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art culture Winter 2012

of Palm Beach County

a bold statement Great big design trends in fashion jewelry

welcome home The Palm Beach County Cultural Council takes up residence in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building

clearly expressed Artists get creative with glass

PLUS the 2012 Muse Awards honorees, famed fashion designer Yuki, SunFest celebrates 30 years and more


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ART WALLY FINDLAY

EST. 1870

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AMERICAN WOMEN REBUILDING FRANCE 1917 - 1924 “ANNE MORGAN’S WAR”

A PHOTOGRAPHIC EXHIBITION MARCH 1ST - 31ST t1"-.#&"$)

WALLY F INDLAY GALLERIES

1 ( :  < 2 5 .  ‡  3$ / 0  % ( $ & +  ‡  % $ 5 & ( / 2 1 $

:257+$9(18(‡3$/0%($&+)/‡7  )   ,0$*(‹$0(5,&$1)5,(1'62)7+(%/(5$1&2857


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Be charming. Be gracious. Be the one everyone wants to sit next to.

%E WHAT  O† JATP

LUXURY SHOPPING

FINE & CASUAL DINING

Boca Raton • 561.362.0606 • miznerpark.com

W O R L D C L A S S E N T E R TA I N M E N T


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Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ETOILE ROYALE The Most Exquisite Jewels & Antiques

Exclusive Art Deco CARTIER Necklace Totaling 90 cts of Diamonds

PALM BEACH 329 Worth Avenue Tel. 561-655-3025

NEW YORK 784 Madison Avenue (between 66 St. & 67 St.) Tel. 212-752-1706 LETOILEROYALE.com

ISTANBUL The Grand Bazaar Tel. 90-212-527-7865


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features

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from london to worth avenue The unlikely path of famed fashion designer Yukiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s career winds from Japan to London â&#x20AC;&#x201C; with a memorable stop in Palm Beach in 1976. By Frederic A. Sharf

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blown away Artists and artisans breathe life into blown glass. By Christina Wood

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art, fashion and jewels Fashion jewelry celebrates everything in a big way. By Jean Tailer Photography by Harry Benson

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taking it to the streets A sunny mix of outdoor fairs and festivals enlivens the cultural arts in Palm Beach County. By M.M. Cloutier

2012 muse awards honorees exemplify the best in palm beach county arts and culture

Harry Benson

The 2012 Muse Awards honor outstanding individuals and organizations for their contributions to arts and culture throughout Palm Beach County.

70 Cover Image:

Jewelry at the haute couture house of Badgley Mischka, Palm Beach Photo by Harry Benson

winter 2012

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R I C H T Er s

RICHTERS RARE GEMS AND ESTATE JEWELRY SINCE 1893 • 224 WORTH AVENUE, PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 33480 • (561) 655-0774


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welcome letter A remarkable achievement inspires words of gratitude. By Rena Blades

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Get to know some of the distinguished and distinctive personalities that make our lives more interesting. By Robert Kirschner

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publisher’s note

upfront • The Literacy Coalition of Palm County Beach announces the five finalists for the 2012 Read Together Palm Beach County campaign. • Big birthdays are being celebrated. • FAU rides a wave of excitement with new Surfing Florida exhibit. • The Palm Beach County Cultural Council displays vivid “Foundations” in its new home. • Choreographer Christopher Flemming catches up on his reading! • Creative culinary news to nibble on. • The Gavlak Gallery hosts an exhibit of John Loring collages. • A new book from Harry Benson captures the glamour of Manhattan and some smiles from Palm Beach. • Ann Norton may have planted the seeds for our passion for lawn ornamentation. • Wally Findlay Galleries welcome American Women Rebuilding France, 1917 – 1924. • A series of renowned art fairs transforms the Palm Beach County Convention Center.

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art works! Cultural diplomacy builds strong bridges around the world. By Christina Wood

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portrait Charlotte Miller offers a unique perspective on Palm Beach Opera’s 50th anniversary. By Amy Woods

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profile The streamlined lady that stands at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth has stories to tell, from its origins as the Lake Theatre to its newest incarnation as the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building – the new home of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. By Leon M. Rubin

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calendar Get your year off to a colorful start with an exciting lineup of entertaining and engaging activities, performances, events and exhibits.

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inside culture The Palm Beach County Cultural Council hosts a series of Artist Conversations; the Palm Beach County History Museum commemorates the World War II experience in Palm Beach County; local artists partner with young people at Home Safe in Lake Worth; and much more insider news.


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PALM BEACH 237A Worth Avenue 561.802.4410 NEW YORK

O

NANTUCKET

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Palm Beach County Cultural Council 601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460 561-471-2901 • www.palmbeachculture.com President & Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Vice President, Marketing & Government Affairs

Bill Nix

561-687-8727 bnix@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Arts and Cultural Education

Alyx Kellington

561-471-1602 akellington@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Melissa Santee

561-472-3340 msantee@palmbeachculture.com

Membership & Special Projects Manager

Mary Dunning

561-472-3330 mdunning@palmbeachculture.com

Development Coordinator

Kristen Smiley

561-472-3342 ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com

Jennifer Lamont

561-471-2902 jlamont@palmbeachculture.com

Nichole Hickey

561-471-3336 nhickey@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Marketing Coordinator

Jeanine D’Alusio

561-471-3334 jdalusio@palmbeachculture.com

Administrative Assistant

Debbie Calabria

561-471-2901 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Grants Director of Development

E-marketing and Website Manager Artists’ Services Coordinator Grants Manager Bookkeeper Contributing Writer/Editor

Volunteer

Pat Thorne

Cultural Council Board of Directors Bradford A. Deflin Cecile Draime Shirley Fiterman Craig Grant Roe Green Christopher E. Havlicek Herbert S. Hoffman Irene J. Karp Raymond E. Kramer, III Sydelle Meyer Geoff Neuhoff

Officers Michael J. Bracci, Chairman Berton E. Korman, Vice Chairman Michael D. Simon, Secretary Jo Anne Rioli Moeller, Treasurer Directors Bruce A. Beal Carole Boucard Howard Bregman Christopher D. Canales

Jean Sharf Kelly Sobolewski Dom A. Telesco Ex Officios Mark Alexander Roger Amidon Jennifer Prior Brown Paulette Burdick Cheryl Reed

Cultural Council Founder Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Shelley Vana, Chairperson Steven L. Abrams, Vice Chair

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Burt Aaronson Paulette Burdick Karen T. Marcus

Jess R. Santamaria Priscilla A. Taylor


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E XC E E D I N G Y O U R E X P E C TAT I O N S . . .

2900 Hillsbor Hillsboro o Road,, West West e Palm Beach, FL 33405 (561) 835-040 01 | www.woolemsinc.com www w..woolemsinc.com 835-0401


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winter 2012 - volume 6, issue 2

editorial staff managing editor

christina wood

561.472.8769 christina@passportpublications.com

editorial coordinator

bradley j. oyler

561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

jordan waterman

561.472.8768 contact@passportpublications.com

editorial researcher

cultural council editorial staff editorial director

rena blades

executive editor

bill nix

managing editor

leon m. rubin

contributing writers thom smith, m.m. cloutier, jan engoren, sheryl flatow, leon m. rubin, john loring, frederic a. sharf, jean tailer, don vaughan, amy woods

contributing photographers harry benson, lucien capehart, steven caras, jim fairman, christopher fay, barry kinsella, robert stevens, studio palm beach

art & design art & production director

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

assistant production director

nicole smith

561.472.8762 nicole@passportpublications.com

advertising sales director of advertising

richard s. wolff

561.472.8767 richard@passportpublications.com

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

lew blatte

561.472.8774 lew@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

contract administrator

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

senior advertising manager signature publications national advertising manager

publisher 561.472.8769 robert@passportpublications.com

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.

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Rena Welcome - Winter 2012:Layout 1

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ceo

WELCOME TO

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art&culture

Approximately five years ago, the Palm Beach County Cultural Council began to assemble the pieces of a beautiful and intricate puzzle. What was particularly intriguing about this puzzle was that there was no picture on a box that we were attempting to match. We didn’t know how many pieces would go into the puzzle, or even where all the pieces could be found.

puzzle with such spectacular results. Our appreciation extends from the generous contributors listed on this page − along with many, many others – to the Palm Beach County and Lake Worth city officials, artists, architects, designers, builders, construction workers and countless other individuals and companies that have helped us.

But we had a vision that the puzzle could be completed – and we were determined to do it.

Special thanks are due to our entire Board of Directors, which has been aligned with our vision and fully committed to realizing it from Day One, and to every member of our staff, who – to a person – has pulled out all the stops to plan, manage and implement our transition to the Montgomery Building.

Our vision was for a permanent home for the Cultural Council in an easily accessible, centralized location where we could reach everyone we serve – artists, cultural organizations, residents, visitors and so many others. Our new home would be much larger so we could enhance the services we offer and magnify the impact we make.

from

Although it might have seemed far-fetched at the time, today that puzzle is not only finished, but we are living in it! The picture that ultimately took shape on our puzzle is that of the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in downtown Lake Worth. I invite you to look inside the walls of this magnificent building elsewhere in this edition of art&culture, where we have assembled a fascinating profile of its past, present and future. I would like to express our sincere gratitude to everyone who has helped us to assemble this

There’s actually one more piece needed to put the finishing touches on our puzzle – and that piece is you. Please visit us at the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building as soon as possible. We look forward to welcoming you in person and showing you around our wonderful new home. This is one of the proudest moments in the history of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. Thank you so much for making it possible. Rena Blades

Rena Blades President and CEO Palm Beach County Cultural Council

$1 Million or more The Montgomery Family $500,000 − $999,999 Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency

Michael Price

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$100,000 − $499,999 Irene and James Karp Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc. Estate of Nancy Grayson Alex and Renate Dreyfoos The Roe Green Foundation Berton E. and Sallie G. Korman

$20,000 − $99,999 Northern Trust Bank of Florida, N.A. Bruce A. Beal and Francis V. Cunningham Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Herbert and Diane Hoffman

As of December 15, 2011

$19,999 or less Anonymous John and Rena Blades Dana T. Pickard


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Banking on the

Arts

We invite you to visit one of our 10 convenient locations on Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s east coast. Boca Raton: 1180 N. Federal Highway | Boynton Beach: 1101 North Congress Avenue Delray Beach: 900 SE 6th Avenue | Fort Lauderdale: 1201 South Andrews Avenue Jupiter: 1315 West Indiantown Road | Palm Springs: 2764 S. Congress Avenue Pompano Beach: 990 North Federal Highway | Royal Palm Beach: 119 South State Road Seven West Palm Beach: 605 North Olive | Wilton Manors: 2465 Wilton Drive

www.iberiabank.com |


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publisher

MAKE NEW FRIENDS BUT KEEP THE OLD Friends add color and meaning to our lives. So do the arts. A good friend can cheer you up on a gloomy day, touch your heart in unexpected ways and help you get the most out of life’s simple pleasures. Among the 1.3 million people who call Palm Beach County home there are countless artists who make our lives more interesting. The county is also home to a thriving population of cultural organizations, staffed by dedicated professionals and supported by devoted philanthropists, scattered across 1,970 square miles stretching from the Atlantic Ocean to the Everglades.

from

Since the inception of art&culture magazine in 2006, we have profiled a number of fascinating and memorable individuals who have made their mark on the richness and diversity of Palm Beach County’s cultural community. In this issue, we’re taking a slightly different approach. The subject of the profile you’ll find on page 32 is a popular, widely respected septuagenarian with deep roots in the community and fascinating stories to tell. It is the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building, the new home of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. If you turn a few pages, you’ll also get to know Charlotte Miller, who has been hitting just the right note with the Palm Beach Opera for 50 years (see page 30), and visit with old friends – like the Delray Affair, which will be celebrating its 50th birthday this year, and SunFest, which has been making music in the sun and under the stars for 30 years (both are featured in our story on open air fairs and festivals found on page 70). Harry Benson and Jean Tailer team up on page 58 for a story on fashion jewelry that’s full of personality. On page 46, Frederic Sharf introduces us to international fashion designer Yuki.

Studio Palm Beach

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The 2012 Muse Award honorees are among the distinguished – and distinctive – personalities that populate the pages of this issue of art&culture. So are Clara Driscoll and Beth Lipman, two women, separated by 100 years of history, who have singularly and successfully expressed their creativity through the medium of glass. Driscoll’s work for Tiffany Studios is highlighted in a special exhibit at the Flagler Museum in Palm Beach; Lipman’s work is on display at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. Examples of both can be seen in our feature on glass art on page 52. Although Lipman and Driscoll never met, they are connected. And, though their link is forged in glass, the bond is strong. As art&culture Managing Editor Christina Wood points out, the arts and culture have a unique power to build relationships and foster understanding – within communities, across borders, between people. Artists challenge, intrigue, educate and entertain us – whether they speak to us from Palm Beach Gardens, Pahokee or the past. Cultural organizations – whether they are new neighbors, like the Arts Garage in Delray Beach, or wellestablished members of the community, like the Society for the Four Arts in Palm Beach – bring us closer together. You can’t put a price on friendship. And you should never underestimate the value of the arts. Please Enjoy.

Robert S.C. Kirschner President/Publisher Passport Publications & Media Corporation


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contributors Born in the Far East and raised by mystics, our managing editor, Christina Wood, developed a flair for the creative at an early age. Oh all right, she was born in Wisconsin and studied at the University of Wisconsin-Madison before making a move to Florida. After further studies at Oxford University, England, she received her degree from Florida Atlantic University. Before launching her career as a freelance writer and editor in 1995, Christina enjoyed a variety of challenges working with both print and broadcast media. She is the recipient of a Golden Ink Award, Communicator Award, numerous Addy awards and the President’s Award from the Palm Beach County Literacy Coalition.

With a lifelong interest in the arts inspired largely by his highly creative parents, Leon Rubin has been writing about arts and culture for 35 years. A former Boca Raton resident, he helped to establish the Boca Raton Cultural Consortium and was actively involved in children’s theater. He now contributes to art&culture virtually from the home that he and his wife, Suzi, share in the mountains above Dahlonega, Georgia.

Gigi Benson

art&culture is again honored and privileged to feature the work of celebrated photojournalist and Wellington resident Harry Benson. Arriving in America with The Beatles in 1964, he has photographed every U.S. president from Eisenhower to George W. Bush; was just feet away from Bobby Kennedy the night he was assassinated; in the room with Richard Nixon when he resigned; on the Meredith March with Martin Luther King Jr.; and was there when the Berlin Wall went up and when it came down.

M.M. Cloutier is a West Palm Beach-based freelance writer who has written extensively about art and culture in Palm Beach County and elsewhere. Throughout her career, she has also written numerous profiles and covered business, cuisine, fashion and more for such newspapers as The New York Times, The Miami Herald, The Palm Beach Post and Palm Beach Daily News, among others, and for several magazines, including reporting for Time.

Frederic A. Sharf is a collector, scholar and author. His interests lie in publishing and exhibiting original material which illuminates 20th-century events and in exploring the evolution of 20th-century design.

Jean Tailer is a three-time chairman of the Palm Beach Preservation Society Ball, fourtime chairman of the Norton Museum of Art‘s “Vernissage” and one-time chairman of the Red Cross Ball. She has been honored by Palm Beach Atlantic University with its Woman of Distinction award and by the Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce with its Charity Achievement of the Year award.

Before launching her freelance career, Amy Woods worked as the society editor of Palm 2 Jupiter and as the editor of Notables at The Palm Beach Post, a position she held for 11 years. An experienced editor, columnist, writer and reporter, Amy’s goal is to use her experience as a journalist and skills in public relations for the benefit of our local non-profit community.

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R OSETTASTONE F I N E A RT G A L L E RY


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Literary Devices By the Numbers

Voting by the Book You can’t predict what book is going to be the most talked about title of the year – but you can vote for it. Five books have been selected as finalists for the 2012 Read Together Palm Beach County campaign, organized by the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County. From January 17 through February 24, you can vote for your favorite online or by using ballot boxes at various locations throughout the community. The winning title will be announced on March 12. From March 26 through April 30, individuals and groups will be reading “The Book” and discussing it in libraries and grocery store checkout lines as well as at the office, the club and a variety of special events.

Did someone say cake? An impressive number of organizations and events in our community are celebrating big birthdays this season. We’d like to congratulate them all, including:

2012 Read Together Palm Beach County Finalists: Crooked Letter, Crooked Letter by Tom Franklin Digging to America by Anne Tyler Last Train to Paradise by Les Standiford Picking Cotton by Ronald Cotton and Jennifer Thompson Zeitoun by Dave Eggers

FOR

Delray Affair – 50 years SunFest – 30 years Delray Beach Chorale – 30 years Duncan Theatre – 25 years Palm Beach Pops – 20 years Art Palm Beach – 15 years

more information call (561) 279-9103 or visit readtogether.palmbeachpost.com

Duncan Theatre

Now Showing S u r f ’s U p – a n d O n E x h i b i t Scholars and surfers have united on a project chronicling the history of surfing in the Sunshine State. Because of the inconsistent conditions, surfers from Florida share an insatiable hunger for waves and an aggressive approach to the sport that has resulted in an incredible number of world titles for Florida’s competitive surfers. So, while the waves in Florida might not be overly impressive, the cultural history surrounding the sport is. “Surfing Florida,” the brainchild of local artist Paul Aho, who won the Junior Men’s Division of the Florida State Open Surfing Contest in the 1970s, and Rod Faulds, director of University Galleries at Florida Atlantic University, will be on display at FAU’s Schmidt Center Gallery from March 17 through May 12. This summer, it can be seen at the Pensacola Museum of Art.

FOR

more information

call 561-297-2661 or visit www.fau.edu/galleries

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Now Showing Anne Morgan and American Women at War March into Palm Beach On March 1, Wally Findlay Galleries in Palm Beach will welcome “Anne Morgan’s War: American Women Rebuilding Devastated France, 1917 – 1924.” The exhibition, organized by the Franco-American Museum in Château de Blérancourt, France, consists of more than 25 vintage photographs plus rare silent film footage that brings to life the extraordinary work undertaken by 350 American women – all volunteers – who helped the war-ravaged civilian population of northeastern France. The dynamic leader of this effort was Anne Morgan, daughter of financier J. Pierpont Morgan. After record attendance at showings in New York, Kansas City and Washington D.C. this traveling exhibition has found its way to Palm Beach supported by the board members of American Friends of the Blérancourt and J. Pierpont Morgan’s relatives residing in the county.

