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art culture Spring 2013

of Palm Beach County

art in store Fine art enhances the shopping experience

the glamorous life From Paris to Palm Beach with designer Jackie Rogers

don’t risk it Protecting and preserving our cultural treasures

PLUS Kenn Karakul and Jim Held’s creative philanthropy, Actors Equity hits 100, chamber music and more


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WALLY F IN D L AY G A L L E RIE S

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ART WALLY FINDLAY

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EST. 1870

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{contents}

features

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always in style Fine art – a good portion of it by Florida-based artists – enhances the shopping experience at many of the county’s finest retail spaces. By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

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forever jackie rogers The glamorous life and unapologetically feminine fashions of an international beauty. By John Loring

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the role of a lifetime Actors Equity Association celebrates 100 years of contributions to the theater. By Anne Rodgers

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it’s personal The intimate charms of chamber music speak to music-lovers. By Amy Woods

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collections at risk The challenge to protect and preserve our cultural treasures is met with professional skill, personal dedication and advanced technology. By Christina Wood

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Spring 2013

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welcome letter Welcome accolades and sincere appreciation. By Rena Blades

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editor’s note You don’t have to be an artist to be creative. By Christina Wood

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upfront • The Randolph A. Frank Prize for the Performing Arts recognizes those dedicated to enhancing our cultural and artistic life in Palm Beach County. • Stephen Bogart shares movie insights and memories of his famous film-star parents on WXEL–TV. • The South Florida Science Museum completes a major expansion project. • Local Blue Star Museums open their doors to active-duty military families. • Musical milestones give us all something to sing about. • LEGOs®, the beloved building blocks of childhood creativity, take on new life in an intriguing exhibition at the Norton Museum of Art. • David Hyde Pierce makes a special appearance at Palm Beach Dramaworks. • The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County shines a light on local artists.

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art works! Curling up with a book is good for you. By Christina Wood

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profile Kenn Karakul and Jim Held make a difference, creatively. By Thom Smith

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portrait The world is a stage for director and diplomat J. Barry Lewis. By Thom Smith

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calendar Enjoy an artsy air-conditioned adventure this summer. Our calendar is packed with plenty of cool opportunities to enjoy Palm Beach County’s cultural offerings!

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inside culture The Cultural Council’s Summer Cultural Guide returns; the Kravis Center showcases student talent in Stage Awakenings; the Delray Beach Public Library scores a success with its Centennial Creative Writing Contest; and much more insider news.

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cultural cuisine guide Inspirations from Palm Beach County’s Finest Restaurants and Eateries

71 Cover Image: Frank Prize-winner Karen Stephens in Doubt - A Parable at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Photo: Alicia Donelan

Cover Image: Coco Chanel with Jackie Rogers, 31 Rue Cambon, Paris, 1962 Photo: Douglas Kirkland © Corbis

spring 2013

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Loblolly Realty LLC _ AC Spring 13:Loblolly Realty_A&C Spring 13

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YOU’R E NOT DR EA MING.

With the best of everything all in one place, life never looked so good! Loblolly is a gated, private community with 275 homes in a variety of styles and sizes. Club membership, separate from homeownership, affords the opportunity for members and their families to enjoy a wide variety of amenities and services not often found within one club. Homes and homesites from $400,000 to over $3,500,000. Please call for an appointment. Jill Christu, Broker 772.545.2531 | loblollyinfo.com Loblolly Realty/Licensed Real Estate Broker

Located on Florida’s Treasure Coast | 7407 SE Hill Terrace, Hobe Sound, Florida 33455


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601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460 | 561-471-2901 | www.palmbeachculture.com OF OZ TH E LA ND

xÉ{ÊUÊÓä£Î The Wizard of Oz xÉ£äÊUÊÓä£Î Street Beat, Inc.

President & Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Vice President, Marketing & Government Affairs

Bill Nix

561-687-8727 bnix@palmbeachculture.com

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Mary Lewis

561-472-3340 mlewis@palmbeachculture.com

Shawn Berry

561-472-3347 sberry@palmbeachculture.com

Debbie Calabria

561-472-3330 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Kristen Smiley

561-472-3342 ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com

Nichole Hickey

561-471-3336 nhickey@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

Laura Tingo

561-471-1602 ltingo@palmbeachculture.com

Theresa Loucks

561-471-3334 tloucks@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Contributing Writer/Editor

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Visitor Services Coordinator

Marlon Foster

561-472-3338 mfoster@palmbeachculture.com

Autumn Oliveras

561-471-2901 aoliveras@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance Director of Grants

2013-2014 SNEAK PEEK! ££É£™ÊUÊÓä£Î Atlantic City Boys £ÓÉ£ÇÊUÊÓä£Î Golden Dragon Acrobats

r e

10:52 AM

£ÉÇÊUÊÓä£{ Rudolf Nureyev State Ballet Theatre in “Giselle” ÓÉ£äÊUÊÓä£{ Hair

Director of Development Manager of Arts and Cultural Education Membership & Special Events Manager Development Associate Manager of Artist Services Grants Manager Public Relations Coordinator Marketing Coordinator

ÓÉÓäÊUÊÓä£{ I Wish for all Time Celebrating the Genius of Michael Jackson & Stevie Wonder ÎÉ££ÊUÊÓä£{ Rhythm of the Dance ÎÉ£ÇÊUÊÓä£{ South Pacific ÎÉÓÇÊUÊÓä£{ The Aluminum Show All dates, artists and programs subject to change.

BUY TICKETS @ www.dollyhand.org BOX OFFICE 561.993.1160

Bookkeeper

Administrative Assistant Volunteer

Pat Thorne

Cultural Council Board of Directors Officers Berton E. Korman, Chairman Craig Grant, Vice Chairman Michael D. Simon, Secretary Michael J. Bracci, Treasurer

Bradford A. Deflin Cecile Draime Shirley Fiterman Roe Green Christopher E. Havlicek Herbert S. Hoffman Irene J. Karp Raymond E. Kramer, III Beverlee Miller Suzanne Niedland Bill Parmalee

Directors Bruce A. Beal Carole Boucard Howard Bregman Christopher D. Canales

Jean Sharf Kelly Sobolewski Dom A. Telesco Ethel I. Williams Ex Officios Mary Lou Berger Daniel Biaggi Jennifer Prior Brown

Cultural Council Founder Alexander W. Dreyfoos

1977 College Drive | Belle Glade, FL Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Steven L. Abrams, Mayor Priscilla A. Taylor, Vice Mayor All dates, artists and programs subject to change.

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Mary Lou Berger Paulette Burdick Jess R. Santamaria

Hal R. Valeche Shelley Vana


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THE POINT IS... 3 minutes to ocean, 10 minutes to private airport, 45 minutes to the Palm Beaches, 60 miles to the Bahamas.

sailfish point Hutchinson Island, Florida

Miles of Atlantic shoreline • Nicklaus Signature Golf • Oceanfront Country Club Fitness Complex • Spa/Salon • Yacht Club and Marina minutes to the ocean • North of Palm Beach INQUIRE ABOUT GUEST OPPORTUNITIES

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art&culture of Palm Beach County

Spring 2013 - volume 7, issue 3

Art

publisher publisher & president

561.472.8778 robert@passportpublications.com

editorial staff

Exhibitions

managing editor

classes & Workshops

business editor

For Adults, Teens, Children and Special Needs, Beginner to Professional.

editorial coordinator

christina wood

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com 561.472.8768 westlund@passportpublications.com 561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

richard westlund bradley j. oyler

cultural council editorial staff

LighthouseArts.org t Painting t Figure Drawing t Photography t Photoshop t Mixed Media t Jewelry t Sculpture t Ceramics t Raku & Soda Kilns t Wheel Throwing t Summer ArtCamp t3rd Thursday Events, 5:30 to 7:30 p.m.

robert s.c. kirschner

editorial director

rena blades

executive editor

bill nix

managing editor

leon m. rubin

contributing writers m.m. cloutier, jan engoren, sheryl flatow, david lawrence, john loring, anne rodgers, leon m. rubin, frederic a. sharf, thom smith, jean tailer, don vaughan, christina wood, amy woods, jenifer mangione vogt

contributing photographers harry benson, steven caras, alissa dragun, jim fairman, christopher fay, jacek gancarz, barry kinsella, michael price, robert stevens

art & design art & production director graphic designer

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

rebecca m. lafita

561.472.8762 art@passportpublications.com

advertising sales director of advertising national advertising manager signature publications senior advertising manager contract administrator

School of Art: 395 Seabrook Road Tequesta, FL (561) 748-8737 Museum: 373 Tequesta Drive Tequesta, FL (561) 746-3101

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richard s. wolff

561.472.8767 richard@passportpublications.com

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

richard kahn

561.906.7355 rich@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the County Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.


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fromtheceo

WELCOME TO

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Whether you’re a Carbonell Award-winning choreographer or a student who’s just won a scholarship in the latest Women in the Visual Arts Celebration of High School Art competition, there’s a special kind of satisfaction that comes with being recognized by someone to whom you are not related by blood or marriage. Accolades from our parents and kids and spouses are welcome, of course… but when someone farther outside the loop praises us, it’s usually just a little bit sweeter.

give new life to a building that is much-loved by the Montgomery family and our community.

This phenomenon might explain why we’ve been walking around the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building with more smiles than usual in the past few weeks. Let me explain.

The award was part of the NEA’s 2013 Art Works grants program, which distributed $26.3 million in grants to nonprofit national, regional, state and local organizations nationwide in 13 fields. There were 20 grants awarded in Florida for a total of $580,000. Also receiving funds in our area were the Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners, $40,000; the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, $10,000; and Palm Beach Opera, $15,000.

First, we learned that the Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency’s far-reaching Neighborhood Stabilization Program – which includes an artist live/work space component − had been recognized by the National League of Cities, the National Black Caucus of Local Elected Officials and the National Development Council. As a participant in this project and a member of the Lake Worth community, this made us quite proud. Shortly thereafter, Rick Gonzalez of REG Architects informed us that the Montgomery Building had been selected to receive Honorable Mention recognition in the restoration/ rehabilita-tion category of the 2013 Florida Trust for Historic Preservation Awards Program, which recognizes exemplary efforts in historic preservation. This recognition is well-deserved. Rick, who was responsible for overseeing the extensive interior renovations of our building in preparation for our move into our new home, and many others took great care to ensure that our headquarters – which began life as the Lake Theatre in 1940 – would remain true to its heritage. We are so pleased to

Michael Price

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Finally, we received word that the Cultural Council had been awarded a $20,000 grant from the National Endowment for the Arts to support our growing program of exhibitions in the gallery spaces in our building. The grant funds will help us mount a series of group and solo exhibitions of work by artists living and working in Palm Beach County.

This national acknowledgement for a key aspect of the Cultural Council’s efforts to develop and expand programming for artists in Palm Beach County is especially satisfying. As many of you know, this has been one of our long-term goals – and one that has truly begun to take off since we moved into our new headquarters in 2012. We greatly appreciate the recognition that we and others have received in recent months – and we are grateful to everyone who contributes to our efforts to support and enhance our rich and diverse cultural community.

Rena Blades President and CEO Cultural Council of Palm Beach County


Celedinas Insurance Group_AC v7 Spring:Celedinas Insurance Group

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Collecting art is as much a passion as an investment. *DOOHULHVDQGPXVHXPVWDNHHODERUDWHPHDVXUHVWRSURWHFWÃ&#x20AC;QHDUW²VKRXOGQ·W \RX"&HOHGLQDV,QVXUDQFH*URXSXQGHUVWDQGVWKHULVNV²DQGUHZDUGV²RI LQYHVWLQJLQDUW:KHWKHULWKDVJUHDWVHQWLPHQWDOYDOXHRULVDQLQYHVWPHQWLQ WKHIXWXUH\RXUDUWGHVHUYHVSUHVHUYDWLRQ&HOHGLQDVRIIHUV\RXLQVXUDQFHIURP SUHHPLQHQWFDUULHUVLQFOXGLQJ$&(3ULYDWH5LVN$,*3ULYDWH&OLHQW*URXS $;$$UW&KXEE)LUHPDQ·V)XQGDQG385(WKHVDPHFDUULHUVZKRLQVXUHWKH ZRUOG·VJUHDWHVWFROOHFWLRQV /HW&HOHGLQDVSUHSDUHDFXVWRPSULYDWHULVNPDQDJHPHQWUHYLHZIRU\RX:H RIIHULQQRYDWLYHFUHDWLYHVWUDWHJLHVIRUSURWHFWLQJ\RX\RXUIDPLO\DQG\RXU LQYHVWPHQWV /HWXVH[FHHG\RXUH[SHFWDWLRQV« 561.622.2550 www.celedinas.com

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SURPRISINGLY CREATIVE You don’t have to be an artist to live a creative life. Sure, you could face the day with a paintbrush in your hand but you could also express your creativity by veering off the beaten path in the kitchen, at the gym or on the job. The thesaurus is bursting with delightful synonyms for the word creative! In addition to artistic, you can be original, imaginative, inspired, inventive, resourceful, ingenious, innovative or – get this – productive.

fromthe

And you don’t have to sit in a concert hall, buy a ticket to a show or wander through the galleries of a museum to enjoy the creative power of the arts. Look around you – and all through the pages of this issue of art&culture – and you’ll discover the beauty, inspiration and influence of the arts waiting for you in surprising corners and quiet moments. High-end retailers know that the arts make a fashionable statement. In “Always in Style” on page 36, we’ll show you how they enhance your shopping experience – from Worth Avenue to the mall. Regular contributor Amy Woods shows us how chamber music has found its way into a variety of intimate performance venues – and into people’s hearts – in a story we’re calling “It’s Personal” on page 60. In “Art Works!” on page 28, you’ll discover the profound difference a book can make on the playground, in the workplace or at your next doctor’s appointment. In “Collections at Risk” on page 64, we look at the challenges involved in protecting and preserving our cultural assets from the multitude of threats that hang in the air, lurk around corners and live in the imaginations of the dedicated professionals who must be prepared to contend with every possibility. Actors Equity Association, the union representing professional actors and stage managers, celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. In honor of the occasion, we look into the history of the

Jacek Gancarz

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organization and the impact its creative approach to collective bargaining has had on the development of professional theater – across the country and right here in Palm Beach County – in “The Role of a Lifetime” on page 56. Kenn Karakul and Jim Held, whom you will meet in our profile on page 30, have channeled their innate creativity into their business success as well as their philanthropic efforts. In our portrait on page 32, you’ll see how J. Barry Lewis infuses international diplomacy with a touch of drama. And, in “Forever Jackie Rogers” on page 42, the always-ingenious John Loring introduces us to a fashion designer whose creativity has produced feminine fashions and a glamorous life. And there’s more… As you flip through the pages of art&culture, you’ll learn about innovative exhibits popping up across the county all summer long – from a dazzling LEGO® display at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach to County Contemporary at the Cultural County of Palm Beach’s headquarters in Lake Worth and Flying High: The Story of Kites at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts. You’ll meet people with a passion for the arts and for arts education. You’ll find intriguing ideas, captivating images, useful information and, I truly hope, inspiration. Think of us the next time you find yourself in a place, a situation, a relationship in need of a touch of beauty, originality or resourcefulness. Add your creativity to the mix – and let us know what happens next. Imagine!

Christina Wood Managing Editor


Iberia Bank_AC vol7 Spring13:Iberia Bank

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Banking made simple... with your lifestyle in mind

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{contributors} MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE PRESENTS

YOUR TICKET TO GREAT ENTERTAINMENT

This thrilling murder mystery, filled with suspense, jealousy, blackmail and bbackstabbers, will keep you on the edge of your seat.

James W. Fairman

2013/14 SEASON!

John Loring was a contributing writer and New York Bureau Chief at Architectural Digest. He served as the design director of Tiffany & Co. for 30 years and has written numerous books on style and social history. John graduated from Yale University, completed four years of graduate studies at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris and has an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts degree from Pratt Institute.

OCTOBER 27 - NOVEMBER 10, 2013

Leapin’ Lizards!

