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Spring/Summer 2010

The Creative Process “Learn, Do and Learn More” with the Armory Art Center’s Artists-in-Residence

By John Loring

Expecting Great Things Local theaters and passionate playwrights give birth to new works

One Step at a Time Explore the past and present step by step on a walking tour

PLUS,

the greening of Palm Beach County’s cultural landscape, the one and only Dolly Hand, visual effects guru Dean Lyon and more

of Palm Beach County


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features

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from page to stage Developing new work for the stage is an essential yet risky prospect for playwrights and producers. By Karen Kendall

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stepping out If you thought long walks on the beach were the only option, think again! Walking tours are a great way to explore Palm Beach County’s diverse cultural landscape. By Christina Wood

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34 50

an arsenal for art The prestigious Visiting Master Artist Workshop enhances the Armory Art Center’s creative fire power. By John Loring

how green is our valley Palm Beach County’s lush cultural landscape is becoming increasingly green thanks to the efforts of conservation-minded artists and administrators. By Jim Jackson

54 Cover Image: Armory Art Center, Oils on Palette Photo: Christopher Fay

spring/summer 2010

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welcome letter The Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s new home in Lake Worth will serve as a springboard to the future. By Rena Blade

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e d i t o r ’s n o t e

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Spring is a celebration of new beginnings; so is art. By Christina Wood

u p f ro n t

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• Spend a few happy hours with one of the innovative cultural organizations that offer fun after-hours activities. • Leading dancers from New York City’s American Ballet Theatre will appear as guest artists in Boca Ballet Theatre’s summer production of Giselle. • Nat King Cole’s twin daughters honor their father’s musical legacy with a mission to support music education in South Florida. • The Palm Beach County Cultural Council will have a new home in a historic building thanks to Mary Montgomery and the family of the late Robert M. Montgomery Jr. • Palm Beach Opera hits the right note with its new iPhone app. • Summer is heating up with creative summer camps and cool cultural activities for kids. • The newly opened waterfront in West Palm Beach offers more than breathtaking views.

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p ro f i l e

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Passion and need have inspired Dolly Hand in her efforts to create beautiful opportunities in Belle Glade. By Leon M. Rubin

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portrait Visual effects artist and entrepreneur Dean Lyon can make dogs talk, waterfalls move and an industry grow.

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calendar Look somewhere else for those lazy summer days; our busy calendar is packed with fun and entertaining events from May through August.

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i n s i d e c u l t u re The Muse Awards showcase local leadership and talented youth; the arts community orchestrates help for Haiti; the Palm Beach Poetry Festival honors high school students; and much more insider news.

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spring/summer 2010

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Palm Beach County Cultural Council 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 300, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 561-471-2901 • www.palmbeachculture.com President & Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Bill Nix

561-687-8727 bnix@palmbeachculture.com

Contributing Writer/Editor

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lmrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Arts and Cultural Education

Alyx Kellington

561-471-1602 akellington@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Membership

Mary Dunning

561-472-3330 mdunning@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Larry Boytano

561-471-1601 lboytano@palmbeachculture.com

Jennifer Lamont

561-471-2902 jlamont@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Development Assistant

Maggie Edwards

561-472-3340 medwards@palmbeachculture.com

Development Associate

Melissa Santee

561-472-3340 msantee@palmbeachculture.com

Monica Hammett

561-471-2901 mhammett@palmbeachculture.com

Vice President, Marketing & Government Affairs

Director of Grants

Public Relations Coordinator

Marketing Coordinator

Grants Manager

Bookkeeper

Secretary to the President/CEO Volunteer

Pat Thorne

Cultural Council Board of Directors Officers Michael J. Bracci, Chairman Michael D. Simon, Secretary Howard Bregman, Treasurer

Timothy A. Eaton

Dana T. Pickard

Shirley Fiterman

Jean Sharf

Craig Grant

Kelly Sobolewski

Herbert S. Hoffman

Alex TaylorDom A. Telesco

Directors Clarence E. Anthony Carole Boucard Christopher D. Canales Bradford A. Deflin Cecile Draime

Irene J. Karp

Ex Officios

Berton E. Korman

Commissioner Burt Aaronson

Raymond E. Kramer, III

Roger Amidon

Sydelle Meyer

Paulette Burdick

Jo Anne Rioli Moeller Geoff Neuhoff

Gary P. Eliopoulos Terry L. Maple

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Burt Aaronson, Chairperson Karen T. Marcus, Vice Chair Jeff Koons

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Shelley Vana Steven L. Abrams

Jess R. Santamaria Priscilla A. Taylor


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Joan Mitchell Nathan Oliveira Dennis Oppenheim Alexander Rodchenko Bernar Venet

E ATO N F I N E A RT, I N C . 435 Gardenia St., West Palm Beach, FL 33401 Phone: 561/833-4766 Fax: 561/833-3134 Email: eatonart@aol.com - www.eatonart.net


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The Chesterfield Hotel

Page 8

art&culture of Palm Beach County

spring/summer 2010 - volume 4, issue 3

editorial staff

Located in the heart of Palm Beach just steps from Worth Avenue, The Chesterfield features 52 beautiful guest rooms and uniquely decorated suites, a library and a heated pool and hot tub spa.

managing editor

christina wood

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com

senior verification specialist

bradley j. oyler

561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

cultural council editorial staff editorial director

rena blades

executive editor

bill nix

managing editor

leon m. rubin

contributing writers m.m. cloutier, jim jackson, karen kendall, john loring, leon m. rubin, christina wood

contributing photographers lucien capehart, steven caras, christopher fay, jim fairman, barry kinsella, robert stevens, sig visions, studio palm beach, christina wood

art & design art & production director assistant production director

The world-famous Leopard Lounge and Restaurant offers breakfast, “Executive Lunch,” afternoon tea, dinner, dessert, and late menus every day, and dancing to live entertainment every night.

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

nicole smith

561.472.8762 nicole@passportpublications.com

advertising sales senior advertising manager director of signature publications advertising manager

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

paula l. hoekstra

561.472.8768 paula@passportpublications.com

publisher publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

561.472.8778 robert@passportpublications.com

on the cover photo: christopher fay; armory art center

363 Cocoanut Row (561) 659-5800 • (Fax) 659-6707 Reservations (800) 243-7871 Email: ChesterfieldPB@aol.com or visit us online at www.ChesterfieldPB.com

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®

a passion for people & publishing

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.


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fromtheceo

Just 19 days into the new decade, the Palm Beach County Cultural Council took a step forward that has the potential to benefit our community for generations to come. When we announced that Mary Montgomery and her family were donating the historic former Lake Theater building in the heart of Lake Worth to our organization, we really believed that we could see the future. You can find details about this magnificent gift on page 17, but I would like to take a moment here to talk about its significance to the Cultural Council and to the larger community. In 2005, when we completed our current five-year strategic plan, our board and staff recommended strongly that we should seek a new home. The time had come, we believed, to move out of our leased office space in West Palm Beach into a facility where our constituents – artists, educators, non-profits, residents and even visitors to our area – could reach us easily. “The Council will consider centrally located venues with street-level access that would enable us to offer substantially more services than is currently possible,” the plan stated. Now, thanks to the Montgomery family’s generosity and the unprecedented support from the City of Lake Worth and its Community Redevelopment Agency, we have taken a giant step toward realizing this goal. Over the next several months, we will work with our board,

architects and contractors to create the design and renovate the structure. Our plans are certain to include elements that will enable us to host meetings and training sessions for cultural organizations, support artists through exhibitions and other services, provide information to tourists and generally raise the profile of the Cultural Council in Palm Beach County and beyond. The timing could not have been better. Earlier this year, we conducted a survey to assess the community’s perceptions and attitudes about the Cultural Council, which provided valuable information for a recent board and staff planning retreat. As a result of that process, we are finalizing a new five-year strategic plan that will guide us in the years ahead. Our new facility in Lake Worth will serve as a springboard to, and also a potent symbol of, our future. By building – both literally and figuratively – on the history of this former theater, contemporary art museum and cultural icon, we will have the opportunity to substantially enhance the impact that we make in an endless variety of ways. We look forward to sharing our ideas and plans with you and welcome your support as we move ahead into this very exciting phase in the evolution of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council.

Rena Blades President and CEO Palm Beach County Cultural Council

Michael Price

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SPRING FEVER Welcome to the spring issue of art&culture! I know there are plenty of people who say that we don’t have seasons in South Florida but – even without this year’s record-breaking winter weather – I would have to disagree. As I write, I can feel the playfulness of the breeze through my open window and hear the spring boasting of birds. As Aristotle pointed out, though, “One swallow does not make a spring, nor does one fine day.”

fromthe

Spring is hard to pin down – on a calendar or on a map. I don’t think it’s about melting snow as much as it is about hope. From Wisconsin to West Palm Beach, spring is a celebration of new beginnings. We begin our spring coverage with a celebration of the new plays blooming in theaters across Palm Beach County. On page 46, you’ll be introduced to the process involved in developing new work for the theater as author Karen Kendall takes us “From Page to Stage.” The Armory Art Center is home to an ongoing celebration of the creative process, as regular art&culture contributor John Loring points out in “An Arsenal for Art” on page 34. The guest list at this particular “party” includes the 26 accomplished artists and educators participating in the Center’s 13th annual Visiting Master Artist Workshop series.

an award-winning visual effects artist, is ready to plant some seeds of his own, the kind that could result in new growth for our local film industry. Dean and his hopes are the subject of our spring Portrait on page 26. Of course, with spring in the air, we couldn’t resist the opportunity to take it outside. Our sunny weather is ideal for the walking tours that are featured in our story “Stepping Out” on page 54. We’ve also teamed up with Radio Green Earth, which can be heard weekly on public radio WXEL 90.7 FM, to explore the greening of our cultural landscape. In “How Green Is Our Valley,” found on page 50, Radio Green Earth Host Jim Jackson introduces us to some of the artists and cultural institutions that are leading the effort to conserve resources and protect the environment. You might want to find a sunny spot where you can enjoy the spring breeze as you read these stories and explore page after colorful page of information and insight. Summer will be here soon. As the temperatures begin to climb, remember, you can always refresh yourself with art&culture. Every work of art is a new beginning, a birth, the outcome of a creative process and cause for celebration – any time of year. Imagine!

“Guardian Angel,” written by Leon Rubin, is a salute to Dolly Hand, the subject of our spring Profile. On page 22 you can read about the seeds she has been sowing in Belle Glade and the rich, colorful harvest they have produced. Dean Lyon,

Jacek Gancarz

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Christina Wood Managing Editor


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contributors Sometimes it’s all about how others see you.

Jim Fairman

Once again, in the annual U.S.News & World Report survey on America’s Best Hospitals, ophthalmologists from around the countr y ranked Bascom Palmer

John Loring was a contributing writer and New York Bureau Chief at Architectural Digest. He served as the design director of Tiffany & Co. for 30 years and has written numerous books on style and social history. John graduated from Yale University, completed four years of graduate studies at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris and has an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts degree from Pratt Institute.

Jim Jackson is the producer and co-host of “Radio Green Earth,” an environmental radio program heard on public radio WXEL 90.7 FM. Jim retired as the weeknight anchor of WPBF TV ABC in 2002, after a 25-year career in Florida TV news. He has won numerous broadcasting awards, including two Edward R. Murrow awards and the National Association of Broadcasters Friend of Education Award as well as the Fenwick Conservation Writer of the Year for his reporting on coastal estuary pollution and the threatened Gulf of Mexico shark fisheries. Jim and his wife, Donna, live on the beach in Jupiter with their dog and two cats. When not working on conservation issues, Jim spends his time kayaking and fishing along the coast and in Lake Worth Lagoon.

Eye Institute the best eye hospital in the United States. This honor is a great testimony to our experience and technology. More importantly, if any member of their

Karen Kendall is a south Florida resident and the author of twenty novels. Her current series

families needed a procedure, the

is about a Miami-based agency that recovers

best eye doctors in the world would

stolen art. For more information, please visit

tell them to travel long distances to

www.KarenKendall.com.

get here. And that makes you very lucky. Because you don’t have to.

Palm Beach - (561) 515-1500 7101 Fairway Dr., Palm Beach Gardens Miami • Naples • Plantation (305) 326-6000 www.bascompalmer.org

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With a lifelong interest in the arts inspired largely by his highly creative parents, Leon Rubin has been writing about arts and culture for more than three decades. A Boca Raton resident for almost 17 years, Leon was actively involved in children’s theater and helped to establish the Boca Raton Cultural Consortium. He now contributes to art&culture virtually from the home that he and his wife, Suzi, share in the mountains above Dahlonega, Georgia.


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A higher rate of survival and fewer complications in heart care. Why choose “much like Cleveland Clinic” when you can choose Cleveland Clinic?

Some area hospitals have advanced technology and robust research programs. And, much like Cleveland Clinic, some have even adopted a team approach to surgery. But we know it’s not just about having resources, it’s what you do with them. Independent studies* show that patients at Cleveland Clinic Florida have a higher rate of survival and a lower risk of complications in heart surgery than at other hospitals in the region. That’s the critical difference between “much like” Cleveland Clinic and Cleveland Clinic itself. It’s why we are the best choice for you and the people you love.

Every life deserves world class care.

9LVLWFOHYHODQGFOLQLFÁRULGDRUJ or call 800.639.DOCTOR

*Thomson Reuters 100 Top Hospitals®: Cardiovascular Benchmarks, 2009. Teaching hospitals with cardiovascular residency programs. www.100tophospitals.com.


