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art&culture Spring 2012

of Palm Beach County

well rounded Enduring design legend Vladimir Kagan By John Loring

from the heart Bill Koch shares his passion

sitting down on the job Four leading rock drummers put their feet up in Palm Beach County

PLUS digital dynamo Laurence Gartel, food trucks, technology and more


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EL AINE IRWIN, CIRCA CLIENT

R e Eva luat e

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the diamonds and jewelry you no longer wear. At CIRCA, we believe that every diamond we buy from you is one less that has to be mined. Helping the environment has never been easier or more beautiful.

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the possibilities of the diamonds and gems you no longer wear. CIRCA is the foremost authority on purchasing your jewelry. Beauty shouldn’t be hidden. Contact us today.

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{contents}

features

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10 under $10 Palm Beach County is rich in cultural offerings and artistic activities that won’t break the bank. By M.M. Cloutier

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the lovely curvaceousness of kagan

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Iconic furniture designer Vladimir Kagan celebrates sexy shapes. By John Loring

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the beat goes on Sit down with four famous drummers who are as comfortable in the world of rock and roll as they are at home in Palm Beach County. By Thom Smith

61 61

it just clicked: arts organizations embrace technology Plug in to a world of information about arts and artists. By Bill Meredith

54 Cover Image: Serpentine Sofa, 1950 by Vladimir Kagan

spring 2012

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L’ETOILE ROYALE The Most Exquisite Jewels & Antiques

Exclusive Art Deco CARTIER Necklace Totaling 90 cts of Diamonds

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ISTANBUL The Grand Bazaar Tel. 90-212-527-7865


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{contents} departments

welcome letter

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The Cultural Council opens the door on a new era. By Rena Blades

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editor’s note

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The delightful beat of a different drum fills the air in Palm Beach County. By Christina Wood

upfront

23

• Memorable milestones. • Find just the right words at local writing workshops. • Iron Chef Morimoto enjoys visiting Boca Raton – and art&culture. • A colorful local artist shines in the national spotlight. • Food trucks deliver great taste to cultural events in Palm Beach County. • The Uniquely Palm Beach Gift Shop offers one-of-a-kind treasures. • The Palm Beach Picture Book offers an irreverent look at island life.

32 28

art works! The arts allow us to transcend our limitations and see beyond barriers. By Christina Wood

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portrait Digital arts pioneer Laurence Gartel breaks new ground. By Amy Woods

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profile Bill Koch gives as good as he gets. And he can’t get enough. By Christina Wood

36 36

calendar Combat South Florida’s rising temperatures with a cool lineup of cultural activities, live performances, intriguing exhibits and sizzling summer events.

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inside culture More than 300 guests celebrated the arts at the 2012 Muse Awards Ceremony; Foundations, the Cultural Council’s first art exhibition in its new home at the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in downtown Lake Worth, marks the beginning of a new era; the Maltz Jupiter Theatre announces a multimillion-dollar endowment; and much more insider news.

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Celestial Woman (c) Gartel 2011 30”x 40” Digital Print

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spring 2012


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J

ourney through the nationally recognized home, studio and gardens by the visionary sculptor Ann Weaver Norton (1905-82)

601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460 | 561-471-2901 | www.palmbeachculture.com President & Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Vice President, Marketing & Government Affairs

Bill Nix

561-687-8727 bnix@palmbeachculture.com

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Mary Lewis

561-472-3340 mlewis@palmbeachculture.com

Membership & Special Projects Manager

Mary Dunning

561-472-3330 mdunning@palmbeachculture.com

Development Coordinator

Kristen Smiley

561-472-3342 ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com

Jennifer Lamont

561-471-2902 jlamont@palmbeachculture.com

Nichole Hickey

561-471-3336 nhickey@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

PR Coordinator

Laura Tingo

561-471-1602 ltingo@palmbeachculture.com

Bookkeeper

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Debbie Calabria

561-472-3338 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Marlon Foster

561-471-2901 mfoster@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance Director of Grants Director of Development

E-marketing and Website Manager Artists’ Services Coordinator Grants Manager

Contributing Writer/Editor Visitor Services Coordinator Administrative Assistant Volunteer

Pat Thorne

Cultural Council Board of Directors

T h e

h i s t o r i c

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens

Plan your Journey Today! Private and Group Tours Available

Bradford A. Deflin Cecile Draime Shirley Fiterman Craig Grant Roe Green Christopher E. Havlicek Herbert S. Hoffman Irene J. Karp Raymond E. Kramer, III Sydelle Meyer Geoff Neuhoff

Officers Michael J. Bracci, Chairman Berton E. Korman, Vice Chairman Michael D. Simon, Secretary Jo Anne Rioli Moeller, Treasurer Directors Bruce A. Beal Carole Boucard Howard Bregman Christopher D. Canales

Jean Sharf Kelly Sobolewski Dom A. Telesco Ex Officios Mark Alexander Roger Amidon Jennifer Prior Brown Paulette Burdick Cheryl Reed

Cultural Council Founder

Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens 253 Barcelona Road West Palm Beach, FL 33401 www.ansg.org or (561) 832-5328 Wednesday - Sunday 10am - 4pm 10

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Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Shelley Vana, Chairperson Steven L. Abrams, Vice Chair

Burt Aaronson Paulette Burdick Karen T. Marcus

Jess R. Santamaria Priscilla A. Taylor


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spring 2012 - volume 6, issue 3

editorial staff managing editor

christina wood

561.472.8769 christina@passportpublications.com

editorial coordinator

bradley j. oyler

561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

jordan waterman

561.472.8768 contact@passportpublications.com

editorial researcher

cultural council editorial staff editorial director

rena blades

executive editor

bill nix

managing editor

leon m. rubin

contributing writers m.m. cloutier, jan engoren, sheryl flatow, leon m. rubin, john loring, frederic a. sharf, thom smith, jean tailer, don vaughan, amy woods

contributing photographers harry benson, steven caras, jim fairman, christopher fay, jacek gancarz, barry kinsella, michael price, robert stevens, corby kaye’s studio palm beach

art & design art & production director

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

assistant production director

nicole smith

561.472.8762 nicole@passportpublications.com

advertising sales director of advertising

richard s. wolff

561.472.8767 richard@passportpublications.com

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

lew blatte

561.472.8774 lew@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

contract administrator

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

national advertising manager signature publications senior advertising manager

publisher 561.472.8769 robert@passportpublications.com

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.

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R I C H T Er s

RICHTERS RARE GEMS AND ESTATE JEWELRY SINCE 1893 • 224 WORTH AVENUE, PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 33480 • (561) 655-0774


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ART WALLY FINDLAY

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Welcome Rena _Spring 2012:Layout 1

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WELCOME TO

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art&culture

fromtheceo

The welcome mat is out – and we’ve thrown open the doors! After years of wishing and months of planning, the Cultural Council is open for business in our new home in the historic Lake Theatre in downtown Lake Worth – now known as the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building. We are delighted to be here and are thoroughly enjoying the juxtaposition of old and new that greets us every day. Reminders of the structure’s rich history are all around us, while at the same time we are able to utilize all the trappings of today’s technology that help us carry out our mission. We have welcomed more than 2,000 people through our doors in our first two months. Some came for celebratory events that allowed us to proudly spotlight all the things that make our new headquarters unique. Many more have come to conduct the business of the arts in a location that is centrally located and much more accessible than our previous offices. Some of our guests have been visitors seeking to learn about the vast array of cultural opportunities in Palm Beach County. And many, appropriately enough, are artists. They’ve ranged from the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship recipients whose work appeared in our inaugural exhibition, Foundations, to those who have taken advantage of training and professional development opportunities, networking events and numerous other resources that we provide.

Michael Price

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At the same time that we have physically thrown open our doors to the community, we’ve also done so figuratively in a variety of ways. In fact, this process began before our move, when we hosted a series of Artist Conversations around the county in which more than 250 professional artists participated. The feedback, ideas and suggestions generated from these meetings – along with data gathered through written and online surveys – have proven to be extremely helpful to us as we plan our programming. More recently, we issued a call to artists to submit artwork in all media to be considered for the first juried exhibition in our new gallery space. We were exceptionally pleased by the response and were delighted to open the show on May 5. To be able to mount an exhibition of this nature under our own roof makes us tremendously proud. If you’d like to share in the excitement that emanates from every corner of the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building, please feel free to stop by for a visit. Our public hours are Tuesdays through Saturdays, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. We look forward to opening our doors to you!

Rena Blades

Rena Blades President and CEO Palm Beach County Cultural Council


Trianon Seaman Schepps_Spring 12:Layout 1

PALM BEACH 237A Worth Avenue 561.802.4410 NEW YORK

O

NANTUCKET

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THE BEAT OF A DIFFERENT DRUM Since 1854, when Walden was first published, free spirits of every stripe have fondly quoted Henry David Thoreau, who concluded: “If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer.” An ardent individualist, Thoreau’s advice for those who might have a more discerning ear than the Average Joe: “Let him step to the music he hears, however measured or far away.”

fromthe

The sound of freedom was music to Thoreau’s ears but he was also strongly committed to living a life of principle. It’s not always enough, the patron saint of free thinkers recognized, to tap your toe. Sometimes you have to get up and dance – for all the world to see. In this issue of art&culture, you’ll find a number of delightfully individual individuals who have dared to follow the beat of a different drummer right into the spotlight – as well as a few drummers who have successfully laid down their own distinctive beat on the world stage, including Don Brewer of Grand Funk, Nicko McBrain of Iron Maiden, Tico Torres of Bon Jovi and Butch Trucks of the Allman Brothers Band, all of whom sat down to talk with Thom Smith for our feature “The Beat Goes On,” which you’ll find on page 54. Bill Koch, an obsessive collector, generous philanthropist and champion sailor, relishes the independent spirit reflected in the Code of the West – but that doesn’t stop him from realizing the critical importance of interdependence. The surprisingly down-to-earth billionaire moves to an upbeat and impressive rhythm, as you’ll discover in our profile on page 32.

The driving beat behind Laurence Gartel’s work reflects a sense of urgency, according to Amy Woods, who introduces us to the pioneering digital artist on page 30. On page 42, John Loring sets out to map the twists, turns and compelling curves in the career path laid down by Vladimir Kagan, who has been creating iconic furniture designs for more than 50 years. Regular contributor M.M. Cloutier follows an irresistible beat to some affordable adventures in our feature “10 under $10” on page 38. And, in “It Just Clicked,” on page 61, we celebrate a variety of technological innovations that are making it easier for all of us to hear the distinctive beat of the arts community in Palm Beach County, which embraces artists such as Lea Vendetta, whose colorful spirit is captured on page 26, and A.J. Brockman, whose amazing story is featured in our Art Works! column on page 28. From professional puppeteers to amateur scribblers, Palm Beach County is home to a dazzlingly diverse population of creative talents, each in perfect step with a different drummer yet able to harmonize beautifully with the area’s appreciative audiences. They all seem to follow Thoreau’s confidently in the direction of your urged. “Live the life you’ve And, please, take art&culture along the ride. Imagine!

Christina Wood Managing Editor

Jacek Gancarz

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advice. “Go dreams!” he imagined.” with you for


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contributors James W. Fairman

John Loring was a contributing writer and New York Bureau Chief at Architectural Digest. He served as the design director of Tiffany & Co. for 30 years and has written numerous books on style and social history. John graduated from Yale University, completed four years of graduate studies at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris and has an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts degree from Pratt Institute.

Bill Meredith has written the "Local Music" column for the TGIF section of The Palm Beach Post for more than 10 years and has also been covering sports for the past five. He's also contributed to Jazziz magazine for more than 10 years, JazzTimes for five and the Palm Beach

Arts Paper and JazzBluesFlorida for the past few. By night, he freelances as a drummer, percussionist and vocalist for several Palm Beach County bands. He and his wife, Ginny (whose non-profit Inspirit takes live music to people shut into places like nursing homes, pediatric hospitals and Alzheimer's facilities), live in Lake Worth.

M.M. Cloutier is a West Palm Beach-based freelance writer who has written extensively about art and culture in Palm Beach County and elsewhere. Throughout her career, she has also written numerous profiles and covered business, cuisine, fashion and more for such newspapers as The New York Times, The Miami Herald, The Palm

Beach Post and Palm Beach Daily News, among others, and for several magazines, including reporting for Time.

Davidoff Studios, Palm Beach

During more than three decades at The Palm Beach Post, Thom Smith covered popular music, movies, television and the courts, served as the paper’s “Listening Post” (ombudsman) and produced a consumer column. For 20 years he wrote columns about people, places and events in the Palm Beaches culminating with the “Palm Beach Social Diary.” These days he freelances for international publications and writes the “On the Avenues” column for The Coastal Star, a monthly newspaper that covers Lake Worth to Boca Raton. He and his wife, Diane, live in Boca Raton.