America’s favorite comic-strip orphan will come to life in the Tony Award® -winning musical set in the Great Depression …just in time for the holidays! SPONSORED BY:

Before launching her freelance career, Amy Woods worked as the society editor of Palm 2 Jupiter and as the editor of Notables at The Palm Beach Post, a position she held for 11 years. An experienced editor, columnist, writer and reporter, Amy’s goal is to use her experience as a journalist and skills in public relations for the benefit of our local nonprofit community.

DECEMBER 3 - 22, 2013 This poignant and inspiring Tony Award®winning long-running hit musical follows the audition process of theatre “gypsies” as they try to land a job in a Broadway show.

Anne Rodgers is an author and freelance journalist who lives in West Palm Beach. She was a writer and columnist at The Palm Beach Post for seven years. She has just completed her first book, Kiss and Tell: Secrets of Sexual Desire from Women of all Ages, which will be published in the spring.

SPONSORED BY:

JOAN AND ALLEN BILDNER

JANUARY 14 - FEBRUARY 2, 2014 In this thi Tony®- nominated nnew ew play, p a young novelist retu home to Palm returns SSprings prin for the holidays aand nd aannounces that she is about to publish a memoir. But will her family Bu stop her? SPONSORED BY:

JOHN OSHER

FEBRUARY 16 - MARCH 2, 2014 S we dance? Come discover Shall 19th-century Siam through the eyes of a British schoolteacher hired by the King. This Tony Award®-winning phenomenon will leave you whistling a happy tune!

Jenifer Mangione Vogt is a writer and publicist who specializes in art, finance and Italian culture. She writes about art for many publications, including JetSet Magazine and Artlog. Jenifer also has more than 20 years of experience in corporate and nonprofit marketing, serving art organizations such as the Friends of the Uffizi Gallery, Metropolitan Museum of Art and Christie’s, as well as Fortune 500 companies, including MasterCard International and The Bank of New York.

SPONSORED BY:

ROE GREEN AND

MARCH 18 - APRIL 6, 2014 FOR MORE INFORMATION:

(561) 575-2223 www.jupitertheatre.org 1001 East Indiantown Road Jupiter, FL 33477

Sponsored in part by the State of Florida, Department of State, Division of Cultural Affairs, the Florida Council on Arts and Culture

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Davidoff Studios, Palm Beach

KATHY AND JOE SAVARESE

During more than three decades at The Palm Beach Post, Thom Smith covered popular music, movies, television and the courts, served as the paper’s “Listening Post” (ombudsman) and produced a consumer column. For 20 years he wrote columns about people, places and events in the Palm Beaches culminating with the “Palm Beach Social Diary.” These days he freelances for international publications and writes the “On the Avenues” column for The Coastal Star, a monthly newspaper that covers Lake Worth to Boca Raton. He and his wife, Diane, live in Boca Raton.


Cleveland Clinic_AC Spring 13:Cleveland Clinic

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The Envelope Please Local Stars Shine The Randolph A. Frank Prize for the Performing Arts was created to recognize those dedicated to enhancing cultural and artistic life in Palm Beach County. This year’s recipients are Karen Stephens, a West Palm Beach actor, and Dan Guin, executive and co-artistic director of Boca Ballet Theatre. Stephens, who was honored with the Performing Artist Prize, has established herself as an artist of note in her inspired work as an actor, writer, performer and director – most recently appearing in the Maltz Jupiter Theater’s production of Doubt. Guin, winner of the Performing Arts Educator Prize, has led BBT in its mission to enrich the cultural landscape of our community for more than 20 years, providing focused training, opportunities to interact with professional dancers, award-winning outreach and, most recently, Dan Guin introducing an innovative program for those suffering from Parkinson’s disease. “The Frank Prize was established to underscore the Dan Guin critically important roles both performing artists and performing arts educators play in our community – and to award these leaders for their efforts,” says Steven Caras, founding chair of the Frank Prize. “When you think about it, they are truly one and the same. A talented performer leaves his or her audience inspired and motivated. Exceptional educators must do the same for their students. Over several decades, the work Karen Stephens and Dan Guin have contributed to Palm Beach County is substantial. Their past accomplishments and dedication going forward perfectly Karen Stephens symbolize the basis of our mission.”

Now Playing A Beautiful Friendship Between Film Fans and WXEL Begins Of all the public television stations in all the towns in all the world, Stephen Humphrey Bogart walked into the studios of WXEL in Boynton Beach. The son of movie legends Humphrey Bogart and Lauren Bacall – and a TV and movie producer in his own right – is hosting a locally produced series on the local PBS affiliate. Bogart on Movies, which airs Friday evenings at 5:30 p.m. with replays on Saturdays at 10:30 a.m. and 6 p.m., features movie reviews, commentary, classic picks and current critiques. During the half-hour program, Bogart also shares entertaining tales of film greats and not-so-greats that will delight film buffs. “Steve brings to Bogart on Movies the experience of having grown up in the heyday of the Hollywood film colony and New York’s theater and TV worlds and will share with viewers behind-the-scenes stories that will provide new perspectives for them,” says Bill Scott, WXEL-TV executive vice president. “I love movies… the great ones, the good ones and even the bombs visit www.wxel.org and I will call them as I see them,” Bogart says. “I am excited to be part of the new WXEL-TV.”

FOR

more information

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On The Map

Spotlight On

Over the Moon

A Fitting Salute

The South Florida Science Museum is heightening its “wow factor” with the completion of a major expansion project. A multi-million-dollar investment has allowed the museum to grow from 20,000 to 30,000 square feet over the past year. As the dust settles, visitors will explore expanded exhibit and aquarium spaces as well as new permanent exhibits, including Science on a Sphere – a mesmerizing visualization system that displays planetary data on a six-foot diameter globe – an interactive Everglades adventure and a newly expanded science and nature path. The finishing touch on the project will be the addition of a new name. “We are a high-touch, interactive center and we wanted a name to reflect that. And by tripling the size of the former aquarium space, we knew that popular attraction had to be spotlighted in our name,” says Lou Crampton, CEO of the 50+-year-old institution. “The new South Florida Science Center and Aquarium name will be official on June 7 when we host our community day to thank the public for their role in bringing exciting change to this beloved institution.”

FOR

more information call (561) 832-1988 or visit www.sfm.org

This summer, all across the country, museums participating in the Blue Star program will open their doors free of charge to active-duty military families. Blue Star Museums in Palm Beach County include the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach, the Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum and the Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum in Tequesta, among others. You’ll find a complete list online. Launched in the summer of 2010, the program is a collaboration between the National Endowment for the Arts, Blue Star Families, the Department of Defense and more than 1,800 museums across America. Free admission is available from Memorial Day through Labor Day visit www.arts.gov/bluestarmuseums 2013 to active-duty military and their family members (military ID holder and up to five family members). Some special or limited-time museum exhibits may not be included.

FOR

more information

By The Numbers Something To Si n g Ab o u t

The Young Singers of the Palm Beaches, featuring the talents of more than 350 local vocalists, have been delighting audiences and teaching life skills through music for 10 harmonious years. The choir, based in West Palm Beach at the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, is composed of students in grades 3-12 representing Palm Beach County’s rich racial, ethnic, geographic and socio-

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economic diversity. The Master Chorale of South Florida, a regional choral ensemble that has thrilled local audiences with such classical masterpieces as Beethoven’s Symphony No. 9, Orff’s Carmina Burana and Handel’s Messiah, also celebrates its 10th anniversary this spring. The Music at St. Paul’s concert series in Delray Beach has been going strong for 25 years; monthly performances continue through the summer.


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all-classical public radio

Classical Music. It’s In Our Nature. classicalsouthflorida.org

GLOBAL NEWS, LOCAL CHANNEL. Get the latest public radio news and shows, now on the air in the Palm Beaches. wpbinews.org


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Outside The Box LEGOS Reach New Heights at the Norton Museum of Art LEGO® bricks, the beloved building blocks of childhood creativity, take on new life in an intriguing and extremely family-friendly exhibition at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach this summer. Block by Block: Inventing Amazing Architecture, on display from June 20 through Oct. 20, is an exhibition of 10 landmark skyscrapers from around the world, each masterfully constructed with LEGO toy building bricks by LEGO Certified Professional Dan Parker, who will be visiting the museum for a public program on August 8. Two former LEGO aficionados – Tim Wride, the William & Sarah Ross Soter Curator of Photography at the Norton, and Ellen Roberts, the museum’s Harold and Anne Berkley Smith Curator of American Art – are putting together an accompanying exhibition. Building Blocks: Amazing Architecture in the Permanent Collection celebrates the materials and masterworks of architecture that have fueled the imaginations of photographers, painters, call (561) 832-5196 and printmakers.

FOR

more information or visit www.norton.org

Look Who’s Reading A&C Break a Leg Fraser-alum and veteran stage performer David Hyde Pierce recently visited Palm Beach Dramaworks to kick off a fundraising drive for The Actors Fund. William Hayes, Dramaworks’ producing artistic director, and the theater’s managing director, Sue Ellen Beryl, serve as national ambassadors for The Actors Fund, a nonprofit organization founded in 1882 that serves all professionals – not just actors – in film, theater, television, music, opera and dance. The fund is a safety net, providing programs and services for those who are in need, crisis or transition. “They take care of people in this business, cradle to grave,” Pierce, who is the co-chair of the Fund’s Actors Committee, told the gathering of local theater professionals in West Palm Beach. Over the course of a month-long campaign, the cast of Dramaworks’ acclaimed production of A Raisin in the Sun raised more than $18,000 for the cause. “We are thrilled by the response from our South Florida patrons,” Hayes says. “The initiative is not only vital for the entertainment community across the country but it does great work right here in Florida.” erce David Hyde Pi

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FOR

more information call (561) 514-4042 or visit www.palmbeachdramaworks.org


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The 411 On 601 Looking for information on the exhibits, events and excitement brewing at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth? We’ve got it!

Letters… We Get Letters If a picture is worth a thousand words, then pictures combined with handwritten messages are positively priceless. The Cultural Council recently received a delightful batch of colorfully illustrated thank you notes from children at Sacred Heart School who visited the recent Artist as Author exhibition. The example shown here pays homage to three of the works included in the show. Another writer might be a good candidate for a future marketing position at the Council. “I hope business goes well for years to come,” wrote Dmitri Mitchell. “I will tell every person I know to visit your exhibit.”

Artists Answer the Call The results are in! On June 14, the all media juried show County Contemporary will open to the public. The exhibition features a wide array of artwork created by professional artists who live or work in Palm Beach County. Distinguished juror Mark Richard Leach, executive director of the Southeastern Center for Contemporary Art in Winston-Salem, N.C., pored through entries submitted by some 130 area artists in preparation for the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County's newest exhibition. Among the works selected for the exhibition, Leach will choose three standouts to receive monetary prizes: Best of Show ($2,000), second place ($1,000) and third place ($500). There will also be a $500 People’s Choice award. All artwork will be available for purchase; a portion of the selling price will go to support the Council’s programming for artists. County Contemporary will be on view in the main gallery at the Cultural Council’s Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in downtown Lake Worth through Sept. 7. A preview for Cultural Council members will take place on June 13.

601 in 360 Degrees If you’re unable to see the Cultural Council’s headquarters in person, you can still experience the beauty of the building as well as highlights of what it houses – virtually. By visiting the Council’s website, you can now take one of three virtual 360-degree tours of the lobby area, the Uniquely Palm Beach Store and the main gallery. The detail is remarkable; you can practically pick an item off the shelf of the store! See for yourself at www.palmbeachculture.com/601.

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art rt works!

Between the Lines By Christina Wood

“There is more treasure in books than all the pirate's loot on Treasure Island,” Walt Disney once said. New horizons, engaging ideas and exquisite comfort can all be found wedged between the covers of a book. A talented writer can unravel the mysteries of the past, journey across vast oceans in the blink of an eye and place the stars above in the palm of your hand. Books provide answers, open doors and illuminate our darkest nights. Books educate and inspire. Books transform our lives. Curling up with a book is good for your health. Research shows that reading helps reduce stress, enhances concentration and reduces memory loss. A page turner – whether it is a biography or a bodice-ripping romance – can stimulate your brain, boost your spirits and stir your imagination. The written word also has what it takes to stand up to bullies, as local elementary school students learned when the Turning Bullies into Buddies Program was introduced at the West Jupiter Community Center. Hearing The Recess Queen by Alexis O’Neil read aloud led to an eyeopening discussion as, one after another, fourth and fifth graders realized painful truths about themselves. The pen really is mightier than the sword, you see. In the right hands, it has the power to disrupt the cycle of poverty, reduce prison recidivism rates and improve prospects for employment. “Literacy is a bridge from misery to hope... (it is) the road to human progress and the means through which every man, woman and child can realize his or her full potential,” Kofi Annan, former secretary general of the United Nations, has said. For decades, declining rates of literacy in this country have been a cause for concern. “The harsh fact is that we have a crisis today in America,” the Report of the National Commission on

Adult Literacy (June 2008) concluded. “At a time when one out of three of our children is not graduating from high school, the competitiveness of our workforce at all levels has significantly declined, threatening our standard of living and way of life.” In Palm Beach County, one in seven adults lacks basic literacy skills. Thirty percent of fourth grade students in the county read below grade level, putting them at a much greater risk of dropping out of school. Without basic literacy skills, the world of books – and the riches it contains – is an alien landscape, far beyond reach. If you can’t read, you can’t fill out a job application or make sense of a prescription label let alone share the magic of The Velveteen Rabbit with your children. Leonor Perez once brought salt home from the grocery store instead of baking soda because she couldn’t read the labels. Since the young mother enrolled in the Literacy Coalition of Palm Beach County’s Glades Family Education Program, however, she has bravely learned to navigate the written world around her. “My teachers believed in me and gave me the confidence to believe in myself,” Perez recently told the audience at this year’s Love of Literacy Luncheon at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. After learning English and improving her reading and writing skills, she went on to master basic computer skills and financial literacy. She has now been promoted at work – twice – and reads to her 4-year old daughter Anita every day. “My life has changed,” Perez told the sold-out crowd at the Literacy Luncheon. “I am prepared for any situation in the future. And I can help others as well.” In other words, when it comes to happy endings, it’s hard to beat a good book.

“There is more

treasure in books than all the

pirate’s loot on

Treasure Island.”

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–Walt Disney


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Kenn Karakul and Jim Held: MAKING A DIFFERENCE, CREATIVELY By Thom Smith

in

two or three decades, the world will be a better place. Not because of politicians in Washington or Paris or Beijing, not because of tycoons in New York or Tokyo. “I have all these pals who own companies,” an optimistic Kenn Karakul says with a twinkle in his eye, “and I ask them, ‘How many of your people who are making decisions and involved in the process are under 30?” While many contemporaries focus on Wall Street, Karakul and partner Jim Held seek out young wizards blazing trails across the frontiers of finance, health, government and commerce. And they do it from Palm Beach. Ever since they first visited family and friends on the island a quarter century ago, they knew it would be home. They just had to take care of a few things first. Born in Rhode Island, raised in New York and fresh from law school, Held joined the retail world in Manhattan. After making his mark as a managing director at Lord & Taylor, in 1983 he began climbing Bloomingdale’s ladder – senior vice president, general merchandise manager, then manager of the flagship store in Manhattan. With a psychology degree, Ohio-born Karakul also wound up in New York with Lord & Taylor and Bloomies. “It was a blast,” Karakul says. “If you were young and creative and had a business sense and worked hard, you could make a difference. And some really cool leaders and mentors allowed us to do that. At 28 or 29 I’m running a major Bloomingdale’s store and I’ve got 6,000 people reporting to me at all levels of creativity.” Then the retail industry went topsy-turvy. Karakul became a numbers cruncher but hated being “the bastard who said NO.” Both men bolted for cable TV.