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Devonia Antiques The finest antique tabletop

Porcelains • Crystal • Dining Tables • Accessories • Bridal Registry

WEST PALM BEACH • 3703 SOUTH DIXIE HIGHWAY BOSTON • 15 CHARLES STREET devonia-antiques.com Contact: Lori Hedtler, Owner • 617-510-3890


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a m e d l e y o f w h a t ’s h o t o n t h e l o c a l a r t & c u l t u r e s c e n e

{upfront}

Spotlight On Montgomery Donation Provides New Home for Cultural Council Thanks to Mary Montgomery and the family of the late Robert M. Montgomery Jr., the Palm Beach County Cultural Council will be taking up residence in a historic building in the heart of Lake Worth. In January, Mrs. Montgomery announced the donation of the former home of the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art to the Council. The Art Deco building, which opened as the 1,000-seat Lake Theater in 1940, has also housed a pizza parlor, a disco, the acclaimed art collection of J. Patrick Lannan Sr. and the Palm Beach Community College Museum of Art. “I am extremely proud to make this gift in honor of Bob’s memory and the legacy he built in the legal, cultural and philanthropic communities,” Mary Montgomery said referring to her late husband, a prominent attorney and philanthropist. “Giving this historic building to the Cultural Council will strengthen Bob’s vision of a healthy cultural foundation developing better students, better citizens and a better community.” The building will be named in Robert Montgomery’s honor. The Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency has committed $700,000 to the Cultural Council to renovate the building as part of its Cultural Renaissance Program. The structure will serve as the Cultural Council’s headquarters, which will include community exhibitions, tourism services and training and meeting spaces.

Jacek Gancarz

Michael Bracci, Palm Beach County Cultural Council Chair, Board of Directors Rena Blades, Palm Beach County Cultural Council President and CEO Shelley Vana, Palm Beach County Commissioner Rene Varela, Lake Worth Mayor Peter Meyerhoefer, Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency Board of Commissioners Chairman

Outside the Box Palm Beach Opera Is First Florida Arts Organization to Launch iPhone App Palm Beach Opera is the first major cultural arts organization in Florida – and only the second opera company in America – to launch its own app for users of Apple’s iPhone and iPod Touch. The Palm Beach Opera app offers users instant touch-screen access to information on upcoming productions; recent music, podcasts, news and blogs; background on featured artists; program notes; videos of past performances; and ticket orders. “As a cultural organization, it is critically important to keep our audience engaged,” says Palm Beach Opera

General Director Daniel Biaggi. “New media provides many opportunities for almost constant engagement with our audience. Not only can we provide information to our audience but we also receive feedback, which provides insight into what our audience wants and expects.”

FOR

more information call (561) 833-7888 or visit www.pbopera.org

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On Location

New Waterfront Is a Contender

FOR

more information call (561) 822-2222 or visit www.wpb.org/waterfront

Now Showing D a n c e Wo r l d ’s Le a d i n g L i g h t s Wi l l S h i n e i n B o c a This summer, Julie Kent and Marcelo Gomes will be appearing in American Ballet Theatre’s production of Romeo & Juliet at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York City and in Boca Ballet Theatre’s production of Giselle. Kent, the only American dancer to win the Prix Benois de la Danse, starred in the movie Center Stage with Mikhail Baryshnikov. Gomes, a native of Brazil, will be making a return trip to South Florida; he studied at The Harid Conservatory in Boca Raton before launching his professional career. Boca Ballet Theatre’s ability to attract such bright stars demonstrates the esteem in which the company is held within the international dance community. For almost 20 years, this award-winning civic ballet company has been building on a unique perJulie Kent

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formance tradition, combining the talents of internationally acclaimed professionals with the efforts of aspiring young dancers from its school. Giselle, with its haunting blend of ethereal beauty, vibrant emoMarcelo Gomes tional intensity and its mesmerizing interplay of love and the supernatural, will be performed at the Florida Atlantic University Theatre from July 30 through August 1. or

FOR

more information call (561) 995-0709 visit www.bocaballet.org

Robert Stevens

Earlier this year, West Palm Beach Mayor Lois Frankel and 100,000 of her closest friends turned out to celebrate the grand reopening of the city’s waterfront. Highlights of the event included performances by area students, a series of “Car Plays” presented by Florida Stage, a Cirque Majik show and a fireworks display. The new West Palm Beach waterfront features more than just breathtaking views. A lushly landscaped esplanade runs parallel to the Intracoastal Waterway for a full mile, three public docks accommodate boaters, a green space welcomes relaxing thoughts and a green building, the Lake Pavilion, provides space for art exhibits as well as receptions and parties. “Tens of thousands of people have come to our new waterfront and seen the free exhibition by Federico Uribe at our Lake Pavilion,” the mayor said, referring to the art installation that folks were lining up to see during the grand opening. “And this is just the beginning. We’ll be hosting groundbreaking, thought-provoking exhibitions throughout the year as part of our commitment to making our waterfront a destination for residents and visitors.”


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Outside the Box Palm Beach County Is Cool After Hours

At the end of a long day, instead of a martini, consider indulging in an ARTini at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach. The Norton is one of several innovative cultural organizations that are opening their doors to visitors after hours. The Norton offers Art after Dark from 5 to 9 p.m. on the second Thursday of every month. Each month offers a new lineup of music, film, special tours and hands-on art activities as well as a cash bar and delicious menu options from Café 1451 at the Norton. For more information, call (561) 832-5196 or visit www.norton.org. The Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse offers Sunset Tours on the second and fourth Wednesday of every month, allowing you to take in spectacular views and witness the Jupiter Light turning on to illuminate the night sky. Visitors also get an inside look at the nuts and bolts of a working lighthouse watchroom. For more information, tour times or for reservations, call (561) 747-8380 ext. 101 or visit www.jupiterlighthouse.org.

Art The Norton Museum of

The Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach has combined the allure of South Florida’s summer nights with the tranquil beauty of its gardens to create the Sushi & Stroll Summer Walk Series. From 5:30 to 8:30 p.m. on select Friday evenings throughout the summer, you can stroll through the gardens, sample the menu at the Cornell Café or indulge in some shopping at the Museum Store. For more information, call (561) 495-0233 or visit www.morikami.org. On the first Wednesday of May and June, the Boca Raton Museum of Art will be open from 5 to 9 p.m. – even better, admission is free (www.bocamuseum.org). On the second Saturday of each month, the South Florida Science Museum hosts laser concerts in its planetarium featuring the music of The Doors, Pink Floyd and Led Zeppelin, among others (www.sfsm.org).

Morikami M useum and Japanese

Gardens

FOR

more information on great ways to spend your evening, visit the Palm Beach County Cultural Council online at www.palmbeachculture.com.

Lighthouse Jupiter Inlet

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S h o w & Te l l

P e r s o n a l To u c h

Get Creative this Summer

An Unforgettable Singer Inspires a New Generation

More than 60 organizations in Palm Beach County are offering art and cultural activities for kids this summer. Old School Square in Delray Beach has a summer arts camp just for girls. At the Lighthouse Center for the Arts School in Tequesta, children will create art inspired by their favorite fairytales, super heroes and storybook characters. From art adventures, garden games and earth science discoveries at the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens in West Palm Beach to the Teen Summer Theatre Program at the Palm Beach State College Eissey Campus Theatre in Palm Beach Gardens, there’s something for every interest and every age group.

Nat King Cole was one of the most popular singers ever to hit the American charts. A brilliant recording and concert artist during the ‘40s, ‘50s and ‘60s, Cole had a rare blend of technical musical knowledge and sheer performing artistry that attracted millions of fans. His youngest daughters, Timolin and Casey Cole of Boca Raton, are ensuring

Nat King Cole with Timolin Cole

Summer camp at Lighthouse Center for the Arts

Timolin Cole (Left) and Casey Cole

his legacy will live on by enriching students with the opportunity to enhance their musical talents and abilities. The Cole twins created the non-profit foundation Nat King Cole Generation Hope Inc. in order to provide funding for music education for children of all ages in South Florida. Students at Forest Hills High School (West Palm Beach), Boca Raton Middle School, Plumosa Elementary School of the Arts (Delray Beach) and Roosevelt Middle School (West Palm Beach) are among those who have already benefited from the twins’ heartfelt mission.

Eissey Campus Theatre's teen program at Palm Beach State College summer camp

FOR

more information check out the Summer Cultural Guide from the Palm Beach County Cultural Council online at www.palmbeachculture.com. 20

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The Cole twins at Plumosa Elementary, where their foundation - along with Roots Cultural Heritage Foundation - donated musical instruments.

FOR

more information visit www.natkingcolefoundation.org


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OUTH EASHELLS

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guardian

angel Dolly Hand Has Blessed Belle Glade for 60+ Years – and Vice Versa By Leon M. Rubin

IT’S

Why study law? “It was one of those things I was always a tiny bit strange the first couple of times you hear going to do,” Dolly responds without hesitation. “I was going Dolly Hand refer to “the Dolly Hand.” But it’s not to go to law school.” In those post-World War II days, it was an echo – and it’s certainly not an ego trip. possible to do so after just two years of pre-law. She started Palm In fact, the first time that Frances R. “Dolly” Hand learned Beach Junior College at 15 and, at 17, headed off to Stetson. that the cultural arts center she helped build in Belle Glade Her father passed away shortly before she graduated, would be named for her was when she arrived for its grand however, so she sacrificed her legal career to help her mother opening on April 17, 1982. The trustees of what was then in the family business. “I was an only child. Palm Beach Junior College had I had made arrangements to go into a law managed to keep the honor under wraps. firm in Belle Glade, but we had a business But it was no secret that they’d made the that needed someone to take care of it,” correct decision. Without Dolly Hand, the she explains. “My legal background was person, there wouldn’t be a Dolly Hand, always very helpful.” She soon married her the place. high school sweetheart, Homer Hand, Dolly Hand was a child of the Glades – and launched herself into work and and she’s devoted most of her adult years to enhancing quality of life and creating Dolly Hand speaking at the Lawrence Will Museum community service. In the early 1970s, the Hands were part of a group of opportunity for the hardscrabble residents of the mostly community leaders who were asked to explore the poor, primarily agricultural region on the western fringes of possibility of establishing a Palm Beach Junior College Palm Beach County. Born not long after the fierce and campus in Belle Glade. “At that time, you had to go to West destructive hurricane of 1928, she grew up in Belle Glade and Palm Beach for classes,” she recalls. “We felt very strongly never strayed far from it – except when she went that people should have the opportunity to go to college off to become not only the first female graduate here. We found there was a very definite interest, so we went of Stetson Law School in Deland, Fla., in 1949, but also the to the board of trustees and were successful in establishing youngest at age 20.

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Dolly and Homer Hand

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a presence.” Classes were offered at first in the business wing of the hospital, then in the armory and finally on a newly built campus in 1977. Soon after joining the college’s board of trustees herself, a new cause arose that would capture Dolly’s attention – and inspire a newfound passion. “One of the vice presidents called and said he had learned about an opportunity for state grants for matching funds for cultural facilities,” she remembers. “We looked into it and found that might be something we could do. We had $78,000 in seed money from the Sugar Cane Growers Cooperative that was going to be used to help buy land for the new college building, but wasn’t needed.” The timing was certainly right. After the college opened, “We had some early success with a small series of cultural events in the Palm Beach Junior College classrooms in Belle Glade,” Dolly says. “There was a group of people who felt we needed to have a cultural center, but we had no idea that we would ever be able to do it at

to pinch ourselves that we have this here in little old Belle Glade.” Indeed, the difference that the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center has made to the community is immeasurable. “It is more than a performing arts center,” Dolly observes. “It has made it possible for the arts to be accessible to the entire community. It has become a community center and a landmark building for Belle Glade. School, county and state organizations have adopted the Dolly Hand as their home. We’ve had weddings and receptions and parties and even a funeral there.” It has also functioned as an ambassador for a community that she believes is often misunderstood. “People from all over Palm Beach County − who might not otherwise have come to Belle Glade − come to see a show or an event at the Dolly Hand. They often leave the theater with a new, positive attitude about the Glades. It’s exciting to see how much they enjoy it. It has been a marvelous addition, and it continues to get better all the time. It’s near and dear to our hearts.” A cultural center, of course, is only as successful as the programs

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that time. When we found out funds were available, we thought it would be enough to get the ball rolling.” They believed they could build the building for $300,000, but soon faced a rude awakening. That figure quickly grew to $600,000, then $900,000 and, ultimately, $2 million. All along the way, Dolly Hand led the charge to raise the necessary funds from every possible source. “We felt the need; we wanted it to happen,” she says now with the same degree of passion in her voice that must have made it difficult to say no to her 30 years ago. “Once we saw the possibility, it was so exciting. Everyone embraced it. “When it opened, you cannot imagine the excitement of it,” she continues. “It was so invigorating and gratifying − a real celebration! Today, oh today…” She pauses, as if to gather up enough superlatives. “The success of it and the quality and the impact have greatly exceeded everyone’s expectations. Sometimes we just have

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that it houses. To no one’s surprise, Dolly Hand has been instrumental in nurturing the Dolly Hand’s success in this way, as well. Soon after it opened, for example, she helped to start a Theatre for Schools program that would open children’s eyes to the wonders of the arts. Now known as the CAFE (Cultural Arts for Education) Series, the program serves more than 18,500 students a year from 50 schools throughout the Lake Okeechobee region. She subsequently worked with the Palm Beach Community College Foundation to establish an endowment to underwrite the cost of the CAFE Series, enabling students to attend for just $1 each – and with their transportation paid for by the foundation. Among the highlights of these efforts are a number of residencies by professional artists and performers. One of them, the Missoula Children’s Theatre, is now in its 16th year. At the beginning of the weeklong program, local children audition for parts and, five days later, they present a fully staged musical production.


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“It’s beautiful. It’s amazing what they can do,” Dolly says. “The residency programs bring the diverse people of this community together in ways that nothing else could. Many of our children would never have this opportunity. “If you could be there and see what happens when they come in…” she continues. “It is hard to explain. It is like trying to describe the look on that wide-eyed, awestruck, child who has just seen this magnificent building and an unforgettable performance for the first time. You have to see the look on his face to really understand it.” The praise that Dolly Hand lavishes on her namesake – and its staff – comes back to her many times over, of course. She has received countless kudos, including the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s 2008 Muse Award as Outstanding Civic Leader, the Florida Arts Recognition Award from the Florida Department of State and an honorary degree from Stetson University, where she serves on the board of trustees.

