11 artists from Florida’s five southeastern counties who won a highly competitive and generous annual grant awarded by the South Florida Cultural Consortium. This year’s winners are Phillip Estlund (Palm Beach County); Nellie Appleby (Monroe County); Domingo Castillo, Clifton Childree, Jiae Hwang, Nicolas Lobo, Ernesto Oroza and Tom Scicluna (Miami-Dade County); and Eric Landes, Mark Moormann and John Sanchez (Broward County). The artists are selected through a twostep judging process that includes a regional panel and then a national panel of visual arts professionals. More than 300 artists apply each year, in part because the grant award for each artist of either $15,000 or $7,500 is among the nation’s highest for individual artists. The majority of the artists in the exhibi-

tion are sculptors and multi-media artists who will be exhibiting alongside painters, photographers and filmmakers. At least three of the artists, Castillo, Lobo and Scicluna, created new site-specific or situational works for the exhibition. Estlund, the Palm Beach County Fellowship recipient, explores aspects of our built environment through surreal collages often constructed from interior design and architecture magazines. He also creates relief and freestanding sculptures in reference to the raw material of domestic architecture that has become abject through natural disasters, decay or neglect. The University Galleries are open Tuesday through Friday from 1 to 4 p.m. and Saturday from 1 to 5 p.m. Visitors must obtain a $2 parking pass or use the limited metered parking before visiting the galleries. The South Florida Cultural Consortium is funded in part with the support of the National Endowment for the Arts, the Florida Department of State Division of Cultural Affairs and the Florida Arts Council, the Boards of County Commissioners of Broward, Miami-Dade, Martin and Monroe Counties and the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. University Galleries programs are also made possible in part by the R.A. Ritter Foundation and Beatrice Cummings Mayer. For more information on the exhibition, visit www.fau.edu/galleries.


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cultural council news

Urban Arts Lofts Coming to Downtown Lake Worth

Insightful Insightful Cultural Exhibitions

20011 2

EVENTS EV ENTS

Area artists have a rare opportunity to play a highly personal role in the ongoing cultural Renaissance of downtown Lake Worth. The city’s Community Redevelopment Agency is constructing 12 affordable, two-story live/work lofts just west of Dixie Highway that will be available for purchase by artists who meet certain criteria. The Urban Arts Lofts project acknowledges downtown Lake Worth’s growing role as a focal point for arts and cultural activities, which is anchored by the Cultural Council’s new home in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building. The lofts, which range from 2,200 to 2,600 square feet, include studio space on the first floor and living space on the second floor. Features include two and a half baths, a one-car garage, impact glass windows and a number of components to promote sustainability, including Energy Star appliances and a tankless water heater. To be eligible to purchase one of the units, which are available in three different styles, individuals must meet a definition of “artist” that includes “a record of professional accomplishment demonstrated through continuous public presentation and peer acceptance as either an emerging artist of outstanding promise or as an established artist with a recognized body of work.” Individuals working in arts-related fields, such as architects, graphic and web designers, writers, interior decorators and others, also are eligible. For information about the program and floor plans for the Urban Arts Lofts, visit www.lakeworthnsp.org.

PERFORMANCE PERFORMANC CE

16 A Acres cres of Exotic Gardens Gar dens

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EXHIBIT

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DEMONSTRA DEMONSTRATION ATION T

The Morikami presents: p Entertaining the Gods and annd Man: Ronin TTaiko aiko a Japanese p Dolls, and the Theater

Sado: The W aayy of TTea eea Way

November 29 & 30, 2012

Oct. 20, Nov Nov.. 17 & Dec. 15, 201 2012 12

On view through January 27, 2013 2

M MUSEUM | GARDENS | CUL CULTURE TURE | CUISINE 4000 Morika Morikami ami Park Road, Delray Beach, FL 561.495.0233 561.495.0233 | morikami.org

Bring Your Family To See Our Family Learn - Laugh - Discover At The Palm Beach Zoo

Urban Arts Lofts are under construction in downtown Lake Worth.

