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art culture Fall 2013 Spring 2014

action! Film and television cameras are rolling across Palm Beach County

whole lotta love When arts groups collaborate, the whole can be greater than the sum of its parts

of Palm Beach County

a breath of fresh air Local artists revel in en plein air painting

PLUS Two thumbs up for Don Ephraim, Bruce Helander’s induction into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame, an abundance of amphitheaters and more


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o il a n d a c r ylic o n c a n vas, 56 x 60 i nches, 133433

LEONARD NELSON (1912 - 1993) ABSTRACT EXPRESSIONIST MASTER

WALLY F IN D L AY G A L L E RIE S

N E W Y O R K • PA L M B E A C H • B A R C E L O N A

165 WORTH AVENUE • PALM BEACH FL 33480 • T: (561) 655 2090 F: (561) 655 1493 W W W . WA L LY F I N D L AY . C O M


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ART WALLY FINDLAY

St. Florent, Corse,

oi l on canv as , 25 x 31 i nches , 135261

YVONNE CANU (1921 - 2007)

COLOR, HARMONY & CONTRAST GA L L E RY COL L E C T I O N O N V I E W PA L M B E AC H

EST. 1870

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features

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lights, camera, close up! Palm Beach County’s film and television industry comes into focus. By Christina Wood

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en plein air A new exhibition mounted by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County explores the importance – and the popular resurgence – of an artistic movement that brought a breath of fresh air to the art world. By Marisa J. Pascucci

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hats off to bruce helander West Palm Beach artist receives the highest and most prestigious cultural honor bestowed by the State of Florida. By Christina Wood

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star studded stages Entertainment plays out under South Florida skies all year long at a bounty of local amphitheaters. By Amy Woods

52 52

all for one Collaboration energizes the arts scene in Palm Beach County. By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

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fusion! The Muse Awards celebrate the best in art and culture. By Leon M. Rubin

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“First Republic shares our passion for innovation and world-class performance.” ANDREA MILLER

Artistic Director and Founder Gallim Dance

241 Royal Palm Way, Palm Beach (561) 835-8829 (877) 486-6700 or visit www.firstrepublic.com New York Stock Exchange Symbol: FRC Member FDIC and

PalmBchArtCulture Spring 14 Miller ND2014.indd 1

Equal Housing Lender

3/6/14 1:16:33 PM


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welcome letter Celebrating excellence and opening doors to opportunity. By Rena Blades

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editor’s note Be the star of your own movie. By Christina Wood

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Upfront • People of the Water, on display at the Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum, provides a glimpse into South Florida’s distant past. • Local student advances from Florida Atlantic University to stardom. • Science on Tap organizers invite crowd to drink up and get smart. • A select group of Palm Beach County arts administrators participated in the Kennedy Center International Arts Leaders Forum in Washington, D.C. • Music is in the air at Palm Beach County’s theaters this summer. • Delray Beach author pens a whale of a tale. • Delray Beach Center for the Arts hosts Summer STEAM Camp. • Stunning new mural by internationally known artist adorns the Alexander Lofts in West Palm Beach. • Exhibits, events and excitement are brewing this summer at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters in Lake Worth.

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art works! Movies do more than entertain. By Christina Wood

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profile Philanthropist Don Ephraim earns rave reviews. By Thom Smith

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portrait West Palm Beach resident James Valenti is the opera star next door. By Allegra Nagler

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calendar The summer forecast calls for a showering of entertaining opportunities and cool cultural offerings for all ages.

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inside culture The Cultural Council takes to the airwaves to promote Palm Beach County’s cultural treasures, the county’s first STEAM school set to open, local artists flying high with airport exhibition and much more insider news.

21 With $138 million in local production-related spending, 2013 was a record breaking year for film and television production in the area, according to the Palm Beach County Film & Television Commission. Cover Image: Photo by James Steidl

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2014-2015 Season

lakeworthplayhouse.org 561-586-6410 Lake Worth Playhouse 713 Lake Ave Lake Worth, FL 33460

Legally Blonde July 10-27 8pm, 2pm 7 Tony Awards Season Tickets & Individual Tickets Available $29, $35

President and Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Director, Marketing and Government Affairs

Marilyn Bauer

561-687-8727 mbauer@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Mary Lewis

561-472-3340 mlewis@palmbeachculture.com

Shawn Berry

561-472-3347 sberry@palmbeachculture.com

Debbie Calabria

561-472-3330 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Kristen Smiley

561-472-3342 ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com

Nichole Hickey

561.472.3336 nhickey@palmbeachculture.com

Dan Boudet

561-471-2902 dboudet@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

Marlon Foster

561-472-3338 mfoster@palmbeachculture.com

Bebe Novick-Brodigan

561-471-1602 bbrodigan@palmbeachculture.com

Victoria Van Dam

561-472-3334 vvandam@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Administrative Assistant

Vera deChalambert

561-214-8085 vdechalambert@palmbeachculture.com

Grants Assistant

Alexandra Gitelman

561-214-8087 agitelman@palmbeachculture.com

Shani Simpson

561-471-2901 ssimpson@palmbeachculture.com

Gloria Rose

561-471-2901 grose@palmbeachculture.com

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Grants

Membership and Special Events Manager Development Associate Manager of Artist Services Website and Online Marketing Manager Grants Manager Visitor Services and Music Coordinator Public Relations Coordinator Marketing Coordinator Bookkeeper

South Pacific Jan 15 - Feb 1 8pm, 2pm 16 Tony Awards Season Tickets & Individual Tickets Available $29, $35 Arsenic and Old Lace Feb 26 - Mar 15 8 pm, 2 pm Critically Acclaimed Season Tickets & Individual Tickets Available $29, $35 Cabaret Apr 9 - 26 8pm, 2pm 23 Tony Awards Season Tickets & Music and Lyrics by Individual Tickets Kander and Ebb Available $29, $35

$29, $35 Season Subscriptions Available Ask About Dinner & a Show art&culture

601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460 | 561-471-2901 | www.palmbeachculture.com

Manager of Arts and Cultural Education

Odd Couple Nov 20 - Dec 7 8pm, 2pm 16 Tony Awards Season Tickets & Individual Tickets Available $29, $35

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Director of Development

Mame Oct 9-26 8pm, 2pm 7 Tony Awards Season Tickets & Individual Tickets Available $29, $35

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Development Assistant Assistant Bookkeeper Contributing Writer/Editor

Cultural Council Board of Directors Officers Berton E. Korman, Chairman Irene J. Karp, Vice Chairman Bradford A. Deflin, Treasurer

Cecile Draime Shirley Fiterman Roe Green Herbert S. Hoffman Raymond E. Kramer, III Suzanne Niedland Bill Parmalee Jean Sharf Michael D. Simon Dom A. Telesco

Directors Bruce A. Beal Michael J. Bracci Howard Bregman Christopher D. Canales

Ethel I. Williams Ex Officios Mary Lou Berger Daniel Biaggi Jennifer Prior Brown Glenn Jergensen Sylvia Moffett

Cultural Council Founder Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Priscilla A. Taylor, Mayor Paulette Burdick, Vice Mayor

Steven L. Abrams Mary Lou Berger Jess R. Santamaria

Hal R. Valeche Shelley Vana


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art&culture of Palm Beach County

Spring 2014 - volume 8, issue 3

publisher publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

561.472.8769 robert@passportpublications.com

editorial staff managing editor business editor editorial coordinator

christina wood

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com

richard westlund

561.472.8768 westlund@passportpublications.com

bradley j. oyler

561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

cultural council editorial staff editorial director contributing editor

rena blades leon m. rubin

contributing writers john loring, allegra nagler, rich pollack, anne rodgers, leon m. rubin, frederic a. sharf, thom smith, jenifer mangione vogt, christina wood, amy woods

contributing photographers harry benson, steven caras, jim fairman, jacek gancarz, michael price, robert stevens

art & design art & production director

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

graphic designer

rebecca m. lafita

561.472.8762 art@passportpublications.com

advertising sales director of advertising national advertising manager signature publications senior advertising manager contract administrator

richard s. wolff

561.472.8767 richard@passportpublications.com

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

richard kahn

561.906.7355 rich@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the County Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.

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Although several weeks have passed since the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s 2014 Muse Awards Celebration, I’m still on cloud nine.

fromtheceo

There are obvious reasons for my continuing enthusiasm: This was the most successful Muse Awards event since we initiated the program in 2006. Thanks to the generosity of our supporters and the hard work of our volunteers and staff, we raised nearly $200,000 and welcomed a record crowd of some 370 guests to enjoy a memorable evening. But the success of the Muse Awards event has deeper meaning. On one level, it’s important to remember what the Muse Awards recognize – namely, excellence in arts and cultural programs in Palm Beach County. As you read the brief descriptions of this year’s honorees elsewhere in this issue of art&culture, I think you will find the depth of their commitment and the heights of their creativity to be absolutely staggering. To cite just a few examples, the Lake Worth Street Painting Festival makes it possible to transform asphalt into art. The Kravis Center shows teachers how to weave the arts into their classrooms. SunFest boosts our county’s cultural vitality as well as its economy. The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum celebrates history and diversity. And there’s so much more.

Michael Price

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On another level, it’s essential to reflect on what the Muse Awards accomplish. The funds we raise through this program literally open the doors of our community’s cultural institutions to children by taking them on school field trips that – without our help – might well become a thing of the past. As doors are opened, so too are the eyes and the imaginations of these impressionable youngsters. Where that might lead is anyone’s guess. At its core, the mission of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is to serve the cultural community – and that’s what the Muse Awards are all about. We are so pleased to have found this wonderful way to celebrate excellence while creating opportunities for children who have the potential to become the next generation of cultural leaders. Thank you to everyone who played a role in making our 2014 Muse Awards Celebration the best one yet. We are exceptionally grateful for your support and look forward to climbing to even greater heights in the years ahead.

Rena Blades President and CEO Cultural Council of Palm Beach County


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IN A WORLD If your life story were made into a movie, who would you want to play the leading role? What kind of movie would it be? Do you see yourself at the center of an action flick? Maybe your story is a romance. I know there are days when I think my life plays out like a slapstick comedy. From the big screen to all the various small screens that populate our lives, movies provide a common currency that allows us to connect, to share our stories and to see our lives in a broader perspective. As author and acerbic wit Gore Vidal pointed out, “Movies are the lingua franca of the 20th century.”

fromthe

As we move bravely into the 21st century (imagine a wide-angle camera shot accompanied by a soundtrack that swells to epic heights), the impact of film and television is shifting. In this issue of art&culture, we explore some of the many ways that television and movies touch our lives in this new era. Major feature films continue to be produced in Los Angeles and New York but blockbuster movies represent just one aspect of today’s film and television industry. In “Lights, Camera, Close up!” on page 36, we’ll go behind the scenes with a variety of productions being filmed here in Palm Beach County. In Art Works! on page 27, we explore the impact film has on us as individuals and as a society. Turn to page 64 to see how the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is taking advantage of the medium to make an impact on tourists.

Jacek Gancarz

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an art movement ideally suited to Palm Beach County’s glorious landscapes. “Star Studded Stages” on page 48 takes you on a tour of the county’s many outdoor amphitheaters. In “All for One” on page 52, regular art&culture contributor Jenifer Mangione Vogt shows what happens when local arts organizations come together in pursuit of a common goal. James Valenti is blessed with movie-star good looks but – as you’ll see in our portrait of the West Palm Beach resident on page 32 – his star is shining brightly in the opera firmament. Bruce Helander’s colorful life story could easily provide fodder for a movie but it would be extremely difficult to cast someone in the role of the West Palm Beach artist. We celebrate with this true original – who was recently inducted into the Florida Artist Hall of Fame – in “Hats Off to Bruce Helander” on page 46. Everyone was a star at the Cultural Council’s 2104 Muse Awards, which honor the best in art and culture. We’ll introduce you to the winners and the amazing work they do in “Fusion!” on page 56. From the singers backing up the headliners at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach and the potters teaching master classes at the Armory Art Center to the independent filmmakers fine-tuning their scripts on a Palm Beach County set, we are all stars of our own lives. And, from artists and authors to educators and administrators, we’ll continue to shine a light on our hometown cultural heroes in every issue of art&culture.

On page 28, we’ll introduce you to Don Ephraim, a philanthropist with a passion for film. Before retiring from a successful law practice in Chicago, Ephraim developed a stellar client list that included film critics Gene Siskel and Roger Ebert.

Imagine!

When the popcorn is gone, it’s time to head outdoors for a breath of fresh air. In “En Plein Air” on page 40, you can explore the past and present of

Christina Wood Managing Editor


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Carlos Aristizabal

Discover local artists and experience artful events

4/24/14

Leon M. Rubin has been writing about arts and culture for nearly four decades, including more than 20 years in South Florida. Rubin helped establish the Boca Raton Cultural Consortium and was actively involved in local children’s theater for many years. In addition to writing the occasional feature story, he is responsible for Inside Culture, the calendar and a variety of other items in each issue of art&culture.

Marisa J. Pascucci is an experienced curator, author, speaker and educator. Presently she holds a senior leadership role with the Boca Museum of Art as curator of 20th-century and contemporary art. Most recently she was associate editor of The Art Economist, a critical publication discussing the global contemporary art market, and an adjunct faculty member at Palm Beach State College. Previously Pascucci worked at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, Everson Museum in Syracuse, N.Y., and the Cleveland Museum of Art.

EXHIBITIONS ART CLASSES WORKSHOPS

50

th

1964 - 2014

During more than three decades at The Palm Beach Post, Thom Smith covered popular music, movies, television and the courts, served as the paper’s “Listening Post” (ombudsman) and produced a consumer column. For 20 years he wrote columns about people, places and events in the Palm Beaches culminating with the “Palm Beach Social Diary.” These days he freelances for international publications and writes the “On the Avenues” column for The Coastal Star, a monthly newspaper that covers Lake Worth to Boca Raton. He and his wife, Diane, live in Boca Raton.

Before launching her freelance career, Amy Woods worked as the society editor of Palm 2 Jupiter and as the editor of Notables at The Palm Beach Post, a position she held for 11 years. An experienced editor, columnist, writer and reporter, Amy’s goal is to use her experience as a journalist and skills in public relations for the benefit of our local nonprofit community.

Museum, Gallery & School of Art

Museum: 373 Tequesta Drive Tequesta, FL (561) 746-3101 School of Art: 395 Seabrook Road Tequesta, FL (561) 748-8737 Open Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m. LighthouseArts.org

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Davidoff Studios, Palm Beach

Alegra Nagler grew up in New York in a creative household. Her father was an artist and, from an early age, she was exposed to working artists and the creative process. Although she did not follow in her father’s footsteps, she did develop what would become a lifelong appreciation for the arts. Today, Alegra uses her writing skills to connect with artists and the art world and is delighted to live in a region with an abundance of creative energy.

Jenifer Mangione Vogt is a writer and publicist who specializes in art, finance and Italian culture. She writes about art for many publications, including JetSet Magazine and Artlog. Jenifer also has more than 20 years of experience in corporate and nonprofit marketing, serving art organizations such as the Friends of the Uffizi Gallery, Metropolitan Museum of Art and Christie’s, as well as Fortune 500 companies, including MasterCard International and The Bank of New York.


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Now Showing M A K I N G A S P L A S H | The Historical Society of Palm Beach County provides a glimpse into South Florida’s distant past with

Lucien Capehart Pho tography

a special exhibition on display at the Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum in the 1916 Court House through June 28. People of the Water offers insight into the life of the Belle Glade Culture, which ruled the watery world of central and south Florida for more than 3,000 years. This incredible history has been revealed through archaeological excavations near Belle Glade, Palm Beach County’s westernmost city, and Boynton Beach, the southern boundary of the Belle Glade Culture. The exhibition tells two stories, weaving together the history of the Belle Glade Culture with the experience of uncovering these sites. Among the highlights are artifacts discovered by Florida archaeologists that are on loan from the Lawrence E. Will Museum of the Glades in Belle Glade, the Florida Museum of Natural History in Gainesville and Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton, which are on display for the first time ever.

. Students discover People of the Water

The Envelope Please

FOR

more information call (561) 832-4164 or visit www.historicalsocietypbc.org

Outside The Box Q U E N C H Y O U R T H I R S T, F E E D Y O U R M I N D | For

F A U ’ S G O T T A L E N T | Before winning the national competition The X Factor on FOX TV, Alex Kinsey of Alex and Sierra was making waves at Florida Atlantic University. Kinsey made his first recording at FAU, contributing a track called I Like It to the Compowlation 2 CD, produced by FAU’s Hoot/Wisdom Recordings in 2012. It was, in fact, Hoot/Wisdom Student President Matt Smith who urged Kinsey to make the recording after hearing him singing in the dorm. To hear the track go to www.hootwisdom.com.

the price of a cup of coffee, a quality craft beer or a pleasantly chilled glass of wine, you can now discuss the latest trends in science and technology with a world-class scientist. The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium recently launched “Science on Tap,” a series of casual, interactive discussions modeled after the science café trend sweeping pubs and coffee houses across the country. “Science is sexy – no longer do ‘nerds’ and ‘geeks’ draw the same connotation that they have in previous generations,” says Kate Arrizza, South Florida Science Center chief operating officer. “Animals, dinosaurs, mysteries of the mind, cooking, swimming – whatever it is that you enjoy, there is some sort of science behind it and, if you are interested in learning more while most importantly having fun, we encourage you to come out to one of these events.” The first event featured Dr. William Bosking, senior neuroscientist at Max Planck, who engaged a diverse crowd gathered at O’Shea’s Irish Pub in West Palm Beach in a discussion of visual perception and how our brains create the call (561) 832-1988 or visit www.sfsciencecenter.org world we see.