FOR

more information call (561) 655 2090 or visit www.wallyfindlay.com

Comité Américain Relief Efforts, Chavigny, France 1917, from the Anne Morgan archives at the FrancoAmerican Museum, Château de Blérancourt, Picardy, France

On the Map A Break from Convention This year, the international art world will once again beat a path to the Palm Beach County Convention Center. Every year, the stylish meeting facility is transformed into an elegant showcase of fine art and collectibles for a series of renowned art fairs, including the American International Fine Art Fair (February 3-12), Palm Beach Jewelry Art & Antique Show (February 17-21) and the Palm Beach Fine Craft Show (March 2-4). Highlights of this year’s season are sure to include an exhibit featuring classic cars, a new series of Fabergé eggs and a collection of rare violins and stringed instruments on display at the AIFAF as well as vintage jewelry and a selection of Chinese art, ranging from the Neolithic to the contemporary, at the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show.

Courtesy of Fabergé

FOR

more information visit www.pbconventioncenter.com

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Violin by Antonio Stradivari, Cremona, 1727, Courtesy of Rare Violins of New York


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Now Showing

S h o w a n d Te l l

A Ta l e n t f o r S t o r i e s

The Other Borough

Paige Rense

FOR

more information call 561-833-0583

Outside the Box Set in Stone Our passion for lawn ornaments might just have its roots in the gardens of Renaissance Italy, where classical statues excavated from Greek and Roman ruins inspired conversation and contemplation of ancient art and wisdom. From there, the penchant for placing classical statuary in green groves and blooming beds spread throughout Europe. By the dawn of the 20th century, garden gnomes were hunkered down in Germany while marble gods and goddesses sported on the grounds of country estates. “Of course, there were sculptures in the great gardens of Europe. But in America? For a typical home, the idea of buying a sculpture to put in your garden was kind of a new thing,” says Cynthia Palmieri, executive director of the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens in West Palm Beach. At least until Ann Norton came along. At the same time that her sculpture was on display at the Museum of Modern Art in New York, Norton was struggling to pay the bills. To generate a little income, she came up with the idea of selling sculptures intended to be placed in the average American garden. Today, she is best known for her monumental sculptures, which can be seen at the Sculpture Gardens. Perhaps she should also be credited for helping to open the door call 561-832-5328 to the friendly army of garden gnomes that have taken or visit www.ansg.org over lawns all across the country.

more information

FOR

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Photos from New York New York courtesy of Photographs@Harry Benson

Readers of art&culture may be familiar with John Loring’s writing; the former design director for Tiffany & Co. is a frequent contributor. Now you have an opportunity to experience his artwork, examples of which are included in the permanent collections of the Museum of Modern Art and the Whitney in New York City and the Art Institute of Chicago. A solo exhibition of recent collages, which Loring says, “are stories built of specifics that can’t fit together,” is on display at the Gavlak Gallery in Palm Beach through February 11. Loring’s photography was recently featured in an exhibit at the Holden Luntz Gallery, also in Palm Beach.

Hilary Ross

Scottish-born photojournalist Harry Benson, the most published photographer in the history of LIFE magazine and a resident of Palm Beach County, has teamed up with society columnist Hilary Geary Ross to create a stunning portrait of New York’s best-known citizens in New York New York. The new book, published by powerHouse Books, captures the glamour of Manhattan from the early ‘60s to today in hundreds of black-and-white and color photographs featuring captains of industry, politicians, movie stars, artists, celebrated athletes and society doyennes – including a number of famous faces connected with Palm Beach as well as New York.

FOR

more information visit www.HarryBenson.com


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Showroom

P e r s o n a l To u c h

Foundations: The Inaugural Exhibition at t h e R o b e r t M . M o n t g o m e r y, J r. B u i l d i n g Through April 14

Lo o k W h o’s Re a d i n g art&culture!

FOR

more information

e Photo courtesy of Boca Ballet Theatr

From the surreal to the literal, the aesthetic to the sublime, painters, photographers, sculptors and even animators, the breadth of artistic talent in Palm Beach County is extraordinary. Following in the footsteps of the previous occupants of 601 Lake Ave., who championed artists and new work in particular, the Palm Beach County Cultural Council is proud to showcase local talent in its new home. “Foundations” – the first exhibition at the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building – features work by South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship winners. The aptly named show firmly lays the groundwork upon which the Council will build a dynamic new tradition. Proceeds from sales during the show will directly benefit artist’s services in the community.

When he was in town, acclaimed choreographer and former member of New York City Ballet Christopher Fleming took a break from rehearsals of his ballet Play Ball! to read a&c – much to the chagrin of the dancers from Boca Ballet Theatre!

(561) 471-2901 www.palmbeachculture.com

Kathleen Holmes, “Novel Tea Too,” ceramic and mixed media, 2009. 22 x 12 x 9 inches

Something to Nibble on A l w a y s i n G o o d Ta s t e Take a cultural culinary excursion with the Museum of Lifestyle and Fashion History, which now offers TASTE HISTORY CULINARY TOURS OF DELRAY BEACH AND BOYNTON BEACH. By bus and on foot, you’ll explore local lore and experience food culture with tastings at restaurants located in historic settings. For more information, visit www.mlfhmuseum.org. Those who appreciate THE BARTENDER’S ART will enjoy the Cocktail Culture exhibition at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. On display through March 11, the multidisciplinary exhibit features fashion, design and cocktail recipes, including this one:

PALM BEACH COCKTAIL 1 ½ oz. gin 1 ½ tsp. sweet vermouth 1 ½ tsp. grapefruit juice Shake all ingredients with ice, pour into a cocktail glass and serve.

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To appreciate the development of this unique art, swing by Café Boulud in Palm Beach and pick up a copy of DANIEL BOULUD COCKTAILS & AMUSE-BOUCHES, a new collection of sophisticated recipes from the renowned chef and restaurateur. The two-volume set (one For Him and one For Her) gives classic cocktails and hors d’oeuvres a modern twist, incorporating unusual ingredients such as teas, spices and herbs and using seasonal produce and even the occasional molecular technique. In addition to fine art, Palm Beach County also loves crafts, CRAFT BEERS, that is. From The Funky Buddha in Boca Raton to the Yard House in Palm Beach Gardens, good times are brewing in a growing number of local beer bars. World of Beer Clematis in West Palm Beach gets creative with distinctive brews and live music while Brewzii’s, in Boca Raton and West Palm Beach, serves up a Boca Blonde Lager.


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A World of Possibilities By Christina Wood

art rt

works! You don’t need to speak a foreign language to understand the charm of a Viennese waltz, the passion of an Argentine tango or the czar’s fondness for Fabergé eggs. From an Irish reel to a Japanese print, the arts speak to us in a language all their own. Miami City Ballet swept audiences in Paris off their feet this past summer. Florida Classical Ballet told their story in Cuba. Countless local artists have performed on the world stage while, here at home, on the stage at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts you can see the State Ballet Theatre of Russia, a children’s opera that originated in Czechoslovakia or the New Shanghai Circus. Festival of the Arts BOCA will feature performers from Spain, Ireland and the Ukraine, among others. “It goes beyond words and the intellect,” says Cheryl Maeder, a fine art photographer who serves on the City of West Palm Beach’s Cultural Affairs Council and whose work has been exhibited in London, Paris, Istanbul and Beirut, as well as in galleries in Palm Beach County, Miami and New York. “Art goes beyond politics, borders and boundaries – all the things that separate us. Art allows us to connect as human beings.” A song reminds you of a former home far beyond the waves. Finely carved statues evoke the glories of a civilization long gone. A splash of color conjures the warmth of an African sun. And, when others want to paint a stark picture of our society in black and white, the arts counter with the irresistible hues and subtle shadings of reality. A powerful army of American piano players, cellists, tap dancers, painters, composers, choreographers, quilters, sculptors, horn blowers, guitarists, photographers, poets, potters and artists of every stripe roam

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the world in a show of artistic force that reflects the strength and beauty of our values. The U.S. Department of Defense has troops stationed in some 130 countries around the globe but, in a demonstration of what Joseph S. Nye Jr., a political scientist and the former dean of Harvard University’s Kennedy School of Government, called “soft power,” the Department of State is engaging young people, educators, artists, athletes and future leaders in more than 160 countries through the Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs. Nye defined soft power as, “the ability to persuade through culture, values and ideas, as opposed to ‘hard power,’ which conquers or coerces through military might.” In today’s world, hard power is not enough. Our global economy demands new levels of cooperation and understanding. We must work together to overcome the threat of violent extremism. According to Demos, a British think-tank focused on power and politics, “cultural exchange gives us the chance to appreciate points of commonality and, where there are differences, to understand the motivations and humanity that underlie them.” The arts build bridges. “The theorists call cultural diplomacy soft power,” says James Bacchus, a former U.S. congressman from Florida and former chairman of the Appellate Body of the World Trade Organization who currently chairs the global practice of the Greenberg Traurig law firm. Soft power deploys an arsenal of symphonies, step dances and sculpture, opening the door to understanding and forging the kind of profound connections needed to create real solutions. As Bacchus says, it’s “very potent stuff.”


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HIGH NOTES DEBUT DIVA CHARLOTTE MILLER RELISHES A 50-YEAR AFFAIR WITH PALM BEACH OPERA By Amy Woods

The 94-year-old soprano with cheek bones as high as her voice gazed giddily at her handsome husband and said he’s the reason she became the first star of the Palm Beach Opera. The date was January 29, 1962. The performance: La Traviata. The lead: Charlotte Miller playing the role of Violetta.

“It just happened that my illustrious husband brought me here,” says Miller, who celebrates her 74th wedding anniversary this year. “It was fate.” Donald served as a surgeon in the Navy and, when he retired in 1961, the couple moved to Palm Beach County, where he joined the staff at Good Samaritan Medical Center in West Palm Beach. That summer, Miller met and socialized with several opera enthusiasts who eventually founded the Civic Opera of the Palm Beaches. “There were a lot of very talented and interesting people in the area at the time,” Miller said. “We were very busy starting the Palm Beach Opera.” And they’ve stayed that way. The Palm Beach Opera turns 50 this year. Miller and six other founders – Isabel Chatfield, Octavia Could, Rosita Franks, Alberta Grant, Thelma Miller and Princess Jane Obolensky – will be honored at the Golden Jubilee Concert and Gala on January 20 as the successful regional performing arts organization looks back on its history and peers into its future. Neither would be the same without Miller.

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Charlotte Miller, Charlotte Murray (grand-daughter), Mary Greenman (daughter), Caroline Murray (great grand-daughter) at the 2006 Family Opera performance of The Magic Flute

Charlotte Miller and international opera legend Virginia Zeani (and local) in 2011

The delightfully dainty diva with the sweet, southern drawl said she always fancied opera. Her favorite performance is Manon by Jules Massenet. “It was such beautiful music,” she says. She started studying voice while raising her four children. “I had not had the chance to just devote myself to singing,” she admits. Others always complimented her when she sang – mostly in church in her hometown of Faison, N.C. – and she realized she had a special gift. “The high notes were God-given, actually,” she says. She never had sung a full opera prior to La Traviata. “It’s very involved,” she explains. “First of all, you have to have a lot of study and prepare yourself to even audition for it. It takes a lot of rehearsals. I had to work very hard with Ms. Chatfield.” Chatfield, who starred on stages from Philadelphia to Paris before helping Palm Beach Opera get its start, cast Miller in the lead role of Violetta. A half century later, Miller continues to support the organization and serves as one of five emeriti board members. “You become like a family in the opera,” she says. Over the year, Miller’s “family” has included the likes of Paul Csonka, the company’s original artistic director and principal

Charlotte and (husband) Dr. Donald Miller at Opening Night December 2010

conductor; Arthur Silvester, one of the opera’s big benefactors; Bob Montgomery, its chairman from 1985 to 2005; and Anton Guadagno, artistic director from 1983 to 2002, who will be remembered for shaping the opera into the South Florida showcase it is today – a $4.7 million operation with 1,200 subscribers, a 65-piece orchestra and a 50-member chorus. “He always had the idea of starting off with a bang,” says Guadagno’s widow, Dolores. “He always wanted to start things with something important, something that would catch people’s eye.” As the opera celebrates its golden anniversary, it has begun to take into account the ways of the high-tech world, where high-definition broadcasts of major operas worldwide play in movie theaters, download onto computers and come out on DVDs. “The last three years have been quite interesting for cultural organizations,” says Palm Beach Opera General Director Daniel Biaggi. Some things, however, never change. “Our primary, core mission,” he says, “is still quality.” Perhaps that’s what keeps Miller – and all the other loyal supporters of the opera – coming back for more, year after golden year.

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Stories to Tell: The Remarkable History of 601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth By Leon M. Rubin

When The Palm Beach Post announced on July 1, 1939, that a new theater would soon be constructed in downtown Lake Worth, it stated that the owners planned to make the 1,000-seat house “one of the finest in South Florida.” The announcement heralded the arrival of a structure that – seven decades later – is once again making news.

From its origins as the Lake Theatre to its newest incarnation as the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building – the exciting new, permanent home of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council − this architecturally significant Streamline Moderne building has featured a storyline with as many twists and turns as the plots of the some of the films that once were shown on its silver screen. That 1939 front page Post story about the new theater − to be built by Florida Theatres Inc., operator of 110 theaters in the state – projected that the cost of the structure and its equipment would be approximately $75,000. “The new theater will be of the most modern design…and it has been especially designed to embody the latest features of sound and moving picture projection,” the article said. “There will be 800 seats in the orchestra section with an additional 200 seats in a special loge balcony above the theater doors. All seats will be of the newest de luxe spring edge type with deep upholstery.”

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Architecturally, the theater would reflect the popular influences of the day: “The structure…will have a front of modernistic design trimmed with stone, glass and stucco and will be ornamented with sidewalk marquise of porcelain enamel and stainless steel. The entrance foyer will be heavily carpeted and the walls will be treated in the latest wall design.” It was also noted that “careful study has been given to ventilation…so that the theater will be properly ventilated and cooled to the satisfaction of patrons.” The building was designed by well known Florida architect Roy A. Benjamin, who had a number of other theaters in the Southeast to his credit, including the strikingly similar San Marco Theatre in Jacksonville. Construction was slated to begin in August with completion scheduled in time to “afford the public of Lake Worth the benefit of the new theater before the winter season.”

A PROUD OPENING The new Lake Theatre opened on February 29, 1940; the fact that it was Leap Day likely made it all the more special. Mayor Grady Brantley called it “something for Lake Worth to be proud of.” The Lake Worth Herald said it was “hailed as Palm Beach County’s most modern movie palace.” It was reported that telegrams were read from such Hollywood luminaries as Joan Crawford, Myrna Loy, Tyrone Power, Mickey Rooney, Don Ameche, Fred MacMurray, Bob Hope, Shirley Temple, Bing Crosby, Alice Faye, Clark Gable, Jack Benny and Linda Darnell. The first feature was Little Old New York, starring Faye and MacMurray. “A throng of moviegoers had crowded about the box office and formed a long line along Lake Avenue,” The Herald reported. In its heyday, the Lake was considered the city’s predominant theater. It showed first-run films and did its part to support the war effort – hosting benefits for the USO and offering free

admission for purchasers of war bonds. The theater had another direct connection to the war, albeit a sad one. Alexander R. “Sandy” Nininger, Jr., a 1941 graduate of West Point and the son of the Lake’s second manager, was killed in action in the Philippines during a heroic effort to capture an enemy position. He was posthumously awarded the first Congressional Medal of Honor of World War II. As time went on, the theater filled numerous entertainment needs for the community. It screened re-releases of Hollywood classics and later offered Summertime Fun Shows for kids that cost just 50 cents – or 10 RC Cola bottle caps with a newspaper coupon. By the early 1970s, however, as suburban multi-screen theaters with plentiful parking began to proliferate, the Lake Theatre could no longer sustain itself. It finally went dark after a June 16, 1974, showing of Disney’s Robin Hood. Employees gave the once-glorious movie palace a rather checkered send-off with an after-hours party where they drank beer and threw crushed ice snowballs at the screen.

TRYING AND FAILING Several attempts were made to give the theater new life, but each was relatively short-lived. In November 1975, the Pasta Palace opened in the building with a menu featuring “29 complete dinners priced under $5” and free movie screenings. There was an Italian delicatessen in the lobby where patrons could “buy homemade noodles from our pasta machine.” The bar and lounge were located in front of the movie screen and the former loge seats were utilized as “special dining areas for more privacy,” The Lake Worth Herald reported. By February 1976, it had closed. The building’s next occupant (from November 1976 until late 1978) was Horsefeathers – a restaurant that continued the practice of showing films while diners ate their meals on the former theater floor or, for larger groups, in the balcony. The décor featured movie stills, posters and memorabilia. After 10 p.m., according to an article in The Herald, “the ‘Boogie in the Balcony’ discotheque comes to life with lights flashing to the beat of disco music engineered by a professional disc jockey.” After Horsefeathers closed, another disco – Kaleidoscope – took up residence. Opening on June 1, 1979, it was geared to 12- to 18-year-olds, who could “dance the night away with destiny” on South Florida’s largest dance floor with the “greatest super disco sound and light system in Florida.” Drinks were nonalcoholic, proper dress was required and parents were welcome. Despite initial success, however, The Lake Worth Herald reported that, “Kaleidoscope quietly closed its doors in January 1980, leaving behind a long line of unpaid bills.”