Q &A Did your parents set an example that led to your commitment to community service? My parents came to the Glades in 1926 and embodied the rugged pioneer spirit that was required in those days to hack a living out of this land. They were both college graduates, which was not that common in the early 1900s. This had a significant impact on me. But, it was their work ethic and their determination to accomplish difficult things that probably had the most influence on my development.

What are your memories of the arts and/or cultural activities when you were growing up in Palm Beach County? In Belle Glade in the ’30s and ’40s there weren’t any cultural activities, except for the senior class play or the Christmas cantata. It was isolated. It had very hardworking people who routinely worked from sunup to sundown. Even if there were cultural activities, there wouldn’t have been an opportunity to participate. Glades-area children become the stars each year in a production staged by Missoula Children’s Theatre.

And there is personal admiration, as well. “Having Dolly involved is tremendous,” says Leigh Woodham, director of the cultural arts center since 1996. “She’s always there to back us up − to go to bat for us. It’s great to have her support.” Dolly is a life member of the center’s advisory board and has been a tireless volunteer. “She used to come early to every show to work in the box office,” Woodham notes. “Our performers are always amazed that they’re meeting the person that the center is named after,” she adds. “I think it’s unique in that respect.” Judging from her infectious enthusiasm and obvious pride in the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center, it’s highly likely that she would do it all over again if the opportunity presented itself. “This community has been so wonderful to us. It has blessed us beyond measure,” she says. “God has been good to us every day of our lives. We have been given so much. We just must give back.”

Have you seen long-term benefits from children’s exposure to the arts through the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center? My husband and I have a foundation to help young people with their education. Not long ago, the Foundation received a request for assistance from a young lady who had taken part in the Living Christmas Tree and the Missoula program as a child. When she went to the Missoula Children’s Theatre tryout and was chosen, she was enthralled. Now she wants to go to college. Her major will be journalism and theater. Her wish is to bring programs like Missoula to help children with theater all over the United States. It’s amazing what can happen.

In what ways has Mr. Hand supported you in your community involvement? Homer is everything to me. His encouragement and support have made everything I do possible. Homer Hand has the heart of a giant. He is the most generous, thoughtful, compassionate person I know and God’s special gift to me . . . and to this community.

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Dean

Lyon: unbelievably real By Christina Wood

a

ccording to Orson Welles, “A writer needs a pen, an artist needs a brush but a filmmaker needs an army.” According to Dean Lyon, what a filmmaker really needs is a community. And he thinks he’s found a promising one, right here in Palm Beach County. “Hollywood is no longer the center of the universe,” says Lyon, an expert in the art of making the unbelievable seem real. A pioneer in the field of visual effects, the Detroit native builds things, not with bricks and mortar but with patience and pixels. For more than 25 years, he has been pushing the envelope through the creative manipulation of footage, using traditional and digital techniques. Welles indulged both his talent and his ego from a prominent position, whether it be behind the camera or in the spotlight. Lyon sits quietly in front of a computer. Over the years, he has worked with superheroes, prehistoric animals and aliens. He transformed a small Chihuahua into a talking sensation and wiped the mist of a waterfall from a hobbit’s face. He didn’t work on Avatar, but the film probably couldn’t have been made without the stereoscopic 3D technology Lyon helped to develop. Recently, he announced plans to launch a new venture on the back lot at G-Star Studios and School of the Arts in West Palm Beach. During his career, Lyon has collaborated with cutting-edge directors, large and small studios, production companies, postproduction facilities and technology developers around the world. He’s contributed to hundreds of commercials, music videos, television shows and feature films, including Independence Day, Armageddon, Air Force One, Without a Paddle and Ice Age. He turned down an opportunity to work on The Matrix. In 2000, he went to New Zealand for what was going to be a

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ten-day holiday. The days turned into weeks and then months. He was considering investing in a water taxi when a phone call to Peter Jackson launched him on a new adventure. Lyon spent the next five years leading a start-up company specializing in visual effects and animation. Among the many award-winning projects they worked on was a little series of films called Lord of the Rings. Since then, Lyon has circled the globe at least three times in pursuit of a mission to develop new technologies that will facilitate creativity and collaboration in the film industry. Last summer he was working on a movie being made at G-Star Studios. “I was on the set and the kids [students at G-Star School of the Arts] kept coming up to me and saying, ‘When you do the visual effects on this can we watch?’” he says. “That’s when it dawned on me.” Lyon is passionate about the potential of technology to transform the art of visual storytelling. His vision for Splinter Studios, the start-up that will soon take up residence at G-Star within sight of the school’s vast new soundstage, incorporates education along with the latest visual effects and computer-generated imagery. “You can’t believe anything you see on the screen with me,” Lyon freely admits. His enthusiasm, however, is charmingly real. Palm Beach County Film Commissioner Chuck Elderd is convinced. So is Greg Hauptner, founder and CEO of G-Star. A fledgling army of students that includes filmmakers, school kids and retired IBMers is also firmly on Lyon’s side. “It’s a unique opportunity for us to try to do something here,” Lyon says. “We need to cooperate and collaborate.” The warm welcome he’s received from the film community in Palm Beach County makes him believe that’s a very real possibility.


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May

Lewis Kemper’s new exhibit “Capturing the Light” at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre showcases the California-based photographer’s mastery of light and composition. Images of a spectacular eruption of a Hawaiian volcano, dramatic sunrises over an Icelandic lagoon and other scenes demonstrate Kemper’s magical touch. Through June 5. 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-276-9797 or www.workshop.org. Lava spews from Hawaii’s Waikutanaha volcano in this Lewis Kemper photo.

Elvis at 21: Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer, presents 56 striking photos taken by Werthheimer in 1956, when he was hired by RCA Victor to shoot promotional images of a recently signed 21-year-old recording artist, Elvis Presley. His instincts to “tag along” with the artist provided an unguarded look at the future superstar. Through June 13. Boca Raton Museum of Art, 501 Plaza Real; 561-392-2500 or www.bocamuseum.org. ALFRED WERTHEIMER (American, 1929-), Washroom, No Towels, 1956. ©Alfred Wertheimer. All rights reserved.

Voices of Pride will sing music by and about women in “TRIBUTE – Celebrating the Women in Our Lives!” Enjoy an evening of songs made famous by Billie Holiday, Peggy Lee, Ethel Merman, Judy Garland and other heroines of stage and screen, accented by that special touch of Voices of Pride humor. May 7-8, Rinker Playhouse, Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; 561-832-7469 or www.voicesofpride.org.

Discover the “bear necessities” of supporting bear conservation during Bear Awareness Days at the Palm Beach Zoo on May 15-16. You can check out amazing bear bio-facts, learn about bear behavior through an exciting keeper talk/enrichment session, create your own bear masterpiece and play “Do Bears Eat Better Than I Do?” 1301 Summit Blvd., West Palm Beach; 561-547-9453 or www.palmbeachzoo.org. Photo Credit: Birger Petterson

New York’s celebrated High School for the Performing Arts provides the setting for Fame – The Musical, the inspiring story of a diverse group of students through four years of grueling artistic and academic work. The Maltz Jupiter Theater’s spirited production explores prejudice, identity, self-worth, literacy, substance abuse and learning to persevere. May 21-22. 1001 E. Indiantown Road., Jupiter; 561-575-2223 or www.jupitertheatre.org. Lanardo Davis and Alexa Evans (center) in rehearsal for Fame. Photo Credit: Scott Simmons

Celebrate the Boca Raton Singers’ fifth anniversary with a musical mélange of favorites from Broadway and the Silver Screen. Under the direction of Music Director Dr. Gerald J. Luongo, the choral group has performed to sold-out audiences and standing ovations since its debut concert in 2005. Crest Theatre, Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach; 561-866-1868 or www.BocaRatonSingers.org.

The New Gardens Band pays tribute to those who have served our country so bravely in a special All-American Memorial Day weekend concert. “Remembering America’s Heroes” honors the members of our Armed Forces, past and present. May 29, Eissey Campus Theatre, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens, and May 31, Mizner Park Amphitheater, Boca Raton; 561-207-5900 or www.newgardensband.org.

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June

In Edward Albee’s Three Tall Women, an elderly woman reflects on her youth, marriage and estrangement from her gay son with a mixture of satisfaction and regret in this Pulitzer Prize-winning play that explores the challenges of living and dying. Directed by J. Barry Lewis, through June 13. Palm Beach Dramaworks, 322 Banyan Blvd., West Palm Beach; 561-514-4042 or www.palmbeachdramaworks.org.

The Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture presents two exhibitions through September 25. “Masterworks: Photographs by Jeremiah Jenner” showcases his post-contemporary photographs from the past 10 years, while “STUFF II: The Joy of Collecting” features art, artifacts, décor, tools and other treasures on loan from regional collectors and celebrities. 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach; 561-243-7922 or www.oldschool.org. Painted, by Jeremiah Jenner

Raising the temperature for summer exhibition fare, Lighthouse Center for the Arts offers “Multiple Sins” through September 3. Featured are Barry Seidman’s photographic series “Smoke” and “Drinks,” showing larger-than-life martini glasses, tumblers, liquors, wines and coffees, plus Carol Korpi-McKinley’s artwork of tempting chocolates, junk foods and desserts. 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta; 561-746-3101 or lighthousearts.org. Carol Korpi-McKinley, Swiss Cake Rolls

Members of the Stringendo School for Strings Summer Academy faculty from the Cleveland Orchestra, Atlanta Symphony Orchestra, Naples Philharmonic and Palm Beach Atlantic University perform four evenings of wonderful chamber music on June 8, 15, 22 and 29. Helen K. Persson Recital Hall, Vera Lea Rinker Hall, Palm Beach Atlantic University, 326 Acacia Road, West Palm Beach; 561-803-2970 or ticketcentral@pba.edu. Stringendo School for Strings Director Patrick Clifford

Puddle Jumpers of Lantana commemorates the history of Civil Air Patrol Coastal Patrol 3, which filled a void during World War II by providing small civilian airplanes for anti-submarine patrols. The exhibit includes original cartoons and an authentic CAP uniform. Through July 16. Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum, 300 N. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach; 561-832-4164 or www.historicalsocietypbc.org.

In “Florida’s Got the Blues,” the Spady Cultural Heritage Museum showcases our state’s relationship with the sultry, emotional musical genre. The engaging exhibit explores early blues, Florida women and the blues, blues clubs and jook joints, depression blues and the WPA recordings, popular music and the blues and contemporary blues. Through July 3. 170 N.W. 5th Ave., Delray Beach; 561-279-8883 or www.spadymuseum.org.

Famed Palm Beach society architect Addison Mizner purchased various craft shops to supply the décor and materials for his projects, making Mizner Industries one of the largest manufacturing companies in Palm Beach in the 1920s. Through September, the Boca Raton Historical Society exhibits rare products and artifacts that represent the Mizner style. 71 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton; 561-395-6766 or www.bocahistory.org.

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They are our cousins and our grandparents, our neighbors and our long-lost relatives. They are our family. And whether they are here at home, navigating the most severe economic downturn in generations, in the former Soviet Union or in Israel, more and more are turning to the Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County and its network of affiliated agencies for food and urgent financial relief. Care to help? Visit JewishPalmBeach.org or call 561-478-0700 to donate or for more information.

Jewish Federation of Palm Beach County CAMPAIGN 2010 JewishPalmBeach.org


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July

July/August

Experience the drawing and sculptures of Ann Norton while visiting her beautiful gardens filled with more than 300 species of rare palms, native plants and monumental sculptures that invoke mystery and surprise. Visit her studio to gain an understanding of her perspective as an artist. Open through July, the gardens offer a quiet retreat in the midst of the high rises. 253 Barcelona Road, West Palm Beach; 561-8325328 or www.ansg.org.

July

Fashion Treasures from the permanent collection of the Museum of Fashion and Lifestyle History are once again on display in the museum’s new space in the Boynton Beach Mall. The chronological exhibit of clothing, accessories and artifacts, which is displayed in a decade-by-decade sequence from the late 1800s to the 1960s, changes seasonally. 801 N. Congress Ave., Boynton Beach. 561-243-2662 or MLFHMUSEUM.org.

ca. 1950s Hattie Carnegie fruit & flower pixie hat

July

Paintings and drawings by Louis Schneiderman will be on view in a new GardensArt exhibition opening on July 14. Enjoy a reception with the artist from 6-8 p.m. that day, or visit anytime Monday to Friday through August 18. Born in Coral Gables, Schneiderman built his career in Atlanta before opening his Palm Beach Gardens studio in 2001. Palm Beach Gardens City Hall, 10500 N. Military Trail; 561- 630-1116 or www.pbgfl.com.

“Eve with Infant,“ mixed media on paper, 30” x 22,“ 2009

July

Feeling a bit of blood lust? The Palm Beach Shakespeare Festival concludes its “sensational season of suspense” with William Shakespeare’s Macbeth. The festival began its life 20 years ago with the classic tale of regicide and comes full circle with this new production, which runs from July 15-August 1. Seabreeze Amphitheater, Carlin Park, Route A1A and Indiantown Road, Jupiter. 561-575-7336 or www.pbshakespeare.org.

Photo credit: Courtesy Ron Warren

July

The Northwood Village Art & Wine Promenade on the fourth Friday of every month encompasses live musical performances, complimentary wine samplings and plenty of opportunities to browse the shops of Northwood Village and visit 30+ street-side artists in the 400 and 500 blocks of Northwood Road. Also on May 28, June 25 and August 27. One mile north of Palm Beach Lakes Boulevard on Dixie Highway; 561-822-1551.

August

Inspired by Obon, Japan’s traditional three-day holiday honoring ancestors and thanking them for the quality of life enjoyed by the living, the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens will celebrate its 32nd annual Bon Festival with rousing taiko drummers, traditional folk dancing, a street fair, a tranquil sea of floating lanterns and a fireworks display. 4000 Morikami Park Road, Delray Beach; 561-495-0233 or www.morikami.org.

