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art culture Spring 2011

concrete presence Palm Beach County is a paradise for sculptors By John Loring

true originals Local singer/songwriters add polish to Palm Beach County’s music scene

of Palm Beach County

character, color and corsets How costumes complete the picture

PLUS Sydelle Meyer’s artistic and philanthropic vision, the art of chocolate, dynamic SmARTBiz partnerships and more


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Feminine Perfection The Octopus Necklace A creature of deep mystique and symbol of cunning and grace under pressure, this piece of feminine perfection with luxurious pink, yellow and blue sapphires will give you a halo of pure brilliance, while mesmerizing your friends on seeing you wrapped up in these dramatic diamond encrusted tentacles. For art lovers only.

JEWELERY DESIGNERS SINCE 1954 MONTREAL 路 2195 Crescent St. 路 514.848.0595 PALM BEACH 路 210 Worth Ave. 路 561.832.4918 www.kaufmanndesuisse.com


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features

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all dressed up The costumer’s art combines a passion for detail with an eye for style, a respect for history and a creative itch. By Christina Wood

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it’s a mmmmmasterpiece

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Chocolate is among the most temperamental – and delicious – art media. By M.M. Cloutier

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spatial relations Sculptors stake out their sun-lit territory in Palm Beach County’s lovely parks and gardens. By John Loring

52 34

how original Successful singer/songwriters and talented musicians dot the landscape and fill local clubs with the sound of music. By Bill Meredith

52 Cover Image: Edwina Sandys, "Lucifer" - six-foot high aluminum cut-out (2003) Photo: Jim Fairman

spring 2011

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welcome letter

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There are great reasons to ask our elected officials to support the arts – and great need. By Rena Blades

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editor’s note

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Palm Beach County provides fertile ground for creativity. By Christina Wood

upfront

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• PNC Bank makes an investment in the arts that promises to deliver significant returns. • Palm Beach Dramaworks prepares to make the move to a new, larger home. • Arts education is a priority for the JP Morgan Chase Foundation. • The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum celebrates 10 years in Delray Beach. • Burt Reynolds and other groundbreakers in the film industry are honored with the 2011 Legend Award. • You’ll find creative gift ideas for Mother’s Day at many of Palm Beach County’s cultural treasures. • SunFest, Florida’s largest waterfront music and art festival, returns to West Palm Beach.

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art works!

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The benefits of arts education can have kids dancing to a different tune. By Christina Wood

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28 32

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calendar We’ve got a colorful array of activities, performances, events and exhibits to keep you busy all summer long.

profile Sydelle Meyer has an eye for art and a generous heart. By Thom Smith

portrait George Bolge moves on after a successful career building art museums and audiences. By Leon M. Rubin

inside culture Ron Sims, deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Rocco Landesman, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, discussed innovative partnerships at a South Florida arts summit; the 2011 Muse Awards sizzled; Bugz! takes over the South Florida Science Museum; and much more insider news.

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spring 2011

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Rough Diamond Drop Earrings Rough Diamond and 18K Gold Cuff Bracelet by Neil Lane Oval Rose Cut Diamond, Rough Diamond Beads and Platinum Ring by A.R.T.

FINE JEWELRY & ART 2 4 9 W O R T H AV E N U E , PA L M B E A C H

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W W W . A R T W O R T H AV E N U E . C O M


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Palm Beach County Cultural Council 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 300, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 561-471-2901 • www.palmbeachculture.com President & Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Bill Nix

561-687-8727 bnix@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Arts and Cultural Education

Alyx Kellington

561-471-1602 akellington@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Membership

Mary Dunning

561-472-3330 mdunning@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Melissa Santee

561-472-3340 msantee@palmbeachculture.com

Larry Boytano

561-471-1601 lboytano@palmbeachculture.com

Jennifer Lamont

561-471-2902 jlamont@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Contributing Writer/Editor

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lmrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Development Coordinator

Kristen Smiley

561-471-2901 ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com

Debbie Calabria

561-471-2901 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Vice President, Marketing & Government Affairs

Director of Grants

Director of Development

Public Relations Coordinator

Marketing Coordinator

Grants Manager

Bookkeeper

Administrative Assistant

Volunteer

Pat Thorne

Cultural Council Board of Directors Officers Michael J. Bracci, Chairman

Timothy A. Eaton

Dana T. Pickard

Shirley Fiterman

Jean Sharf

Berton E. Korman, Vice Chairman Michael D. Simon, Secretary Howard Bregman, Treasurer

Craig Grant

Kelly Sobolewski

Roe Green

Dom A. Telesco

Herbert S. Hoffman

Ex Officios

Directors Carole Boucard Christopher D. Canales Bradford A. Deflin Cecile Draime

Irene J. Karp

Mark Alexander

Raymond E. Kramer, III

Roger Amidon

Sydelle Meyer

Jennifer Prior Brown

Jo Anne Rioli Moeller Geoff Neuhoff

Paulette Burdick Cheryl Reed

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Karen T. Marcus, Chairperson Shelley Vana, Vice Chair

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Burt Aaronson Steven L. Abrams Paulette Burdick

Jess R. Santamaria Priscilla A. Taylor


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art&culture of Palm Beach County

spring 2011 - volume 5, issue 3

editorial staff managing editor

christina wood

verification specialist

jeffery archer

verification specialist

bradley j. oyler

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com 561.472.8776 jeffery@passportpublications.com 561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

cultural council editorial staff editorial director

rena blades

executive editor

bill nix

managing editor

leon m. rubin

contributing writers fredick a. sharf, thom smith, m.m. cloutier, jan engoren, jim fairman, bill hirschman, leon m. rubin, christina wood

contributing photographers lucien capehart, steven caras, christopher fay, jim fairman, barry kinsella, robert stevens, sig visions, studio palm beach

Once again, and for the seventh year in a row, in the annual U.S.News & World Report survey on America’s Best Hospitals, ophthalmologists from around the country ranked Bascom Palmer Eye Institute the best eye hospital in the United States. This honor is a great testimony to our experience and technology. More importantly, if any member of their families needed a procedure, the best eye doctors in the world would tell them to travel long distances to get here. And that makes you very lucky. Because you don’t have to.

art & design art & production director assistant production director

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

nicole smith

561.472.8762 nicole@passportpublications.com

advertising sales senior advertising manager

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

director of signature publications

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

contract administrator

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

publisher 561.472.8778 robert@passportpublications.com

on the cover “Lucifer� - six-foot-high aluminum cut-out (2003) by Edwina Sandys Photo by Jim Fairman

Palm Beach - (561) 515-1500 7101 Fairway Dr., Palm Beach Gardens Miami U Naples U Plantation (305) 326-6000 www.bascompalmer.org

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art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.


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COUTURE OPTIQUE Setting the Standard for Fine Eyewear Voted “Retailer of the Year” by Eye Care Business Magazine

Custom Designed Eyewear Sunglasses Prescriptions Filled 2 LOCATIONS TO SERVE YOU 150 Worth, Esplande • Palm Beach 832.2020 | Downtown at the Gardens • Palm Beach Gardens • 624.0474


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WELCOME TO

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art&culture

fromtheceo

No matter which party we vote for or whether we consider ourselves to be red, blue, purple or chartreuse, I would like to think that we share a common platform – that art and culture are essential threads in the fabric of our community. I hope we also can agree that the arts deserve to be supported by our local, state and federal governments. For those of us who work in the cultural community, the case for such support is compelling and consistent from year to year. Art and culture inspire us every day in innumerable ways. Arts education helps our children learn and grow so they can become the thoughtful, creative and articulate leaders of tomorrow. And the arts provide fuel for an economic engine that creates and sustains jobs. But despite such powerful messages − which seem so clear to us − we continue to have to fight for even a modest investment in the arts by our state legislature and the U.S. Congress. In Florida, the state’s investment in arts and culture has plummeted from more than $34 million in 2006 – second in the nation – to just $950,000 last year, putting our state in 49th place. At the Federal level, the National Endowment for the Arts, the National Endowment for the Humanities and public broadcasting have all been threatened this year – again. As this issue goes to press, it is too soon to know what the outcome of this year’s budget process will be. We’d like to think that support for the arts will increase – or at the very least that it will not be totally stripped away. But no matter what happens, we will continue to argue that arts and cultural organizations add tremendous value to our society – and that public funding produces exceptional results.

Michael Price

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In Florida, it is estimated that every dollar invested in the arts returns $5 to the community. The latest economic impact studies report that Florida’s non-profit cultural industry delivers more than $446 million in state and local revenue and supports in excess of 88,000 full-time jobs. In Palm Beach County alone, the non-profit cultural industry generates more than $18 million in state and local revenue and pumps $209 million into the economy. As friends and supporters of the Cultural Council, we hope that you will join us in making the case for the arts to our elected officials at all levels – municipal, county, state and Federal. If we speak with a strong and unified voice, we’ll increase the likelihood that we will be heard. To find an example of the economic impact of the arts, there’s no need to look any further than our own organization. I am pleased to report that the preparations for our new home – including the renovation of the former Lake Theater in downtown Lake Worth – are proceeding on time and within budget. Thanks to an investment of $700,000 from the Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency and, of course, the magnificent donation of the building to us by Mary Montgomery and the family of the late Robert M. Montgomery Jr., we expect to move into the facility by the end of this summer. We look forward to welcoming you later this year.