July 1, 1939 – Palm Beach Post announces construction of the new theater

September 11, 1939 – building permitted for use as a theater

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February 29, 1940 – Lake Theatre opens with Little Old New York

December 31, 1946 – model/repair permit issued to the Warrick Estate


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LANNAN ERA BEGINS

November 8, 1954 – waiver requested to install sliding doors on alley

challenging idioms, such as bizarre sculptures and heavily colored canvases. The works are provocative and frequently surprising.” While its primary focus was to exhibit Lannan’s remarkable collection, the Lannan Museum also became a venue for a wide array of cultural pursuits. Earlier in 1983, in fact, the Daily News reported that dancer Pamela DeFina was teaching the Isadora Duncan style of dance at the museum. In April, the Daily News noted that Gordon Getty’s song cycle The White Election, based on the poems of Emily Dickinson, had been performed there as part of the Palm Beach Festival. In October, pianist Shigeru Asano was scheduled to perform a concert at the museum to benefit the Palm Beach County Chapter of the American Red Cross. On September 25, 1983, Lannan died unexpectedly of heart failure in New York at age 78. In 1986, the Lannan Foundation received a substantial endowment from (his) estate. It continued to expand the collection, but eventually the board chose to relocate the foundation’s headquarters from Lake Worth to Los Angeles. According to the August 12, 1988, edition of the Miami Herald, “The Lannan Museum in Lake Worth, home of one of the most important modern art collections in America today, will cease to exist.” The next chapter in the old Lake Theatre’s history was about to begin.

PBCC TAKES THE REINS According to the Lannan Foundation’s website, “The Lannan Museum in Lake Worth was donated to Palm Beach Community College (PBCC). In addition, the foundation donated a collection of more than 1,000 American craft objects, approximately 20

Barry Kinsella

Later in 1980, J. Patrick Lannan, Sr., a well-known financier, entrepreneur and part-time Palm Beach resident, would take steps to breathe new life into the former theater – although with a radically different purpose. He purchased the building to house his extensive and acclaimed collection of contemporary and modern American and European art. “Architect Mark Hampton of Miami spent about a year and a half, under Lannan’s direction, renovating the building for the collection,” The Lake Worth Herald reported. “Multilevel floors, nearly hidden alcoves and the old theater balcony all add to the building’s new character.” The former Lake Theatre appealed to Lannan on several levels. “Mr. Lannan really liked this community and the feel of the area,” said Nancy Mato, who was then curator of the museum, in The Herald. “The area is quiet and it is not overdeveloped and this particular building has phenomenal space for this sort of art because of the ceiling height.” Furthermore, she added, Lannan was “saving a marvelously constructed building.” (Nancy Mato is now executive vice president and curator of the Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach.) The February 7, 1983, edition of the Palm Beach Daily News noted that, “The official celebration of the opening of the Lannan Foundation Museum in Lake Worth, which will benefit the Palm Beach Festival (a multidisciplinary arts festival of the day), will take place at 7 p.m. March 6.” Tickets for the “world premiere” cost $125. The event was slated to begin with tours of the collection, champagne and seafood cocktails. “A formal dinner will follow and chairmen of the event, Mrs. Robert Dodge, Mrs. J. Bradford Greer, Mrs. Lee Olsen and Mrs. Jim Lyons are planning a gourmet repast.” The Lannan Foundation Museum hosted the gala opening. “This is the greatest place in the world for contemporary art,” said Richard Madigan, director of the Norton Gallery of Art, as quoted in the Daily News. “He is such a brilliant and creative man.” Donald Miller, in a 1983 Pittsburgh Post-Gazette article, wrote, “When Lannan’s collection was shown to the public in his home, it was written about in magazines. One of the collection’s most unusual aspects was the display of large abstract paintings flat on ceilings.” According to the Lannan Foundation, “Included in his collection were important early works by emerging artists who went on to develop international reputations.” Miller went on to say, “The new installation…takes advantage of the existing building elements with a series of carpeted levels, half-walls and mezzanines. Two paintings are affixed to the ceiling.” It was noted that 400 works, “which are one-tenth of the art (Lannan) owns,” were on view. “Lannan has an eye for both delicacy, as seen in fine drawings, glass and ceramics, and strongly

View of part of the Lannan Foundation Collection in Lake Worth, circa 1985

November 1975 – Pasta Palace opens

June 16, 1974 – Lake Theatre Closes with Robin Hood

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works of kinetic art dating from the 1960s and 1970s and a Tom Otterness frieze, Battle of the Sexes, which had been commissioned especially for the building.” As fundraising to support the transition began, the college clearly stated its intentions for the building. “We’re going to keep the standards set by the Lannan,” said Reuben Hale, chairman of the PBCC Humanities Division, in a Palm Beach Post story by Gary Schwan. “It’s going to be a showplace for pertinent, important art.” In February 1991, Skip Sheffield wrote in the Boca Raton News, “The building is still the same: a striking ‘art moderne’ structure that opened as the Lake Theatre, but the landmark edifice at 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth, is now known as the Palm Beach Community College Museum of Art.” It had been closed for a year and a half to allow for the transition, he continued. Museum Director Kip Eagen, who had come from the University of Cincinnati, “has hired a receptionist who greets one and all. He has also created a permanent education center, where visitors can learn more about the artists through written materials and video tapes.” The new musuem’s first exhibition featured paintings by five emerging or mid-career artists – Charles Clough, Judy Ledgerwood, Dennis Ashbaugh, David Mann and Peter Hopkins, The Palm Beach Post reported. Said Eagen, “We want a dynamic museum, not a didactic one that bangs people over the head. I view this museum as a laboratory. The college has a chemistry lab and a biology lab. This museum will be the visual arts lab – a place where new ideas in the visual arts are experimented with.” In 1999, the building would change hands once again. “The Palm Beach Community College Foundation board recently voted to sell its Museum of Contemporary Art in Lake Worth, Fla., to local philanthropists and museum trustees Robert and Mary Montgomery for $500,000,” Art in America reported in its June edition. “The Montgomerys will receive both the building and the entire contents of the museum, which includes some 1,200 glass, ceramic and kinetic sculptures by artists such as Dale Chihuly, Len Lye, Peter Voulkos, Beatrice Wood and Viola Frey.” Bob

Montgomery had been the chair of the PBCC Foundation board when it acquired the building and recognized its promise. After purchasing the building and the art it housed, Robert and Mary Montgomery moved forward with the creation of a new entity, the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art. According to its website, “The PBICA was founded on the premise that contemporary art is a vital means of understanding ourselves and our culture. Artists have often been called the prophets of our time and we believe it is the artist’s voice that can speak most eloquently to our minds and our hearts. PBICA is intended as a place of pleasure and significance, a place where large questions are posed and investigated. It is a venue for major national and international art in all media and a meeting ground for the diverse populations who live in and visit the Palm Beach region.” PBICA was fresh, popular and exciting. In 2002, readers of New Times named it the “Best Museum in Palm Beach.” The publication wrote, “PBICA has quickly established itself as an institution willing to take enormous risks. Among the highlights: a New Media Lounge and two inaugural shows in 2000 − a landmark examination of film and video as art and a provocative exhibition that wrenched design elements from their context and repositioned them as art; and last year’s large group show of artists from Brooklyn.” Writing in New Times, Michael Mills said that PBICA “promises to showcase the sort of cutting-edge art not typically found north of the Miami-Dade County line.” He said Robert and Mary Montgomery had “sponsored a facelift on a scale that’s dramatic even by Palm Beach standards.” Visiting Curator Amy Cappellazzo, who assembled the inaugural exhibition – “Making Time: Considering Time as a Material in Contemporary Video & Film” − praised their commitment to media that challenge traditional assumptions about art, New Times reported. “Video art is now more than 30 years old, and people are still arguing about whether it is really art,” she said. Despite such critical acclaim, it appeared that there was not enough local demand to support a full-time museum of contemporary art. In March 2005, Art in America wrote, “After a five-year run, the privately funded Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art will close its doors.” Longtime Palm Beach Post art critic Gary Schwan lamented the closing. “Openings were crowded, and respectable numbers would turn out for lectures and such,” Schwan wrote. “Former PBICA Director Michael Rush brought some intriguing artists here. He also made a special effort to introduce the latest in video and computer art. The irony is that PBICA had a larger reputation in, say, New York than it did in its back yard.” Sidney Brien, acting director of PBICA and a longtime adviser to Robert Montgomery, had the job of “closing the building in an elegant way,” Schwan wrote. “The future use of the building Continued on page 38

February 1976 – Pasta Palace closes

November 19, 1976 – Horsefeathers opens

Late 1978 – Horsefeathers closes

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‘A PLACE FOR ART’ Then, Now and in the Future

As it takes up residence in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in downtown Lake Worth, the Palm Beach County Cultural Council finally has a home of its own more than three decades after its birth. From a practical as well as a psychological standpoint, this long-awaited move represents a monumental step forward. “It is critically important for the umbrella organization for art and culture in Palm Beach County to have a hub,” says Board Chairman Michael J. Bracci. “The building will help people understand the importance of art and culture to our quality of life. It provides a place for the cultural community as well as our residents and visitors to gather and find information. It is also vitally important to the strategic goals of the Cultural Council. We couldn’t be more pleased.” Finding a place for the Cultural Council to finally put down roots has been high on the agenda of Rena Blades, President and CEO, since she took the helm of the Council in 2004. “As an organization that is over three decades old, with a major impact in this region of the United States, this is a logical move to a permanent and more visible home,” Blades says. Beyond the obvious advantage of owning (debt-free, no less), rather than renting Blades explains that the move to the new building will make it possible for the Cultural Council to expand its programming in a number of key ways: • Support for artists – “We have a history of helping artists, but this will exponentially grow our programs,” Blades observes. The building will include 2,500 square feet of exhibition space and also enable the Council to offer many more training and networking opportunities for local artists. • Connections and capacity building – “For years, we’ve had to move our 70+ meetings and gatherings all over the county. We will still visit different parts of the county,” Blades says, “but by being centrally located it will be just as easy for someone to reach us from Boca, Belle Glade or Jupiter.”

• Promoting art and culture – “We will have an information center in the lobby dedicated to culture,” Blades points out. “Residents and visitors can pick up literature, view our online cultural calendar and access a touchscreen powered by the Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau to search for cultural attractions and hotels.” • Celebrating local culture – A store in the new building will be dedicated to Palm Beach County art and culture. “We’ll have objects made by our artists and craftspeople as well as proprietary materials from our museums,” Blades says. “It’s part of the Council’s mission to help artists be more successful as artists and entrepreneurs. This is a way to highlight their work.” She envisions the store as a place where people can go to send a gift to friends out of state to show that they’re proud of Palm Beach County’s cultural treasures. “The icing on the cake,” Blades says, “is that we are continuing in the footsteps of other visionaries who saw that this building could be a place for art. From its origins as a movie theater, to J. Patrick Lannan’s repurposing it for his collection, to its years as Palm Beach Community College’s Museum of Contemporary Art and the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art under Robert and Mary Montgomery’s leadership, this building has a remarkable past. “We feel incredibly blessed with that history,” she continues, “and also an awesome sense of responsibility to continue such an impressive legacy of arts programming and visibility.” For Mary Montgomery − who along with her family has made all of this possible by so generously donating the building to the Cultural Council – it is the right move at the right time. “As the new home of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council, the cultural heritage of this wonderful facility is certain to be preserved. I know that my husband would be incredibly pleased to know that our vision and the community’s vision will continue to be realized.” Mary & Robert Montgomery

March 27, 1979 – change to “Dance Hall, Entertainment;” owned by Cracor Corp

June 1, 1979 – Kaleidoscope opens

January 1980 – Kaleidoscope closes

March 6, 1983 – Lannan Museum opens

J. Patrick Lannan in his house in Palm Beach, 1976

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is still up in the air, although Brien said some groups have expressed interest in using it for temporary art exhibitions. Montgomery said he’s taking a wait-and-see attitude,” Schwan continued, quoting Montgomery as saying, “I’m not going to let somebody throw just anything in there. I’d want to see something commensurate” with cultural use.

THE NEWEST CHAPTER And so the former theater, museum, educational facility and performance venue once again stood shuttered. Still, hope remained that this storied facility would once again occupy a place of prominence in Palm Beach County’s cultural landscape. Enter the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. More than five years ago, the Cultural Council’s strategic plan articulated the importance of securing a new physical location for the organization to house its programs, which touch more than one million people annually through services to cultural organizations, artists, citizens and tourists. It was strongly felt that the Cultural Council should own, rather than rent, its building – and that it should be centrally located within the county. In 2010, the pieces that would make this vision a reality fell into place. The city of Lake Worth – recognizing the power of the creative industries to inject energy and economic vitality into communities – had embarked on a Cultural Renaissance Program that focused on attracting artists, cultural centers and institutions. Its goal is no less than making Lake Worth the hub of Palm Beach County’s cultural scene. As part of this effort, the Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA)

March 4, 1989 – Lannan Museum closes

committed a substantial amount of money to the Cultural Council to help it renovate a building in downtown Lake Worth to serve as its headquarters. Then, in a truly magnificent gesture, Mary Montgomery and the family of the late Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. donated the building at 601 Lake Ave. to the Cultural Council. And so the remarkable story of this venerable landmark − which has played such diverse roles as movie theater, cuttingedge museum, Italian restaurant and even disco – continues to be written. The Cultural Council has remade the building once again under the watchful eye of consulting architect Gene Lawrence, upon whose vision and artistic sense the Montgomerys relied when they transformed it into the PBICA. His primary contribution, among many others, is the glass entrance that so warmly welcomes everyone to the building. Equally important to the process is Rick Gonzalez of REG Architects, who has overseen the extensive interior renovations in preparation for the Cultural Council’s move. Still, as befits a building with such a rich history, there are echoes of the past: The Battle of the Sexes continues to be waged in the Tom Otterness frieze that J. Patrick Lannan, Sr. commissioned for the lobby three decades ago. As the Palm Beach County Cultural Council takes up residence, an exciting new chapter begins – one that will assuredly preserve and honor the legacy of the old Lake Theatre for many years to come. Writers (and former Lake Theatre patrons) Don Vaughan and Bill McGoun contributed to this article.

July 1, 1999 – PBCC Art Museum closes

January 18, 1991 – PBCC Art Museum opens

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March 4, 2000 – PBICA opens


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A Peek Inside the Lake Theatre from Two Who Were There

For kids growing up in Lake Worth during the years it was open, the old Lake Theatre was a familiar fixture. “As a child I saw numerous movies at the Lake, though I would be hard-pressed now to recite specific titles,” writes Don Vaughan, a former reporter for The Lake Worth Herald and occasional contributor to art&culture. “What I recall more vividly are the sights and smells of the movie-going experience. For example, I was entranced by the neon-illuminated Weeki Wachee Springs clock in the lobby and the ancient vending machine that dispensed iced soft drinks in paper cups. The Lake Theatre was part of Wometco Enterprises (which also owned the Miami Seaquarium, in addition to several movie houses) so practically everything in it had some kind of Florida theme. The kiddie drinks, for instance, came in large plastic oranges with green lids and white plastic straws. Inevitably, the empty containers would get loose from their owners and roll like miniature cannonballs beneath the rows of seats until they came to rest at the very front of the theater. “When I turned 15, I went from customer to employee, accepting a part-time job at the Lake as an usher for $1 an hour and all the popcorn and RC Cola I could consume. The job required that I wear a tie, which I wasn’t keen on, but working in an air conditioned theater beat the heck out of mowing lawns in the brutal Florida heat. And as an employee, I also got to come in any time on my days off and watch movies for free, high up in the then-blocked off balcony. A lot of these movies contained nudity and adult themes that were a real eye-opener for this shy, yet-to-be-kissed 15-year-old, a bonus that helped compensate for the lousy pay.”

Another long-time patron was Bill McGoun, a retired Palm Beach Post columnist and historian. “During the years immediately following World War II, I spent many an evening in the Lake Theatre with my parents,” McGoun writes. “It was my introduction to the silver screen. I remember Captain from Castile, A Night in Casablanca and my all-time favorite, The Three Caballeros. My father finally dragged me out of the theater after I had watched it for the fourth time in two days. “Films ran continuously in those days, which is how I got to watch The Three Caballeros more than once for the 14 cents it cost a child (up from 10 cents in 1940). People would come in and go out in the middle of features. One story was told of a child, leaving Snow White at the point where he had come in, turning toward the screen and saying, ‘If she eats that apple again, she’s really stupid.’ “I can still sing the title song from The Three Caballeros, more or less, if anyone asks. So far, no one has.”

March 26, 2005 – PBICA Closes

January 2012 – PBCCC opens

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February

Full of Grace, a Journey through the History of Childhood, chronicles the roles of children from Queen Victoria to the present. Curated by Ray Merritt, the exhibition features more than 200 works of art – both photography and sculpture − from five private collectors. The Palm Beach Photographic Centre calls it “our most ambitious show to date.” Through March 17; 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-253-2600 or www.workshop.org. ©Andre Kertez, Wander

Divorce Party the Musical − The Hilarious Journey

Janet Dickinson (left) and Janna Cardia

to Hell…and Back! continues its world premiere run at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts through Feb. 19. This adults-only show promises “a night of laughter and solidarity for all.” Produced by Mark Schwartz (Menopause the Musical) with direction, lyrics and choreography by Jay Falzone. 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; 561-832-7469 or www.kravis.org.

Itzhak Perlman personally selected violin soloist Areta Zhulla to perform this concert with the Boca Raton Symphonia, which includes Haydn’s Symphony Number 1 in D major, Barber’s Violin Concerto, op. 14 and Beethoven’s Symphony Number 2 in D Major, op. 36. Duilio Dobrin will be the guest conductor. Roberts Theater at Saint Andrew’s School, 3900 Jog Road, Boca Raton; 561-376-3848 or www.bocasymphonia.org. Areta Zhulla

The Spady Museum in Delray Beach hosts an exhibition of nearly two dozen colorful photographs taken by Sam Spear Jr. during trips to Senegal, Ethiopia, East Togo, Benin and other locations. “Africa is so much more than what people think it is or how it has been portrayed,” Spear says, “and that is what I try to capture in my photographs.” Through February; 170 NW 5th Ave.; 561-279-8883 or www.spadymuseum.org.