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“We started online retailing before anybody else had figured it out, way before Amazon and eBay,” says Held, who eventually became chairman, president and CEO of Home Shopping Network. “Seeing something go on the air and watching for five minutes as $50,000 worth sold, it was staggering.” They expanded into investments, eventually forming JPBK Holdings. “We try to make a difference by investing in things that have potential to make a stronger world,” says Karakul, the grandson of immigrants and son of teachers. “Our system is broken in so many ways. We need a revolution; we need to think out of the box. This isn’t about saving the planet. This is about saving humanity.” Mind you, Karakul and Held don’t shun the good life. They hobnob with the old boys in the paneled rooms, travel the globe and entertain in one of Palm Beach’s landmark homes. In 2006 they bought and restored El Castillo on El Bravo, one lot west of Ocean Drive. It was designed and built in 1920 by Marion Sims Wyeth. Addison Mizner reworked it in 1928; John Volk later added the pool house. In presenting them with its Ballinger Award in 2009, the Preservation Foundation praised them for maintaining “a wonderful sense of the past Center for Creative Education while creating a contemporary environment geared toward today’s Palm Beach lifestyle.” Karakul, a former Cultural Council Board member and Arts Education Committee chair, sits on the town’s architectural review committee. He doesn’t like shoddy work or ideas. “Many people want to put up something inferior,” he explains, “and we ask, ‘Why’d you buy here? Why didn’t you buy somewhere that has no rules, where you can put up a tin shack, using the cheapest possible materials?”


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& with

©The Palm Beach Post/ZUMA

Jim Held and Kenn Karakul

Yet when the old rules no longer apply, Karakul and Held believe new ones must be written and the writers will come from the next generation – if we can educate them. More than a decade ago, Karakul and Held discovered the Center for Creative Education. Established in 1994 by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, its mission is to integrate the arts and artists into the schools, especially those serving disadvantaged communities. It appears so removed from Palm Beach, but they consider it essential to the quality of life for the entire county. CCE involves 12,500 students at more than 90 schools and community centers such as Boys and Girls Clubs. It trains teachers countywide. For many years, it operated out of an old barracks near Palm Beach International Airport but, in 2005, the board (chaired from 2001 to 2010 by Karakul, who is now honorary chair), used an anonymous $1-million gift to buy an abandoned roller rink in the Northwood Village section of West Palm Beach. Work on the project is being completed in three phases. A Community Open House was scheduled for May 31 to mark the completion of the first phase, which will allow the CCE to move its offices to the new location and provide classrooms, rehearsal space and an art gallery. Future plans include space for in-house programming, to train teachers and artists in arts-integrated education and to create special programs for the community that will further the goals of creative learning. “One day an elderly black gentleman came up and said how wonderful it was to have this as a center for everyone, ‘because when I was a kid, we couldn’t go to that roller rink,’” Karakul says. “This building and the community grassroots and the changes we can make are very important to us. It’s another flavor, another piece of what we do.”

What drives your philanthropy? Karakul: We’re involved in programs around the world that help improve mind and body. We support a research program by a woman at the University of Miami to physically and mentally prepare soldiers going to and coming from combat areas. Those things have potential to make a difference. This is where I get my optimism. Why did you become involved in education and specifically the Center for Creative Education? Karakul: We have to focus on our home community because right now we are under-educating and underutilizing our young people. They’re dropping out. Something’s wrong with the system. Held: Once they have a few experiences where they do well – they get a good grade or a reward of some sort – it helps them develop a love of learning. The next time they’re given a challenge academically, it’s not as harsh. We need to use all the resources and talent in our community. We need artists in our education system. CCE employs 60, 70 artists, and the work helps to keep them in the community instead of taking their skills elsewhere. Plus CCE is the largest provider of afterschool care in the county. We provide the educational programs for the Boys and Girls Clubs. We teach them how to ignite students’ love of learning, to develop their abilities – and they all have abilities. Give an example of a typical CCE program. Karakul: Artists work with teachers to develop new lessons and tools that enrich and transform the educational experiences. For a unit on immigration, students interviewed parents and relatives about their ethnic backgrounds, then set up a mock immigration center and clinic with different inspection stations. At the end the kids say, “I get it.” What are your hopes for the future of the CCE? Karakul: We and other supporters feel strongly and committed millions of dollars to do this. But we need for more to step up from the entire county, because we serve the entire county. I just don’t understand why more people don’t invest in it. It’s so core, it’s so fundamental, it’s so necessary for a good world and a good future America. Everyone has a gift. We have to help them understand their gifts, stop calling them dummies because they got a low score on an FCAT exam. These are steps a community can take.

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J. Barry Lewis: A D I P L O M AT I C D I R E C T O R By Thom Smith

the

Shel Shanak

Barry directing Barbara Bradshaw and Dan Leonard in The Chairs.

Alicia Donelan

idea of a desk job does not appeal to J. Barry Lewis. In between shows at Palm Beach Dramaworks in West Palm Beach, where he serves as resident director, he’s likely to be dashing around the nation and the globe, staging a play, hosting an exchange program at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., or fostering international dialog in his newest role as a State Department cultural liaison officer. “I think one of my strengths has always been as an observer… of life, of the world we live in, and to me that translates directly into what theater’s about,” Lewis says. Born in Kentucky, where his dad was a Baptist minister, his words remain slightly tinted with bluegrass. One of his first jobs out of grad school at Northwestern University was as a teacher at a private school in Huntsville, Ala., developing a drama program for students whose parents worked in the space program. He went on to teach young collegians at fledgling Palm Beach Atlantic College and Oklahoma Baptist University. He directed passion plays in the Smokies, worked as a production stage director for several Off-Broadway houses and mounted musicals in New England. “I did Oklahoma eight times,” he confesses. In 1987, a former student at Palm Beach Atlantic called. She was doing lighting for a new theater company. They needed a director but had barely $500 to pay one. Lewis listened nonetheless. “Lou Tyrrell was starting The Theatre Club of the Palm Beaches,” Lewis says. “I said I’d come down if they would put me up and I could make it sort of a working vacation.” In his second season with The Theatre Club, he moved down for good and won his first Carbonell Award, South Florida’s

Barry with the cast and crew of Palm Beach Dramaworks’ production of The Fantasticks.

version of the Tony Awards, for best direction. “We did a lot of good stuff, experimental work, we pushed the envelope,” Lewis beams. “It was exciting.” From there, he moved on to the Kravis Center, the Burt Reynolds Institute for Theatre Training, the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and elsewhere, always seeking new challenges. In 2004 Palm Beach Dramaworks (which, coincidentally, had “only $500”) offered him the chance “to play in a different library – Arthur Miller, Harold Pinter and Ionesco.” More Carbonells soon followed. For his leadership and service to the arts, the Theatre League of South Florida awarded Lewis its 2005 Remy Award and, in 2009, he received the first Randolph A. Frank Prize for his contributions to the performing arts in Palm Beach County. But Lewis has broader interests. In college, he had also studied political science, so when an old friend mentioned a State Department cultural diplomacy program, he jumped at the opportunity. Each year some 4,000 citizens from around the globe – artists, scientists, government officials, sports figures – visit the United States for two or three weeks of grassroots interaction. Since the program started in the ‘50s, some 250 participants have gone on to become presidents or prime ministers, Lewis says. He likens the small groups of 20-25 participants to a master class, except he’s learning as much as the students. One group included a supreme court justice from Malta, so they attended a U.S. Supreme Court hearing. Afterward they were invited into chambers for tea with Justices Samuel Alito and John Roberts. “People say that’s not theater but it is theater – on every facet. Every bit of it continues to aid my understanding of the world as an observer. It’s a shot in my arm,” Lewis says. “All the world’s a stage, truly.”

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June

Acrylic paintings and drawings by artist Adam Hughes

Adam Hughes

of Palm Beach Gardens can be seen through June 10 in an exhibition in the lobby of the Eissey Campus Theatre at Palm Beach State College. Hughes’ themes range from nature to figure drawings. The theater is open Monday to Friday from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. and before performances. 11051 Campus Drive, Palm Beach Gardens; (561) 207-5905 or www.palmbeachstate.edu.

The Artists of Palm Beach County’s Spring Exhibit presents the work of 17 artists in a number of media including oils, pastels, photography and watercolors. Among them are Irma Friedman’s lush oils and Marilyn Samwick’s impressive photography. The featured artist is portrait painter Naomi Cordero Williams. Through June 27; Art on Park Gallery, 800 Park Ave., Lake Park; (561) 345-2842 or www.ArtistsofPalmBeachCounty.org.

Palm Beach Dramaworks concludes its season with Brian Friel’s finely etched memory play Dancing at Lughnasa. Set in 1936 in rural Ireland, the Tony and Olivier Award-winning play – directed by J. Barry Lewis – tells the poignant story of the Mundy sisters, who make the most of their uncomplicated existence. Through June 16; Don & Ann Brown Theatre, 201 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; (561) 514-4042 or www.palmbeachdramaworks.org. Julie Rowe and Margery Lowe in a scene from Dancing at Lughnasa Photo by Alicia Donelan

Longtime arts promoter Chrystal Hartigan presents three “Songwriters Showcases” at the Norton Museum of Art as part of its Art After Dark series. The June 6 offering features female singer-songwriters, including Inez Barlatier; Gin Blische, formerly of Inhouse; and Charlene Chuckaree, aka “A Girl Named Chuck.” Future showcases take place on July 11 and Aug. 1. 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach; (561) 832-5196 or www.norton.org. Gin Blische

Join people around the planet to celebrate World Oceans Day. Loggerhead Marinelife Center will host free, fun activities from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. to generate awareness about the importance of conserving and protecting our world’s oceans, which too many people take for granted. Fletch, the sea turtle mascot, just might make an appearance, too! 14200 US Highway 1, Juno Beach; (561) 627-8280 or www.marinelife.org.

The Palm Beach Photographic Centre’s 17th annual INFOCUS Juried Exhibition opens on this date and continues through Aug. 17. The exhibit features the work of amateur and professional photographers worldwide and showcases a wide variety of photographic styles and techniques, from traditional to experimental mixed media. 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; (561) 253-2600 or www.workshop.org. Photo by Ni Rong - last year’s “Best of Show.”

Monty Python’s Spamalot is “lovingly ripped off“ from the 1975 film Monty Python and the Holy Grail. Like the film, it’s a highly irreverent parody of the Arthurian legend and the Knights of the Round Table featuring raucous humor, killer rabbits and perhaps even a shrubbery. Presented June 20-30 by Entr’acte Theatrix at Delray Beach Center for the Arts, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach; (561) 243-7922 or www.entractetheatrix.org.

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Artists who have studied with Sibel Kocabasi are exhibiting their work at the Lighthouse ArtCenter Gallery at Midtown through July 31. Included are Christine Fogel, Ira Fogel, Jacqueline Rood Leopold, Buddy Lurier, Beverly Marshall, Michael Rippey, Leila Schlesinger, Carole Shulz, Jules Slotnik and Lee Tregurtha. Wednesday through Sunday, 11 a.m.-2 p.m.; 4777 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; (561) 746-3101 or www.LighthouseArts.org.

Florida Atlantic University’s Festival Repertory Theatre

July

Vertical blue abstract by Beverly Marshall

July

returns for a 15th year with an expanded slate in June and July. On tap are A Funny Thing Happened on the Way to the Forum, The Man Who Came to Dinner and Side by Side by Sondheim on a rotating schedule, plus a Four-Piano Extravaganza on July 26 and two Big Band concerts on July 27-28. 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton; (800) 564-9539 or www.fauevents.com.

Two family-friendly summer exhibitions

July

at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts are soaring with color, shape, line and form through Sept. 29. Flying High: The Story of Kites showcases the history of kites from their origins 3,000 years ago, while A Quilting Evolution – presented with the Gold Coast Quilters Guild – celebrates this much-loved art form. 51 N. Swinton Ave.; (561) 243-7922 or DelrayCenterForTheArts.org.

Pirate on the Porch by John Bowen

Happiness is Sol Children Theatre’s production

July

of You’re a Good Man, Charlie Brown from July 12-28. Sol’s talented young actors bring Charlie Brown, Lucy, Linus, Schroeder, Snoopy and the Peanuts gang to life in this delightful – and ageless – musical comedy. It’s part of a full series of summer shows, including Puss in Boots and Sleeping Beauty. 3333 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton; (561) 447-8829 or www.solchildren.org.

What better time to visit a lighthouse than at night?

July

The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum hosts moonrise tours on June 23, July 22 and Aug. 20. Allow 75 minutes to climb the steps to the top of the tower of the landmark 1860 lighthouse and enjoy a spectacular view of the full moon. Sunset tours are also offered frequently throughout the summer. 500 Captain Armour’s Way, Jupiter; (561) 747-8380 x101 or www.jupiterlighthouse.org.

VSA Florida – Palm Beach County’s annual extravaganza,

August

“Celebration of the Arts,” includes an original one-act theatrical performance and an exhibit of works in a wide array of visual art forms. VSA’s mission is to create an inclusive community where people with disabilities can learn through, participate in and enjoy the arts. CMAA Therapeutic Recreation Complex, 2728 Lake Worth Road, Lake Worth; (561) 966-7015 or www.vsapbc.com.

The Maltz Jupiter Theatre’s summer Youth Artists’ Chair

August

program presents Hamlet. The Maltz invites high school students to apply to be part of the free summer mentorship program, which will culminate in the production of one of Shakespeare’s most famous tragedies. Hamlet’s journey reminds us all “to thine own self be true.” Performance at Lighthouse ArtCenter, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta; (561) 575-2223 or www.jupitertheatre.org. 2012 Youth Artists’ Chair students

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ALWAYS INStyle By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

Fine art — a good portion of it by Florida-based artists — enhances the shopping experience at many of the county’s finest retail spaces.

Leaping Gazelle, 1936, Marshall Fredericks  at The Gardens Mall

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Fine art sets the tone for an upscale shopping experience at Neiman Marcus at the Town Center Mall in Boca Raton.

Stanley Marcus knew fine art enhanced not only the quality of people’s lives, but also their shopping experience. He was on to something in 1951 when he commissioned the first artwork for the Neiman Marcus stores founded by his father. The corporate art collection he started now includes more than 2,500 works. Since Neiman Marcus first paired art and shopping, the concept has been embraced by many high-end retailers, particularly here in Palm Beach County where shoppers encounter art that is evocative, colorful, contemplative and sometimes simply fun. Neiman Marcus sets the bar high, which is evident in its Boca Raton and Palm Beach stores that showcase blue chip art to complement luxury wares like Fendi purses and Diane von Furstenberg wrap dresses. The company’s merchandising style, with its impeccable orderliness and minimalistic displays set against gleaming marble floors and cream-colored walls, really makes the art on the walls pop out. The collection includes nonfigurative paintings, works on paper, limited edition prints and sculpture. The art is even labeled, just like in a museum or gallery. A great deal of thought is given to placement at Neiman Marcus, the only luxury retailer with a full-time corporate art curator. Julie Kronick, who currently holds the positions, says, “We place art strategically to enhance cultural awareness and perhaps offer something stimulating or thought-provoking or simply unique and beautiful for everyone to appreciate.” Neiman’s Palm Beach County stores feature works by South Florida-based artists such as Purvis Young, Richard Medlock and Bruce Tolman. “Much of our art is created by artists residing in the region where the store is located,” Kronick notes. “Its presence engages the community in recognizing our support of local artists.”

Nordstrom also incorporates art within its stores in Wellington, Palm Beach Gardens and Boca Raton. The collection includes original paintings, mixed media, works on paper and sculptures. While Nordstrom doesn’t have an in-house curator, the company does rely on a professional art advisor. “Our art buyer and in-house visual teams find the right spot to enhance the overall shopping experience,” says Brooke White, vice president of corporate affairs. “We feel that there’s a natural marriage between art and fashion and art helps create more of a residential feeling.” Art does make a space feel cozier. On Worth Avenue in Palm Beach the public art inspires personal pleasure. Smiles light up the faces of shoppers as they duck into the charming bougainvillea-filled Via Amore and find bronze statues of children in various states of play created by artist Monyo MihailescuNasturel Herescu, a Romanian prince. “People love them,” says Sherry Frankel, vice president of the Worth Avenue Association. “I can’t tell you how frequently they are photographed.” There’s also a two-tiered cherub fountain in the courtyard. “Not only do shoppers notice it,” Frankel says. “They stop to throw coins in it!” She sees how legendary architect Addison Mizner’s taste has shaped the avenue. “It’s like being in Europe – like a fantasyland,” she explains. That also holds true in nearby Via Flora where visitors feel like Alice in Wonderland next to the gigantic bronze tulip sculpture Grande Prima Flora by Robert St. Croix. The European-like penchant for outdoor art continues in Palm Beach Gardens, where all of the major shopping venues accentuate their spaces with original sculptures thanks to the city’s Art in Public Places program. “Most European cities don’t have nearly as much greenery as Palm Beach Gardens, but highquality design and inclusion of art are historically European characteristics,” says PGA Commons developer Joel Channing.