FOR

more information

art&culture

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Look Who’s Reading A&C T H E B R O A D E R S T A G E | Earlier this year, thanks to the generosity of Cultural Council Board Member Suzanne Niedland, arts leaders from Palm Beach County attended the 2014 Kennedy Center International Arts Leaders Forum in Washington, D.C. Those who went with Niedland were Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades, General Director of the Palm Beach Opera Daniel Biaggi, Executive Director of Miami City Ballet Dan Hagerty, Producing Artistic Director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Andrew Kato and Kravis Center for the Performing Arts CEO Judith Mitchell. These influential Palm Beach County arts administrators joined more than 200 other professionals from around the world to discuss important topics such as audience development, board governance and future trends in marketing and promotions. As one of the largest and most sophisticated arts communities in the United States, the opinions of Palm Beach County’s local leaders were sought after and appreciated. Cultural Council of Palm Beach Coun ty President and CEO Rena Blades with Kennedy Cente r CEO Michael Kaiser.

Palm Beach County participants in the 2014 Kennedy Center Arts Leaders Forum included (from left) Rena Blades, Dan Hagerty, Andrew Kato, Suzanne Niedland, Daniel Biaggi and Judith Mitchell.

Spotlight On S I Z Z L I N G S T A G E S | The summer musical is a tradition in South Florida, where theaters offer a tempting respite from the heat. With an eclectic lineup of musical offerings, however, this summer promises to be hotter than ever on Palm Beach County’s theater scene. The outrageously prodigious comic and musical soul of 1930s Harlem lives on in Ain’t Misbehavin’, which runs through June 15 at The Wick Theatre in Boca Raton. This rollicking, swinging, finger-snapping revue is still considered one of Broadway’s best. (www.thewick.org) Palm Beach Dramaworks in West Palm Beach presents a pair of musicals in concert. Zorba the Greek shares his joyous philosophy of life with a young American student as they each navigate love, romance and heartbreak in Zorba!, which runs June 20 through June 29. The Most Happy Fella – with book, music and lyrics by Frank Loesser – takes the stage July 18 through July 27. (www.palmbeachdramaworks.org) Theatre at Arts Garage in Delray Beach turns up the heat with a production of Ring of Fire, running from June 20 through July 13. The great bio-pic Walk the Line told the story of the incredible struggles and triumph’s of Johnny Cash’s life. Ring of Fire puts the music center stage, running the gamut from vintage country and rockabilly to rock ‘n’ roll, searing ballads and gentle songs of love and deep faith. (www.artsgarage.org).

Ain’t Misbehavin at The Wick Thea tre

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Next Generation F U L L S T E A M A H E A D | The Maker Movement has come to Palm Beach County. Last summer, the first authorized Maker Camp in Florida was held by the Palm Beach Lab of Experimentation and Design and Startup Delray at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts. This summer, DBCA will once again host a Maker Camp in conjunction with Startup Delray. Through outreach to youth organizations in the community, DBCA’s Summer STEAM Camp, set to begin July 28, will offer underserved children from age 7 to 17 an opportunity to work together in learning how to take advantage of new technologies to create a variety of beautifully practical objects. Touted by Chris Anderson, founder of Wired Magazine, as “the new industrial revolution,” the Maker Movement is driven by ordinary people using extraordinary tools to make things – in garages, workshops, classrooms and shared facilities as well as in camps around the world. There is a strong focus on using and learning practical skills and applying them creatively, providing a powerful example of what can happen when STEM education (science/technology/engineering/math) is converted to STEAM through an infusion of art. “This new way of creating and manufacturing enables artists, makers and inventors to connect globally in the design, manufacture and sale of the things they make,” says Irene Revelas, founder and director of Startup Delray. “It’s revolutionary.”

FOR

more information

call (561) 243-7922 or visit www.DelrayArts.org

Literary Devices A W H A L E O F A T A L E | Delray Beach resident

Juliana Sohn

Joshua Max Feldman’s debut novel is being hailed as a major literary debut. The Book of Jonah, billed as a tale of love, failure and unexpected faith, takes readers on a journey that leads from New York to Las Vegas via Amsterdam. The modern-day Jonah at the center of Feldman’s retelling of the biblical book of Jonah is a young Manhattan lawyer named Jonah Jacobstein who seems to be living a charmed life. He has not just one but two beautiful women ready to spend the rest of their lives with him and an enormously successful career. In fact, he’s on the brink of becoming a partner in one of the city’s top law firms when a bizarre, unexpected vision at a party changes everything. “Ultimately, Jonah’s journey is about making peace with the unknown, with mystery. In contemporary society, we don’t have much patience for the unknown. Between big data-driven algorithms and the promise of neuroscience, we like to think we’re on the verge of total understanding of and control over our lives,” Feldman says. “Unfortunately, that’s a fairy tale.”

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The 411 On 601

Looking for information on the exhibits, events and excitement brewing at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth? We’ve got it!

Summer Reading

Pictures at an Exhibition

If you’re searching for a great way to keep cool this summer, why An always-intriguing venue for showcasing work by local artists, not curl up with a good book − or several − from the Cultural Council’s the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Roe Green Uniquely Palm Beach store? There’s a wide selection of Building in Lake Worth is maintainreading material available in addition to the ing a busy schedule during the beautiful artist-made jewelry, handspring and summer months. bags, accessories and hundreds of Currently on view (April 26 to other items available for sale. May 24) in the Lawrence A. Here are a few titles to get your Sanders Foundation Artist summer reading list started. All Resource Center are solo exhibibooks in the store have a Palm tions by Leora K. Stewart and Beach County connection, Raymond Neubert. In addition to whether they’re by local authors wall-mounted fiber works, Palm Such Liberties by Raymond Neubert or focused on a topic of relevance Beach resident Stewart has created a site-specific fiber to the region. installation in conjunction with Steve Spring from the Billionaires & Butterfly Palm Beach Photographic Center. West Palm Beach resiBallots, A 20-year Palm Beach ‘Cartoonspective’ − Long-time Palm dent Neubert specializes in portraiture, comingling his life Beach Daily News editorial cartoonist David Willson offers a humorexperiences and wordplay. ous look at two decades of headline-grabbing stories. Subsequent solo exhibitions include: Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise  Three Figuratively (June 20 to August 16), featuring and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean – Les Standiford’s new work by Jacques de Beaufort, Yury compelling volume examines the construction of the railroad to Key Darashkevich and Suzanne Scherer/Pavel Ouporov.  An exhibition of the work of watercolorist and West West and its sudden destruction by a massive hurricane. Palm Beach resident Richard Frank, who has painted The Kennedy Men: 1901-1963 – Written by Laurence Leamer, every corner of Palm Beach County while also the journalist and bestselling author of The Kennedy Women, the extending his brush internationally (August 23 to book explores the lives of prominent figures in one of America’s October 11). most fascinating families. In the main exhibition space, the summer exhibition will Widow’s Walk: Part 2: The Reckoning – West Palm Beach attorbe Southern Exposure: New Work Now (June 20 to August ney and author Kenneth Spillias spins a fast-moving and entertain16). The show, which promotes emerging/mid-career artists ing sequel to Widow’s Walk: The Precipice, continuing the trials and who live or work in Palm Beach County, is being curated by temptations of the Reverend Jim Donovan. Nichole Hickey, the Cultural Council’s manager of artist servLessons from Rocky & His Friends: Pawprints on the Heart – ices, and Jacques de Beaufort, director of UNIT1 exhibitions Local dog lover, writer and entrepreneur Bradford P. Miller offers a and associate professor of art and art history at Palm Beach heart-warming compilation of 77 stories written by dog lovers for State College. dog lovers. As each new exhibition is mounted, additional information can be found on the Cultural Council website at www.palmbeachculture.com.

Something for the Kids Beyond its own walls, the Cultural Council actively promotes activities for children around the county in June, July and August through its annual Summer Cultural Guide. Underwritten by the Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, the guide includes arts and cultural camps, classes and activities from more than 50 local organizations. Opportunities abound in visual and performing arts, environmental studies, science, history and more. To download the guide, visit www.palmbeachculture.com.

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Coming Attractions By Christina Wood While serving as Philadelphia City Commerce Director, Dick Doran famously credited Sylvester Stallone with doing more for the city’s image “than anyone since Ben Franklin.” Few foreign visitors to The City of Brotherly Love know much about Betsy Ross, for example, but, according to the Independence Hall Association, their eyes light up in recognition when they see the steps in front of the Philadelphia Museum of Art and the nearby statue of Rocky, the underdog boxer Stallone brought to life on the big screen. Rocky won the Oscar for Best Picture in 1977. To this day, thousands still climb the museum steps and strike a pose for the camera, hands held high as the movie’s theme song undoubtedly plays in their heads. Movies do more than entertain. They educate and inspire, comfort and encourage. The camera can see through the mists of time, bringing the past into focus or the promise of the future into question. Feature films and documentaries show us the world beyond the borders of our nation and our neighborhoods. Sometimes they give us an all-too-clear picture of ourselves. The movies allow us to escape – from the worries of the day or from the summer heat, as Don Ephraim did growing up on the South Side of Chicago (see page 28 for more on that). Movies also bring us together. “Film is a very democratic art form,” says Ellen

Wedner, executive producer of The Donald M. Ephraim Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival. “Can you name a single person that you know that’s never seen a movie? I don’t think that’s possible.” We raise our children on a diet consisting of Disney classics and a fresh crop of animated films. We talk about the latest release in the break room. We root for the heroes, turn our backs on the villains and shed real tears for the brokenhearted. We pay attention. And sometimes we grow. FernGully: The Last Rainforest, an animated fantasy featuring the voices of Robin Williams and Tim Curry among others, came out in 1992. The documentary An Inconvenient Truth was released in 2005. Both have inspired audiences – from government leaders to Girl Scouts – to take action to protect the environment. “Films have the ability to create change on many levels,” says Diana Barrett, founder and president of The Fledgling Fund – which recently partnered with Palm Beach Dramaworks in West Palm Beach to present a pair of thought-provoking films. “Sometimes the change is deeply personal and affects an individual’s attitudes and belief systems. Sometimes change happens at the national level with policy change but, very often, there are opportunities for engagement at the local level.” Local screenings of documentaries and independent films – such as those at Dramaworks as well as at the Stonzek Theatre in Lake Worth and at the county’s various film festivals – help to make those connections, she says. “Film is the one way we can all communicate with each other – regardless of language or culture,” says Randi Emerman, president and chief executive officer of the Palm Beach International Film Festival. “It is one of the most important cultural mediums.” Even during the Great Depression, people flocked to theaters. The Marx Brothers invited audiences to laugh at the rules governing society, James Cagney inspired them to break those rules, Shirley Temple lifted their spirits – all for the price of a ticket. In 2009, with much of the economy “teetering between bust and bailout,” The New York Times reported that the movie industry was again experiencing a box-office surge; attendance was up nearly 16 percent. “Suddenly it seems as if everyone is going to the movies,” the paper noted. Movies take us to places we can only dream of – from the winner’s corner in the boxing ring to a galaxy far, far away. “It’s the magic of telling a story,” Wedner says. “It’s the beginning, the middle and the end.”

art rt works!

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Two

Thumbs Up By Thom Smith

Philanthropist and film enthusiast Don Ephraim makes a positive impact

W

hen Lou Rawls sings of “The Hawk,” the icy wind that stampedes across the lake into Chicago, he feels it. Summers, too, can be unforgiving, the heat seeping in and trapping the city’s residents in an enervating, baking ooze. These days, polar vortices are just news blips at Don Ephraim’s home at BallenIsles in Palm Beach Gardens. As he pores over investment charts or visits the clubhouse for lunch, South Florida’s ever-present air conditioning cushions him from the extremes of his childhood on the South Side, near the steel mills. His father worked for the railroad, a job that allowed his mother, a legal secretary, to stay home with Don and his sister – even during the Depression.

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Maxine Marks and Don Ephraim attend opening night of The Donald M. Ephraim Jewish Film Festival.

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{upfront-profile} “The only place that was air-conditioned was the movie theater,” Ephraim, 82, recalls. “A friend worked there and let me in for free.” Every Saturday, he’d slip into the cool darkness for the feature films and serials; watching as the Lone Ranger, Tom Mix or Batman, once again, ended up in peril. “That started it. I loved going to movies . . . still do.” In January, The Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival opened its 24th season with a new name, The Donald M. Ephraim Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival, in recognition of the former entertainment lawyer’s $1-million donation. Millions have gone to other causes as well. Not bad for a kid who started working at 14. After caddying for one day at South Shore Country Club in Chicago, he stocked shelves at Jewel Foods through high school. With his savings and an accounting scholarship, he headed to the North Side and DePaul University. He worked for a coal mining magazine, for an accounting firm and even as a railroad tour assistant. He passed the state CPA exam at 20, although Illinois law required CPAs to be 21, then entered the University of Chicago Law School. The young lawyer planned estates, until Johnny Morris, a client who happened to have played for the Chicago Bears, called with a question. A Chicago television station wanted the all-pro back to do a Sunday night sports show; contracts needed to be drawn up, details needed to be negotiated. “I told him I’d never done anything like that but I’d love to try,” Ephraim says. More pro athletes, radio and TV personalities soon signed on. One day, film critic Gene Siskel walked through the door; his cohort Roger Ebert followed. Ephraim steered the local critics to national stardom and in the process he became tougher – and more involved in the television industry. The Emmy in his home office, a Governors’

Award, recognizes his contributions as a member and an officer of the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences at the local and national level. In his autobiography, Life Itself, A Memoir, Roger Ebert reflected on Ephraim’s skill: “Don, we found, was legendary for his attention to detail and once sent back a contract to Disney after finding that they had taken two-thirds of a cent and rounded it down instead of up. ‘It’s the principle of the thing,’ he said, with an indignation I sometimes thought was acting. ‘If they go to the trouble of rounding it down, we can go to the trouble of rounding it up again.’” Ephraim is officially retired. Three sons, two lawyers and a banker, build on his legacy in the now air-conditioned Chicago. Ephraim, who is divorced, prefers Florida, but instead of playing golf or lounging poolside with Maxine Marks, his significant other, he serves on the boards of the Mandel Jewish Community Center and the film festival and even serves on its screening committee. He’s sponsored performances by Woody Allen, Garrison Keillor and others at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach and has sponsored shows for the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and the Palm Beach Pops. He also started the scholarship program at the National Academy of Television Arts and Sciences Chapter in Chicago and funded scholarships at the schools he attended. “I got myself involved – and my clients,” Ephraim says. And the net proceeds from The Donald M. Ephraim Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival go to the Mandel JCC, which, he says, has a wide range of programs throughout the community. “That’s very important to me.” Ephraim hasn’t seen all of this year’s Oscar Award-winning films – “So many choices, just not enough time” – but he and Marks will have an opportunity to catch up on their viewing soon. They’re cruising the Orient; the crossing from China to the States should give them plenty of time. But whether on the high seas, back in Chicago or home in Palm Beach Gardens, Ephraim always is alert for new acts, new programs and new films. Film festival Executive Producer Ellen Wedner uses him as a sounding board for all sorts of ideas and he’s not afraid to offer his opinion but always in an edifying, productive manner, reminiscent of his old clients. “We screened a film recently and he was one of the last to speak,” Wedner says. “First thing he said was, ‘I can see how this would fit in the festival.’ Then he went on to talk about the things he personally liked and disliked about the film. “When it comes time for the festival, he’s seen all the films, but he still comes and sits in the audience and asks questions of the filmmakers. He’s interactive.” What’s best, Wedner says, is not the million bucks or his name on the festival: “If an usher doesn’t show up, he doesn’t hesitate to help. He’ll give out programs; he’ll scan the tickets. He’s just Don.”