Rena Blades

Rena Blades President and CEO Palm Beach County Cultural Council


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Slice of Life In today’s environment, you deserve a safe and sound bank. Let us take care of your financial needs, so that you have more time for the things in life that matter most. • • • • • • • •

One of the strongest banks in the Southeast Founded in Louisiana in 1887 Strong earnings Solid asset quality First bank in the country to return TARP 226 offices serving 12 states Over 2,000 talented associates Well-positioned for continued growth

Ask a branch representative about our Community Partners Program. www.iberiabank.com

We invite you to visit one of our 10 convenient locations on Florida’s east coast. Boca Raton: 1180 N. Federal Highway | Boynton Beach: 1101 North Congress Avenue Delray Beach: 900 SE 6th Avenue | Fort Lauderdale: 1201 South Andrews Avenue Palm Beach Gardens: 11345 Legacy Avenue, Building D - Suite 101 | Palm Springs: 2764 S. Congress Avenue Pompano Beach: 990 North Federal Highway | Royal Palm Beach: 119 South State Road Seven West Palm Beach: 605 North Olive | Wilton Manors: 2465 Wilton Drive

Coming Soon – Jupiter


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IN FULL BLOOM Years ago, my sister gave me a small, whimsical plaque made by an artist displaying her wares at Cranberry Fest, one of the many fairs and outdoor festivals that the good people of Wisconsin squeeze into the few months when outdoor activities other than ice fishing are possible. It hangs in my kitchen, reminding me daily to “Bloom where you are planted.”

fromthe

As a transplant from way up north, spring still conjures up for me images of reckless crocuses popping up through the snow, masses of forsythia bursting forth in a happy torrent; tulips, iris and – my favorite – sunny daffodils banishing the last gray shadows of winter. I wish I could plant lilacs outside my backdoor in Delray Beach, but I know they wouldn’t be as happy here as I am. I may love spring flowers but I adore Palm Beach County’s subtropical climate, which breeds its own delightfully lavish and distinctive beauties. On page 40, you will find sculpture bred to thrive in our lush, heady landscapes in John Loring’s lively feature, “Spatial Relations.” On page 52, we introduce you to some of the talented singers and songwriters who have blossomed in our sunny climes. Costume designers are among the many talented artists who keep our stages, movie screens and museums bursting with color and life all year long,

as you’ll discover on page 34 in our feature “All Dressed Up.” On page 48, we’ve got a sweet story about another group of deliciously creative artists – those who have come to South Florida from far-flung corners of the world to create dazzling works of chocolate for us. Sydelle Meyer, another northern transplant who has thrived in Palm Beach County, understands that the gift of beauty must be nurtured – whether it’s sprouting in the garden or in the arts community. Thom Smith tells her story in our profile on page 28. George Bolge has cultivated beauty in other ways – as the executive director of, first, the Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale and, more recently, the Boca Raton Museum of Art. On page 32, Leon Rubin takes a look back at the seeds he has planted. Throughout this issue of art&culture, you’ll see evidence of the abundant color and creativity that has taken root in Palm Beach County. You’ll meet people who have helped shape our cultural landscape. There are achievements to be honored, new ideas to explore, innovative partnerships to celebrate and exciting growth to report. I hope that, as you turn the pages, you’ll realize how much you are a part of it all. Imagine!

Christina Wood Managing Editor

Jacek Gancarz

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Be artful. Be inspiring. Be even better in real life.

%E WHAT  O† JATP

LUXURY SHOPPING

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Boca Raton • 561.362.0606 • miznerpark.com

W O R L D C L A S S E N T E R TA I N M E N T


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contributors James W. Fairman

John Loring was a contributing writer and New York Bureau Chief at Architectural Digest. He served as the design director of Tiffany & Co. for 30 years and has written numerous books on style and social history. John graduated from Yale University, completed four years of graduate studies at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris and has an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts degree from Pratt Institute.

M.M. Cloutier is a West Palm Beach-based freelance writer who has written extensively about art and culture in Palm Beach County and elsewhere. Throughout her career, she has also written numerous profiles and covered business, cuisine, fashion and more for such newspapers as The New York Times, The Miami Herald, The Palm Beach Post and Palm Beach Daily News, among others, and for several magazines, including reporting for Time.

With a lifelong interest in the arts inspired largely by his highly creative parents, Leon Rubin has been writing about arts and culture for more than three decades. A Boca Raton resident for almost 17 years, Leon was actively involved in children’s theater and helped to establish the Boca Raton Cultural Consortium. He now contributes to art&culture virtually from the home that he and his wife, Suzi, share in the mountains above Dahlonega, Georgia. And not even a New York blizzard is enough to keep them from enjoying the theater!

Bill Meredith has written the "Local Music" column for the TGIF section of The

Palm Beach Post for more than 10 years and has also been covering sports for the past five. He's also contributed to Jazziz magazine for more than 10 years,

JazzTimes for five and the Palm Beach Arts Paper and JazzBluesFlorida for the past few. By night, he freelances as a drummer, percussionist and vocalist for several Palm Beach County bands. He and his wife, Ginny (whose non-profit Inspirit takes live music to people shut into places like nursing homes, pediatric hospitals and Alzheimer's facilities), live in Lake Worth.

Davidoff Studios, Palm Beach

During more than three decades at The Palm Beach Post, Thom Smith covered popular music, movies, television and the courts, served as the paper’s “Listening Post” (ombudsman) and produced a consumer column. For 20 years he wrote columns about people, places and events in the Palm Beaches culminating with the “Palm Beach Social Diary.” These days he freelances for international publications and writes the “On the Avenues” column for The Coastal Star, a monthly newspaper that covers Lake Worth to Boca Raton. He and his wife, Diane, live in Boca Raton.

New York native Jim Fairman was introduced to photography in high school and has rarely put his camera down since. The West Palm Beach resident is a busy freelance photographer who captures a diverse array of subjects from yachts and exotic cars to high fashion and flowers. Fairman has been a contibuting team member to art&culture since day one.

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To arrange for a personal tour of this one-of-a-kind community call

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a m e d l e y o f w h a t ’s h o t o n t h e l o c a l a r t & c u l t u r e s c e n e

Leading the Way PNC Bank Invests in Art and Culture

Craig Grant of PNC Bank at the Muse Awards

the Business of the Arts and Culture Craig Grant, regional president of Summit, a two-part professional PNC Bank for Florida, understands development seminar that will bring that investing in art and culture can together members of the business deliver valuable returns. “Today more than ever, the businesses that we attract, the jobs we create, the visi- community with the leadership of cultural organizations to learn tors who extend their stay are drawn by what Palm Beach County has about the economic impact of art and culture. “SmARTBiz will benefit Palm Beach County on many levels,” says to offer,” he says. “We must continue creating partnerships with non-profit organizations to help strengthen the economic vitality of Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council. “These the region.” The new SmARTBiz Grant Program, generously funded programs will help animate and enhance the pivotal role our non-profit cultural industry has on the county’s quality of life and economy. As by The PNC Foundation, will help do just that. The two-year program, which will be managed by the Palm more and more communities turn to art and culture to spur economBeach County Cultural Council with involvement from PNC ic development, providing cultural organizations with added leadership, will provide operational support and professional knowledge and resources to enhance management practices and development training for non-profit cultural organizations. A program capacities will help our communities grow even further.” SmARTBiz will also include an awareness campaign that highlights $200,000 grant from The PNC Foundation, which receives its principal funding from the PNC Financial Services Group Inc., will the May 2012 results of the National Arts Index and the Economic Prosperity Study conducted by Americans for the allow the Cultural Council to make grants of up Arts. The previous study results were released in to $5,000 each that will assist a wide variety of 2007 and revealed that Palm Beach County enjoyed organizations in building capacity, enhancing an impressive $209 million economic impact from efficiency and improving operational performits cultural industry. ance. The SmARTbiz Program will also establish visit www.palmbeachculture.com

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You Have to See This On the Waterfront West Palm Beach’s scenic waterfront will be sounding sweet as well as looking lovely when the crowds gather for SunFest 2011. Among the national acts scheduled to perform along Flagler Drive between April 27 and May 1 are Jason Mraz, Earth, Wind & Fire, MGMT, Cee Lo Green, Jeff Beck, Gregg Allman, Styx, the Preservation Hall Jazz Band and Ziggy Marley. “SunFest has become known for putting together a diverse line-up and this year we have truly delivered,” said Paul Jamieson, executive director of SunFest. “From pop and reggae, classic and alternative rock, jazz and Latin, we have pulled together an exciting lineup. We have an incredible setting along the waterfront of downtown West Palm Beach. It’s a music experience like no other available to festival-goers and music lovers.” Founded in 1982, SunFest is Florida’s largest waterfront music and art festival. In addition to multiple stages and a diverse lineup of musical talent, the annual event includes a juried fine art and craft show, family activities and a popular call (800) SUNFEST fireworks show. or visit www.sunfest.com

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S h o w a n d Te l l JPMorgan Chase Foundation Puts a Priority on Arts Education

lades and Rena B gan Chase or M JP of ek Chris Havlic

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The JPMorgan Chase Foundation granted $50,000 to the Palm Beach County Cultural Council to support its new Workforce Development for Artists (WDA) program and Building Learning Communities Through Arts and Culture (BLCTAC) program, which is in its second year. “These funds are going to positively affect the community on many levels,” says Rena Blades, Cultural Council president and CEO. “The WDA programs will help Palm Beach County artists expand their business skills and advance their careers. Building Learning Communities will continue to help students from some of our most underserved communities learn about social studies through the use of art and culture.” “We are proud to partner with the Palm Beach County Cultural Council in supporting the needs of local visual artists, musicians, dancers and actors,” says Alvaro Martinez-Fonts, CEO of J.P. Morgan Private Bank in Florida. “Developing programs and encouraging the efforts of non-profits focused on preserving cultural arts education is a big part of our charity giving, and we hope our grant serves the needs of the artist community.” visit www.palmbeachculture.com

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Classical Music. It’s In Our Nature. Just like all of us, classical music lives and breathes. Make it part of your lifestyle. Tune to Classical South Florida on the radio or online. It’s in your nature.

classicalsouthflorida.org


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Now Showing Palm Beach Dramaworks Growing Strong

The Beauty Queen of Leenane by Irish playwright Martin McDonagh opens at Palm Beach Dramaworks on May 6. When the show closes on June 19, it will mark the end of an era. The critically acclaimed company has outgrown its 84-seat theater in downtown West Palm Beach and is making a move. They’re not going far – the move will take them from the 300 block of Banyan Boulevard to 201 Clematis Street – but it’s a big step, nonetheless. Dramaworks’ new home – the former Cuillo Centre for the Arts, which was purchased by the West Palm Beach Community Redevelopment Agency and subsequently leased to the theater – is currently being refurbished. When the project is complete, the facility will feature patron-friendly access, a tempting proscenium stage, expanded office space and 225 purple seats. Sue Ellen Beryl, managing director at Dramaworks, admits the color wouldn’t have been their first choice. She prefers to think of them as green; the redesign is being handled with a cost-conscious and environmentally friendly approach that incorporates as many preexisting fixtures as possible – including the ensconced purple seating. The growth of the theater is exciting – for the community as well as the company – and, although Dramaworks is nearly tripling its seating capacity, according to Beryl, longtime friends and patrons need not worry. “Maintaining the intimate magic that everyone has call (561) 514-4042, or visit come to love and to expect from Dramaworks is our prime objective,” she says. The www.palmbeachdramaworks.org grand opening is scheduled for November 11, 2011.