August

The Norton Museum of Art presents superb examples of Chinese ceramics in the new exhibition “On the Silk Road and High Seas: Chinese Ceramics, Culture and Commerce,” opening on August 21 and continuing through November 21. These pieces were prized at home and treasured abroad, where they were truly rarities until the mid-18th century. 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach; 561-832-5196 or visit www.norton.org.

Pair of horses in the style of the Jesuit court artist Lang Shi-ning (Giuseppe Castiglione), Qing dynasty, Qianlong style, 19th century. Porcelain, height 9 ¾ in. (24.8 cm).

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Dates are subject to change. For an up-to-the-minute, searchable calendar of cultural events, please visit the Palm Beach County Cultural Council's website at www.palmbeachculture.com. For more information about individual organizations' schedules, please visit the websites noted in each item.


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An Arsenal for

Art

VISITING ARTISTS ENHANCE ARMORY ART CENTER'S MISSION: “Educate,” “Enrich,” “Engage” and “Experience.” By John Loring Photographs by Christopher Fay

Muriel Kaplan, a highly accomplished realist sculptor, was the first teacher at the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach. Today, standing in what was a vast military drill hall and is now an exhibition hall surrounded by a veritable army of portrait busts and other statues shown in her recent “68-year retrospective” exhibition, the school’s doyenne muses, “I was at the founding of the place, scraping floors and chasing bats out of the rafters.”

 The Art Deco facade of the Robert & Mary Montgomery Historic Armory Building.  Vintage photograph of the Armory before restoration.  Painter in residence Doug Crocco in his studio inspecting his Post-Pop Realist colored pencil drawings.

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Master painter Tim Hawkesworth in the studio where he and Lala Zeitlyn teach painting-from-life classes. (Painting of a nude by student Molly Aubry is in the forground.)

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Master painter Sam Perry’s studio/classroom.

Housed in the historic Florida Art Deco-style Armory building that was occupied by the National Guard from 1939 to 1982 and then used by the Norton School of Art until 1987, the Armory Art Center was founded and endowed by Palm Beach philanthropists and patrons of the arts Robert and Mary Montgomery. It now welcomes more than 3,000 students annually as one of Palm Beach County's preeminent creative spaces, with more than 100 course offerings and a dozen state-of-the-art studios where painting, sculpture, drawing, ceramics, printmaking and jewelry are taught to established and aspiring artists of all ages. Each is welcomed and encouraged to “Learn, Do and Learn More,” as the mission statement directs. As put into practice, the four E’s of the Armory Art Center’s mission are “Educate,” “Enrich,” “Engage” and “Experience.”

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Painting student Diane Bywaters in the Hawkesworth/Zeitlyn studio at work on her painting of nude life models.

Sculpture and sculpture’s close companion, ceramics, play a leading role at the Armory Art Center, where a 3,500-square-foot facility, the Muriel S. Kaplan Sculpture Building, was added to the school at the south end of Howard Park in 1999. Kaplan, whose son endowed the building named for his mother, has taught and served on the board of governors for the entire 23 years of the school’s history. Diversity and the celebration of the artistic creative process in all its forms are the dominant themes that emerge from the Armory Art Center adventure, whether observed in the rugged processes of bronze casting, the delicate precisions of a jeweler’s benchwork, the gestural exuberance of expressionist painting or the rigorous discipline of super-realist drawing. In its 13th season, which began last December, the Armory Art Center’s prestigious Visiting Master Artist Workshop series boasts 26 broadly recognized artists and educators.

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Helen Otterson, director of the ceramics department, in her studio with her bold and intricate, floriform stoneware sculptures.

Along with the master artists’ workshops, the Armory also offers state-of-the-art studios to four artists-in-residence where they can develop their own portfolio of works while at the same time teaching Armory students. This year there are three ceramicists and one painter. The great draw of the Armory to all levels and ages of artists is its “we’re all in this together, and we can help” philosophy as eloquently expressed by the master teaching staff and resident or visiting artists who, for all their striking differences in style, are perfectly in sync. This is perhaps nowhere better in evidence than in the expressionistic painting-from-life class of the Irish-born conceptual painter Tim Hawkesworth, who has taught as a visiting master artist for over a decade, and his co-master artist Lala Zeitlyn. They teach together as a duo. “We’re on a fishing trip,” Tim begins the phrase; “for each person’s goal,” Lala completes it.

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Sculptor-in-residence Jesse Walp opening a mold of one of his wood sculptures to be cast in resin.

“We’re trying to get people going on their own line of inquiry – the task of energizing the hand on a quest for line as a personal practice… to how they see… to their perception of the world… to the alignment of perception and expression. We get them coming and going in a spontaneous converging of ideas,” Hawkesworth elaborates. “We teach them to bring out what’s inside them – otherwise they’re just yakking somebody else’s yak,” Zeitlyn continues. “The focus is on what works rather than on what doesn’t work. What doesn’t ring true isn’t useful. What is working energizes the hand.” Visiting painting and drawing resident Doug Crocco approaches art and its line of inquiry from a sharply different angle in his development of highly to obsessively detailed, if playful, pencil drawings that drive pencil and paper on to a

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breathtaking photo finish where they run neck and neck with paint and print. “It’s picture-building as opposed to intuitiveness. It’s about developing and having a language you use, a bag of tricks you use,” he says of his own precise art, a view he extends to his students. “How much visual information is already established in the world! You (the artist) choose an icon or image and manipulate it to do what you want,” he emphatically states. “Picture building is about control – controlling your process.” Taking the position of addressing collective values in a social context − as he does in his work − and, as he says, “investigating how we as people reconcile convenience and accessibility with detachment and isolation,” telling the secrets of a community rather than personal secrets, he


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Chris Riccardo, chair of the sculpture department, with sculptor-in-residence Jesse Walp opening a kiln holding Riccardoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s giant rabbit ceramic sculpture, which was later auctioned to raise funds for the Armory Art Center.

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Chris Riccardo in fire-resistant protective clothing inspecting a crucible of molten bronze.

realizes, separate him as far from free-form teaching as Pop Art is from Abstract Expressionism. “That is the strength of the Armory Art Center,” he observes, “just how diverse it is.” The same healthy divergence in artistic expressions can be found in the ceramic and sculpture studios as well. Here a well-nourished and panoramic vision of the possibilities of ceramics − from sculptural to painterly, from fine art object to utilitarian, if decorative, table furnishings − flourishes. The chair of the sculpture department and foundry director, Chris Riccardo, while a master of the fine art of bronze casting, also creates amply scaled to massive ceramic figures with a vigorous clarity of line and volume, along with a both whimsical and menacing ambiguity of intent. “Artists should never feel limited to a certain medium or technique in their work,” he points out. Two of the artists-inresidence, ceramicist Bethany Krull and sculptor and art

A bronze casting “pour.”

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Jesse Walpâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s floriform sculpture of mahogany, walnut and ebony sitting on his mahogany sculpted table.

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Sculptor-in-residence Bethany Krull’s nickel-plated bronze sculptures “June Beetle” and “Mississippi Insect.”

Doug Crocco’s colored pencil drawing “DEEP.”

furniture maker Jesse Walp, work closely together with Riccardo to extend their porcelain and wood sculpture to bronze. The two other ceramic artists-in-residence, Stephanie Steufer and Tyra Forker, follow the different path of “utilitarian clay,” as a poster outside their studio proclaims. “I like to make functional art, making pieces with biomorphic or anthropomorphic forms and fleshy tones. I carefully design pieces to be used in the home and yet also be viewed outside the cupboard. The tactility of ceramics is amazing!” Steufer explains. Forker shares in Steufer’s love of organic form and love of nature and adds her own richly textured, painterly surfaces in her solid and traditionally salt-glazed vessels. The director of the ceramics department, acclaimed ceramic sculptor Helen Otterson, sees her department as a place to “pick up new techniques and inspiration for artistic direction.” Her own masterfully and intricately executed floriform sculptures in bare and glazed stoneware and cast glass frit express her well-informed passion for botany and biology and for the idiosyncratic side of nature, including plant life’s survival techniques, taking such invisible-to-the-eye phenomena as the exquisitely textured cellular structures of pollens seen under a molecular microscope as inspiration for her jewel-like sculptures. The Armory’s CEO, Sandra Barghini, is justly proud of the competence and diversity of the great and popular Palm Beach County institution under her direction. “With such an astonishing spectrum of talented artists in a variety of media,” she suggests, “making a choice may be the most difficult part of participating in our courses.”

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Pho to b y

Ken Jacq ues Pho togr aph y

oberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s t Oct at las e Festival. s s e c r d suc ical Theat njoye s emy e York Mu d a c A New

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Ac to An r M dre ich w ael R rea ose McK din ndo eev g o rf f er ( f W ollo lef ast wi t) a ela ng nd nd the Pla at y Flo first wrig rid sta ht a S ged tag e.

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l. iva a ds Fest a e l l orks rel Tyr ew W s i u N Lo ge tor Sta rec 1st i D 0 tic 201 rtis the A ge ing Sta ur da ion d i r Flo cuss dis

Acad emy r at th eceived it e Ma ltz Ju s first sta g piter Thea ed readin ter in g 2008 .


berâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Octo al. tiv e Fes

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From Page : e g a t S o t A Play is Born

By Karen Kendall

stage, as the a s dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; rl o w e th l al If ore writers m , ed p ip u q e c n o d ar B g wage. For n vi li a g in rn ea e b ld shou e spoken, b an c e gu o al di f o e not a lin hed, or a set ap gr o re o h c re tu s ge or a often at th l ti n u . . . d te n piece pai barely sane d an ed ey dil w d, le p rum and reviews veteran of revisions embled s as as h t gh ri yw la p known as a on paper. a pattern of words

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The New York cast of Academy, which originated at the Maltz Jupiter Theater

 Playwright Carter W. Lewis, Dramaturg Liz

Engelman and Director Des Gallant listen to audience feedback following a reading of Lewis’ most recent work at this year’s New Works Festival at Florida Stage.

 Florida Stage Managing

Director Nancy Barnett introduces the Playwrights’ Panel at this year’s 1st Stage New Works Festival.

Louis Tyrell leads a  rehearsal for the first reading of Wasteland by Andrew Rosendorf.

Playwright. The term conjures visions of Noel Coward, Tennessee Williams and Arthur Miller reclining in black-and-white glamour shots, immortalized for an adoring public in dignified, faintly smug poses. Smug because at the time the photographs were taken, each of them had completed his play. But what might they have looked like in media res – in the middle of things? Less than a week before the first staged reading of his new play Wasteland, Andrew Rosendorf looks slightly dazed. His first draft was completed after ten months of research, writing and soul-searching. After typing the final sentence, Rosendorf, the playwright-inresidence at Florida Stage and a resident of Lake Worth, indulged in an exhilarating sense of achievement, which lasted only a few glorious moments before he plunged into the revision process. He was still re-writing the night before the reading. Listening to the play being read by professional actors in front of an audience at the 1st Stage New Works Festival at Florida Stage in March allowed Rosendorf to gain valuable insight. “From the reading I’ve learned a lot,” he says. “Learned a lot about what’s working. Learned a lot about what’s not.” Taking a new production from paper to performance is not a simple process undertaken by a solitary creative genius. “A playwright is a collaborator,” says Carter

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W. Lewis, playwright-in-residence at Washington University (St. Louis) and one of six playwrights who participated in the New Works Festival at Florida Stage, which has produced several of his plays in the past, including The Storytelling Ability of a Boy. The directors and dramaturges who nurture the creative process, the actors who breathe life into the characters and the audiences who laugh in unexpected places cannot be seen in those iconic images of Coward, Williams and Miller. We are lucky to have a vibrant theater scene that nurtures new plays in Palm Beach County. Florida Stage is the largest professional theater company in the country dedicated to producing new and emerging American plays. The Emerging Artists Series in Musical Theater Playwriting at the Maltz Jupiter Theater is developing new work for the musical stage. New Voices/New Visions at the Burt Reynolds Institute for Film and Theatre in Jupiter and the New Bridges Festival for Emerging Playwrights at Palm Beach Dramaworks both encourage new talent through workshops and staged readings. The Caldwell Theatre Company in Boca Raton incorporates new work in its mission to explore timeless and current human issues through the art of theater. Palm Beach Dramaworks Managing Director Sue Ellen Beryl explains that via New Bridges, the theater works with Aspen-based TheaterMasters to put playwrights together with directors who can help take their work to the next level. “It’s important for the playwright to hear the words spoken aloud by an actor,” she says.


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Florida Stage nurtured the development of The Storytelling Ability of a Boy by Carter W. Lewis, which was read at the 2009 1st Stage New Works Festival and premiered during the theater’s 2009/2010 main stage season.

Photos by Ken Jacques Photography

“Writing ‘End of Play’ is truly only the beginning of the work,” Rosendorf says. “It’s like finding out you’re going to have a child. You celebrate but then realize you still have nine months of doctor appointments, of midnight food runs, of unexpected mood swings. You have nine months until you can smoke that cigar.” “It’s one thing to birth them,” Nancy Barnett, managing director of Florida Stage, says. “It’s another thing to raise them.” Producing new work, she explains, is “expensive and frightening and risky.” It’s also terribly important. “If you don’t continue to add to the canon, you lose that living history that’s created by theater.” Plays being written today have the ability to address issues in ways that connect powerfully and directly with modern audiences. Academy, a musical based on Faust and set in a boys’ prep school, originated at the Maltz Jupiter Theater and is making a strong connection with far-flung audiences. It was conceived and developed by Andrew Kato, executive director of the Maltz, with the book, music and lyrics by John Mercurio. “Mounting a musical is both time-consuming and expensive,” Kato says. It is also a perilous proposition. “People love the classics,” Kato admits. But there is a hunger for new work. “To be a great regional theater, you have to contribute to the national landscape, so it’s our obligation to do that.” Academy won acclaim at the New York Musical Theater Festival with a workshop production directed by Tony-nominated Broadway

veteran John Carrafa (Into the Woods, Urinetown). The show got a rave review in The New York Times, won several Carbonell Awards here in South Florida and brought home the prestigious Daego International Musical Theater Award. It will travel to Seoul, South Korea, this summer before the Maltz hosts the official world premiere in December. “South Florida is achieving a national reputation as a place where things are happening in theater and the arts,” Teresa Eyring, executive director of Theatre Communications Group, the national organization for non-profit professional theater, said in her keynote address at this year’s 1st Stage Festival at Florida Stage. Rosendorf hopes to add to that reputation. He is at work on a second draft of his play, which was commissioned by Florida Stage and which revolves around Florida’s complicated and historic relationship with water. The show will be read and revised and renamed and read and revised yet again before audiences see it staged in the Rinker Playhouse at the Kravis Center next season. Rosendorf is far too grateful for the support he has received from Palm Beach County’s theater community to look smug in any future portraits for which he may pose. “Theaters like Florida Stage are very rare around this country,” he says. It’s more likely that his portrait as a playwright will show the smiling face of a thankful artist whose work has made the arduous journey from the page to the stage. With Christina Wood.