Gene Siskel, Don Ephraim and Roger Ebert

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What brought you to Palm Beach County? A client invited me on a yacht race. He was buying a condo in North Palm Beach. I fell in love with it. As soon as one opened up, I came down and bought it. I’ve bought several houses since then. Is there anything about philanthropy that frustrates you? Some people I know who have far more money than I have do not give anything to charity. I said in my opening night speech at the festival that when it comes to charity, some people will stop at nothing. Unfortunately I know people like that. They don’t get the good feeling that you get by helping people. You’ve said that films can transform people’s lives. Is television an art form as well? Movies showed us a world we couldn’t see at home. Television really isn’t a vast wasteland any more. There’s some really good stuff. As a movie fan, it must have been fun working with and for Siskel and Ebert. What was their rapport like off screen? They were in the same boat, but they were competitors. They even argued about which one I would represent if they broke up. Finally, I cut in and said neither, because I knew too much about both of them. Maxine Marks and Don Ephraim

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{upfront-portrait}

The

Opera

Star Next Door By Allegra Nagler

The

Jon Bon Jovi’s Livin‘ on a Prayer at karaoke night. At home, he doesn’t listen to music. “I spend my days with music,” he says. “When I get home, I want quiet.” His success enables him to give back. Valenti is an ardent advocate for Children International, a humanitarian organization dedicated to improving the lives of impoverished children, their families and communities. He also gives his time and energy to a number of local organizations, including the Junior League of Palm Beach, the March of Dimes, the Red Cross and the Achilles Foundation for Wounded Soldiers. “And,” he says, “I am always happy to assist Palm Beach Opera. They are one of my favorite opera companies.” Recently, Valenti took on the role of silent film star Rudolph Valentino in the Minnesota Opera’s production of Dominick Argento’s The Dream of Valentino. “There are parallels between Valentino and me,” says Valenti, who had to learn the tango for the role. “He was a revolutionary and I’m part of a new generation of young singers, breaking the mold.” As he and his voice mature, Valenti hopes to remain relevant. In 10 years he wants to sing the lead tenor in Andrea Chénier, a verismo opera in four acts by the composer Umberto Giordano, a role that would allow him an exceptional opportunity to demonstrate theatrical skill and showcase his voice. His ambitions are simple. “I want to be the preeminent American opera tenor, philanthropist and world traveler,” he admits. “My goal is to be invited back.” Children International

voice – warm, friendly, mellifluous, sounding like the boy next door – comes over the phone. To his neighbors in West Palm Beach, James Valenti is that boy next door. The rest of the world knows him as the drop-dead gorgeous international opera star with the dark, expressive voice. The 36-year-old, 6’ 5” tall-dark-and-handsome tenor could grace any Ralph Lauren Polo ad but, despite his good looks and easy-going manner, Valenti is a serious singer who has performed challenging opera roles the world over. “It’s who I am. I heard the Three Tenors sing when I was 16 and the music spoke to me,” Valenti says. “Operas are like a Hollywood movie. They’re full of love, youthful ardor and the intoxicating feeling of love. The stories are accessible. They’re relatable. Singing opera is a visceral and exhilarating experience.” Valenti studied at West Virginia University and the Academy of Vocal Arts in Philadelphia and, at age 25, debuted in Rome’s Teatro dell’Opera as Rodolfo in Puccini’s La Bohème. His voice has taken him to La Scala and London’s Royal Opera House, to the Paris, Sydney, Metropolitan and San Francisco Operas, even to Palm Beach Opera. To the delight of his large Catholic Italian-American family, last Christmas Eve Valenti sang “O Holy Night” at St. Patrick’s Cathedral in New York, broadcast live on PBS. When he’s not on the road, Valenti relaxes and dines at The Breakers and Café Boulud in Palm Beach or Cafe des Artistes in Jupiter. He hangs out with friends and belts out Journey songs or

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May/June

Featuring paintings by leading artists such as George Bellows, Robert Henri, John Marin, Reginald Marsh, Georgia O’Keeffe and John Sloan, Industrial Sublime: Modernism and the Transformation of New York’s Rivers, 1900-1940 celebrates the changing way of life along the city’s urban waterfront. Through June 22, Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach; (561) 832-5196, or www.norton.org.

Aaron Douglas, Power Plant in Harlem, 1934, Oil on canvas, 20¼ x 22 1/3 inches

May

Yvonne Parker and Carin Wagner share their artistic visions of change, transformation and decay in The Nature of Impermanence at the Palm Beach State College Art Gallery through Sept. 5. Parker’s sculptures transform vintage materials into contemporary statements of beauty, truth and love, while Wagner’s alluring paintings of nature remind us of the cycles of life. 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; (561) 207-5015 or www.palmbeachstate.edu.

Carin Wagner, Everything in Harmony, 2012, Oil on canvas, 24 x 24 inches

May

Missoula Children’s Theatre returns to Belle Glade for its 20th annual production, Rapunzel. The show takes our heroine on a frivolous frolic through the French countryside, where she encounters elves, gremlins, ogres and even three billy goats gruff. Following the 11 a.m. performance, enjoy refreshments and lots of fun children’s activities. Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center, 1977 College Drive, Belle Glade; (561) 993-1160 or www.dollyhand.org.

May

The New Gardens Band, Indian River Pops and Robert Sharon Chorale combine forces for their annual salute to veterans and tribute to those fallen in service to our country. America Remembers, a rousing program of patriotic favorites, is sure to stir the heart and spirit. Eissey Campus Theatre, Palm Beach State College, 11051 Campus Drive, Palm Beach Gardens; (561) 207-5900 or www.newgardensband.org.

May

The Arts Garage transports itself to Buenos Aires for an intimate evening of tango. Come early for a dance lesson with world champion dancer Monica Llobet. Then enjoy a classic tango Milonga (dance) accompanied by a quartet featuring Alibal Berraute (piano), Federico Britos (viola), Miguel Arrabal (bandoneon) and Renyel Rivero (bass cello). 180 NE First St., Delray Beach; (561) 450-6357 or www.artsgarage.org.

June

Two Boca Museum of Art exhibitions weave fascinating stories through July 27. Elaine Reichek: The Eye of the Needle features elegant knitted and embroidered artworks with a conceptual twist created by the artist from 1972-1995. Concurrently, Afghan Rugs: The Contemporary Art of Central Asia offers 40 stunning rugs representing a unique category in the decorative arts. 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton; (561) 392-2500 or www.bocamuseum.org.

Elaine Reichek, Sampler (Their Manners Are Decorous), 1992, Hand embroidery on linen, 13 1/4 x 14 1/2 inches

June

Florida Atlantic University presents its annual summer repertory theater festival with two shows sharing the stage for matinee and evening performances. From June 27 to July 26, it’s the Pulitzer Prize-winning August: Osage County by Tracy Letts. Riding into town July 5-27 is the Frank Wildhorn musical, Bonnie & Clyde. University Theatre, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton; (800) 564-9539 or www.fau.edu/festivalrep.

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Oh, you beautiful doll! To Have and To Hold: The Art and Beauty of Doll Collecting, the summer exhibition at the Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture (May 22 to Aug. 31), chronicles the history of dolls and the popularity of collecting. Ranging from vintage to contemporary, the dolls are on loan from the Gold Coast Doll Study Club. Delray Beach Center for the Arts, 51 N. Swinton Ave.; (561) 243-7922 or www.DelrayArts.org.

Photo courtesy of Gold Coast Doll Study Club

July

Boca Raton’s first women pioneers were the wives and daughters of men who came to farm in South Florida at the turn of the 20th century. In Herstory: Boca Raton’s Pioneer Women (continuing through Dec. 19) we learn about their challenges and adaptations to a life much different from the ones that many left behind in their northern homes. Boca Raton History Museum, 71 N. Federal Highway; (561) 395-6766 or www.bocahistory.org.

Harriett Gates was one of Boca Raton’s early residents.

Beloved blonde Elle Woods takes the stage

July

by storm in this fun, upbeat musical about self-discovery. Elle appears to have it all – until her boyfriend dumps her. Determined to win him back, she uses her charm to get into Harvard Law, where she struggles with peers and professors before she realizes her true potential and sets out to prove herself to the world. Through July 27. Lake Worth Playhouse; 713 Lake Ave., Lake Worth; (561) 586-6410 or www.lakeworthplayhouse.org.

Sol Children Theatre’s resident Commedia del Sol troupe

July

presents The Commedia Pinocchio – the classic story of a boy puppet who springs to life from a block of wood, only to be swallowed by a great fish. It’s told through the lively comedy form known as commedia dell’arte, which has used acrobatics, dance, music and quick wit to entertain audiences since the 15th century. 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton; (561) 447-8829 or www.solchildren.org.

Performed by students

July

in the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Paul and Sandra Goldner Conservatory of Performing Arts’ Junior Conservatory on July 25 and 26, the energetic musical Schoolhouse Rock Live Jr. is based on the Emmy Award-winning Saturday morning educational cartoon series featuring “Conjunction Junction,” “Interplanet Janet” and more. 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter; (561) 575-2223 or www.jupitertheatre.org.

Participants in VSA Florida - Palm Beach County’s

August

community theater program and visual arts classes will showcase their creativity in the organization’s Celebration of the Arts. On-stage performances will be complemented by an exhibition featuring ceramics, pottery, painting, glass fusing, photography and other media. CMAA Therapeutic Recreation Complex, 2728 Lake Worth Road, Lake Worth; (561) 966-7025 or www.vsapbc.com.

Boca Ballet Theatre showcases its students in the beloved classical ballet Swan Lake for three performances on Aug. 1-3. Staged after the original choreography of Marius Petipas and Lev Ivanov and set to the timeless music of Peter Tchaikovsky, this production promises to be hauntingly beautiful. Olympic Heights Performing Arts Theater, 20101 Lyons Road, Boca Raton; (561) 995-0709 or www.bocaballet.org. Dates are subject to change. For an up-to-the-minute, searchable calendar of cultural events, please visit the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County's website at www.palmbeachculture.com. For more information about individual organizations' schedules, please visit the websites noted in each item.

August

Bill Howard

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lights, camera, close up! Palm Beach County’s film and television industry comes into focus By Christina Wood

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Making movies is magic. It also tends to be a lot of sometimes-sweaty, almost-always-long days.

On the set of Hidden Assets in Lake Worth.

“It’s not particularly glamorous,” admits Dean Lyon, an independent producer and visual effects guru who worked on the blockbuster Lord of the Rings trilogy and a fistful of other box office hits. Lyon recently worked as a producer on Hidden Assets, an independent feature film produced by WorldMark Entertainment and Journey Entertainment. A typical day on the Lake Worth set of the crime thriller would begin at 3 or 4 in the afternoon and last until 3 or 4 in the morning. “You show up and everybody’s fresh and everybody’s happy but then they have to set up.” Setting up – which involves what seems like miles of cables and cords and covers everything from establishing camera angles and hanging lights to rehearsing the actors’ lines – may take three hours. “By the time you’re ready to roll the camera, a lot of people are already tired.” If luck, light and the schedule for the trains running on any nearby tracks are on your side, you might get the shot done in one take. “You can never count on that,” Lyon cautions. “So you do two or three takes.” Maybe more. Each take allows the actors to further rehearse and develop the material but, by the third or fourth take, a handheld camera, audio boom or light reflector can start to get heavy. “So whereas the acting may get better and better the longer you do a scene, the technical part may actually get harder and harder,” he explains.

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G-Star students work on the set of NBC’s The Today Show.

G-Star students assembling a video screen for The Moody Blues.

G-Star student Emily Serpico applies makeup for dancer Ashley Everett, who was performing with Beyonce.

“It’s a slow, I would say laborious process,” agrees Bob Lemchen, senior vice president of scripted production at Fox Television Studios. Among the many series that Lemchen oversees is Graceland, a police drama set in Southern California that is filmed in southern Florida. “The script for each episode of Graceland is approximately 58 pages and we shoot that in seven days so you’re shooting about eight pages a day,” Lemchen says. “Eight pages is about eight minutes of material.” When viewers tune in (Graceland airs on the USA network), they’ll see young undercover law enforcement agents struggling with challenges in the criminal world and in their own lives. What they won’t see are the dozens and dozens of crew members behind the camera; the electricians, carpenters, grips, lighting techs, makeup artists, audio engineers, caterers, drivers, writers, publicists, prop masters, seamstresses, production assistants, camera operators and all the other folks that show up for work and put in the long hours to get the job done.

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The public may focus on the stars but, in reality, film and television production, Lemchen says, “is a blue collar industry.” Graceland recently filmed a number of scenes in Palm Beach County. “Good local crew, infrastructure, camera, lighting equipment, trucks, lumber, dry cleaners, restaurants, hotels – all the things you need, they’re all there,” Lemchen says. Palm Beach County’s film-friendly environment is not exactly a secret. High-profile productions are routinely drawn to the area by the offer of great year-round weather, diverse locations and talented crews as well as discounted production space and other economic incentives. Among those recently shooting on the county’s scenic beaches, along our city streets, in our parks, on our golf courses and even in our homes have been The Vanilla Ice Project on DIY Network, Four Weddings on TLC, Barrett-Jackson Car Auction on the Fox Sports networks, The Today Show on NBC, Nuestra Belleza Latina on Univision, Feherty on the Golf Channel, Tanked on Animal Planet, Jobs That Bite on Nat Geo Wild, Offi-

cially Amazing on the BBC, Toy Hunter on the Travel Channel and House Hunters on HGTV. “There’s a lot of TV production here,” says Greg Hauptner, founder and CEO of G-Star School of the Arts, the only high school in the world located on the back lot of a commercial motion picture studio. “It helps the local economy by leaps and bounds.” Commercials, music videos and online content – much of it shot at G-Star’s vast state-of-the-art soundstage – add to the bounty. “Generally, if a big production comes in from Los Angeles or New York, they’ll bring in their stars, their director, of course, and the producers but then they’ll hire local people here,” says Hauptner, who points out


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that the benefits go beyond economics. “We’re bringing in films and major professionals in the industry and the kids [G-Star’s students] are getting to meet them face-toface and actually work on those sets.” The charter school’s students worked as production assistants and interns on the set of the Jennifer Lopez and Jason Statham film Parker. They were hands-on with commercial shoots for Nike, the NFL and Abercrombie & Fitch. They’ve worked on music videos and rehearsals with the likes of Bob Dylan, Celine Dion, Rod Stewart, Stevie Nicks and Roger Daltrey. “There is no other

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high school in the world that does what we do,” Hauptner says. Indeed, education is a major factor in advancing Palm Beach County’s film and television industry. “People come from all over the world to come to our schools,” Lyon says. “In Florida we actually train a lot of people. We have film schools, we have animation schools, we have graphic design schools.” To make sure the state’s talented students have jobs when they graduate, Lyon says, “We need to continue to grow the local industry – and there are people in Palm Beach County that are committed to that.”

Best Performance in a Supporting Role

 G-Star students training on feature film cameras by CineVideoTech.

Movie poster for the upcoming release of Hidden Assets, filmed in Lake Worth.

Dean Lyon, editor and producer, works behind the scenes with Jacqueline Journey, the director, producer, writer and star of Hidden Assets.

The story of a successful production begins long before the director calls for quiet on the set. The Palm Beach County Film & Television Commission provides vital support, which allows local destinations, local crews and local students to shine. Founded in 1989, the commission’s mission is to generate a positive impact on business tourism and the county’s economy through the growth of the film, television and still photography industries. Commissioner Chuck Elderd and his staff are charged with attracting productions to the area and providing services to both visiting professionals and local filmmakers. “Palm Beach County has done a good job of really trying to grow something locally as well as to promote itself to the outside world,” industry veteran Dean Lyon says. Florida’s Film and Entertainment Industry Financial Incentive Program also plays a significant role. According to a study sponsored by the Motion Picture Association of America, the program has supported 87,870 jobs and $2.3 billion in labor income as well as $7.2 billion in economic spending across the state, both through production spending and induced tourism. “The thing that tips the balance of the scale for Florida has been the incentive,” says Bob Lemchen, senior vice president of scripted productions for Fox Television Studios.

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En Plein Air Art and artists evolve naturally By Marisa J. Pascucci Curator of 20th Century and Contemporary Art, Boca Museum of Art

Brennan King at the Society of the Four Arts

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Manon Sander on Worth Avenue

Manny Jomok at the Society of the Four Arts


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En Plein Air – three short words that identify a revolutionary modernization in the history of painting. During the mid-19th century, art-making radically changed for the first time in centuries. From the early Renaissance to the early 19th century, painting was an academic process consisting of formal training between a master and a student and the creation of an overabundance of sketches before even beginning to put paint to canvas or board.

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The mid-19th century brought the Barbizon school of painters; a group that sought to abandon laborious academic traditions and seemingly endless theory in favor of the direct portrayal of true life and a sense of individualism. They were observers – and chroniclers – of the land and life in the French countryside, painting studies under the open sky and finishing the canvases in the studio. This methodology paved the way for the Impressionists, whose aim was to capture the immediacy of modern life as well as nuances of the city and natural landscape. With the intent of rendering the subjective impression of natural light, they worked outdoors, creating complete paintings beyond the walls of the studio. The literal translation of the French term en plein air (pronounced \an-ple-ner\) is “in the open air.” It refers to the act of painting directly from the natural landscape. Moving out of doors into the natural light, as the Impressionists did, simultaneously brought about the practice of lightened color and looser paint application. A technological innovation was introduced at roughly the same time that the Impressionists were venturing outside, allowing their radical thought process and method of painting to reach its fullest potential – the collapsible paint tube. In 1841, John G. Rand, an American portrait painter who was working in London, invented a collapsible zinc paint tube with a stopper. This ingenious invention, dubbed Rand’s Patent Collapsible Tube, truly transformed art-making. Previously, artists had to create their own paints by mixing powdered pigments with a binder, such as oil. The process required specialized training, provided by a master through an apprenticeship or in an academy. Once the paint was mixed it was stored in a pig’s bladder that was closed with a string. This “container” was never able to be resealed tightly enough to keep the paint from drying out. Rand’s invention not only prolonged the life of the paint, it also eliminated the need for the specialized knowledge of mixing the pigments to create the desired colors. The avant-garde approach to subject matter combined with the modern invention of materials


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EN PLEIN AIR opened a floodgate of radical change to artists – and they have never looked back. By moving out of doors, artists have a stronger relationship to their subject matter as they are fully immersing themselves in not only the visual aspects of their environment, but also the sounds, tastes, and tactile feelings of being in nature and drenched in natural light. The last several decades have witnessed a resurgence in en plein air painting as artists seem to be re-focused on the physical space that surrounds them as opposed to a more conceptual approach to

subject matter found in the purely abstract painting of mid-20th century Abstract Expression and Minimalism. The physical space that surrounds artists living and working in Palm Beach County provides an added incentive. Our near-paradise lends itself perfectly to the tradition of painting light, spontaneous, naturalistic landscapes – as is clearly demonstrated in the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s exhibition En Plein Air. On display through June 7, the exhibition features drawings and paintings produced by local artists at en plein air meet-ups across the county.