1301 Summit Boulevard, WPB, FL 33405 (561) 547-WILD (9453) • www.palmbeachzoo.org Photo: Budge Jamison

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{inside culture} cultural council news New Educational Guide to Art and Culture Unveiled 013

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The seventh edition of the Cultural Council’s annual publication An Educational Guide to Art and Culture in Palm Beach County is now available on the web. This oneof-a-kind educational resource for educators and families may be viewed or downloaded online at www.palmbeachculture.com/ educationalguide. An Educational Guide to Art and Culture in Palm Beach County is an easy-touse resource tool that assists educators and parents looking for free or low-cost events, field trips and in-school presentations to enhance learning experiences for children. The publication offers hundreds of activities for the K-12 student age bracket and provides information for educators and families to help keep art and culture a constant throughout the year. In early August, thousands of brochures

1 County

outlining how to access the online Educational Guide were distributed to teachers at professional development workshops to assist them in planning for the 2012-13 school year. The brochures also were distributed to all public and private schools and home-school support organizations in Palm Beach County. “This information is not available anywhere else,� said Shawn Berry, manager of arts and cultural education for the Cultural Council. “More than 60 Palm Beach County arts and cultural organizations – all members of the Cultural Council – are featured in the guide along with special discount offers for teachers from Office Depot,� Berry said. The Cultural Council publishes the Educational Guide with generous support from the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Arts Council, the National Endowment for the Arts, the Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation Inc. and Office Depot.

Experience One of America’s Great House Museums “An absolute must-see� ~ National Geographic Traveler

When it was completed in 1902, Whitehall, Henry Flagler’s Gilded Age estate in Palm Beach, was hailed by the New York Herald as “more wonderful than any palace in Europe, grander and more PDJQLĂ€FHQWWKDQDQ\RWKHUSULYDWHGZHOOLQJLQWKHZRUOG

Fall Exhibition Capturing The Cup: Yacht Racing During the Gilded Age, on view October 16, 2012 to January 6, 2013.

Today, Whitehall is a National Historic Landmark open to the public as the Flagler Museum featuring docent-led tours, selfguide brochures and audio tours.

Holiday Evening Tours from December 18 to 23. Tour Whitehall E\WKHJORZRIWKHRULJLQDOOLJKWĂ€[WXUHVDQGOHDUQDERXW the source of our Christmas traditions.

h e n r y

Cafe Des Beaux-Arts open November 23, through March 30, 2013.

m o r r i s o n

FLAGLER MUSEUM palm beach, florida

'PSNPSFJOGPSNBUJPOBOEUJDLFUTDBMM  tXXXGMBHMFSNVTFVNVT 78

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cultural compendium Armory Art Center Announces 2012-13 Artists in Residence The Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach announced that six emerging and upand-coming artists from across the country will be part of its Artist in Residence Program during the 2012-2013 season. The highly competitive program attracts a diverse group of artists from varied backgrounds. Working in the Armory’s state-of-the-art studios for eight months, the artists develop a portfolio of work in their area of study while at the same time teaching students and learning from faculty and visiting master artists. Their residency culminates in a spring show of the work produced during their tenure. The Armory Art Center’s Artists in Residence for 2012-2013 are Jesse Ring and Matt Fiske for ceramics, Lisa Johnson for jewelry, Eriberto Biera for painting and drawing and Ariel Bowman and Virginia McKinney for sculpture. The Artists in Residence Program is underwritten by Armory Art Center governing board member and benefactor Mary Montgomery. The Armory Art Center is celebrating its 25th anniversary season. Housed in a historic Art Deco building, it provides more than 150 art classes for students of all ages, including ceramics, digital arts, fibers, drawing, glass fusing, jewelry, painting, printmaking, fibers and sculpture. It hosts approximately 20 exhibitions each year and presents art salons, lectures and special events. For information, visit www.armoryart.org or call 561-832-1776.

From

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NATIONAL NA ATIONAL T SYMPHONY SYM MPHONY ORCHEST ORCHESTRA TRA OF CUBA Saturday Satur day y and Sunday, Sunday y, Novemberr 10 10 -11 -11 to

T THE IRISH TENORS Friday Friday, y, December 7* to

THE E LEGEND OF ZELD ZELDA: DA: SYMPHONY GODDESSES Y OF THE GODDESS SES TOUR Satur Saturday, day y, December 8* tto

JACKIE JAC CKIE EV EVANCHO VANCHO A LIV LIVE VE Music of the Movies

W Wednesday, ednesday y, December 12* 12** to

MOSCOW CLASSICAL BA MOSCOW BALLET ALLET T THE NUTCRACKER Thursday through th hrough Saturday, Saturday y, December Decemb ber 1 13-15 3 -15 t to