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Shannon Cruz, grade 5 Pine Jog Elementary School, delivers a conservation message with â&#x20AC;&#x153;Daily Special.â&#x20AC;? The waiter and patron are crafted out of recycled newspaper.

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green how

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our

valle y

The environmental movement is spreading like a happy virus. In Palm Beach County, the arts and the institutions in which they bloom are among those feeling green. By Jim Jackson

“You can paint it any color you want, so long as it’s green,” Eydi Lampasona says with a broad smile and a flourish of her blonde and silver locks as she relaxes in the printmaking studio at the Boca Raton Museum of Art School of Art. Lampasona’s smooth delivery comes not because she is some kind of con artist but because she has been living her belief in all things green most of her life. “Mom and Dad started me dumpster diving when I was about eight. My parents, both artists themselves, were not shy about shying away from store-bought toys. They wanted me to create my own fun, so every Thursday I would drag my little red wagon around ahead of the trash pickup. I have been dumpster diving ever since,” she says. “As I got older I elevated the term to curbside shopping but that still didn’t convey what I do.”

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Rooftop solar panels helped the Melvin J. and Claire Levine Animal Care Complex at the Palm Beach Zoo earn LEED gold certification.

Before and After: The Crest Theatre at Old School Square, housed in the restored Delray High School (c. 1925), represents one of the most successful adaptive re-use preservation projects in Florida.

Rebecca Rodriguez, grade 5 Pine Jog Elementary School, works on an oil painting titled “Florida's Endangered Panther.”

Now, Lampasona refers to her acquisitive habit – and the class she teaches at the School of Art – as “Urban Archeology.” Students bring in their finds and items from nature to create assemblages, collages and installations. “I draw the line at food and shoes. Anything else is fair game,” she says with a sparkle in her eyes. From other people’s trash, Lampasona creates works that generate iconic images. Our lives of excess, homelessness, waste and pollution are among the themes of her work. It is the peeling away of layers through time that intrigues her. Glimpse her website (www.EydiLampasona.com) once and you get the picture. She creates portraits of our lives using the profligate waste we all create. But the greening of our cultural landscape is about much more than making mobiles made of old cans. A “Green Wave” is washing over the world of art and culture in the Palm Beaches. Proponents of the movement seek to make the institutions that house and sponsor art and culture more sustainable. “Preservation is the ultimate in recycling,” declares Joe Gillie, executive director of Old School Square Cultural Arts Center in Delray Beach. Once the crumbling remains of the city’s early 20th century elementary and high schools, the complex is now a National Historic Site. After 13 years of restoration, the buildings house the Crest Theatre, the Cornell Museum of Art and American Culture and the immaculately restored gymnasium, which has become

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a popular venue for weddings, lectures, luncheons and exhibits of all kinds. “That we saved the buildings, that we devised an adaptive re-use of the facilities has been recognized by the state as one of the most successful [preservation efforts] in Florida,” Gillie says. “We honor the past and prepare for the future by finding ways to make this treasure more sustainable.” Road shows, those traveling theatrical caravans that bring Broadway to the hinterlands, can leave a big carbon footprint as they roll through town. Semitrailers recently carrying Cabaret to the Crest Theatre, however, bore the bold logo of the Broadway Green Alliance, an industry-wide initiative designed to educate and inspire the theatrical community and its patrons to adhere to environmentally friendly practices at work and at home. The Loggerhead Marinelife Center in Juno Beach demonstrates the two primary components powering this green wave – education and collaboration. The center was constructed as a LEED-certified facility. LEED is an acronym for Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design, a third-party certification program developed by the U.S. Green Building Council that rates a facility’s sustainability. When you walk through the Marinelife Center’s beautiful new complex, you not only learn about the turtles that grace our beaches, you also see plaques and signs throughout


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Conservation is at the heart of the Loggerhead Marinelife Center’s programs, educational signage and new LEED certified facilities.

Nature photography by Angie Amado, grade 4 Pine Jog Elementary School, demonstrates a greener perspective.

that explain how the building was constructed and is maintained with conservation uppermost in mind. Those signs also serve to remind us that we can practice conservation in our own homes. In its annual report, the center credits its success to the massive influx of both funds and expertise provided by a broad array of government entities, foundations and non-governmental organizations, including the Palm Beach County Cultural Council, the Town of Juno Beach and the Palm Beach County Recreational Assistance Program. When you visit the Palm Beach Zoo, you will see the same kind of educational and collaborative message on display. The Zoo’s recently completed Melvin J. and Claire Levine Animal Care Complex is the first zoo hospital in the country to win LEED gold certification. The zoo touts the fact that the honor would not have been possible without Florida Power and Light, which provided the solar panel array that supplies 13 percent of the hospital’s power needs. The Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties has been a trailblazer in the green movement. The foundation was the first non-profit in the country whose business practices and facilities were certified by GreenNonprofits.org. Now, it is using the power of collaboration and education to inspire a greener outlook

among the non-profit arts, cultural and educational organizations that benefit from its largesse. The foundation’s Environmental Endowment funds dozens of local environmental educational initiatives and supports the “Nonprofits Going Green” contest, which funds sustainability initiatives. Karen Nobel is an art teacher and a self-professed “greenie.” Her classroom at Pine Jog Elementary in West Palm Beach is festooned with bags of bottle caps, straws, Styrofoam and shelves full of doohickeys and gimcracks. Collages made with old cereal boxes and sculptures made of soda cans adorn the walls. With Nobel, every art lesson carries a piece of the conservation message and the holy trinity of “reduce, reuse, recycle.” In the summer she carries her bags of stuff – and her message – to summer campers at the Armory Art Center in downtown West Palm Beach. Nobel likens the way the next generation will approach sustainability to the way they handle seat belts. “Even though seat belts have been mandatory for years, the older generation still has to remember to put the things on. When a child gets in the car, cinching the seatbelt is as natural as closing the door. Similarly, recycling and conservation will be second nature to them,” she says. “The kids are the ones who are going to save us all.” Until then, we can count on an emerald army of dumpster-diving artists, architects and arts administrators to fuel the green movement in Palm Beach County.

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Robert Stevens

Stepping Exclusive Enclaves

The Wild Side

The Heart of the City

Walking tours are a great way to explore Palm Beach Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s colorful past and naturally engaging attractions. By Christina Wood

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Robert Stevens

Out Deco on Display

a

History in the Park

stream of cars flows steadily past palm trees, over bridges and through toll plazas every day as Palm Beach County goes to work and to school, to the bank and the grocery store, to a soccer match or a night out. A complicated tapestry of highways, avenues and quiet culs-de-sac blanket the county from Lake Okeechobee to the beach. But a car can only take you so far. If you want to take a trip back in time, slip on a comfortable pair of shoes. Want to visit another world? Lace up your sneakers! Put your best foot forward and explore Palm Beach

Wonderful Worth Avenue

County step by step. Let your imagination be your guide for a solitary hike along the shores of Lake Okeechobee or a leisurely stroll through lush gardens or get to know the regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s vibrant character a little better with a guided walking tour. Take the first step! Try one of these adventures or explore a wealth of possibilities, from Turtle Walks on the beach to a gallery stroll along a city street. Be aware that schedules and tour offerings may vary according to the season. A bottle of water is good to have when you set out to quench your thirst for local lore, and donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget the sunscreen.

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Exclusive Enclaves

f

ollow a docent from the Boca Raton Historical Society through the doors of the Boca Raton Resort & Club and step into another world. As you walk down the hallways and pass beneath some rather impressive arches, you will be strolling through layers of history. Addison Mizner’s architectural vision is writ large; more subtle clues reveal a glimpse into his life and the lives of the men and women who helped shape the iconic landmark’s distinctive

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character. Since Mizner opened what was then the Cloister Inn in 1926, a succession of Vanderbilts, presidents and tennis stars have graced its hallways, dined at its tables and sung its praises. The property is a private facility, open only to resort guests and club members, so the Historical Society’s tour is also a delicious opportunity to slip inside the doors of this exclusive enclave. For information and reservations, contact the Boca Raton Historical Society at (561) 395-6766 or visit www.bocahistory.org.


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The Wild Side

t

he Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge, which encompasses more than 221 square miles of Everglades habitat, is popular with seasonal visitors. In fact, of the more than 350 types of birds spotted in the Everglades, about 200 are migratory. Alligators, bobcats, otters, snail kites, wood storks and herons are among the yearround residents. The various tours offered through the park’s Visitors Center, located off US 441/State Road 7 in Boynton Beach, are equally popular with both residents and visitors of the two-legged variety. Lewis Hecker, a park ranger with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service, has been leading tours for the past ten years. “Some of the deadliest and some of the most beneficial plants in the planet are in the swamp,” he says, referring to the area covered by the Cypress Boardwalk Tour. Tours of the Marsh Trail, guided birding tours and night prowls are also available at various times of the year. “If you’re interested in flora and fauna and you don’t mind getting your shoes dirty,” Hecker says, the tours are a great way to explore this unique natural resource. For more information, call (561) 734-8303 or visit http://Loxahatchee.fws.gov.

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The Heart of the City

c

Robert Stevens

ities are spending millions of dollars to create a sense of place, a central space that you could call the heart and soul of a particular community,” says Rick Gonzalez, AIA, president of REG Architects. West Palm Beach, he says, has no need to create a sense of place. “We’ve always had that. Clematis Street has always been like our collective town center.” Gonzalez leads the Historical Society of Palm Beach County’s Downtown West Palm Beach History Strolls. He traces the evolution of the city’s distinctive personality through its architecture and offers interesting forays into politics and urban planning. “I would like to dispel the notion that there is no history in Florida,” he says. For more information, call (561) 832-4164 or visit www.historicalsocietypbc.org.

Wonderful Worth Avenue

j

im Ponce brings Palm Beach history alive on his walking tour of Worth Avenue. “For the tour, I dress pretty much like a proper gentlemen who would have shopped on the avenue in the very early days, with a vest and a watch with a fob and definitely a hat,” he says. Worth Avenue encompasses less than a quarter of a mile of shops but it is known around the world. Walking, especially with such a dapper and personable guide (Ponce has been officially recognized as the only two-legged landmark in Palm Beach) gives you a sense not only of the variety of shops but also of the colorful history behind the elegant facades. The tour begins in the Gucci Courtyard and winds past Addison Mizner’s Everglades Club, built in 1918, and Ta-boó, the first shop on the avenue to stay open year round. Ponce tells stories of Judy Garland and Venetian bridges as the tour strays into some of the delightfully beckoning courtyards and vias that add so much charm to the avenue. One-hour tours of Worth Avenue are held from November through May. For more information, contact the Worth Avenue Association at (561) 659-6909 or visit www.worth-avenue.com.

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History in the Park

o

n a peaceful Saturday morning following a soaking rain, Riverbend Park is almost impossibly green. An osprey circles high above a blanket of trees in a calm blue sky; the Loxahatchee National Wild and Scenic River murmurs contentedly. It’s hard to imagine the crack of rifles and the shrill cries of battle that filled the air here more than 170 years ago. The park’s 680 acres encompass the sites of two battles fought in 1838 during the Second Seminole War. Tour guide Richard Procyk shares his knowledge of the battlefield with park visitors, speaking as passionately about the need to teach and to preserve history as he does about the efforts of General Thomas Jessup to lead a contingent of Tennessee Volunteers across the Loxahatchee River with a U.S. flag bearing just 26 stars. You can find out more about the monthly series, which features special topics, such as the role of Major William Lauderdale in the Seminole War, the Black Seminoles and the archaeology of Lake Okeechobee, by calling (561) 966-6686 or visiting www.co.palm-beach.fl.us/parks/locations/riverbend.

Deco on Display

w

hat do Boston’s on the Beach and the Empire State Building have in common? Both buildings were built in the 1930s in a style now commonly referred to as Art Deco. Multiples of three are a common design element in Art Deco – a building façade will sport three windows, a column will be adorned with three fluted ribs, three steps will lead to a recessed entryway – so it is only fitting that Sharon Koskoff, founding president of the Art Deco Society of the Palm Beaches, has developed three different walking tours that showcase Palm Beach County’s Art Deco architecture. A full-time mural artist, designer and preservationist, Koskoff combines a passion for art and architecture with extensive local knowledge to guide groups to the historic treasures of Delray Beach, Lake Worth and the Northwood neighborhood of West Palm Beach. For more information, call (561) 276-9925 or visit www.artdecopb.org.