Martin Schoeller: Close Up, presents 48 arresting large-format color images – including many of Schoeller’s most famous celebrity portraits. They challenge viewers to question topics such as self-representation, celebrity and photographic honesty, as well as the impressive explanatory power of portrait photography. Jan. 18 through March 18; Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton; 561-392-2500 or www.bocamuseum.org. Martin Schoeller, George Clooney, 2007, C-print, 61 1/16 x 49 9/16 inches

Winner of the 2010 Tony Award, Red is a provocative portrait of abstract expressionist Mark Rothko as he works feverishly to complete the biggest commission in the history of modern art. When his assistant challenges his ambition, he faces the agonizing possibility that his crowning achievement could also be his undoing. Through Feb. 26; Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter; 561-575-2223 or www.jupitertheatre.org.

Spanning continents and generations, Uncle Philip’s Coat by Matty Selman begins in old Russia and, with humor and pathos, takes the audience through Ellis Island and into the challenges of life and relationships in a new land. Starring Harlan Tuckman, who offers a talk back following each show. Through Feb. 26; Adolph and Rose Levis JCC, 21050 95th Ave. S., Boca Raton; 561-852-3241 or www.levisjcc.org. Harlan Tuckman in Uncle Philip’s Coat

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March

American Women Rebuilding France, 1917-1924, offers over 25 vintage photographs and rare silent film footage that bring to life the extraordinary work undertaken by financier J. Pierpont Morgan’s daughter, Anne, and 350 American women – all volunteers – to help the war-ravaged civilian population of northeastern France. Through March 31; Wally Findlay Galleries, 165 Worth Ave., Palm Beach; 561-655-2090 or www.wallyfindlay.com.

The newest show presented by GardensArt is Paint,

Owl’s Head Light by Linda Bail

a group exhibition by plein air artists Linda Bail, Inger Hansen, Sandra Landergott, Cynthia Maronet, Beth Sloat, Roxene Sloate and Nancy Tart, along with ceramics by Maria Hayden. This year-round art in public places program is sponsored by the Palm Beach Gardens Recreation Division. Feb. 20 through March 29; City Hall, 10500 North Military Trail; www.pbgfl.com.

March’s MacArthur under Moonlight Concert

Dick Staber and Judith Chasnoff

showcases the pure, traditional sound of Dick Staber (vocal, mandolin) and Judith Chasnoff (vocal, guitar), who have been performing their unique brand of folk and bluegrass-based acoustic music since 1993. John D. MacArthur Beach State Park, Singer Island between Blue Heron Boulevard and PGA Boulevard, North Palm Beach; 561-776-7449 or www.macarthurbeach.org.

The Neil Simon musical comedy Sweet Charity is a poignant and consistently funny look at the adventures, or perhaps misadventures, in the ways of love encountered by the gullible and guileless Charity Hope Valentine − a dance hostess who always gives her heart and dreams to the wrong man. March 2-18; Boca Raton Theatre Guild; Willow Theatre, 300 S. Military Trail, Boca Raton; 561-347-3948 or www.brtg.org.

The inspiration for Herbert Mehler’s large-scale steel sculptures

Sculpture by Herbert Mehler

comes from organic, natural matter such as fruits and seeds. In Curved, through April 6, the sculptures play between light fluid shapes and the seemingly insurmountable weight of the metal. This ambivalence between natural and man-made makes Mehler’s works remarkably captivating. Armory Art Center, 1700 Parker Ave., West Palm Beach; 561-832-1776 or www.armoryart.org.

Three Phantom of the Opera

Ron Bohmer, Craig Shulman and Kevin Gray

stars will make music of the night in concert on March 19 and 20 at the Crest Theatre. Ron Bohmer, Craig Shulman and Kevin Gray all played the masked one and can boast of a boatload of other leading-man credits − from The Scarlet Pimpernel (Bohmer) to Les Miserables (Shulman) to The King and I (Gray). Old School Square; 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach; 561-243-7922, ext. 1 or www.oldschool.org.

The Delray Beach Chorale concludes its 30th anniversary season with “An Afternoon At The Opera.“ The program by the venerable community chorus will feature selections from arias, choruses and duets from the world of opera. Directed by Eric Keiper with piano accompaniment by Ed Shuman. First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St., Delray Beach; 800-984-7282 or www.delraybeachchorale.org.

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How Do You Define

Luxury Living?

“Living at Devonshire guarantees me the same luxury lifestyle I’m used to— but without the worries of owning my home. I virtually have no stress now and much more time to do the things I enjoy and try new ones, as well.”

Devonshire at PGA National

defines Luxury Living as the most spacious and well-appointed Independent Living residences in South Florida ranging up to 2,841 square feet. The attached 65,000 sq. ft. clubhouse of additional living space and attentive staff caters to an enriching lifestyle. Plus, Devonshire residents know they have quality Life Care, should they need it, which is the ultimate luxury.

866.415.7961 350 Devonshire Way Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 www.DevonshirePGA.com

Independent Living, Assisted Living, Memory Care, Skilled Nursing & Rehabilitation


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{upfront-calendar} Boca Ballet Theatre’s Spring Fever

Keith May

is a mixed repertoire concert featuring Co-Artistic Director Dan Guin’s Bubbling Over. Set to music performed by Grammy Award-winner Michael Bublé, Spring Fever is an upbeat collection of classical ballet and modern jazz wrapped up in a fun-filled, feelgood show. March 31 and April 1. FAU University Theatre, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton; 561-995-0709 or www.bocaballet.org.

Kids love to make noise – and they have a perfect chance

Blue Man Group Making Waves

to do so at the Children’s Science Explorium from Jan. 27 through April 29. Blue Man Group Making Waves is a highly interactive exhibit that features a playful and accessible approach to the science of sound. It’s a multi-sensory exploration of sound for the whole family. Sugar Sand Park, 300 South Military Trail, Boca Raton; 561-347-3913 or www.ScienceExplorium.org.

Photograph courtesy of Kyle Bajakian

The only authenticated photograph of Billy the Kid

Billy the Kid, Tintype, Circa 1879 or 1880, from the exhibit “Recapturing the Real West: The Collections of William I Koch”

is just one of the numerous treasures in “Recapturing the Real West: The Collections of William I. Koch” – the current exhibition at the Society of the Four Arts. The rarely seen collection also includes stagecoaches, paintings, sculptures, photographs, clothing and guns that illustrate the era. Feb. 4 through April 15; 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach; 561-655-7226 or www.fourarts.org.

Dinosaurs invade the South Florida Science Museum! Come face to face with these ancient creatures in the very intense and engaging Dinosaur Attack exhibit from Jan. 27 through May 13. Guests can actually touch real 70-million-year-old dinosaur bones, dig for fossils in the museum’s dig pit and talk with local dinosaur hunters about tools and techniques. 4801 Dreher Trail N., West Palm Beach; 561-832-1988 or www.sfsm.org.

David Osborne, known as the “pianist to the presidents,”

David Osborne

provides a rousing finale to Libby Dodson’s 2011-2012 Live at Lynn Theatre Series. Osborne − who has performed for Carter, Reagan, Bush, Clinton and Obama – serves up a delicious mix of romantic, classical, jazz, pop, inspirational, patriotic and Broadway show tunes. Wold Performing Arts Center, Lynn University, 3601 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton; 561-237-9000 or www.lynn.tix.com.

The Delray String Quartet finishes another memorable season So-Min Kang Photography

The Delray String Quartet: Tomas Cotik, Mei Mei Luo, Richard Fleischman, Claudio Jaffé

with Piano Masterworks: The Trout Quintet – a concert featuring Schubert’s Quintet in A major, D. 667 (“Trout”), Schumann’s Piano Quartet in E flat, op 44; and Mahler’s “Adagietto” from the Fifth Symphony. Guest artists are Tao Lin, piano, and Janet Clippard, contrabass. Colony Hotel, 525 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach; 561-213-4138 or www.delraystringquartet.com.

VSA Florida − Palm Beach County’s Annual West Festival provides children with disabilities an opportunity to showcase their achievements in the arts and to be exposed to new visual and performing arts experiences. Activities include a stage show spotlighting performing groups from area schools plus outdoor art activities led by professional artists. Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center, 1977 College Drive, Belle Glade; 561-966-7025.

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PALM BEACH OPERA

GOLDEN JUBILEE: 50th Anniversary Concert

January 20 & 22, 2012

ROMEO AND JULIET Charles Gounod February 24 - 26, 2012

LUCIA DI LAMMERMOOR Gaetano Donizetti March 23 - 25, 2012

2011-2012 SEASON: AN

UNFORGETTABLE EXPERIENCE 561.833.7888_PBOPERA.ORG


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From London to Worth Avenue:

1976

Yuki An Unlikely Story By Frederic A. Sharf

The French couturier Pierre Balmain, writing in 1963 about his own success, observed: “To become a true couturier one must be able to suggest something more than clothes. Technical perfection is not enough. Nor is a variety of excellent ideas about the cut. To be a couturier means offering women a certain standard of elegance. That is why designers who prosper have a little more than mere professional competence.”

Gnyuki Torimaru, 1976

Martha Phillips (1898-1996) and her daughter Lynn Manulis (1918-2004) of Palm Beach met Gnyuki Torimaru − better known simply as Yuki − in London in the fall of 1975. They attended a fashion show at which Yuki presented his line for the next season. Although he was virtually unknown in the United States, he was wildly popular in London. Women who were “in the know” went to him to have very distinctive clothing custom made. Manulis was looking for new designers whose clothing could be promoted to the exclusive clients at Martha, her mother's shop at 230 Worth Ave. in Palm Beach. After the show, Phillips and Manulis were introduced to Yuki and invited him to show his designs at their two Florida shops in February 1976 and at their flagship New York shop in April. Yuki agreed to appear on Worth Avenue at Martha’s. Right: Design for Ben Kahn, New York City furrier, 1972. 

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Far Right: Design for Saka Mink, Copenhagen, Denmark, 1971. This design reflects the influence of Yuki’s apprenticeship under Pierre Cardin in Paris, 1969 and 1970. 


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Yuki He would create a collection of approximately 30 pieces. He would travel at his own expense. They would pay his hotel accommodations. They would take orders from their customers, and then Yuki would deliver finished outfits approximately 30 days after his return to London.

Taking Palm Beach by Storm On February 22, Yuki flew from London to Miami. It was a long flight, so Yuki got up to walk down the aisle. Much to his surprise the Swedish model Agnietta was on board. He asked where she was heading. She replied that she would be his model at the Martha stores. She had met Yuki earlier that month at a London dinner party. At the party she offered him her services in Palm Beach. She interpreted Yuki’s response as “yes” − although he thought he had merely been polite. She was married to a wealthy businessman and did not want to be paid. However, she did want some free clothing! After clearing customs in Miami, Yuki and his model were picked up in a limo sent by Phillips. They were booked into the Colony Hotel, which was the hotel of choice for most designers who came during the season to show their clothes. It was Yuki’s first trip to the United States. He traveled very light; the entire collection for Martha was in one suitcase. Monday was a day off and a day to get organized. On Tuesday they drove to Bal Harbor for a full day’s showing at the Martha shop there. The main event started on Wednesday with the opening of his presentation on Worth Avenue. A full-page ad in

The Palm Beach Daily News, affectionately known as the Shiny Sheet, announced his presence. The presentation would take place over four days. There was a lot of interest and many orders were placed. Yuki recalls that on one day, while taking a lunch break at the Colony, he was summoned back in the middle of his meal to present the line personally to an important client. Phillips was very demanding! Phillips took credit for finding Yuki and bringing him to the United States. Her ads proclaimed that the collection had been specifically designed for her shops and that she was now Yuki’s exclusive representative in this country. The language of her ads was flowery: “Poetry in motion describes the elegant look, the couture touch of this talented young designer.” While she told her customers Yuki was young, he was in fact approaching his 39th birthday. Furthermore, there was certainly not any exclusive arrangement between Yuki and Phillips. On February 29, the Shiny Sheet ran a full-page story about Yuki. The language approved by Phillips for this story was outrageous: “What Michelangelo carved in stone so spectacularly Japanese-born London designer Yuki creates in fabric equally beautifully.” This article described his training with Pierre Cardin and named some of his celebrity clients. Presumably Palm Beach ladies would be flattered to wear the look of the movie stars and royalty who patronized Yuki in London. While the last flowery story was running in Palm Beach, an exhausted Yuki flew back to London. March would be a busy month. He needed to oversee the production in his small shop of dresses ordered in Palm Beach. He also needed to

 Blue dress designed for Princess Diana in 1986.

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design an entirely white summer collection for Helena Rubinstein, who wanted as many as 50 different pieces, primarily evening wear. The company was launching a line of white scarves.

Working It On March 5, Yuki celebrated his 39th birthday. It is interesting to note that in the promotion of a fashion designer it was customary to knock anywhere from five to as many as 10 years off the designer’s real age. In addition, the recipe for success included numerous print interviews (essentially no cost advertising). It was very helpful if the designer had an exotic background. Yuki’s story fit the bill. He grew up on Kyushu, the southern island of Japan. He left home at age 15 to enter a technical school located near Kyoto where he could study textile engineering, then moved to Tokyo to become an artist. He found work with a prestigious company that made animated motion pictures. In Tokyo he met a wealthy British gentleman, Desmond Morris, who needed a guide for a few weeks’ tour of Japan. Afterwards, Desmond invited Yuki to come to London. He agreed to fund this trip and to arrange for Yuki to learn English. In April 1959, Yuki arrived in London. He entered the fashion trade in 1964 as an assistant to Ted Tinling, a well-known designer of tennis clothing. In 1966, he graduated from the London College of Fashion. He then worked for several years in the studio of Norman Hartnell, designer to the Royal Family. In 1968 he became a naturalized British citizen.

Fast Forward to Fashion Forward On April 18, 1976, Yuki flew from London to New York City to fulfill his second commitment to Phillips, whose shop was located on Park Avenue at 58th Street. After a day of rest on Monday, the main event began on Tuesday with a presentation to select clients and the press. Phillips had agreed with Yuki on a cost price for each piece in the collection. She set her own retail prices, which were in line with Yuki’s expectations on the opening day. When he returned for the second day, all the retail prices had been raised. Phillips’ cost never changed, but each day retail prices went up, probably as a result of the positive reception of the line by her clients, according to Yuki. The year 1976 was big for Japanese designers in the United States. The loose-fitting draped look with pleated fabrics, which was their hallmark, was in demand by numerous fashionable American ladies. On April 21, the well-known fashion writer Bernardine Morris proclaimed in The New York Times that, “It was a good day for Japanese designers in New York City.“ The previous day she had covered Yuki’s show for Martha and Issey Miyake’s show at the Fashion Institute. It was also a very big year for Yuki. The January issue of British Vogue featured a Yuki design worn by Jerry Hall. In February, he arranged a promotion with the Helena Rubinstein company that would take place in the spring in two locations − Tokyo in May and London in June. In June 1976, he was again featured in Vogue: this time in a cover shot with Jerry Hall. In the

Yuki designed this dress in 2004 for  Queen Silvia of Sweden to wear at the Nobel Prize Award Ceremony. The Queen was a long-time patron of Yuki.

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Yuki From left to right:  Yuki held up by models in 1976.  A proposed costume design prepared in 1970 under Pierre Cardin for Star Wars. Cardin was not selected as the costume designer for this movie.  Model in London wearing a Yuki design.  Designs for big bold dresses, which were popular in 1980s.

fall, his designs were taken to Australia by Margaret Thatcher, who was then a rising political star. Earlier that year, the Russians had coined a name for her: the Iron Lady. Yuki’s clothing was not only very comfortable and stylish but would also create a softer image for her. Yardley, a well-known British fashion house, named Yuki Designer of the Year in the fall. On November 18, he was one of the celebrity judges at the Miss World Beauty Pageant held in Albert Hall, London. Phillips may not have read Balmain’s book (My Years and Seasons) but she understood his message. Her efforts successfully launched Yuki in the United States. When he left New York on April 25, he had a small, but ultimately devoted, roster of clients in the United States for whom he would continue to make clothing for many years. (He later dealt directly with them after he found that Phillips and Manulis did not pay him promptly.) Phillips and Manulis were wonderful promoters. They organized dinner parties for their clients to meet the couturiers and they were leaders in using fashion shows to raise money for charitable causes. Yuki learned a lot from his two 1976 trips to work for Phillips. She knew how important the presentation of couture was in defining a designer’s image to her exclusive clients.

was mistaken for a tradesman and was directed to the servant’s entrance. He ended up in the kitchen but was quickly rescued. Yuki was ushered to an upstairs room which overlooked the famous Palace gardens. Without ceremony Diana appeared. She decided to try on all three dresses. The three dresses fit Diana perfectly. She wondered how Yuki would have known her exact size. When she asked him for an explanation, he simply smiled. (In fact, through some discreet “industrial espionage,“ a friend within the trade provided Yuki with her exact measurements.) She selected the royal blue dress. Yuki arranged to be in Tokyo at the time of her visit in May. On the last day − a day on which she would dine with Emperor Hirohito in the Imperial Palace − she wore the royal blue dress. There was worldwide press coverage of Diana arriving at the Palace in Yuki’s dress and then departing to the airport to return to London. Diana became a regular customer in 1986. Yuki launched a successful licensing business in Japan and − within a few years − made enough money to retire.

The Princess and the Couturier

After 35 years, it looked like Yuki would never return to Palm Beach. However, he saved six pieces that he designed for Martha and, in July 2011, he donated them to the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. Through the efforts of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council and the Norton Museum of Art, some of these pieces are returning to Palm Beach for the 2012 season. This season will also mark Yuki’s return to the island; his appearances here during the week of February 6 provide this unlikely story with a happy ending.