FORBIDDEN FOR RBIDDEN BROADW BROADWAY WAY W Wednesday ednesday y thr through ough Monday Monday, y, December Decem mber 26-31 26 -31

Detail from the necklace by Armory Artist in Residence Lisa Johnson

There’ss som There’ something mething for everyone everyone at the Kraviss Center. Center. For a complete compllete 2012-2013 schedule or to order ordeer tickets visit kravis.org kravis.oorg or call 561-832-7469 561-832-74469 or 11-800-572-8471 - 800--572- 8471 Grou ups: 561-651-4304 561-651-4304 or 56 1-651-44338 Groups: 561-651-4438 On the th he go? Access kravis.org from your mobile phone. phonee.

*Tickets *T ickets also available available through

Yours. Y oourrss. Truly. Truly.

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cultural compendium £��É£xÊUÊÓä£Ó Titanic: The Musical £ÓÉ£ÊEÊ£ÓÉÓÊUÊÓä£Ó The Living Christmas Tree £ÓÉ£äÊUÊÓä£Ó The Lowe Family Christmas Spectacular £ÉnÊUÊÓä£Î The Great American Songbook £ÉÓ{ÊUÊÓä£Î Juan Siddi Flamenco ÓÉ£ÊUÊÓä£Î Ernie Haase & Signature Sound

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ÓÉ£ÓÊUÊÓä£Î Cirque Zuma Zuma ÓÉÓxÊUÊÓä£Î Fiddler on the Roof ÎÉ£ÓÊUÊÓä£Î Rave On! The Buddy Holly Experience

2012/2013

ÎÉÓxÊUÊÓä£Î Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues {É£ÈÊUÊÓä£Î TAP - The Show!

xÉ{ÊUÊÓä£Î The Wizard of Oz xÉ£äÊUÊÓä£Î Street Beat, Inc.

BUY TICKETS @ www.dollyhand.org BOX OFFICE 561.993.1160

Norton Museum Acquires 39 Annie Leibovitz Photos The Norton Museum of Art has acquired a collection of 39 works by the renowned photographer Annie Leibovitz and will showcase these new acquisitions in an exhibition from Jan. 17 through June 9, 2013. “The Norton’s photography collection of more than 3,000 works spans the entire history of the medium,” said Charles Stainback, assistant director of the Norton Museum. “Annie Leibovitz is one of the most important portrait photographers of our time and as such deserves a prominent place in our encyclopedic permanent collection.” Stainback worked closely with Leibovitz to narrow the selection to the final 39 photographs, which include a mixture of wellknown and lesser-known works that range from the 1970s to the present. Both Stainback and Leibovitz felt it was important to select a grouping that emphasized the scope of her portraiture – from her images of celebrated figures to less familiar subjects. The black-and-white and color images on view will include American Soldiers and Mary, Queen of the Negritos, Clark Air Base, The Philippines (1968); Cindy Sherman, New York City (1992); R2-D2, Pinewood Studios, London (2000); and The Reverend Al Sharpton, Prima Donna Beauty Care Center, Brooklyn, New York (1988). There are also iconic portraits of actors, musicians and artists from Tom Cruise and Brad Pitt to Allen Ginsberg and Andy Warhol.

Delray’s Old School Square Evolves into Delray Beach Center for the Arts From its beginnings 26 years ago as an arts-based, historic preservation project that ignited Delray Beach’s downtown renaissance, Old School Square has evolved into an award-winning, nationally recog-

1977 College Drive | Belle Glade, FL

nized, multi-disciplinary arts organization. To acknowledge its growth and highlight its mission, the organization has adopted a new name – the Delray Beach Center for

All dates, artists and programs subject to change.