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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE

Conservatory v t OF PERFORMING A Arts Ar rts rt

cultural council news

SUMMER CAMPS ACTING DANCE VOICE

Senior Conservatory

'RADES  3TUDENTSPERFORM High School Musical ONTHE-ALTZ*UPITER4HEATRE3TAGE

Cultural Council Vice President Bill Nix with Mary Montgomery

HIGH *UNEn MON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FRI SCHOOL MUSICAL

(From left) Event Co-Chairs Jean Sharf and Irene Karp; Ervin Duggan, president of the Society of the Four Arts; and Edith Dixon, chair of the Society of the Four Artsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; board

AMnPM

4HREE7EEK#AMP

Junior Conservatory 'RADES 

3TUDENTSPERFORM Seussical Jr. ONTHE-ALTZ*UPITER4HEATRE3TAGE

*ULYn MON â&#x20AC;&#x201C; FRI

AMnPM 4HREE7EEK#AMP

One Week Camps

Michael Bracci, chair of the Cultural Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s board of directors, and his wife, Colleen

Jeffrey Fessler, recipient of the Arts Educator Award

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Grades 6 - 12 )MPROV3KETCH#OMEDY s *UNEn*ULY 3CENE3TUDYFOR4EENS s*ULYn Dance Intensive for Teens s!UGUSTn

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(561) 575-2672 www.jupitertheatre.org click â&#x20AC;&#x153;educationâ&#x20AC;? Steven Caras and Sydelle Meyer

Photos by: Jacek Gancarz

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Joan Goldberg and Gary Schweikhart


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cultural council news

Muse Awards Showcase Cultural Leaders, Talented Youth Some 350 cultural enthusiasts gathered at the Kravis Center on February 27 to honor the recipients of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s 2010 Muse Awards during a high-energy evening filled with exceptional performances and engaging presentations. The Muse Awards honor the accomplishments of those who contribute, create, inspire and help make our community a better place to live, work and play through their efforts. Irene Karp and Jean Sharf were co-chairs of the event, which showcased more than 150 talented student performers from across the county, including Chayse Banks; the BAK Middle School of the Arts Trumpet Ensemble; the Street Beat dance troupe; soprano Madison Marie McIntosh; the Young Singers of the Palm Beaches; and vocalists F. Michael Haynie, Philippe Arroyo, Kevin James Connor, Sam Haas and Nick Savarese who sang “Bells” from the musical Academy.

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{inside culture} cultural council news The 2010 Muse Awards recipients and finalists were: Arts Educator – Jeffrey Fessler, a social studies teacher at U.B. Kinsey Elementary School of the Arts (honoree), Kathleen Klein, Sharon Koskoff (sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. James Karp) Art or Cultural Program of the Year − “Thank you for the Music” collaboration with Street Beat and Young Singers of the Palm Beaches (honoree), “LAMP: Library Adventure Museum Pass” − Palm Beach County Library System, “African Dance & Drumming Residency” − VSA arts of Florida-Palm Beach County (sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Butler) Arts and Cultural Organization (budget over $500,000) − Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts (honoree),

Florida Stage, Palm Beach Dramaworks (sponsored by The Palm Beach Post) Arts and Cultural Organization (budget under $500,000) Educational Gallery Group (honoree), Inspirit Inc., Street Beat Inc. (sponsored by Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf) Civic Leader – Philanthropist and community volunteer Helen K. Persson (honoree), Raymond Graziotto, Harvey E. Oyer III (sponsored by Wachovia Wealth Management) Note: Persson’s heartfelt acceptance remarks can be found below. Cultural Leader − Beth Clark, executive director of Young Singers of the Palm Beachers (honoree), Jamie Stuve, Debby Coles-Dobay (sponsored by Gunster) Awards of special merit were the Council’s Choice Award, presented to the Loxahatchee River Historical Society (sponsored by Northern Trust), and the Chairs’

Award, which was received by the Society of the Four Arts. Diane Arrieta, who established the gallery program at the John D. MacArthur Campus Library of Florida Atlantic University, was honored with the Hector Ubertalli Award for Visual Artists. Awards presenters included Michael Province, a violin prodigy; Harrison Tyler, a visual artist attending the Dreyfoos School of the Arts; and McIntosh. The evening was produced by Andrew Kato, artistic director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and creative consultant/coordinating producer for the Tony Awards. All proceeds from the Muse Awards go to the Cultural Council’s art education programs. The producing sponsors were Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman, Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Maltz and Sydelle Meyer. Bronze sponsors include A.R.T., Cil Draime and Dana Picard, Edwards Angell Palmer and Dodge, LLP.

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{inside culture} cultural council news A Few Words from Helen K. Persson I am so pleased and honored to receive this prestigious award, especially in Palm Beach County, where there are hundreds of men and women dedicated to promoting arts and culture in this county. Nevertheless, I am grateful to be recognized for doing my part. I have to credit my parents, whose values and teachings greatly influenced my life, especially their example of helping others. There is also no question that the guidance of my late husband also aided me and helped direct my philanthropy efforts. Throughout my life my two loves have been the nursing profession and music. I was a pediatric nurse until joining the United States Navy. During the war I made my début in the San Francisco Opera with Lily Pons − I was told I was the only nurse on record to accomplish such a feat! I have professed my love of nursing through hospital volunteer work, board service and the creation of nursing endowments and scholarships. Likewise, music has enhanced my life immeasurably, both as a performer and audience member, and I am thrilled to have been a part of providing that same experience to others through philanthropic contributions and volunteer service.

I thank the Palm Beach County Cultural Council for all that they do to promote arts and culture. I believe that if you love where you live, you have to actively care for it, and I am delighted to be a part of supporting Palm Beach County’s arts and cultural assets.

Culture & Cocktails Events Inspire Spirited Conversations

March: Anne Washburn, Jenny Garrigues, Dora Frost

March: Missie Edwards and Ryan Tracy

March: Rena Blades, Kara Walker-Tome, Tim Eaton, Elayne Mordes, Cheryl Brutvan

March: Stephen Ferber and Dr. Sandra McNeal

In the past several months, the Cultural Council’s continuing Culture & Cocktails series has run the gamut from the Silver Screen to the Broadway stage to contemporary art – with a stop in South Palm Beach County along the way. More than 100 fans of contemporary art attended the March gathering at Café Boulud in Palm Beach, where they enjoyed “In the Know of Now: A Conversation about Contemporary Art.” The panelists included Cheryl Brutvan, curator of contemporary art for the Norton Museum of Art; Tim Eaton, owner of Eaton Fine Art; and Elayne Mordes, owner of Whitespace – The Mordes Collection. Independent curator Kara Walker-Tomé moderated the lively, hour-long discussion and audience Q&A. In February, more than 80 culture lovers seeking insights about the South County

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{inside culture} cultural council news

January: Fran Luckoff, Henry Patraki and Maddy Singer

arts scene attended the very first Culture & Cocktails event held outside of Palm Beach. The February 1 event was held at the Boca Raton Resort and Club’s Boca Beach Club, with the topic “Cultural Bounty / South County − A Conversation about the Booming Art Scene in Boca and Delray.” The panelists included George Bolge, executive director of the Boca Raton Museum of Art; Clive Cholerton, artistic

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and marketing director of the Caldwell Theatre; Daisy Fulton, executive director of EPOCH and the Spady Museum; Joe Gillie, executive director of Old School Square Cultural Arts Center; Amy Hever, director of advancement for the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens; and Charlie Siemon, festival chair of Festival of the Arts BOCA 2010. Palm Beach County Commissioner Steven Abrams served as moderator. January’s Culture & Cocktails, back in Palm Beach at Cafe Boulud, drew more than 60 theater fans for “No Biz Like Show Biz! − A Conversation with Big Time Producers.” Vicki Halmos, producer of numerous Broadway and Off-Broadway shows and founder of the Palm Beach Principal Players, swapped humorous anecdotes and wry advice with Rodger Hess, producer of such Broadway shows as the

Tony Award-winning revivals of Macbeth and 1776. The two veteran producers were interviewed by Andrew Kato, artistic director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. In December, the largest Culture & Cocktails in the program’s history turned out for “Burt! – A Conversation with Burt Reynolds” at Cafe Boulud. Suzanne Neidland, chair of the Burt Reynolds Institute for Film and Theatre, led a wideranging conversation that took the audience from the actor’s early days at Palm Beach Community College through his celebrated career in Hollywood. Reynolds told a number of amusing anecdotes about the various stars with whom he worked (Clint Eastwood, Charles Durning, Ossie Davis), palled around (Fred Astaire, Ella Fitzgerald, Barbra Streisand) and laughed (Carol Burnett, Dom Deluise, Maureen Stapleton).


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{inside culture} cultural council news

January: Joyce Howard and Irv Welzer

December: Cherie and Steve Golden

February: Jean Ellen, Elayna Toby Singer and Daisy Fulton

December: Linda Lawn, Jill Walsh and Beth Dowdle

February: Charlotte Robinson, Joe Gillie and Steven Abrams

December: Burt Reynolds, Sallie and Burt Korman, Rena Blades

Muse Awards Preview Event Sparkles Prior to the Muse Awards, Co-Chairs Irene Karp and Jean Sharf hosted a reception honoring the 18 finalists at A.R.T., a jewelry and art salon on Worth Avenue. Approximately 50 honorees and cultural supporters enjoyed cocktails and hors dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres while strolling among displays of exquisite jewelry and fantastic art. The finalists attending included Ervin Duggan from the Society of the Four Arts, Sue Ellen Beryl from Palm Beach Dramaworks, Judy Mitchell from the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, Shawn Berry from Young Singers of the Palm Beaches and Ginny Meredith from Inspirit. Among the cultural supporters attending were Jorge Pesquera from the Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau; Jo Anne Moeller, Berton Korman and Michael Bracci from the Cultural Council Board of Directors; and Jane Holzer, curator of a selection of works from Andy Warhol, Damien Hirst and others at A.R.T.

Shawn Berry, Lesley Davison and Glen Barefoot

Judith Mitchell and Sue Ellen Beryl Jane and Ashley Holzer

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{inside culture} cultural council news Scholarships, Memberships Promote Summer Cultural Guide Nearly $7,000 in scholarships and memberships provided an attractive incentive to generate interest in the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s fifth annual online Summer Cultural Guide. To promote the guide, the Cultural Council sponsored an online survey and contest with prizes offered by more than 20 area cultural organizations. Winners were scheduled to be announced in April. Groups contributing to the contest included the Academy of Dance, Music & Theatre, the Armory Art Center, ArtStage,

the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Boynton Beach Art Center, Everglades Youth Conservation Camp, the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, Lake Worth Playhouse, Lighthouse Center for the Arts, Loggerhead Marinelife Center, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens, the Cultural Council, the Palm Beach Zoo, Pine Jog Summer Art Camp, the River Center, the Schoolhouse Children’s Museum, Sol Children Theatre Troupe, the South Florida Science Museum, Standing Ovation Performing Arts and the Youth Orchestra Summer Camp.

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Anyone seeking fun family summer activities need look no further than this information-filled resource, which features descriptions of 61 organizations that host art and cultural summer actives for kids. Find all the details on the Cultural Council’s website: www.palmbeach culture.com.

Everglades-Themed Art Show Travels the County In conjunction with the 25th Annual Everglades Coalition Conference at PGA National Resort in January, the Cultural Council hosted a countywide K-12 art competition entitled “Explore the Changing Face of the Everglades.” Nearly 200 entries were received and judged, and 30 works of art were chosen to travel throughout the county to celebrate “The Year of The Everglades.” Stops included the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in Boynton Beach, the Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center Gallery at Palm Beach State College in Belle Glade and the Community Foundation of Palm Beach and Martin Counties in West Palm Beach. The exhibit remains on view through DATE TO COME. The following students were recognized by having their works included in the traveling exhibition: Best in Show − Kelly Baez, 11th grade, Wellington Christian School Best Environmental Interpretation of the Everglades − Austin Brown, 11th grade, Wellington Christian School Best Artistic Interpretation of the Everglades − Ben Shaevitz, 4th grade, Panther Run Elementary Sculpture − Shannon Burke, 7th grade, Grandview Preparatory School; Julia Palermo, 7th grade, Cassidy Fennell and Christina Magana, 8th grade, St. Mark’s Episcopal School


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cultural council news Honorable Mention 2D, grades K-5 − Maddison Onuska and Skylar Hines, 2nd grade, Olivia Schmidt, 4th grade, and Zachary Ladd, 5th grade, St. Mark’s Episcopal School; Mabel Palmero, 4th grade, Berkshire Elementary; Ciris Williams, 1st grade, Palmetto Elementary; Allianah Sylvain and Sophia Lorello, 3rd grade, and Jocelyn Newman, 4th grade, Panther Run Elementary; Justin Godur, 5th grade, Grandview Preparatory School; Emily Hernandez, Sebastien Crooks and Jessica Pope, 5th grade, Pine Jog Elementary Honorable Mention 2D, grades 6-8 − Aileen Israde and Lillian Hahn, 6th grade, and Aleksi Turkki, 7th grade, Palm Springs Middle School; T’Neal Cooper, 7th grade, Grandview Preparatory School; Beau Britt and Stephanie Weil, 8th grade, Wellington Christian School Honorable Mention 2D, grades 9-12 − Michelle Baez, 11th grade, Wellington Christian School; Mike Klein, 11th grade, The Benjamin School; Ken Henry, 12th grade, South Tech Academy

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{inside culture} cultural compendium

Ben Harper and Relentless7

SunFest Shines Spotlight on New Waterfront The ever-popular SunFest â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest arts and music festival â&#x20AC;&#x201C; returns in 2010 in a familiar, yet vastly different, location. The newly imagined space along Flagler Drive in downtown West Palm Beach is playing host to a wide array of national acts spanning numerous genres

and generations â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from jazz to hip hop to alternative rock â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from April 28 through May 2. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We know our fans feel the setting is as important as the music,â&#x20AC;? says Paul Jamieson, executive director of SunFest. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One of the magic ingredients that makes SunFest unique is the waterfront setting. We are looking forward to bringing

festivalgoers out to experience the festival in a whole new way. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t believe there is a more spectacular place to enjoy a music festival than the new West Palm Beach waterfront.â&#x20AC;? National acts appearing at SufFest were scheduled to include Weezer, ZZ Top, Shinedown, Ben Harper and Relentless7, Patti LaBelle, Maze featuring Frankie Beverly, Flaming Lips, Rise Against, B-52â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Damian Marley, Nas, Five For Fighting, Flogging Molly, Sister Hazel, Better than Ezra, Marcus Miller, Classic Albums Live and The Charlie Daniels Band. In addition to big-name and local musical acts, SunFest features a juried fine art and craft show, family activities and â&#x2C6;&#x2019; closing the festival with a bang â&#x2C6;&#x2019; the Verizon Wireless Fireworks Show on May 2. Tickets can be purchased online at www.sunfest.com, at the SunFest store located at 525 Clematis St. in downtown West Palm Beach and by calling 1-800-SUNFEST.