Before launching her freelance career, Amy Woods worked as the society editor of Palm 2 Jupiter and as the editor of Notables at The Palm Beach Post, a position she held for 11 years. An experienced editor, columnist, writer and reporter, Amy’s goal is to use her experience as a journalist and skills in public relations for the benefit of our local non-profit community. CULTURAL COUNCIL

OF PALM BEACH COUNTY

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For a second opinion, come to us first. A second opinion is critical, and that is why Cleveland Clinic Florida is your best choice. Providing complex medical care close to home, our nationally ranked specialists have a track record of successful outcomes â&#x20AC;&#x201D; even in cases considered untreatable by others.

Same-day appointments available at our locations in Weston and West Palm Beach. Call 1.800.639.DOCTOR. clevelandclinicďŹ&#x201A;orida.org


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{upfront}

For Sale Gifts from the Heart – of Palm Beach County

FOR

more information call (561) 471-2901 or visit www.palmbeachculture.com

Looking for a special gift? How about delightful handcrafted work created by Palm Beach County artists and artisans, books penned by local authors or colorful gift items representing some of our leading cultural organizations? The Uniquely Palm Beach Store at the Cultural Council’s home in downtown Lake Worth is stocked with one-of-a-kind treasures. You will find everything from leather and Swarovski crystal bracelets by Heet and handmade soy candles with tropically inspired scents by Palm Beach Candle Company to hand-painted clutches by Susan Tancer on the shelves. And your gift will keep on giving: proceeds from all sales at the shop, which is located within the historic Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building at 601 Lake Ave., will provide support for future exhibitions, training and other programs for artists offered by the Council.

P e r s o n a l To u c h A Picture – of Palm Beach– Te l l s a T h o u s a n d Ta l e s What could be more uniquely Palm Beach than A Palm Beach Picture Book? The homage to the island is, appropriately, available at the Uniquely Palm Beach Store at the Cultural Council’s headquarters in downtown Lake Worth. The book, a candid, slightly irreverent look at the island’s architecture, nature, sports, clubs and celebrated homes that line the island’s byways – as well as the artists and eccentrics that inhabit them – is the work of local photographer and documentary filmmaker Leslie D. Weinberg. First printed in black and white in 1988, the new edition incorporates full-color images and handpainted photographs taken by the author as well as the insights of James Ponce, the official historian for the Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce and a living landmark in his own right, representing the “Old Guard;” event designer Bruce Sutka, speaking for the “New Guard;” and artist/publisher Bruce Helander, visit www.LeslieWeinberg.com providing a voice for the “Avant Garde.”

FOR

By the Numbers Where Did the Time Go?

The Rolling Stones, Chieftains and Beach Boys have all been making music for 50 years. Thirty years ago, when WXEL-TV42, our local public television station, first signed on the air in 1982, the Stones were touring Europe and the curtain was rising on the inaugural season at the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center in Belle Glade. The Art Deco Society of the Palm Beaches got its start 25 years ago, the year before the Beach Boys were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame.

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P e r s o n a l To u c h Lo o k W h o’s Re a d i n g art&culture!

Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto, known to millions as the star of television’s Iron Chef and Iron Chef America, has made sushi a fine art. Creativity is always on the menu at his eateries, including Morimoto, the eponymous sushi bar and restaurant located at the Boca Raton Resort & Club, where the chef recently took advantage of an opportunity to put down his knives and pick up a tennis racquet – as well as a copy of art&culture.

Literary Devices The Plot Thickens Writing is a solitary occupation but, if there’s a book in you that’s itching to get out, you may find strength in numbers. Libraries are always a good source of inspiration; many offer workshops or writers groups in addition to shelf after shelf of good examples. You can also look for support and encouragement online; websites such as Meetup.com may help you connect with other aspiring writers close to home. If you’d like professional guidance on your creative journey, sign up for a writing workshop at Murder on the Beach in Delray Beach’s Pineapple Grove District. The independent bookstore, which specializes in mysteries, offers writing workshops taught by published authors on a variety of topics ranging from the “Building Blocks of Fiction” to “The Magic of Memoir.” A little further north, you’ll find creative writing workshops for adults and children at visit www.MurderontheBeach.com The Blue Planet Writers’ Room in West or www.BluePlanetWriters.org Palm Beach.

FOR

more information

S o m e t h i n g To N i b b l e O n Keep on Trucking

Photo courtesy of Old School Square

Gourmet food trucks have been hitting the road – and earning rave reviews – all across the country. Here in Palm Beach County, they are adding a touch of spice to a growing number of cultural gatherings. With the band on break and the Beach Boys drifting out of a loudspeaker at a recent Downtown Open Market in Boynton Beach, visitors could enjoy arts and crafts as well as tasty flatbreads and pasta from the Ciao truck or Korean barbeque fusion from the Seoul Food Truck; parked in front of the Old Schoolhouse Museum, PS 561 was offering split and griddled dogs, including a chalkboard special called The Crazy Art Teacher, loaded with corn chips, jalapenos, cheddar and extra barbecue sauce. The food trucks have also been pleasing cultural crowds at Old School Square in Delray Beach, Mounts Botanical Gardens in West Palm Beach and the Boynton Beach Arts District. “The food trucks are a BIG hit,” says Melissa Carter, director of marketing and public relations for Old School Square. “The prices are very reasonable and the food is great so the crowd loves them.”

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How Do You Define

Entertainment?

“My husband and I love to dance! If we want, we can dance or listen to live music at Devonshire almost every night.”

Devonshire at PGA National defines Entertainment as a vibrant, full social life, all within our 65,000 square foot clubhouse. Residents’ social calendars are kept full and lively. Devonshire also combines entertainers, myriad events in the Stratford Performing Arts Center and Churchill Lounge with fine dining and five restaurants, luxury amenities, unparalleled service and new friends—with the peace of mind of Life Care.

866.342.1687

350 Devonshire Way Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 www.DevonshirePGA.com

Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Care, Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation


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Now Showing A Colorful Local Artist Gets Real Lea Vendetta was an artsy kid growing up in Paris. She had her first art show at 17, in the south of France. Today, her paintings can be seen in the Boynton Beach Art District, where she has a studio. Her creativity is also on display on the clients she inks at Stroke of Genius Tattoos in Boca Raton. Vendetta was one of 10 tattoo artists recently featured on the reality show Ink Master, which aired on Spike TV. The competition was an emotional roller coaster ride, she says. “I loved the TV experience and meeting all those amazing artists was great but the competition part was not enjoyable.” In fact, she says, it was brutal. She’s happy to be home in Palm Beach County now, where she relishes the sunshine, the ocean, the proximity to an international airport and the great food on Delray Beach’s Atlantic Avenue. “I love living where I feel like I’m on vacation everyday!” she says. Feeling like she’s on vacation may be as close as she comes to rest and relaxation for a while. In the wake of her six-week run on national television, Vendetta’s talents as a tattoo artist are in high Photo by Janette Valentine demand. Success keeps her busy but it’s not about to make her abandon her painting, which is often inspired by her Parisian roots and a passion for art deco. She looks forward to the monthly art shows in the Boynton Beach Art District – and not just for the tasty blend of art, music and food on offer. “Paintings allow me to express my creativity,” she says. “Tattooing forces me to technically push visit www.LeasLounge.com myself to excel.” The Big Kahuna, 46” x 58” Sous le Soleil Exactement, 2009,

FOR

more information

oil on canvas

4’ x 4’oil on canvas

Spotlight On Palm Beach County Makes a Cameo Appearance Palm Beach County is more than ready for its close-up! Our sandy beaches, film-friendly weather forecasts and an extensive base of on- and offscreen talent have combined with free production facilities and lucrative state incentive programs to attract a growing number of filmmakers and highprofile production projects. Jennifer Lopez and Jason Statham created quite a buzz around town while they filmed Parker, a new feature film set to hit the big screen nationwide in October. According to the Palm Beach County Film & Television Commission, cameras also rolled locally for a variety of small screen projects, including the Barrett-Jackson Car Auction on the SPEED Channel, The Today Show on NBC, Fact or Faked: Paranormal Files on the SyFy Network, Made on MTV, Dateline NBC, My First Sale on HGTV, The Vanilla Ice Project on DIY Network, Royal Pains on USA Network, When Fish Attack II on Discovery Channel and Extreme Makeover: Weight Loss Edition and Extreme Makeover: Home Edition on call (800) 745-FILM ABC, among others.

FOR

more information or visit www.pbfilm.com.

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Today Show Correspondent Jamie Gangel films an Education Nation segment at G Star School of the Arts.


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R OSETTASTONE F I N E A RT G A L L E RY


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{upfront – art works!}

Opening Doors By Christina Wood

art rt

works! Artists create new worlds with clay, watercolors and glass. They overcome with music and marble. Through their work, flowers bloom in the dead of winter. A tear is stopped in its tracks. Hope is given substance and shape. According to digital artist AJ Brockman, “Anything is possible if you put your mind to it.” Brockman shows just how brightly the creative spark can shine in the dark. The lifelong resident of Palm Beach Gardens suffers from, but has not succumbed to, spinal muscular atrophy, a neuromuscular disease that causes progressive muscle degeneration and weakness. He has been in a wheelchair since the age of two. When his disease denied him the pleasure he had found in painting, Brockman discovered the world of digital art and made it his own. At First Site by AJ Brockman The recipient of several awards, Brockman was selected to participate in the Artigras Fine Arts Festival this year as an Emerging Artist and took first place in Sunshine Artist magazine’s Next Show Artist contest. He is one of 23 local artists selected by the county’s Public Art Committee to participate in an exhibit currently on display at the Palm Beach International Airport. Brockman’s work was also seen at the 50th annual Delray Affair and at the SunFest Juried Fine Art & Craft Show in downtown West Palm Beach. “I view myself as being ‘differently abled’ rather than ‘disabled,’” he says even though he retains limited range of motion in just one finger. Art celebrates the best in all of us. Peeps by Joshua Banks Through the creative process, we can transcend our limitations and see beyond barriers. Artists with diverse abilities throw open big, sturdy doors and graciously allow us to follow them through on an amazing adventure.

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From his wheelchair, Brockman has traveled beneath the waves, engaged the power of a LeMans-worthy Ford GT40 and raced down a snowy peak. Joshua Banks’ vibrant abstract images express a joyous world view. Autism may have robbed the 24year old of his ability to speak but his art, which was celebrated in a solo exhibit this spring at the Town of Jupiter Community Center, gave him a voice. By giving teens and adults with disabilities an opportunity to shine in its Community Theatre Program, VSA Florida - Palm Beach County has placed the power of the human spirit center stage. The therapeutic benefits of artistic expression have been well documented. The arts make us whole. Creativity is an essential part of our nature. It allows us to color outside the lines, believe in the improbable and find beauty in the most unlikely of places. If life hands you lemons, art can help you make profound lemonade. The arts give us the power to create a sense of order and meaning in our messy lives. We can take charge of our destiny with a paintbrush, a piano, a pen. Creative activities – from photography to drama and dance – can foster a sense of wellbeing, relaxation and empowerment. A writer can find the words to turn heart-wrenching loss into poetry. Bright colors on a canvas can keep cherished memories alive. “If nothing else,” Brockman tells visitors to his website (www.SingleHandedStudio.com), “I would like my work and my personal story to inspire others to create and live life to the fullest.”


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DIGITAL-ART DYNAMO Continues to Break New Ground By Amy Woods

Electric. Provocative. Daring. Complex. Viewers of Laurence Gartel’s imaginative creations might use such adjectives to describe the digital artist’s work, as each meticulously plotted piece evokes a sense of urgency and an element of danger, amid a riot of comic-book color.

The tools of the trade differentiate digital art from traditional art. A digital artist uses pixels, while a traditional artist employs paint. In the end, the fractal design on paper or the pallet knife on canvas convey a message that moves the human spirit. Gartel forayed into the field of computer-generated art in 1975 and pioneered his own palette at a time when mainframes and central-processing units took up entire walls. “When I started in 1975, there were less than a half dozen facilities in the United States that had computers,” the New York City School of Visual Arts graduate says. “What to do with them was a whole other story and challenge. Suffice to say my vision caught on and the rest is pure art history.” Gartel’s most recognizable work remains the Absolut Gartel advertising campaign for Absolut Vodka that ran in dozens of U.S. magazines from 1991 to 2001. His tools: Adobe Photoshop 2.0 and Canon’s first-generation digital-video camera, the 760. “In the year of 1991, a handful of people owned a digital camera,” he says. “Film still completely dominated the field of photography. I was looked at as a pure freak.” One year after the Absolut Vodka commission, Gartel, a New York City native, received an invitation from the Norton Museum Above: Laurence Gartel with Coney Island Baby (c) 1999 - 63”x72” Digital Print 

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Celestial Woman (c) 2011, 30”x40” Digital Print

The Laurence Gartel 1959, Fleetwood Cadillac Limousine, commissioned by SXLiquors

Motor Head (c) 2006 - 36”x47”Iris Print

of Art in West Palm Beach to display an exhibition titled Laurence Gartel: A Cybernetic Romance. The exhibition revealed his passion for fine art and desire to create never-seenbefore imagery. “Laurence Gartel: A Cybernetic Romance opened the eyes of South Florida residents and the world,” the artist boldly proclaims. It also opened the eyes of the boy from the Bronx to the beauty of coastal living. “I love it here,” says Gartel, a Boca Raton resident since 1992. “You can wear a T-shirt 11½ months of the year. The international mix of people here also opens up a fantastic mix of dialogues.” His latest project involves wrapping an antique car in vinyl graphics for an SXLiquors advertising campaign. Given the South Beach theme of the Miami company’s initiative, he will interpret the haute hotels that line the famed oceanfront on the curvy canvas of a 1959 Cadillac. “Wrapping cars is something that I didn’t do before,” Gartel says. “I’m in a completely different realm. I have a feeling there will be things next year that I didn’t do this year.” The next wave of technology will usher in dramatic advancements in interactive digital video for both the art world

Moziac Lady (c) 2000 - 30”x40” Digital Print

and the real world, he says. “You will be able to experience things visually, and you’ll actually be able to move around images,” he says. “There’s so much to really talk about. In summary, the future of my medium is endless. It is a continuum that will forever flow.” Gartel’s iconic images hang in the permanent collections of the Smithsonian Institution’s Museum of American History, Bibliotheque Nationale Paris and the Victoria and Albert Museum in London, to name a few. Locally, his work has appeared at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre, where he teaches Photoshop courses to beginner children and advanced adults. “I am so proud of having him involved with the center,” says Fatima NeJame, president and CEO of Palm Beach Photographic Centre. “When it comes to digital art, he’s definitely a pioneer.” NeJame, who describes Gartel as a big kid willing to do anything to help the center, selected the brash artist as the recipient of the FOTOmentor Award during FOTOfusion 2009. “That’s how much I respect him,” she says. “He does things that nobody else does. He’s really creative. He’s just out there. He’s always in the forefront.”