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Outside the Box Your Mom Deser ves our Best Make Mother’s Day a really special occasion this year. Share the gift of your time and Palm Beach County’s cultural treasures with your mom. The Flagler Museum’s Café des Beaux-Arts will open specially for Mother’s Day on May 7 from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m. and on May 8 from noon to 3:00 p.m. Guests enjoy panoramic views of Lake Worth while dining on a Gilded Age-style lunch of tea sandwiches, scones and sweets. Each mother will also receive admission to the Flagler Museum, a special corsage, keepsake photo and a $10 gift card for the Museum Store. Tickets are $25 for museum members, $20 for museum members' children, $40 for non-member adults and $25 for non-member children. For information, call (561) 655-2833. You can make lasting memories with the Mother’s Day Card Making Family Fun Program at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens in Delray Beach. After creating your own special greetings, explore the gardens and museum – and then treat Mom to lunch at the Cornell Café & Tea House. If your mother loves live theater, she might enjoy seeing The Cha-Cha of a Camel Spider, an electric and timely new play opening at Florida Stage on May 6. Encourage her creativity; sign her up for photography classes at Old School Square in Delray Beach or a watercolor workshop at the Lighthouse ArtCenter’s School of Art in Tequesta. Perhaps she would enjoy a leisurely stroll through Mounts Botanical Garden, Palm Beach County’s oldest and largest public garden. For more beautiful ideas, visit www.palmbeachculture.com call your favorite arts organization or cultural institution!

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On Location

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Spady Museum Celebrates 10th Anniversary The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum in Delray Beach is dedicated to discovering, collecting and sharing the African-American history and heritage of Florida. The museum, located in the historic West Settlers District of Delray Beach, has played host to a series of exhibits highlighting the talents and influences of AfricanAmericans, Caribbean-Americans and Haitian-Americans as well as a full schedule of community events, public education programs and children’s activities. Over the past 10 years, shows ranging from handmade quilts to pho“From Quilts in the Attic to Quilts tographs from the Civil Rights movement have been displayed on the Wall: Exploring Textile Art by African Americans” exhibit on in the museum, which is located in the former home of the late loan from the South Carolina Solomon D. Spady (1887-1967), a prominent African-American educaState Museum, November 2009 tor and community leader in Delray Beach. at the Spady Museum. This year, as the museum celebrates its 10th anniversary, expansion plans are underway. Right next door, construction crews are transforming the historic Munnings Cottage into the new Kids Cultural Clubhouse. The work on Munnings Cottage also signifies progress call (561) 279-8883 or visit www.spadymuseum.org toward a larger Spady Museum Complex, which will include a 60-seat C. Spencer Pompey Amphitheater.

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"Oh Freedom Over Me" exhibited January 2010 at the Spady Museum, on loan from the Center of Documentary Studies at Duke University. Caption: Summer volunteers, Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC) workers and local students singing freedom songs at Mileston, a community of independent black farmers in the Mississippi Delta near Lexington, Mississippi. Matt Herron/Take Stock

Spotlight Burt Reynolds Heads List of 2011 Legend Award Recipients This summer, home-grown talent will be honored as Film Florida hosts the sixth annual Legend Awards in West Palm Beach. Actor and director Burt Reynolds – a Palm Beach County resident – heads the list of recipients. From the earliest days of filmmaking, Florida has played a significant role in the entertainment industry. Jacksonville hosted the Keystone Cops and Laurel and Hardy in the early 1900s, D.W. Griffiths filmed in Fort Lauderdale and Miami’s Fleischer Studios turned Popeye and Betty Boop cartoons into Saturday matinee staples. The state’s tropical locations served as the backdrop for the Tarzan series and such notable flicks as Creature from the Black Lagoon, Twelve O’Clock High, The Yearling, and the James Bond classic Goldfinger, among others. When television was coming of age, Jackie Gleason and Flipper represented Florida’s contribution to the medium; a few decades later Miami Vice continued the tradition. With so much history and so many stories to tell, Film Florida, a non-profit organization that provides a leadership role in Florida’s film and entertainment ndustries, created the Legend Awards to honor the men and women who played such a big part in establishing the Sunshine State as an entertainment powerhouse. Burt Reynolds in Reynolds – a Florida legend since his days as an all-star quarterback at Florida State Smokey & The Bandit University – is being honored for a career that began in the 1960s with TV westerns and continues today, with recent roles in the filmed-in-Florida series Burn Notice. Also being honored this year are Dee Miller, Casting Directors Inc., who has been involved with casting on 65 feature films including The African Queen, The Champ, Smokey and The Bandit 3, Easy Money, Miami Vice (TV series) and Married to the Mob; director/cinematographer Victor Milt, who has directed national commercials for most of the Fortune 100 and is known for film projects including Cracker: The Lost Cowboys of Florida; and Wes Skiles, an adventure visit www.filmflorida.org photographer best known for creating mystifying underwater images who died in 2010 at the age of 52 while filming a project near the Boynton Beach Inlet.

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Reading, Writing and Renoir By Christina Wood

art rt works! Every little girl who wiggles into a leotard for her weekly dance class dreams of being a prima ballerina. While she’s dreaming, chances are she’s also working on a science project, decorating posters for her student council campaign or volunteering at the local animal shelter. According to “Living the Arts through Language + Learning,” a report on community-based youth organizations by Shirley Brice Heath, Stanford University and the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, kids who are involved in the arts are: • four times more likely to be recognized for academic achievement • three times more likely to be elected to class office within their schools • four times more likely to participate in a math and science fair and • three times more likely to win an award for school attendance Children who participate in the arts for at least three hours on three days each week over the course of at least one full year also read for pleasure nearly twice as often and perform community service more than four times as often as their peers. The arts teach discipline, strengthen problem-solving skills and contribute towards the development of a positive work ethic. They also breed creativity and innovation, two of the top skills that U.S. employers say will increase in importance over the next five years, according to a study by The Conference Board. In fact, the study reports that finding employees who can think creatively and offer innovative solutions is among the top challenges facing CEOs in the 21st century workplace. “While we often focus on the success our students have enjoyed on the stage, dancing for such prominent companies as American Ballet Theater, Cirque du Soleil, the Joffrey Ballet and

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Studen ts at th e Schoo l of Boc a Ballet

Theatre Orlando Ballet Theatre, the story of Samantha Parker beautifully illustrates what we hope to achieve with our program,” says Dan Guin, co-artistic director/executive director of Boca Ballet Theatre, an award-winning civic ballet company and non-profit dance school. “Sam, as we have grown to know her over the years, not only trained with us, she also volunteered to work with the children enrolled in 1st Step, our outreach program for underserved children in our community. “Several years ago,” Guin continues, “Sam left us after graduating from Boca Raton High School as the class valedictorian. When other college kids headed to the beach for spring break, Sam returned to Boca Ballet Theatre to once again volunteer her time. She then enrolled in medical school. Sam is not destined for a professional career in the dance world but the training she received with us has prepared her to be a successful, engaged and active member of the community. And we couldn’t be happier.” At every age and every income level, the benefits of arts education are clear. The summer months are a great time to introduce young people to the possibilities. Visit a museum with your family, take in a concert or see a show. For more ideas on making the arts part of your child’s life, check out the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s sixth annual online Summer

Cultural Guide at www.palmbeachculture.com. The guide has information about more than 60 organizations that will be hosting art and cultural activities for kids – and inspiring dreams – this summer.


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The 2009 Tony Award-winner for best play, God of Carnage by Yasmina Reza, is a comedy of manners without the manners. In the Caldwell Theatre Company’s current production, running through May 15, two couples meet to discuss the misdemeanors of their sons. The evening begins amicably, but deteriorates into havoc. 7901 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton; 561-241-7432 or www.caldwelltheatre.com. The God of Carnage cast includes (from left) Kim Cozort, Kim Ostrenko, Michael Serratore and Nick Santa Maria.

The Ann Norton Sculpture Garden hosts a retrospective of the work of 96-year-old Edward C. Michener in Creative Journey: From There to Here in 75 Years through May 15. A Philadelphia College of Art graduate and long-time advertising executive, Michener painted throughout his career and has been featured in many shows. 253 Barcelona Road, West Palm Beach; 561-832-5328 or www.ansg.org. Milford Sound by Edward C. Michener

GardensArt presents Visions: Real and Imagined, an exhibition of photographs and digital imagery, from May 9 to June 23. Elle Schorr’s photographs convey past and present in a single image, while Nathan Selikoff transforms equations and systems into beautiful digital prints. Opening reception May 11. City Hall Lobby, 10500 North Military Trail, Palm Beach Gardens; 561-630-1100 or www.pbgfl.com. Wonderland by Elle Schorr

Coppelia & Gems, Atlantic Dance Theatre’s fifth annual spring dance concert on May 14-15, showcases its students in two works. Act One tells the story of Coppelia in the classic ballet of love, comedy and magic, while Act Two offers Gems, a modern jazz ballet based on Balanchine’s Jewels. Eissey Campus Theater, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 561-575-4942 or www.TheAtlanticTheater.com. Atlantic Dance Theatre company member Danielle Giustino

Two original Broadway cast members of Cats − Anna McNeely and Brian Andrews – lead students from the Maltz Jupiter Theatre’s Conservatory of Performing Arts in a new production of Cats on May 20-21. The timeless music by Andrew Lloyd Webber brings T.S. Eliot’s Old Possum’s Book of Practical Cats to life. 1001 E. Indiantown Road, Jupiter; 561-575-2223 or www.jupitertheatre.org. Maltz Jupiter Theatre Conservatory students rehearse for Cats.

For Such a Time as This: The Story of Queen Esther is the centerpiece of Florida Classical Ballet Theatre’s upcoming performance, which also includes several short ballets. The ballet, based on the biblical book of Esther, features music by Edvard Grieg. FCBT has been invited to perform in Russia this summer. Eissey Campus Theatre, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 561-207-5900 or www.fcbt.org. FCBT resident artist Lily Ojea as Queen Esther

The New Gardens Band offers an All-American Memorial Day weekend tribute to the members of our armed forces − past and present. Conducted by Owen Seward, “Remembering America’s Fallen” will feature the patriotic music and American favorites that never fail to inspire us. Eissey Campus Theatre, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 561-207-5900 or www.newgardensband.org.

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June

Summer exhibitions at Lighthouse ArtCenter draw new crowds to enjoy art in unusual ways. The vision, voice and volume of expression waiting to be heard from the South Florida under-35 young-adult community ensures that the annual Emerging Young Artists Exhibition is always on the cutting edge. Lighthouse ArtCenter, 373 Tequesta Drive, Tequesta; 561746-3101 or www.lighthousearts.org. Young artist Katie Walsh showed her triptych in a recent Lighthouse ArtCenter exhibition.

Approximately 40 works from Robert Vickrey’s 60-year career as the living master of tempera painting are on view in The Magic of Realism at the Boca Raton Museum of Art through June 19. His egg tempera works are included in more than 80 American art museums. Sharing the galleries is Art for the People: 20th Century Social Realism. 501 Plaza Real, Boca Raton; 561-392-2500 or www.bocamuseum.org. Robert Vickrey (American, 1926- ), Sea Breeze, 1985, egg tempera on board, 20 x 30 inches. Museum Permanent Collection 1993.340. Gift of the artist.