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When it was completed in 1902, Whitehall, Henry Flaglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gilded Age estate in Palm Beach, was hailed by the New York Herald as â&#x20AC;&#x153;more wonderful than any palace in Europe, grander and more PDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQWWKDQDQ\RWKHUSULYDWHGZHOOLQJLQWKHZRUOGÂľ Today, Whitehall is a National Historic Landmark, and is open WR WKH SXEOLF DV WKH )ODJOHU 0XVHXP  )RU D FRPSOHWH  Season Program Guide SOHDVH FDOO    RU YLVLW RXU :HE VLWHDWZZZĂ DJOHUPXVHXPXV


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cultural compendium Arts Community Orchestrates Help for Haiti

Durga Garcia

Following January’s devastating earthquake in Haiti, the Palm Beach County arts and cultural community rose to the occasion by raising funds to help with the relief and recovery efforts in a number of creative ways. Lake Worth’s Flamingo Clay Studio – Clay Glass Metal Stone Gallery reacted immediately to the devastation caused by the Haitian earthquake by sending out a “Call to Artists” for handcrafted ceramic bowls to be sold at the gallery, with all funds raised going to Haitian Relief efforts. The call to artists brought a response from all over Palm Beach County. Bowls were donated by students at Jupiter High School, Royal Palm High School, Bak Middle School of the Arts and the Dreyfoos School of the Arts, the Ceramic League of the Palm Beaches, Florida Atlantic University, the Lighthouse Center for the Arts and the Armory Art Center, as well as by individual artists. The bowls were sold during a day-long event on March 20 featuring Haitian music and food from participating restaurants and shops Hoot/Wisdom Recordings, Florida Atlantic University’s student-operated record label, and the Peace Studies Program in FAU’s Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters hosted a night of art and music. Aimed at raising continued support for the Haitian earthquake relief effort, “Dear Haiti: Notes of Peace and Compassion,” showcased a mixture of FAU musicians and artists. In addition, artwork donated by select FAU artists was sold in a silent auction. Hoot/Wisdom recording artists Danny B. and Marcus Banks headlined the event, which also featured a jazz-fusion combo led by FAU graduate student Kiki Sanchez and original orchestral works of sophomore music student Alton Terry. The Department of Languages, Linguistics and Comparative Literature at FAU, in partnership with the university’s

Painted bowls by Amelia Costa

student organization, Konbit Creole, hosted a film series to benefit earthquake victims. In addition to raising funds, the film series provide a forum for learning about the rich cultural and historical heritage of the country. “It is important that our students feel that the education that they are getting here at FAU is helping

them better engage with the world, help solve its problems and make them more responsible people. Education is not about accumulating knowledge but rather about using that knowledge to help make the world a better place,” said Dr. Carla Calargé, assistant professor of Francophone studies at FAU. “In solidarity

April 20 – June 13 561.392.2500 www.bocamuseum.org Elvis at 21, Photographs by Alfred Wertheimer was developed by the Smithsonian Institution Traveling Exhibition Service, Govinda Gallery, and the Smithsonian’s National Portrait Gallery, and is made possible through the generous support of HISTORY™. © Alfred Wertheimer. All rights reserved.

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cultural compendium with our many Haitian and HaitianAmerican students and friends, we hope to raise funds for the Haiti-based NGO, Partners in Health. One hundred percent of all donations will go to this organization with 20 years of experience on the ground in Haiti.” Film distributors waived screening rights for the event, allowing for all donations to go to relief and rebuilding efforts in Haiti. The Art Creation Foundation for Children (ACFFC), a non-profit organization established by Judy Hoffman, President of Profile Marketing Research, has been working to enhance the lives of children in Jacmel, Haiti, through art for the past decade. Following the earthquake, the foundation expanded its scope to begin seeking funds for rebuilding of homes and lives in Jacmel. “It seems that more happens because of the small NGOs in coordination and that is the route we are taking,” Hoffman wrote on the ACFFC website. “We can make a difference.”

Hope Alswang

Norton Museum Names Hope Alswang as Executive Director Hope Alswang has been appointed director and chief executive officer of the Norton Museum of Art. For the past four years, Alswang was president and chief executive officer of the Museum of Art at the highly-regarded Rhode Island School of

Design. Prior to that, she was executive director of the Shelburne Museum in Shelburne, Vt., and director of the New York State Council on the Arts Museum Program. Roger Ward, chief curator and curator of European art since 2001 and acting director since May 2009, has been named deputy director. Alswang succeeds Christina Orr-Cahall, who left the Norton Museum in 2009 to become executive officer and director of the Experience Music Project | Science Fiction Museum and Hall of Fame in Seattle, Wash. “The Norton Museum’s permanent collection is one of the treasures of our nation,” Alswang said. “It is magnificent. The collection is a tremendous cultural resource for the Palm Beaches and indeed the entire Florida community. Christina Orr-Cahall, Roger Ward, the trustees and the Norton’s outstanding professional staff have created together an exciting and vibrant institution. I look forward to helping to build on their remarkable success.” Alswang has served as consultant to a number of museums and historical societies, including the Smithsonian Institution in Washington D.C. She holds a bachelor’s degree in American History from Goddard College and was an Electra Havemeyer Webb Fellow at the Shelburne Museum.

Palm Beach Poetry Festival Honors High School Students Five area high school students earned the opportunity to participate in January’s Palm Beach Poetry Festival by virtue of their winning entries in the festival’s annual High School Poetry Contest. The first place prize was awarded to Debra Marcus of Wellington, a junior at Wellington High School, for her poem Circus Water. The four runners-up included Rachel Katz of West Palm Beach, a junior at Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts, for her poem I’ve put on my Makeup For You; Adriana Ugarte of West Palm Beach, a junior at Dreyfoos, for Autumn;

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cultural compendium Melissa Dubey of Jupiter, a ninth grader at Jupiter High School, for Changing; and Benjamin Copan of Wellington, a junior at Wellington High School, for E.O. Wilson’s Ants and the Hofstaderian Brain. Open to Palm Beach County public and private high school students, the contest received 454 entries this year. The judge was Dr. Jeff Morgan of Lynn University’s Department of English. In addition to receiving festival passes and cash prizes, the winning students had their poems published on the festival’s web site at www.palmbeachpoetryfestival.org. In addition, they read their poems at a special presentation ceremony at Old School Square’s Crest Theatre in Delray Beach.

Michiko Kurisu

(Standing from left) Dr. Jeff Morgan, Miles Coon, Dr. Blaise Allen, Benjamin Copan; (seated) Rachel Katz, Adriana Ugarte, Melissa Dubey

Boynton Beach Raises Profile of Public Art It’s been nearly five years since the Boynton Beach City Commission adopted its Public Art Ordinance, which ensured that public artworks would be integrated into the city’s architecture, landscape, infrastructure and greenways. Anyone who wonders if the strategy has paid off need only drive along the city’s downtown “Avenue of the Arts” to view 10 outdoor artworks that speak to environmental issues, are made from recycled materials, call attention to environmental issues or suggest environmental solutions. As the pro-

gram’s brochure states, the exhibit is open 365 days a year, 24 hours a day, seven days a week – and it’s free. Within the past several months, Boynton Beach Art in Public Places Program has unveiled a number of major works, including the Graffiti Mural Project in Sara Sims Park; When Are You Coming To Visit, a sculpture at City Hall by Melissa Markowitz that helps raise public awareness about elderly neglect; and Brotherhood in Mourning, a sculpture by Boynton Beach Fire Rescue Division Chief Ray Altman, in the Boynton Beach Fire Rescue Station #5 and Emergency Operations Center. Also on view in the facility are a timeline, photographs, mosaic tile floor emblems and other items commemorating the city’s firefighting history. The Graffiti Mural Project was led by artists Peter Agardy, Doug Hoekzema and John Griffin, who were assisted by guest artists Jermaine Johnson, Angel Mir and Chan Shepard as well as by young people who participated in developing the project concept and painting the mural. The project was sponsored by the City of Boynton Beach Youth Violence Prevention Program, the Palm Beach County Criminal Justice Commission, the City’s Art in Public Places Arts Commission and the Police Department. The mural can be seen at the park, located at 209 NW 9th Court in Boynton Beach. The program, which is managed by Public Art Administrator Debby Coles-Dobay, also sponsors exhibits and other activities throughout the year. To see a map of the Avenue of the Arts, information about the city’s other public artworks, calls to artists and more, visit www.boyntonbeacharts.org.

The Graffiti Mural in Sara Sims Park was unveiled on February 4

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{inside culture} cultural compendium Wold Performing Arts Center Opens on Lynn University Campus The Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center on Lynn Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s campus in Boca Raton is now a reality. The newest state-of-the-art facility in South Florida features superb acoustics, a modern lighting system, a large, lightfilled lobby and flexible space well-suited for dramatic productions, concerts and other cultural events. The public dedication and ribbon cutting in March featured a brief ceremony followed by an open house where patrons were invited to explore the building, tour the dressing rooms, see a performance by Lynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s drama students in the intimate rehearsal studio and even take the spotlight on stage with Floridaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s first lady of theater Jan McArt and Jon Robertson, dean of Lynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Conservatory of Music. Designed by nationally acclaimed architect Herbert S. Newman, the 750-seat

Inside the new Wold Performing Arts Center at Lynn University

performing arts center will be home to live theatrical performances by the universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s theater arts program and professional Live at Lynn series, as well as Conservatory of Music concerts and other university-hosted events. The first public performance in the new facility was scheduled to feature Mitzi Gaynor in Razzle Dazzle! My Life Behind the Sequins in April. Lead donor Elaine J. Wold has committed $8.3 million for construction of the theater that bears her â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and her late husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s â&#x20AC;&#x201C; name. She began supporting Lynnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

theater arts program in 2004 with a $1 million gift that created the Keith C. Wold M.D. Memorial Fund for the Development of Theatre Arts. In May of 2007, the university publicly announced Elaine J. Woldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s gift of $6 million toward the construction of The Keith C. and Elaine Johnson Wold Performing Arts Center. Wold later made an additional $2.3 million challenge grant in support of the project, which was met by other generous benefactors. Gifts also were made to start an endowment for the care of the facility and programs.

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{inside culture} cultural compendium Flagler Museum Receives Exceptional Gift The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum recently received the largest gift in its history, which was made in honor of the museum’s 50th anniversary. Leon and Charlotte Amar of Palm Beach donated 64 items of art, antiquities and books including European paintings, prints, French furniture, Asian artifacts and French rugs. A highlight of the Amar’s gift is a Louis XV Bombé Commode, made in 1761 by French ébéniste Léonard Boudin (1735-1804). With elaborate gilded bronze ormolu mounts and wood veneers, the piece has been described as one of the most important commodes in the world. Other notable items include paintings of The Ducal Palace, Piazza San Marco, Venice after Richard Parkes Bonington (English, 1802-1828); Mary, Countess of Inchiquin, 1794-95, from the studio of Sir Thomas Lawrence (English, 1769-1830); a Venetian Canal Scene with View of Santa Maria della Salute, by Henry Courtney Selous (English, 1811-1890) and a portrait of Armand-Guillaume-François de Gourgues, Marquis of Varyes and D’Aulnay, 1753, by Jean Valade (French, baptized 1710-1787). “I cannot think of a better way to commemorate the museum’s golden anniversary,” said Museum Director John Blades. “This collection is of objects of superior quality and perfectly suited to the period Whitehall represents. The museum will be forever grateful to Leon and Charlotte Amar for their generous gift.”

Mary, Countess of Inchiquin, 1794-95, from the studio of Thomas Lawrence

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briefly noted Royal Palm Beach High School photography students Sara Walde and Lauren Rice received Gold Key Awards in the Scholastic Art competition, the nation’s largest and longest-running recognition program for creative teenagers in the visual and literary arts. Each year, more than 77,000 students participate nationwide. Their photos will be entered in the National Scholastic Awards competition this summer in New York. In total, 16 Royal Palm Beach High students were recognized. Their work was displayed at Eg2 Gallery in CityPlace in February. “We have talented, dedicated artists at Royal Palm Beach High School,” said Cindy Oakes, the photography teacher. “I am very proud of their ability to use their creative thinking skills to observe and capture images in a unique way.”

Ken Jacques Photography

Award-winning photo by Sara Walde

Gordon McConnell (front) and Francisco Solorzano in Florida Stage’s production of

The Palm Beach County cultural scene was in the news on February 19, when articles in both The Wall Street Journal and The New York Times focused attention here. Journal theater critic Terry Teachout praised Florida Stage’s Southeastern Premiere of Sins of the Mother, a new play by Israel Horovitz. The production was part of the 70/70 Horovitz Project, a year-long event celebrating Horovitz’s 70th birthday with 70 productions of his plays. “This was my first visit to Florida Stage,” Teachout wrote. “From now on it will be a regular stop on my reviewing itinerary.” Meanwhile, the Times offered travel tips about Boca Raton, highlighting the Boca Raton Museum of Art, Gumbo Limbo Nature Center and, in Delray Beach, the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens and the American Orchid Society.