Diane Hagg at Riverbend Park in Jupiter

Kat Albert at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County

Manon Sander on Worth Avenue

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EN PLEIN AIR

Brennan King at the DuBois House in Jupiter

Kerry Eriksen at Mounts Botanical Gardens

Chris Kling at Mounts Botanical Gardens


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EN PLEIN AIR on display April 11 through June 7 at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth In the past, artists often gathered in small groups to explore the possibilities of painting in the open air. The advent of social media over the course of the past decade has contributed to a resurgence of plein air painting groups. This delightfully fresh exhibition features drawings and paintings produced by local artists who gathered at “paintouts” held at various locations throughout Palm Beach County (listed below) that were facilitated by Donna Walsh and Ralph Papa, co-organizers of Palm Beach Plein Air Artists. A pair of lectures that provide insights into the exhibition will also be presented at Mei-Hui Goette at Riverbend Park in Jupiter the Council’s headquarters in Lake Worth:  Tuesday, April 29, at 3 p.m. – Ralph Papa and Donna Walsh will discuss the Palm Beach Plein Air Artists.  Tuesday, May 6, at 3 p.m. – Ralph Papa will speak on the joy of plein air painting. The exhibition is open to the public free of charge from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays. For information, call (561) 471-2901 or visit www.palmbeachculture.com. Exhibition sponsors: The Gardens Mall and Johnson’s Custom Cakes and More

Lake Avenue in downtown Lake Worth by the Cultural Council The gardens at the Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach Old School Square in Delray Beach Boynton Inlet / Parking at Ocean Inlet Park Loxahatchee Wetlands Gumbo Limbo in Boca Raton on A1A Riverbend Park in Jupiter off Indian Town Road Mounts Botanical Gardens in West Palm Beach DuBois Park by the Jupiter Inlet Worth Avenue in Palm Beach art&culture

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Hats Off to Bruce Helander!

Bedlam, 2013, Original acrylic on canvas with printed background, 60 x 40 in.

West Palm Beach artist inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame By Christina Wood

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Christopher Fay

“Being an artist is a lonely business,”

says Bruce Helander. Long, solitary hours and inward glances have their reward, however, as the West Palm Beach artist discovered this year when he was inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame. “I paint because I have to. I have this intuitive desire; I have since high school,” Helander says. “This kind of recognition reinforces the forward motion of your career.” Established in 1986, the Florida Artists Hall of Fame is the highest and most prestigious cultural honor bestowed by the state. To qualify, artists must either be natives of the Sunshine State or must have adopted Florida as their home. Helander arrived in Palm Beach in 1982 to set up a studio and art gallery. Eventually, he and his wife, Claudia, moved to Clematis Street, where they were among the first to legally occupy a live/work loft. Helander continued to live and work in downtown West Palm Beach for the next 18 years, occupying a spacious studio in CityPlace for several years before moving to his current loft studio in the Whitney condominium. Helander, who has a master’s degree in painting from the prestigious Rhode Island School of Design, specializes in collage and assemblage. He is a fellow of the National Endowment for the Arts and a recipient of the South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship for Visual and Media Artists. His work is represented in more than 50 museum collections, including the Metropolitan Museum of Art, the Solomon R. Guggenheim Museum, the Brooklyn Museum, the Smithsonian, the Art Institute of Chicago and, most recently, the Whitney Museum of American Art and Museum of Contemporary Art in Los Angeles. “If there was a Pulitzer Prize for collage, Helander would surely win it,” Kenworth Moffett, former director of (From left) Chairman of the Florida Council on Arts the Museum of Art in Fort Lauderdale, once quipped. and Culture Glenn Lochrie, Florida First Lady Ann Scott, Bruce Helander and Florida Secretary of State Ken Detzner Helander is only the third individual from Palm Beach County to be inducted into the Florida Artists Hall of Fame; Ralph Norton (1875-1953), who founded the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, and Laura Woodward (1834-1926), Florida’s most important 19th-century female artist, blazed the trail. Previous inductees from across the state include artists and designers such as Robert Rauschenberg, James Rosenquist, Duane Hanson and Addison Mizner as well as writers Tennessee Williams and Ernest Hemingway and singers Jimmy Buffett, Bo Diddley and Ray Charles. (This year’s performance inductee was Tom Petty.) “All artists appreciate the recognition for keeping at it, keeping their nose to the grindstone,” Helander says, but admits this award went a step further. “When I looked over the list and saw that I shared this honor with some pretty remarkable talent, I was thrilled.” It’s the kind of thing that, he says, “puts high test in your tank.” He’ll need the energy that a full tank provides. Helander has an ambitious schedule that includes four upcoming exhibitions – one each in Toronto, Williamsport, Pa., Moscow and St. Petersburg, Russia. On top of that, he is an art critic for The Huffington Post. He is also a member of the ArtSpeaks committee at the Norton Museum, serves on the board of the Center for Creative Education in West Palm Beach’s historic Northwood neighborhood and is artistic curator for a Northwood gallery, ArtHouse429. He’s incredibly grateful for the honor of being inducted into the Artists Hall of Fame; humbled, even. “More than anything,” he says, “I am grateful for the longevity of the support this community has given me.” Maybe that’s why the grin shining from beneath the brim of his colorful trademark derby hat was so big when West Palm Beach Mayor Jeri Muoio acknowledged the honor the state had bestowed on Helander and presented him with a Key to the City.

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r a st dded u t s s e g a t s oods my W A y B

The stars above shine down on an engaging and eclectic mix of entertaining performers at Palm Beach County’s many amphitheaters

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A performance of Shakespeare’s "Scottish play" at Seabreeze Amphitheater in Jupiter.


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Palm Beach County residents routinely rock and roll, move and groove, snap, tap, dance and dally as music plays in the open air thanks not only to our enviable year-round weather but to an abundance of amphitheaters. “Where else can you see your favorite band perform while simultaneously watching a sunset, reclining in a lawn chair or enjoying a picnic?” asks Donald Perez, amphitheater manager for the Palm Beach County Parks and Recreation Department. “We are, after all, the Sunshine State.”

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The Monkees lead singer Micky Dolenz performs at the Meyer Amphitheatre in West Palm Beach. Photo: Sarah Pinder

in

the past few months alone, just about every genre of music has played out on sunny and starry stages overlooking blanket-covered and chair-lined grass, from JJ Grey and Mofro at the Sunset Cove Amphitheater west of Boca Raton to Bad Company at the Meyer Amphitheatre in West Palm Beach and the Eagles tribute band The Long Run at the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center in Belle Glade. “I don’t know many other parks-and-rec departments that have as varied a range of venues as Palm Beach County,” says Perez, who oversees the Canyon Amphitheater in Boynton Beach and Seabreeze Amphitheater in Jupiter as well as Sunset Cove. The county contains more than one dozen sky-capped stages that allow country fans, jazz aficionados and everyone in between to enjoy an eclectic mix of entertainment. Community events, theatrical performances and concerts draw diverse audiences to Veteran’s Plaza at Palm Beach Gardens City Hall, the Wellington Amphitheater and The Pavilion at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts. Orchestras, jazz greats, dance companies and pop artists appear at the Count de Hoernle Amphitheater in Boca Raton’s Mizner Park. Local bands take the stage at Bryant Park Amphitheater in Lake Worth. National acts like the Dave Matthews Band and One Republic play to big crowds at the Cruzan Amphitheatre at the South Florida Fairgrounds in West Palm Beach. In the western communities, the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center has – after 32 years of performances on its Palm Beach State College-operated stage – started sponsoring concerts outside. “It brings new people on campus,“ Theater Director Leigh Woodham says. “We’re hoping if somebody comes to an outdoor concert and they have a good time, they might want to explore what it’s like to see a show inside.” As the lone performing arts center in the five-county area surrounding Lake Okeechobee, the Dolly Hand has wide appeal. “We actually have people that come out here from West Palm, Wellington,” Woodham says. “We have a number of people that

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A 4th of July celebration at Sunset Cove Amphitheater in Boca Raton.

come out here just to go to the Dolly Hand.” “Outdoor venues naturally lend themselves to concerts,” says Melissa Carter, director of marketing and public relations for the Delray Beach Center for the Arts at Old School Square. “Being able to experience something like that outside – especially on the grass – where you can have your blanket, your own individual sort of party going on, it just makes it a really enjoyable experience.” On West Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach, a new venue complements the offerings at the Center for the Arts a few blocks to the east. Constructed in 2010, Libby Wesley Park provides a public amphitheater for church services, flea markets and other types of grassroots events. “It’s a place for people to come and sit and converse and talk – that’s the value of it,” says Alberta Gaum, the city’s recreation superintendent. “The Meyer Amphitheatre represents an opportunity for us to bring the community together,” says Christine Thrower, West Palm Beach parks and recreation director. “From our perspective, one of the most important roles it plays is as a gathering place.” The Meyer’s popular monthly series Sunday at the Waterfront resumes May 18 and brings families from all over the county to the palm-tree-ringed venue in West Palm Beach. Opera @ The Waterfront debuted in December; Palm Beach Opera’s outdoor experiment attracted audiences who might may have never set foot inside the Kravis Center. “The opportunity to expose people to things that they would not be able to see is a great plus,“ says Thrower. The amphitheater’s signature event, SunFest, brings five days of music to the downtown waterfront district every spring – rain or shine. “All of our events are rain or shine,” admits Perez, who tends to look at the bright side – even when the clouds blot out the sun. “Ever see a light rainstorm open up over 3,000 people listening to their favorite band on a hot summer day? It can make a memory legendary.”


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Top left: The Pavilion, Delray Beach Center for the Arts. Top right: Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center in Belle Glade. Bottom left: Sunset Cove Amphitheater in Boca Raton. Bottom right: Canyon Amphitheater in Boynton Beach

Breeze on in

Palm Beach County boasts a surprising number of outdoor stages. The area’s incredible weather allows patrons of the performing arts to enjoy a diverse range of entertainment year-round. Pick a place! Bryant Park Amphitheater Lake Avenue and South Golfview Road, Lake Worth, (561) 586-1600 Canyon Amphitheater Canyon District Park, 8802 Boynton Beach Blvd., Boynton Beach, (561) 966-7030 Cruzan Amphitheatre South Florida Fairgrounds, 601 Sansbury Way, West Palm Beach, (561) 795-8883 The Pavilion, Delray Beach Center for the Arts 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach, (561) 243-7922, Ext. 322 Delray Marketplace Amphitheater 14851 Lyons Road, Delray Beach, (561) 865-4613 Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center Palm Beach State College, 1977 S.W. College Drive, Belle Glade, (561) 993-1160 Libby Wesley Park Southwest Fifth Avenue at Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach, (561) 243-7250

Meyer Amphitheatre 104 Datura St., West Palm Beach, (561) 822-1515 Michael and Andrew Gosman Amphitheatre Kravis Center, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach, (561) 833-8300 Mizner Park Amphitheater 590 Plaza Real, Boca Raton, (561) 393-7700 Seabreeze Amphitheater Carlin Park, 750 A1A, Jupiter, (561) 966-7030 Sunset Cove Amphitheater Burt Aaronson South County Regional Park, 20405 Amphitheater Circle, Boca Raton, (561) 966-7030 Veterans Plaza Palm Beach Gardens City Hall, 10500 N. Military Trail, (561) 799-4100 Wellington Amphitheater 12100 Forest Hill Blvd., (561) 791-4000

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All for One Collaboration energizes the arts scene By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

A new wave of cultural energy is surging through the theaters, museums and streets of Palm Beach County. It’s evident in the world-class actors and musicians that grace our performance spaces, the leading authors that speak in our lecture halls, the prominent dancers that appear with our local troupes and the major art exhibits that arrive from cities like New York and Venice.

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Cultural organizations throughout Palm Beach County enjoy the benefits of collaboration.

W

hile the arts are known for fierce competition – think of the grueling auditions in A Chorus Line or Fame – our arts scene is flourishing because of strong partnerships rather than competitive one-upsmanship. Rather than compete for audiences, local arts organizations are clearly demonstrating that the journey towards success is paved with mutually supportive relationships. These relationships have been nurtured by a handful of collaborative arts organizations that have worked hard to build inter-organizational cooperation. Chief among them are the South Florida Cultural Consortium, Boca Raton Cultural Consortium and the Northern Palm Beaches Cultural Alliance. The result of these collaborations is a supportive and interconnected arts community – and this has far-reaching benefits. “The arts provide a competitive edge to our aspirations to be a great regional center for tourism and also to attract a sophisticated workforce,” says Michael Spring, chairman of the board of the South Florida Cultural Consortium and director of the Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs. “You can’t think of any great community or civic center that doesn’t have a thriving arts scene.”

BREAKING GROUND: SOUTH FLORIDA CULTURAL CONSORTIUM The South Florida Cultural Consortium has existed for the past 20 years as a collaboration among the countywide arts agencies in Palm Beach, Broward, Miami-Dade, Martin and Monroe counties. The organization promotes the arts across borders and operates with a think-tank-like thrust allowing for strategic and creative planning, sharing of best practices and pooling of resources. “Each agency is visible in its county and we don’t want to eclipse

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that but together we implement policies and programs that contribute to the growth of the arts in South Florida,” Spring explains. Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, who also serves as vice-chair of the SFCC board, says, “What we’re doing is innovative and other counties throughout the country are watching. We work hard to make sure the arts leaders know one another and socialize and connect with each other.” That interconnectivity results in creating opportunities for artists, including the SFCC’s annual Fellowship for Visual and Media Artists, a program that awards grants of $15,000 and $7,500 to emerging, mid-career and established artists that reside in the five counties. “It’s a long-time program that has recognized the very best artists in South Florida and it’s an important part of an artist’s career to get it,” Blades says. “Regionally, it helps build a community of world-class artists.” In response to a need identified during a consortium meeting, the SFCC is also in the curriculum development phase of a new five-county regional certification program for teaching artists across all disciplines, including visual arts, music, theater and dance. Spring notes that the cost will be nominal: “Our core value is to keep our programs free or extremely affordable.” Blades explains that the program will establish performance criteria, maintain a directory of certified teaching artists and encourage qualified candidates to seek jobs not only in their resident county, but in any of the five. “To our knowledge this doesn’t exist anywhere else and colleagues around the country are watching what we do because they may want to emulate it,” she says. In addition to this type of groundbreaking programming, the SFCC also fills the critical role of arts advocate both regionally and locally. “We talk to elected officials about art and culture funding, mostly at the state level, but also in Washington, D.C.,” Blades says.


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Photo by Alexis Hayward

FOSTERING AN ARTS-FOCUSED COMMUNITY: BOCA RATON CULTURAL CONSORTIUM

Now the consortium is readying for a bigger challenge. “We feel there’s a need for a high-end fundraising event, such as a gala, and that we could create something very special with all these different arts organizations,” says Guin.