Art offers shoppers at Nordstrom at Town Center Mall a calm respite. Royal Palm Place promenade sculpture by Yaccov Heller

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Stack 45, Mark Fuller at Legacy Place

The dancing fountain entertains shoppers at CityPlace.

At the Commons, shoppers encounter the whimsical work Moods for Wind and Water, created by West Palm Beach artist Mark Fuller. The work evokes images of children’s cartoons and adds a sense of playfulness to the surroundings. Fuller has also been commissioned to create many of the sculptures found in the other retail environments in Palm Beach

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Gardens, including those at Legacy Place, which pay tribute to community planner Hank Skokowski, who died tragically before the mall space was finished. Fuller’s massive sculpture Stack 45 attests to Skokowski’s love of the music from the era of 45 RPM records and smaller sculptures found near benches, such as a pair of bronze cowboy boots, give the impression that Skokowski will soon return. Artist Terry Thommes’ enormous Reliance at Mainstreet at Midtown is another commissioned work and resulted from collaboration between the Borland Center for Community Enrichment and Ram Realty Services, the site developer. The 15foot sculpture is constructed of concrete, glass and steel. “Two monumental arches reach out for each other, depicting how we rely on family, friends and neighbors to create homes and communities of value,” says Shari Meltzer, director of marketing for Mainstreet. “This creates a visual and physical connection between the development and the community.” At The Gardens Mall, the posh interior feels even more luxurious and upscale because of the art it contains. Marshall Fredericks’ Leaping Gazelle, a striking bronze sculpture with a green patina finish, bursts forth with energy and natural beauty. Albert Wein’s Diana, inspired by the Greek goddess, displays exquisite detail. Shoppers rest their weary feet on benches near these works. Sidney Forbes of The Forbes Company, which


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Fabulous Finds Newborn, 1961, William Zorach, at The Gardens Mall

Reliance, Terry Thommes, at Mainstreet at Midtown

owns and manages the property, says, “I’m proud that we can give our local communities art that can be enjoyed freely and at any time.” Mizner Park and Royal Palm Place, both in Boca Raton, also have a European feel. Most of the outdoor sculptures found there were created by Yaacov Heller, who owns Gallery 22 with his wife Sue. Outside the gallery, located in Royal Palm Place, Heller has created a sculpture park that includes bronze statues such as The Temptation and Fiddler on the Roof. In terms of fountain art, there’s nothing quite as spectacular as the $3.5-million, eco-friendly dancing fountain that serves as the focal point of the Italian piazza-like courtyard at CityPlace in West Palm Beach. Visitors are entertained every half hour as the choreographed fountain spurts water in time to musical accompaniment; in the evening, the fountain dances against a backdrop of multicolored lights. Whether shoppers prefer magnificent fountain light shows like this or quieter courtyard sculpture gardens, one thing that is clear is that in Palm Beach County the enchantment with – and commitment to – fine art isn’t confined to museums and galleries. Art is everywhere, even next to the Gucci loafers you’ve been eyeing. And why not? Art takes an environment up a notch and makes a place feel special. As Forbes points out, “Art is incredibly important to enhance one’s quality of life.”

It isn’t just the visual arts that add to the pleasures of shopping in Palm Beach County. The performing arts also make a fashionable statement.  CityPlace in West Palm Beach hosts free outdoor concerts in front of the fountain. Past performances have featured popular artists such as Julianne Hough, Clay Walker and Colbie Caillat. Check www.CityPlace.com regularly for new concert listings.  Mainstreet at Midtown in Palm Beach Gardens hosts a Music on the Plaza concert series that features an eclectic lineup of pop, oldies, rock, blues and jazz. Visit their website at www.midtownpga.com.  Nearly all of the county’s major shopping centers also host art fairs, including the popular juried Art Festival at Mizner Park and an outdoor fair at CityPlace. For more information and ideas, visit www.palmbeachculture.com.

Cherub fountain on Worth Avenue

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Forever Jackie Rogers By John Loring

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 Jackie Rogers with Coco Chanel, 31 Rue Cambon, Paris, 1962.  Tiffany Martin in black silk crepe and organza cocktail dress from the “Little Black Dress” collection.  Previous pages: Coco Chanel with her models: Jackie Rogers (left), Betty Saint Catroux (between Chanel and Rogers), Silvia Agulla Granillo (center), 31 Rue Cambon, Paris, 1962. Photo: Douglas Kirkland. © Corbis

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 Donna Preudhomme in sky blue satin-face organza “flower” dress.

“Palm Beach? It’s the last outpost, the last great refuge of beauty,” says Jackie Rogers while adjusting a lavender, satin-face organza collar of ample proportion worn by a model in her new courtyard boutique at 240 Worth Ave. With 60 years experience in high fashion and the international nomadic life, Rogers’ odyssey has carried her from her mother’s hat and dress boutique in Boston – The Chic Gown – to her own boutiques in New York and Palm Beach via Monte Carlo, the Via Margutta in Rome, a palace in Bologna, 31 Rue Cambon in Paris and back to New York’s Upper East Side and the Hamptons. “During my not overly promising days in Boston up until the early 1950s, my only great fashion inspirations were Fred Astaire, Ginger Rogers and Greta Garbo films,” she confesses. Then in 1952, the beautiful and resourceful Rogers escaped to New York with her sister Pat, took a room at the Mayflower Hotel and landed her first real job as a showroom model working for the already highly successful –

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Tiffany Martin in lavender burlap  “petal” jacket with black patent leather skirt.

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and now legendary – designer Nettie Rosenstein. Rosenstein, one of the leading founders of American fashion, had a marked admiration for “the little black dress” first introduced by Gabrielle Chanel as well as for the bias cut first introduced by Madeleine Vionnet. Not one to sit on the sidelines, Rogers auditioned, without remarkable success, for various Broadway musicals when not busy modeling for Rosenstein. She attracted the attention of Cole Porter while he was casting Can Can in 1958. Porter didn’t welcome her into the cast of the show but instead welcomed her into his dazzlingly glamorous, high café society nightlife. She was not passing unnoticed. Salvatore Dali followed her down the street one afternoon, finally excusing himself saying, “You were so beautiful; I had to follow you down the street.” As with Porter, they too became friends.

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One thing led to another, as it so often does in New York, and before long she was also friends with Christopher Plummer, Sammy Davis Jr., Andy Warhol and many others of their ilk. Her 1958 circle of friends fortuitously included mega film producer Sam Spiegel. Spiegel was struggling with the completion of Joseph L. Mankiewicz’s and Tennessee Williams’ Suddenly Last Summer with Elizabeth Taylor, Katharine Hepburn and Montgomery Clift; and so, needing a break from film land, he escorted Rogers on a junket to Monaco. It was her far-from-average introduction to a Europe few get to see firsthand. On arrival in Monaco and ostensibly daydreaming of Grace Kelly and her fairytale marriage to Prince Rainier, Rogers sighed, “If only I could get a prince.” Well, she actually got one, a good one. Gambling at the casino of Monte Carlo one evening, she found herself in the

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 Donna Preudhomme in lavender satinface organza blouse with black silk crepe skirt.  Jackie Rogers and Marcello Mastroiani on the set of Federico Fellini’s 8 1/2, 1962.


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company of Aristotle Onassis, Maria Callas and Stavros Niarchos along with the dashing 32-year-old Andrea Hercolani, Prince of Bologna, who was conveniently and recently estranged from his beautiful Roman society wife of six years. An inevitable romance ensued with Rogersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s newfound prince charming, reputed to be the most handsome man in Italian society. Prince Andrea carried her off to his imposing 18th century neo-classic ancestral home, the Palazzo Villa Hercolani di Belpoggio in Bologna, and then on to Paris. There Rogers called her fashion icon pal Dorian Leigh at her flourishing modeling agency and landed a job modeling hats at Lanvin. Still passionate, however, about Prince Hercolani, she abandoned Paris, sold her home in New York and took an apartment in the Via Margutta, epicenter of Romeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fast-paced art, film and design world. From there she divided her time between modeling for Simionetti and Fabiani as well as for Capucci and taking trips to the Villa Belpoggio in Bologna.

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By early spring 1962, she met film director Federico Fellini and casually told him she didn't understand his classic film La Dolce Vita – to which Fellini modestly replied, “I’m just an amateur, not a professional” and offered her the role of a journalist in 8 ½ (a masterpiece that won the Oscar for Best Foreign Film in 1963). During the filming, she became close friends with the star, Marcello Mastroianni. Notwithstanding all this, the Roman adventures eventually wore thin while Paris fashion still beckoned. By mid-1962, she was back in Paris where a lifechanging meeting had been arranged at 31 Rue Cambon with Coco Chanel. “When I arrived, Chanel was at the top of her stairs wearing her ‘uniform’: hat, gloves, oversized scissors hanging around her neck. She greeted me with, ‘Great epaules! Une beaute!’” (“Great shoulders! A beauty!”) And there it was; Chanel took one look at the American beauty (whom she would call “Cowboy” because of Rogers’ habit of thrusting her hands in her jacket pockets) and hired her on the spot as both fit and runway model. So began a friendship with Chanel that lasted throughout the 1960s, dining across the street from 31 Rue Cambon at the Ritz – alone or with Alan Delon and Romy Schneider or with Chanel’s omnipresent accessories designer Lilou Marquand. “We talked about everything in Chanel’s life from her affair with [English sportsman] “Boy” Capel to her friendships with Misia Sert, Jean Cocteau and so many others,” recalls Rogers. More importantly, Chanel took Rogers under her wing and personally guided her in fashion design. “She announced shortly after I began as a model, ‘I will show you how to work!’ She showed me how to select fabrics. She taught me style – how to emphasize line and proportion – and minimalization, if you want to call it that, that less is better. She would tear a new model apart, destroy it completely and then reconstruct it to get the right line. Her style had to do with fit and cut and look and line.

Jim Fairman

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 Tiffany Martin in ombré silk chiffon evening dress.  Jackie Rogers at her 240 Worth Avenue boutique wearing her necklace of antique Chinese jades.

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“I remember the advice she gave me when I decided to return to America as a designer: ‘Design for men; women will drive you crazy!’ – and so I did.” The first Jackie Rogers boutique on Madison Avenue in the upper 60s was an ultra-hip, men’s barber shop that sold designer jeans, Art Deco accessories and popular Milan designer Ken Scott’s men’s wear that ventured from florals on into leopard and zebra prints. “Everyone came there; my clients included Jack Nicholson, Dustin Hoffman, Winthrop Rockefeller and Paul McCartney,” she says. Women’s fashions were quickly added and, to celebrate their

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arrival, W ran a cover photo of Lee Radziwill wearing a Rogers “petal” design. By the 1970s the first Jackie Rogers Worth Avenue boutique was open, featuring her signature black and whites along with her popular solids. “I take great pride in what I do,” Rogers states. “Aesthetically it’s got to be perfect – clear – authentic – solidly based.” Over the years, her women clients have included Meryl Streep, Diana Ross, Courtney Love, Renee Fleming and on and on. She vividly remembers every detail of Chanel’s style both in her fashions and her homes, which she describes as “very austere and very beautiful. To this day her look is sensational!”


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Jim Fairman

A lot of that hard-worked-for beauty and simplicity holds sway in Rogers’ fashion house today. There is a certain quiet, well-tailored glamour about it all whose spirit and clarity maintain their ties to Paris and the Rue Cambon. And there is a solid chic to Jackie Rogers’ colorful, clean-lined, often bias-cut and unapologetically feminine and glamorous fashions that in spirit never left the historic birthplace of fashion. They all reflect the designer’s simple if worldly dictum: “Glamour, I like that; I believe in a glamorous life!” Her assistant Amy Negrin adds, “What a life! And dream!”

 Donna Preudhomme in black silk crepe top with white silk gazar bow and white silk crepe pants.  Opposite left: Jackie Rogers, Paris 1963.  Center: Jackie Rogers (left) with other Chanel models and Coco Chanel (right), Chanel showroom, 31 Rue Cambon, Paris, 1962.

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One of a Kind Fine Art and

Mystique is among the nation’s leading experts specializing in fine jewelry reproductions crafted in solid gold and platinum. Margarita stud earrings set in solid 14K gold, starting at $295.00.

Jewelry in Palm Beach County

Mystique Created Gems 250 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 655-3008 www.mystiquegems.com

Artist: Geroge Nemethy (b.1952) Title:: Sailing the Keys Size: 6 x 10 inches Medium: Oil on canvas board Inspired by Persian miniatures, these highly detailed jewel like paintings capture the essence of tranquility and the freedom of the sea with pastel waters and billowy clouds. Wally Findlay Galleries 165 Worth Ave., Palm Beach www.wallyfindlay.com (561) 655-2090 Summer Hours: Tuesday-Saturday, 10am - 6pm

Inspired by the flow of water, the Splash Collection fuses feminine style with nature’s serenity. Dripping in gemstones and diamonds, this collection carries a soft sophistication that makes each woman feel in control of her beauty. A timeless embodiment

of earth’s element, the Splash Collection is a tribute to the beauty of nature. Kaufmann de Suisse 210 Worth Ave., Palm Beach (561) 832-4918 www.kaufmanndesuisse.ca

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Role of a Lifetime: By Anne Rodgers

ACTORS EQUITY ASSOCIATION CELEBRATES 100 YEARS OF

CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE

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Doubt - A Parable at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Photo by Alicia Donelan

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Theatre z Jupiter t the Malt a elan  e n li o il D M a ly Modern to by Alici h o g h u P ro o h T ge  lorida Sta Cane at F

America’s theater actors enjoy a bit of celebrity status as well as respect in today’s arts community. Just a century ago, however, actors were shabbily treated. They were poorly paid and often left high and dry without any payment at all when a show closed. Producers viewed them as vain and capricious. They even had to buy their own costumes. Perhaps the single most influential event responsible for transforming the reputation, status and day-to-day reality of theater actors across the country was the formation of Actors Equity Association (AEA), the union representing actors and stage managers, which celebrates its 100th anniversary this year. “Equity was formed to allow actors to make a living and not be stranded in the middle of Iowa when a show closes unexpectedly,” summarizes Gordon McConnell of Lake Worth, an actor, director and teacher who’s been a member of the organization for 25 years. The creation of the AEA enabled the development of a pro-

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fessional class of performers and stage managers – but the road was rocky. Formed in New York in 1913 by just 112 actors, in little more than five years, AEA had grown to about 2,700 members. In 1919, they came together to call the American theater’s first strike, seeking simple benefits such as pay for rehearsal time and an eight-performance week. The strike – which the AEA boasts was the most entertaining the nation had ever seen – lasted 30 days, spreading to eight cities, closing 37 plays and preventing 16 others from opening before its successful conclusion. New members flocked to the fledgling organization and a solid foundation for a new era in the theater was laid. According to Irene Adjan of Coral Springs, an actor who serves as the South Florida Equity Liaison for AEA, Actors’ Equity makes it possible for artists to be professionals. When work standards are set, she explains, everything improves – for both the actors and the theaters they work for. The accountability to a


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 The E ffect at Palm of Gamma Rays Beach D ramawo rks  The M usic Man at the Maltz Ju pit Photo b er Theatre y Alicia D onelan

set of work standards creates a professional work environment, which in turn makes for a healthy theater community as well as a more entertaining theater experience for audiences. “Ask any actor and I guarantee they’ve been asked, ‘What’s your real job?’” she says. “I’ve heard it time and time again. What we do looks fun and it is often our job to make it look easy but the fact is many of us have had extensive training and earned degrees in our chosen field, just like people in other professions.” “When you bring in an Equity performer, what’s great is that they’re very highly skilled,” says Andrew Kato, producing artistic director at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. On the other hand, he acknowledges, working with the union can create certain challenges for local actors and the theaters that employ them. Smaller theaters often can’t afford the higher wages associated with AEA contracts, potentially limiting opportunities. Then you have shows like Annie; not that many kids are card-carrying members of any

union. “You can see the predicament,” Kato says. As it begins its second century, the AEA will continue to address issues like these that affect the lives and livelihoods of theater professionals. Building on a solid tradition of social action (over the years Equity and its members have not only stared down problematic producers but have also stood up for social justice – on and off the stage – tackling issues such as segregation, blacklisting and AIDS), the AEA and its members will also continue to play an active role in the community. “As theatrical artists, we inherently believe that the performing arts truly define a locale, a community,” says Melissa Robinette, Equity’s eastern regional vice president. “We are there to entertain, educate, inspire and enlighten our audiences. In the South Florida region, we have an exceptional group of union actors and stage managers who take this to heart and move it off the stage. Our members are not only committed to their craft but to their community.”