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(From left) George Bolge, Noemie Felipe, Becky Sanders and Ella Levy

Noemie Felipe and Ella Levy are the recipients of the Boca Raton Museum of Art’s 2009-10 Milton and Florence Hoffman Sculpture Scholarship Award. The scholarships are given annually to students who meet certain scholarship criteria and are enrolled in a sculpture course at the Boca Raton Museum’s Art School. “We are delighted to have the opportunity to support these two outstanding students in their artistic endeavors,” said Museum Executive Director George S. Bolge. “We are grateful to Milton and Florence Hoffman for their generosity in supporting students in the medium of sculpture.” The awards were presented during the inaugural “Art Rocks” event, which highlighted the Art School’s diverse programs and talented teachers while raising funds for its support.


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{inside culture} briefly noted

Mounts Botanical Garden in West Palm

Corby Kaye, Studio Palm Beach

Beach recently received three grants totaling nearly $245,000. The largest award, $175,000 from the Esther B. O’Keeffe Foundation of Palm Beach, will fund an environmental facelift of the dock and bridge to the Shade and Color Island. The Marge and Fritz Bell Tropical Fruit Project donated just under $65,000 for educational programs about cultivating and disseminating tropical fruit, including developing brochures in both English and Spanish, adding pineapple and fruit trees and educational stations and, potentially, by revitalizing the popular annual Tropical Fruit Festival. Mounts received $5,000 from the Stanley Smith Horticultural Trust for new signage describing different landscape elements and horticultural techniques used in South Florida. For more information, please call (561) 233-1757 or visit www.mounts.org. (From left) Arthur O’Keeffe, Mounts Garden Director Allen Sistrunk, Clare O’Keeffe

Students at Orchard View Elementary work on their mural

Mural artist Sharon Koskoff continues her quest to brighten the worlds of students in Palm Beach County. In one recent project, she worked with children ages 5-18 at the Osborne Center after-school program sponsored by For The Children Inc. in Lake Worth to create murals in three classrooms representing the three levels of the atmosphere: an underwater coral reef, a landscape with trees and a rainbow and an outer-space fantasy. At Orchard View Elementary School in Delray Beach, Koskoff and educator Ken Zeno worked with 4th and 5th graders to create a 70-foot mural entitled Kids, Parents & Businesses Go Green, which was sponsored by a private family foundation in Boca Raton. Work progresses on a colorful fish at For the Children

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{inside culture} briefly noted ArtStart named Christy Laureano, an aftercare counselor at Pine Jog Elementary School in West Palm Beach its “Most Valuable Teaching Partner” for 2009. “Christy is always willing to go the extra mile and always does so with a smile,” said Jeannette Pomeroy Parssi, ArtStart’s founder and president. “It’s easy to see why the students love her so much.” ArtStart awarded its 2009 Youth Art Scholarship for Portfolio Development to Jalen Lopez, a fifth grade student at Egret Lake Elementary School in West Palm Beach. The $250 scholarship includes art supplies, a professional quality portfolio/carrying case and classes to help Jalen prepare for his interview at Bak Middle School of the Arts, where he has applied as a visual arts major. Christy Laureano is congratulated by her students.

Local jazz musician Charlie Beck

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intends to “keep the music playing” by donating his professional music library to Palm Beach Atlantic University’s School of Music and Fine Arts. The collection, 15 years in the making, is composed of more than 1,500 big band arrangements. After 40 years practicing dentistry in Tarrytown, N.Y., Beck retired to South Florida in 1986 to pursue his love of music and begin a new career as a jazz musician. He is a founding member of the Palm Beach Gardens Concert Band and performed with the band for more than two decades. He is also a founding member of Serenade in Blue Big Band. Beck currently plays trumpet for the Boynton Beach and Royal Palm Beach community bands.

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Charlie Beck


Brazilian Court_FULL page_a&c Spring 10:Brazilian Court

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the Elegance of a Landmark hotel

Plan your next meeting or event at the landmark Brazilian Court, a historic Florida resort. Perfect for executive retreats, incentive trips and other meetings, The Brazilian Court features four private rooms to meet your meeting and event needs. The Brazilian Court offers gourmet dining from Café Boulud and the complete services of a salon and spa by Frédéric Fekkai. all Brazilian Court guests will enjoy complimentary access to our brand new private Beach Club. Reservations

561.655.7740 301 Australian Ave Palm Beach, FL 33480 thebraziliancourt.com


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{inside culture}

Tony Arruza

briefly noted

Florida has produced world-class talent, including multiple world titleholders. Pictured here in this historic image are (from left) Todd Holland, Scott McCranels, Rich Rudolph, Kelly Slater, Matt Kechele and Charlie Kuhn.

Surf’s up at FAU! Florida Atlantic University’s University Galleries has received a $16,596 matching grant from the Florida Humanities Council to research and produce a traveling exhibition, “The History and Culture of Surfing in Florida.” The exhibition is being researched and designed by W. Rod Faulds, director of the University Galleries, and Paul Aho, adjunct professor of art and lifelong Florida surfer. The organizers welcome assistance in identifying and contacting collectors of surf photography, surfboards and memorabilia. The “Surfing Florida” exhibition, due to open in Fall 2011, will bring together humanities scholars and members of Florida’s sizeable surfing community to present and interpret the huge impact that surfing and surf culture has made on the state. For more information, contact Faulds at (561) 297-2661 or wfaulds@fau.edu.

It might take awhile to make your guitar gently weep,

Instructor Jerry Tyler guides students through an “Instant Guitar” session.

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but if you want to learn the basics, consider “Instant Guitar for Hopelessly Busy People,” a two-and-a-half-hour crash course offered by the Community Center at Sugar Sand Park in Boca Raton. “In just a few hours,” the course description says, “you can learn enough about playing the guitar to give you years of musical enjoyment and you won’t have to take private lessons to do it.” All you need is an acoustic guitar and $26. Sessions (for ages 14 and up) are set for June 7, July 12 and August 9. If you already have some experience with chords, you might enjoy “Just Once: How to Play Guitar by Ear,” a practical presentation of music theory that covers how to find the starting note of a song, how to determine when chords change and much more. Call (561) 347-3900 or visit www.SugarSand Park.org.


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BiCE Ristorante • 3131/2 Worth Avenue • Palm Beach, Florida 33480 • (561) 835-1600


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cultural council membership Your membership in the Palm Beach County Cultural Council enables us to provide valuable programs and services to cultural organizations, artists and thousands of school children each year. In return for your tax-deductible contribution, you’ll enjoy these valuable benefits.

FRIEND $60 $125 $175

art&culture is the awardwinning magazine of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. Enjoy in-depth features, compelling interviews and behind-the-scenes looks at the innovators and places that shape Palm Beach County’s rich cultural landscape.

PATRON $550

$1,000

Cultural Calendar mailed to your home

Subscription to art&culture magazine

Benefit of membership at any level.

Cultural Calendar Culture Connection member E-newsletter

Invitation to annual member reception

1 pass

1

2

2

Complimentary admission to Culture & Cocktails

The ultimate guide to arts and cultural events in Palm Beach County. Includes comprehensive listings for museum exhibitions, festivals, dance and music performances, children’s events, workshops and more.

Benefit of membership at any level. CultureCard Member discount card

1

2

2

Invitations to VIP member events

2

2

VIP passes to prestigious Art & Antique Fairs

2

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Recognition in art&culture magazine

Culture Card Your passport to incredible savings! Use the card to access ticket discounts, 2-for-1 admissions, and monthly special offers at dozens of cultural institutions.

Benefit at $175 level and above.

JOIN TODAY! On-Line: www.palmbeachculture.com By Phone: 561-472-3330

Culture & Cocktails

For additional information on corporate or individual memberships at higher levels, please contact our Membership Department at 561-471-2901.

Join our guest panelists for six evenings of exciting cultural “conversations” on art, literature, entertainment and more. Wine and hors d’oeuvres served. Held during season at Café Boulud.

The Palm Beach County Cultural Council is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation. A copy of the official registration and financial information may be obtained from the Division of Consumer Services by calling toll-free within the State of Florida 1-800435-7352. Registration does not imply endorsement or approval.

Complimentary admission with membership at $175 level and above. RSVP required at 561-472-3330.

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{inside culture} In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and greater help us accomplish our mission 1st United Bank Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson

Ms. Jennifer Garrigues Jennifer Garrigues, Inc.

Mr. John Loring Dr. Catherine Lowe

A.R.T.

Mr. Robert Gittlin JKG Group

Ms. Carol Barnett Publix Supermarket Charities

Mr. J. Arthur Goldberg

Ms. Ruth Baum

Mr. Craig D. Grant PNC Bank

Belle Glade Chamber of Commerce

Mr. Raymond Graziotto

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Benson

Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce

Mr. and Mrs. John Blades Ms. Carole Boucard Boca Raton Resort & Club Mr. Michael J. Bracci Northern Trust Bank of Florida, N.A.

Mr. Rod Macon Florida Power & Light Mr. Milton S. Maltz The Malrite Company Mr. and Mrs. Randolph A. Marks Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews

Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand

Ms. Judy A. Hoffman Profile Marketing Research

Mr. and Mrs. Francois Brutsch

Ms. Ann E. Howard John C. & Mary Jane Howard Foundation

Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties

Ms. Hilary Jordan Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp Ms. Judith Katz Mr. and Mrs. Amin J. Khoury B/E Aerospace, Inc.

Mr. Gus Davis Mr. Robert DeForest

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Koch

Mr. Bradford A. Delfin Wachovia Wealth Management

Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Kohnken Kohnken Family Foundation

Mrs. Cecile Draime Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos Mr. Timothy A. Eaton Eaton Fine Art Mr. George T. Elmore Hardrives, Inc. Mrs. Wilma Elmore Mr. & Mrs. Jack Farber Mrs. Marjorie S. Fisher Marjorie S. Fisher Fund Mrs. Shirley Fiterman Miles & Shirley Fiterman Charitable Foundation

Mr. Leon M. Rubin Rubin Communications Group

Ms. Beverlee Miller

Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager

Mrs. Molly Foreman-Kozel

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kushnick

Mr. Daniel J. Leahy Ms. Margo Lefton Mr. Paul N. Leone The Breakers Mrs. Ellen F. Liman Liman Studio Gallery

Mr. Gary Schweikhart PR-BS, Inc.

Ms. JoAnne Rioli Moeller Office Depot

The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida

Mrs. Mary Montgomery

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman

Mr. Adam Munder Rednum Capital Partners

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf

Ms. Jane F. Napier Ms. Suzanne Niedland and Mr. Lawrence De George Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce

Ms. Judy Oppel Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show Ora Sorensen Gallery Ms. Debby M. Oxley Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker

Mr. Raymond E. Kramer, III Beasley, Hauser, Kramer, Leonard & Galardi, P.A.

Mr. Lewis M. Schott

Ms. Jane Mitchell

The Omphoy Ocean Resort

Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman

Mrs. Emily F. Landau

Mr. Stephan Richter Richters of Palm Beach

Mr. William A. Meyer

Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro

Mr. Robert S.C. Kirschner Passport Publications & Media Corporation

Dr. Richard P. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Elia

Ms. Joyce Reingold Palm Beach Daily News

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Rodusky

Mrs. Sydell L. Miller

Mr. Howard Bregman Greenberg Traurig, P.A.

Mr. and Mrs. John K. Castle

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Puder

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce Mr. Herbert S. Hoffman Hoffman Companies

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Butler

Dr. A. Carter Pottash

Mrs. Sydelle Meyer

Greater Boynton Beach Chamber of Commerce

Mr. J. Daniel Brede Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation

Business Development Board

Mr. Dana T. Pickard Edwards, Angell, Palmer, Dodge, LLP

Palm Beach Civic Association The Palm Beach Post Mr. Dack Patriarca

Ms. Muriel F. Siebert Mr. Michael D. Simon Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart P.A. Ms. Catherine Sincavage Ms. Biba St. Croix Gallery Biba Mr. and Mrs. Harold Smith sMs. Brenda N. Straus Mr. Dom A. Telesco Mrs. Patricia G. Thorne Ms. Phyllis Tick Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio, Jr. The Wachovia Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Midtown Payson Galleries

William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust

Mr. Jorge Pesquera Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Ms. Mary Wong Office Depot Foundation

Ms. Lisa H. Peterfreund Merrill G. & Emita E. Hastings Foundation

WXEL Ms. Ruth Young The Colony - Palm Beach

Listing as of print date

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{next issue â&#x20AC;&#x201C; fall 2010}

Tiempo Libre; photo courtesy of The Schmidt Family Centre for the Arts

A sultry sunset, a saxophone and all that jazz. In Palm Beach County, you can hear jazz on the breeze, in the sophisticated confines of the Colony Hotel or on public radio. The Great American Songbook is sung in Palm Beach, a dash of Dixieland can be heard at the Harriet Himmel Theater at CityPlace and a trio of musicians jams at the corner bar. Whether you like it straight up, smooth or served with a southern accent, we invite you to come along for the ride as we explore the local spin on this delightfully diverse and uniquely American art form in the next issue of art&culture.

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Classical South FL_A/C Spring 10:Layout 1

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Midtown PBG_Spring 10:Layout 1

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THE ART OF

ENJOYMENT at midtown

join us on mainstreet Mainstreet at Midtown is full of entertainment. There is fabulous dining, great shopping, excellent shows at The Borland Center, exciting activities at the JCC and we are host to Palm Beach Gardenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premier festival, Art in the Gardens. So come and enjoy Midtown. )))&ORKS0RIME3TEAKHOUSEs#ANTINA,AREDOs&IELDOF'REENSs*!LEXANDERSs -ARBLE3LAB#REAMERYs0IZZA&USIONs3AITOS*APANESE3TEAKHOUSEs ,OVE'ARDENs/LIVER"OUTIQUEs'YMBOREE0LAY-USICs*##.ORTHs *USTINS,OREAL(AIR#OLOR#ENTER$AY3PAs3COOP0ILATES3TUDIOs $IANA#LASSIC#HILDRENs3WEET'REENS&ARMERS-ARKET&ALL

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art&culture magazine (v4i3)  

As the primary catalyst for Palm Beach County’s thriving cultural climate, art&culture magazine is the official publication for the communit...

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