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KOCH Bill

PERCEPTION

REALITY By Christina Wood

Bill Koch cares. He cares about kids – his kids, our kids, any kids. He cares about education, deeply. His eyes light up if you ask him about the Old West, sailing the high seas or Thomas Jefferson’s choice in wine. Bill Koch cares about winning. He cares about teamwork and technology. He cares about family. He respects talent and, when it comes to art, he knows what he likes.

KOCH IS NOT RULED BY A SINGLE PASSION. THE ULTIMATE CONNOISSEUR, HE COLLECTS THEM. Monets and Modiglianis. Winchester rifles. Sioux beadwork. A forest of family photographs and cherished memories. Four world sailing championships and a victory in the 1992 America’s Cup that still has people talking. A business that routinely appears on the Forbes list of America’s Largest Private Companies. A doctoral degree in chemical engineering from MIT. A wine cellar that challenges the imagination. And so very many stories. “My wife calls me a hoarder and says I should go on that TV show,” Koch says, referring to TLC’s Hoarders: Buried Alive. “I’m not as bad as they are,” he insists, despite the

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potential lurking in his office in West Palm Beach. A carved masthead – a gift from a friend – stands in one corner, a carton of tightly rolled blueprints or diagrams in another. A large, framed painting of a sailboat has been sitting in the middle of the sofa for a month. A swarm of books, photos, keepsakes and trophies inhabit the shelves. A tight-knit family of computer screens encircles his desk. A fluffy purple toy, part of his six-year-old daughter’s collection, sits by the window, drinking in the ocean view. His wife, Bridget Rooney Koch, granddaughter of Pittsburgh Steelers founder Art Rooney, also says he has too many projects. In that respect Koch says, “She’s absolutely right.” Born and raised in Wichita, Kansas, Koch has served on

the boards of the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the Smithsonian Museum for American Art and the President’s Circle for the National Academy of Arts, Science and Medicine, among others. He chaired the Kansas Crime Commission. He recently joined the Board of Trustees at the Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach. Last year, he was among the top 50 philanthropists in the country, according to the Chronicle of Philanthropy. He believes in the way things are done at Bak Middle School of the Arts in West Palm Beach and supports the school’s efforts. He founded Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches, a private preparatory school in West Palm Beach, in order to create an environment where students fall in love with learning.

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“He doesn’t do anything by half measures,” says Elizabeth Broun, the Margaret and Terry Stent Director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum and the Renwick Gallery. “He is one of the most obsessive collectors I know. He combines a love of art with an intensity focused on its history. He’s making sense out of who we are as a people.” Surrounded by the works of Remington and Russell, by Sitting Bull’s breastplate and General George Custer’s field belt, by gold nuggets, corsets and cowboy gear, by Jesse James’ revolver and the only known image of Billy the Kid along with all the other art and artifacts featured in

“Recapturing the Real West: The Collections of William I. Koch,” an exhibit that was recently on display at the Society of the Four Arts, Broun says, “He has these passions.” From that, she says, “He creates something amazing.” “I like to separate perception from reality and concentrate on the reality,” says Koch, who has called Palm Beach home since 1988. In the exhibit drawn from his vast western collection, which by his own estimate contains in the neighborhood of 1.5 million objects, his vision played out on densely covered walls, where the work of a master might be watched over, closely, by a buffalo head. In the crowded galleries, art could not slip away from the culture and context that originally nurtured it. “This is not a normal kind of installation,” Nancy Mato, executive vice president and curator at the Society of the Four Arts, admitted shortly after the exhibit opened. Not surprising, considering Koch is not your normal rich guy. “With him, it truly is collecting what he loves. He’s not buying for investment or the important names.” As a teenager, Koch spent summers on the family’s ranch in

like the big museums. I get requests all the damn time. I loaned some paintings to the Metropolitan in New York, to the Louvre in Paris. What I’ve found with these big institutions is that I’m lucky to get a thank you letter. What I do now, if a big institution wants to borrow a painting, I’ll say fine, we’ll trade. I’ll loan you mine if you loan me one of yours of comparable value and quality.

QA

Do you still offer tours of the art in your Palm Beach home? We have a program to give tours to the art schools and to other schools around here that want it. I think we’ve shown it to about 5,000 kids, maybe I’m wrong, maybe it’s 1,500 but it’s a big number. [Official estimates put the number at approximately 500 students annually.] My idea is to expose kids at a young age so they can appreciate it.

WITH BILL

What is your motivation in loaning art from your various collections to museums around the country and the world? It’s a way of sharing it with people who wouldn’t otherwise see it. In New York, they have a panoply of art but if you show it in Billings, Montana, people rave about it. I’ve had six or eight showings there. When I showed in Wichita, Kansas, they had record attendance and I got a lot of nice letters. If you do something nice, it’s nice to be appreciated. I’ve gotten so that I don’t

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Why is it important to expose kids to art? Well I don’t know. It influenced my life as a kid in a positive way. Art is very important to our culture. Actually it’s important to every culture. It makes you a better person; makes you better understand our lives and other cultures. I think that’s a positive thing. What’s at the top of your to do list these days? My passion right now, I’m building this western town [in Colorado]. I’m essentially creating a living museum of the history of the west. I just want to preserve this time period and do it in my own way. I’ve hired historians to help me. I’ve been buying up


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Montana. It wasn’t a vacation. “My dad sent me up there to work, 10 hours a day, seven days a week.” The pay was 50 cents an hour. “Those were the days,” he says. “In order to win the respect of the other working men, which every young boy wants, I had to work harder and be as strong as they were and as self-reliant. It was a great experience for me. I just fell in love with it.” Koch keeps the romance alive with help from the art with which he surrounds himself. “A brilliant artist can communicate emotion,” he says. The iconic watercolors of Charles Russell evoke warm memories of Montana and the placemats his mother once set out on the table. The obvious intensity in a cast of Auguste Rodin’s Thinker reminds him of the preparation necessary for a deposition, lawsuit or a big race. He bought Field of Oats and Poppies by Claude Monet because it reminded him of a pasture on his father’s ranch where he had picnicked as a kid. “The tree line, the color in the grass looks almost identical to what it looks like in Kansas on that field in springtime,” he’ll tell you. “That’s what I do. I only buy things that make me feel good,

other people’s collections so I can furnish and stuff the town. The only things that aren’t going to be totally authentic: I put radiant heat in, I put electricity in and I put modern day plumbing. I have outhouses but I put modern plumbing in the outhouses. What do you plan to do with the town once it’s built? It’s a place for my children to play, a place to get to know one another. We have six between us [Koch has four children from previous relationships; his wife brought another child to the house in Palm Beach; together they have a six-year old daughter]. I want them to get along and not fight the way my brothers and I did. My wife has 34 immediate relatives. They’re very Irish; they’re fun to be with. I want to have a place for them to stay. Then I want to use it for entertainment for my businesses. I have a coal mine and some gas drilling properties within 10, 15 minutes of my ranch. In addition to that, I want to bring in historians and have debates and let them argue over a bottle of whiskey in the saloon. It would be fun to debate whether Wyatt Earp was a good guy or a bad guy. What kinds of books do you like to read? I’ve read novels in the past but most of my reading now is history. I’m tired of reading scientific books or political books. Are you a perfectionist? As part of my independence, I have my own standards of perfection and my own way of doing things. I do that in spite of

Photo by Jenifer Vogt

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lift my spirits or have a very personal meaning for me, such as my love for the west.” Fortunately for everyone who visited the recent exhibit based on his western collection – or the two previous exhibits at the Society of the Four Arts celebrating Koch’s maritime and eclectic art collections and the patrons of museums in Boston, Wichita, Topeka, Yellowstone, Oklahoma City, New York City, Paris and all the other places where his art has been displayed plus the thousands of students who have been invited to tour his home – Mato reports, “He wants to share what he loves.”

what other people say or think. I get gratification out of doing things in the best possible way that I could do – and then still being successful. I try to take that approach in virtually everything I do. Shoot for perfection as best that I can, by my standards, and then try to be successful. I’m doing that with the school, I’m doing that with my art collection. What is the standard for perfection at the school you recently founded in West Palm Beach? What makes Oxbridge Academy different from other private schools? We’re doing something very unique; we’re saying children come first. The reality in teaching is that you’ve got to get the kids interested. If they’re not interested, they won’t learn. You’ve got to make it entertaining and you’ve got to show them that algebra is a good skill to have. What we’re doing is having the kids come up with projects; it’s called project education. Can you give us an example? If you want to have a model sailboat that can sail on its own, remote-controlled, from Florida to England you’re going to have to learn about aerodynamics, hydrodynamics, weather, structural engineering, control technology, communications and you’re going to have to find out how to gather the information, how to put a team together, to get all the various experts and then how to motivate them to achieve a simple objective. That’s a terrific educational experience. There’s a whole lot of very interesting things about it. It gets kids thinking out of the box.

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June

A mid-20th century master photographer, Wynn Bullock is best known for his evocative black and white images. But in the early 1960s he also created a significant body of color work he called “Color Light Abstractions.” Through June 9, Wynn Bullock: Insights and Surprises also includes vintage black and white photos and more. Palm Beach Photographic Center, 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-253-2600 or www.workshop.org. ©Wynn Bullock

Playwright David Auburn’s intricately crafted drama, Proof, won both the Pulitzer Prize and the Tony Award when it debuted. Palm Beach Dramaworks’ new production presents the story of the daughter of a brilliant but mentally disturbed mathematician who tries to come to grips with her possible inheritance − his insanity. Through June 17; Don and Ann Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-514-4042 or www.palmbeachdramaworks.org.

Fort Mose: Colonial America’s Black Fortress of Freedom − a traveling exhibit from the Florida Museum of Natural History − explores the history of Fort Mose, America’s first legally sanctioned free black community. The exhibit, which can be viewed through July 29, also explores the African-American colonial experience. Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, 170 NW Fifth Ave., Delray Beach; 561-279-8883 or www.spadymuseum.org.

Elegant Enigmas: The Art of Edward Gorey opens the Norton Museum of Art’s summer exhibition schedule with more than 150 drawings that Gorey created for many of his books, including The Gashlycrumb Tinies, The Unstrung Harp and The Gilded Bat. Sketchbooks, illustrated envelopes, book cover ideas and theatrical costume designs are also included. Through Sept. 2; 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach; 561-832-5196 or www.norton.org. “The top of the Zagava Tree / Was frequently where they had tea,” from The Osbick Bird, 1970; Pen and Ink, 4 x 5 in. ©2010 The Edward Gorey Charitable Trust

Take a guided snorkeling tour of MacArthur Beach State Park’s near-shore reefs and learn about the species that inhabit the shimmering waters. Bring your own snorkeling gear, including mask, snorkel and fins. Open to experienced swimmers and snorkelers age 10 and above; under 18 must be accompanied by an adult in the water. Saturdays through August; 10900 Jack Nicklaus Drive, North Palm Beach; Reservations required, 561-624-6952. A wrasse on the rock reef

In “Young Artists in Concert,” Sol Children Theatre’s talented performers will revisit the top of the music charts from the ’60s through the ’90s! From “Westminster Cathedral” to Michael Jackson and Madonna, the young vocalists will have you singing along! Accompanied on piano by Jason Buelow and KJ Hoffman with Kayla Thurber on guitar. June 22-24; 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton; 561-447-8829 or www.solchildren.org.