A decade later, in March 1986, Yuki received word from Kensington Palace that Princess Diana would accompany her husband Prince Charles on a state visit to Japan and would need outfits which were suitable for various occasions. An appointment was arranged for Yuki to visit with the Princess. He decided to create three dresses − one red, one white and one royal blue − to bring to the Palace. When he arrived, he

Epilogue: Palm Beach Beckons

All artwork and images courtesy of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection Museum of Fine Art, Boston

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no t

, d e r r i Sh A

draped, midnight-blue jersey dress by London-based designer Yuki was chosen to represent the 1970s in the Cocktail Culture exhibition currently on display at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. The multi-disciplinary exhibition, which runs through March 11, explores the social rituals of drinking and entertaining through the lens of fashion and design. “Fashion has really come into its own as being appreciated as an art form,” says Norton Museum Director Hope Alswang. “The public understands that style is a mirror to the movements of society. Like paintings and photographs, it too, has a voice.” The exhibit features more than 150 objects dating from the 1920s to the present, including garments by major designers such as Cristobal Balenciaga, Christian Dior and Valentino as well as accessories by Judith Leiber, Van Cleef and Arpels and Kenneth Jay Lane. A number of the items are uniquely connected to Palm Beach’s cocktail culture. A black silk taffeta 1950s dress by long-time Palm Beach resident and respected custom dressmaker Philip Hulitar is paired with a diamond-encrusted

Summer Cocktail Party with English Butler, 1961, Larry Salk Watercolor, gouache, ink Courtesy of Jean S. and Frederic A. Sharf Collection, Museum of Fine Arts, Boston From the Cocktail Culture exhibition at the Norton Museum of Art

Shaken.

enameled cigarette holder retailed by Tiffany & Company. Two 1960s fashion illustrations by Fred Greenhill for Saks Fifth Avenue evoke the ambiance of rooftop cocktail parties on the island. “The cocktail party is almost a purely American conception – it is the hours between afternoon and evening, where fashion and culture collide,” says exhibit curator Michelle Tolini Finamore, who is on staff at the Textile & Fashion Arts Department at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and holds a Ph.D. in the history of decorative arts, design and material culture. “For more than 80 years, it has been a fascinating reflection of history and culture from shifting customs to changing roles in society.”


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Beth Lipman. One and Others, 2011; 65" x 78" x 41" glass, wood, paint, glue. Collection of the Norton Museum of Art. Photo courtesy of Robb Quinn. Beth Lipman at work in her Wisconsin studio. Photo courtesy of Robb Quinn.

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Blown Away By Christina Wood

Our attraction to glass, like our affinity for light, is instinctual. Like moths to a flame, we are drawn to the spark that is captured in that heated mix of sand, soda, crushed limestone and imagination. “The fact that glass is able to transform and transmit light is what makes it so seductive for us,” says Steve Gibbs, manager of hot glass programs at the Corning Museum of Glass in New York, a non-profit educational institution that preserves and expands the world’s understanding of glass. “Human beings are attracted to light. It gets back to that idea of gathering around the campfire; that warmth, that glow.” “The material is continually inspiring. It’s really symbolic of the life cycle,” says Beth Lipman, an artist who “thinks” in glass. “It speaks of a certain affluence. It’s excessive but it’s also fragile. It’s elusive. It’s ephemeral.” The contrast between life-giving light and the historical preoccupation with death and decay as represented in 17th and 18th century European still-life paintings infuses Lipman’s extravagant, blown glass sculptures with energy and meaning.

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of a certain affluence. “It speaks It’s excessive but it’s also fragile.

It’s elusive. It’s ephemeral. –Beth Lipman

When Hope Alswang, director of the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, commissioned her to create a site-specific piece based on the museum’s collection, Lipman was excited. “When I started sniffing around at the Norton, the thing that struck me immediately was the fact that it was sitting across the street from a cemetery. I automatically started thinking about the preservation of objects, memory, history, mortality and the transiency of time; how objects are in some ways a substitute for identity.” The project had her in its clutches for the better part of a year. “Over a period of time, it became clear to me what I wanted to respond to,” she says. Her still life One and Others balances atop a casket-like table. Pineapple flowers, leaves and fruit – a reference to Richard Hone, the 19th-century settler and pineapple grower whose grave lies somewhere beneath the floors of the museum – spill over and around objects that reference specific paintings in the collection. Gazing balls from David Teniers the Younger’s The Interior of a Nobleman’s Gallery symbolize both temporality and omnipresence. A sash slips its hold; a ball and chain binds. Multiple floral swags refer to Daniel Seghers’s A Garland of Pink Roses, a Tulip, a Pink Carnation, Narcissi and Other Flowers with Blue Bows. “It was really clear to me that I had to do something that would connect the man in the basement [Hone] and myself and the Norton,” Lipman says. “I consider the piece a composite portrait.” When the still life paintings that inspire and intrigue Lipman were first created, glass was not considered a medium for personal expression. “Glass, historically, has been an industrial commodity,” says Gibbs, who has been fascinated with the stuff since he was 13 years old and first apprenticed in his uncle’s stained glass workshop. He enjoyed a long career with Steuben Glass before joining the Corning Museum in 1998. From simple pieces created around Roman fires to elaborate Venetian goblets and from flat sheets of colored glass carefully cut to form the richly hued stained glass windows that adorn

Dan Dailey, Boca Palm Vase, 1993, blown glass, height 14 ½ inches. Collection of the Boca Raton Museum of Art.

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Dale Chihuly. Green Macchia with Lemon Yellow Lip Wrap, 1994; blown glass, 23 x 38 in. Collection of the Norton Museum of Art.

Toots Zynsky. Blue Horses Chaos, 1993; filet-de-verre (fused and thermoformed color glass threads), 6 他 x 10 x 9 in. Collection of the Norton Museum of Art.

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Harvey K. Littleton. Ruby Orange Mobile Arc, 1982; blown, cut and polished art glass, 14 ¾ x 18 ½ x 2 ¼ in. Collection of the Boca Raton Museum of Art.  William Morris. Canopic Jar: Fawn, 1992; Hand-blown and formed glass, 27 x 11 in. Collection of the Norton Museum of Art.  Hot Glass Show at The Corning Museum of Glass. Photo by Ed Wheeler.

medieval cathedrals to the intricate designs that emerged from the Tiffany Studios, skilled artisans have produced beautiful yet practical objects made from glass for thousands of years. “It’s only been the last 50 years, since the Art Glass Movement happened, that independent artists have been able to access glass easily,” Gibbs explains. “The essentials of the industry and the craft really haven’t changed too much since medieval times.” The change was a matter of scale. Increasingly, it’s about intention. Harvey Littleton is largely credited with launching the Studio – or Art – Glass Movement by introducing small-scale furnaces that would allow individual artists to not only design but also create objects made from glass. Artists like Lipman, who aspire not to master the craft of glass blowing but to explore a world of expression, are forging a new relationship with the medium. “There’s a huge range of what happens in the material, just as there is in painting or metal or ceramics or stone or anything,”

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says Lipman, who lives and works in Wisconsin and whose work has been acquired by numerous museums, including the Brooklyn Museum of Art, the Smithsonian American Art Museum in Washington, D.C., and the Corning Museum. “It’s a very accessible material, there’s power in that.” There is also something elemental. Artisans and artists will breathe life into glass when the Corning Hot Glass Roadshow, a live glassmaking experience that creates a state-of-the-art studio environment outside the walls of the Corning Museum, visits Palm Beach County for 10 weeks this winter. “There’s something primal about heat, the way the glass moves, the way these artisans manipulate the glass,” says Gibbs. “When we’re working on the Hot Glass stage, the artisans work in rhythm and harmony with the glass and take advantage of gravity, centrifugal force, air pressure, the viscosity of the material as it changes and cools and finally becomes rigid. It’s those factors that are so seductive and so intriguing.”


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Reflecting on Glass This season a number of local exhibitions will explore the art and artistry of glass. Beth Lipman: A Still Life Installation Through May 27 at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach The Norton Museum of Art commissioned contemporary artist Beth Lipman to create a large-scale, site-specific glass construction. Inspired by the museum’s collection of Old Master still life paintings, the piece will be installed in the center of the museum’s European galleries.

The Corning Museum of Glass Hot Glass Roadshow Through March 25 at the Norton Museum of Art Corning glassblowers will demonstrate complex hot glassmaking techniques using their unique glassmaking equipment six days a week with a schedule of nine public programs each day. This innovative and exciting programming will include live demonstrations, hands-on-workshops and glassblowing performances.

Studio Glass: Works from the Museum Collection Through May 27 at the Norton Museum of Art A selection of Studio Glass from the museum’s collection, including works by internationally recognized artists Dale Chihuly, William Morris and Toots Zynsky will be featured with other outstanding examples of contemporary studio glass. The artists work in a variety of styles, addressing themes such as nature and abstraction while creating pieces that are dramatic in scale and form.

A New Light on Tiffany: Clara Driscoll and the Tiffany Girls January 31 through April 22 at the Flagler Museum in Palm Beach Groundbreaking research has revealed that Clara Driscoll (1861-1944), head of the Women’s Glass Cutting Department at Tiffany Studios, and other “Tiffany Girls” were responsible for many of the firm’s most iconic designs. This exhibit, organized by the New-York Historical Society, features more than 50 Tiffany lamps, windows, mosaics, enamels and ceramics designed by these artists, as well as numerous objects made under Driscoll’s direction and pages from her recently discovered correspondence.

Contemporary Glass: The 50th Anniversary of the Studio Glass Movement March 27 through October 14 at the Boca Raton Museum of Art This survey of contemporary studio glass will showcase the one-of-a-kind fine art pieces associated with the Studio Glass movement. The display focuses on unique objects that explore ideas by leading glass artists including Dale Chihuly, Dan Dailey, Michael Glancy, Harvey Littleton, Concetta Mason, William Morris, Jay Musler, Toots Zynsky and others. Organized in conjunction with Habitat Galleries, West Palm Beach. Wisteria lamp, designed by Clara Driscoll c. 1901, 18’ in. diam. New-York Historical Society, Gift of Dr. Egon Neustadt, N84.130. From “A New Light on Tiffany” exhibit at the Flagler Museum.

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Art, Fashion and

jewels Text by Jean Tailer Photography by Harry Benson

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Previous double page: Jewelry by June Cummings and from The “Paulette” collection at the Norton Museum Left: Jacques an Lanh necklace at Mariko Opposite: Pieces from the Mariko collection

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When asked what kind of jewels she fancied, “Suzy” − the empress of society glamour gossip columnists − once quipped, “I like them big – outré – like the yoke on an ox!” Fashion agrees, and since the invention of fashion jewelry in Paris at the time of the 1937 Exposition des Arts et Techniques, fashion jewelry designers have had a consistent bent toward the “big” with multitudes of satisfyingly yoke-like neckpieces created along the way.

powerful fashion editors with their new-found passion for color photography. Edna Woolman Chase (editor-in-chief at Vogue) and Carmel Snow (editor-in-chief at Harper’s Bazaar) were watching! It was adios to the ropes of white pearls and rivers of diamonds (real or faux) adapted from Hollywood studio black and white glamour portraits and bonjour to the colorful and whimsical.

All this began in the mid-1930s when the Great Depression forced demand for diamonds, oriental pearls and precious gemstones to stall in its tracks. Then, the invention of color photography sent fashion spinning in a new direction. Alternate semi-precious to not-at-all-precious materials had to be explored and they needed to be colorful and large-scaled to satisfy the all-

The two now-legendary jewelry designers who put the fashion jewelry bandwagon on the road-not-paved-with-gold were Jean Schlumberger at Schiaparelli and Falco de Verdura at Chanel. Schlumberger hunted the Paris flea markets for inspiration and came back to Schiaparelli with Porcelain de Saxe flowers plucked from chandeliers and bright red, wooden chess

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men to embellish as fanciful brooches and buttons. Verdura designed broad ivory or black lacquer cuff bracelets sporting bold Maltese crosses of semi-precious stones for Chanel. Scallop shells became almost as fashionable as cabochon Kashmir sapphires. All of a sudden, in 1937 faux was “in.” By 1940, quartz spelled quality with formerly humble amethyst and citrine quartz fashioned and faceted into oversized emerald-cut eye-catchers along with emerald’s modest first cousins in the beryl family (aquamarine and golden beryl) having their heyday in “retro,” scrolling gold settings. Just as fashion itself embraced the faux (think ultra suede, faux furs, acrylics and PVC), so fashion jewelry embraced

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Bakelite, Lucite, resins and glass along with nature’s free- to almost-free-for-the-asking shells, nuts, bones, woods, base metals, leathers, rubber and what have you. Dyed, radiated and reconstituted semi-precious stones and tiny diamonds of less than gem color or clarity were also added – all this with often stunning and dramatic effect while taking the stun and drama out of the price tags. Last year, the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach consecrated fashion jewelry as an art form in its own exuberant way with its comprehensive retrospective show of Kenneth Jay Lane, longtime reigning prince of the faux and the fashionable in jewels.


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Opposite: Jewels by Iradj at Mariko Below: Cuff bracelet at D. Dream Atelier

The exhibit is a memory but the Norton’s stylish museum store still presents a broad, intriguing collection of up-to-the minute fashion jewelry, which includes arresting works by long-established Palm Beach County designers Jane Cummings of Palm Beach and Paulette Howard of Boca Raton. Cummings' assertively fashion-forward collection of tailored and amply scaled vermeil collars, cuffs and door knocker earrings has a splendor that would have made them fitting gifts for Voltaire’s not-easy-to-please “Princess of Babylon.” They feature textured gold wings, chevrons and etched lion motifs all jauntily dressed up with cascading fringes and tassels of simulated pearls, coral and aquamarine accented by antique style granulated rondelles and pointy tips.

The “Paulette” collection sticks to the artist’s conviction that art should be hung − preferably around the neck. Her dramatic one-of-a-kind necklaces have included everything from chandelier crystals and East Indian talismans to tiger coral and zebra jasper. The current imagination-packed collection includes an intricately carved Chinese jade plaque, a pewter and amethyst butterfly of impressive wingspread, a sculptural pewter geranium leaf hung from variegated jasper discs and a shimmering nautilus shell studded with abalone and motherof-pearl suspended from voluminous painted and etched Chinese bone beads interspersed with coral that gives “sea change” new definition.

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Left: Bracelets at Mildred Hoit Opposite: Jewels from Jennifer Miller

The ample to over-scaled, exotic jewels of New York designer Iradj, available at Mariko in Palm Beach, command attention in the avalanche of “baubles, bangles and beads” that sing out in the stockpile of glitter. An arresting parrot head brooch is the size of, well, a parrot head. If it could talk, it would recite, “Lapis, turquoise, coral, aqua, peridot, citrine… Polly wants it all.” The smartly jeweled parrot keeps company with a splendid, broad collar/choker composed of four assertive Xs of amethyst, citrine and clear rock crystal interspersed with six bright cerulean blue turquoise cylinders reminiscent of the ancient cylinder seals of Iradj’s Persian ancestors. A daring pair of earrings with long pendant brass leaves accented with citrine, coral and misty pale green emeralds joins the show. Paris designer Jacques an Lanh contributes a multi-strand dyed, turquoise neckpiece with an authoritative amber pendant the size of a teacup from the Mad Hatter’s tea party. There are also the so chic, 24-karat gilded wood and resin abstract and elegant designs of the Mariko Collection, which goes from perfectly balanced geometric forms to intriguing asymmetries studded with simulated colored stones and on and on from there to a host of other fashion jewelry sources and materials too stylish and diverse to find superlatives that fit. Novelty watches with flashing LEDs in cycling colors, available from Mildred Hoit in Palm Beach, seem all but irresistible to those craving stylish accessories and excessories. Colorful stingray shagreen cuffs with jeweled stars and owls, florettes and hob nails compete for attention. A wide beige shagreen star cuff of tiger’s eye

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Necklaces and cuff bracelets at CJLaing

cabochons and peridots may even eclipse the LED watches, as might a bracelet of six large, open square links of reconstituted turquoise studded with bezel-set peridots and tiny diamonds. If bigger is the goal – which it often is − there is a hinged cuff of 18karat gold and multicolor, decorative, semi-precious, faceted stones that has carats to spare. Visual excitement is core to the art of fashion jewelry. Stunning fashion jewels designed in-house at CJLaing in Palm Beach adroitly achieve the desired effect with modest materials making them accessible as well as seductive. Abalone shell, dyed tagua nut “palm ivory,” silvered and brass discs, dyed Philippine

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or simulated coral, cotton cording and simulated agates make their persuasive fashion statement with cuffs and collars and neckpieces perfectly in tune with Palm Beach style. Couture accessory jewelry designs from well-practiced hands made Jennifer Miller a favorite of New York, Hamptons and Palm Beach fashionistas. With all their chic allure, Jennifer Miller designs have an underlying simplicity that keeps in step with the best in fashion. A long, debonair horn link necklace, a dramatic gun-metal mesh bib studded with large white simulated pearls, star performance faux grey pearl and turquoise hoop earrings, an eye-opening pink coral and citrine set in yellow


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gold vermeil starfish motif on a blue crocodile cuff and sultry Kaela earrings with pendant plaques of pave grey diamonds set in oxidized silver and studded with turquoise cabochons all deserve applause. Young Turkish artist and designer Duygu Ozdemir (“D” for short) runs her showcase D.Dream Atelier in Palm Beach. Her simple and resolutely modernist fashion jewels, inspired by the beauty and brilliance of nature and natural stones, find expression far from faux. Set in silver or 22-karat vermeil, the subtly colored stones and nuanced keshi pearls of her ever-so-cleverly balanced asymmetrical motifs and colors retain quietly integrated hints

of her exotic Istanbul background and gracefully fit the quiet exoticism of her adopted island home. On the other hand (or ear or neck), there’s nothing quiet about the huge, dazzling faux diamonds of the ever-innovative and evening-elegance-addicted haute couture house of Badgley Mischka, also in Palm Beach. Its “diamonds” may not turn out to be “a girl’s best friends” for their resale value, but for sheer delight in dressing up to the nines (and way beyond) for party time, they’d be impossible to beat for good old-fashioned fun. Their jewels are pure, festive bling that shout “Celebrate everything!” which is, after all, the motto of fashion jewelry.