On a smaller geographic scale, the Boca Raton Cultural Consortium, created in 1999, has advocated for the arts to be a strong part of Boca Raton and the south county community – and it has POOLING RESOURCES TO SPUR GROWTH: succeeded. There are 16 members, including Festival of the Arts NORTHERN PALM BEACHES CULTURAL ALLIANCE BOCA, Boca Ballet Theatre and the Boca Museum of Art. Leon Rubin, contributing writer and editor at art&culture and When the Northern Palm Beaches Cultural Alliance was formed one of the consortium’s founders, explains: “Initially, we went to in 2004, it received advice from Rubin and the Cultural Council. public hearings and asked the city to remember the arts during Not surprisingly, the organization operates in much the same way major development projects like Mizner Park and the new public as the Boca Consortium. With 46 north county members library.” This advocacy has resulted in a focus on culture in the city. representing museums, performing arts schools, theaters and “When we began there wasn’t much mention of culture, so we wildlife organizations as well as local municipalities, businesses and drummed up support from the city and chamber of commerce,” says the media, the group needs a bigger conference room, though. Dan Guin, who is the consortium’s current “Palm Beach is a large county and president and is also the founder, executive South Florida Cultural Consortium: sometimes smaller arts organizations get www.palmbeachculture.com/sfcc-fellowship director and co-artistic director of Boca Ballet lost by comparison to the larger Boca Raton Cultural Consortium: Theatre. “They supported us because organizations, such as the Norton or the www.artsinboca.org Northern Palm Beaches Cultural Alliance: tourism-wise we helped attract visitors.” Kravis Center,” says Roger Buckwalter, www.npbculturalalliance.org The consortium has created a collaborwho helped found the alliance and is the ative environment where organizations frequently partner on events, current chair. With this in mind, marketing is the organization’s such as the annual performance of Peter and the Wolf, staged by primary focus. “We publish a cultural guide and map and we have Boca Ballet at the Mizner Park Amphitheater with music provided by a website.” the Boca Raton Symphonia and funding provided by the city. As with the Boca Consortium, there are also opportunities for Shared audiences are a win-win and so is shared advertising networking, advertising and collaborative projects. The alliance space. “If you look at any Boca Ballet playbill, about 50 percent represents members at events and festivals such as the Palm of the ads are from consortium members. Everyone saves money Beach Gardens Green Market and the Juno Beach ArtFest by the and has a stronger presence and it builds the idea that there’s so Sea. Booth space is often donated. much going on culturally,” Guin says. Through outreach, the alliance has significantly impacted the Marketing was at the heart of the founders’ original vision for quality of life in northern Palm Beach County. “The cultural sector the group. “We thought it would be good to market arts up here has been growing and growing. Everyone wants to raise organizations collectively using our strengths to reach a broader the profile of the cultural community and there’s great strength audience,” Rubin explains. in collaboration,” Buckwalter says.

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The Maltz Theatre Youth Touring Company and the Young Singers of the Palm Beaches Select Ensemble raised their voices in song.

 (From left) Andrew Kato, who produced the Muse Awards performances; Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades; William Hayes, Palm Beach Dramaworks, recipient of the Clyde Fyfe Award; Maryanne Webber, Lake Worth Street Painting Festival; Tracy Butler, Kravis Center; Thalia Award recipient Roe Green; Charlene Jones, Spady Museum; Nancy Jones and Cynthia Palmieri, Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens; Carrie Bradburn, SunFest; Sharon Koskoff, recipient of the Ellen Liman Award; and John Blades, Flagler Museum. Not pictured: Marcy Koch, Norton Museum.

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Fusion MUSE AWARDS CELEBRATE THE BEST IN ART AND CULTURE By Leon M. Rubin

Magical from start to finish. Brilliant. Perfect in every way. Wow! The accolades began pouring in to the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County early on the morning after the 2014 Muse Awards and maintained a steady pace throughout the day. It was clear that the celebration of excellence by individuals and organizations providing programs in arts and culture in Palm Beach County was a smash.

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Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades and Muse Awards Co-Chair Bruce Beal

Sharon Koskoff (left) with Ellen Liman, who established the new award for excellence in arts education that Koskoff received.

Chaired by Sallie Korman and Bruce Beal, the spectacular event held at the Cohen Pavilion of the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts featured a variety of performances produced by Andrew Kato, award-winning producing artistic director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and coordinating producer of the annual Tony Awards. During the evening, which was attended by a record-breaking 370 Cultural Council supporters, more than 80 performers entertained the audience with a diverse mixture of music and dance. The participating organizations included:  The Center for Creative Education Teaching Artists and Divinity Dance Ensemble  Miami City Ballet School  Bak Middle School of the Arts String Quartet with the Palm Beach Chamber Quartet  Palm Beach Opera

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Barbara Chieves, Palm Beach County Administrator Bob Weisman and Deputy County Administrator Verdenia Baker enjoy the evening.

 The Maltz Theatre Youth Touring Company and the Young Singers of the Palm Beaches Select Ensemble “The Muse Awards is not only an entertaining evening of award presentations and performances highlighting the most sophisticated arts and cultural organizations in the Southeast, it is also a chance to highlight the work the Cultural Council does in outreach and arts education. It is a special night that flies by with a first-class awards show,“ notes Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades. “This year’s theme of Fusion was selected to illustrate that bringing two very different things together can result in art that is more meaningful, powerful and surprising. I know that our audience was delighted to see the many new performances that were offered by some of our community’s most talented artists.” The event raised nearly $200,000 to help fund arts education programs that directly impact the lives of Palm Beach County


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students by giving them an opportunity to take field trips to local arts and cultural organizations that their schools could otherwise not afford. Over the past several years, the Council has provided countless cultural opportunities to children in Palm Beach County thanks to the Muse Awards. The awards presented during the evening honored both individuals and organizations for their contributions to the rich tapestry of art and cultural experiences that distinguish Palm Beach County as one of the most robust cultural communities in the Southeast. The awards and honorees included: Excellence in Arts and Cultural Outreach – Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens The legacy of American sculptor Ann Weaver Norton lives on for the hundreds of students who are reached each year by the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens’ innovative Community Enrichment Program. Since 2007, the initiative has reached more than 18,000 students, teachers and members of the community. Last year, the organization greatly expanded its educational opportunities by publishing a children’s book – The Awesome Adventures of Annie V – that introduces youngsters to Norton’s art and her commitment to the environment. Copies of the book were donated to more than 100 schools, preschools, public libraries and literary education programs in Palm Beach County. Excellence in Arts Integrated Education – Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts Eight years ago, the School District of Palm Beach County and the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts became members of the Kennedy Center Partners in Education program. The center now serves as the primary provider of artsintegrated professional development training for approximately 1,000 public and private teachers in the county. Teachers learn to integrate the arts into their classrooms and inspire their students

Blindfolds for audience members helped to create an “opera in the dark” performance by Palm Beach Opera singers.

to new heights of creativity. In 2013, the Kravis Center received special funding to develop a day-long teacher seminar that addresses an arts-integrated approach to Holocaust education. Clyde Fyfe Award for Performing Artists – William Hayes, Producing Artistic Director, Palm Beach Dramaworks The Clyde Fyfe Award for Performing Artists recognizes individuals not only for their own body of work, but also for the difference they make to others through teaching or mentoring. As producing artistic director for Palm Beach Dramaworks, William Hayes has directed numerous award-winning productions for the theater company. Thanks to his leadership, Palm Beach Dramaworks has taken its place on the regional and national stage with numerous Carbonell awards, favorable reviews in The Wall Street Journal and an expansion into a beautiful new theater in downtown West Palm Beach. Outstanding Collaboration – Norton Museum of Art Since 1991, the Norton Museum of Art has touched the lives of thousands of students by giving them opportunities to experience fine art. Through its award-winning Progressive Afterschool Art Community Education Program − or PACE − the Norton offers wide-ranging, art-based outreach activities at six local sites and brings young people into the museum who might not otherwise have the chance to visit. The Norton works hand-in-hand with community partners in underserved areas of Palm Beach County and features instructors who not only teach but also provide positive community role models for students in the program. In 2012-2013 alone, PACE engaged more than 1,000 students. Council’s Choice Award – Lake Worth Street Painting Festival As the largest event of its kind in the world, the Lake Worth Street Painting Festival celebrated 20 years of cultural excellence in 2014. In the space of two days, more than 600 professional

A Bak Middle School of the Arts string quartet teamed with the Palm Beach Chamber Quartet for a memorable rendition of Eleanor Rigby.

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Palm Beach Opera General Director Daniel Biaggi, Gladys Benenson and Scott Guzielek were among the Muse Awards guests.

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Cultural Council Chair Bert Korman, Cultural Council Board Member Glenn Jergensen and Muse Awards Co-Chair Sallie Korman

artists, students, children and families bring the pavement to life with approximately 230 individual street paintings. In the process, they draw more than 100,000 people to downtown Lake Worth to experience its transformation into a colorful and inviting outdoor art gallery. The festival gives young people the opportunity to participate side-by-side with professional artists who offer assistance and mentoring. Local organizers frequently receive inquiries from individuals and organizations around the world who want to emulate the success of this festival.

casting. Green has worked her magic with many local arts and cultural organizations in Palm Beach County – including the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. Nationally recognized for her commitment to advancing the arts in Ohio, Colorado and elsewhere, Green provides an inspiring example of the importance of private support. The Cultural Council selected Green as the recipient of its inaugural Thalia Award – named in honor of the Greek Muse of music, song and dance − in celebration of her generous nature and irrepressible spirit.

The Ellen Liman Excellence in Arts Education Award – Sharon Koskoff Palm Beach County is Sharon Koskoff’s canvas as well as her classroom. She works tirelessly to engage students of every age in the process of creating art for all to enjoy through murals, ceramic tiles, sculptures – even a painted piano. She is also the author of Art Deco of the Palm Beaches, founding president of the Art Deco Society of the Palm Beaches and chairperson of the Delray Beach Public Art Advisory Board. The first Ellen Liman Excellence in Arts Education Award honors Koskoff for her boundless energy, her soaring imagination and the sense of joy she brings to everyone who encounters the fruits of her and her students’ labors throughout our community – every day.

Excellence in Historical and Cultural Heritage − The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum The centennial of Henry Flagler’s Over-Sea Railroad to Key West was clearly a cause for celebration. The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum marked the occasion in 2013 with a comprehensive approach that included preservation of original documents, lectures, exhibitions at Whitehall and the South Florida Fair that attracted more than 600,000 visitors and the publication of a special edition of Last Train to Paradise: Henry Flagler and the Spectacular Rise and Fall of the Railroad that Crossed an Ocean – Les Standiford’s acclaimed book about the railroad. In addition, educational programs introduced more than 1,800 students throughout the region to this vitally important series of events in Florida’s history.

The Thalia Award − Roe Green A few years ago, when theater students at Kent State University invited Roe Green to play the role of the fairy godmother in Sweet Charity, it was a brilliant bit of

Outstanding Festival – SunFest Conceived in 1983 as a way to generate economic impact from tourism in the shoulder season, SunFest has developed into one of the premier art and music festivals

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Dancers from the Miami City Ballet School presented an enlightened performance.

in the nation. Today, it encompasses an incredible amount of talent and creativity in just 36 hours and has been recognized by the International Festival and Event Association, Fodor’s Travel Guide, The Weather Channel and many others. Thanks in large part to the efforts of hundreds of volunteers each year, SunFest is truly an event produced by the community for the community. With six consecutive years of improved ticket sales, a continuing mission to raise funds for local charities and a healthy economic impact on downtown West Palm Beach, SunFest continues to shine. Chairs’ Choice Award – The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum – which is operated by EPOCH (Expanding and Preserving Our Cultural Heritage) − is steadfastly committed to preserving the history and telling the story of the black community in Delray Beach. Based in the historic home of the late Solomon D. Spady, the museum carries out its mission through compelling exhibitions, its annual Spady Day Heritage Festival, monthly Ride and Remember Trolley Tours, teacher workshops and a Kids Cultural Club that serves 800 youngsters every year. The 2014 Chairs’ Choice Award honors the Spady Museum and its leaders for their exceptional cultural impact as well as their ability to overcome financial odds.

The Muse Awards program was generously sponsored by PNC Bank, Bruce A Beal, Francis V. Cunningham, Jean and Frederic A. Sharf, Sallie and Berton E. Korman, Edith R. Dixon, JP Morgan, Palm Beach Kennel Club and Joseph and Kelly Rooney, Suzanne Niedland and Larry DeGeorge, Dina Baker, Roe Green and the Roe Green Foundation, Gunster, Jim and Irene Karp, Patrick Park and the Park Foundation, Cecile Draime, Florida Power & Light Company, Peggy and Richard J. Katz Jr., Betsy K. Matthews, Bruce and Robbi Toll, Lee Wolf, Boynton Beach Flower Market, Peg and Lee Greenspon, Priscilla Heublein, Judy and Stanley Katz, Jane and Leonard Korman, Jean and William M. Matthews, Olympusat Inc., Luann and Bill Parmelee and Sandra Thompson. Special thanks go to Bonnie Seeman, 2013 South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship winner from Palm Beach County, who designed a limited edition print for the attendees; Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz, the artists who created the Muse Awards sculpture; artist Frank Navarrete, vice president, Green Sky Productions; and graphic designer Kathy Daigler, Daigler Design Group. Adding a green touch to the evening, all of the decorations from the event were collected and given to Resource Depot, which makes donated materials available to teachers for use in their classrooms and programs.

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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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{inside culture} cultural council news

The Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens provided one of the backdrops for the Council’s recent video shoots.

The Cultural Council Is ‘On the Air!’ As part of a concerted effort to raise the international profile of Palm Beach County’s arts and cultural opportunities, the Cultural Council is taking to the airwaves through several new partnerships with highprofile media and video companies. The Council spent three days filming around Palm Beach County with BrandUSA as part of an advertising buy on the Discover America website. The Council traveled throughout the county shooting Palm Beach Opera’s production of The Barber of Seville at the Kravis Center, exhibitions at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, the Lake Worth Street Painting Festival, a lecture by Mia Farrow at the Society of the Four Arts and footage of the collections at the Flagler Museum. Throughout the three days, BrandUSA representatives also photographed the arts

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and cultural assets of our county. When potential cultural travelers visit DiscoverAmerica.com, they will find a Palm Beach County arts and culture landing page that will include a 500-word essay, maps and special offers in addition to video and still photos. The Council will receive all raw footage and photos not placed on the Discover America website for future use. The Council purchased two segments – one in English and a second one in Portuguese − that were posted on the Discover America website in April. At the same time, a video crew from Olympusat participated in the shoots. Olympusat is working on two videos and a commercial for the Council that will spotlight the varied and sophisticated arts and culture offerings in the county. The initial work with Olympusat resulted in a two-minute video unveiled at a meeting of the Palm Beach Chamber of Commerce. The final project will result in two videos – one business-to-

consumer and the other business-tobusiness, as well as a 30-second commercial in English and Spanish to be aired to 11 million households in Latin America. The Council’s marketing department also worked with Olympusat to produce a number of videos for the Muse Awards celebration. The segments included those honoring the winners of the awards and the beneficiaries – children from schools in underserved areas. This video footage also will be made available for re-edit into future videos; each winner’s package was donated to the arts organization or arts individual. Lastly, the Cultural Council co-produced three shows for WPBT2’s Emmy Award-winning arts show, Art Loft. The shows featured the Palm Beach Poetry Festival, the Norton Museum of Art’s exhibition on Baby Jane Holzer and Andy Warhol and the radio play Casablanca, presented by John Watts of Arts Radio Network at the Arts Garage in Delray Beach.


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{inside culture} cultural council news

Tamar and Milton Maltz

Dr. Sanford Kuvin, guest speaker David Rubinger, Gabriel Kuvin, Arnold Drapkin, Miryam Flint and Lisa Schreier

Fatima and Art NeJame

Bill Hayes, Rena Blades and guest speaker Barry Day

Dorothy Einstein, Bobbi Horwich, Deborah Pollack and Marti Rosenburgh

Sue Ellen Beryl and Sherron Long

Culture & Cocktails Continues Lively Conversations Audiences continue to be entertained and enriched by the popular Culture & Cocktails series, which supports the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s artist programs. In March, more than 70 people gathered at The Colony Hotel, Palm Beach, for I Like America: Noël Coward in the U.S.A. – a conversation between Barry Day, author of The Letters of Noël Coward, and William Hayes, producing artistic director of Palm Beach Dramaworks. Day discussed why Coward’s works are increasingly revived when so many of his contemporaries have faded and explored why his classic comedies, such as Private Lives and Blithe Spirit, remain among the most frequently produced plays in the world more than 70 years after they were Corby Kaye’s Studio Palm Beach

first staged. His presentation included a series of delightful anecdotes, familiar songs and rare film clips featuring Coward with such theatrical luminaries as Alfred Lunt and Lynn Fontanne, Gertrude Lawrence and Mary Martin. In January, approximately 90 guests enjoyed Israel through My Eyes − a conversation with photojournalist David Rubinger, the unofficial photographer-historian for Israel since its founding and for many years the primary photographer in the Mideast for TIME-LIFE. Rubinger, whose signature photograph depicts paratroopers at the Western Wall shortly after its recapture by Israeli forces in the Six-Day War, was visiting South Florida from Israel to receive the FOTOmentor award at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre’s FOTOfusion 2014. The final Culture & Cocktails of the season in April attracted nearly 100 guests to

Cultural Entrepreneur, a conversation with Milton Maltz, the founder of Malrite Communications Group, which operated radio and TV stations from New York to California. A major backer of the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame in Cleveland, the International Spy Museum, in Washington, the Maltz Museum of Jewish Heritage in Cleveland, the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, Maltz was interviewed by Beth Neuhoff, president and CEO of Neuhoff Communications. The 2013-2014 season was sponsored by the Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation; the Roe Green Foundation, Roe Green, founder; The Palm Beach Post and the Palm Beach Daily News, and PR-BS, a Boca Raton-based public relations firm.

Editor’s note: For a report on the February edition of Culture & Cocktails, see page 84.

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{inside culture}

Lucien Capehart Photography

cultural council news

Muse Awards Co-Chairs Sallie Korman and Bruce Beal with Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades

Jim and Judy Mitchell

Priscilla Heublein and Thalia Award recipient Roe Green

Arts philanthropist Bruce Beal, co-chair of the 2014 Muse Awards, hosted a private cocktail party at his home in Palm Beach on Feb. 27 as a prelude to the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s 2014 Muse Awards celebration. Beal is also a member of the Cultural Council’s board of directors. Approximately 60 guests attended the event, including the 2014 Muse recipients, the Cultural Council’s board of directors, members of the Muse Awards honorary committee and sponsors of the Muse Awards event, which took place on March 13 at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts’ Cohen Pavilion in West Palm Beach.