Florida Atlantic University’s Festival Rep productions are always among the highlights of the summer months. This year is no different, with Showtune – a Musical Revue celebrating the words and music of the incomparable Jerry Herman (Hello Dolly, Mame, La Cage aux Folles) alternating with William Shakespeare’s Love’s Labor’s Lost. June 22 through July 21; University Theatre, FAU Boca Raton; www.fauevents.com or 1-800-564-9539. Showtune – a Musical Revue

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July/August

Sentimental Journey: Boca Raton During WWII

July

features 16 enlarged historical photographs and memorabilia from the time when Boca Raton was the site of the Army Air Corps’ only war-time radar training base. The base occupied almost one fourth of the current city limits and forever changed the face of the town of about 700 residents. Boca Raton History Museum, 71 N. Federal Highway; 561-395-6766 or www.bocahistory.org. Main entrance to the Boca Raton Army Air Field, located at East Palmetto Park Road at about Northwest Fourth Avenue (ca. 1942)

Get a bug’s eye view of what’s lurking outdoors

July

in Backyard Monsters at the South Florida Science Museum through September 17. The exhibit features giant robotic insects, some with nearly 20-foot wingspans, and interactive, enlightening displays allowing visitors to move remote-controlled bugs, learn how insects eat and fly and much more. 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach; 561-832-1988 or www.sfsm.org.

Shiver your timbers! Ahoy Maitz! Pirates & Treasures!

July

at the Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture offers a family-friendly look at pirates, myths and legends through the remarkable and imaginative paintings of celebrated artist Don Maitz, who created the well-known Captain Morgan Spiced Rum character. Through October 28, Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach; 561-243-7922 or www.oldschool.org. Blackbeard’s Revenge by Don Maitz

Every Friday night the Palm Beach Zoo comes alive

July

with children's entertainment, roving animal encounters and shows, complimentary rides on the Wildlife Carousel, live music in the Fountain Plaza, dinner specials in the Tropics Café, Wonders of Wonder Interactive Fountain Show and much more! 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach; 561-547-WILD (9453) or www.palmbeachzoo.org. Alan Weiner

The Delray Beach Public Library’s Lifelong Learning

July

Community Institute is the only library in South Florida offering a Lifelong Learning Center. For three Wednesdays beginning July 11, Dr. Terry Lawrence, art historian, artist and professor of drawing and art history, will discuss scandals, forgeries and intrigue in “Murder and Mayhem in the World of Art.” 100 W. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach; 561-266-9490 or www.delraylibrary.org. Terry Lawrence

For the last 11 years, Interamerican Community Action

July

has celebrated the independence of Colombia through its annual Palm Beach Colombian Fest. The event shares Colombian folklore and customs through world championship dancers and singers directly from Cali, typical foods, folkloric dances, crafts and more. American German Club, 5111 Lantana Road, Lake Worth; 561-541-0692 or PalmBeachColombianFest.net.

Always a family favorite, Coppélia is a farcical comedy

August

about a boy, a girl, another girl who’s not really a girl but a doll and an eccentric doll-maker who attempts to bring his beautiful doll Coppélia to life. Boca Ballet Theatre’s production keeps everyone on their toes – including the audience, which has an enjoyable wait to see who gets the last laugh. August 3-5, Florida Atlantic University Theatre, 561-995-0709 or www.bocaballet.org. Boca Ballet Theatre’s Coppélia

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The Boca Raton Museum of Art in Mizner Park is a world-class institution that offers intriguing national touring exhibitions as well as a multifaceted permanent collection. Now through mid-December, admission to this 44,000square-foot cultural hub is trimmed to $8 ($6 seniors, $4 students, free for children 12 and younger), including weekly art activities. For more information: (561) 392-2500; www.bocamuseum.org.

John D. MacArthur Beach State Park

Palm Beach County’s only state park – the John D. MacArthur Beach State Park – is blessed with a mangrove-fringed estuary, coastal hardwood forest and two miles of beach and shore reefs. The park, located in North Palm Beach, is open from 8 a.m. until sundown 365 days a year. The entrance fee is $5 per vehicle (maximum of eight people). Park visitors can participate in a variety of recreational activities, including kayaking, fishing, bird-watching and snorkeling. Guided nighttime turtle walks during the summer spawning season are also offered for just $5 per person. For more information: (561) 624-6950; www.macarthurbeach.org.

The Puppetry Arts Center of the Palm Beaches, which is now in a new 5,000-square-foot home in Delray Beach’s colorful Pineapple Grove district, celebrates the enduring appeal of puppetry. Hand puppets, marionettes and magic transform the center’s 180-seat black box theater as professional puppeteers and ventriloquists perform shows ranging from children’s folktales to adult-oriented comedy acts. Many performances, including Saturday matinees, are $6.50 per person. For more information: (561) 2434330; www.puppetcenter.org.

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For less than the cost of a few lattes, Palm Beach County serves up a variety of tempting opportunities to quench your thirst for culture and the arts. To help get you started on an affordable exploration, here are 10 richly rewarding possibilities for $10 or less.

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The Tequesta-based Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum and School of Art is the oldest arts institution in northern Palm Beach County. For 50 years, the organization has championed the work of regional artists. The center’s calendar is full of exhibitions and opportunities for visitors to meet artists, whether at monthly exhibition openings or at “3rd Thursday” cultural happenings ($5; free to members). The Lighthouse ArtCenter opened an auxiliary gallery at Midtown in Palm Beach Gardens last year; admission there is free. For more information: (561) 746-3101; www.lighthousearts.org.

Boynton Beach’s Schoolhouse Children’s Museum and Learning Center has welcomed a million children and their families since it opened in 2001. Housed in the city’s 1913 two-story elementary schoolhouse, the museum provides interactive experiences inspired by Florida’s past, such as a whimsically designed 19th century general store stocked with props and costumes so that kids can dress up as pioneers. Admission is $5 for adults, $4.50 for seniors and $4 for children. For more information: (561) 742-6782; www.schoolhousemuseum.org.

Robert Stevens

In an artful marriage of the natural and manmade, nine monumental sculptures commingle with 300-plus rare palm trees at the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens in West Palm Beach. American artist Ann Weaver Norton (1905-1982) began creating the large-scale artworks in the early 1950s after the death of her husband who founded the nearby Norton Museum of Art. In all, more than 100 of her works are on display throughout the property, which includes her former home, studio and gardens. Admission is $7. For more information: (561) 832-5328; www.ansg.org.

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Since 1860, Palm Beach County’s fiery-red lighthouse in Jupiter has survived Seminole Indian uprisings, Confederate rebels and hurricanes. In more recent decades, it has thrived as a cultural destination. While the main draw at the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse and Museum is taking a guided, 105-step climb to the top of the light overlooking a federally designated Outstanding Natural Area, a 120-acre site that also includes a fascinating waterfront museum and historic outdoor exhibits. Admission is $9 for adults and $5 for children 618; children 5 and younger are free. For more information: (561) 747-8380; www.jupiterlighthouse.org. You know you’re worlds away from mainstream cineplexes when catching a flick means passing through an art gallery. But what really sets the Mos’Art Theatre in Lake Park apart is its steady diet of indie and foreign films, documentaries and other artsy fare. Most tickets at Mos’Art are $8 for adults, $7 for seniors. For more information: (561) 337-6763; www.mosarttheatre.com. The Stonzek Theatre in Lake Worth, which is affiliated with the Lake Worth Playhouse, also screens a thoughtful selection of films. Tickets generally run $9, although Monday matinees are $7. For more information: (561) 296-9382; www.lakeworthplayhouse.org/indie_films.html.

Absolutely Priceless! Palm Beach County boasts a treasure trove of cultural activities and attractions that are yours to enjoy – for free. Music fills the air. Galleries line the streets. Parks bloom with beauty and a bounty of art and craft shows. These gems are among the county’s most priceless:

The Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum West Palm Beach Admission is always free at the museum housed in downtown West Palm Beach’s historic 1916 courthouse. www.historicalsocietypbc.org

Library Adventures Everywhere! Public libraries throughout the county offer a variety of complimentary activities and events, ranging from story hour for the kids to poetry workshops.

Loggerhead Marinelife Center Juno Beach There is never a charge to visit the 12,000-square-foot center, which includes aquariums and a sea turtle hospital. www.marinelife.org.

Natural Resources If you’re looking for fresh air adventures, make www.co.palm-beach.fl.us /erm/links/ your first stop. Palm Beach County has many environmental resources – from the Wakodahatchee Wetlands and the Okeeheelee Nature Center to our beautiful beaches – that are naturally welcoming.

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Now celebrating its 30th anniversary, the Dolly Hand Cultural Art Center at Palm Beach State College’s Belle Glade campus features a 500-seat performance hall that hosts world-class productions and a refreshing breadth of affordable cultural arts opportunities. For more information: (561) 993-1160; www.palmbeachstate.edu/dolly hand.xml.

Photo by: Sandy Sklar

A profusion of tropical and subtropical plants from six continents blankets 14 acres at Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm Beach. Everything from North American trees to aquatic plants and the rarest of tropical fruits show how unique the growing environment in Palm Beach County is. In addition to being a place of beauty, Mounts, a component of the Palm Beach County Cooperative Extension Service and an affiliate of the University of Florida, is a serious horticulturist’s mecca. A suggested donation of $5 gets you in the gate. For more information: (561) 233-1757; www.mounts.org.

Clematis by Night West Palm Beach The popular weekly concert series in Centennial Square is the place to be on Thursday nights from 6 to 9 p.m. www.clematisbynight.net/

Founder’s Day at the Flagler Museum Palm Beach The museum is open free of charge every year on June 5 in honor of its founder Jean Flagler Matthews, Henry Flagler’s granddaughter. www.flaglermuseum.us.

The Philip Hulitar Sculpture Garden and the Four Arts Gardens at the Society of the Four Arts Palm Beach The gardens are open every day; there is no charge for admission. A self-guided tour is available from the King Library. www.fourarts.org.

Sundays on the Waterfront West Palm Beach The city stages a free monthly concert series at the scenic Waterfront Commons. www.wpb.org/sow/

Free Saturdays at the Norton Museum of Art West Palm Beach Admission is free every Saturday for West Palm Beach residents and on the first Saturday of each month for all Palm Beach County residents. www.norton.org

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The Lovely Curvaceousness of

Kagan by

John Loring

Custom Omnibus Sofa in NYC Penthouse, 2004

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E

nduring design legend – and Palm Beach County resident –

Vladimir Kagan describes his iconic masterpieces of 20th (and now 21st) century furniture as “romantic, organic, sculptural, architectural, ergonomic, sexy and (of course) curvaceous.” In 1949 and fresh out of New York’s School of Industrial Arts, he designed his totally innovative (even revolutionary) and exuberant space-structuring “Hampton Serpentine Sofa,” and so began the armies of his creations that have marched out to capture the world of interior design – works

The New York Times calls “icons of modernity and an obligatory reference for every designer.”

 Serpentine Sofa, 1950

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Vladimir Kagan at his Palm Beach home, where he does much of his designing today. Photo by Harry Benson

Fifty-two years after the still-so-relevant Serpentine Sofa, Tom Ford selected Kagan’s multi-tiered “Omnibus” seating for all 360 Gucci stores worldwide. Giorgio Armani followed suit − placing Kagan “Cubist” chairs and banquets in his ultra-chic Nobu restaurant in Milan. The corporate headquarters of BMW, LVMH and NBC Television all boast Kagan furnishings; his many other clients range from King Faisal to Donna Karan and Angelina Jolie. Past clients have included Marilyn Monroe, Frank Sinatra and Andy Warhol. All this began in 1927 in the German city of Worms on the Rhine, where Kagan was born into a Russian-German family. His father Illi Kagan was both a cabinetmaker and an art dealer with galleries in Worms and

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Heidelberg, where he dealt in the modern and progressive art of the time. Kunsthaus Kagan specialized in works by the Wiener Werkstaette and Bauhaus designers along with paintings and prints by family friend Oskar Kokoschka. “The influence of art was strong in the house,” Kagan observes, “and my dream as a youth was to study music and art.” Germany during the Great Depression was anything but a comfortable environment and by the time young Kagan was 6 there were communist marches on the Hauptstrasse of Heidelberg passing the Kunsthaus Kagan. Five years later, these were succeeded by Nazi demonstrations. It was time to leave. The Kagan family moved to New York in 1938 bringing along as much of their art collection as was transportable. Once settled in New York, Illi Kagan opened a new woodworking shop, while Vladimir was sent to study at the city’s public School of Industrial Art (later the School of Art and Design)

 Contour Rocking Chair, 1953  Dune Loveseat and Ottoman for Barlow Tyrie, 2007

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 Low Back Contour Chair, 1953

 Barrel Chair with V. Kagan, 1947

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by his father, who insisted that he know how to draw before approaching cabinetry or woodworking. “It was all straight lines – Bauhaus-y – nothing of the organic that later blossomed in my life, but I learned everything in that school,” Kagan recalls. “The courses (illustration, cartooning, photography, drafting, ceramics, fashion designing, lettering, and notably architecture) were fabulous, and I came away with a wealth of knowledge that I still use today. I worshiped Dr. Erwin Mueller, who taught introductory architecture. (He designed many of the bridges on the Merritt Parkway, and I love bridges.) This was the turning point in my career. His class was disciplined and fundamental. We spent weeks drafting nuts and bolts and construction details. We were graded not only on the technical detail, but also on the layout of the page and on our lettering and presentation. To this day, I judge any fledgling designer wanting to intern for me by this criteria.