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One of a Kind Fine Art

and Jewelry in Palm Beach County

Important gold, platinum, diamond and emerald chimera bracelet by David Webb Richters 224 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-0774 Harry Benson “Andy Warhol and Bianca Jagger at The Factory,” Archival Pigment Photograph, Executed in 1977, Signed, dated and editioned out of 35 in ink on recto. 27 1/2 x 60 inches

Mystique is among the nation’s leading experts specializing in fine jewelry reproductions crafted in solid gold and platinum. Margarita stud earrings set in solid 14K gold, starting at $295.00. Mystique Created Gems 250 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-3008 www.mystiquegems.com

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In 1977 Harry Benson was visiting Andy Warhol at “The Factory” (his studio) in New York City. He took these two successive pictures of Andy Warhol and Bianca Jagger – one focusing on Andy Warhol, who was interviewing and photographing Bianca Jagger, and one focusing on Bianca Jagger, a natural beauty in her heyday. Looking back on the picture we have a chance to watch the greatest voyeur of the 20th century watching and recording one of the world’s celebrities. This photograph is from our current exhibition called “Bold and the Beautiful.” The show portrays photography in the age of exuberance. Holden Luntz Gallery 332 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 805-9550 www.Holdenluntz.com


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Featuring an important 44.07carat, azure-colored Paraiba Tourmaline and a mélange of 270 scintillating diamonds, the enthralling Water Goddess Pendant evokes the allure and enchantment of nature’s most sensual and primordial element with its feminine mystique. Price upon request. Kaufmann de Suisse 210 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 832-4918 www.kaufmanndesuisse.ca

Rene Boiven, “Hindou” Made in Paris 1945 L’Etoile Royale 329 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-3025 www.letoileroyale.com

Franck Muller unveiled the innovative and undeniably daring Color Dreams collection. The principle behind this surprising line is that each numeral is hand-painted in a different color. US retail - $40,800 The Trinity Collection 27 Via Mizner, Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 659-3364

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By

M .M .C lo ut ie r

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Palm Beach County’s outdoor cultural arts festivals – large and small, world-class or low-key, gentrified or funky – are thriving. The alfresco festivals provide an accessible, affordable gateway to the arts. While others around the country shovel snow, in Palm Beach County you can: ■ enjoy Florida’s largest music and art festival as a who’s who of the music industry rocks three stages along West Palm Beach’s revitalized waterfront. ■ participate in the country’s largest event of its kind as hundreds of artists transform city-block pavement into a temporary museum of fine chalk art. ■ chat up Pulitzer Prize-winning authors after an underthe-stars performance by rising Metropolitan Opera stars.

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SunFest

“WE’RE INVOLVED WITH THE MUSIC INDUSTRY, WHICH…HAS GONE FROM EIGHT TRACK TAPES TO INSTANT DIGITAL DOWNLOADS. IT’S A TESTAMENT TO US THAT WE CONTINUE TO THRIVE AND BE RELEVANT.” —Melissa Sullivan, marketing manager, SunFest

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“Our outdoor arts festivals are critical to the overall cultural landscape we enjoy,” says Carli Smith, public relations/communications director for the Palm Beach County Convention & Visitors Bureau, which is engaging new tools to measure the quantitative and qualitative impacts of homegrown outdoor arts festivals. “They reflect and fuel the character of our local districts and of Palm Beach County as a whole.” They’re economic engines, too. Last year, SunFest, the waterfront music extravaganza, generated $16 million in hotel, restaurant and other spending during its five-day May run. The revenues are impressive but SunFest organizers say they’re perhaps most proud of their 2,500strong army of volunteers – and the fact that SunFest is celebrating its 30th anniversary. “Think about it: We’re involved with the music industry, which, in the last 30 years, has gone from eighttrack tapes to instant digital downloads. It’s a testament to us that we continue to thrive and be relevant,” says Melissa Sullivan, SunFest’s marketing manager. Ditto for Delray Affair, a three-day outdoor festival in April that draws SunFest-sized attendance as 800-plus artists exhibit their art and crafts to the hum of live entertainment and the aroma of conch fritters. The annual event is celebrating its 50th anniversary this year and plans are underway to honor its 1940s roots, when Delray’s


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then-strong gladiola farms sponsored a scholarshipbenefiting Gladiolus Festival, complete with parade floats and a Gladiola Queen. Nancy Stewart, special events director for the Greater Delray Beach Chamber of Commerce, a prime beneficiary of the Delray Affair, says, “Even as the Delray Affair has grown, we have always maintained our focus as a community event.” That same philosophy infuses Jupiter’s ArtiGras Fine Arts Festival. The weekend-long February event is as much about a 150,000-patron festival of entertainment, youth art and 900-plus onsite exhibiting artists as it is a fundraiser for local school arts programs and scholarships.

Delray Affair

“OUR OUTDOOR ARTS FESTIVALS ARE CRITICAL TO THE OVERALL CULTURAL LANDSCAPE WE ENJOY” — Carli Smith, public relations/communications director,

Palm Beach County Convention & Visitors Bureau

“Every year, when we come up with new ideas for ArtiGras, a lot of them revolve around what we can do to help the arts in our schools,” says ArtiGras’ director, Suzanne Neve, who is also director of services for the Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce. To facilitate that outreach, ArtiGras established an eponymous fundraising foundation in 1995, which, coincidentally, is the same year another February outdoor arts festival debuted in Palm Beach County. The Lake Worth Street-Painting Festival is the largest street-painting affair in the country.

Lake Worth Street-Painting Festival

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Festival of the Arts BOCA

“IT RELATES PERFECTLY TO THE QUALITY OF LIFE WE ENJOY.”

Delray Affair

—Charlie Siemon, Festival of the Arts BOCAʼs chairman

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Annually, 400-plus skilled artists spend a weekend putting colored chalk to pavement. “It’s such a unique art form,” says Lake Worth art gallery owner Maryanne Webber, chairman of the street-painting festival. “It’s not about the finished work, but about the performance of creating it, which involves both the viewers and the artists.” Other upcoming outdoor festivals that arts devotees are anticipating include the Lake Worth Reggae Festival and Festival of the Arts BOCA, a showcase of music, dance and film as well as ideas. In addition to a screening of the 1942 film classic Casablanca accompanied by a live orchestra and performances by musical luminaries such as opera tenor Jose Carreras and rising jazz and classical stars, the highlights of the 11-day Festival of the Arts BOCA, scheduled for March, include an authors’ program that typically features a Pulitzer Prize-winner or two. “The quality of the artists and programming in the festival is certainly noteworthy,” says Charlie Siemon, Festival of the Arts BOCA’s chairman. “It relates perfectly to the quality of life we enjoy.”


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“EVERY YEAR, WHEN WE COME UP

WITH NEW IDEAS FOR ARTIGRAS, A LOT OF THEM REVOLVE AROUND WHAT WE CAN DO TO HELP THE ARTS IN OUR SCHOOLS.” —Suzanne Neve, ArtiGrasʼ director

GET OUT AND ENJOY PALM BEACH COUNTY’S FRESH AIR, FAIRS & FESTIVALS:

ArtiGras February 18-20 ArtiGras.org

Lake Worth Street Painting Festival February 25-26 StreetPaintingFestivalInc.com

Festival of the Arts BOCA March 7-18 FestivaloftheArtsBOCA.org SunFest

Lake Worth Reggae Festival March 31-April 1 LWChamber.com

Delray Affair April 13-15 DelrayAffair.com

SunFest May 2-6 SunFest.com ArtiG

ras

Lake Worth

ing Festival

Street-Paint

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2012 Muse Awards Honorees Exemplify the Best in Palm Beach County Arts and Culture

E

ach year, the Palm Beach County Cultural Council honors individuals and organizations for exceptional contributions to arts and culture through its prestigious Muse Awards program. The caliber of the 2012 recipients demonstrates without a doubt that Palm Beach County truly is Florida’s Cultural Capital®. “The Muse Awards not only celebrate the many wonderful contributions these recipients are making to Palm Beach County residents and visitors, but they also spotlight the intrinsic ways, both obvious and subtle, that our cultural community continues to positively impact both the local economy and our overall quality of life,” says Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council. The Muse Awards will be presented during an entertainmentfilled dinner and show in the Cohen Pavilion at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach on February 9 from 6 to 9 p.m. The theme for the gala evening is “Behind the Scenes.” Proceeds from the Muse Awards event benefit the Cultural Council’s arts and cultural education programs. We are pleased to introduce our readers to the 2012 Muse Awards honorees:

Outstanding Civic Leader − Milton and Tamar Maltz The founder and former chairman/CEO of the Malrite Communications Group, Milton Maltz has played a critical role in the development of several cultural and entertainment projects across the country, including the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, the International Spy Museum in Washington, D.C., and the Maltz Jupiter Theatre in Palm Beach County. Tamar Maltz has served on the board of directors for the Montefiore Home and the Friends of the Library at Siegal College and is the founder of the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage. Through the Maltz Family Foundation, the couple continues to support numerous cultural and philanthropic organizations.

Outstanding Cultural Leader − Dr. Ray E. Robinson For more than half a century, Dr. Ray Robinson has been a music educator, reviewer and visionary. He retired as artistic director and general manager of the Palm Beach Symphony at the end of the 2010-2011 season. Robinson joined the faculty of Palm

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Beach Atlantic College in 1989 following appointments at the Peabody Conservatory of Music (Baltimore), Westminster Choir College (Princeton) and Cambridge University’s Wolfson College (England). The author of 10 books, Robinson is a specialist in the music of Felix Mendelssohn and Krzysztof Penderecki as well as the works of Polish and Romanian composers.

Outstanding Arts Educator − Stephen Backhus An interdisciplinary artist and educator, Stephen Backhus creates site-specific installations and performances that incorporate his drawings, sculptures and collages. As the outreach program manager for the Milagro Center in Delray Beach, he has worked through such organizations as The Haven, The Arc, Quantum House, Virtue in a Pocket, Kids in Distress and Head Start, where his unique and tailored programs teach young people how to discover their individual creativity and reach their highest potential.

Outstanding Art or Cultural Program of the Year − Obon, the Annual Bon Festival at the Morikami Museum & Japanese Gardens The only museum in the southeastern United States dedicated to Japanese culture, the Morikami Museum & Japanese Gardens is a living memorial to the Japanese community (the Yamato Colony) that first settled in Palm Beach County more than 100 years ago. Following ancient tradition, Obon, the annual Bon Festival at the Morikami, celebrates the moment when, according to legend, after returning for a visit to the living ancestral spirits depart to the otherworld on a journey illuminated by floating paper lanterns. For 34 years, the Morikami has celebrated Obon with a variety of activities including folk dancing, taiko drumming and a traditional Japanese street fair that attracts thousands of visitors.

Outstanding Arts and Cultural Organization (Budget under $500,000) − The Palm Beach Poetry Festival The Palm Beach Poetry Festival is a non-profit organization dedicated to fostering the writing, reading, performance and


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appreciation of poetry by presenting an annual festival featuring America’s finest poets plus numerous other poetry events in Palm Beach County throughout the year. The Festival is a nationally recognized learning opportunity for writers of poetry as well as a life-enriching series of cultural events for listening audiences, including workshops, public readings, late-night open mic events, a high school poetry contest and more. The eighth annual Palm Beach Poetry Festival will take place January 16-21 at Old School Square in Delray Beach.

Outstanding Arts and Cultural Organization (Budget over $500,000) − Boca Raton Museum of Art During the last 60 years, the Boca Raton Museum of Art has evolved into one of the leading cultural institutions in South Florida. It has achieved international recognition as a world-class visual arts institution, presenting dynamic traveling exhibitions from acclaimed and emerging artists and developing an outstanding permanent collection. Some of the museum’s programs include art films, artist lectures, family programs, the Annual Art Festival and more than 100 classes a week at its highly respected studio Art School.

Council’s Choice Award − Andrew Kato Now celebrating his sixth anniversary as artistic director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, Andrew Kato has produced more than 30 major shows. He has been a creative consultant/coordinating producer for the annual Tony Awards for the last seven years and has served as executive producer of the Cultural Council’s last five Muse Award presentations. Kato has produced numerous Broadway concerts, including Chess in Concert starring Josh Groban, the 20th anniversary concert benefit of Dreamgirls with Audra McDonald, Funny Girl in Concert, the original Broadway cast reunion concert of Once on This Island and the 10th anniversary concert version of Into the Woods. Recently, he conceived and directed the award-winning musical Academy at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, which has won top awards in musical theater festivals in New York City and South Korea. Tickets to attend the Muse Awards gala dinner and show on February 9 at the Kravis Center are $300 per person. Sponsorship opportunities are still available. For information, please contact Melissa Santee, the Cultural Council’s director of development, at (561) 472-3340 or e-mail msantee@palmbeachculture.com. Details also are available at www.palmbeachculture.com/ museawards2012.

Hector Ubertalli Award for Visual Arts − Carol Prusa An award-winning visual artist, Carol Prusa has exhibited her work in numerous museums, including the American Museum of Arts and Design in New York City and the Triennial Exhibition of German and American Artists that traveled to the Museum for Angewandte Kunst in Frankfort. Other recent exhibitions include those at the Miami Art Museum, Boston’s DeCordova Museum, the Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale, the Louisiana Museum of Art and Science, the Frist Center for the Arts in Nashville and the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in North Carolina, among others. Prusa recently completed public art commissions for the University of Florida and Florida Atlantic University. She has received visual art fellowships from the South Florida Cultural Consortium and the Howard Foundation through Brown University.

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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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{inside culture} cultural council news

Shannon Donnelly, Pat Crowley and Rena Blades

Helene and Stanley Karp

Leah Holtzberg, Bobbi Horwich and Lisa Huretas

Donald and Bonnie Dwares

Paul Noble and Lisa Peterfreund

Pat Thorne and Inga Hiilivirta

Culture & Cocktails Kicks Off Seventh Season The popular Culture & Cocktails series, hosted by the Palm Beach County Cultural Council, attracted more than 120 supporters to Café Boulud in Palm Beach for the first one-on-one discussion of the 20112012 season. In “A Conversation with Shannon Donnelly,” the well-known (and occasionally feared) society editor of the Palm Beach Daily News was interviewed by Pat Crowley, the long-time cartoonist/humorist and raconteur. In the wide-ranging, laughfilled conversation, the twosome chatted about Palm Beach parties, both famous and infamous, and assorted Island personalities, including Donald Trump, George Hamilton and the late Celia Lipton Farris. The second Culture & Cocktails of the season, on December 5, featured a memorable conversation between Edward Villella, the founding artistic director of Miami City Ballet who recently announced that he will be stepping down at the end of the season, and Philip Neal, former principal dancer with New York City Ballet and

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Arlette Gordon and Shannon Donnelly

currently Miami City Ballet’s Palm Beach liaison. On January 9, entrepreneur and cultural philanthropist Alex Dreyfoos was scheduled to be interviewed by Judy Mitchell, chief executive officer of the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts. Upcoming conversations include: • YUKI − A Conversation with Fashion Designer Yuki Torimaru about Couture, London, 1976-1986. The February 6 conversation will be conducted by Frederic A. Sharf. • LES − A Conversation with author Les Standiford, on March 12. John Blades, executive director of the Flagler Museum, will pose the questions.

All Culture & Cocktails events are free for members of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council ($175 level and above). The price for everyone else is $35 per person with all proceeds going to the non-profit Cultural Council. Each event runs from 5 to 7 p.m., with registration and cocktails from 5 to 5:45 p.m., and the conversation from 5:45 to 7 p.m., including audience Q&A. Café Boulud serves complimentary beverages and an array of specially prepared hors’ d’oeuvres. A cash bar and free valet parking are also available. The renowned restaurant is located in The Brazilian Court, 301 Australian Ave., in Palm Beach. As an added bonus, attendees are offered a 20 percent discount for dinner at Café Boulud immediately following the conversation. This discount is for food only, and does not include drinks, tax or gratuity. Seating is limited. To make reservations, call Mary Dunning at the Cultural Council at 561-472-3330. The 2011-2012 season of Culture & Cocktails is once again generously

Photos by Corby Kaye’s Studio Palm Beach


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NOW THROUGH MARCH 18

cultural council news

AMERICAN TREASURES:

Masterworks from the Butler Institute of American Art sponsored by the Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation, with additional support from the Peter and Vicki Halmos Foundation/Palm Beach Principal Players, the Palm Beach Daily News and PR-BS, a Boca Raton-based public relations firm.

b

FRANK WESTON BENSON (1862-1951), Red and Gold, (detail), 1915, oil on canvas, 51 x 59 inches. Collection of the Butler Institute of American Art, Museum Purchase 1954

Christina D’Elosua, newly appointed executive director of Leadership Palm Beach County (standing, left) and Mark Alexander, chair of the Cultural Executives Committee and executive director of the Duncan Theatre (center) facilitate a conversation in Belle Glade with local artists and members of the Leadership Palm Beach County Class of 2012.

501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton, Florida bocamuseum.org | 561.392.2500

Conversations Assess Ways for Council to Assist Artists As it prepared for its move into its new home in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in Lake Worth, the Cultural Council hosted a series of Artist Conversations to learn about the needs and concerns of these creative individuals − and what it can do to support them. A total of 108 professional artists attended the sessions, which took place in Belle Glade, Boca Raton, Palm Beach Gardens and West Palm Beach in November. Rena Blades, the Cultural Council’s President and CEO, hosted the conversations, through which the Council sought to gain a better understanding of such issues as how to prepare artists to be successful entrepreneurs, the types of working spaces needed, accessibility to financial and technical assistance opportunities and economic issues affecting artists working in different media. “We had an exceptional turnout of professional artists from all disciplines,” said Nichole Hickey, the Council’s artists’ services coordinator. “The disciplines have ranged from painter to storyteller to architect to dancer and more.

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{inside culture} cultural council news The many ideas and concepts as well as the information recorded over the last few weeks by our team will be most useful for our next phase.â&#x20AC;? At the same time, a written and online survey was conducted to assist the Council in collecting data about local artists and allow an additional opportunity to focus directly on specifics. Findings from the conversations and survey results will be made available to other arts organizations in the area for their consideration in future programming. The Artist Conversations were underwritten by J.P. Morgan, while members of the Leadership Palm Beach County Class of 2012 took on the project as a special initiative. Other partners included Art and Culture Group Inc., Artists of Palm Beach County, Boynton Beach Art in Public Places Program, Duncan Theatre, LuLa and Palm Beach County Art in Public Places.