In 1981, the IBM PC was developed and introduced in Boca Raton. To mark its 30th anniversary – and the centennial of IBM − the Boca Raton Historical Society and IBM Boca Raton will present an exhibition at Boca Raton Town Hall from June 13 to September 30 that looks back at the contributions of IBM Boca Raton to the city and the world. 71 N. Federal Highway; 561-395-6766 or www.bocahistory.org. The IBM Personal Computer, IBM’s most famous product, was developed in Boca Raton in the early 1980s.

The Big Apple will be the talk of the town when Sharon Koskoff, president of the Art Deco Society of the Palm Beaches, presents Art Deco Art & Architecture: New York Style. This richly illustrated lecture also documents Koskoff’s trip to the Eighth Annual Art Deco World Congress. Hagen Ranch Road Library, 14350 Hagen Ranch Road, Delray Beach; 561-276-9925 or www.artdecopb.org.

It’s a life lived out loud in Ella! – an exhilarating musical about “The First Lady of Song,” Ella Fitzgerald. Created by Florida Stage and starring Tina Fabrique, this theatrical event weaves myth, memory and music as it tells the story of one of the greatest jazz vocalists of all time. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; 561-585-3433 or www.floridastage.org.

For thousands of years, women in Japan have been involved in the production of ceramics. Soaring Voices: Contemporary Japanese Women Ceramic Artists at the Morikami Museum and Japanese Gardens includes over 80 delightful ceramic works created by 25 exceptional contemporary women artists. 4000 Morikami Park Road, Delray Beach; 561-495-0233 or www.morikami.org. Etsuko Tashima, Cornucopia 04-Y’IV, 2004, stoneware and glass, Photo by © Taku Saik

Florida Atlantic University Theatre students take to the stage to perform a rotating repertory of two shows in Festival Rep 2011. From June 24 through July 30, The 1940’s Radio Hour, directed by Jean-Louis Baldet, will alternate with A Tribute to Movie Musicals: A Musical Revue, arranged and directed by Bruce Linser. University Theatre, 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton; 800-564-9539 or www.fau.edu.

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Take in the spectacular sunset views and witness

July

the Jupiter Light turning on to illuminate the night sky. Visitors get an inside look at the nuts and bolts of a working lighthouse watchroom. Every second and fourth Wednesday of the month; tour lasts approximately 75 minutes, call for time. Jupiter Inlet Lighthouse & Museum, 500 Captain Armour’s Way, Jupiter; 561-747-8380 or www.jupiterlighthouse.org. The Jupiter Lighthouse at sunset.

Point your eyes to the skies on summer nights

July

with the help of the Children’s Science Explorium’s professional-grade telescope. These free events take place (weather permitting) on May 13, June 10, July 9, Aug. 12 and Sept. 9. Recommended for ages 8+; under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Sugar Sand Park, 300 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton; 561-347-3913 or www.ScienceExplorium.org.

Master crayon artist Don Marco’s complex creations provide

July

a central focus for Coloring Outside the Lines: The History of the Crayon, the Art, the Innovations. Relive the nostalgia of crayons as a household medium and the colorful mark they’ve made on American culture. Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture, Old School Square, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach; 561-243-7922 or www.oldschool.org. Portrait of Burt Reynolds by Don Marco

Be the star you know you are!

July

Energetic performances on May 4, June 15, July 13 and Aug. 10 allow 20 young singers, dancers and comedians to have their five minutes of fame. Pre-registration required at Sugar Sand Park community center; tickets on sale one week prior to show. Willow Theatre, 300 N. Military Trail, Boca Raton; 561-347-3948 or www.WillowTheatre.org. At the Willow Theatre’s Community Cabaret

Boca Ballet Theatre offers a high-energy, fun-filled showcase

July

of what its students have learned from prominent guest artists during its Summer Intensive Workshop in All American Summer – a Summer Repertoire Concert. The centerpiece is an entertaining homage to the “grand ole game,” Play Ball! FAU University Theatre (Griswold), 777 Glades Road, Boca Raton; 561-995-0709 or www.bocaballet.org.

In one unique evening, the visual and performing arts unite

August

and are applauded by artists, actors, instructors, family, friends and the community at VSA Florida Palm Beach County’s “Celebration of the Arts.” The event includes an original one-act theatrical performance and an exhibit of a wide array of visual art media. CMAA Therapeutic Recreation Complex, 2728 Lake Worth Road, Lake Worth; 561-966-7025.

The Spady Cultural Heritage Museum’s annual

August

Living Heritage Day Festival welcomes the Tradition Bearers of Renaissance Park from Marianna, Fla., who bring the ways of the old country alive with demonstrations and stories of turn-of-thecentury life. The event features live performances, storytelling, music and more. 170 NW Fifth Ave., Delray Beach; 561-279-8883 or www.spadymuseum.org.

Dates are subject to change. For an up-to-the-minute, searchable calendar of cultural events, please visit the Palm Beach County Cultural Council's website at www.palmbeachculture.com. For more information about individual organizations' schedules, please visit the websites noted in each item.

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Sydelle By Thom Smith

Meyer

The Clear Vision of a Colorful Visionary The eyes have it. Arthur Meyer had an eye for the perfect deal. Sydelle Meyer, her outrageous eyewear notwithstanding, had an eye for art. Together, they were a 20/20 couple. And their vision made both this county – and this country – a better place to live. Just look around: The Meyer Amphitheatre on Flagler Drive, the Dreyfoos School of the Arts up on the ridge, the Interfaith Pavilion at St. Mary’s Hospital, the Jewish Community Center and the Meyer Academy Day School out west and the Temple Judea religious school in Palm Beach Gardens. Farther afield, the Meyers founded and supported the Albert Einstein Medical School in New York and the Jewish Community Center in Harrison, N.Y. Hundreds of smaller gestures left lasting impressions. During their 61 years of marriage, the Meyers acquired great wealth and grand possessions – homes, jewelry, clothes, Sydelle’s legendary collection of eyeglasses and especially art. They gave much of it away – because they could and because they wanted to. “We had such a good time,” Sydelle says simply. Arthur died in October 2008 at age 92. She misses him, but she gets twinkles in her eyes – not tears – as she recalls their life together. Their mission continues. At first glimpse, the marriage seems improbable. She was the privileged one, growing up in Manhattan with a Central Park address. Her mother painted and sculpted and was in the antique business. After public schools early, Sydelle graduated from The Dalton School, the progressive Ivy League prep on the Upper East Side. Then defying conventional wisdom at the time, she headed west . . . to Ohio State University. . . to study chemistry! With World War II in the rear view mirror, she headed back to New York where she met this guy from across the tracks – actually across the bridge – Brooklyn. He was no dummy. Born in 1916, Arthur Meyer had earned accounting and legal degrees at NYU Photo by: Alissa Dragun

and, at age 22, had begun practicing bankruptcy and real estate law. With the onset of war, he went to work for General Electric while taking night courses in mechanical engineering at Yale. His engineering skills landed contracts for some classified military projects. Some bigwigs were impressed and didn’t forget. After the war, he bought a cutlery company in New Jersey. Business heated up and so did his romance with that uptown girl, Sydelle, who was hardly shy and retiring. “The only one who was shy, was my father,” recalls daughter Gail Asarch, definitely a chip off both blocks. The marriage didn’t make the society pages but no matter. “He always knew he was going to make money,” Sydelle responds. In the post-war boom, few goals were more noble. The cutlery factory burned down, so Arthur convinced the man in charge of Japan’s reconstruction, Gen. Douglas MacArthur, to let him take over a failing samurai sword operation in Tsubume. Swords were stamped into stainless steel knives, forks and spoons to be used by U.S. servicemen. It was the largest cutlery producer in Japan when Meyer sold it in 1952 to enter the realm of finance and venture capital. Sydelle had two toddlers, Bill and Gail, to raise but it was a shared partnership. “He was a collector of businesses,” Sydelle says. “I dressed him well, oh, and how.” “He loved that she laid out all his clothes,” Gail interjects. “I bought everything, his shoes, his socks, underwear, combs, ties,” Sydelle continues, “everything but suits. He had to be there to be fitted.” “I wish I had her impeccable taste,” Gail confides. “At least I’m good for something,” Sydelle retorts, “but he really did offer me independence and freedom.” With the kids grown and Arthur issuing mortgages and car loans and buying companies and acquiring hotels that eventually became Servico, Sydelle went back to school. She earned a master’s at Sarah Lawrence and planned to teach. But . . .

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Sydelle Meyer

Sydelle Meyer (center) with her children Gail Asarch and William Meyer

Sydelle’s parents had moved to Palm Beach. Sydelle and Arthur considered wintering in California but flights from New York to Florida were shorter. They took an apartment at the Palm Beach Towers and, in 1986, they built a new home on two acres in Harrison, N.Y. “That’s where the real push came to get the art,” Sydelle admits. Her daughter, half-joking, says it was a “natural progression, from clothing and jewelry to the fine arts.” In truth, Sydelle’s mother had laid the foundation: In the finely carved furniture and those delicate vases, her daughter had learned what had value and what didn’t. But that wasn’t enough. “I took courses,” Sydelle says. “I got a curator; I went to shows; I learned to distinguish styles.” In some ways it had the markings of a corporate merger – Arthur’s business acumen and Sydelle’s artistic sense. Arthur had no problem with it; he liked art, too, but he also saw it as a commodity. “She wasn’t just going to buy pretty pictures,” curator Joyce Pomeroy Schwartz says of her prized client. Schwartz, one of the most prominent art experts in the country, opened Sydelle’s eyes to abstract expressionists Jackson Pollock, Larry Rivers and Willem de Kooning. “When she started, she didn’t know much about art, because her interest had been in antiques, and her furniture reflected that,” Schwartz reports from her office in New York. “When she started to look at contemporary art, she saw that it offered interesting things in terms of interior design. It became a contrast.