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Custom Serpentine Sofa in a New York townhouse by Julie Hillman Design.  Photography: Bärbel Miebach, 2007

“I loved drawing trees. (Of course, I admired one of my favorite artists Mondrian’s studies and abstractions of trees.) Learning about trees, I learned everything about construction. They’re such perfect engineering from their roots to their trunk to their limbs and branches and leaves. You see this everywhere in the sculpted, integrated, organic wooden legs of my designs that are not just stuck on and in the branch and leaf patterns, which stay very close to their antecedents. “As well as trees, animals and anatomical studies influenced me,” Kagan continues. “Watching the braced stance of a newborn colt or faun inspired the splayed legs of designs such as my ‘Barrel’ chairs. From my father I learned simplicity, the ‘less is more’ side to design as well as the functional side – that it has to function as a piece of furniture side. “Decoration is not design! A chair is not a question of upholstery

 Custom Sofa rendering, 2011

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(or pretty flower prints) but of support; it is a vessel, a shell in which the human body is totally supported. It is first ergonomic.” The senior Kagan’s motto in his woodworking shop was “Honor handwork!” When his son combined it with a fondness for ample scale (the serpentine sofa can seat eight), it made Vladimir Kagan furniture expensive. Early on experiments with more industrially oriented Danish manufacturing were explored, but Vladimir Kagan has, throughout his career, remained oriented (like his father before him) to handwork and great craftsmanship, keeping it from mass production and maintaining the exclusivity and prestige it enjoys to this day. The creative modeling of interior space structured by amply scaled and curvaceous center “island” sofas or by his groundbreaking multi-leveled modular “Omnibus” seating of 1969 (inspired by rocks on a riverbank) structures and lays out the traffic patterns of his fluid “interior landscapes,” as he likes to call them. There are at times steel, cast aluminum, Lucite and glass elements, yet Kagan’s sensuous, organic, frequently asymmetric forms of sculpted walnut and monochromatic upholstery wander and float in the middle of large rooms encompassing multiple possibilities of activity – contemplating, art, conversing, reading, watching television. Kagan furniture is avidly sought-after today by connoisseurs and museums worldwide and is in the permanent collections of London’s Victoria and Albert Museum, New York’s Cooper Hewitt Museum, the Brooklyn Museum and the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art, to name a few. His designs are currently produced in the U.S., Italy and England and are available through Ralph Pucci International in New York and West Hollywood, where his “Kagan Classics Collection” takes pride of place. Kagan still draws superbly − as he always has − and, from his Palm Beach home, currently works on numerous commissions for new furnishings and interior design for his privileged clients worldwide. “I always have to reinvent myself,” he muses. “I charge a delightful fee for consulting and I come up with some of the sexiest furniture I’ve ever designed.”

 Kagan’s living room with Infinity Table, Omnibus Sofa and Stalagmite Tube Lamp, 1971  Tri-Symmetric Stool, 1958

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One of a Kind Fine Art

and Jewelry in Palm Beach County

Roberto Edwards began his “Cuerpos Pintados” project over 25 years ago as a photographic collaborative project documenting the dialog between painters and models. It celebrates the expressive potential and diversity of direct body painting. On March 17 Holden Luntz Gallery opens its gallery exhibition of new photographic selections from the “Cuerpos Pintados Workshop” from Santiago, Chile. Holden Luntz Gallery 332 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 805-9550 www.Holdenluntz.com

Mystique is among the nation’s leading experts specializing in fine jewelry reproductions crafted in solid gold and platinum. Margarita stud earrings set in solid 14K gold, starting at $295.00. Mystique Created Gems 250 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-3008 www.mystiquegems.com

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Important platinum, gold, diamond and emerald "Chimera" bracelet by David Webb. Price upon request Richters 224 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-0774


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The Blue Sapphire Seduction holds ancient powers locked in its 23cts sapphire: the stone of beauty. This spring, spoil her with a corporeal declaration of your unwavering love: endless and deep, enough to fill the seven seas. Price upon request. Kaufmann de Suisse 210 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 832-4918 www.kaufmanndesuisse.ca

Rene Boiven, “Hindou” Made in Paris 1945 L’Etoile Royale 329 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-3025 www.letoileroyale.com

Since its founding in 1870, Findlay Galleries has been dedicated to representing and bringing forth the worlds leading artists to the american and international art collector.

Chick Brooch in baroque pearl, diamond, sapphire mounted in 18k white and yellow gold. Designer: Seaman Schepps

Specializing in works of art by both impressionist and postimpressionists, modern masters, and leading contemporary artist Wally Findlay Galleries welcomes you to celebrate its 52nd year on Worth Avenue in Palm Beach, Florida. Wally Findlay Galleries 165 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-2090 www.WallyFindlay.com

Seaman Schepps Palm Beach 237A Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 802.4410 SeamanSchepps.com

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the

goes on By Thom Smith Photgraphy by Michael Price

Before horns, long before strings, long before reeds, when early man wanted to make an impression, he picked up a stick and pounded on a log. Little has changed. Today, the sticks are buffed and balanced; the logs, now polished and glittery, have skins stretched over them and hang from monstrous scaffolds. They still make sounds, basic sounds – thunks, taps, chinks, bops, bongs, boinks, clops, booms – and in the right hands, the simple collision of stick against log creates magic. For half a century Don Brewer, Nicko McBrain, Tico Torres and Butch Trucks have made impressions with some of the most influential bands in rock ‘n’ roll. Now they enjoy the fruits of their labors in Palm Beach County. They have no plans to stop but they did take a break, just long enough to get together for a chat with art&culture. “There’s no talent here; we’re drummers,” teases Palm Beacher Trucks, as the four talk about drumming at BB King’s Blues Club in West Palm Beach. “Talent is the guitar players and singers; just ask ‘em. We’re the guys who hang out with the musicians.” Trucks, a founding member of The Allman Brothers Band, adds, “We’re the heart, the central nervous system of the band.

Left to right: "Butch" Trucks, "Tico" Torres,  "Nicko" McBrain and Don Brewer

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Band: Bon Jovi Age: 58 Birthplace: New York (parents emigrated from Cuba in 1948) Residence: Jupiter

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Torres

Name: Hector Juan Samuel “Tico” Torres

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Family: Wife Maria, one son How long in Palm Beach County: 16 years

Why Palm Beach County: Tico had an art show at a Palm Beach gallery in September 1995 and was invited to the opening of Mar-a-Lago that December. His flight was delayed because of snow and it was freezing. The sun and palms on Royal Poinciana were convincing. Other: Tico also is an artist and has developed Rock Star Baby, a line of fashions for infants.

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And we’re the luckiest people in the world, to have been able to make a living making music.” Between them, the quartet of drummers and the bands they played for have cranked out enough hits to stock a record store. Brewer formed Grand Funk in Detroit in 1969. In 1970 the group sold more albums than any other American band with hits like We’re an American Band. The Allman Brothers also formed in ’69 and were inducted into the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in 1995. Iron Maiden, a pioneer of British Heavy Metal’s New Wave, had been around for eight years when McBrain joined in 1983. Their latest studio offering, The Final Frontier, reached No. 1 in 28 countries. Torres is an original member of Bon Jovi, which has been scoring hits such as Livin’ on a Prayer and It’s My Life since 1983. Of the four, Torres is the most recent arrival to Palm Beach County. He moved here in 1996 and settled in Jupiter. He and McBrain, friends for years, arrived at BB King’s fresh from a round of golf. Otherwise, because of the demands of the business – the recording, the touring, the promoting – none had ever met. Within minutes they were behaving like brothers at a fraternity reunion. The drummer’s job, according to Torres, is to make the guys in the band who are front and center look good. “The band can have a breakdown once in a while and your job is to bring ‘em back,” he says. And when the drummer fails? “If you get a really good band and they got a lousy drummer, they’ll sound terrible,” McBrain says. “If you get a lousy band, but it’s got a really hot drummer, they’ll be dancing. The drummer is key: We’re the drivers. If we ain’t on our game, the band ain’t gonna have a good gig.” No one at the table argues with him.

Despite thousands of shows, and millions of headaches, they stay at it. “You start playing music and it happens,” Trucks says. “There’s no tomorrow, no yesterday, you’re completely in the moment. It is absolute magic and the brain has to disappear, the brain has to get out of the way.” With a two-year, 100-concert tour behind him, London-born McBrain, 59, is free, for the moment, to concentrate on Rock ‘n’ Roll and Ribs, his highly regarded barbecue spot in Coconut Creek, just south of his Boca Raton home. But come June, Iron Maiden begins a North American tour. Jupiter’s Brewer and Grand Funk played the South Florida Fair earlier this year. Recently inducted into Classic Drummer magazine’s Hall of Fame, he also drums with Bob Seger, who just


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completed a major tour. This will be a light year for Trucks and the Allman Brothers. After their annual March run at New York’s Beacon Theatre and the three-day Wanee Festival in Live Oak, Fla., they'll play about a dozen dates, including six with Santana, while Gregg Allman tours to promote his new autobiography. Torres, at 58 the kid in this group, is back on the golf course and working on his art after a year-long world and U.S. tour with Bon Jovi. Next up is a show that will take him back to his roots in New Jersey, where he played bugle in his junior high band until he was bounced for not cutting his hair. Brewer was in a junior high school band, too, playing clarinet. “I hated it, just hated it,” he says. “Then the instructor said, ‘I need volunteers for the drum section. I only have girls back there and I need somebody to carry the bass drum.’” Brewer thought he might find a date; instead he found his calling. And his parents backed him. His father, who had played drums for beer during the Depression, bought Don a Joe Morello Champagne set by Ludwig, named after the legendary jazz drummer who helped the Dave Brubeck Quartet reach unheralded heights of popularity. Brewer’s dad taught him the basics. To Trucks’ Southern Baptist parents, music was sinful, but they let him play in the high school band. “At least I wasn’t getting my neck broken playing football,” he reasons. In 11th grade, he asked for a drum set. Finally his parents gave in. He, too, started with a four-piece Ludwig Champagne. With Bon Jovi still years away, Torres scored extra cash as a roofer while always looking to improve his drumming. He didn’t have a Ludgwig set but heard that Joe Morello gave lessons at his home. “The wall was stained from the roof leaking,” Torres recalls, “so I said I’ll fix the roof for lessons. Deal. Next week I brought a ladder and fixed it up. Between me working and him being on the road, I only got about four lessons, but we became good friends.” McBrain was watching television in his native England when he saw Morello playing Take Five with Dave Brubeck. “I said I want to be just like him,” McBrain recalls. Morello, who died last year, was known for using unusual time signatures – 5/4 on Take Five and 9/8 and swing 4/4 on Blue Rondo a la Turk – and even soloed using just sticks, no drums. “Me dad says you’ll never be as good as Joe Morello. With that, I went into the kitchen and picked up me mum’s knives and started beating the shit out of her enameled pans, all these chips flying, making a royal kerfuffle.” His first drums were kitchen castoffs – biscuit tins, Bovril tins, Oxo cube tins – anything that made a noise. For

Brewer

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Name: Don Brewer Band: Grand Funk Railroad (founder), Bob Seger and the Silver Bullet Band Age: 63 Birthplace: Flint, Mich. Residence: Jupiter Family: Wife Sunny Quinn, former DJ at Sunny 104.3 in West Palm Beach How long in Palm Beach County: 32 years

Why Palm Beach County: He used to come to Florida when on break from Grand Funk tours. That’s how he met his first wife, who was from Pompano Beach. After Grand Funk disbanded in 1976, the couple decided to move from Michigan to Boca Raton. Other: Brewer met Sunny while on tour with Bob Seger. Named one of the most influential drummers in the history of rock by Modern Drummer magazine.

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Band: The Allman Brothers Band Age: 64 Birthplace: Jacksonville Residence: Palm Beach

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Trucks

Name: Claude Hudson “Butch” Trucks

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Family: Wife Melinda, four children. His son Vaylor is a member of two bands based in Atlanta, Bonobos Convergence and The Yeti Trio. His nephew Derek Trucks plays guitar with the Allman Brothers and, with wife Susan Tedeschi, the Tedeschi Trucks Band, which won a 2012 Grammy for Best Blues Album. How long in Palm Beach County: 22 years

Why Palm Beach County: Melinda, an artist, wanted to live in New York. Butch said no way; the “next best thing for an artist is Miami and Palm Beach was as close as we could find to Miami that was civilized.” Other: They also own a home in Southern France; the foundation was built in the seventh century, the second floor in the 17th; it’s a “work in progress.” Developing Moogis, a subscription-based Internet venture to promote live music performances, sort of a musical version of Facebook or Netflix.