‘How Do You Get to Carnegie Hall?’ Feed the aforementioned straight line to most people, and the answer you’ll get is “practice!” In the case of Shawn Berry, the Cultural Council’s manager of arts and cultural education and an accomplished pianist, however, it was a different story. As Berry explains, his Carnegie Hall debut came about as part of an evening celebrating the 75th anniversary of Shawnee Press – one of the world’s largest publishers of choral and instrumental music. Four conductors were featured, including Mark Hayes, a friend and mentor of Berry’s from Kansas City, who asked him to accompany his portion of the program. Berry, who is co-founder and artistic director of the Young Singers of Palm Beaches,

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Lucien Capehart Photography

Muse Awards Recipients Treated to Preview Party

Carrie Bradburn, Alex Dreyfoos and Beth Neuhoff

commissioned Hayes to write Ubuntu, the Center a few years ago, but never had I opening piece for the group’s spring 2013 been in Carnegie Hall,” Berry added. concert. Berry was subsequently asked to “Therefore, this was very special. I was accompany another conductor at Carnegie excited − and grateful.” Hall, as well. The Feb. 17 Carnegie Hall performance featured a full choir and full symphony orchestra − including piano. Berry played for the rehearsals, so he had to learn all of the music. “Due to the expectations of playing for such esteemed conductors and composers, I knew I would have to put in some serious practice time in preparing for this concert,” he said beforehand. “I was fortunate to direct the Bak Middle School of the Arts Shawn Berry accompanied performances by a full symphony orchestra and full choir at Carnegie Hall in February. boys’ choir on the stage of Lincoln


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{inside culture} cultural council news

The Cultural Council’s Art on the Road Boca Raton group gathers in the courtyard outside the Boca Raton Resort & Club.

A guest on the Art on the Road tour to the Boca Resort poses in front of a sculpture by Rob Lorenson (Niagara, 2006, Aluminum) overlooking the Intracoastal Waterway.

Art on the Road Tours Offer Cultural Exploration Intrepid cultural aficionados recently enjoyed three excursions to intriguing sites in Boca Raton, Palm Beach and Delray Beach via the Cultural Council’s 2014 Art on the Road series. In total, approximately 120 guests boarded buses at the Council’s headquarters in downtown Lake Worth before setting off on these one-of-a-kind opportunities to meet collectors, artists and owners of some of the most popular venues in Palm Beach County. In January, participants traveled to the recently dedicated Artists’ Alley in Delray Beach. Part of the greater Pineapple Grove Arts District, this industrial area of artists’ studios and outdoor art installations is a unique destination in which to view the

The Cultural Council’s Art on the Road Palm Beach group, accompanied by Cultural Council Manager of Artist Services Nichole M. Hickey (far right) pauses for a photo on Worth Avenue.

Ellen Liman welcomed guests on the Palm Beach tour to the Ellen Liman Gallery.

work of emerging as well as mid-career artists. Galleries on the tour included Cacace Fine Art, Linda White Gallery, Cloud House Pottery, Pat Kaufman Studio, Abbey Funk Studio, Schmidt Stained Glass and Jeff Whyman Studio. February’s excursion took guests across the water to Palm Beach, where they visited three venues. The Liman Gallery in the historic Paramount Building maintains an inventory of works by more than 90 artists vetted by gallery owner Ellen Liman, a painter herself with extensive contacts in the art world. At Gallery Biba on Worth Avenue, the gallery’s principal, Biba St. Croix, shows works by modern and contemporary masters including Pablo Picasso, Andy Warhol and Robert Rauschenberg. The third stop took guests inside the bou-

tique owned by Jackie Rogers, whose career has run the gamut from big-band singer, Hollywood starlet, film actress for Fellini, Chanel’s favored mannequin, successful New York model and owner of an innovative Madison Avenue boutique. For the final trip of the season, participants ventured to the venerable Boca Raton Resort & Club, a Waldorf-Astoria Resort. They received a guided tour of the historic hotel, which was designed by legendary architect Addison Mizner, and explored its architecture, gardens and artworks installed throughout the property by Baker Sponder Gallery. Additional photos from these entertaining expeditions can be seen on the Cultural Council’s page on Facebook: www.facebook.com/palmbeachculture.

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{inside culture} cultural council news Council Receives Regional Public Relations Award The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County received the Bernays Award from the Gold Coast Public Relations Council for its marketing and public relations campaign surrounding The Deep and the Shallow: Photographers Exploring a Watery World exhibition. The award was for a project by or on behalf of a nonprofit organization. The Deep and the Shallow campaign was honored for its effectiveness at communicating the mission and reach of the Council in Palm Beach County and for demonstrating the Council’s dedication to local artists through education, opportunities to exhibit and marketing and public relations support. The awareness campaign consisted of collateral materials, news releases to local media, a catalog, exhibition, lectures and an art&culture magazine cover story, all featur-

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ing the original photography of Palm Beach County artists, including the “Shark Whisperer” Jim Abernethy. Other Bernays Awards recipients with cultural ties included the Kretzer Piano Music Foundation for its “Keys to the Cities” fundraising campaign, which featured painted pianos throughout the community, and Gary Schweikhart, a supporter of the Cultural Council’s Culture & Cocktails series and head of the PR-BS public relations firm, who received the PR Star Award. GCPRC is the largest independent organization of public relations, marketing and communications professionals in South Florida, with members coming from MiamiDade, Broward, Palm Beach and Martin counties. The group presented the Bernays Awards during its 10th annual awards program in Boca Raton in January. The award is named after Edward J. Bernays, considered the “father” of public relations.

Cultural Council Public Relations Coordinator Bebe Novick-Brodigan (right) accepts the Bernays Award from GCPRC President Julie Mullen.


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{inside culture} cultural compendium Airport Exhibition Spotlights Palm Beach County Artists Works of photography, painting and mixed media created by 25 of Palm Beach County’s finest emerging and professional artists can be seen in the latest “Art at the Airport” exhibition at Palm Beach International Airport. “A snapshot of the local creative class, these exhibitions support growth of the county’s cultural economy, building fiscal and professional capacity among independent working artists,” says Palm Beach County Art in Public Places Administrator Elayna Toby Singer. “With the exception of two exhibitions during the early downturn of the economy, artists have sold works in every show. Residents and travelers purchase featured pieces, plus exhibited works prompt commissions and sales from artists’ existing bodies of work. “When we were changing out the (last) show, one of the artists told me that as a result of his photograph exhibited at the

County’s First STEAM School to Debut in August Palm Beach Gardens Elementary will be the first Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts and Math (STEAM) Choice elementary school in Palm Beach County beginning in August. “I am really excited to see students get the hands-on exposure in STEAM in their classrooms every day to get them ready for Choice Programs in our middle and high schools,” says Stacey Sunser, a third grade gifted teacher. “This will help prepare them for career choices in these fields that are driving our industries today.” In collaboration with teachers, the administration and parent supporters, Sunser began coordinating grade level STEAM projects while researching the process of becoming a Choice school and completing the proposal to the Palm Beach County School District during the current school year. The efforts focused on gathering information and data

airport, he sold five additional photographs to a gentleman from New York who recently bought a home locally,” Singer says, adding that artists receive 100 percent of the sale price. Nearly 90 artists applied to participate in the newest exhibition and 25 were selected by members of Palm Suzanne Schwartman’s Stepping Out is among the works included in the current “Art at the Airport” exhibition. Beach County’s Public Art Committee. Stephens and Wayne Stephens from Featured artists include William Wellington; and Greg Allikas, Lisette Buchanan, Jennifer Fisher, Ben Hicks, Cedeno, Eliana Douglas, Jean Goddeau, Richard Newland, Agata Ren, Suzanne Tracy Guiteau, Andrea Krausz, Erik Kucera Schwartzman and Victoria Sheridan from and Melinda Trucks from West Palm Beach. Boca Raton; Ralph Papa from Delray On view until June 25, the exhibition is Beach; Kris Davis and Rose Shaw from located on Level 2 Main Terminal. Parking is Jupiter; Maria Belcher, Kristin Miller Hopkins, Sharon Salansky and Marilyn available in Short Term, levels 4-7. For a virtuSorkin from Lake Worth; Esther Gordon from Palm Beach Gardens; Sherry

al

tour,

visit

http://www.pbcgov.com/

fdo/art/exhibitions/ArtAtAirport.htm.

about what Palm Beach Gardens Elementary was already doing and developing a plan for future growth opportunities. The school kicked off its STEAM initiative by having a Family Fun Night, which included a variety of STEAM projects and experiments. Art teacher Kathy Adkins lent a helping hand, creating STEAM-inspired artwork with students. In addition, Elizabeth Hoke and the drum club performers entertained students and families throughout the evening. Recycled drumhead artwork was on display in school hallways for everyone to enjoy. The school’s next step will be creating a motto, a logo or brand and a video to showcase the unique opportunities Palm Beach Gardens Elementary offers students. The school district’s Choice programs are designed to create an educational environment that responds to student interests, celebrates cultural and ethnic diversity and fosters student achievement.

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cultural compendium

Courtesy Palm Beach Opera

Palm Beach Opera Launches $18-Million Campaign Palm Beach Opera announced an $18-million fundraising campaign, “Raise Your Voice!,” to promote the growth of the company and achieve an even greater impact on the community it serves. Campaign co-chairs are long-time Palm Beach Opera supporter Mary M. Montgomery and Palm Beach Opera Vice Chairman Sanford (Sandy) Fisher. More than $4.2 million has already been committed towards the goal, the keystone of which was a generous gift from the estate of Helen K. Persson. Funds raised through the campaign will be used to increase the number of main stage opera productions, resume PBO’s commitment to emerging talent through an annual vocal competition, expand the Young Artist Program by providing more training opportunities for young singers, increase K-12 educational programs, extend audience development and outreach programs such as Opera @ The Waterfront and other free events and support and present new contemporary operas. Over its 52-year history, Palm Beach Opera estimates that it has reached more than one million people in the Palm Beaches and beyond. Founded in 1961, the fully professional Palm Beach Opera presents main stage performances at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. More information about the campaign is available at www.raiseyourvoiceforpbo.org.

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cultural compendium

Corby Kaye’s Studio Palm Beach

(From left) Tiffany Abreu, Abigail Miller, Kenneth Haliburton, Juliana Diatezua, Tessa Bravata

Poetry Festival Honors Student Contest Winners Five area students were recognized as winners of the annual Palm Beach County High School Poetry Contest sponsored by the Palm Beach Poetry Festival. The awards were announced by Miles Coon, director of the festival, and Blaise Allen, director of community outreach. The first place prize (two passes to the festival and $100) went to Abigail Miller, a senior at Dreyfoos School of the Arts in West Palm Beach, for her poem Crescent Moons. Additional winners, who each received two festival passes and $25, were:  Kenneth Haliburton, a junior at the Riviera Beach Maritime Academy, for Handbrake Turn.  Juliana Diatezua, a senior at Wellington High School, for Ways to Disappear.  Tessa Bravata, a senior at Dreyfoos School of the Arts, for Rebel Gum.  Tiffany Abreu, a sophomore at Dreyfoos School of the Arts, for Wisps. A pre-selection committee of Lorraine Stanchich-Brown and Adele Alexandre reviewed 366 entries from Palm Beach County public and private high school students, narrowing the list to 25 finalists. The winner was chosen by Jeff Morgan, professor of English at Lynn University. The poems by the winning students are posted under the “Other Programs” tab on the festival’s website at www.palmbeachpoetryfestival.org.

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cultural compendium Women in the Visual Arts Celebrates High School Artists Women in the Visual Arts presented $24,000 in awards and scholarships to Palm Beach County art students through its 18th Annual Spring Celebration of High School Art. The winners were selected from entries submitted by 130 students from 16 Palm Beach County high schools – all of which were exhibited at Boca Raton’s Sugar Sand Park during March. Since 1997, WITVA has awarded nearly $300,000 to local art students.

MAY 3-JULY 27

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The top student winners (and their teachers) included:  President’s Award: Melissa Grobler, Atlantic High School (Katia Martinez)

Rug with Geisha (detail), knotted wool, Afghanistan, acquired Peshawar (Pakistan), 1994, 75 ¼ x 44 ½ inches Afghan War Rugs: The Modern Art of Central Asia curated by Enrico Mascelloni and Annemarie Sawkins, PhD

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 Irving B. Kahn Foundation Scholarships: Vernica Serjilus, Park Vista High School (Bernie George); Stephanie Paulive, West Boca Raton High School (Susan Feldmann); Lauren Stewart, West Boca Raton High School (Troy Preece) and Olivia Haynie, Atlantic High School (Cynthia Merchant)  Lynn Travis Stender Art Scholarships: Linda Kaplan Award − Cachae Alford, Palm Beach Central High School (Jennie Barnett); Linda Gross Award − Melanie Quinones, Pahokee Middle Senior High School (Mark Shanahan); Laura McCutcheon Award − Annalisa Spreadborough, Lake Worth High School (Brent Bludworth); Mr. and Mrs. Arthur Calace Jr. Award − Isabella Guttuso, Boca Raton High School (Rob Sweeten); and Mr. and Mrs. Thomas Colucci Award − Declan Jolowski, Jupiter High School (Elizabeth Bruno).


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{inside culture} briefly noted The Friends of Florida State Parks honored MacArthur Beach State Park’s education crew with its Volunteer Team of the Year award. The group − led by Janice Kerber, director of education − is committed to offering standards-based field experiences designed to enhance what students learn in the classroom. The 23 volunteers on the education team at MacArthur Beach State Park led an average of 45 students per day, for a total of 5,200 students and 1,889 volunteer hours, last year. The volunteers also put in countless hours educating themselves in order to provide the best experiences for the students. The volunteers trained to facilitate 10 different programs including participating in Project WILD and Project Learning Tree certification. John D. MacArthur Beach State Park, Palm Beach County’s only state park, is situated on a barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and the Lake Worth Lagoon. Visit www.macarthurbeach.org for more information.

The Raymond F. Kravis Center

Helen K. Persson

for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach received $5 million from the estate of Helen K. Persson for the center’s Permanently Restricted Endowment Fund, bringing the fund’s value to $17.3 million. “Thanks to Mrs. Persson and her vision for the future, the Kravis Center can expand its services, raise its sights and continue its mission of making the best in arts and educational programming available to the entire community for many generations to come,” says Judy Mitchell, CEO of the Kravis Center. Persson, who died in 2013, was honored by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County with a 2010 Muse Award for her generosity and tireless volunteer efforts benefiting numerous arts and cultural organizations, including the Kravis Center, Palm Beach Opera and Palm Beach Atlantic University. She was also a talented musician and former professional singer.

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briefly noted

129 E Ocean Avenue | Boynton Beach, FL 33435 (561) 742-6780 | www.schoolhousemuseum.org

Open for play: Tuesday - Saturday 10 AM - 5 PM Story time, special classes, events, birthday parties and more!

Where learning is an adventure!

MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE PAUL AND SANDRA GOLDNER CONSERVATORY OF PERFORMING ARTS

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(561) 575-2672 www.jupitertheatre.org/classes-and-camps 1001 EAST INDIANTOWN RD, JUPITER, FL 33477 74

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director of the Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art, which offers courses in painting, drawing, ceramics, jewelry making, photography and sculpture. She also oversees the ArtCenter’s summer camp programs. Previously, Trone managed Jupiter Outdoor Center and Jupiter Pointe Paddling for six years. She also is the volunteer project lead for Expedition Florida 500, a statewide conservation effort. A Tequesta resident since 2005, she graduated from Colby College in Maine with a bachelor of arts in English literature. “We look forward to Cynthia guiding some of our relationships with other local organizations by integrating environmental themes in the art projects our students create,” says Katie Deits, executive director of the museum and art school, which is celebrating its 50th anniversary. For information on the Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum, Gallery and School of Art, visit www.LighthouseArts.org or call (561) 746-3101.


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The life and work of renowned stained glass artist Conrad Pickel, who lived in Boynton Beach from 1956 until his death in 1994, will be celebrated on May 24 with a daylong event. Hosted by the Boynton Beach Historical Society, Historic Resources Preservation Board and Art in Public Places, the celebration includes a guided bus tour to see a number of buildings with Conrad Pickel's works; a presentation by the artist's son, Paul Pickel, of Conrad Pickel Studios; a stained glass demonstration and a reception at the Conrad Pickel exhibition at Boynton Beach City Library. The day will focus on Pickel’s historical imprint on Boynton Beach, his vision of arts and culture and contribution to the global arts community. One of the artist’s commissions, the Resurrection Mausoleum in Chicago, is the world’s largest stained glass installation according to the Guinness Book of World Records. For information, contact (561) 742-6026 or (561) 742 6757.