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She wanted to learn everything about it. When she traveled, she always went to museums and she sent me calls from all of them, saying ‘Guess what I saw in the Gucci?!’ ‘Guess what; I saw a Leger!’ “Her sensibility is her own. She’s flamboyant. She loves paintings. She loves color. She loves gesture. It’s part of her personality. She’s not a minimalist.” The New York home was a study in contrast – the beautiful furniture and fabrics from her antique heritage and the modern art. “It was a good balance,” Schwartz says. Coincidentally, when Meyer moved from her big house in Palm Beach to a more manageable apartment nearby, large sculptures by Leger and Louise Nevelson that had been on the lawn were donated to the Norton Museum. Though she first saw them, did the research and cut the deals, they are not Sydelle Meyer’s. Technically, they’re part of the Meyer Family Collection. The “family” includes Sydelle and her children, Gail and Bill, both of whom are into real estate in a big way – hotels, restaurants, health care – and, thanks to Sydelle, art. Bill also chairs the board at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach. “The vast majority have appreciated,” Gail says of the art. One such piece, a de Kooning, provided a significant return on the family’s investment. “We sold it a year ago and I danced for a week,” Sydelle says. Over the years, the art helped the Meyers expand their philanthropy in New York, Palm Beach County and abroad. They bought a video projector for Suncoast High School. They gave $1.5 million for the Meyer Academy and $1 million plus art works to the Norton Museum of Art. That will continue, Sydelle vows, despite the multi-million dollar losses on investments made with Ponzi-schemer Bernie Madoff. “At the end of the day, we would make sure it would benefit the public,” Sydelle says. “Did we care about just having a name on a building? Oh God, no!” In January at the Alzheimer’s Community Care Reflections Gala, the Meyers were honored for the broad scope of their philanthropy. In her remarks, Alzheimer’s Community Care President and CEO Mary M. Barnes was to the point: “They have nurtured a family that finds value in making a difference in the lives of others. The commitment and passion that the Meyer family gives to each charitable work that they undertake is truly a rarity in today’s society.” “My philosophy about philanthropy is very simple,’ Sydelle says, “If not me, who then?”


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Q&A Sydelle Meyer

Does your family share your enthusiasm for art? They like art. They collect some, but not like I do. I haven’t pressured them; I’ve always let them find their own way. One grandchild is a doctor of clinical psychology, another is an MIT grad. One granddaughter works for a local artist, but that’s it. When did you first develop an interest in art? Well, my mother would take my sister and me to museums and galleries when we were children but I really didn’t get caught up in it until the children were grown and we built the house in Harrison (N.Y.). It needed something. When you were young, did you ever want to go into theater, to be an actress? Oh, God, no! I did sing. At Dalton we all had to take part in school plays, so I sang, but I preferred working behind the scenes.

Studio Palm Beach

Who do you go to for the inside scoop on art? I’ve always had a curator. Joyce Pomeroy Schwartz, who’s in New York and is one of the most knowledgeable people about art anywhere. When I bought, I always consulted with her. That way I knew that every piece had a provenance; they were known. I didn’t just pick out some pieces and say, “Oh, they’re fabulous.”

Q&A

You’re legendary for your flamboyant sense of fashion, your love of color and especially your collection of eyeglasses. Do you dress that way at home? Oh, God, no. Usually, I wear a t-shirt and jogging suit around the house. Whatever the situation allows. Because of your glasses and your bright clothes, do some people underestimate you? I love what I’m interested in and I never take myself seriously. But I never fool around when it comes to education, science – the things that I consider really important. What is most important about the art and cultural scene in this area? All these organizations to enhance quality of life, to educate people. We are all students and they help us better understand and appreciate the beauty around us.

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George Bolge Builds Art Museums – and Audiences By Leon M. Rubin

Artist David Maxwell captured a scene from the construction of the new Boca Museum in 2000.

G

eorge Bolge has built two major art museums in South Florida. But, he’s quick to point out, the building is just the beginning. “Once you build the box, the public looks to you and says ‘show us why you needed that box,’” observes Bolge, who is retiring from the Boca Raton Museum of Art in June after 16 years as executive director. He clearly speaks from experience; prior to taking the reins of the Boca Museum in 1995, he was executive director of the Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale from 1970 to 1988 (where he was awarded the title Director Emeritus). Both museums were constructed under his watchful eye. “Once you get the hollow building, you have to fill it with a permanent collection that doesn’t just look good, but has a narrative,” he explains. “Then, you begin bringing in shows that not only engage the audience that comes down from major cities around the country, but also the one that is here all the time. What every museum needs to do is to build an audience. “The Greek philosophers would say there’s an ethos – a

spirituality – in everything; something that makes it rise above everything else,” Bolge continues. “Every institution needs an ethos. It’s a thought, a drive to educate. You’ve got to be needed. People have to feel that you’re an essential element in their lives. If you don’t have that, you just have a shopping mall.” Bolge first put his strategy to the test in Fort Lauderdale, where the Museum of Art was one of the first cultural institutions in the region to mount a successful capital campaign, he says. The awardwinning structure that resulted − designed by the world-class architect Edward Larrabee Barnes − became the standard of a downtown Renaissance that would later include the Broward Center for the Performing Arts and the Museum of Discovery and Science. When he accepted the job in Boca, he had his work cut out for him again. In fact, he recalls, “when I was being interviewed for the job, they said the museum probably wouldn’t last through the summer.” At the time, the museum was shoehorned into a 12,000square-foot building on Palmetto Park Road. Plans to build a much larger facility hadn’t gotten off the ground.

Top right photo: David Maxwell (American 1941 – 2006), BOCA MoA, 2002, opaque watercolor on artists’ board, 31 x 27 inches. Permanent Collection 2009.2. Gift of David and Mary Maxwell.

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George Bolge, pictured in the Arman: Through and Across Objects exhibition at the Boca Raton Museum of Art in 2001-2002.

Bolge set to work shoring up the organization and, within five years, it was accredited by the American Association of Museums – a distinction achieved by less than 5 percent of the nation’s museums. By that time, an ambitious capital campaign was well underway and, in January 2001, the new, 44,000-square-foot museum in Boca Raton’s Mizner Park opened its doors to an eager public. Fast forward 10 years. Unquestionably, Bolge is pleased with what he and the Boca Museum have accomplished: a series of award-winning exhibitions, successful outreach programs, a popular art school and growth of the permanent collection, to name just a few. What’s more, he points out, “All this success happened during the worst economic times possible.” For a person with as much energy as Bolge, retirement won’t involve resting on his laurels – or in an easy chair. He’s eager for his next challenge – perhaps the teaching and lecture circuit, or “a museum who really needs a guy with my experience.” In the meantime, he has more than earned the right to wax

philosophical about museums and his career. “Every museum is a mirror of its leader,” he says, citing Sherman Lee, longtime director of the Cleveland Museum of Art – who Bolge calls “my hero” – as an example. “Every director worth his salt has taken an institution beyond where it was. It’s why I enjoy smaller museums, because they have a character about them.” The man who’s often called the dean of art museum directors in Florida describes himself as “cut from the old school. I’m in the group of directors who came out of academia. It’s amazing that anyone in the arts makes a career of this anymore,” he says. “I’m just a curator and educator − with 38 years of management experience.” Bolge’s knowledge of his profession has given rise to tremendous artistic growth – first in Fort Lauderdale and again in Boca. It’s no surprise that he stayed with both institutions long enough to see the fruits of his labors. “To make a difference,” he says, “you’ve got to be around for awhile.”

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Dressed

By Christina Wood

The moment Darth Vader appears on the screen, you know trouble is coming. Juliet, cloaked in the innocence of youth and unaware of Romeo waiting in the wings, steals your heart the second she dances onto the stage. One look is – obviously – all it takes to know the guy wearing the white hat is a hero. If clothes make the man, as Mark Twain postulated, then you could say costumes clarify the character. Johnny Depp would have a hard time being a pirate without one; the Sugarplum Fairy would lose her sparkle and the Phantom of the Opera might be just another selfabsorbed tenor. When an actor – or a dancer or the leading soprano – puts on a costume, something rather special happens. A cascade of silk, a somber shade, even the angle of a hat can speak volumes. “If you’re playing a character who is repressed but is trying to break free, how do you express that in a costume? It can be complicated but it’s very creative,” says Clayton Phillips, production manager at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. “It’s its own art form.”

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Jennifer Kronenberg and Carlos Guerra in Miami City Ballet’s Romeo and Juliet. Photo Š 2009 Lois Greenfield.

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 Kate Eastwood Norris and Lourelene Snedeker in Ghost-Writer at Florida Stage. Photo by Ken Jacques.

 Crazy for You at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre is in the pink.

 Costumes aid actress Elizabeth Dimon in her transformation from (left to right) a born-again Jewish housewife (End Days, Florida Stage) to a clairvoyant (Dr. Radio, Florida Stage) and on to a tone-deaf society maven (Souvenir, Palm Beach Dramaworks).

The costumer’s art combines a passion for detail with an eye for style, a respect for history and a creative itch. “From an intellectual point of view, it’s very interesting to think about how the costume designers were able to mold and to shape and even to manipulate our opinions about these people depending in part on how they were dressed,” says Roger Ward, chief curator at the Norton Museum of Art, which will be hosting an exhibition of science fiction costumes this summer. (“Out of This World: Extraordinary Costumes from Film and Television” will be on display June 4-September 4.) “Superman is always in the three primary colors of red, yellow and blue, whereas Darth Vader is always dressed in black. From the very beginning, they have relied on these stereotypes of costume and color to give us visual clues about the goodness or the evilness of the character whom

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they are dressing.” “I think it’s the final element to a character,” Phillips says. “Sort of like the signature on a letter.” “It really does complete you,” says Elizabeth Dimon, a local actress who, in a variety of stage productions, has stepped into the shoes of, among others, a tone-deaf 1940s society maven, a clairvoyant and a born-again Jewish housewife. “It can clarify your character and can certainly clarify it for the audience. It should let them know a little bit about who you are as soon as they see you.” “It’s not just about the actor,” says Penny Williams, who – over the course of a 22-year career – has designed costumes for a long list of clients, including the Caldwell Theatre, Dreyfoos School of the Arts (where she teaches and serves as artist-in-


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 The somber hues used in Twelve Angry Men at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre set a distinct tone.

residence) and Palm Beach Atlantic University. As a costume designer, she explains, it is her job to make the director’s vision a reality. When work started on the Palm Beach Shakespeare Festival’s production of Baby Doll by Tennessee Williams, the director told Williams he wanted the show to feel gritty, like a 1950s movie. Her work on the musical Hairspray, which was staged at Dreyfoos School of the Arts in the spring, required a much different – and more colorful – approach. “Costuming is a look. Everybody has to complement each other on stage. There has to be an ebb and flow to it.” The budget for a production may also inspire a certain level of creativity. Designers typically resort to a combination of borrowing, buying and building – or sewing – costumes. Thrift stores are often a good place to start. “I’ve built stock, purchased

stock and I have my own personal collection of vintage clothes, hats, purses and shoes,” says Williams, who oversees two huge warehouses full of costumes. “People don’t understand how much work actually goes into putting that set and those costumes together,” Phillips says. “Costumes in particular are the kind of thing you don’t notice until it’s wrong.” Getting it right requires an understanding of fashion history as well as an eye for color and shape and the ability to wield a needle. “Just like a fashion designer, they [costume designers] have to know how to create a pattern. They have to know how to drape. They have to know how to do different kinds of pleating,” Phillips says. But that’s not all. “Costume designers have a strong understanding of period.”