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sticks, he used his mother’s knitting needles. “Next Christmas they gave me my drum set. They were working class. That set was a lot of money for them, but it was a revelation. I knew, I’m on my way now.” Trucks had some formal training – he actually played tympani in the Jacksonville Symphony Orchestra and still uses the impressive kettle drums today – but most drummers perfected their art by watching and listening, picking up a stroke here and a roll there. “The Joes (Morello) and the Buddys (Rich) and the Gene Krupas were the power drummers of their time and they served as the role models,” McBrain says. “What we had with the jazz style was kind of a sketch plate – who could do the fastest single stroke roll, who could play underneath the high hat, who could spin their sticks, who was the better showman. They all still had their art but when pop music came along and changed to rock in the ‘50s, the drummers changed.” Trucks says he doesn’t “think any of the people sitting around this table spent a lot of time listening to Ringo and Charlie Watts,” but he is quickly challenged. “Ringo Starr was my hero,” McBrain says. “Joe Morello got me into it but what Ringo was doing at that time with the Beatles was phenomenal. He was absolutely genius with his timing and Charlie Watts (Rolling Stones) was actually a swing drummer and he just happened to fall into the Stones. Those two guys certainly weren’t massively technical players but what they did worked. Then Keith Moon (The Who) and John Bonham (Led Zeppelin) broke the mold of every drummer who’d come along. We were learning our art from all these guys.”

Learning to drum is one thing. The drummer also has to find a band, hopefully, one that will last. Brewer, McBrain, Torres and Trucks all paid their dues in local bands before settling in – some sooner than others – for the long run. “I could have stayed in bar bands or a cover band, but we made a conscious decision that we were gonna be a concert band, and do original material.” Brewer says. “You just change your whole direction and say even if I starve I don’t care.” Trucks joined bands – including one with Duane and Gregg Allman and others at Florida State University – but he was insecure… until a certain free concert in Jacksonville. Duane was forming a new band. “Jaimoe [Jai Johanny Johanson, Allman’s first drummer] kept telling Duane he needed two drummers,” Trucks says. Apparently, Duane


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figured if having two drummers in the band was good enough for James Brown, it was good enough for him. “Jaimoe kept telling Duane I was the one.” The only thing standing in Trucks’ way was his own insecurity. “We’re playing a shuffle. It’s going nowhere,” he recalls. Duane turned around on stage and stared at him. Trucks continued to flounder. Again, Allman gave him the look. “I’m just flopping around. Then he does it again.” Trucks realized he was being made to look foolish. He started to get mad. That’s when the music took off and took over. “Duane just backed up and smiled. It’s like he reached inside [me] and flipped a switch. “From that moment to this,” Trucks says, “I have never, ever been afraid.” He can’t explain what happened on that stage but it happened. His insecurities checked out for good. “It was the epiphany of my life.” That’s not to say he hasn’t screwed up. There was the time he kicked off a slow song, Please Call Home, with a blues beat. “It’s supposed to go bom, bom, bom, bom and I’m going da-da-dada-da-da. We tried to make it work but we played the whole damn song like that,” he says to sympathetic moans from the other drummers gathered around the table. “We couldn’t figure out how to get into the right tempo. It was a five-minute train wreck. And the whole time, everybody’s looking at me.” Challenges abound offstage, too. All four agree: they’ve been put off by others – unscrupulous managers, greedy record companies and band members who come up with a few lines of melody, flesh it out with the band and then claim the songwriting credits – and royalties. McBrain can laugh now about his preMaiden stint with the politically active French band Trust, which had a penchant for food fights in three-star Parisian restaurants. Fortunately, the blunders and the rip-offs are far outweighed by the triumphs: Grand Funk’s record sell-out at Shea Stadium, the Allmans’ Lifetime Achievement Grammy in February, 130 million albums and counting for Bon Jovi, Iron Maiden more popular than ever. “Our audiences now are 70 percent college age and under,” Trucks crows. “And their parents and their grandparents are coming, too!” “That’s an accolade to the power of the songs, the power of the performances,” McBrain offers. “If you’ve got a lousy band, and a lousy song, it ain’t gonna last. We’re basically time capsules, all of us sitting here. Cause when we’re dead and gone and the world will hopefully be a better place, there’ll still be rock ‘n’ roll, there’ll still be funk blues and there’ll still be great soul music. Our legacy will be there.”

McBrain

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Name: Michael Henry “Nicko” McBrain Band: Iron Maiden (since 1982) Age: 59 Birthplace: Hackney, London, England Residence: Boca Raton Family: Wife Rebecca, two sons How long in Palm Beach County: Since 1989 Why Palm Beach County: Met Rebecca at an Iron Maiden concert in Broward County. They settled in Boca Raton. Other: Finished two-year, 98-city worldwide tour last August. Owns Rock ‘n’ Roll and Ribs in Coconut Creek.

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all-classical public radio

Classical Music. It’s In Our Nature. classicalsouthflorida.org

GLOBAL NEWS, LOCAL CHANNEL. Get the latest public radio news and shows, now on the air in the Palm Beaches. wpbinews.org


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It Just By Bill Meredith

The marriage of social media and mobile phones is resulting in a honeymoon for arts fans. With smart phones, iPads and computer programs, a world of information about arts and artists is now, literally, at hand. Palm Beach Opera’s audience can click on website links to get reviews from Yelp, see highlights on YouTube, listen to highlights on iTunes Ping or view photographs on Flickr. Fans can also keep up to date with the organization on Facebook and Twitter. When everything clicks, everyone seems to benefit. “Having an accessible website with easy-to-use links for secure ticket sales and donations is important but we realized that social media is very useful in public engagement. And studies have shown that the fastest-growing age group of Internet users is 60 and older,” says Ceci Dadisman, director of marketing and PR for Palm Beach Opera.

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The Maltz Jupiter Theatre website has the popular Facebook and Twitter links but Artistic Director Andrew Kato also points out the benefits of YouTube. “Our YouTube videos show both highlights and the behind-the-scenes process of shows coming together,” he says. “A theater has to constantly reinvent itself and they help us to communicate that and to cover the core facets of our mission statement to ‘educate, entertain and inspire.’” Classical music is another time-honored art that’s embracing the brave new world of the Internet. The Boca Raton Symphonia is among the many arts groups around the country that have taken advantage of the discount site Groupon to offer low-cost tickets. With Groupon and other similar online services, such as LivingSocial, patrons enjoy the possibility of saving money while arts groups have the opportunity to fill seats and connect with new audiences. Younger arts fans grew up with technology and it shows at indie-rock establishments like the Speakeasy Lounge in Lake Worth. The club lists its events and info on Facebook and uses advancements that may make hard-copy concert tickets obsolete. “We have the capacity to scan Internet tickets through smart phones,” says Justin Thompson, the club’s production and booking manager. “The ShowClix app allows you to scan an advanced matrix barcode between two phones or iPods.” CultureNow.org is on a mission to create a museum without walls, packed with information about art, architecture and history submitted from locations all across the country. Locally, fans of world-class art have the option of visiting the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach or connecting through its newly revamped website. “Our website now allows viewers to bookmark and share on social platforms like Facebook and Twitter,” says Hilary Greene, the Norton’s communications coordinator. “It’s much more interactive.” Even the 110-year-old Flagler Museum in Palm Beach has opened the door to technology, offering interactive foreign language tours in Spanish, French and, starting next year, German via its in-person audio wand technology or virtual online link. Henry Flagler may have been a visionary but he couldn’t have foreseen that.

Make Something Beautiful Happen All across Palm Beach County, folks are connecting to the arts in new and exciting ways. • Bradford A. Deflin, a senior banker with JP Morgan Chase and a member of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s board, listens to music using Songkick and Pandora. • Award-winning author and Jupiter resident Donna Gephardt uses Facebook and blogging as a way to connect with her readers. • Thousands have explored the cultural landscape through www.palmbeachculture.com.

Here are some other ways people are making something beautiful happen using today’s technology: “We created a mini-website within our website last year to teach 240 students their parts for our presentation of Joseph and the Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat. Eight teams of 30 kids could download sheet music and audio recordings of their vocal harmony sung against the melody, videos of the staging and information from costumes to contracts.” Andrew Kato, artistic director, Maltz Jupiter Theatre “To be honest, good old Google is my best friend for the arts. I just type in what I am looking for… When we have an Art Deco walking tour or bus trip, I can just call or text ahead to our next stop and let them know we are on our way!... SquareUp.com is my latest discovery. It is a free app and device that plugs into the iPhone and swipes credit cards. Unbelievable, no contracts, no minimum, no monthly fee – just a small percentage of each sale. The buyer uses a finger to “sign” their signature on the screen of the phone, they even send an email receipt. It is really as easy as 1-2-3!” Sharon Koskoff, Boynton Beach-based artist and president of the Art Deco Society of the Palm Beaches “Arts Radio Network provides a conduit for local arts organizations to share their stories with patrons through the use of the Internet and new technology such as smart phones and iPads. We wanted to make it easy for visitors and residents to keep up to date with what’s going on in Palm Beach County.” John C. Watts, president, Arts Radio Network

Cultural Council is sporting tech-savvy new business cards! The QR code on the back of the cards allows smart phone users to go directly to the Council’s website. Just scan the QR code for instant access to information about Florida’s Cultural Capital®.

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Embrace a New Beginning

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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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{inside culture} cultural council news 2012 Muse Award Winners (from left) Tom Gregersen and Bonnie LeMay (Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens); artist Carol Prusa; Dr. Ray E. Robinson (formerly with Palm Beach Symphony); Stephen Backhus (Milagro Center); Tamar Maltz, Andrew Kato and Milton Maltz (Maltz Jupiter Theatre); Stephen Maklansky (Boca Raton Museum of Art); Miles Coon (Palm Beach Poetry Festival) and Randal Baker (Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens)

Alex and Renate Dreyfoos

Andrew Kato and special guest Sally Ann Howes

Muse Awards Co-Chair Elizabeth Neuhoff and her husband, Geoff

Soprano Alexandra Rafalo performs with the Lynn University Chamber Orchestra.

Muse Awards Co-Chair Jean Sharf and her husband, Fred

Young singers from the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Paul and Sandra Goldner Conservatory of Performing Arts

2012 Muse Awards Celebrate County’s Cultural Excellence More than 300 cultural philanthropists, artists and other enthusiastic and appreciative guests celebrated the arts at February’s 2012 Muse Awards event, presented by the Cultural Council. Hosted by Co-Chairs Jean Sharf and Elizabeth Neuhoff and featuring members of the Muse Awards’ 42-person honorary committee, the entertainment-filled evening made the most of its theme, “Behind the Scenes.” “The Muse Awards not only celebrate the many wonderful contributions these recipients are making to Palm Beach County residents and visitors, but they also spotlight the intrinsic ways, both obvious and subtle, that our cultural community continues to positively impact both the local economy and our overall quality of life,” says Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council. Proceeds from the Muse Awards benefit the organization’s ongoing arts and cultural education programs. The prestigious Muse Awards recognize individuals and organizations for their

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contributions to arts and culture throughout Palm Beach County. The 2012 recipients included: • Milton

manager for the Milagro Center in Delray Beach – Outstanding Arts Educator • Obon, the Annual Bon Festival at the

and

Tamar

Maltz,

major

Morikami

Museum

and

Japanese

benefactors behind the Maltz Jupiter

Gardens, now in its 34th year –

Theatre, FAU Lifelong Learning Center,

Outstanding Art or Cultural Program of

the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland and the International Spy Museum

in

Washington,

D.C.

Outstanding Civic Leader • Dr. Ray E. Robinson, former artistic

the Year • Palm Beach Poetry Festival, which in only eight years has become America’s most important wintertime poetry celebration –

Outstanding

Arts

and

Cultural

director and general manager of the

Organization (budget under $500,000)

Palm Beach Symphony and author of 10

• Boca Raton Museum of Art, celebrating

books – Outstanding Cultural Leader

its 60th anniversary as one of South

• Stephen Backhus, outreach program

Florida’s leading cultural institutions – Photos by Jacek Gancarz


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cultural council news Outstanding Arts and Cultural Organization (budget over $500,000) • Carol Prusa, award-winning visual artist whose works have been exhibited at leading museums around the world – Hector Ubertalli Award for Visual Arts • Andrew Kato, producing artistic director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, a creative consultant/coordinating producer on the Tony Awards for the last seven years and the five-time producer of the annual Muse Awards – Council’s Choice Award The evening’s entertainment included amusing videos from JumpCut Media, plus musical performances by the 31-piece Lynn University Chamber Orchestra under the direction of Conductor Terence Kirchgessner; a selection from Madama Butterfly by soprano Alexandra Rafalo, a participant in the Palm Beach Opera Young Artist Program; pas de deux by Jerry Opdenaker, director and choreographer of O Dance; a performance of Barry Manilow’s One Voice by the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Paul and Sandra Goldner Conservatory of Performing Arts; and a special appearance by acclaimed theater and film star Sally Anne Howes. The Cultural Council is grateful to the sponsors of the 2012 Muse Awards, which included PNC Bank, J.P. Morgan, Gavlak Gallery, Northern Trust, Digital Domain Institute, Wells Fargo, The Palm Beach Post and Gunster.