14511 s. olive a 145 avenue, venue, we west s t ppalm alm bea beach, ch, ffl 33401

Organized by Organized by the Norton N ton Museum Of A Nor Art, rt, this eexhibition xhibition is made possible pos thr ough the generosity generosit o y of m u r iel a nd ra t zm a n.. through mu an all p h s al altzman Ex clusive corporate corporate sponsor Exclusive W ith additional support sup pport provided provided by by the Milton Milton and She eila Fine Fine Endowment Endowment With Sheila ffor or Contemporary Contemporary A rt, the Stat lorida, Depar tment of State, State, Division of Art, Statee of FFlorida, Department C ultural A ffairs, and dT he FFlorida lorida C ouncil on A rts and C u e. ultur Cultural Affairs, The Council Arts Culture. Media support support pr ovided v b he P alm Beach Beach P ost and pb bpulse.com. provided byy T The Palm Post pbpulse.com.

www.norton.org www .n norton.org

WARHOL’S W ARHOL’S’

FIRST SUPERSTAR SU UPERSTTAR A

on view through may 25, 2014

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{inside culture} briefly noted

The Chamber Music Society of Palm

Alissa Dragun/South Moon Photography

The Palm Beach Symphony’s brass quartet includes Mark Poljak, Clinton Soisson, Jordan Robison, Josue Jimenez and Ricardo Chinchilla.

As a part of the Palm Beach Symphony’s community outreach programming initiatives, a number of its musicians teamed with members of the Detroit Symphony Orchestra to present back-to-back performances at the Gardens Mall in Palm Beach Gardens. Surprised patrons paused during their afternoon shopping to hear sounds of music not typically heard in a day at the mall. A performance by a Detroit Symphony string quartet was followed by a Palm Beach Symphony brass quintet, engaging many who were passing through the mall’s Grand Court. “We were thrilled to pair with members of the internationally acclaimed Detroit Symphony Orchestra while they were touring locally,” notes David McClymont, the Palm Beach Symphony’s executive director. The symphony, led by Maestro Ramon Tebar, celebrated its 40th anniversary this season.

Beach named Michael Finn as its executive and artistic director. Finn, who founded the organization with Vicki Kellogg, will oversee all artistic decisions, operations, administration, marketing and fundraising initiatives. He was previously the executive director of the Palm Beach Symphony, director of performance activities with Lincoln Center and associate dean at the Juilliard School. A performer himself and a Juilliard graduate, Finn has appeared with the Orpheus Chamber Orchestra, the Orchestra of St. Luke’s and the Metropolitan Opera. He has produced orchestral and operatic performances at festivals including the Spoleto Festival in Italy, the Lucerne Festival in Switzerland and the BBC Proms in London. He also co-produced Elton John at Radio City Music Hall in New York for a sold-out run with an orchestra composed of 120 musicians from the Royal Academy of Music in London and the Juilliard School.

The Palm Beach Photographic

Key Stroma, a sculpture by Kelly Milukas, is among 50 multimedia artworks on view in the Palm Beach Photographic Center’s current exhibition, Keys to the Cure.

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Centre has met its match! Inspired by a $100,000 challenge from a board member (who asked to remain anonymous), supporters contributed an additional $300,000 to the Photographic Centre’s first matching gift campaign. “The vision of the Palm Beach Photographic Centre is to become the world’s preeminent center for the study and appreciation of the photographic arts,” says Fatima NeJame, president and CEO. “This matching gift challenge is the largest single gift received from a board member in our 27-year history.” The funds raised through the campaign are expected to be used to fulfill a number of goals outlined in the organization’s Vision 2020 Strategic Plan, including artist-in-residency programs, scholarships for children in underserved markets and the establishment of a research library.


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a&caccommodations We wish to thank the following hotels and resorts for their support and assistance in providing art&culture magazine to you, as they assist us in our mission of sharing our diverse cultural landscape for your enjoyment. From theater and dance to museums and galleries, Palm Beach County is Florida’s Cultural Capital®.

800.863.2819 www.pgaresort.com

(561) 659-5800 www.ChesterfieldPB.com

561.340.1700 3800 North Ocean Drive Riviera Beach, FL 33404

Historic Inn & Restaurant

280 Sunset Avenue, Palm Beach 561/832-7050 | 800/822-4116 www.bradleyparkhotel.com info@bradleyparkhotel.com

(561) 655-7740 www.TheBrazilianCourt.com

106 S. Swinton Ave. Delray Beach, FL

561.272.5678 sundyhouse.com

INDULGE TRANSFORM EXPLORE PLAY Your getaway by the sea awaits! On-site dining, tropical pool, full-service spa and more! Located near boutiques, outdoor cafés, art galleries and nightlife!

2842 S. Ocean Blvd. Palm Beach, FL 33480 888.344.4321 561.540.6440 www.omphoy.com

561-274-3200 | 877-389-0169 www.delraybeachmarriott.com

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Experience Amazing Wildlife Daily Animal Shows • Interactive Fountain • Carousel • Snack Bars Restaurant • Gift Shops • 23 Acres of Lush Tropical Habitat Open Daily 9 AM to 5 PM (561) 547-WILD (9453) • www.palmbeachzoo.org 1301 Summit Boulevard, West Palm Beach, FL 33405

Thanks to the efforts of the newly formed Gardens Conservancy, Ann Weaver Norton’s legacy of a garden sanctuary in downtown West Palm Beach is once again being cultivated by an English caretaker. Following a line of Brits at the historic Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens, Bristol-born biologist Paul Milsom was named the organization’s first director of horticulture. In his new role, Milsom is responsible for the overall well-being and maintenance of rare palms, cycads, native plants and all floriculture plantings at the historic site at Barcelona Road and Flagler Drive. A primary focus of his role will be to expand the gardens’ community engagement – calling on his background as a marine biologist to develop and participate in educational, volunteer and advanced garden programs. The tri-athlete, marathon runner and self-described fish keeper says he is most excited about the potential to develop new education and science programming and to improve the garden’s water features and aesthetics.

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{cultural cuisine guide}

Cultural Cuisine Between Food and Culture

Inspirations from Palm Beach County’s Finest Restaurants & Eateries

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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern Voted Best Italian 2010, 2012, 2013 Best Brunch 2012

Best Wine List 2012 Wine Spectator Award Winning Wine List 2003-2013

“The Italian Restaurant on the Beach”

561-274-9404 Open 7 days serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Weekend Brunch

34 South Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach, FL 33483 caffelunarosa.com facebook.com/caffelunarosa

Friends, Family & Neighbors All Gather at ...

Monday - Thursday 11 a.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. Sunday 12 p.m. – 10 p.m. Dine In

Delivery

Catering

Take Out

Outdoor Seating Available 701 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, Florida 561-296-9190 Just 2 Doors from the Playhouse Serving Veal, Chicken, Gourmet Pastas, Pizza, Subs, Salads & Sauces Made From Scratch

all our steaks are

served tender, juicy and

sizzling. Private Dining & Catering Available for groups up to 300 people.

Boca Raton | 561.392.6746

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 3800 OCEAN Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa 3800 North Ocean Drive, Singer Island 561.340.1795 Discover an inspiring menu that echoes Chef Max’s dedication to simplicity, intense flavor and farm-to-table cuisine.

 CITY CELLAR WINE BAR & GRILL CityPlace, WPB 561.366.0071 A diverse menu featuring steaks, chops, fish and pasta complements a huge 10,000-bottle wine collection.

 BB KING’S BLUES CLUB 550 Rosemary Ave., WPB 561.420.8600 Live music venue. Experience it today and “Let The Good Times Roll.”

 CITY OYSTER 213 East Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.272.0220 A traditional American seafood restaurant. Fresh, simple and delicious seafood selections.

 BIZARRE AVE CAFE 921 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.588.4488 A welcoming, cozy atmosphere where one would feel at home entertaining friends with good food and fine wine.

 CORDON BLEU CATERING 213 S. Rosemary Ave., WPB 561.339.2444 Dinner parties, cocktail parties, yacht charters, wine tastings/pairings. European culinary excellence.

 BLUE MARTINI CityPlace, WPB 561.835.8601 An upscale martini bar featuring more than 20 of the hottest specialty martinis complemented by a sensational tapas menu.  BOGART’S BAR & GRILLE 3200 Airport Road, Boca Raton 561.544.3081 Bogart’s Bar & Grille, located at the JM Lexus Premier Level at Muvico 20 Palace in Boca Raton, is the ultimate dinner-and-a-movie experience.  BREWZZI CityPlace, WPB 561.366.9753  Glades Plaza, 2222 Glades Road, Boca Raton 561.392.2739 Italian-American Bistro with upscalecasual dining for lunch and dinner, featuring a state-of-the-art, gold medal microbrewery. Late night patio bar (WPB); breakfast (Boca Raton).  BUCA DI BEPPO WELLINGTON 2025 Wellington Green Drive, Wellington 561.790.3287 In the spirit of Italian culture, our dishes are served family-style and meant to be shared by everyone at the table.  BURGER BAR 4650 Donald Ross Road, PB Gardens 561.630.4545 Indulge in hand-shaped signature gourmet burgers, specially fashioned from a proprietary blend of short rib, brisket and chuck steak.

 DAVE’S LAST RESORT 632 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.588.5208 Dave's has a Key West atmosphere in the heart of the Palm Beaches. Tropical drinks, a great raw bar and fantastic service.  DECK 84 840 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.665.8484 As the Avenue’s first waterfront dining concept of its kind, Deck 84 provides a stimulating waterfront dining experience.  DON RAMON RESTAURANT 7101 S. Dixie Highway, WPB 561.547.8704 Open daily for lunch and dinner. Come with family and friends and enjoy a great atmosphere. Finest in Cuban cuisine.  GREASE BURGER BAR 213 Clematis St., WPB 561.651.1075 Grease Burger Bar offers a selection of fresh ground-daily, hand-shaped, 10-ounce juicy burgers.  HENRY’S 16850 Jog Road, Delray Beach 561.638.1949 The ultimate location for gourmet American comfort food in Delray Beach. Henry’s combines substance and style for lunch and dinner.

 CAFÉ CHARDONNAY 4533 PGA Blvd., PB Gardens 561.627.2662 We delight you with the finest American cuisine. Chef Frank is constantly creating new foods to satify your every culinary desire.

 HOFFMAN’S CHOCOLATE 705 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.766.2517 For more than 35 years Hoffman's Chocolate has been the premier source of luxury chocolates and confections. “Welcome to the Sweet Side of Life!”

 CAFÉ LUNA ROSA 34 South Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach 561.274.9404 We offer a memorable and authentic Italian dining experience, designed on two levels with alfresco seating and an elevated openair dining room.

 IRONWOOD GRILLE PGA National Resort & Spa, PB Gardens 561.627.2000 Offering classic American cuisine with contemporary influences, serving up tantalizing menu selections.


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HOW DO HOW D YOU DEFINE DEFIN NE YOU

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Social Socia al Secu Security? rity?

Luxurious Luxuriou us

Independent Living Living

At Devonsh Devonshire, hire, it means L Luxurious i IIndependent ndependent d d t Living with Life Care in the and elegance an nd excitement of Palm Beach h Gardens. redefining We are red defining social security with an ar array amenities nities designed to rray of activities and ame help you be both social s and secure. Nestled d in the heart of PGA National, Devonshire Dev vonshire provides endlesss options for staying vibrant, engag engaged ged and social. Devonshire e also gives you the security of kno knowing Living, owing that Assisted Living g, Memory Care, Skilled Nursing and Rehabilitation services are included if and when you need th them em at Chatsworth at PGA A National. Do a little or do a lot. At A Devonshire, the choice is always yours. Be social, be secu secure re at Devonshire.

Devonshire represe represents ents the height of luxury an and nd accommodation. Residents enjoy five restaurants, resort-style amenities, residences, clubhouse spacious residence es, valet services, and a clu bhouse including performing ng art center, and wellnesss & fitness centers. a cinema, performi

F Find out what’s what’s NEW in 2014! 2 14! 20 C now now for for more more information information Call or to to schedule a personal visit. visit. or

((888) 888) 254-5403

D E F IIN DE NE N Y O UR L I FE AT DEVO NSHIRE. NSHIRE E E. 350 3 50 De Devonshire vonshire W Way, ay, P Palm alm Beach G Gardens, ardens, FL 334 33418 418 9874619 8 46 9

www.DevonshirePGA.com www.Devonsh hirePGA.com

An Erickson Living Community Community


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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern

Don Ramon Restaurant

The Finest In Cuban Cuisine Since 1990

 LA BONNE BOUCHE BISTRO 516 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth 561.533.0840 Enjoy a sun-kissed lunch or a Frenchy breakfast in our outdoor patio or dinner in our cozy, très Parisian bistro-esque dining room!  LEGAL SEA FOODS Town Center at Boca Raton, Boca Raton 561.447.2112 High-quality dining experience never goes out of style. With more than 40 varieties of fresh fish and shellfish available.  LEOPARD LOUNGE AND RESTAURANT The Chesterfield Hotel, PB 561.659.5800 Eclectic, “New American” gourmet cuisine offered in an elegant, yet playful atmosphere, with dancing and live entertainment.

561.547.8704 | donramonrestaurant.com 7101 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, FL

 MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 777 South Flagler Drive, WPB 561.820.8125 USDA Prime aged beef, live Maine lobsters, fresh fish, hand-selected vegetables and elegant desserts.  MULLIGAN’S BEACH HOUSE BAR & GRILL 10 S. Ocean Blvd., Lake Worth 561.588.4133 Open seven days a week, 365 days a year for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We offer an array of daily drink and food specials.  THE OFFICE 201 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.276.3600 A place where whimsy and gastronomical delights go hand in hand, The Office is a modern American gastropub.  PADDOCK RESTAURANT Palm Beach Kennel Club, WPB 561.683.2222, Ext. 199 A unique dining experience – fine dining and an exciting show in an elegant dining room with a commanding view of the track.

Casual Dining on Worth Avenue

Open 7 days Lunch/Dinner Sunday Brunch Continuous Dining 11am - 10pm 221 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach

835.3500

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 PAMPAS GRILLE CITYPLACE 651 Okeechobee Blvd., WPB 561.791.6487 The menu at Pampas Brazilian Grille is as diverse as the Brazilian culture.

 RED BRICK GRILLE 4775 Lyons Road, Delray Beach 561.454.8002 Full-service casual dining experience featuring contemporary Americana cuisine featuring appetizers, gourmet pizzas, pasta, mouthwatering burgers, handcrafted sandwiches, fresh salads and more.  RENATO’S 87 Via Mizner, PB 561.655.9752 Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with a dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls.  ROCCO’S TACOS AND TEQUILA BAR 224 Clematis St., WPB 561.650.1001 Rocco’s Tacos offers a true taste of Mexico within a fun, casual environment.  ROTELLI 701 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.296.9190 Rotelli is pure Italian food, with classic dishes from ordinary spaghetti and lasagna to shrimp scampi.  ROYAL ROOM CABARET The Colony Hotel, PB 561.655.5430 The Royal Room features top-name cabaret performers. Enjoy dinner and show or just the show.  RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE CityPlace, WPB 561.514.3544 Premier steakhouse at CityPlace in West Palm Beach. Catering service available.  SAILFISH RESTAURANT 98 Lake Drive, PB Shores 561.844.1724, Ext. 107 This exceptionally popular seafood restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.  SEASONS 52 11611 Ellison Wilson Road, PB Gardens 561.625.5852 Enjoy the taste of fresh food grilled over open wood fires, great wines and live piano music nightly in the wine bar.

 PARADISO RISTORANTE OF LAKE WORTH 625 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth 561.547.2500 Fish, seafood, steaks, full bar, wine cellar, private dining rooms, wine cellar dining. Prix fixe menu and a la carte.

 SOUTH SHORES TAVERN & PATIO BAR 502 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth 561.547.7656 Our moderately priced menu boasts generous portions and fresh ingredients. The cuisine is not the only thing that is fresh; so is the entertainment.

 POLO STEAKHOUSE RESTAURANT The Colony Hotel, PB 561.655.5430 Full-service restaurant specializing in prime dry-aged beef. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails.

 STIR BAR & TERRACE The Ritz-Carlton, Manalapan 561.533.6000 Stir Bar offers creatively blended, muddled and stirred cocktails with a twist: Stir’s lively indoor and outdoor social scene.

 RED, THE STEAKHOUSE 1901 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton 561.353.9139 An unparalleled dining experience, RED, The Steakhouse, is touted by critics as a universal favorite.

 SUNDY HOUSE RESTAURANT 106 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach 561.272.5678 Sundy House is a charming 150-seat, finedining establishment with accommodations nestled amid botanical gardens and waterfalls.


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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern  TA-BOÓ, AN AMERICAN BISTRO & BAR 221 Worth Ave., PB 561.835.3500 An American bistro and bar featuring casual dining on Worth Avenue since 1941. Featuring prime steaks, Dover sole, sea bass, pizza, homemade desserts and cappuccinos.  TOOJAYS 419 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.582.8684 Corned beef piled high on freshly baked rye, classic Reubens and chicken noodle soup; more than 20 salads and much, much more.

At Cafe Chardonnay we give center stage to local farm fresh foods and seafood. Chef Frank feels the flavor of every dish is dramatically improved by farm to table freshness.