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 Lara Flynn Boyle in Land of the Blind (2006)

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 1700s corset and panniers like those worn by the Duchess of Devonshire.

 Heath Ledger in Casanova (2005)

 Angelica Houston in Ever After (1998)

Inspiration for the period costumes featured in “Cut! Costume and the Cinema,” a recent exhibit at the Boca Raton Museum of Art, came from historic pictures, pattern books, portraits and actual clothing. In film, where every actor dreams of his or her close up, costumes must be ready to stand up to intense visual scrutiny. Fabric, lace, braid, embroidery, beading and even the proper undergarments can be used to achieve a look that will establish an air of authenticity and distinguish maid from master or an honest farmer from the city slicker. “Clothing in history tends to inform you about a lot of the social mores of the period,” adds South Florida actress Lourelene Snedeker, who wore not one but two corsets in her most recent appearance at Florida Stage. “Whether it’s a ’20s flapper outfit or a long skirt that restricts the length of your stride, costuming of any kind informs the actor in a physical manner of their appropriate behavior in those clothes.” The physical demands that a costume will endure are of particular concern whenever dancing is involved – whether it is a production of Crazy for You at the Maltz or Miami City Ballet’s premiere of Romeo & Juliet. “Dance is a physical art form,” says Haydée Morales, costume designer and director for Miami City Ballet. “It’s all in the body expression; the costume is an extension of that.” Bias-cut fabrics, gussets, spandex inserts and a few extra hooks and eyes are among the tricks of her trade. “Even though the garment fits almost like a second skin, it has to breathe,” she says. “When you lift your arms, the garment stays where it’s supposed to stay because you have more fabric for the mobility of the arms. The rise of

 The Batman costume worn by George Clooney in the film Batman & Robin can be seen at the Norton Museum of Art this summer in “Out of This World: Extraordinary Costumes from Film and Television,” an exhibition organized by the Experience Music Project and Science Fiction Museum. Courtesy of the Paul G. Allen Family Collection.

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 Kiera Knightley in The Duchess (2008)

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 Natasha Richardson in The White Countess (2005)

 Johnny Depp in Pirates of the Caribbean, Dead Man’s Chest (2006)

 Kate Winslet in Finding Neverland (2004)

The costumes above were recently seen at the Boca Raton Museum of Art in the exhibition “Cut! Costume and the Cinema,” which was presented by Exhibits Development Group in cooperation with Cosprop Ltd., London.

the pants has to be high up, as close to the body as possible for them to do all their movement without any impediments.” And, of course, shoes are critical. “This year, we have budgeted about $180,000 in just shoes,” Morales reports. While the male members of the company may dance in a particular pair of shoes for months and months, a principal ballerina may wear a pair of toe shoes only once. “I’m pretty sure our Juliet is going to kill one pair of shoes a performance,” Morales says. “Some girls change shoes in the intermission.” In the world of ballet, where tradition often reigns supreme, the need to accommodate those amazing leaps and twirls isn’t the only thing that distinguishes the art of costume design. “When we acquire the rights of a ballet,” Morales explains, “we acquire the choreography rights, the music, the scenery, the lighting and the bible of the costumes.” She and her team, which includes seamstresses, a draper and cutter and one very talented costume artist, must follow the designs spelled out in the “bible” to the letter. When the company puts its own stamp on a piece, as it did with the Raymonda Variations, Morales has more latitude to express her creativity. Whether she is honoring the vision of those who went before her or breaking new ground, Morales loves her job. And it shows in every tutu and sparkling tiara. “The minute the curtain goes

 Haydée Morales is the costume designer and director for Miami City Ballet. Photo courtesy of Miami City Ballet.

up, you hear a gasp,” she says. “I always call that my applause because I feel that the audience has really understood what I have tried to do at that moment.”

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spatial relations By John Loring Photographs by Jim Fairman The great French/American intellectual 20th century novelist and first American member of the Academie Française Julien Green was so enamored of sculpture that he envisioned paradise to be a room filled with beautiful statues – arguably not the fantasy of a great humanist, if still the fantasy of a great commentator on human nature. To side with Julien Green, sculpture by its very physicality and concrete presence in the threedimensional world may well speak louder about human nature than its two-dimensional siblings painting, drawing and print. Environment obviously plays a greater role in sculpture than in the other visual arts for the simple reason that it is as often as not made to be placed outdoors in parks and gardens, those man-made, paradisiacal re-orderings of nature or, most recently, placed in a plot of almost equally unnatural artified acreage. Green’s vision of paradise’s sculpted population was of course inspired not only by the classical sculptures of the Louvre Museum but by his daily walks in Paris’s magnificent Tuilerie Gardens, which are densely populated by sculptures – many of great beauty as well as of great sensuality. Here in our own largely man-made paradise of Palm Beach County, with its many lovely parks and gardens, it comes as no surprise that sculpture and sculptors abound to stake out their territories both sun-lit and shaded.

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Muriel Kaplan’s clay studies and bronze portrait bust of Robert F. Kennedy (1969) 

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Edwina Sandys with her cut-out aluminum “Red Rooster” (2008) 

Edwina Sandys is, by birth, the granddaughter of Winston Churchill. She is also – by design – the granddaughter of Lewis Carroll, Edward Lear, Henri Matisse and Alexander Calder. As with all her work in her long career as an artist and keen observer of human nature – in both its light and dark sides – her current series of cut-out and colorfully enameled aluminum sculptures speak of the poet-Carrollian world where nonsense obligatorily plays its role if something important is not to be left out. There are the perforations, negative spaces – or maybe they are “rabbit holes” – in Sandys’ cut outs for our imaginations to fall through and have “adventures in Wonderland.” There is the witty “nonsense” of Lear’s famous poems that delights children, who instinctively understand it so well, and that sets their elders back on their haunches to question just about everything, as “elders”

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 “Sunflower Woman” – nine-foot-high aluminum cut-out (2003)

and artists invariably do. There are the strong, clean, unfuzzied but sensually inflected lines of Matisse cut-outs and the flat, monochromatic steel surfaces of Calder’s ever-playful carnival of essentially biomorphic if abstract forms. All the play and, as she terms it, “frolics” in Sandys’ work take polemic turns as she frolics with intent. “When something exciting happens in the world, I want to jump in and get involved. It’s in my blood. I want to join in. I want to do something. If I were a politician, I’d politic. If I were a dancer, I’d dance. As a sculptor, I sculpt,” she explains. The most politically charged of her cut-outs is the largest and most celebrated. It incorporates eight 4-by-12-foot sections of the Berlin Wall “sculpted” by negative spaces of two standing totemic figures piercing its 32-foot length, which stands


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“Lucifer” – six-foot-high aluminum cut-out (2003) 

prominently at the Churchill Memorial on the campus of Westminster College in Fulton, Missouri, where her grandfather gave his legendary “an iron curtain has descended” speech on March 6, 1946. In dedicating the memorial sculpture on November 9, 1990, President Ronald Reagan said, “What a privilege it is to be on hand to dedicate Edwina Sandys’ sculpture celebrating the triumph of her grandfather’s principles… a man and a woman break through the wall and symbolically demolish whatever remaining barriers stand in the way of international peace and the brotherhood of man.” This cutting out life, cutting through it, cutting holes in it was perfectly pegged by her friend and great art historian Sir Roland Penrose in 1980: “When you meet Edwina Sandys, she looks straight through you as if you were a slice of gruyere. Which

 “Eve’s Apple” – six-foot-high enameled aluminum (2003)

reminds me of being told when I was at school that I was no more than a hole in the air – one of those jokes with troublesome metaphysical implications that upset our ordinary conception of solidity and emptiness with their dependence on each other in order to exist, just as the cave needs the mountain and the hole needs the gruyere.” The triumph of those principles and of life as it is fully lived by the artist with all life’s positive and negative spaces (with all its metaphysical “being and nothingness”) informs all her work. The cut-out statues as they cut to the chase are neither additive nor subtractive. They are cut directly out of the fabric of human frolics and follies. Whimsical? Yes, but those are whims of steel; and, for all their flirty, innocent airs, they do know just where they’re headed, and they’ve met us all along the way.

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 Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz with study for “The Arc” (2004)

Luis Montoya and Leslie Ortiz’s collaborative sculptures confront us with a meticulously crafted Pop/Surrealist vision of their own world of wonders, where exhilarating shifts of scale – such as those Alice discovered in Wonderland – metamorphose the everyday into the sublime in ways that are at once celebratory, quietly witty and gently disorienting. They know that an encounter with a 17-footlong slice of watermelon will suspend belief in our habitual patterns of perceiving familiar, even banal, objects and provoke wonder and excitement. To that end they crafted just such a marvel in “The Arc” with 98 sections of cast bronze, luminously rich and bright-colored patinas and five months of superbly-skilled craftsmanship. (There are easier ways to grow a slice of watermelon, but they cannot impress.) “The Arc” fits into a long line of exaggeratedly scaled fruits and vegetables bursting out of – or refusing to fit into – normally scaled cooking pots, baskets, buckets, funnels, vases, bowls or even a garden wheelbarrow, all hyper-realistically rendered in bronze with colorful patinas. These still lives that refuse to keep still all look so genuine in every detail they leave us incredulous before issues of size and substance as they carry on their witty and intentionally confusing dialogue between the natural, the imaginary and the man-made with their likeness in form, color and texture and with their total unlikeness of scale. Luis Montoya, a native of Madrid, was led naturally to sculpture by his grandfather, who was also a sculptor. He received his undergraduate and graduate degrees from the Royal Academy of Fine Arts in San Fernando, where Goya was once director and where Picasso, Dali and Botero all studied. He opened his first studio in West Palm Beach in 1972 at the age of 22. Leslie Ortiz, a West Palm Beach native, received her

 “Factories” series – cast bronzes and drawings (2008 - )

 “Alternative Fuels” series – patinated bronze (2007 - )

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Courtyard of bronze foundry with, at right, “The Three Leeks” and “Killer Tomatoes” – patinated bronze (2006, 2005) 

“Factories” series – patinated bronze (2008 - ) 

undergraduate degree in sculpture from Boston University and continued her studies at the National Academy of Applied Arts in Amsterdam. For the past 16 years, they have combined their talents in a unique collaborative they named “Popliteo.” Their works are displayed in the Palm Beach County collections of The Society of the Four Arts, the Norton Museum and the Boca Raton Museum of Art as well as in museum collections across the globe from Spain to Japan. Recent works such as “WMD,” where the guided missiles on their launching pad are giant asparagus spears standing upright in a cooking pot too small to hold a single one of them horizontally, or the “Alternative Fuels” series, where giant fruits and vegetables are perched on various disproportionately small fuel containers, or another series, where the lighting tubes in four fluorescent fixtures are replaced by a yard-long carrot, green bean, leek or jalapeno pepper, gently suggest concern and amusement with today’s ever-present themes of environmental political correctness. The theme is exquisitely reprised in Popliteo’s new series of factories, refineries, distilleries, smokestacks and other energy-related structures fashioned from antique fuel containers, funnels, nozzles, “goose necks,” aerosol cans and what-have-you. All are, like the fruits and vegetables, hyper-realistically rendered by the duo’s alchemy that in these works turns hollow tin to solid bronze. Recent exhibitions at the Tampa and Vero Beach museums of art have baptized their works “Revisions of Nature” and “Food for Thought.” Sidestepping the conjectures invariably invited by the surreal, Luis Montoya sums it up: “We like to have fun!”