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 The Mir贸 Quartet at the Flagler Museum

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itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s personal The intimate charms of chamber music speak to music-lovers By Amy Woods

 The Core Ensemble

Chamber music has charmed society since the 17th century with its stirring strings, tinkling ivories and waxing and Lila Photo

waning wind instruments. The familial format flourished throughout the Renaissance period and the Baroque era and eventually entered the homes of upper-crust Americans during the glorious Gilded Age.

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Top photo–Quartetto Bernini at the Flagler Museum; bottom photo–Delray String Quartet

Today, chamber music continues to cast a spell of civility on audiences across America, particularly in Palm Beach County. While not all of the region’s 1.3 million residents consider themselves fans of allegros, nocturnes or waltzes, those who do enjoy the opportunity to experience the sounds of some of the world’s most renowned players. The Flagler Museum opened its 14th season of sold-out shows with the Rome-based Quartetto Bernini and closed it with the internationally acclaimed Miro Quartet from Austin, Texas. St. Paul’s Episcopal Church’s 2013 bill includes artists from England, France and the Netherlands – booked two years in advance. The alwayspopular Palm Beach Chamber Music Festival will draw more than 2,000 loyal listeners to its summer series July 5 through 28 and, thanks to a grant from the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, will educate and coach student groups throughout the school year. The Core Ensemble, based in Lake Worth, will stage a twist on tradition by adding a story line and an actor to a pair of performances this fall – Tres Vidas and Los Valientes. “I think that

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a lot of people think that chamber music is something from an earlier century,” says Margot Emery, development director for the trio, which features a pianist, cellist and percussionist. “That is true but it also can be very current and very contemporary.” What sets chamber music apart isn’t its age. “There is no substitute for the intimate experience of being in a room with a small group of musicians,” Emery says. “It’s very special.” “There’s an intimacy to chamber music that you don’t get in orchestras,” says Dr. Keith Paulson-Thorp, who runs the concert series at St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Delray Beach. “People like chamber music; it’s something different.” “Even though it’s played in a larger hall, you still have the delicacy of the work and the subtlety of the piece,” says W. Lee Bell, senior director of programming at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. In addition to a main stage sampling of chamber music that ranges from chamber orchestras to international duos, the Kravis Center also presents a Young Artists Series in the intimate Rinker Playhouse that brings up-and-


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Photo by Bill Reitzel

coming virtuosos to the forefront. While The Society of the Four Arts in Palm Beach and the Crest Theatre in Delray Beach echo with chamber music each year, school auditoriums, hotel ballrooms and black-box theaters can also serve as modern-day settings for musica da camera, an elevated art form that, four centuries later, proves its relevance with every flat and sharp. “I think Beethoven is to Lady Gaga the same way that a live Shakespeare play is to a Steven Spielberg movie,” says Claudio Jaffe, a cellist with the Delray String Quartet, whose season gets underway in the fall with monthly dates at the Colony Hotel in Delray Beach. “All four are great artists but they appeal to different audiences. As such, I think chamber music will live forever as a testament to great human achievement – not only that of the composers, dead or alive, but, of course, that of the performers, not to mention the instrument makers.” Jaffe has studied the cello for more than three decades and has logged enough hours behind his bow to become a master of

Turtle Island Quartet appeared at The Society of the Four Arts this past season.

the craft. “Chamber music… is very much like an actor in a play, except that in music, we all ‘talk’ at the same time and still must respond to what the others are doing, sometimes leading, sometimes blending in, sometimes following or supporting,” he explains. “The most extraordinary moments in playing chamber music are when all this communication happens as we play, without words, within the music itself. All this with intense concentration, body language and spontaneity; it is a kind of high, being in the zone, like a great basketball team on a really good night.” John Blades, executive director of the Flagler Museum in Palm Beach, says the annual music series at Whitehall – which is broadcast nationally on American Public Media’s Performance Today – aims to expand the interpretation of turn-of-the-century gatherings. “The quality of chamber music enjoyed during the Gilded Age is very high, as is the quality of the ensembles chosen for the series. Those things, along with the wonderful setting, are an unbeatable combination,” he says. “As one musician from the series said recently, quality always finds an audience.”

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Beautiful – yet fragile – glass enhances a visit to the Flagler Kenan Pavilion at the Flagler Museum while challenging those charged with the responsibility of protecting Whitehall’s treasures.

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By Christina Wood

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Who knows what might happen if a window got blown in or a door got blown open? John Blades, executive director of the Flagler Museum

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 Martin J. Hanahan, registrar at the Boca Museum of Art, prepares a work of art for shipping.

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 Among the cultural treasures at risk in Palm Beach County are (from left): a moon rock and the mummy of an Egyptian child at the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium; as well as Zacatecas-style earthenware figures (100 B.C.E - 300 C.E.) from the Jean and David Colker Collection at the Boca Museum of Art.

It’s easy to while away an afternoon in Palm Beach County exploring the intriguing collection of colorful artworks, historic artifacts and natural gems on exhibit in a welcoming array of museums and cultural centers. While the collections themselves may vary widely – from delicate studio glass and bold works in bronze to rare manuscripts, tapestries and even taxidermy – there is something you will find on display wherever you go: passion. The people entrusted with the job of protecting and preserving our cultural treasures – whether a Gilded Age railcar, a moon rock or a sketch by Degas – take their responsibilities very seriously. “Working at a museum is not like visiting one,” says John Blades, executive director of the Henry Morrison Flagler Museum in Palm Beach. As you follow in Flagler’s footsteps, wandering the hallways of Whitehall, take in an exhibit at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre after lunch on Clematis Street, enjoy a free summer visit to Art After Dark at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach – or pass through the doors of any of the area’s museums and galleries – you enter another world. “These places represent the potential for creating beauty, the potential for thinking about things in a much bigger way,” Blades says. Those who know where to look, however, will find more than a collection of Gilded Age confections at the Flagler Museum. In addition to the pearls and parasols, the piano and portraits, the fainting couch and sewing box, a swarm of possible threats lurk within the walls of Whitehall, Flagler’s fabled home. The Norton Museum and the Photographic Centre are not immune; neither is the Lighthouse ArtCenter in Tequesta, the Boca Museum of Art or the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium. In fact, risk hangs in the very air of every museum in South Florida. “Humidity is our biggest enemy,” Blades says. Leaky pipes, sticky fingers and stray sparks are also on a long list of potential foes that he and his staff vigilantly guard against. The thought of a hurricane makes every cultural executive cringe.

Fortunately, in their mission to safeguard the treasures in their care, the folks at the Flagler – and their counterparts across the county – are armed with sensitive environmental controls, elaborate security systems, detailed disaster plans and insurance policies that could fill a book.

GOING PLACES “You always want to be up on the latest things,” says the Boca Museum of Art’s registrar, Martin J. Hanahan. Being in a newer facility – the museum moved into its current Mizner Park location in 2000 – makes the job a little easier. As Hanahan points out, however, “Part of the mission for art institutions is to make the artworks available to as many people as possible. That’s where properly built crates and fine art shipping come into play.” Getting artworks safely from point A to point B, he says, is an industry in itself. When the museum loaned Released by John De Andrea to an institution in Madrid, Spain, Hanahan accompanied the life-sized hyperrealist sculpture of a woman on the trip. “She had more room on the plane than I did,” he says. The concern he might feel about sending something from the museum’s 5,000-piece collection out into the world is also lessened by something called a facilities report. Just as a loving parent might want to know something about the family their child was going to spend the night with, museum professionals need to know as much as they can about an institution wanting to borrow a valuable work of art. The facilities report, Hanahan explains, “is a 20- or 30-page document that details all of their environmental specifications, the lighting that they have, the building structure, how far they are from a fire station, their security system, anything you can think of regarding the safety of the artwork you’re about to lend them.” Typically, the borrowing institution is responsible for the reams

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CAU TION TION U A CAU N C UTIOTION CAUTION CAUTION CA CAUTION CAU N O TION I T U A C

Whether your walls are graced with a single family heirloom or a dazzling collection of modern masters, your private collection deserves to be protected – just like a museum’s. “What you really want to avoid are large swings in the temperature and the humidity,” says Martin J. Hanahan, registrar at the Boca Museum of Art. “If you’re in a home that is air-conditioned all year, that’s the best environment for an artwork.” Humidity and light are hazardous to drawings, prints, photographs, manuscripts and other works on paper. “If you have older artworks that are framed in plain glass you might want to reframe them with something that protects the paper from UV light,” he adds. “Have a complete risk management plan prepared before disaster strikes,” says Ray Celedinas, president and CEO of the Celedinas Insurance Group in Palm Beach. Among his recommendations:  Take photos of the artwork and include descriptions.  Have a hurricane evacuation contingency plan for your most valuable pieces.  Keep small fire extinguishers in critical areas of your home.  Test electrical wiring more than 20 years old for faults through a qualified electrician.  Install intruder alarms and keep doors and windows locked.  Make sure you understand your insurance coverage. Many standard home insurance policies only provide a very limited amount of coverage for fine art and similar collectibles. Fortunately, Celedinas says, you don’t have to face down the threats alone. Due to a high concentration of art dealers, collectors, world-class events and museums, Palm Beach County is home to a large number of highly specialized businesses that cater to individuals who are passionate about art.

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of paperwork – as well as the insurance – for traveling works of art and exhibits. Hanahan may have enjoyed his trip to Spain, but he is now tied to his desk, wrestling with the organizational details surrounding The Santa Fe Art Colony: Early American Modernists in New Mexico, an exhibit opening in October at the Boca Raton Museum of Art. “It’s kind of a coordination ball of yarn because we’re actually putting the show together ourselves. There are a lot of details,” he says. “There are lenders from all over the country. As the registrar, I have to coordinate all of the shipping and make sure all of the lenders are familiar with proper techniques of packing.” If they’re not, he’ll send someone to pack the art for them and will, of course, make sure all of the insurance is in place. “It’s intense,” he says. “Each exhibit brings its own challenges.”

EARTHLY CARES The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium (formerly the South Florida Science Museum), is one of only 17 organizations in the country that boasts a Mars rock in its collection. Every day it is on display, along with a rare moon rock. Every night, the two priceless artifacts are securely locked away in a miniature vault. “Only three people in the museum know the combination,” says COO Kate Arrizza. Protecting the extraterrestrial rocks is a relatively easy challenge for Arrizza and her team. They don’t require strict environmental controls and – unlike most of the exhibits at the Science Center – they are kept behind glass, well out of the reach of inquisitive young hands. “We are very high-tech, high-touch,”

 Robert Henri's Macedonia (1917, oil on canvas) is one of the works of art that will be carefully shipped to Boca Raton for the upcoming Santa Fe Art Colony exhibition.


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 A custom generator is rolled out when hurricanes threaten the Flagler Museum.

 An expert conducts a conservation survey at the Flagler Museum.

 Hurricane damage at the Flagler Museum

Arrizza says. “We have an upgraded digital planetarium. Our exhibits nowadays incorporate iPads; they incorporate touch kiosks. We’re hands-on, inquiry-based so kids can do experiments and touch things. If a hurricane comes and you get a leak in that roof, it could damage some very expensive equipment.” To minimize the risk, the center’s staff runs fire drills, practices for a bomb threat and engages in detailed disaster preparedness planning. They also carry insurance that covers the replacement cost of their high-tech electronics. A replacement policy isn’t going to work across the bridge at the Flagler Museum, though. “If something happened to Whitehall, nobody wants a replica,” Blades says. “The insurance doesn’t protect the artwork,” Hanahan explains. “The physical work itself is protected by proper handling techniques, proper storage. What insurance does,” he says, “is protect the owner of the artwork.”

SHELTER FROM THE STORM To protect Whitehall and its contents, Blades employs a mix of low- and high-tech tools. If a repair requires a bit of welding in the basement, someone is appointed to stand by with a fire extinguisher and spray bottle to keep the surrounding wood damp. (“The riskiest time for a museum,” he says, “is when you’re doing a construction project or an addition or a new system is being installed because you’re working with people who

aren’t as aware of the risk.”) A computerized system monitors the plumbing for even the tiniest leaks. (“Under every air handler and every critical area we have what are called water bugs,” Blades explains. “If they sense any water at all they set off an alarm and security goes and checks it immediately, 24 hours a day.”) When Hurricane Frances blew through, Blades took up residence at Whitehall for four days. In fact, he stays at the museum whenever a hurricane threatens the county. “I can’t in good conscience leave the building unattended,” he says. “Who knows what might happen if a window got blown in or a door got blown open? I can’t hope that the pigeons don’t take up residence or that somebody doesn’t come in and help themselves. I just can’t do it.” For some cultural organizations, the biggest danger associated with hurricanes is the possible loss of power. The rare child’s mummy and colorful fish tanks at the Science Center are among countless treasures that could suffer irreparably without electricity. Generators are their first line of defense. “We have a disaster plan that details exactly what to do in preparation for a hurricane and also, very importantly, what to do after a hurricane in case any of our structures are breached,” Hanahan says. “We’re always trying to find new ways to increase the security and new ways to prepare the museum for real challenges like hurricanes while not intruding on the visitor experience,” Blades says. So, whatever winds may blow this summer, you can still while away a carefree afternoon amidst a reassuring world of beauty and possibility.

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We wish to thank the following hotels and resorts for their support and assistance in providing art&culture magazine to you, as they assist us in our mission of sharing our diverse cultural landscape for your enjoyment. From theater and dance to museums and galleries, Palm Beach County is Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Cultural CapitalÂŽ.


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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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{inside culture} cultural council news

Gary Beach and his Tony Award

Ricki Margolis and Myrna Hill

Mario Nievera and Ross Meltzer

Jason Arbuckle and Nick Gold

Carl and Iris Apfel with Charlotte and Larry Pelton

Bonnie Roseman, Susan Lundin and Maryann Seidman

also starred in the film version), Beauty and

the Beast, Les Misérables, Annie and others. He also appeared in such popular TV series as Cheers, Sisters, Queer as Folk and

Murder, She Wrote. The actor delighted the crowd with inside anecdotes about landing his first Andrea Stark, Richard and Robin Bernstein

Sheryl Wood and Lesley Hogan

professional role in the road company of

1776, his biggest Broadway flop and what it

Eighth Culture & Cocktails Series Concludes with Fashion and Fun This 2012-2013 season of Culture & Cocktails, hosted by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, finished in fine form with conversations featuring a fashion icon and a Tony Award-winning actor. In March, more than 200 fashion fans flocked to the Colony Hotel Pavilion in Palm Beach for IRIS: A Conversation with Iris Apfel. The legendary international designer was interviewed by her good friend Charlotte Pelton, president of Charlotte Pelton & Associates. Between amusing

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anecdotes and witty asides, the conversation

was like to co-star in Palm Beach with

ranged from Apfel’s family background, with

theatrical icons Mary Martin and Carol

overtones of Fiddler on the Roof, to her

Channing. Beach even brought his Tony

years as a color consultant to several First

Award for attendees to see and hold.