Cultural Council Welcomes Supporters and Donors to New Home During the celebration of the opening of the Cultural Council’s new home in the historic Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth, more than 130 key supporters, donors and local officials attended a special preview reception the evening before the facility’s official grand opening and ribbon cutting on January 19. Named after the late Robert M. Montgomery, Jr., a prominent attorney and philanthropist, the building was renovated with

Summer Sum mer W Walks alks at the Mori Morikami ikami JUNE 8 | JULY JULLY 13 1 | AUGUST 24 | SEPTEMBER SEPTEEMBER 14, 2012

MUSEUM MUSEU UM | GARDENS | CUL CULTURE LTURE T | CUISINE 4000 Morikami Park P Rd., Delray Beach, FL | 561.495.02 561.495.0233 233 | morikami.org

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{inside culture} cultural council news

Eugene Lawrence, Conrad Schaefer, George T. Elmore

Cil Draime, Roe Green, Kelly Sobolewski

Lawrence F. DeGeorge and Suzanne Niedland

Bert and Sallie Korman

Cultural Council Chair Michael Bracci and his wife, Colleen

Lake Worth CRA Chair Cary Sabol Photos by: Corby Kayeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Studio Palm Beach

Experience One of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Great House Museums â&#x20AC;&#x153;An absolute must-seeâ&#x20AC;? ~ National Geographic Traveler

When it was completed in 190 1902, 2, Whitehall, Henry Flaglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gil Gilded ded Age estate in Palm Beach, was wa as hailed by the New York Heral Heraldd as â&#x20AC;&#x153;more wonderful than any palace p in Europe, grander and more m PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQWWKDQDQ\RWKHUSU ULYDWHGZHOOLQJLQWKHZRUOGÂľ PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQWWKDQDQ\RWKHUSULYDWHGZHOOLQJLQWKHZRUOGÂľ h e n r y

Today, Whitehall is a National N Historic Landmark op open pen to the public as the Flagler Museum M featuring guided tou tours, urs, audio tours in English, Spani ish and French, and self-guide brochures b Spanish LQ(QJOLVK6SDQLVK)U UHQFKDQG*HUPDQ LQ(QJOLVK6SDQLVK)UHQFKDQG*HUPDQ m o r r i s o n

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A National Nation nal Historic Landmark

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assistance from the Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA), which committed $700,000 for the project. It first opened in 1940 as the Lake Theatre and later housed three different art museums, but had been closed to the public since 2005. When the Montgomery family donated the classic building to the Cultural Council in January 2010, it was the largest single donation in the Council’s 33-year history. The special guests toured the building’s 12,500 square feet of galleries for community exhibitions, the Uniquely Palm Beach Store, tourism services area, education and training facilities and meeting space. They also viewed the Council’s opening exhibition, Foundations. To date, the Cultural Council has spent more than $1.5 million to renovate the building. In addition to the original donations by the Montgomery family and the Lake Worth CRA, major supporters of the project include Jim and Irene Karp, the Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, the Estate of Nancy Grayson, Alex and Renate Dreyfoos, the Roe Green Foundation and Berton E. and Sallie G. Korman. Additional donors include Northern Trust, Bruce A. Beal and Francis V. Cunningham, Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf, Cil Draime and Herbert and Diane Hoffman.

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The HARID Conservatory

2011-12 Performance Season May 25, 26, & 27, 2012

Alex Srb ©

Classical & contemporary ballets; character & modern dance. See what all the fuss is about! Call 561-998-8038 for tickets. info@harid.edu

O

www.harid.edu art&culture

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SUMMER CAMPS 2012 GRADES 6 - 12

Senior Conservatory Grades 6 - 12 Students Perform Bye Bye Birdie onstage June 29-30

February: Jeff Todino, Susan Baker, Michelle Gutzwiller, Wayne Baker

January: Dr. Clare Crawford, Rob Davis, Bobbi Horwich

-/.n&2)s9 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 pm Three Week Camp

June 11 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 29 TWO WEEK CAMP: Grades 6 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 12

Dance Intensive Ballet s jazz s tap

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*ULYn!UGsAM PM

GRADES K - 5 FOUR DAY CAMP: Grades K â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 FOU

March: Myrna Hill, Janice and Michael Barry, Charlotte Furman

March: Wayne and Firenze Diller

Magic!

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July 2 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6 sAM PM PM

Junior Conservatory Grades 3 - 5 Students Perform Willy Wonka Jr. onstage July 27-28

g

-/.n&2)s9 am â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 3 pm Three Week Camp

July 9 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 27 ONE-WEEK CAMP: Grades K â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5 Clowning, Improv and Sketch Comedy

February: Michelle Tolini Finamore, Fred Sharf, Rena Blades, Yuki

Culture & Cocktails Series Offers Lively Conversations

*ULYn!UGsAM PM

Dance, philanthropy, fashion and South

ONE-WEEK CAMP: Grades K â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 5

Florida history were hot topics as the

UNDER THE SEA

!UGUSTnsAM PM To register or for more information

(561) 575-2672 www.jupitertheatre.org/education 1001 East Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33477

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January: Jane Mitchell and Margaret May Damen

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Cultural Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s annual Culture & Cocktails series unfolded during the winter season. Each of the lively conversations featured a one-on-one interview and question-andanswer session with a well-known arts and cultural icon. In December, the focal point of the conversation was Edward Villella, the founding

artistic director of Miami City Ballet. He was interviewed by Philip Neal, a former principal dancer with the New York City Ballet and Miami City Balletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Palm Beach liaison. In the wide-ranging, memory-packed discussion, the two ballet stars reminisced about past performance triumphs in New York, Moscow, Miami and Paris. Januaryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s conversation featured entreÂŽ preneur, cultural philanthropist and Oscar winner Alexander W. Dreyfoos, who was interviewed by Judy Mitchell, chief executive officer of the Kravis Center for the


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Lighthouse Climbing Tours History Museum Tindall Pioneer Homestead Sunset Tours & Hiking Trails Events & Programs

March: Deborah Bigeleisen, Steve Koslow, Lanell Ganeda

Performing Arts. The far-ranging chat covered Dreyfoos’ early scientific career, his years as an amateur photographer and world traveler, and the pivotal role he played in developing Palm Beach County as Florida’s cultural capital – including establishing the Cultural Council. In February, the subject of the conversation was the international fashion designer Gnyuki Torimaru – better known simply as Yuki – who discussed “Couture, London, 1976-1986.” Michelle Tolini Finamore from the Textile and Fashion Arts Department at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston interviewed Yuki about the period in his career when he designed dresses for such diverse personalities as Princess Diana, Prime Minister Margaret Thatcher and supermodel Jerry Hall. The season’s final Culture & Cocktails in March was a conversation with Les Standiford, author of Last Train to Paradise, Bringing Adam Home, Meet You in Hell and numerous novels. The topic was the 100th anniversary of Henry Flagler’s Key West Railroad – one of the greatest engineering feats of all time that was tragically destroyed by a massive hurricane in 1935. John Blades, executive director of the Henry Morrison Flagler Museum in Palm Beach, posed the questions. All the events took place at Café Boulud in Palm Beach’s Brazilian Court hotel. The 2011-2012 season was sponsored by the Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation, with additional support from the Peter and Vicki Halmos Foundation/Palm Beach Principal Players, the Palm Beach Daily News and PR-BS, a Boca Raton-based public relations firm.

jupite

Gift Shop & Sweet Shop Weddings

561.747.8380 www.jupiterlighthouse.org 10am-5pm, last Lighthouse tour 4pm Jan-Apr Open 7 Days May-Dec Open Tues-Sun Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse Outstanding Natural Area National Landscape Conservation System

Become a Young Singer Palm Beach County’s award-winning choir is accepting audition appointments Saturday, June 2, 2012 At the Kravis Center, Cohen Pavillion For singers age 8-18 years (3rd grade - 12 grade) Auditions may be scheduled via our website: www.yspb.org

Become a Young Singers Donor Give the gift of music to the children and community of South Florida. By making a contribution, you are helping to ensure the continuation of Young Singers of the Palm Beach’s mission of transforming and enriching the lives of children and our community. For more information about Young Singers of the Palm Beaches visit www.yspb.org.

ZZZ\VSERUJ‡

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{inside culture} cultural council news Reception Welcomes Artists to Foundations Exhibition More than 75 guests attended an invitation-only reception celebrating Foundations, the first art exhibition in the Council’s new home in downtown Lake Worth. The exhibition, which was on view from the time of the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building’s grand opening in January through mid-April, presented works by 16 of the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship winners from Palm Beach County. Artists represented in the exhibition included Sam Perry (1988), Donald Neal (1989), Paul Aho (1995), Victoria Skinner (1996), Kathleen Holmes (1997), Tammy Knipp (2000), Bruce Helander (2001), Carol Prusa (2002 and 2008), Amy Broderick (2004), Kevin Boldenow (2004), Miroslav Antic (2005), Amy Gross (2006), Katie Deits (2007), Walter Hnatysh Jr. (2007 and 2011), Diane Arrieta (2008) and Sibel Kocabasi (2010).

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Helen Levin and Paul Slater

Annie Artise and Lisa Nolan

Arrieta, Boldenow, Gross, Helander, Hnatysh, Kocabasi, Neal, Perry, Prusa and Skinner were among the guests at the reception. “It was a great experience to share with the community our first

Kevin Boldenow, Lucy Keshavarz, Maryann Seidman and Elle Schorr


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cultural council news

exhibition showcasing the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship winners from the last 23 years,” says Rena Blades, the Cultural Council’s president and CEO. “We look forward to continuing to work together with the artists and the community to further enhance and promote arts and culture in Palm Beach County. With a variety of media represented, the breadth and talent of the artists of this region is extraordinary. From the surreal to the literal, the aesthetic to the sublime, painters, photographers, sculptors and even animators demonstrate their resolve to create, inspire and dream,” Blades says. The South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship Program offers the largest regional, local arts agency-sponsored artists’ grants in the United States, awarding fellowships to resident visual and media artists from Broward, Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe and Palm Beach counties. Since it was established in 1988, the Consortium has awarded close to $2 million in fellowships to more than 200 artists.

First Juried Art Exhibition in New Headquarters Opens PBC:ART, the first juried art exhibition in the Cultural Council's new home in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building, opened May 5. Featuring the work of 22 artists, the exhibition will run through August 4. During March, professional artists who reside in Palm Beach County were invited to submit up to three artworks from the past three years for consideration by a jury panel of local professionals. The panel of jurors included Rolando Barrerro, gallery director of ActivistArtistA GalleryStudio in Boynton Beach; Jamnea Finlayson, owner of JF Gallery and Framing in West Palm Beach; and Ken Plasket, owner of Kenneth Plasket Gallery, also in West Palm Beach. Artists whose work was selected were notified in early April.

The Excitement and Wonder of the World’s Wildlife Right Here in South Florida Treat Your Family to a Palm Beach Zoo Adventure! Daily Animal Shows - Interactive Fountain - Carousel - Snack Bars - Restaurant - Gift Shops Open daily 9 AM to 5 PM.

Zoo Memories last a Lifetime! 1301 Summit Boulevard,WPB, FL 33405 • (561) 547-WILD (9453) • www.palmbeachzoo.org Photo: Budge Jamison

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cultural compendium 11/15 • 2012 Titanic: The Musical 12/1 and 2 • 2012 The Living Christmas Tree 12/10 • 2012 The Lowe Family Christmas Spectacular 1/8 • 2013 The Great American Songbook 1/24 • 2013 Juan Siddi Flamenco 2/1 • 2013 Ernie Haase & Signature Sound 2/12 • 2013 Cirque Zuma Zuma

2/25 • 2013 Fiddler on the Roof 3/12 • 2013 Rave On! The Buddy Holly Experience 3/25 • 2013 Neil Simon’s Biloxi Blues 4/16 • 2013 TAP - The Show! 5/4 • 2013 The Wizard of Oz 5/10 • 2013 Street Beat, Inc.

All dates, artists and programs subject to change.

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1977 College Drive, Belle Glade, Florida

Maltz Jupiter Theatre Announces $10 Million Endowment Campaign To provide ongoing financial security while ensuring continued excellence and innovation, the Maltz Family Foundation announced a three-to-one matching challenge grant to secure a $10 million endowment for the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. “We have been privileged to provide financial stability that the theater needs to remain an artistic jewel in our community,” says Milton Maltz, founder and chairman of the board of directors. The principal of the fund will be invested, with earnings supporting artistic and educational programs on an ongoing basis. The challenge requires the theater to raise $2.5 million by June 30 to receive $7 million from the foundation. This, added to its existing $500,000, will bring the total endowment to $10 million. More than $1.6 million has been raised toward the challenge. The theater has formed a separate notfor-profit organization – the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Endowment – chaired by Harvey Golub, former CEO and chairman of American Express. “An endowment will provide the Maltz Jupiter Theatre with the opportunity to dream big, plan wisely and have the financial resources to provide a rich cultural life for our community,” Golub says. “Like any non-profit theater, ticket sales and subscriptions are never enough to sustain operations.” In other Maltz Jupiter Theatre news, the board of directors announced the promotion of artistic director Andrew Kato to producing artistic director. Having worked as an independent producer in New York for the last 14 years, Kato is a producer for the annual Tony Awards® and has served as executive producer of the last five Cultural Council Muse Awards events, where he recently received the Council’s Choice Award. Kato, who grew up in Tequesta, had his

Milton Maltz, founder and chairman of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre’s board, and Harvey Golub, chairman of the endowment board

first producing experience at the theater he leads today. In his early 20s – while working at the Burt Reynolds Dinner Theatre during the 1980s – he conceived and produced his first musical, Switch! “A solid foundation in education and hands-on experience are the keys to success in the theater world,” he says. “I believe in creating those opportunities for our youth.” Kato attended Florida Atlantic University and received his theater degree from Florida State University.