“Popliteo” painting and drawing studio (2011) 

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“Zeus, Poseidon, Weatherman” – mixed media (1971) 

Portrait busts of Captain David McCampbell as a WWII ace pilot  and 45 years later as a Lake Worth resident – clay (1988)

Muriel Kaplan was the first teacher at West Palm Beach’s Armory Art Center, which honored her with a retrospective exhibition of 68 years of her work with a focus on the Expressionist portrait sculpture she has exhibited nationally from New York’s National Academy of Art and Brooklyn Museum to the Norton Museum of Art and Northwood University in West Palm Beach. The phrase “What’s past is prologue” is inscribed on the base of one of Kaplan’s more polemic works (in this case a protest to the war in Iraq) and the rich textures of past history play their role in work with roots that spring from classical sculpture as well as from the more modern greats August Rodin and Alberto Giacometti. Political protest is right at home in Kaplan’s emotionally charged sculptures, as exemplified by her 1971 over-life-sized statue “Zeus, Poseidon, Weatherman.” The piece features a bearded, shirtless young man posed like the 460 BC bronze of the god of the seas in Athens’ archaeological museum but wearing blue jeans, carrying a gas mask and hurling, not a trident, but a Molotov cocktail during the notorious Kent State University anti-Vietnam War protest. Exhibited in 1971 in Lever House’s Park Avenue sculpture gallery, it provoked such violent reactions that the New York police had to be called in to protect it before the statue could be removed. Kaplan’s bent towards polemics and political protest can well be traced to her close friendship with renowned New York philanthropist Vera List, with whom Kaplan shared a sculpture studio in New York and who founded the Vera List Center for Art and Politics at the New

School, where Kaplan studied art and philosophy. Quite naturally the political and the heroic are favored subjects of Kaplan’s and include Robert F. Kennedy, former Israeli Prime Minister Yitzhak Rabin and “Ace of Aces,” Medal of Honor World War II aviator Captain David McCampbell, who lived in Lake Worth and for whom the Palm Beach International Airport is named. A small bronze version of her lifelike bust of RFK is presented every year to the recipient of the Robert F. Kennedy Humanitarian Award. Powerful, incisive, spirited, emotional, moving, often beautiful – all these adjectives apply to Muriel Kaplan’s sculpture. “In doing a portrait,” the artist states, “I try to make not only a likeness but a work of art. I do not wish to make a photographic copy of the sitter but to catch essence, to elevate the features to the realm of art. Character interests me more than classic beauty. I see the rhythm in the ripples of muscles, the planes of the forehead and cheeks. I wish to accentuate them so others can see and feel them too. “I believe sculptures done originally in clay should retain the qualities of clay, just as those done in wood should make one aware of the material, and those done in stone should have stone-like qualities. “A portrait sculpture is a three-way affair – the sitter, the artist and the clay must all come to terms with each other if the sculpture is to be a work of art. The finished work,” she concludes, “imparts its vigor to the viewer when this is successful.”

 Muriel Kaplan in her studio with portrait busts of Robert F. Kennedy (1969)

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It’s a

Mmmmmasterpiece! By M.M. Cloutier

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Underwater Fantasy courtesy of The Breakers Palm Beach 

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 Photo courtesy of The Boca Raton Resort & Club

Photo courtesy of The Boca Raton Resort & Club 

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For several hours, artisans at The Boca Raton Resort & Club carved, chiseled and adorned the building blocks of a 12-foottall replica of Paris’ most iconic landmark. With warmed, brown “glue” and the help of an engineer, they then assembled their version of the Eiffel Tower and put it on display at the resort’s Mizner Center, where it provoked a curious response. Onlookers not only surveyed the tower with awe – they were tempted to sink their teeth into it. That’s what happens when sculpture is made out of the world’s most pervasive gastronomic obsession: chocolate, which also happens to be one of the most versatile, if temperamental, art media. Indeed, from Jupiter to Boca Raton, Palm Beach County’s premier pastry chefs, such as the team at The Boca Raton Resort & Club, are elevating chocolate, the perennial go-to sweet treat, into large- and small-scale works of art. Palm Beach County attracts notable talent because its relative affluence and international tourist base draw gifted pastry chefs who thrive under high expectations, says Michael Jasa, president of the local American Culinary Federation chapter. “We always have something challenging us,” says Jean Spielmann, the executive pastry chef at The Boca Raton Resort & Club who collaborated on the Eiffel Tower project. “Working with chocolate is like a beautiful woman. You have to be patient.” Spielmann and his confectionery squad have conceived and executed – largely for themed special events – countless chocolate showpieces, including a replica of a Salvador Dali painting featuring a solid-chocolate “canvas” painted with white chocolate colored to mimic Dali’s palette and symbolic melting clock. Chocolate – in all its forms, types and textures – is a tricky muse complicated by the inflexibility of certain scientific precepts. It’s moody right out of the gate; just to give it sheen and smooth texture, it has to be heated, cooled and manipulated properly.


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Inspired

Photo courtesy of Café L’Europe 

In the right hands, the processes of virtually every traditional art discipline can be applied. You can mix different oil-based colors with chocolate, paint and airbrush with chocolate, mold and sculpt it and coax any number of design flourishes and textures. The results can be dazzling. At The Breakers in Palm Beach, Executive Pastry Chef Elmar Wolf – inspired by the reef just offshore from the resort – once created a large mold out of ice and then poured liquid white chocolate over the ice. The chocolate meandered through the detailed cuts and curves of the design until it hardened. When the ice melted, Wolf had what he envisioned: the base structure of an eight-footlong chocolate reef, which served as a centerpiece of a seafoodthemed buffet. Once completed with additional handiwork, the reef featured, among other things, white-chocolate staghorn corals, plants and conch shells filled with chocolate mousse. “Chocolate as art should be fun and playful,” says Stephanie Steliga, pastry chef at Palm Beach’s upscale Cafe L’Europe restaurant. She has been focused on smaller-scale chocolate works, which sometimes employ Play-doh-consistency modeling chocolate. Steliga’s intricate chocolate pieces, often involving other elements such as gingerbread, have included a one-by-two-foot children’s playroom tableau populated by a trinket-filled toy box, figurines, stuffed animals and a tea-for-two montage made with lattice pretzels. “Just to make the base of that piece took about six hours because I wanted it to look like an aged, planked wooden floor,” says Steliga. “I rolled and cut out little chocolate planks and sponge-painted them with molten white chocolate colored in various shades of brown.” “When you think of the elements of chocolate,” says Fred Meltzer, president of Lake Worth-based Hoffman’s Chocolates, which has five locations across the county, “creativity and artistry know no bounds.”

A team of chefs from The Breakers shows off  the Grand Marnier Chocolate Mousse Tower.

Sad as it may seem, some works of chocolaty art are meant to be admired not consumed. Fortunately, there are intricately crafted, often gravity-defying and completely edible masterpieces, such as the magnificent dessert created by The Breakers for the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s 2011 Muse Awards ceremony at the Kravis Center. The creative process behind the chocolate sensation began with a Matisse-style ink-on-paper drawing. A team of patient chefs, including Elmar Wolf, Jeff Simms and Josh Rhodes, then molded a cylindrical chocolate-croquant tower before spraying it with molten chocolate and crafting a dozen showpiece accents, including a delicate chocolate coil. The final result was a delectable Grand Marnier chocolate mousse tower with raspberry sorbet, pink-sugar chard, bittersweet chocolate sauce, yuzu cream and raspberries. “There are so many techniques with chocolate,” says Executive Pastry Chef Wolf. “If you have the facility, there’s no end to what you can do.” To see a video of The Breakers’ team in action creating the Chocolate Mousse Tower that was served at the 2011 Muse Awards, go to www.palmbeach culture.com/Gallery_musevids2011.

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Successful singer/songwriters and talented musicians are staking out fresh ground in Palm Beach County By Bill Meredith

Palm Beach County’s live music club scene has grown exponentially in recent years – almost keeping pace with the abundance of talent that has existed here for decades. Prominent singer/songwriters dot the landscape, as do musicians who’ve graduated from notable South Florida learning institutions such as the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music as well as from successful music programs at Florida Atlantic University, Palm Beach State College and Palm Beach Atlantic University.