Ladies, to her emergence as the world’s

This season of Culture & Cocktails was

most recognizable 91-year-old fashion icon.

the best attended in the eight-year history

In April, the series concluded with an

of the series, attracting as many as 200

equally entertaining conversation between

people to several of the conversations. The

actor Gary Beach and Andrew Kato,

Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation

producing artistic director of the Maltz

sponsored

Jupiter Theatre. The finale attracted more

additional support from The Palm Beach

than 80 theater buffs to the Cultural

Daily News and PR-BS, a Boca Raton-based

Council’s Lake Worth headquarters.

public relations firm. Culture & Cocktails is

Beach was the star of numerous Broadway hits, including The Producers (he

the

popular

series

with

expected to return for a ninth season in November.

For more photos from Cultural Council events, please see page 92.


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cultural council news Cultural Guide Shows the Way to Summer Fun Thanks to the continuing generosity of the Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s popular Summer Cultural Guide is back for another year. Available online at www.palm beachculture.com/camps, the guide is the ticket to great summertime camps and activities offered by 52 Palm Beach County arts and cultural organizations. To introduce the 2013 Summer Cultural Guide, local families had the opportunity to apply for 27 camp scholarships, memberships and passes valued at more than $11,700. The winners were notified in mid-May. “We are so pleased to continue to educate the community about the many arts and cultural activities and camp experiences available for families in Palm Beach County with our online 2013 Summer Cultural Guide,” said Rena Blades, president and chief executive officer of the Cultural Council. “The combination of exciting educational programs coupled with generous scholarship donations from the arts and cultural community offers unique arts and cultural summer experiences for every age and budget.”

2013 20 013 1133

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{inside culture} cultural council news Paige Rense Shares Her Views with Guests at Special Luncheon For the second time during the winter season, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County hosted a capacity crowd of 60 patrons and guests for its exclusive luncheon lecture series, “It’s What You See.” The intimate affair – Lunch with Paige Rense, editor emeritus of Architectural Digest – author and founder of Bon Appetit – took place in the main gallery of the Cultural Council’s headquarters, surrounded by a backdrop of artistic works and books in the Artist as Author exhibition. Throughout the afternoon, Rense, who served as editor of Architectural Digest from 1970 until 2010, delighted attendees with stories and anecdotes about her career and experiences while serving at the helm of the

iconic magazine. Guests also enjoyed viewing artistic works in the Cultural Council’s galleries and visited the Uniquely Palm Beach Store and Cultural Information Center. “I have enjoyed speaking throughout the United States… but I don’t recall having more fun than speaking to the Cultural Council,” said Rense. The Palm Beach resident is working on a book about the career of her late husband, Kenneth Noland, one of the 20th century’s most famous abstract painters, and writing a book about her 40 years with the magazine. She also plans to open an art gallery in Palm Beach. The luncheon and program were generously underwritten by Irene and Jim Karp, Susan Lloyd, Northern Trust and an anonymous donor. The event proceeds benefited artist services at the Council. The first event in the series, lunch with John Loring, also sold out.

Paige Rense, Susan Lloyd and Rena Blades

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Nancy Bourne and Susan Fine


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{inside culture} cultural council news Artist as Author Reception, Lectures Highlight Multidisciplinary Exhibition More than 200 members, friends and guests enjoyed a preview reception for the Cultural Council’s Artist as Author exhibition earlier this year. Presented by PNC Bank with media sponsor The Palm Beach Post, the unique show highlighted 14 Palm Beach County artists whose artistic works and complementary books comprised the exhibition, The works represented a diverse variety of media, including painting, sculpture, photography, printing architectural design and interior design. “Artist as Author brought this group of amazing Palm Beach County artists from a wide variety of creative disciplines together in one spectacular show,” said Rena Blades, president and chief executive officer of the Cultural Council. “We were so pleased to share this with the public.” Throughout the two-month run of the exhibition, the artists came together for a series of three lectures at which patrons had the opportunity to meet these highly creative individuals and ask questions about the works. The artists participating in the exhibition included Harry Benson, celebrated photographer; JoAnne Berkow, realist painter and gallery owner; Geoffrey Bradfield, nationally recognized interior designer; Carlos Castellanos, syndicated cartoonist; Nancy Ellison, celebrity portrait photographer; Stephen Gibson, award-winning poet; Bruce Helander, collage artist; John Loring, iconic design director emeritus at Tiffany & Co. and silk screen artist; John Mercurio and Andrew Kato, award-winning composer/lyricist and concept developer; Edwina Sandys, renowned painter and sculptor; Barry Seidman, still life photographer; Jeffery W. Smith, renowned architect; and Sandra Thompson, painter. Guests who attended the events received a complimentary copy of the winter edition of art&culture magazine as well as a limited-edition keepsake catalogue of images and information about the artistic works and authors.

Palm Beach County artists (from left) Stephen Gibson, Barry Seidman, JoAnne Berkow, John Mercurio and Andrew Kato – all of whom participated in the Artist As Author exhibition – gathered for a panel discussion at the Cultural Council.

Exhibiting artists John Loring and Edwina Sandys

Elaine Meier, guest curator of Artist as Author, and exhibiting artist Bruce Helander

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{inside culture} cultural compendium their patriarchs and matriarchs may no longer be with us, their descendants remember the stories of how they came to be in Delray Beach and how their professions helped shape the city’s personality. “While most may be familiar with the contributions of Delray Beach’s architects, government officials, artists and developers, the public may not be as informed about the African-American farmers, church-builders, police officers, barbers and teachers who were the spine of the community. These are their tales,” says Museum Director Charlene Jones. The Edmonds, the Mitchells, the Descendants of church builder Spells and the Quinces were Jerry Spells: Max Felix, 39; Ty’tianna Felix, 5; Zion Felix, 7 selected for this show thanks

Spady Museum Highlights Families in New Photographic Exhibition

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Michiko Kurisu

In the 1920s, Delray Beach welcomed new residents from all walks of life and from areas around the country who would influence the city’s character, design, development and future. Today, descendants of some of these pioneers continue to call Delray Beach home. In the original exhibit The Legacies of Delray Beach Families, the Spady Cultural Heritage Museum explores the stories of four families – each of whom contributed special talents and gifts to the city. While

to the relationships formed between Spady Museum Founder Vera Farrington and the family members. Local artist Michiko Kurisu photographed original images of the families and curated their artifacts for inclusion in the show, which can be seen through August 2013. “The families and their stories represent the close-knit nature and oratory that can be found in the city’s intimate neighborhoods,” says Farrington. “In other words, everyone knows a little bit about everyone else. In some cases, as with the Quinces and the Spells, they may even be related.” Exhibit sponsors and program partners are the Delray Beach Community Redevelopment Agency, the City of Delray Beach, the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, the Palm Beach County Tourism Development Council, Palm Beach County and Broward Attractions and Museums Month (BAMM).


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{inside culture} cultural compendium Kravis Center Stage Awakenings Students Show Talents in Third Annual Production Talented young people from throughout Palm Beach County recently strutted their stuff in the third annual production of Stage Awakenings, an evening of dance, music, poetry and theater performances featuring both individual and group performers from local high schools and colleges. Kravis Education, an educational outreach program of the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach, presented the showcase, which was supported in part by the annual Palm Beach Wine Auction. Kim Cozort, a professional stage director, actor and theater educator, served as the artistic director for Stage Awakenings, while Craig D. Ames was music director. The artistic team coached and guided the student participants in shaping a full evening of lively entertainment presented in the Kravis Center’s Persson Hall, which

The Stage Awakenings ensemble presenting the rousing closing number, “Our Time,” from the Stephen Sondheim musical Merrily We Roll Along.

was transformed into an intimate cabaret for the one-night-only performance. Among the student performers were original rap artist Antonae Palmer (Palm Beach Lakes High School), classical ballet soloist Kenzie Lemoine (Dreyfoos School of the Arts), pop duo Conor and Genevieve Smith (Spanish River High School), classical cellists Dariel and Emil Liakhovetski (home schooled), contemporary piano soloist Xavier

Walker (G-Star School of the Arts) and singer Cara Young (Dreyfoos School of the Arts). “A key component of the Kravis Center’s mission is to offer comprehensive arts education programs like Stage Awakenings,” said Tracy Butler, director of education. “The center is committed to supporting and sustaining high-quality student performance opportunities for our local young artists.”

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{inside culture} cultural compendium Delray Beach Public Library Centennial Creative Writing Contest a Great Success In honor of the Delray Beach Public Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Centennial Celebration, the libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Young Adult Department â&#x2C6;&#x2019; in cooperation with Florida Atlantic Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creative Writing Department â&#x2C6;&#x2019; launched a Young Adult Creative Writing Contest open to all middle school and high school students in Palm Beach County. The theme of the contest was historical fiction in the form of a short story or poem set in Delray Beach in 1913. The contest received 119 entries and the winners were selected by Florida Atlantic Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Creative Writing Department. All the winners received merchandise from Levenger and were recognized at the Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Centennial Community Day. The first place winners also attended the Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Centennial

Creative Writing Contest winners had the opportunity to meet author Frank McKinney.

Birthday Bash and participated in a writing workshop with best-selling author Frank McKinney in his famous tree house in Delray Beach. The winners were: Middle School Poetry â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Ryan Milbert, Woodlands Middle School, first; Madeline Claire Uible, Gulfstream Middle School, second; Helen Huisinga, Gulfstream Middle School, third.

High School Poetry â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Nicholas DeMartino, first; Antoine Schneider, second; Emily Allen, third, all from Spanish River High School Middle School Short Story â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Kaitlyn Short, first; Natalie Nevin, second; Rumana Ali and Jasmine Mendez, third (tie); all from Woodlands Middle School. High School Short Story â&#x2C6;&#x2019; Jessica Luzadas, first, Spanish River High School.

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When it was completed in n 1902, Whitehall, Henry Fla Flaglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s aglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gilded Age estate in n Palm Beach, was hailed by y the New York Herald DV ´PRUH ´PRUH ZRQGHUIXO ZRQ QGHUIXO WKDQ WKDQ DQ\ DQ\ SDODFH LQ LQ (XURSH JUDQGHU JUDQGHU DQG DQG PRUH PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQW PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQW WKDQ DQ\ RWKHU RWKHU SULYDWH SULYDWH dwelling in the world.â&#x20AC;? Today, T Whitehall is a Nation National nal Historic Landmark open to the public as the Flagler Museum featuring docent-led tours tours, s, self-guide brochures and audio a tours in English, Spanish, Spaniish, French, and German. h e n r y

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call (561) 655-2833 655-283 33 or or visit visit www.flaglermuseum.us www w.f . la aglermuseum.us for for more more information inform mat tion 78

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cultural compendium Theatre League Invites Fans To ‘Get in Bed with the Arts’ Shades of Once Upon a Mattress! To build awareness of the theatrical arts in the region, the South Florida Theatre League has built a special bed that’s decorated with logos of area theater companies and a map of member theaters. The head board announces the theme of the campaign – “Get in Bed with the Arts” – which will run in conjunction with WLRN’s Summer Theatre Fest program. The bed made its debut at the 37th annual Carbonell Awards ceremony on April 1 at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts; its final appearance will be as a participant in the annual Coconut Grove Bed Race on Labor Day weekend. In between, the bed will visit League member theaters on selected Thursday evenings. Patrons will be invited to participate in the fun by doing interviews or having their photos taken on or next to the bed. The interviews and photos will be posted on the South Florida Theatre League’s website (www.southflorida theatre.com). The bed was designed, built and generously subsidized by Fort Lauderdale’s Bombshell Productions. TheatreMania is also a sponsor. Palm Beach County appearances are scheduled to take place at Lake Worth Playhouse on July 18, the Arts Garage in Delray Beach on Aug. 8 and at Sol Children Theatre on Aug. 22. The South Florida Theatre League is an alliance of theatrical organizations and professionals dedicated to nurturing, promoting and advocating for the growth and prestige of the South Florida theater industry.

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South Florida Theatre League board members tested out the bed following the Carbonell Awards. Members with Palm Beach County connections include Carol Kassie (seated, far left), theatrical marketing and PR consultant; Candace Caplin (seated, far right), founder of Parade Productions (a Palm Beach County theater company), and Keith Garsson (standing, third from left), producer/director at the Boca Raton Theatre Guild.

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{inside culture} cultural compendium

Although the nominations for the 37th annual Carbonell Awards were spread among 18 South Florida theaters, the Maltz Jupiter Theatre took home nine awards and won every musical category − a feat that hasn’t happened in 34 years. The Maltz’ awards were spread across three productions: The Music Man took honors for Best Musical, Best Actor/Musical, Matt Loehr; Musical Direction, Anne Shuttleworth; Choreography, Shea Sullivan; and Costume Design, Jose M. Rivera. Marcia Milgrom Dodge won Best Director for Hello Dolly!, a production that also saw wins for Best Actress/Musical, Vicki Lewis; and Best Supporting Actor/Musical, Matt Loehr. Angie Radosh won the Best Supporting Actress/Musical award for Cabaret. With the Carbonell for Best Scenic

Justin Namon

Maltz Jupiter Theatre Has Big Night at 37th Annual Carbonell Awards

Matt Loehr, winner in two categories for Best Actor/Musical, The Music Man, and Best Supporting Actor/Musical, Hello Dolly!, Maltz Jupiter Theatre

Women in The Visual Arts Celebrates High School Artists Women in The Visual Arts honored 16 Palm Beach County students as winners in its 17th Annual Spring Celebration of High School Art. Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County, was the keynote speaker at the awards celebration at Sugar Sand Park in Boca Raton. Art students at all Palm Beach County high schools were invited to participate. Teachers choose the best work in their class and WITVA’s jurying committee selects the “best of the best” for the exhibition. Students are eligible to receive awards and scholarships, which totaled more than $20,000 in 2012. Since 1997, WITVA has awarded more than $256,000 to local art students. Student winners (and their teachers) included: Presidents Award winner: Jaimin Liu, West Boca High School (Susan Feldmann)

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Katlyn Lowder, a senior at Royal Palm Beach High School, was honored for her pencil drawing, Ball of Cats.

Design/Play or Musical going to Michael Amico for Palm Beach Dramaworks’ Talley’s Folly, Palm Beach County theaters earned a total of 10 awards, followed by Miami-Dade theaters with eight awards and Broward County theaters with two awards. The Carbonell Awards also presented $1,000 scholarships to four South Florida students pursuing careers in theater or journalism, including two from Palm Beach County: Vanessa Contreras, who attends John L. Leonard High School, and Jade Zaroff, who attends West Boca Community High School. Along with New York’s Drama Desk and Chicago’s Joseph Jefferson Awards, the Carbonell Awards are among the nation’s senior regional arts awards. The program is named after Manuel Carbonell, an internationally renowned sculptor, who designed the original solid bronze and marble award in 1976. The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is among the supporters of the program.

Irving B. Kahn Foundation Scholarship winners − Carl Amritt, Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts (Peter Stodolak); Christina Philipp and Jennifer Weitzel, Spanish River High School (Katia Martinez); Katlyn Lowder, Royal Palm Beach High School (Janet Stanton); Peter Dobrowski, West Boca High School (Susan Feldmann) Top Winners, Lynn Travis Stender Art Awards − Dominque Davis and Lia Montes de Oca, Park Vista High School (Bernie George); Marie Gesellschap and Melanie Duran, Alexander W. Dreyfoos School of the Arts (Peter Stodolak); David Nitz, Lake Worth High School (Brent Bludworth); Nicole Dykes, Jupiter High School (Brian Kovachik); Colleen Holland, Royal Palm Beach High School (Janet Stanton); Acquille Dunkley, Royal Palm Beach High School (Cindy Oakes); Mar Dominguez, Atlantic High School (Elaine Stecker); and Elizabeth Morales, West Boca High School (Susan Feldmann)


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briefly noted Whether you’re buying or selling, work with a Realtor® who is with you every step of the way.