Cultural Stories Told on National Day of Listening In 2008, the national non-profit organization StoryCorps launched an effort to encourage all Americans to take an hour to record an interview with a loved one on the day after Thanksgiving. Called the National Day of Listening, the day is billed as a noncommercial alternative to â&#x20AC;&#x153;Black Fridayâ&#x20AC;? shopping sprees. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tens of thousands of Americans have participated in the National Day of Listening, and educators and community organizations have incorporated StoryCorpsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; interviewing techniques into their programs,â&#x20AC;? StoryCorps says on its website. Palm Beach County observed the National Day of Listening in November with a series of interviews with local artists

in six disciplines that were broadcast on ArtsRadioNetwork.com. In collaboration with the Palm Beach County Cultural Council and StoryCorps, the interviews focused on two primary topics: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why are you thankful for the arts in your life? And why are the arts important in Palm Beach County?â&#x20AC;? The interviewees were: â&#x20AC;˘ Dance: Clarence Brooks and Brittany Engle-Adams

of

Florida

Atlantic

University â&#x20AC;˘ Poetry: Lucille Gang Shulklapper and Lorraine Stanchich of the Palm Beach Poetry Festival â&#x20AC;˘ Visual Arts: Amy Berkowitz and Morgan Roth of the Art School at Boca Raton Museum of Art â&#x20AC;˘ Music: Michael Ellert and Josh deVries of Lynn University Conservatory of Music

Experience E xperience O One ne of of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Ame m ri r ca aâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Great Grea at House House Museums Mus u eu ums When it was completed d in 1902, Whitehall, Henry Henry Flaglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gilded Age estate estatte in Palm Beach, was hailed d by the New York Herald as â&#x20AC;&#x153;more â&#x20AC;&#x153;m more wonderful than any palace pallace LQ(XURSHJUDQGHUDQGPRUHPDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQWWKDQDQ\RWKHU LQ (XURSH JUDQGHU DQG PRUH P PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQW WKDQ DQ\ RWWKHU world.â&#x20AC;? private dwelling in the wo orld.â&#x20AC;? Today, Whitehall is a National Today Natiional Historic Landmark, Landmark and d is Flagler 2011/2012 012 open to the public as the F lagler Museum. The 2011/2 Season includes the Whitehall Whiteehall Lecture Series, the Flagler Flag gler Museum Music Series, and d much more. Call (561) 655-2833 655-2833 www.flaglermuseum.us or visit www.flaglermuse um.us for more information. information n. The Fall Exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x153;First Trai Train in to Paradise: The Railroad Tha at That Went to Seaâ&#x20AC;? is on display displaay through January 8, 2012.

The Winter Exhibition â&#x20AC;&#x153;A C New Light on Tiffany: Clara irlsâ&#x20AC;? Driscoll and the Tiffany Gi Girlsâ&#x20AC;? 2. January 31 to April 22, 201 2012.

h e n r y

m o r r i s o n

FLAGLER FL AGLER MUSE MUSEUM UM palm pa alm b beach, each, fl florida orida

A Natio National onal Historic Landmark

â&#x20AC;&#x153;An absolute must-see must--see for visitors to Palm Beachâ&#x20AC;? ~ National Nation nal Geographic Traveler Trraveler

â&#x20AC;&#x153;A A New Light on T Tiffany: iffffany: Cla Clara ara Driscoll and the T Tiffany iffffany Girlsâ&#x20AC;? spons sponsored sored by:

The first train to arrive in Key West, Wesst, January 22, 1912.

This exhibition organized by NewNew-York -Y Yoork Historical Society Society..

For F or mor more e inf information orm mation ccall all (561) 655-2833 65 55-2833 or visit w www.flaglermuseum.us w w.flaglermuseu um.us 82 | art&culture


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cultural council news • Film: Scott Eyman of The Palm Beach Post and Caroline Breder-Watts of 90.7 Classical South Florida. • Performing Arts: Alyona Ushe and Matthew Farmer of The Arts Garage The interviews were produced by 2Watts Productions, which developed the Arts Radio Network in collaboration with CeciCreative. To listen, visit ArtsRadioNetwork.com.

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Your smile says it all... Discover the Artform of Cosmetic Dentistry

Donna Brown, Ms Florida 2002

With my in-house laboratory and as a certified and master dental technician, I can provide the most complex dental services expedited with quality and care. — Dr. Gregory K. Boyajian

Enhance Your Smile

Palm Beach Dentist. World Class Smiles!

When you visit our office, your smile is our top priority. We are dedicated to providing you with the personalized, gentle care that you deserve. Gregory K. Boyajian, CDT, MDT, DDS, Prosthodontist Jennifer Boyajian Medina, RDH, DMD 235 Peruvian Avenue Palm Beach, Florida 33480 (561) 802-4424 • Toll Free: (888) 365-3376 info@SmilePalmBeach.com

(From left) Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades, County Commissioner Priscilla Taylor and Bill Nix, the Cultural Council’s vice president for marketing and government affairs, paused to celebrate National Arts and Humanities Month in front of the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building.

Proclamation Marks National Arts and Humanities Month Palm Beach County Commissioner Priscilla Taylor presented a National Arts and Humanities Month (NAHM) Proclamation to the Cultural Council at its future headquarters, the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building, in downtown Lake Worth. Commissioner Taylor also toured the building. Americans for the Arts sponsors National Arts and Humanities Month each October. In Palm Beach County, there were many exciting reasons to celebrate NAHM: The county has an expansive $209 million cultural industry that enhances quality of life, stimulates tourism and fuels the overall economy. There are more major cultural organizations (with budgets over $1 million) in the county than anywhere in the Coastal Southeast. In fact, Palm Beach County is recognized as Florida’s Cultural Capital®, a trademark that was officially registered in 2011.

Part of our commitment to serving our patients includes providing information that helps them to make more informed decisions about their oral health needs. Contact us today!

Romeo & Juliet Music by Prokofiev

Eissey Campus Theatre at Palm Beach State College 11051 Campus Drive, Palm Beach Gardens

Friday, March 30th 7:30 pm Saturday, March 31st 2:00 & 7:30 pm Colleen Smith Artistic Director

TICKETS 561.207.5900 Seats $22-32 art&culture

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{inside culture} cultural compendium

Ela Stein Weissberger, who played the cat in Brundibár in the Terezín concentration camp as a child, shared her story at the Kravis Center.

Brundibár Presentation Stirs Memories, Emotions Brundibár, a play that was first presented by children at the Terezín concentration camp in Czechoslovakia in the 1940s, was recently introduced to a new generation of children through a compelling performance at the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach.

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The cast of Brundibár

Produced by inSIGHT Through Education as part of the Kravis Center’s Community Outreach program, Brundibár featured 32 performers from the Young Singers of the Palm Beaches and a 14piece orchestra composed mostly of students from Lynn University’s Conservatory of Music conducted by Palm Beach Opera Assistant Conductor and Chorus Master Greg Ritchey.

Three days prior to this emotionally moving performance, the Kravis Center presented The Brundibár Experience, a special lecture by 81-year-old Ela Stein Weissberger, one of the few surviving members of the original cast. She shared her experiences as a young Jewish girl coming of age in the 1940s as a prisoner in Terezín, Hitler’s so-called “Model Ghetto.” Ms. Weissberger played the role of the cat in all 55 performances at the concentration camp. The Nazi regime used the seemingly innocent performances as a propaganda tool to delude the outside world into thinking the Jewish prisoners were being treated humanely. Tragically, the performances ended in 1944, after most of the young cast had been sent to death camps. Now performed around the world, Brundibár was reborn in 2003, first as a children’s book written by playwright Tony Kushner (Angels in America) with illustrations by Maurice Sendak (Where the Wild Things Are) and later as a live, 40-minute opera. Brundibár tells the story of a brother and sister who seek money through singing in the street to buy milk for their ailing mother, only to have the quest thwarted by the evil organ grinder Brundibár. Extolling the triumph of good over evil, Brundibár has become an allegory of Hitler and the Nazi reign. Today, the opera provides a vehicle to instruct children about the importance of responsibility and courage in standing up against bullying and tyranny.


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RECAPTURING THE REAL WEST: THE COLLECTIONS OF

WILLIAM I. KOCH

Budge Jamison

O N D I S P L AY F E B RU A RY 4 t h - A P R I L 1 5 t h

Andrew Aiken with one of the Palm Beach Zoo’s residents, “Scooter” the binturong.

Andrew Aiken Leads Palm Beach Zoo Andrew Aiken, a leader of the Palm Beach Zoo’s successful expansion and board of directors member since 2002, was named president and CEO of the organization – succeeding Dr. Terry Maple, who retired at the end of September. As chairman of the zoo’s Construction Oversight Committee, Aiken was responsible for the development of several key exhibits, including the Cornell Tropics of the Americas, the Florida Reptile House and Wings Over Water, as well as the Levine Animal Care Complex and the new Koala House. “I am pleased to be assuming the position of president and CEO following Dr. Maple’s retirement,” Aiken said. “Dr. Maple has done a great job in advancing the zoo’s mission of animal health and wellness, education and conservation over the past six years.” Maple has joined the faculty at Florida Atlantic University’s Wilkes Honors College in Jupiter. “Thanks to his additional development efforts, we are well on our way to breaking ground on a new tiger exhibit for our rapidly expanding big cat population as well as new administrative facilities in a refurbished city property in Dreher Park. I look forward to Dr. Maple’s mentorship as we make this transition,” Aiken added. A native of New England, Aiken moved

A Pause on the Journey by Philip R. Goodwin

Billy The Kid

Big Alice

The Bronco Buster by Frederic Remington

Admission is $5. Call (561) 655-7226 or visit www.fourarts.org for details. Groups welcome.

2 FOUR ARTS PLAZA

PA L M B E A C H , F L 3 3 4 8 0

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{inside culture} cultural compendium Historical Society Exhibition Recalls County’s Role in WWII

The expanding big cat population at the Palm Beach Zoo, including these three Malayan Tiger cubs born last spring – is just one of the many positive signs of growth at the organization.

to Palm Beach County in 1994, where he became a principal of Renaissance Partners. He was included on The Palm Beach Post’s Top Business People of the Century list in 1999. Aiken is a graduate of Trinity College and received his M.S. from the Center for Real Estate at MIT.

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A new exhibition at the Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum commemorates the 70th anniversary of the United States’ entry into World War II through a decidedly local lens. Paradise in Peril: World War II in Palm Beach County commemorates the bravery and determination of area citizens who played a vital role in the war effort. Fearing attack on the mainland after the devastation at Pearl Harbor, the threat of invasion from both Japan and Germany seemed very real. Florida residents could hear explosions and see evidence of the danger lurking just offshore. Allied ships were left drifting, ablaze and sinking, their crews awaiting rescue or dying after attacks by German U-Boats. Visitors to the museum will travel back through time to the definitive era of

American patriotism. Using selected archival photographs featuring Palm Beach County citizens, maps marking areas of historical significance in specific neighborhoods and artifacts large and small that were integral to fighting and saving lives as well as multimedia resources such as literature and music from the era, guests will have a once-in-alifetime opportunity to experience World War II in Palm Beach County. The exhibition will continue until August 18. The museum, located at 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, in the Historic 1916 Court House, is open Tuesday through Saturday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Admission is free. For more information, visit www.historical societypbc.org.


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briefly noted Palm Beach Pops Introduces Children to Music More than 750 students from elementary schools in Palm Beach County were treated to a free concert by Bob Lappin and the Palm Beach Pops at the Eissey Theatre at Palm Beach State College in the fall. In addition to the hundreds of students in the audience, one student from each school was chosen to accompany the orchestra during a musical selection, while other students appeared on stage to assist Lappin in conducting the orchestra. Now in its 14th year, the Palm Beach Popsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Music & You Education Program has reached more than 85,000 elementary students. During the four weeks leading up to the concert, students learned the rudiments of melody, harmony and rhythm by listening to music ranging from Bach and Mozart to Gershwin and Duke Ellington. Designed to promote music in the classroom by correlating music with social studies,

     

.0-%++ 31%3, .& 02  ,%0)#!- 3+230% #   Maestro Bob Lappin helps Jakob Little from the Arthur I. Meyer Jewish Academy conduct the Palm Beach Pops performance of the â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mexican Hat Dance.â&#x20AC;?

literature, character education, science and math, the program is offered each year at no cost to families, teachers or schools. Students receive a 16-page color workbook and teachers are given curriculum guides to prepare students for weekly sessions, which are benchmarked to Florida Sunshine State Standards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This concert is all about the children and providing them with a meaningful musical experience. The students left the show with a great appreciation of music. I wish we had the funding to provide this opportunity to every student in the county,â&#x20AC;? said Sara Hebert, program coordinator.

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• 30TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON •

2011-2012

briefly noted

Buy tickets online! www.dollyhand.org

Jay Johnson in “The Two & Only” Jan. 12 at 7:30pm

Guy Penrod Jan. 26 at 7:30pm

The Improvised Shakespeare Company Feb. 14 at 7:30pm

Brigadoon Feb. 16 at 7:30pm

(From left) Steve Brouse, Sharon Koskoff and Brandon Kruse pose in front of the “Full Body Portraits” painted by young people at Home Safe.

The Bronx Wanderers Feb. 23 at 7:30pm

Jim Witter in “The Piano Men” March 2 at 7:30pm

The Allan Harris Quartet March 15 at 7:30pm

Palm Beach State College Music Department March 22 at 7:30pm

Celtic Fire: Irish Music and Dance with Riverdance’s Michael Londra

For the past several years, Home Safe in Lake Worth has enabled local artists to partner with young people in the organization’s Safety Net Program and teach them how to use art as a form of therapy. Mural artist Sharon Koskoff recently worked with students to create multilayered “Full Body Portraits.” Artist Steve Brouse teamed up with the teens to create a mural entitled “The Road to Safety,“ while Palm Beach Post photographer Brandon Kruse taught the kids the basics of good photography and how to express themselves with pictures. A number of the portraits were shown at Palm Beach State College during Domestic Violence Month in October.

March 23 at 7:30pm

30th Anniversary Celebration with Buffalo Rome and Larry Gatlin April 17 at 7:00pm

Missoula Children’s Theatre May 5 at 11:00am and 7:00pm

Street Beat, Inc. May 11 at 7:00pm

Box Office: 561-993-1160 1977 College Drive | Belle Glade campus Find us on

Tim B. Wride was named the new William and Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography at the Norton Museum of Art. Previously, he spent 14 years at the Los Angeles County Museum of Art as curator of photography. He also founded and served as executive director of the Los Angeles-based, non-profit No Strings Foundation, which provides artist grants to American photographers. “The Norton’s photography collection is filled with some absolute gems,” Wride said. “I look forward to continuing to build it and contextualize the collection in new exhibitions.” The position was previously held by Charlie Stainback, who was promoted to assistant director of the Norton. Tim Wride

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briefly noted

Inspiritâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission is to take live entertainment to people who might not otherwise have a chance to experience the arts.

When Ginny Meredith founded Inspirit in 2000, she dreamed of taking live entertainment directly to individuals who do not have the option of going out to experience it themselves. Thanks to her passion, Palm Beach County residents in veterans hospitals, cancer clinics, shelters, rehab centers, pediatric units, Alzheimer care and nursing homes have been uplifted by the power of music. The National Endowment for the Arts recently acknowledged the importance of Inspiritâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mission by awarding a $10,000 Challenge America Fast Track Grant to the organization. Inspirit, which received the same grant in 2005, was one of only 10 organizations in Florida to receive this NEA funding.

PGA COMMONS CENTRAL 5080 PGA Blvd., #105 Palm Beach Gardens, FL 33418 T 561.691.9811 | F 561.691.9848 WEST PALM BEACH 319 Belvedere Road, #112 West Palm Beach, FL 33405 T 561.868.7893 | F 561.868.7894 BOYNTON BEACH 640 East Ocean Ave., #4 Boynton Beach, FL 33435 T 561.737.0606 | F 561.868.7894 THAI JO - CITYPLACE 700 S. Rosemary Ave., #230 West Palm Beach, FL 33401 T 561.832.3545 THE RITZ-CARLTON PALM BEACH 100 South Ocean Blvd. Manalapan, FL 33462 T 561.533.6000 COMING SOON - SUSHI JO/THAI JO Loggerhead Plaza, Juno Beach

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2011/12 “The Best of Broadway” Season Tony Award -Winner

®

briefly noted

Take your seat for this energetic, seductive and daring production. Sponsored by AND

JANUARY 10 - 29 Tony Award -Winner

®

A provocative portrait of abstract expressionist, Mark Rothko. ROE GREEN

AND

Sponsored by THE ROE GREEN FOUNDATION

FEBRUARY 14 - 26 Tony Award -Winner

®

This classic musical is a true treasure and will be sure to warm your heart. Sponsored by

MARCH 13 - APRIL 1 KAKL=JJG:=JL9FF=K;9:9J=L;D9KK2

;@JAKE9;<GF9D<K

MEMORIES OF ELVIS

A ONE NUN-SENSE MUSICAL EVENT From the creator of Nunsense. Sister is back!

Celebrating the life and music of Elvis Presley.

JANUARY 16 at 7:30PM JANUARY 22 at 8:00PM KL=N=DAHHA9K SECOND CITY SIMPLY SINATRA THELAUGH OUT LOUD TOUR

Hear the Sinatra hits:

An]?glQgm Under My Skin,”

An]?gll`] World on a String,” and many more!

K][gf\;alqk ! LO L hilarious sketch comedy and trademark improvisation.

FEBRUARY 3 at 7:30PM FEBRUARY 4 at 8:00PM LOVE LETTERS CELEBRITY FUNDRAISER

Two characters share their hopes and ambitions, dreams and disappointments.

ARIAS:

AN EVENING WITH PALM BEACH OPERA

HYde:]Y[`Gh]jYk talented Young Artists singing favorite opera arias and duets.

FEBRUARY 13 at 7:30PM MARCH 1 at 7:30PM

For tickets: (561) 575-2223 For group sales: (561) 972-6117 1001 East Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33477

Sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Council on Arts and Culture

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Tibetan monks will use millions of grains of colored sands to create an intricate mandala at FAU.