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Mikhail Baryshnikov and Mark Morris, New York City, 1988 © Annie Leibovitz

“The Norton has made a sophisticated selection,” Leibovitz said. “While there are several portraits of very famous people, they are not my most famous portraits. There are some surprises.” One of the most celebrated photographers of our time, Annie Leibovitz has been documenting American popular culture since the early 1970s, when her work began appearing in Rolling Stone. For nearly 30 years her photos have appeared regularly in Vanity Fair and Vogue. Leibovitz’s most recent exhibition, Pilgrimage, opened at the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C., early this year. the Arts – and introduced a new logo and website to highlight the transformation. “In the beginning, the name Old School Square Cultural Arts Center was a good fit,” said Joe Gillie, president and CEO. “The restored school buildings became the Cornell Museum and Crest Theatre, with the gymnasium as a major rental facility. These ‘Delray Beach Schools’ were listed on the National Register of Historic Places.” As the years progressed, however, the name of the organization tended to be shortened to Old School


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{inside culture} cultural compendium ArtStart Brings Visual Arts Program to Students with Disabilities and Autism When they learned they would be painting hearts in the style of the famous artist Jim Dine as part of their morning art lesson with ArtStart founder Jeannette Parssi, students in the ESE department at Wellington Community High School were all smiles. “They may not have known Jim Dine by name, but they really loved making these hearts,” said Parssi, “and they did a great job.” The goal of Wellington-based ArtStart is to make the arts accessible to all, Parssi explained. The organization works with a number of area non-profits to develop and

implement art programs that address specific needs and help forward its goals. “We worked with the Mental Health Association, for example, to create a program that used theater to teach important life lessons to kids and teens,” Parssi said. “A program we delivered to the Potentials Charter School, which is part of the ARC of Palm Beach County, allowed students with severe disabilities to create their very own works of art; we also took those kids to museums and galleries, so they could enjoy the wonderful artwork on display.” When

the

ESE

department

disabilities and autism, Parssi was more than happy to oblige. Initial funding for the program is being provided by ArtStart’s board of directors. The program is fully funded for the 2012-2013 school year, and “hopefully we can secure funding to continue into the next school year,” Parssi said.

at

Wellington Community High School asked ArtStart to develop and implement a visual arts program for students with intellectual

Students in the ESE Department at Wellington High School enjoyed creating art thanks to ArtStart.

The acclaimed 10-year-old Women’s Theatre Project (TWTP) has moved north from Fort Lauderdale to a new home at the Willow Theatre in Boca Raton’s Sugar Sand Park. Incorporated in 2002, the Women’s Theatre Project is a company of profession-

al female theater artists dedicated to producing theatrical works exploring the female voice. The move from their previous intimate 50-seat venue to the Willow’s 155seat theater is an exciting step forward in the company’s continuing evolution. “A unique opportunity presented itself at the Willow Theatre,” says founding member and Artistic Director Genie Croft. “I’ve directed The Tale of the Allergist’s Wife and several other plays for the Boca Raton Theatre Guild at the Willow and have imported the Women’s Theatre Project’s productions of The Year of Magical Thinking and Bridge and Tunnel. It’s a natural progression to make our home here – a perfect union of theater, creative growth and venue to expand our productions and mission.”

Since its founding, the company has drawn praise from critics and audiences alike, received numerous Carbonell nominations and built a strong and loyal following throughout South Florida. It has presented staged readings, one-acts and full-length plays, including the world and regional premieres of several works. Over the past few years, TWTP has run a lesbian play festival in conjunction with the Pride Center. The company’s 2012-2013 season at the Willow Theatre includes two productions. Faye Sholiton’s powerful memory play, The Interview, will run January 4-20. Barbara Pease Weber’s contemporary comedy Delval Divas was performed in November. Tickets can be purchased from the Willow Theatre Box office at 561-347-3948.

Square and the staff, volunteers and board found themselves constantly having to explain that Old School Square is Delray’s center for the arts. As the organization grew to include a School of Creative Arts and the outdoor Pavilion, both with new programming, the significance shifted to the programs and services. While the beautiful historic buildings continue to be honored, they now play a supporting role. “We will continue to be the community gathering place for Delray Beach and a leader in developing partnerships to nurture

artistic expression,” Gillie said. “We will continue to grow as a multi-disciplinary organization, striving to offer a broad range of programs and services that will inspire every segment of the community and we will always preserve this National Historic Site.” With the name change comes a fresh, new logo depicting four arches, which represent the center’s major areas of focus: events, theater, exhibits and learning. External changes – including cre-

ative lighting, signage and art – will be phased in on the site. For information, call 561-243-7922 or visit www.delraycenter forthearts.org.

Patti Gardner (left) and Harriet Oser will appear in the Women’s Theatre Project’s production of The Interview.