“Your source for real estate gems”

561.588.7893 www.BijouxRealty.com

Boca Raton | Delray Beach Downtown WPB/CityPlace Jupiter | Boynton Beach Wellington | Palm Beach Palm Beach Gardens | Tequesta

Boca Raton | Delray Beach | Downtown WPB/CityPlace | Jupiter | Boynton Beach Wellington | Palm Beach | Palm Beach Gardens | Tequesta

Park Specialist Lu Dodson and Caretta

MacArthur Beach State Park recently hosted a bon voyage party for its resident loggerhead sea turtle, Caretta, who came to the park in 2009 after having been part of a study at Florida Atlantic University. Staff and volunteers went to great lengths to ensure she would be able to survive in the wild, including stimulating natural feeding behaviors. Caretta was released just south of the Sebastian Inlet, which is prime developmental habitat for juvenile loggerheads. “We are sad to see Caretta go,” says Park Specialist Lu Dodson, “but we are confident that she will live a long healthy life in the wild. Maybe one day she will return to our shores to lay her eggs.” The party kicked off turtle nesting season, which runs through October. Last year MacArthur Beach State Park had a record-breaking season with more than 1,900 nests along its 1.6 miles of beach. Palm Beach County’s only state park is situated on a barrier island between the Atlantic Ocean and the Lake Worth Lagoon.

Everyone’s Invited! Spend a day at our Zoo. It’s like being on a safari, but in your own neighborhood! Daily Animal Shows • Interactive Fountain • Carousel Snack Bars • Restaurant • Gift Shops • 23 acres of lush tropical habitat Open daily 9 AM to 5 PM. (561) 547-WILD (9453) • www.palmbeachzoo.org 1301 Summit Boulevard, West Palm Beach, FL 33405

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{inside culture} briefly noted

In their first flash mob ever,

Alicia Donelan

all 350 members of the Young Singers of the Palm Beaches delighted the patrons waiting to see a performance of Billy Ellio t at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts. The youngsters filled the lobby of the Kravis Center as they sang the familiar tune “I’d Like to Teach the World to Sing,” which was made famous by Coca-Cola commercials. The community-based Palm Beach County youth choir surprised the crowd as a sneak peek at the group’s 10th anniver(From left) Roma Matero, Samantha Santana, Mayumi Sembrano and Michele Balko were among the 350 sary concert in May. The flash mob was Young Singers in the flash mob. part of the Kravis Center’s Beyond the Stage program, which is designed to enhance the entire experience of visiting the venue with pre-performance discussions and musical presentations. Before their performance, the group had its own chance to be inspired by cast members of the show in an exclusive opportunity for Q&A discussion with Billy Elliot cast members. To see a video of the flash mob, visit http://www.youtube.com/watch ?v=qsTfuA19k1A

Susy Diaz is the new executive director of the Middle School of the Arts Foundation. Having worked as an assistant for the mayor of West Palm Beach under two administrations as well as associate director for the American Cancer Society, Diaz has strong relationships within the community. Most recently, she worked as a destination management and event production consultant coordinating high-end events in Atlantis, Paradise Island, Bahamas. She serves on the Hispanic Human Resources Council Board of Directors and volunteers for the Lake Worth Playhouse, where she chaired a recent gala featuring stage and screen actor Burt Reynolds. The mission of the Middle School of the Arts Foundation is to develop permanent resources to ensure world-class standards of excellence in arts and academics at Bak Middle School of the Arts. It seeks to identify and secure resources to meet needs beyond those that can be funded by the Palm Beach County School District.

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briefly noted

Dottie Carson was named interim executive director of the Arthur R. Marshall Foundation for the Everglades, a nonprofit organization that champions the restoration and preservation of the historic River of Grass ecosystem. She succeeds former Executive Director Josette Kaufman, who passed away suddenly in March. “While Nancy and I and everyone associated with the Marshall Foundation are heartbroken over the tragic and unexpected loss of our valiant and beloved Josette, we are confident that Dottie Carson brings the professional skills and experience to successfully lead the organization going forward,” said John Marshall, chairman, and Nancy Marshall, president of the foundation (who is Kaufman’s mother). Carson most recently spent more than five years as director of development for the Alzheimer’s Association Southeast Florida Chapter. From 2001 to 2009, Carson was a member of the Marshall Foundation’s advisory council. For more than 20 years, she was owner/operator of the Carson Group, a marketing and business development firm operating from New Orleans to South Florida.

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{inside culture} briefly noted The Boca Raton Historical

The Norton Museum of Art named James Brayton Hall as deputy director and Holly Davis as deputy director for development. Hall comes to the Norton from the Providence Preservation Society, where he served as executive director since 2010. Before that, Hall was assistant director of the Museum of Art at the Rhode Island School of Design after serving for 20 years as director of campus design and exhibitions. Hall will be responsible for all operational functions and will be the intermediary between the executive director and the management of the museum, overseeing exhibition design, building operations, security and visitor services. Davis’ responsibilities at the Norton include overseeing special events, membership, donor relations and fundraising. Previously, she served for seven years as the assistant dean for development at the University of Miami’s College of Arts and Sciences. She began her career at the University of Chicago Law School, of which she is a graduate, serving as assistant dean for Holly Davis James Hall alumni relations and development.

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Sherry Ferrante

Society has changed the sign in front of historic Town Hall on Federal Highway to read Boca Raton History Museum. “The change was made,” states Jim Ballerano, president of the board of trustees, “to welcome the community into the building to enjoy the history museum inside.” The new sign is part of a re-branding effort by the Historical Society to better engage the community in its local history and to encourage residents and visitors to visit the museum. The current exhibit at the museum is Native Floridians: Seminole and Miccosukee Art and Culture, which is part of the Viva Florida 500 program, sponsored by the state of Florida to recognize the 500th anniversary of Cutting the ribbon are (from left) Anthony Majhess, Boca Raton City Council; Troy McLellan, president and CEO, the arrival of Juan Ponce de León in Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce; Jim Ballerano, president of the Boca Raton Historical Society Board of Trustees; and Boca Raton Mayor Susan Whelchel. Florida. Native Floridians features photomurals, clothing and artifacts and will be on display through Dec. 20. Now in its 41st year, the Historical Society promotes historic preservation and education through its archival services, exhibitions, tours and other unique programs.


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briefly noted

The pitter patter of little paws

Courtesy Claudia Harden, Palm Beach Zoo

can be heard at the Palm Beach Zoo as two male bush dog whelps explore their new surroundings. Born on Jan. 7, the whelps spent their first few months behind the scenes bonding with their parents. Unfortunately, the mother passed away shortly after they were weaned. Native to Central and South America, bush dogs live in many different habitats including lowland forests and wet savannahs. There are only about 25 bush dogs in the Association of Zoos and Aquariums and the Palm Beach Zoo now has seven of them. The new whelps are two of only three recorded whelp births this year. “Bush dogs are elusive by nature,” says Zoological Manager Nancy Nill. “By having the birth of the whelps, staff is able to observe the dynamics of a bush dog family. Information gathered from observations like these could eventually aid in preserving them in the wild.”

˜ÌiÀ>V̈ÛiÊ Ý…ˆLˆÌˆœ˜ÃÊUʵÕ>ÀˆÕ“ÊUÊ*>˜iÌ>ÀˆÕ“ÊUÊÊ,>`ˆœÊ i˜ÌiÀÊ }ޫ̜œ}ÞÊ Ý…ˆLˆÌÊUʈ˜ˆÊœvÊ œÕÀÃiÊUÊ"ÕÌ`œœÀÊ-Vˆi˜ViÊ/À>ˆÊÊÊÊ `ÕV>̈œ˜>Ê7œÀŽÃ…œ«ÃÊUÊ ˆÀ̅`>ÞÊ*>À̈iÃÊUÊ-«iVˆ>Ê Ûi˜ÌÃ

SUMMER 2013 EXHIBIT *Õ˜}iʈ˜ÌœÊ̅iÊ>˜Vˆi˜ÌÊ`ii«Ê>µÕ>̈VÊܜÀ`ʜvÊ̅iʏ>ÌiÊ

ÀiÌ>ViœÕÃÊ«iÀˆœ`Ê>˜`ÊiÝ«œÀiÊ̅iÊLˆ}}iÃÌÊV>À˜ˆÛœÀœÕÃÊ “>Àˆ˜iÊÀi«ÌˆiÃÊ̜ʅ>ÛiÊiÛiÀʏˆÛi`°Ê/…iÊVÀi>ÌÕÀiÃʜvÊ Ì…iÊ->Û>}iʘVˆi˜ÌÊ-i>ÃÊ>ÀiÊ՘ˆŽiÊ>˜Þ̅ˆ˜}ʎ˜œÜ˜Êˆ˜Ê ̜`>Þ½ÃÊܜÀ`°Ê9œÕʅ>Ûi˜½ÌÊÃii˜Ê>˜Þ̅ˆ˜}ʏˆŽiÊ̅ˆÃÊLivœÀit

South Florida Science Museum 4801 Dreher Trail North West Palm Beach, FL 33405 xÈ£°nÎÓ°£™nnÊÊUÊÊÜÜÜ°ÃvÓ°œÀ}

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Palm Beach Zoo Keeper Curtis Phillabaum with one of two bush dog whelps during a recent round of vaccinations.

Complimentary Consultation A Few of Our Books

(888) 862-2754 www.LegaciesandMemories.com art&culture

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{cultural cuisine guide}

Cultural Cuisine Between Food and Culture

Inspirations from Palm Beach Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Finest Restaurants & Eateries

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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern

Ave Cafe

A Tapas Wine Bar ...a

friendly

We’re Romantic, We’re Hip... We’re Completely Unique

neighborhood cafe downstairs and a

casually elegant restaurant upstairs.

Summer Hours

Mon-Thurs: 12 to 10pm Fri-Sat: 12 to 11pm 561.588.4488 | bizaareavecafe.com 921 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460

 3800 OCEAN Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa 3800 North Ocean Drive, Singer Island 561.340.1795 Discover an inspiring menu that echoes Chef Max’s dedication to simplicity, intense flavor and farm-to-table cuisine.  BB KING’S BLUES CLUB 550 Rosemary Avenue, WPB 561.420.8600 Live music venue. Experience It Today & “Let The Good Times Roll.”  BIZARRE AVE CAFE 561.588.4488 921 Lake Ave., Lake Worth A welcoming, cozy atmosphere where one would feel at home entertaining friends with good food and fine wine.  BLUE MARTINI CityPlace, WPB 561.835.8601 An upscale martini bar featuring over 20 of the hottest specialty martinis complemented by a truly sensational tapas menu.  BOGART’S BAR & GRILLE 3200 Airport Road, Boca Raton 561.544.3081 Bogart’s Bar & Grille located at the JM Lexus Premier Level at Muvico 20 Palace in Boca Raton is the ultimate dinner and a movie experience.  BREWZZI CityPlace, WPB 561.366.9753 Italian American Bistro with upscalecasual dining for lunch and dinner, featuring a state-of-the-art, gold medal Microbrewery. Late night patio bar.

DINE IN WITH CORDON BLEU Dinner Parties Cocktail Parties Wine Tasting/Pairings Allow us to do the work while you enjoy the company of your guests.

PH 561 339 2444

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 BREWZZI Glades Plaza, 2222 Glades Rd 561.392.2739 Italian American Bistro with upscalecasual dining for lunch and dinner, featuring a state-of-the-art, gold medal Microbrewery. Now serving breakfast.

 BURGER BAR 4650 Donald Ross Road, PB Gardens 561.630.4545 Indulge in hand-shaped signature gourmet burgers, specially fashioned from a proprietary blend of short rib, brisket and chuck steak.  CAFÉ CHARDONNAY 4533 PGA Blvd., PB Gardens 561.627.2662 We delight you with the finest American cuisine. Chef Frank is constantly creating new foods to satify your every culinary desire.  CITY CELLAR WINE BAR & GRILL CityPlace, WPB 561.366.0071 A diverse menu featuring steaks, chops, fish and pasta complements a huge 10,000bottle wine collection.  CITY OYSTER 213 East Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach 561.272.0220 A traditional American seafood restaurant. Fresh, simple and delicious seafood selections.  CORDON BLEU CATERING 561.339.2444 213 S. Rosemary Ave., WPB Dinner Parties, Cocktail Parties, Yacht Charters, Wine Tastings/Pairings. European Culinary Excellence.  DECK 84 840 E. Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach 561.665.8484 As the Avenue’s first waterfront dining concept of its kind, Deck 84 provides a stimulating waterfront dining experience.  GREASE BURGER BAR 213 Clematis Street, WPB 561.651.1075 Grease Burger Bar offers a selection of fresh ground daily, hand shaped, 10 oz. juicy burgers.  HENRY’S 16850 Jog Road, Delray Beach 561.638.1949 The ultimate location for gourmet American comfort food in Delray Beach. Henry’s combines substance and style for lunch and dinner.

 BUBBA GUMP SHRIMP CO. 1065 North A1A, Jupiter 561.744.1300 Shrimp is the specialty at Bubba Gump Shrimp Co., but in our fun, casual setting there is definitely something for everyone.

 IRONWOOD GRILLE PGA National Resort & Spa, PB Gardens 561.627.2000 Offering classic American cuisine with contemporary influences, serving up tantalizing menu selections.

 BUCA DI BEPPO WELLINGTON 2025 Wellington Green Drive, Wellington 561.790.3287 In the spirit of Italian culture, our dishes are served family-style and meant to be shared by everyone at the table.

 LEGAL SEA FOODS Town Center at Boca Raton, Boca Raton 561.447.2112 High quality dining experience never goes out of style. With over 40 varieties of fresh fish and shellfish available.


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Brewzzi is Florida's most awarded brewery, including Gold and Silver medals at the Great American Beer Festival. Always Brewed-On-Site, our German-style lagers accent many of our recipes and complement all our fare. Our kitchen is renowned for enormous portions of quality favorites using the freshest ingredients brought in daily. While our core menu is based on old world Italian & traditional American comfort food, our selections have expanded to include an eclectic mix of global cuisines. Experience Brewzzi at the original Boca Raton location (now serving Breakfast 7 days a week) or overlooking the fountains at CityPlace, featuring our Patio Bar and Late Night Menu.

WE BREW TO PLEASE CITYPLACE 700 SOUTH ROSEMARY AVENUE • WEST PALM BEACH • 561-366-9753

BOCA RATON Now Serving Breakfast! GLADES PLAZA • 2222 GLADES ROAD • 561-392-BREW(2739) www.brewzzi.com


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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern

y Now Offering

Casual yet sophisticated,

 LEOPARD LOUNGE AND RESTAURANT The Chesterfield Hotel, PB 561.659.5800 Eclectic, “New American” gourmet cuisine offered in an elegant, yet playful atmosphere, with dancing and live entertainment.

 RENATO’S 87 Via Mizner, PB 561.655.9752 Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with a dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls.

 MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 777 South Flagler Drive, WPB 561.820.8125 USDA Prime aged beef, live Maine lobsters, fresh fish, hand-selected vegetables and elegant desserts.

 ROCCO’S TACOS AND TEQUILA BAR 224 Clematis Street West Palm Beach 561.650.1001 Rocco’s Tacos offers a true taste of Mexico within a fun, casual environment.

 THE OFFICE 201 East Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach 561.276.3600 A place where whimsy and gastronomical delights go hand in hand, The Office is a modern American gastropub.  PADDOCK RESTAURANT Palm Beach Kennel Club, WPB 561.683.2222, Ext. 199 A unique dining experience - fine dining and an exciting show in an elegant dining room with a commanding view of the track.

Outstanding food, expertly prepared Great wines, Live music nightly. Seasonally inspired dining... 52 weeks a year!