 TESTA’S RESTAURANT 221 Royal Poinciana Way, PB 561.832.0992 Testa’s serves Italian, American and seafood dishes. Breakfast, lunch or dinner. Testa’s is superb for a romantic getaway.  THREE (III) FORKS PRIME STEAKHOUSE PALM BEACH GARDENS 4645 PGA Blvd., PB Gardens 561.630.3660 III Forks is one of the nation’s prime steakhouses with a savvy menu featuring USDA Prime beef, seafood and local favorites.

4533 PGA Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens www.cafechardonnay.com 561.627.2662

 TIDES OCEANFRONT GRILLE Palm Beach Oceanfront Inn, PB 561.855.7575 Tides Oceanfront Grille proudly boasts being the closest restaurant to the ocean in south Florida.  TIN FISH RESTAURANT 118 S. Clematis St., WPB 561.223.2497 Fresh, delicious fish, served quickly in a casual atmosphere. Try one of our seven famous fish tacos, salmon on slaw, crab cakes, fish sandwich or popular shrimp and corn chowder. Head upstairs to our Top of the Fish bar for an impressive cocktail selection and nightly drink specials.  TOWER RESTAURANT 44 Cocoanut Row, PB 561.659.3241 Tower Restaurant takes pride in its daily specials: wiener schnitzel, stuffed cabbage, pot roast and corned beef and cabbage; and monster apple pancake á la Luchows.  VIC & ANGELO’S DELRAY BEACH 290 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.278.9570 From the garden to the plate, Vic & Angelo’s specializes in ingredients that are imported fresh from Italy.  THE WINE DIVE 319 Clematis St., WPB 561.318.8821 Not just a wine bar and definitely not a dive – The Wine Dive is West Palm Beach’s goto spot for live jazz, innovative menu items, hand-crafted cocktails and, of course, more than 70 wines to be enjoyed by the flight, glass or bottle.

87 Via Mizner, Worth Avenue, Palm Beach www.renatospalmbeach.com 561.655.9752

Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with an intimate dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls. Culinary delights from the classics to the eclectic are complemented with an extensive wine list and fully stocked bar.

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Muse Awards Reception Approximately 90 guests gathered for a reception at the Jupiter home of Patrick Park in honor of the 2014 Muse Awards honorees. Members of the Cultural Council’s board of directors as well as the Muse Awards honorary committee and sponsors attended the event, which was hosted by the Park Foundation.

Larry DeGeorge and Suzanne Niedland

Craig Uebele, Elizabeth Neuhoff and Richard Derbes

Rena Blades, Bert and Sallie Korman and Susan Lloyd

Andrew Kato, Roe Green, Sue Ellen Beryl and Bill Hayes

Jim and Irene Karp

George Elmore, Marti LaTour and Alex Dreyfoos Photos by Lucien Capehart Photography

Culture & Cocktails – February 2014

The February edition of Culture & Cocktails attracted nearly 100 design fans to the Colony Hotel, Palm Beach. The topic was Dishing Design: A Conversation between Steven Stolman and Joseph Pubillones. The two designers and longtime friends offered many Palm Beach memories as they shared amusing anecdotes, style tips and assorted design disasters.

Andrew Liebman and Annette Pankrac

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Debbie Calabria, Mary Carol Keena and Laura Paulsen

Joseph Pubillones, Rena Blades and Steven Stolman

Jay and Linda Rosenkranz, Maxine Marks and Donald Ephraim Photos by Corby Kaye’s Studio Palm Beach


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Join the Cultural Council As a member, we will keep you informed and entertained with our award-winning publications and signature events. Enjoy these exclusive benefits that offer incredible value — all year long!

Membership Benefits     

Invitations to members-only exhibition previews Free or reduced admission to select programs and events 10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store purchases Subscription to art&culture magazine and Cultural Calendar Recognition in the Council’s Annual Report

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CONTRIBUTOR $600 All benefits of the Supporter membership, plus:  One additional guest pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  VIP seating at Culture & Cocktails  VIP passes to local art fairs  Two guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine

PATRON $1,000

All benefits listed above for one person

All benefits of the Contributor membership, plus:  Two additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails  Four guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Invitation to director’s annual event  Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building

HOUSEHOLD $150

FOUNDING PATRON $2,500 AND ABOVE

Individual member benefits for two adults at the same address, plus:  CultureCard (membership discount card)

All the benefits of the Patron membership, plus:  Recognition on donor plaque  Private tours of special exhibitions for you and your guest upon request  Four additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails

INDIVIDUAL $65

SUPPORTER $250 All benefits of the Household membership, plus:  One pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  One guest invitation to all member exhibition previews

To join the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County or for more information on Artist Membership www.palmbeachculture.com/jointhecouncil

Business Arts Partner Membership Benefits The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is a not-for-profit agency providing artists and cultural organizations with programs and services that promote and support their individual missions. Members help us accomplish these goals and ensure our community continues to have access to quality arts programming. Our vibrant arts make our destination desirable to businesses, visitors and residents. Membership provides your business with access to valuable benefits increasing your visibility and connecting you with our donors, members and the greater community.

LEVEL OF SUPPORT AFFILIATE STEWARD LEADER BENEFACTOR DIRECTOR CHAIRMAN $600 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000 $10,000 $25,000

Invitations to Members Only exhibition previews

Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine and Council’s Annual Report

Discounted advertising rates for art&culture magazine

Business logo with live link on Council’s website

art&culture magazine delivered to your business (up to 20 copies per issue)

10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store

Culture Card – Member discount cards for cultural organizations in Palm Beach County

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Tickets to attend the Council’s SmARTBiz Summit for Arts & Business leaders

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Free admissions to all Culture & Cocktails programs (includes VIP reserved seating)

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Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, The Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building Sponsorship of one Cultural Executives Committee Meeting* (Includes four invitations) Logo included in eblasts to all Cultural Council cultural organizations. Listing on donor plaque in the Alex and Renate Dreyfoos Entry into the galleries

Private tours for 12 by advance arrangement Underwriting and exhibition sponsorships and partnerships *Based on availability

For more information, please call Debbie Calabria (561) 472-3330.

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Interior Design: The Florida Room Reception More than 150 Cultural Council members and guests gathered for a reception marking the opening of Interior Design: The Florida Room in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building.

Chelsea Menzies, Kathi Spiel and Gil Walsh

Greg and Jessica Ransom

Herman van de Woestijn and Shirley Cowen

Stephen Mooney, Terry Velozo and Scott Velozo

Rolling out the new Music Membership at the Cultural Council: Please contact Marlon Foster at mfoster@palmbeachculture.com or (561) 472-3338 for more information.

Upon moving to South Florida in 1996, one of the first organizations I joined was the Cultural Council. It was my connection to people who talk my language. The Cultural Calendar keeps me informed on so many wonderful events. The Cultural Council certainly adds another dimension to South Florida life.

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— Roxene Sloate


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In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and above help us accomplish our mission.

Listing as of print date

Mrs. Pamela Acheson Myers

Dr. Richard P. D’Elia

Kohnken Family Foundation Inc.

PNC Bank

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson

Diver’s Direct

Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman

PNC Foundation

Arthur I. and Sydelle Meyer

Mrs. Edith R. Dixon

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Kramer

Dr. and Mrs. Carter Pottash

Mr. and Mrs. John T. Dougherty, Jr.

Mrs. Emily F. Landau

PRP Wine International

The Azeez Foundation

Mrs. Cecile Draime

Audrey & Martin Gruss Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Geo. Zoltan Lefton Family Foundation

Charitable Foundation

B/E Aerospace

Earle I. Mack Foundation, Inc.

Ms. Dina Gustin Baker

Ms. Suzi K. Edwards

Bank of America

Mr. George T. Elmore

Banyan Printing

Donald M. Ephraim Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. R. Michael Barry

Mrs. Claire M. Levine The Liman Foundation

Publix Supermarket Charities REG Architects Inc. Richard and Peggy Greenfield Foundation

Loggerhead Marina

Rose Marie and Ted J. Miller Family Foundation Inc.

Ms. Susan Lloyd

Mr. David Rogers

Catherine Lowe M.D., LL.D.

Mr. and Mrs. Jay Rosenkranz Mr. and Ms. Wilbur L. Ross Jr.

Mrs. Marta Batmasian

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farber

Ms. Adrianna Luchechko

The Fine Foundation

The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Rosenberg

Mr. Bruce A. Beal

The Maltz Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley M. Rumbough Jr.

and Mr. Francis V. Cunningham

Mrs. Shirley Fiterman

Beasley Hauser, Kramer & Galardi

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Flack

Mrs. JoAnne Berkow

Florida Power & Light Company

RSB Richard S. Bernstein

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Flucke

and Associates, Inc.

The Gardens Mall

Mr. and Mrs. John Blades

The GE Foundation

Mr. Milton J. Block

Ms. Beatriz A. Ford

and Mrs. Leanna Landsmann The Boston Foundation Boca Raton Resort & Club Boynton Beach Flower Market Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bracci Mr. Geoffrey Bradfield The Breakers Palm Beach Mr. and Mrs. Howard Bregman, Esq. The Ann K. and Douglas S. Brown Family Foundation Camilla Dietz/Bergeron, Ltd. Business Development Board Mr. Christopher D. Caneles and Mr. Stephen Nesbitt Ms. Rose Carpenter

of Louisville

Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc.

Mrs. Jack M. Friedland

The Lewis Schott Foundation

Goldberg Foundation Inc.

Ms. Nancy Miller

Mr. and Mrs. Craig D. Grant

Sydell and Arnold Miller Foundation

Mr. Raymond Graziotto

Mrs. Sydell L. Miller

The Roe Green Foundation

Ms. Jane Mitchell

Ms. Roe Green

Mrs. Mary Montgomery

Mr. Lawrence Sosnow

Greenberg Traurig, P.A.

Ms. Virginia C. Mossburg

Mrs. Andrea Stark

Hon. and Mrs. William Greenberg

Mrs. Elizabeth Neuhoff

Stark Carpet

Ms. Peg Greenspon

Mrs. Suzanne Niedland and Lawrence F. DeGeorge

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Stiller

Ms. Paige Noland

Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco

Northern Trust

Telesco Family Foundation

Office Depot Office Depot Foundation

The Mary Alice Fortin Foundation, Inc.

Olympusat, Inc.

The Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc.

Mrs. Jane Osgood

Ms. Patricia G. Thorne

Oxbow Carbon and Minerals LLC

Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. Toll

Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Mrs. Phyllis Tick

Palm Beach Daily News

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio Jr.

Palm Beach County Film and Television Commission

Baroness Jeane von Oppenheim

Gunster Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Christopher Havlicek

HERlife Magazine

Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman

The Community Foundation

Mrs. Sydelle Meyer

Ms. Pamela Saba

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Michel Jr.

Fox Rothschild LLP

Community Foundation for Palm

Southeast Michigan

Ms. Elaine Meier

Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Saltzman

Scalamandré

Ms. Priscilla Heublein

Beach and Martin Counties

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews

Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs

The Colony Hotel

Community Foundation for

Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews

Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Rubin

Holyfield & Thomas, LLC John C. and Mary Jane Howard Foundation Ms. Lisa Huertas International Society of Palm Beach

Palm Beach Kennel Club

Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager Mr. Gary Schweikhart Sargent Architectural Photography Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf Mr. Harold Smith

Tanks A lot Aquarium, Inc.

William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust

Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman Ms. Maryanne Webber

Mr. and Mrs. Miles A. Coon

Jasteka Foundation Inc.

Crystal & Company

Johnson’s Custom Cakes and More

Mr. and Mrs. Peter D. Cummings

JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank

Mr. William R. Cummings

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp

Passport Publications & Media

Mr. Gus Davis

Katz Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson

Ms. Sheryl G. Wood, Esq.

Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz Jr.

Dr. Henry J. Petraki

Zissu Family Foundation

Mr. Bradford A. Deflin

Mr. and Mrs. Christopher G. Kellogg

PGA National Resort & Spa

Ms. Anne Zuckerberg

The Palm Beach Post Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker Mr. and Mrs. William Parmelee

Winston Art Group Ms. Susy Witt Mrs. Lee Wolf

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{next issue – fall 2014}

Mira the Florida Panther, Palm Beach Zoo.

go wild Art and architecture are not the only valuable cultural resources that must be safeguarded for future generations. The preservation of rare and endangered animals is so important it prompted the Palm Beach Zoo to change its name last fall. Now known as the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society, the popular destination is home to a number of species that face the very real threat of extinction. Florida panthers, sea turtles and other native species – as well as endangered tapirs and tigers – have found a safe haven in Palm Beach County thanks to the zoo and other sanctuaries and nature centers dedicated to wildlife conservation. Find out more about the important work these organizations do to protect our natural legacy in the next issue of art&culture.

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innovation. inn novati t on. n coll laborat tion. collaboration. par artner t rship p. partnership. That’ hhat’ss what w it takes takes to make make a world-class wor o ld-class medical center, and a at Jupiter Jupiter Medical Center, Cennter, that’s that’s exactly exactly what

we’ve Wee mak makee it a top priorit priorityy to inno innovate, collaborate we’ve got. got. W vate, co llaborate and a partner with our pphysicians hysicians s to bring yyou ou the latest in clinical Through understanding clinical technology technologgy and services services v to exceed exceed yyour our eexpectations. xpectations. T hrough mutual rrespect e ct and under espe standing with our highly-educated trained h highly -educated and tr aineed physicians, physicians, we we offer offer world-class wor o ld-class healthcare, healthcare, close to home. And, we we have have the awards, qualityy outcomes and accreditations awards, qualit acccreditations to prove prove it. Jupiter Center is proud accomplishments and Thank team Jupiter Medical M proud of of our accomp lishments an nd designations. T hank yyou o to our pphysicians, ou hysicians, te am members every dayy to brin bring world-class healthcare, members and volunteers volunteers who comee together together ev ery da ng yyou ou w orld-class he althccare, close to home. Accreditations Accr redit tat tions Nationaal A Accreditation ccreditation Pr Program ogram • National

• Awards A wa ar rds & Reco ognitions Recognitions

ecipieent of of the A ATHENA THEN T AA Award ward in • RRecipient

Busines ss bbyy the Chamber ooff Commer cee Business Commerce ooff the Palm Palm Beaches, Beaches, for achieving pr ofessiional excellence, excellence, actively actively serving ser ving professional the com mmunity and he lping w omen to community helping women rreach each their thheir leadership leadership potential. potential. Recognized R ecognnized as a Gold-Level Gold-Level F Fit-Friendly it-Friendlyy W oorksiite by by the American Heart Heart Worksite A ssociaation for helping helping employees employees eat eat Association be tter and a mo ve mor one ooff only 30 better move moree ((one compan nies in Palm Palm Beach Beach Count companies Countyy to achiev old status) achievee G Gold

Quality Qu ualit a ty Outcomes Out tcomes

• • • •

Rankked Ranked e the #1 Hospital Hospitaal in Palm Palm Beach Beach Count kelihood too R ecommend Countyy in Lik Likelihood Recommend and Overall Overall Patient Patient Satisfaction Satiisfaction bbyy CMS Rated the #1 Preferred Preferred Hospital H in North Palm Palm Beach Beach Cou unty in an County independent stud studyy Top T op o Rated for Qualit Qualityy Outcomes: O T op o 10% for O verall Me edical Car Top Overall Medical Caree Among the N ation’s H ospitals bbyy Nation’s Hospitals Comparion Ranked Rank ked e in T Top op o 3% in th the he Nation Nation in R isk-Adjusted Mortalit Risk-Adjusted Mortalityy bbyy Comparion

• • •

for Br easst Center irst in Palm Palm Breast Centerss – F First Be ach an nd M artin counties Beach and Martin NICHE E Hospital – Nur Nurses ses Impr oviing Care Care for Healthsystem Healthsystem Improving Elder Elderss American Americaan Academy Academy ooff Sleep Medicin ne – F irst Accredited Accredited Medicine First Hospita al-Based Facility Facilit a y in Palm Palm Hospital-Based Be ach an nd M artin counties Beach and Martin Commission Commisssion on Cancer – Among 30% ooff N ational Hospitals National A ccreditted with Commendation as Accredited a Comp prehensive Communit Comprehensive Communityy Cancer P Pr ogram Program Imagingg Services Ser vices Accredited Accredited in A Allll Modalit ties by by the American College College Modalities ooff Radio ology Radiology Breast B reast Im Imaging maging Center of of Ex Excellence xce c llence bbyy the American A Co llege ooff Radio logy College Radiology STAR® ST TAR® A Oncology Oncologgy Rehabilitation Rehabilitation Pr ogram m–F irst Program Program in Florida Program First

SO MUC UCH CH MORE THAN MEDICINE. For F or moree infor information rmation about JJupiter upiter Medic Medical cal Center or for a Ph Physician ysician R Referral, eferral, call (5 (561) 61) 2263-5737. 63-5773377. wy., JJupiter, upiter, FL 333458 3458 • (5 61)) 263-2234 263-2234 • jupitermed. com m 1210 SS.. Old Dixie Hw Hwy., (561) jupitermed.com


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art&culture magazine v8i3 Spring 2014  

As the primary catalyst for Palm Beach County’s thriving cultural climate, art&culture magazine is the official publication for the Cultural...

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