Women’s Theatre Project Finds New Home in Boca Raton

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all-classical public radio

Classical Music. It’s In Our Nature. classicalsouthflorida.org

GLOBAL NEWS, LOCAL CHANNEL. Get the latest public radio news and shows, now on the air in the Palm Beaches. wpbinews.org


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Photo: Brett Bartek

Continuing the legacy of Colin Patrick, the Florida panther who passed away in March after living 17 years at the Palm Beach Zoo, two panther kittens have joined the zoo’s family. The two cubs, who were rescued in Washington State and Idaho, were orphaned when their mothers were euthanized as a result of coming too close to human dwellings. When they arrived earlier this year, both kittens were approximately seven months old and weighed more than 50 pounds. They came to the zoo through the coordination of the AZA Puma SSP (run by the Oregon Zoo), which helps rescue and rehabilitate orphaned panthers and place them in approved facilities such as AZA zoos.

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Atlantic Arts Academy in Jupiter has named David Weinstein as its executive director. Weinstein is a producer, composer, arranger and orchestrator of Broadway Jr. and Theatre for Young Audiences editions for Music Theatre International, ITheatrics and Disney Theatrical Productions. His shows have included The Little Mermaid Jr., Beauty David Weinstein and The Beast Jr., My Son Pinocchio Jr., Avenue Q, Rent, Les Miserables, The Wizard of Oz, Miss Saigon, Sweeney Todd, Ragtime and many more. He has spent the last several years as the creative director and assistant director of French Woods Festival of the Performing Arts in New York. His addition to the staff will allow Atlantic Arts Academy to become one of the first schools in the nation to develop and launch all Broadway Jr. shows.

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{inside culture} briefly noted

Charlene Farrington Jones is the new director of the Spady Cultural Heritage Museum in Delray Beach. Jones, the daughter of museum founder Vera Farrington, works with the board of Expanding Charlene Jones and Preserving Our Cultural Heritage (EPOCH Inc.) to operate the museum. Farrington founded the organization – which is dedicated to showcasing the African-, Haitian- and Caribbean-American cultural contributions to the artistic and historic landscape of Florida and the U.S. – in 1995. Jones joined the staff full-time in 2000 as program director, overseeing the children’s programs that help make the venue a neighborhood hub. “The Spady Museum is more than my mother’s legacy. To me, the Spady Museum represents the voice of a people who helped to build this area into the dynamic collection of people it is now,” Jones said.

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Roosevelt Middle School students painting the Math Clock Wall.

Artist-in-Residence Sharon Koskoff and Roosevelt Middle School students in West Palm Beach recently worked together to create large-scale murals in the school’s main lobby. The math, science, technology, eco-environmental and pre-med magnet school was the inspiration for colorful underwater, landscape, cityscape and technology scenes. On one wall, an original “math clock” inspired by students becomes an educational and unusual way to tell time in the algebraic world of middle school. Other walls include a welcoming robot, a coral reef, the school building with a female nurse and male doctor, indigenous trees, a computer wall with cell tower and symbolic i-clouds.

William Hayes, producing artistic director of

Palm Beach Opera

Palm Beach Dramaworks in West Palm Beach, was elected president of the Florida Professional Theatres Association (FPTA). Other new FPTA officers include Secretary/Treasurer Rachel Blavatnik, associate producer and company manager of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. FPTA is a 32-year-old statewide notfor-profit organization that connects professional theater companies throughout the state to better collaborate, develop and promote live, professional theater in Florida. “The new FPTA officers will work collaboratively to establish partnerships to create opportunities for professional theater companies and professional artists throughout Florida and promote a greater awareness of the high-quality live-professional theater experiences available to the residents and tourists William Hayes of our state,” Hayes said.

General Director Daniel Biaggi was elected to the Board of Directors of OPERA America, the national non-profit service organization for opera. “I am thrilled to join the board and to become part of this illustrious group of cultural leaders at a time when opera tradition and preservation of values must go hand-in-hand with innovation and continuous Daniel Biaggi reinvention,” Biaggi said. Now entering his fourth season as general director, Biaggi is committed to expanding Palm Beach Opera’s mission of presenting high-quality opera productions and engaging educational and community outreach performances in the community. Biaggi joins Ceci Dadisman, Palm Beach Opera’s director of marketing and PR, in a leadership role with OPERA America. Dadisman has served as the organization’s marketing network chair since 2010.