Artists, Restaurants Raise Funds for Children in Haiti More than 20 restaurants and food specialty shops in downtown Lake Worth joined forces on March 24 to support the community’s annual Haitian Empty Bowl Fund-Raiser. Each year, approximately 300 visitors participate in the event, which is organized by Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery, 605 Lake Ave. Participants purchase the bowls, which are made and donated by local artists, and then criss-cross the streets of Lake Worth with bowls in hand getting samples of food. The event raises funds for the children of Jacmel, Haiti, through the non-profit Art


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{inside culture} cultural compendium Creation Foundation for Children, which teaches children to live through the creation of art. They make and sell beautiful papiermache works and also have begun to create mosaic murals that attract the interest of tourists in Jacmel. Their work is for sale in the Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery with 100 percent of the proceeds going to the children. Participating artists included Gail Pasternack, Tracy Rosof-Petersen, Betty Wilson, Courtney Page, John McCoy, Amelia Costa, Joyce Brown, Lisa Kramer, MaryEllen Dohrs, Teri Salomni, Victoria Rose Martin, Madeline Gallo and Donald M. Perez. In addition, bowls were made and contributed by the Ceramics League of the Palm Beaches, Lighthouse ArtCenter students and faculty, the Armory Art Center, Jupiter Community High School students (and teacher Brian Kovachik), Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery and the Lighthouse Ceramic Studio.

Students in Brian Kovachik’s class at Jupiter Community High School created bowls for the project.

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{inside culture} briefly noted

Lake Worth photographer Steve Barry Jr. has been selected as one of 50 emerging artists whose work is featured in the prestigious Philadelphia exhibition ONWARD Compé ’12. The photograph, a stark, black-and-white image of a discarded sofa sitting in front of a run-down storefront flying an American flag, is representative of Barry’s work, which often depicts isolation in the urban landscape. Barry has travelled in Africa, New Zealand and Canada, has lived in Oregon, Montana and several parts of Florida and holds a bachelor of fine arts degree from Florida Atlantic University. His work has been displayed at Art Basel Miami and Gallery Camino Real in Boca Raton, among other locations.

The Eissey Campus Theatre of Palm Beach State College in Palm Beach Gardens launched its new Arts in the Gardens for Young People program this year. Its goals include using direct exposure to the performing arts as a learning tool and creating interactive classroom study guides that include audio and video components. Made possible by a donation from Paul and Sandra Goldner of Jupiter, the new program incorporates a School-Time Series of free performances for grades K-12. Plans call for workshops and master classes in the future.

Florida Atlantic University

The Eissey’s new series for young people began with arias and ensembles from favorite operas performed by the Palm Beach Opera’s Young Artists.

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Department of Music faculty members Irena Kofman, Krisztina Kover and Heather Coltman along with graduate student Dejan Daskalov brought their joy of performing and enthusiasm for great piano music to Boca Raton audiences in FAU’s annual “352 Keys Piano Gala Extravaganza” on May 20. Coltman is chair of the Department of Music and also the director of Keyboard Studies. Heather Coltman The concert, which presented a variety of arrangements and original works for four pianos, kicked off the 19th summer of the university’s TOPS (Teaching Outstanding Performer) Piano and Creative Writing Camps. To learn about the camp program, visit www.fau.edu/tops.


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THE NEW FACE OF CULTURE IN PALM BEACH COUNTY

NEW GALLERY Visit our new gallery and view rotating exhibitions throughout the year that showcase the range and talent of professional artists living and working in Palm Beach County. Admission is free and open to the public, Tuesday-Saturday, 10 a.m. to 5 p.m.

NEW STORE The Council’s Uniquely Palm Beach Gift Store features beautiful jewelry, totes, accessories and sculptures created by professional artists as well as other merchandise unique to cultural organizations in Palm Beach County. All proceeds support the Cultural Council’s artist programs.

NEW INFORMATION CENTER A place for visitors and residents to learn about the area, get oriented and pick up valuable information on the arts and culture of the county. NEW FRIENDS Join our family of supporters — become a member today! We’ll keep you entertained at our members-only events and engaged by our gallery talks, and even put a little money back in your pocket with a discount on purchases at our gift shop.

601 Lake Avenue | Lake Worth, FL 33460 | 561.471.2901 | www.palmbeachculture.com


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{a&c cuisine}

87 Via Mizner, Worth Avenue Palm Beach www.renatospalmbeach.com 561.655.9752 Renatoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with an intimate dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls. Culinary delights from the classics to the eclectic are complemented with an extensive wine list and fully stocked bar.

4533 PGA Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens www.cafechardonnay.com 561.627.2662 At Cafe Chardonnay we give center stage to local farm fresh foods and seafood. Chef Frank feels, the flavor of every dish is dramatically improved by farm to table freshness.

2300 PGA Blvd. Palm Beach Gardens www.waterwaycafe.com 561.694.1700 A relaxing waterfront dining experience awaits you at the Waterway Cafe... Famous for its friendly atmosphere, great service and fresh entrees. Come enjoy our Twilight Dinner Specials and Daily Happy Hour.

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{inside culture} In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and greater help us accomplish our mission. Dr. Stan and Marcie Gorman Althof

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farber

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Fine The Fine Foundation

Ms. Dina Gustin Baker Ms. Carol Barnett Publix Supermarket Charities Mr. and Mrs. James Batmasian Investments Limited

Mrs. Marjorie Fisher The Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kushnick Zissu Family Foundation Mrs. Emily F. Landau The Fisher Landau Center for Art Mr. Marc Leder

Mrs. Helen K. Persson Mr. Jorge Pesquera Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Ms. Margo Lefton Geo. Zoltan Lefton Family Foundation

Ms. Lisa H. Peterfreund Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation

Mr. Paul N. Leone The Breakers Palm Beach

Mr. Dana T. Pickard Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge LLP

Ted and Ruth Baum

Mrs. Shirley Fiterman The Miles and Shirley Fiterman Charitable Foundation

Mr. Bruce A. Beal

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Flack

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin J. Levine

PNC Foundation

Belle Glade Chamber of Commerce

Mrs. Florence Free

Mr. Robert A. Lewis

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Benson

Ms. Jennifer Garrigues Jennifer Garrigues, Inc. Interior Design

Mrs. Ellen F. Liman The Liman Foundation

Mrs. Regina Porten Porten Familly Foundation

Mr. Robert Gittlin JKG Group

Ms. Susan Lloyd Mr. John Loring

Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts

Mr. J. Arthur Goldberg

Dr. Catherine Lowe and Mr. Patrick Orlando

Ms. Joyce Reingold Palm Beach Daily News

Ms. Jo Anne Berkow Rosetta Stone Fine Art Mr. Jeffrey E. Berman Mr. Richard S. Bernstein Richard S. Bernstein & Associates

Dr. and Mrs. Carter Pottash

Mr. and Mrs. John Blades

Mr. Rick Gonzalez AIA REG Architects Inc.

Lynn University

Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Rosenberg

Mr. and Mrs. David S. Blue

Judy B. Goodman Esq.

Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Malasky

Mr. Craig D. Grant PNC Bank

Maltz Jupiter Theatre

Mr. Leon M. Rubin Rubin Communications Group

Boca Raton Resort & Club Ms. Yvonne S. Boice Mr. Michael J. Bracci Northern Trust Bank of Florida, N.A. Mr. J. Daniel Brede Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc. Howard Bregman, Esq. Greenberg Traurig, P.A. Mr. Douglas Brown Ovations Catering Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Brown The Ann K. & Douglas S. Brown Family Foundation Business Development Board Café Boulud Mr. Christopher D. Caneles The Palm Beach Post Ms. Linda A. Casey Mr. and Mrs. John K. Castle Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches

Mr. Raymond Graziotto Seven Kings Holdings, Inc. Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce

Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Maltz The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager

Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews

Mr. Lewis M. Schott The Lewis Schott Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews Denise and William Meyer Foundation

Greater Lake Worth Chamber of Commerce

Mrs. Sydelle Meyer

Ms. Roe Green The Roe Green Foundation

Mrs. Sydell L. Miller

Mr. and Mrs. Peter Halmos The Peter and Vicki Halmos Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand Mr. Christopher E. Havlicek JP. Morgan Chase, The Private Bank Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Ms. Pamela Saba

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph A. Marks

Greater Boynton Beach Chamber of Commerce

Mr. and Mrs. Richard D. Greenfield

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley M. Rumbough Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Meyer Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro The International Society of Palm Beach Ms. Jane Mitchell Ms. Jo Anne Moeller Office Depot Mrs. Mary M. Montgomery Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey H. Neuhoff Neuhoff Communications, Inc.

Mr. Rudy E. Schupp 1st United Bank Mr. Gary Schweikhart PR-BS Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf Ms. Muriel Siebert Mrs. Lois Silverman Silverman Family Foundation, Inc. Ms. Laurie Silvers Hollywood Media Corp. Michael D. Simon Esq. Gunster

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman

Mr. Frank N. Newman Wells Fargo

Ms. Judy A. Hoffman Profile Marketing Research

Ms. Suzanne Niedland and Mr. Lawrence F. DeGeorge

The Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties

Ms. Ann E. Howard John C. & Mary Jane Howard Foundation

Ms. Paige Noland

The Community Foundation of Louisville

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp

Norton Museum of Art

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Karp

Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco Telesco Family Foundation

Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce

Mrs. Patricia G. Thorne

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz Jr.

Palm Beach Civic Association

Mrs. Phyllis Tick

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Katz Katz Family Foundation

Palm Beach Opera

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio Jr. The Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc.

Mr. Amin J. Khoury B/E Aerospace

Palm Beach Zoo Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker

Wachovia Wells Fargo Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman

Ms. Carol F. Cohen Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence H. Cohn

Mr. Miles A. Coon Mr. Gus Davis Dr. Richard P. D’Elia Mr. Bradford A. Deflin JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank

Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sloane Mr. and Mrs. Harold Smith Mrs. Kelly Sobolewski Bank of America Mr. and Mrs. William J. Soter

Mr. Scott Diament Palm Beach Show Group

Mr. Robert S.C. Kirschner Passport Publications & Media Corp.

Digital Domain Media Group

Mr. Robert C. Parsons Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches

Mr. Don Kiselewski Florida Power & Light Company

Mr. Dack Patriarca

Ms. Susy Witt

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Midtown Payson Galleries

Ms. Mary Wong Office Depot Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Jerry K. Pearlman

Sheryl G. Wood Esq.

Ms. Charlotte D. Pelton Charlotte Pelton & Associates

Ms. Ruth Young The Colony Hotel

Mrs. Cecile Draime Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos Mr. and Mrs. George T. Elmore Mr. Donald M. Ephraim Donald M. Ephraim Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Kohnken Kohnken Family Foundation Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman Mr. Gary Krieger

Dr. John C. Whelton

List reflects gifts received between 2/1/2011 and print date.

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{next issue – fall 2012}

Dr. Mark Widick, a Boca Raton otolaryngologist and photographer, captured the last flight of the shuttle Endeavour.

Creativity: A Healthy Prescription for Success Physicians have based the practice of medicine on a rational approach since the days of Hippocrates. The word medicine, however, is derived from the Latin term ars medicina, which can be translated as “the art of healing.” Even with all the technological advances in the medical field, creativity still may have the power to take the healing arts to a level beyond that which science alone can achieve. In the next issue of art&culture, we’ll ponder the possibilities with a number of Palm Beach County physicians who practice both medicine and art with considerable success.

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Iberia Bank_Spring 12:Layout 1

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to the beat

of your own drum.

With over 125 years of banking excellence and a Five-Star rating from Bauer Financial, IBERIABANK has earned a stellar reputation as a conservative company focused on delivering unparalleled customer service at every point of contact. Our conservative approach to business continues to differentiate our company from other banks in the nation. We are a bank you can trust and we pledge to earn that trust every day. IBERIABANK is uniquelypositioned to serve your personal and business banking needsâ&#x20AC;Śnow, and well into the future.

We invite you to visit one of our 10 convenient locations on Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s east coast. Boca Raton: 1180 N. Federal Highway | Boynton Beach: 1101 North Congress Avenue Delray Beach: 900 SE 6th Avenue | Fort Lauderdale: 1201 South Andrews Avenue Jupiter: 1315 West Indiantown Road | Palm Springs: 2764 S. Congress Avenue Pompano Beach: 990 North Federal Highway | Royal Palm Beach: 119 South State Road Seven West Palm Beach: 605 North Olive | Wilton Manors: 2465 Wilton Drive

www.iberiabank.com |

art&culture magazine v6i3 Spring 2012  

As the primary catalyst for Palm Beach County’s thriving cultural climate, art&culture magazine is the official publication for the communit...

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