Painting with colored sands is one of the most exquisite and unique expressions of Tantric Buddhism. In Tibetan, this art is called “dul-tson-kyil-khor,” which literally means “mandala of colored powders.” From February 25-March 3, visiting Tibetan monks will create an intricate sand mandala in the Schmidt Gallery of the Florida Atlantic University Performing Arts Building in Boca Raton. Public opening and closing rituals are an integral part of the program and a public lecture will provide insights into the philosophies and practices related to this enduring mystical art. The project is presented in collaboration with and made possible by FAU’s Peace Studies Program. For a complete event schedule, visit www.fau.edu/peacestudies.


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Bring Your Kids To See Our Kids! (From left) Science Museum President and CEO Lew Crampton, Heath Randolph, Leslie Randolph and Will Bourbeau, regional vice president of Wells Fargo Bank

The South Florida Science Museum’s STARLAB Mobile Planetarium is part of an education initiative for grades K-5 that introduces students in Title I schools to the wonders of the universe. The program, which takes a fully operational planetarium dome experience throughout the region, is projected to reach more than 5,000 people in the coming year. Wells Fargo Bank recently donated $25,000 to support STARLAB. Wells Fargo employee and South Florida Science Museum board member Heath Randolph – whose mother played an important role in establishing the museum 50 years ago – was credited with initiating the grant.

Daily Animal Shows Interactive Fountain Carousel - Snack Bars Restaurants - Gift Shops

The Maltz Jupiter Theatre’s 2011-12 PNC Kids Korner series includes six performances covering a wide range of social and emotional issues that children experience, with all shows based on children’s story books. “When feelings are dealt with through drama, the storyline in a play has a lasting impact on young minds,” said the Maltz’s managing director, Tricia Trimble. For the second consecutive year, the Maltz received a $15,000 grant from the PNC Foundation to support the series, which presents high-quality theater productions to more than 3,000 local children and their families.

The Malayan tiger cubs at the Palm Beach Zoo are growing fast. Plan a family outing soon to watch these adorable youngsters at play. Spend the day visiting a diverse collection of amazing animals exhibited on 23 acres of lush tropical habitat. It's the perfect place to introduce your children to the wonders of wildlife.

Open daily 9 AM to 5 PM.

1301 Summit Boulevard, WPB, FL 33405 (561) 547-WILD (9453) www.palmbeachzoo.org A production of Jigsaw Jones: The Case of the Class Clown kicked off the PNC Kids Korner series.

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ppresents pr esents

on view dec. 15, 2011 – mar 11, 2012

An A n eexhibition xhibition eexploring xploring the socia social al ritual of the ccocktail ocktail par party ty through through o the lens le ens of fashion fashion and design. Featuring Featu uring decorative decorative arts, arts, photography, photograph hy, aadvertising, adv ertising, accessories, accessories, and ffashionable ashionable ccocktail ocktail attir from thee ‘20s ‘20s to to the attiree from present Balenciaga, Dior,r, p pr esent by by such iconic iconic designers designers as Cristobal Cristobal Balenciag a, Christian Christian Dior Alexander Schiaparelli, A Ale xander McQueen, Jeanne Lanvin, Lan nvin, Yves Yves Saint Laurent, Laurent, Elsa Sc chiaparelli, Valentino, Pierre V alentino, and P ierre Cardin. Cardin. www.norton.org www .norton.org

loccal pre local presentation sentation of this eexhibition xhibition is made possible in ppart ar t thr through ou gh the gener generosity osity of mr mr.. bruce beal, jean s. and frederic a. sharf, sharf, and wilmington wilming t on trust. tru us t. media suppor supportt pr provided o vided bbyy the ppalm alm bea beach ch pos post, t, ppalm alm bea beach ch il illustrated, llus trated, and wptv channel 5.

Society PALM

BEACH

PRESENTING SOCIETY FOR 59 YEARS NANTUCKET

NEWPORT

NEW YORK

SARATOGA

SOUTHAMPTON

Vita Celebratio Est!

PUBLISHED BY PALM BEACH SOCIETY COMPANIES, INC.

240 Worth Avenue Palm Beach, FL 33480 Q 561.659.5555 Q www.pbsociety.com 92

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Joe Gillie, president and CEO of Old School Square Cultural Arts Center in Delray Beach, received the National Society of Arts & Letters South Florida Chapter’s Lifetime Achievement in the Arts Award. Gillie was recognized for his contributions to the arts in South Florida for the past 34 years. He has been an actor at the Royal Palm Dinner Theatre, an actor and public relations director at the Caldwell Theatre Company, a teacher at Lynn University and, for the last 20 years, executive director at Old School Square. He has served on numerous boards and committees and is a past chair of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s Cultural Executives Committee.

EXPERIENCE “our” DIFFERENCE “Cosmetic Dentistry is my love, I have trained hard for it and now have the opportunity to give my patients their very best smile”

Richard Steckler DDS, PA DENTAL ARTS

Cosmetic, Restorative & General Dentistry American Academy of Cosmetic Dentistry Fellow of the International Academy of Dental Facial Aesthetics

AREAS OF EXPERTISE Cosmetic & Restorative Dentistry All Porcelain Veneers Crown & Bridge Mini Implant Dentistry Eliminate Dentures Permanently Regular & Perio Cleanings

RIVER PLACE 1001 W. Indiantown Road, Suite 106 • Jupiter, Florida 33458 www.cosmetic-smile.com • Call for a free consultation: (561) 747-7111 art&culture

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Don and Ann Brown rose to the occasion during the unveiling of Palm Beach Dramaworksâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; new marquee.

Benefactors Don and Ann Brown unveiled the marquee for the new home of West Palm Beachâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s only professional resident theater company, Palm Beach Dramaworks, in October. Following the unveiling, Project Architect Gino deSantis and Building Contractor Bill Branning led a tour of the venue, including the reconfigured auditorium chamber with seating capacity of 218, the multi-use black box theater space, the newly designed administration offices, costume shop and lobby bar. The theater debuted on November 11. To celebrate the opening, West Palm Beach Mayor Jeri Muoio declared November 7-13 as Dramaworks Theatre Week. For information about Palm Beach Dramaworks, call 561-514-4042 or visit www.palmbeachdramaworks.org.

Insightful Cultural Exhibitions 16 Acres of Exotic Gardens Landmark Japanese Events Award Winning Cuisine MUSEUM | GARDENS | CULTURE | CUISINE

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4000 Morikami Park Road, Delray Beach, FL | 561.495.0233 | morikami.org


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Art Exhibitions

Basel Wall by Judy Flescher, acrylic mixed-media collage, 30” x 40”

classes & Workshops For Adults, Teens, Children and Special Needs, Beginner to Professional, Daytime, Nights, Weekends.

In an outstanding example of the incorporation of art into a commercial development, the Lighthouse ArtCenter opened a new gallery in donated space at Midtown, a mixed-use community in Palm Beach Gardens. Visitors can see paintings, sculptures, ceramics, photography and jewelry created by members of the Lighthouse ArtCenter Artists’ Guild. “We’re interested in trying new ideas and seeing how people react,” said Belle Forino, marketing coordinator at Midtown. “We have open retail space that, with the help of the Lighthouse ArtCenter, we’re turning into an edgy contemporary pop-up style gallery.” Added Katie Deits, executive director of Lighthouse ArtCenter, “This is an opportunity for more of the community to see the work of the nationally known artists who call the ArtCenter home.” Located at 4763 PGA Blvd., Suite 300, the gallery is open Thursday through Saturday from noon to 8 p.m. and noon to 5 p.m. on Sunday.

LighthouseArts.org Painting Figure Drawing Cartooning Photography Photoshop Mixed Media Jewelry Sculpture Ceramics Soda Kiln Wheel Throwing Tile Making

Caroline, by Catherine Sans

Catherine Sans of Jupiter, a junior at A. W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts, was one of 44 students in the nation to be recognized by the Department of Education and the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities. Catherine’s photograph, entitled Caroline, was exhibited at the Department of Education’s new Arts and Humanities Building in Washington, D.C. The photograph was originally a Gold Key-winning photograph in the Scholastic Art & Writing competition and was shown in New York last June. The award-winning photo was selected from thousands of entries from across the United States.

School of Art: 395 Seabrook Road, Tequesta, FL (561) 748-8737 Museum: 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta, FL (561) 746-3101

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{a&c cuisine}

87 Via Mizner, Worth Avenue Palm Beach www.renatospalmbeach.com 561.655.9752 Renatoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with an intimate dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls. Culinary delights from the classics to the eclectic are complemented with an extensive wine list and fully stocked bar.

2373 PGA Blvd. Palm Beach Gardens www.riverhouserestaurant.com 561.694.1188 At The River House Restaurant a water view is served with every meal. Dinner nightly from 5pm with limited reservations on Friday and Saturday. Established in 1984, we offer facilites for corporate and private parties, a tiki bar and dock.

2300 PGA Blvd. Palm Beach Gardens www.waterwaycafe.com 561.694.1700 A relaxing waterfront dining experience awaits you at the Waterway Cafe... Famous for its friendly atmosphere, great service and fresh entrees. Come enjoy our Twilight Dinner Specials and Daily Happy Hour.

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all-classical public radio

Classical Music. It’s In Our Nature. classicalsouthflorida.org

GLOBAL NEWS, LOCAL CHANNEL. Get the latest public radio news and shows, now on the air in the Palm Beaches. wpbinews.org


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The Cultural Council presents the 7th season of

CULTURE & COCKTAILS Café Boulud, Palm Beach

You’re invited… Join the Cultural Council’s family of supporters and enjoy exclusive member benefits that offer incredible value. As a member, we’ll keep you informed and entertained with our award winning publicaons and special events — all year long!

All members receive...

Remaining Programs of 2011-12 Season

• Subscripon to art&culture magazine • Cultural Calendar of Events • Culture Connecon e-newsleer • Invitaons to member events

Monday, February 6

YUKI A conversation with international fashion designer Yuki Torimaru About Couture, London, 1976-1986 Interviewed by Fred Sharf, Collector, Scholar, Author Monday, March 12

LES A conversation with author Les Standiford about the 100th anniversary of Henry Flagler’s Over-Sea Railroad Interviewed by John Blades, CEO of the Flagler Museum

Popular benefits include: • CultureCard member discount card. Enjoy cket discounts, 2-for-1 admissions and monthly special offers.

• Free admission to Culture & Cocktails, our popular series held during season at Café Boulud on Palm Beach.

• Exclusive VIP show passes to winter art & anque fairs. Includes preview evening for the American Internaonal Fine Art Fair and the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Anque Show. Complete list of membership levels and benefits available

Programs are held 5-7pm at Café Boulud in The Brazilian Court on Palm Beach. Admission is $35 per person. Free with membership in the Cultural Council at the $175 level and above. Seating is limited. Information and reservations at (561) 472-3330. All programs, dates and locations are subject to change.

Underwritten by

JOIN TODAY! By Phone: 561-472-3330 Online: www.palmbeachculture.com Informaon available at 561-472-3330

The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation Additional Support Provided by

The Peter and Vicki Halmos Family Foundation and the Palm Beach Principal Players

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The Palm Beach County Cultural Council is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation. Membership contributions are tax deductible to the extent provided by law.


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{inside culture} In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and greater help us accomplish our mission Dr. Stan and Marcie Gorman Althof Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson Anonymous Ms. Kathleen Azeez The Azeez Foundation Ms. Carol Barnett Publix Supermarket Charities Mr. and Mrs. James Batmasian Investments Limited Ted and Ruth Baum Mr. Bruce A. Beal Belle Glade Chamber of Commerce Ms. Jo Anne Berkow Rosetta Stone Fine Art Mr. Jeffrey E. Berman Mr. Richard S. Bernstein Richard S. Bernstein & Associates Mr. and Mrs. John Blades Mr. and Mrs. David S. Blue Boca Raton Resort & Club Ms. Yvonne S. Boice Mr. Michael J. Bracci Northern Trust Bank of Florida, N.A. Mr. J. Daniel Brede Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc. Howard Bregman, Esq. Greenberg Traurig, P.A. Mr. Douglas Brown Ovations Catering Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Brown The Ann K. & Douglas S. Brown Family Foundation Business Development Board Café Boulud Mr. Christopher D. Caneles The Palm Beach Post Ms. Linda A. Casey Mr. and Mrs. John K. Castle Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence H. Cohn The Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties The Community Foundation of Louisville Mr. Miles A. Coon Mr. Gus Davis Design Center of the Americas Dr. Richard P. D’Elia Dex Imaging, Inc. Mr. Scott Diament Palm Beach Show Group Mr. and Mrs. John T. Doughtery Mrs. Cecile Draime Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos Mr. Timothy A. Eaton Eaton Fine Art Mr. George T. Elmore Mr. Donald M. Ephraim Donald M. Ephraim Family Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Gerald Falk

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farber Mrs. Marjorie Fisher The Max M. and Marjorie S. Fisher Foundation Mrs. Shirley Fiterman The Miles and Shirley Fiterman Charitable Foundation Ms. Allison S. Flack Mrs. Florence Free Mr. Paul Funk Frank Crystal & Company Ms. Jennifer Garrigues Jennifer Garrigues, Inc. Interior Design Mr. Robert Gittlin JKG Group Mr. J. Arthur Goldberg Mr. Rick Gonzalez AIA REG Architects Inc. Judy B. Goodman Esq. Mr. Craig D. Grant PNC Bank Mr. Raymond Graziotto Seven Kings Holdings, Inc. Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce Greater Boynton Beach Chamber of Commerce Greater Lake Worth Chamber of Commerce Ms. Roe Green The Roe Green Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Peter Halmos The Peter and Vicki Halmos Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand Mr. Christopher E. Havlicek JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank Henry Morrison Flagler Museum Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman Ms. Judy A. Hoffman Profile Marketing Research Ms. Ann E. Howard John C. & Mary Jane Howard Foundation Ms. Hilary Jordan Mr. Kenn Karakul and Mr. James Held Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Katz Katz Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Christopher G. Kellogg William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust Mr. Amin J. Khoury B/E Aerospace Mr. Robert S.C. Kirschner Passport Publications & Media Corp. Mr. and Mrs. Thomas M. Kirchhoff Mr. Don Kiselewski Florida Power & Light Company Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Kohnken Kohnken Family Foundation Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman Mrs. Molly Foreman Kozel

Raymond E. Kramer III, Esq. Beasley Hauser Kramer & Galardi, P.A. Mr. Gary Krieger Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kushnick Zissu Family Foundation Mrs. Emily F. Landau The Fisher Landau Center for Art Mr. Marc Leder Ms. Margo Lefton Geo. Zoltan Lefton Family Foundation Mr. Jesus Leon JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank Mr. Paul N. Leone The Breakers Palm Beach Mr. and Mrs. Melvin J. Levine Mr. Robert A. Lewis Mrs. Ellen F. Liman The Liman Foundation Mr. John Loring Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Malasky Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Maltz The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Randolph A. Marks Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews Denise and William Meyer Foundation Mr. Ross W. Meltzer Mrs. Sydelle Meyer Mrs. Sydell L. Miller Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro The International Society of Palm Beach Ms. Jane Mitchell Ms. Jo Anne Moeller Office Depot Mrs. Mary M. Montgomery Mr. Adam Munder Rednum Capital Partners Ms. Jane F. Napier Mr. and Mrs. Geoffrey H. Neuhoff Neuhoff Communications, Inc. Mr. Frank N. Newman Wells Fargo Ms. Suzanne Niedland and Mr. Lawrence F. DeGeorge Ms. Paige Noland Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce Palm Beach Civic Association Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker Mr. Robert C. Parsons Oxbridge Academy of the Palm Beaches Mr. Dack Patriarca Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Midtown Payson Galleries Mr. and Mrs. Jerry K. Pearlman Ms. Charlotte D. Pelton Charlotte Pelton & Associates Mrs. Helen K. Persson

Mr. Jorge Pesquera Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau Ms. Lisa H. Peterfreund Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation Ms. Susy Petros Ms. Linda M. Phelps Mr. Dana T. Pickard Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge LLP PNC Foundation Mrs. Regina Porten Porten Familly Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Carter Pottash Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Puder Ms. Joyce Reingold Palm Beach Daily News Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Rodusky Mr. Leon M. Rubin Rubin Communications Group Ms. Pamela Saba Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager Mr. Lewis M. Schott The Lewis Schott Foundation Mr. Rudy E. Schupp 1st United Bank Ms. Barbara Schwartz Mr. Gary Schweikhart PR-BS Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf Ms. Muriel Siebert Mrs. Lois Silverman Silverman Family Foundation, Inc. Ms. Laurie Silvers Hollywood Media Corp. Michael D. Simon Esq. Gunster Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sloane Business Development Board Mr. and Mrs. Harold Smith Mrs. Kelly Sobolewski Bank of America Mr. and Mrs. William J. Soter Dr. Jay W. Spechler and Dr. Marilyn Spechler Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco Telesco Family Foundation Mrs. Patricia G. Thorne Mrs. Phyllis Tick Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. Toll Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio Jr. The Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc. Wachovia Wells Fargo Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman Dr. John C. Whelton Ms. Mary Wong Office Depot Foundation Sheryl G. Wood Esq. Ms. Ruth Young The Colony Hotel Ms. Melanie Ziskend

Listing as of 1/1/2012

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{next issue – spring 2012}

Bromeliads - Color and Shade Island, Mounts Botanical Garden, West Palm Beach

10 under $10 For less than the cost of a week’s worth of lattes you can satisfy your appetite for culture and entertainment. Join us as we travel up the road, off the beaten path, behind the scenes, between the lines and across Palm Beach County in search of affordable adventures. From a night at the museum to glorious gardens and playful puppets, we’ll be serving up 10 creative experiences priced at $10 or less in the spring issue of art&culture.

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Blue Toro Patented Perpetual Calendar. Self-winding movement. 18 ct rose gold case with ceramic bezel. Water-resistant to 100 m. Limited Edition of 99 pieces. Exclusively available at Ulysse Nardin Boutiques.

W W W . U LY S S E - N A R D I N . C O M


art&culture magazine v6i2 Winter 2012  

As the primary catalyst for Palm Beach County’s thriving cultural climate, art&culture magazine is the official publication for the communit...

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