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{inside culture} Broadway came to Palm Beach County recently when Young Singers of the Palm Beaches produced a three-week intensive study for students who hope to one day make it in the Big Apple. Students performed at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach on the last day of the course, providing parents and the community with a show that spotlighted their talents. Each piece included professional choreography that showed off the skills the students had honed and finessed during the workshop. “You Can’t Stop the Beat” from Hairspray brought down the house in a spectacular finale. On the last days of the workshop, New York City talent director Nora Brennan provided professional advice on landing a role on Broadway. Young Singers of the Palm Beaches’ Executive Director Beth Clark speaks to the audience accompanied by the applause of the cast members.

Boca Raton’s historic Town Hall

The Boca Raton Historical Society and Museum (BRHS&M) is joining forces with the Boca Raton Pioneer Club and the Delray Beach Historical Society in a project to preserve and provide searchable access to back issues of the Delray Beach News, which was published from 1923 to 1986. The earliest years, 1923-1928, are among the most interesting years of the paper since they document the rise and fall of the Florida land boom, when Addison Mizner put the little town of Boca Raton on the map and Delray Beach grew into a resort destination. In other BRHS&M news, the organization received a $19,939 grant from the Florida Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs for fiscal year 2012-2013 to support the outreach programs and exhibitions of the Boca Raton History Museum headquartered in the historic Boca Raton Town Hall at 71 North Federal Highway in Boca Raton.

Following a successful staged reading at Shetler Studios’ Theatre 54 in New York City, playwright Heather Storm of Jupiter is casting for a second reading of her new play, Art of the Pin-Up Girl, in South Florida. Storm, writer and creator of the musical romp through the history of the American pin-up, first envisioned the project more than 10 years ago after seeing a coffee table book, The Great American Pin-Up. The 15 original songs in the musical were composed by Gregory “Popeye” Alexander, Storm’s husband and a well-known South Florida composer, producer, singer and radio personality. The music was co-produced by Alex J. Weir of PokoLoko at Dreamhouse Studios in West Palm Beach. Actors, dancers and musicians interested in the project should contact Storm at palmbeachbystorm@gmail.com. The New York staged reading was directed by Susan D. Rubin, former drama teacher at Spanish River High School in Boca Raton and Storm’s drama teacher in Gainesville, Fla., in the 1980s.

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{inside culture} In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and greater help us accomplish our mission. Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson

Mr. George T. Elmore

The Liman Foundation

Arthur I. and Sydelle Meyer Charitable Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farber

Ms. Susan Lloyd

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Fine

Catherine Lowe, M.D., LL.D.

Mrs. Shirley Fiterman

The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation

Lawrence A. Sanders

The Maltz Family Foundation

Foundation, Inc.

Ms. Dina Gustin Baker Mrs. Marta Batmasian Mr. Bruce A. Bealand and Mr. Francis V. Cunningham Ms. Jo Anne Berkow Mr. and Mrs. John Blades Ms. Yvonne S. Boice Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bracci Ms. Amy Broderick Mr. and Mrs. Douglas Brown

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Flack Florida Power & Light Company Dr. Stan and Marcie Gorman Althof Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Graziotto Galaxy Thrift LLC Goldberg Foundation Inc. Greenberg Traurig, P.A. Gunster

B/E Aerospace

Ms. Roe Green

Bank of America

Ms. Peg Greenspon

Richard S. Bernstein & Associates, Inc.

Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation

The Boston Foundation

John C. & Mary Jane Howard Foundation

The Breakers Palm Beach Brenner Real Estate Group The Ann K. & Douglas S. Brown Family Foundation Business Development Board The Colony Hotel

Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand Mr. Christopher E. Havlicek Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman Ms. Lisa Huertas Mrs. Lyn Ianuzzi

Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties

Mr. and Mrs. F. Ross Johnson

Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan

Jennifer Garrigues, Inc. Interior Design

The Community Foundation of Louisville

JKG Group

Mr. Christopher D. Caneles and Mr. Stephen Nesbitt

Jasteka Foundation Inc.

JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank Mr. Kenn Karakul

Ms. Carol F. Cohen

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Karp

Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence H. Cohn

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp

Mr. and Mrs. Miles A. Coon

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz Jr.

Mr. Gus Davis

Katz Family Foundation

Dr. Richard P. D’Elia

Kohnken Family Foundation Inc.

Digital Domain Media Group, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher G. Kellogg

Donald M. Ephraim Family Foundation

Ms. Sibel Kocabasi Mr. Berton E. Korman

Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro

Mr. Raymond E. Kramer III, Esq.