BOCA RATON PALM BEACH GARDENS FT LAUDERDALE

For details, visit www.seasons52.com

Casual Dining on Worth Avenue

 PAMPAS GRILLE CITYPLACE 651 Okeechobee Blvd., WPB 561.791.6487 The menu at Pampas Brazilian Grille is as diverse as the Brazilian culture.  PARADISO RISTORANTE OF LAKE WORTH 625 Lucerne Avenue, Lake Worth 561.547.2500 Fish, seafood, steaks, full bar, wine cellar, private dining rooms, in wine cellar dining. Prix fixe menu and a la carte.  POLO STEAKHOUSE RESTAURANT The Colony Hotel, PB 561.655.5430 Full-service restaurant specializing in prime dry-aged beef. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails.  RED, THE STEAKHOUSE 1901 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton 561.353.9139 An unparalleled dining experience, RED, The Steakhouse, is touted by critics as a universal favorite.

Open 7 days Lunch/Dinner Sunday Brunch Continuous Dining 11am - 10pm 221 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach

835.3500

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 RED BRICK GRILLE 4775 Lyons Rd., Delray Beach 561.454.8002 Full service casual dining experience featuring contemporary Americana cuisine featuring appetizers, gourmet pizzas, pasta, mouth-watering burgers, handcrafted sandwiches, fresh salads & more



ROYAL ROOM CABARET AT THE COLONY HOTEL, PALM BEACH

The Colony Hotel, PB 561.655.5430 The Royal Room features top name cabaret performers. Enjoy dinner and show or just the show.  RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE CityPlace, WPB 561.514.3544 Premier steakhouse at CityPlace in West Palm Beach. Catering service available.  SAILFISH RESTAURANT 98 Lake Drive, PB Shores 561.844.1724, Ext. 107 This exceptionally popular seafood restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.  SEASONS 52 11611 Ellison Wilson Road, PB Gardens 561.625.5852 Enjoy the taste of fresh food grilled over open wood fires, great wines and live piano music nightly in the wine bar.  SINCLAIRS OCEAN GRILL Jupiter Beach Resort & Spa 561.746.2511 Dine in the informal elegance of our signature Palm Beach restaurant, which provides gourmet meals in a tropical atmosphere.  STIR BAR & TERRACE The Ritz-Carlton, Manalapan 561.533.6000 Stir Bar offers creatively blended, muddled and stirred cocktails with a twist. Stir’s lively indoor and outdoor social scene.  SUNDY HOUSE RESTAURANT 106 South Swinton Avenue, Delray Beach 561.272.5678 Sundy House, a charming 150-seat, finedining establishment with accommodations nestled in botanical gardens and waterfalls.


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{dining out} PALM BEACH COUNTY LOCATION REFERENCE  Southern |  Central |  Northern  TA-BOÓ, AN AMERICAN BISTRO & BAR 221 Worth Ave., Palm Beach 561.835.3500 An American bistro and bar featuring casual dining on Worth Avenue since 1941. Featuring prime steaks, Dover sole, sea bass, pizza, homemade desserts and cappuccinos.  TESTA’S RESTAURANT 221 Royal Poinciana Way 561.832.0992 Testa’s serves Italian, American and Seafood dishes. Breakfast, lunch or dinner, Testa’s is superb for a romantic getaway.  THREE (III) FORKS PRIME STEAKHOUSE PALM BEACH GARDENS 4645 PGA Boulevard, PB Gardens 561.630.3660 III Forks is one of the nation’s prime steakhouses with a savvy menu featuring USDA Prime beef, seafood, and local favorites.  TIDES OCEANFRONT GRILLE Palm Beach Oceanfront Inn, PB 561.855.7575 Tides Oceanfront Grille proudly boasts being the closest restaurant to the ocean in south Florida.  TIN FISH RESTAURANT 561.223.2497 118 S. Clematis St., WPB Fresh, delicious fish, served quickly in a casual atmosphere. Try one of our seven famous fish tacos, salmon on slaw, crab cakes, fish sandwich or popular shrimp and corn chowder. Head upstairs to our Top of the Fish bar for an impressive cocktail selection and nightly drink specials.  TOWER RESTAURANT 44 Cocoanut Row 561.659.3241 Tower Restaurant takes pride in its daily specials: wiener schnitzel, stuffed cabbage, pot roast and corned beef and cabbage; and monster apple pancake á la Luchows.  VIC & ANGELO’S DELRAY BEACH 290 East Atlantic Avenue, Delray Beach 561.278.9570 From the garden to the plate, all of the ingredients at Vic & Angelo’s are fresh and imported from Italy.  THE WINE DIVE 319 Clematis St., West Palm Beach, FL 561.318.8821 Not just a wine bar and definitely not a dive– The Wine Dive is West Palm Beach’s go-to spot for live jazz, innovative menu items, hand-crafted cocktails, and of course over 70 wines to be enjoyed by the flight, glass, or bottle.

87 Via Mizner, Worth Avenue, Palm Beach www.renatospalmbeach.com 561.655.9752

Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with an intimate dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls. Culinary delights from the classics to the eclectic are complemented with an extensive wine list and fully stocked bar.

At Cafe Chardonnay we give center stage to local farm fresh foods and seafood. Chef Frank feels the flavor of every dish is dramatically improved by farm to table freshness.

4533 PGA Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens www.cafechardonnay.com 561.627.2662

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Artist as Author Members Reception

The artists participating in the Cultural Council’s Artist as Author exhibition included (from left) Stephen Gibson, Sandra Thompson, Barry Seidman, John Loring, Nancy Ellison, Jeffery Smith, Elaine Meier (exhibition curator), Edwina Sandys, Geoffrey Bradfield, JoAnne Berkow, Carlos Castellanos, Bruce Helander, Andrew Kato and John Mercurio.

Rhonda Davidson and John Davidson

Gigi Benson and Cil Draime

Andrew Kato, Kelly Karakul and Kenn Karakul

Countess of Caithness, Ronald Wagner, Susan Jacobs, Timothy Van Dam and Mary Churchill

JoAnne Berkow, Steven Tendrich and Priscilla Heublein

Cara Kay and Christopher Twardy

I am so grateful to the Cultural Council for allowing Young Singers of the Palm Beaches to hold our donor cocktail party in the art gallery. All of our guests commented on the beauty of the building, the gallery and the wonderful exhibits. The acoustics were amazing, and our singers sounded lovely. It was the perfect venue.

— Beth Clark, executive director, Young Singers of the Palm Beaches.

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Join the Cultural Council As a member, we will keep you informed and entertained with our award-winning publications and signature events. Enjoy these exclusive benefits that offer incredible value — all year long!

Membership Benefits     

Invitations to members-only exhibition previews Free or reduced admission to select programs and events 10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store purchases Subscription to art&culture magazine and Cultural Calendar Recognition in the Council’s Annual Report

CONTRIBUTOR $600 All benefits of the Supporter membership, plus:  One additional guest pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  VIP seating at Culture & Cocktails  VIP passes to local art fairs  Two guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine

PATRON $1,000

All benefits listed above for one person

All benefits of the Contributor membership, plus:  Two additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails  Four guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Invitation to director’s annual event  Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building

HOUSEHOLD $150

FOUNDING PATRON $2,500 AND ABOVE

Individual member benefits for two adults at the same address, plus:  CultureCard (membership discount card)

All the benefits of the Patron membership, plus:  Recognition on donor plaque  Private tours of special exhibitions for you and your guest upon request  Four additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails

INDIVIDUAL $65

SUPPORTER $250 All benefits of the Household membership, plus:  One pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  One guest invitation to all member exhibition previews

To join the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County or for more information on Artists membership www.palmbeachculture.com/jointhecouncil

Business Arts Partner Membership The Cultural Council is a not-for-profit agency providing artists and cultural organizations with programs and services that promote and support their individual missions. Members help us accomplish these goals and ensure our community continues to have access to quality arts programming in Palm Beach County, which makes our destination desirable to businesses, visitors and residents. Membership provides your business with access to valuable benefits that will increase your visibility and connect you with our donors, members and the greater community.

BENEFITS

LEVEL OF SUPPORT AFFILIATE $600

STEWARD $1,000

LEADER $2,500

Invitations to members-only exhibition previews

Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine and Council’s Annual Report

Discounted advertising rates for art&culture magazine

Business logo with live link on Council’s website

art&culture magazine delivered to your business (up to 20 copies per issue)

Culture Card – Member discount cards for cultural organizations in Palm Beach County

2

4

4

Tickets to attend the Council’s SmARTBiz Summit for arts and business leaders

2

4

6

Free admissions to all Culture & Cocktails programs (includes VIP reserved seating)

2

4

6

Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, The Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building

Sponsorship of one Cultural Executives Committee meeting* (Includes four invitations to meeting) Logo included in eblasts to all Cultural Council Cultural Organizations. *Based on availability

For more information, please call Debbie Calabria at 561-472-3330.

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Culture & Cocktails A conversation with Gary Beach, interviewed by Andrew Kato, March 4, 2013

Lynn Brodsky, Jean Sharf and Susan Lundin

Michael Barry and Janice Barry

Peggy Katz, Richard Katz and Katie Deits

Milton Maltz, Tamar Maltz and Andrew Kato

Donald Ephraim, Maxine Marks, Linda Rosenkranz and Jay Rosenkranz

Virginia Mossburg and Dina Gustin Baker

Gary Beach, Andrew Kato and Roe Green

Find more details about these and other recent Cultural Council events on page 72.

Members See It First Member Preview Dates:  Thursday, September 19, 2013 – Palm Beach County Art Teachers Association  Thursday, November 21, 2013 – The Deep and the Shallow: Photographs Exploring a Watery World  Thursday, January 30, 2014 – Interior Design  Thursday, April 10, 2014 – En Plein Air  Thursday, June 19, 2014 – Southern Exposure: Artists from Below the 23.5° Parallel

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thank you.

Page 95

In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and greater help us accomplish our mission.

Listing as of print date

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson Arthur I. and Sydelle Meyer Charitable Foundation The Azeez Foundation B/E Aerospace Ms. Dina Gustin Baker Bank of America Banyan Printing Mr. and Mrs. R. Michael Barry Mrs. Marta Batmasian Mr. Bruce A. Beal and Mr. Francis V. Cunningham Mrs. JoAnne Berkow Richard S. Bernstein and Associates, Inc.

— Dina Gustin Baker

Mr. and Mrs. John Blades Mr. Milton J. Block and Mrs. Leanna Landsmann Ms. Yvonne S. Boice

Office Depot

I have enjoyed being a member of the Cultural Council for five years. My work was selected to be part of the Scripps Research Institute/Scripps Florida/Nexus: Science+art Exhibition and I recently had a solo exhibition in the gallery. Rena and her staff were professional and a pleasure to work with. My involvement with the Cultural Council has been exciting and interesting.

Office Depot Foundation Oxbow Carbon and Minerals LLC Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Palm Beach Daily News The Palm Beach Post Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker Mr. and Mrs. William Parmelee Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Mrs. Helen K. Persson Dr. Henry J. Petraki PGA National Resort and Spa PNC Bank PNC Foundation Dr. and Mrs. Carter Pottash Mr. and Mrs. Christopher G. Kellogg

Publix Supermarket Charities

The Fine Foundation

Kohnken Family Foundation Inc.

REG Architects Inc. Richard and Peggy Greenfield Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farber Mrs. Shirley Fiterman

Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman

The Boston Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Flack

Mr. Raymond E. Kramer III, Esq.

Ms. Carole Boucard

Florida Power & Light Company

Mrs. Emily F. Landau

Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bracci

Dr. and Mrs. Robert Flucke

Mr. Geoffrey Bradfield

Galaxy Thrift LLC

Geo. Zoltan Lefton Family Foundation

The Breakers Palm Beach

The GE Foundation

Gerard Lemongello, DDS

Mr. and Mrs. Howard Bregman, Esq.

Goldberg Foundation Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin J. Levine

Brenner Real Estate Group

Dr. Stan and Marcie Gorman Althof

The Liman Foundation

Mr. Douglas Brown

Mr. and Mrs. Craig D. Grant

Ms. Susan Lloyd

The Ann K. and Douglas S. Brown Family Foundation

Ms. Roe Green

Catherine Lowe M.D., LL.D.

Greenberg Traurig, P.A.

Business Development Board

Lynn University

Hon. and Mrs. William Greenberg

Mr. Christopher D. Caneles and Mr. Stephen Nesbitt

The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager

Ms. Peg Greenspon Gunster

The Maltz Family Foundation

Mr. Gary Schweikhart

Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand

The Marks Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman

Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph A. Marks

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf

Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Sloane

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews

Mr. Harold Smith

Ms. Elaine Meier

Mr. Lawrence Sosnow

Denise and William Meyer Foundation

Dr. Jay W. Spechler

Mrs. Sydelle Meyer

Mr. and Mrs. Bob Stiller

Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs

Mr. Dom A. Telesco

Mr. and Mrs. George J. Michel Jr.

The Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc.

Sydell and Arnold Miller Foundation

Ms. Patricia G. Thorne

Mrs. Sydell L. Miller

Mrs. Phyllis Tick

Ms. Jane Mitchell

William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust

Ms. Jo Anne Moeller

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio Jr.

The Colony Hotel Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan The Community Foundation of Louisville Mr. and Mrs. Miles A. Coon Mr. Gus Davis Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro Mr. Bradford A. Deflin Dr. Richard P. D’Elia Mrs. Edith R. Dixon Mr. and Mrs. John T. Dougherty, Jr. Mrs. Cecile Draime

Mr. Christopher E. Havlicek

HERlife Magazine Ms. Priscilla Heublein Historical Society of Palm Beach County Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman John C. and Mary Jane Howard Foundation Ms. Lisa Huertas Mrs. Lyn Ianuzzi Jasteka Foundation Inc.

Rose Marie and Ted J. Miller Family Foundation Inc. Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Rosenberg Mr. and Mrs. Jay Rosenkranz Mrs. Susan Ross Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Rubin Mr. and Mrs. Stanley M. Rumbough Jr. Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc. The Lewis Schott Foundation

Mrs. Andrea Stark

Telesco Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Jennifer Garrigues, Inc. Interior Design

Ms. Beatriz A. Ford

Mr. and Mrs. F. Ross Johnson

Mrs. Mary Montgomery

Baroness Jeane von Oppenheim

Earle I. Mack Foundation, Inc.

JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank

Ms. Virginia C. Mossburg

Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman

Mr. Bernard Eisenstein M.D.

Mr. Kenn Karakul and Mr. Jim Held

Mrs. Elizabeth Neuhoff

Ms. Maryanne Webber

Mr. George T. Elmore

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp

Mrs. Suzanne Niedland

Wells Fargo

Donald M. Ephraim Family Foundation

Katz Family Foundation

Ms. Paige Noland

Ms. Sheryl G. Wood, Esq.

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz Jr.

Northern Trust

Zissu Family Foundation

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{next issue – Fall 2013}

This 1969 Chevy Camaro Z/28 was among the classic cars on the block at this year’s Barrett Jackson auction.

performance art The exuberance and forward-looking design aesthetics of the 1950s were not limited to Abstract Expressionism. The Beat Poets didn’t hold a monopoly on rebellious expression. In 1955, a sleekly redesigned, chrome-laden Bel Air with an optional V8 appeared in Chevy showrooms. As the automobile flexed its muscle and continued to evolve, hearts raced ever faster. Last year, more than a dozen collector cars sold at auction for $2 million or more, including a 1955 Mercedes-Benz 300 SL Alloy Gullwing that went for $4.6 million. The exotic, antique and classic cars that collectors crave represent more than creative engineering and design, however. This year, a Barrett Jackson auction of classic cars held at the South Florida Fairgrounds in West Palm Beach not only grossed $21 million in sales, it also attracted 55,000 fans and raised more than $1.8 million for charity. As the Los Angeles Times notes, “Unlike precious metals, stocks, bonds and even most art, rare autos have emotional qualities that other investments lack.” Hit the road with us this fall as art&culture explores the passion that fuels those in Palm Beach County who collect and restore classic cars.

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Clinique of Plastic Surgery_Spring 13:Layout 1

5/31/13

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Frenchmans Creek_AC vol7 Spring13:Frenchman

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12:41 PM

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art&culture magazine v7i3 Spring 2013