Mr. Bradford A. Deflin

Mrs. Emily F. Landau

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Dougherty, Jr. Mrs. Cecile Draime Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos Bernard Eisentein, M.D.

Gerard Lemongello, D.D.S. Mr. and Mrs. Melvin J. Levine Geo. Zoltan Lefton Family Foundation

Richard & Peggy Greenfield Foundation Rose Marie and Ted J. Miller Family Foundation, Inc.

The Marks Family Foundation

The Lewis Schott Foundation

Denise and William Meyer Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager

Sydell and Arnold Miller Foundation

Mr. Rudy E. Schupp

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph A. Marks Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews

and Mrs. Susan Schupp Ms. Barbara Schwartz

Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews

Mr. Gary Schweikhart

Mrs. Sydelle Meyer

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Michel Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf

Ms. Jane Mitchell

Ms. Muriel Siebert

Ms. Jo Anne Moeller Mrs. Mary Montgomery Ms. Suzanne Niedland and Mr. Lawrence F. DeGeorge

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sloane Mr. Harold Smith Dr. Jay W. Spechler

Ms. Paige Noland

Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco

Northern Trust

Telesco Family Foundation

Office Depot

Ms. Patricia G. Thorne

Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Mrs. Phyllis Tick

Palm Beach Daily News

The Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc.

The Palm Beach Post

Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman

PGA National Resort and Spa

Ms. Susy Witt

PNC Bank PNC Foundation

Ms. Sheryl G. Wood, Esq. Ms. Melanie Ziskend

Publix Supermarket Charities Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker Mr. William Parmelee

Wells Fargo Zissu Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Mrs. Helen K. Persson Dr. Henry J. Petraki

in-kind sponsors

Ms. Linda M. Phelps

La Bonne Bouche

Dr. and Mrs. Carter Pottash REG Architects Inc.

Dave’s Last Resort & Raw Bar Ms. Elaine Meier

Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Rosenberg Mr. and Mrs. Jay Rosenkranz Mrs. Susan Ross

Office Depot pr-bs

Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Rubin

South Shores Tavern & Patio Bar

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley M. Rumbough Jr.

TooJay’s

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{next issue – Winter 2012}

Photo Courtesy Delray Beach Center for the Arts

The Beauty of the Game The game of golf has been inspiring – and inflaming – passions for hundreds of years. In the next issue of art&culture, we’ll celebrate Palm Beach County’s unique relationship with the sport, embracing its glorious palm-fringed greens and legendary designers as well as its strong connection to the visual arts. The county – crowned Florida’s Golf Capital® - boasts more than 170 public and private courses that entice novices to take up clubs, welcome the pros that compete at marquee events such as the Honda Classic in Palm Beach Gardens and stir the imagination of artists and collectors. From the upcoming Allianz Championship in Boca Raton to the South Florida premiere of the Seagate Hotel & Spa World of Golf: The Gary Wiren Collection, which is currently on display along with fine art from the Academy of Golf Art at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts, rest assured, colorful perspective will be par for the course in the pages of art&culture.

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Celebrating 10 Years of PLAYERS. PONIES. POLO.

I N T E R N A T I O N A L

Polo Every Sunday January 6 - April 21, 2013 International Polo Club Palm Beach 3667 120th Avenue South Wellington, Florida 33414 561.282.5303 | Internationalpoloclub.com

P O L O

C L U B

P A L M

B E A C H


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Performance you deserve Backed by 125 years of solid financial performance, IBERIABANK is a Louisiana-based bank serving and expanding in South Florida. As one of the strongest banks in the Southeast, we offer competitive products and services you expect and the personal experience you deserve. We are well positioned to meet your personal and business banking needs now and well into the future.

Visit one of our convenient locations in your area: Delray Beach: 900 SE 6th Avenue | East Boca: 1180 N. Federal Highway | West Palm Beach: 605 N. Olive Avenue | Pompano: 990 N. Federal Highway Boynton Beach: 1101 North Congress Avenue | Jupiter: 1315 W. Indiantown Road | Palm Springs: 2764 S. Congress Avenue Royal Palm: 119 S. State Road 7 | Wilton Manors: 2465 Wilton Drive | Fort Lauderdale: 1201 S. Andrews Avenue

www.iberiabank.com |


art&culture magazine v7i1 Fall 2012