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John Ralston 

Delray Beach-based singer/songwriter Rod MacDonald performs at numerous area clubs, playing solo or full-band originals from his dozen CD releases. A prominent artist in Greenwich Village’s post-Bob Dylan folk scene, he moved to South Florida in the mid-1990s to be closer to his aging parents. As a bonus, he found a year-round outdoor live music scene that didn’t exist during winters in New York City. MacDonald still tours throughout the United States and Europe annually. When he’s not on the move, he teaches courses through the Lifelong Learning Society at Florida Atlantic University. The LLS courses allow him to instruct nonaccredited students of all ages (often retirees in their 60s and 70s) on subjects like “Music Americana” and “The Great American Songbook” – a topic he recently used additional fullband concert performances to demonstrate in both Boca Raton and Jupiter. “I’m often up late writing lectures,” MacDonald says, “but I find the courses very rewarding, and I don’t believe in ever complaining about having too much work. I’m also playing a lot at clubs and, occasionally, at city-sponsored events in Delray

 Frank Axtell

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Photos by: Laura D’Art

Beach and Lake Worth. Both towns have lots of live music, strong little scenes. And I enjoy playing at the Bamboo Room – the best club in Palm Beach County – which recently reopened in Lake Worth.” From 1999-2008, the Bamboo Room hosted a variety of local-to-national talent before taking nearly three years off because of the sagging economy. In February, it re-opened in its original location on South J Street, a busy downtown Lake Worth byway that’s also home to the original alternative rock club Propaganda. Not far away, a highly concentrated stretch of Lake Avenue features several different clubs offering up original music and jazz; within five blocks, you’ll find Bizaare Ave Café, Little Munich, Brogues Irish Pub, Fiorentina, Dolce Vita and Havana Hideout. Lake Worth is also home to such talents as pop singer/songwriter John Ralston, who has CD releases on the California-based recording label Vagrant Records; rock trio Franscene, a talented collection of musicians in their early-tomid-20s, and jazz guitarist Frank Axtell. A longtime South Floridian, Axtell also teaches at the School of Rock North Palm

Beach. Now a national chain of more than 70 learning institutions, the original School of Rock was started in Philadelphia in 1998 by guitarist and educator Paul Green (who inspired Jack Black’s character in the film School of Rock). Delray Beach singer/songwriter Marie Nofsinger, a roots musician who plays a mix of acoustic blues, country and folk music, appreciates Lake Worth’s super-sized music scene. “Lake Worth is a wonderful little Bohemian paradise,” she says. “It’s a major reason why the area is getting better musically. I love playing at places like Mother Earth, where they want original music instead of covers. In a venue like that, you can get your lyrical messages across.” Mother Earth Coffee, found off the beaten path on Second Avenue North, books mostly acoustic pop and folk singer/songwriters. Delray Beach is also developing a reputation for live music. Head out in any direction from downtown Delray Beach and, within a few blocks on and around Atlantic Avenue, you can find live music in a variety of forms at The Hurricane, Boston’s on the Beach, Elwood’s Dixie Bar-B-Q, Pineapple Groove, Kevro’s Art Bar and Dada. A little further to

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 Rod MacDonald

the west, blues club The Back Room recently opened its fifth location, at the intersection of West Atlantic and Congress avenues. “It’s especially great to see Elwood’s back in operation again,” says vocalist/guitarist Rick Rossano, who has led the West Palm Beach roots music and rockabilly trio the Dillengers for 20 years. The group recorded one of their three CDs – Live at Elwood’s – at the popular hangout in 1996. They now perform at the new Elwood’s, which opened in February three blocks north of the original location. Musical life also exists beyond the borders of Lake Worth and Delray Beach. Boca Raton is home to rising blues singer/guitarist J.P. Soars; electronica trio Young Circles, a group of mid-20-somethings currently receiving recording label attention; and jazz vocalist and violinist Nicole Yarling. Yarling teaches in Miami-Dade County, at Florida Memorial College and the University of Miami, and has recorded and toured with artists ranging from jazz multi-wind instrumentalist Ira Sullivan to pop star Jimmy Buffett. “It’s great that there are so many places to play,” Yarling says. “I’m either teaching – or driving to teach – so much, that I savor it whenever I can find time to actually play a gig.” Original music can be heard in clubs across the county,

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from the multi-styled Funky Buddha Lounge & Brewery in Boca Raton to rock clubs like Swampgrass Willy’s in Palm Beach Gardens. In between, you’ll find The Living Room serving up acoustic music in Boynton Beach, venerable rock houses Respectable Street and O’Shea’s Irish Pub cranking things up in West Palm Beach, fledgling jazz club the Fusion Lounge and black-box variety venue the Orange Door making music in Lake Park and blues club Chef John’s cooking in Jupiter. “It’s like night and day now,” says versatile Palm Beach Gardens-based guitarist Mario LaCasse, who leads an eponymous blues group. “I’ve gone from hardly any gigs to having several nice places to play close by.” “The scene is inspiring me to make a bit of a comeback,” Nofsinger says. Her only official solo CD – Boots – came out in 1998 but she was an integral part of the band Wildlife’s 2010 CD, Wildlife Rides Again. Throughout both recordings, her creativity, understated humor and outlaw persona shine through. “I may do some more recording after taking most of the last decade off,” she says. “And I’m not the only one. There seem to be more original singer/songwriters all the time.”


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 Mario LaCasse Band

If you’d like to find out more about the music and musicians making Palm Beach County sound so good, check out these websites:

Listen

Rod MacDonald: www.rodmacdonald.net John Ralston: www.john-ralston.com Franscene: www.myspace.com/franscenelw Frank Axtell: www.frankaxtell.com Marie Nofsinger: www.myspace.com/marienofsinger The Dillengers: www.thedillengers.com J.P. Soars: www.myspace.com/jpsoars

up

Young Circles: www.youngcircles.com Nicole Yarling: www.facebook.com/people/nicole-yarling/1382421916 Mario LaCasse: www.mariolacasseband.com

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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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{inside culture} cultural council news

Mark and Sonja Stevens

Cynthia Palmieri, Jeff Fessler and Pamela Caruso

Dack Patriarca and Hilary Jordan

Dimensional Harmony offered a spirited performance.

Dr. Terry Maple with Outstanding Philanthropist honorees Claire and Melvin Levine

Wesley White of the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office sang “What a Wonderful World” to everyone's delight.

Mary Montgomery and Daniel Biaggi

2011 Muse Awards Sizzled with Cultural Variety More than 400 enthusiastic supporters of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council came together in February for a “Culture out of the Box” celebration of the 2011 Muse Awards at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts. The annual cultural excellence awards presentations honored eight recipients during a gala dinner and exciting program that included performances, a fashion show and presentations that illustrated the many ways that arts and culture make a difference every day in our community.

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Muse Awards Co-Chairs Irene Karp and Jean Sharf

The 2011 Muse Award honorees included: • Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival – Excellence in Historical and Cultural Heritage • VSA Florida-Palm Beach County – Excellence in Arts and Cultural Outreach • Center for Creative Education – Excellence in Arts Integrated Education • Festival of the Arts Boca – Outstanding Festival • Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens – Outstanding Collaboration • Melvin and Claire Levine –

Kim and Chris Havlicek

Outstanding Philanthropist • Shawn Berry – Clyde Fyfe Award for Performing Artists • MLK Jr. Coordinating Committee – The Council’s Choice Award The evening began with cocktails in the Kravis Center’s Cohen Pavilion, which featured a huge mirrored box in the middle of the lobby. The crowd moved to the ballroom for dinner and was treated to a video demonstrating the artistry that The Breakers pastry chefs used to create the elegantly presented Grand Marnier Chocolate Mousse Tower with Raspberry Sorbet dessert.

Photos by Jacek Gancarz


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Tony-Award winning actor Gary Beach kicked off the evening’s performances with a rousing rendition of “Be Our Guest” from Beauty and the Beast. Craig Grant, regional president of PNC Bank for Florida, then took the stage with a surprise announcement: PNC Bank was granting the Cultural Council $200,000 for its new SmARTBiz program. (See details on page 20.) As the crowd still buzzed with the PNC announcement, the sound system boomed and a continuous stream of models strode across the stage in a “Fashion as Art” retrospective highlighting trends from the 1920s to the present. The high energy continued to roll as Master of Ceremonies Jeff Fessler (2010 Arts Educator Muse Award recipient) took the stage and kept the crowd entertained and informed between award presentations and performances that included Wesley White, of the Palm Beach County Sheriff’s Office, singing “What a Wonderful World;” Boynton Beach High School Chorus Dimensional Harmony (seen recently on the Today Show) performing “September” and the XCL Dance Studio Performance Team presenting a mixedmedia performance of “Derezzed” from the movie Tron featuring video created by Digital Domain Holdings. “The 2011 Muse Awards was truly a team effort,” says Rena Blades, president and CEO of the Cultural Council. “Our co-chairs, staff, producer and designer worked tirelessly to bring so many elements from numerous sections of our community together for this spectacular show and tribute to the Muse Awards recipients.” The Muse Awards co-chairs were Irene Karp and Jean Sharf, while the honorary chairs were Alex and Renate Dreyfoos. The honorary committee included more than 40 members of the community. The awards show was produced by Andrew Kato, artistic director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre and coordinating producer of the Tony Awards. The décor and graphics were designed by Hilary Jordan of Real Good Designs.

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Palm Beach’s Unique Destination for Art • Music • Films • Workshops Book Signings • Children’s Programs Lectures • Gardens … and so much more.

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{inside culture} cultural council news The evening’s Premier Benefactor was PNC Bank and the Grand Benefactor was J.P. Morgan. Award sponsors were Wells Fargo, Bank of America Merrill Lynch, Palm Beach Jewelry, Art and Antique Show, The Palm Beach Post, Gunster and Northern Trust Bank. Other sponsors included Tiffany & Co., Office Depot and The Breakers.

Muse Awards Recipients Feted at Tiffany’s Prior to the February gala, the 2011 Muse Awards recipients were honored by a Diamond Dazzling celebration hosted by Jeffrey Sabean, director, Tiffany & Co. As guests entered the store, they were immediately greeted by servers in white tuxedoes and Tiffany Blue bowties. Muse Awards Co-Chairs Jean Sharf and Irene Karp, as well as Honorary Chairs Renate and Alex Dreyfoos mingled with the crowd and congratulated the recipients.

Cynthia Palmieri, David Miller, Pamela Caruso

Kris Charamonde, Jennifer Frederick and Jeff Sabean

Frank Haynes, Edith C. Bush and Bobby Powell

Tom Pilecki, Shawn Berry Photos by Jacek Gancarz

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Cosmetic and LASER Dentistry: Whitening Invisalign Implants Crown & Bridge Root Canals

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{inside culture} cultural council news Muse Awards Honorary Committee Members Celebrated at Mar-a-Lago The members of the extraordinary Honorary Committee for the 2011 Muse Awards were celebrated at a luncheon at Mar-a-Lago Club. “We’re extremely pleased that Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos are the Muse Awards Honorary Chairs,” said Co-Chair Irene Karp. “Mr. Dreyfoos founded the Cultural Council in 1978 and has been a vital figure in the Cultural Council’s development and the overall cultural climate in Palm Beach County.” Added Co-Chair Jean Sharf, “We’re equally excited about the Muse Awards Honorary Committee including over 40 cultural supporters, many of whom have worked with the Cultural Council in the past.” In addition, the event featured remarks by Rena Blades, Cultural Council president and CEO, and Hilary Jordan, local artist and gala designer. Committee members also heard about the wonderful programs that the Muse Awards gala has supported in the past, such as providing arts and cultural education field trips for students in underserved communities.

Prizes valued at nearly $7,000 were offered by Academy DMT Performing Arts Camp, Ann Norton The Palm Beach County Sculpture Gardens, Armory Art A T T Give Cultural Council’s sixth annual your ENTIO child the g N PAR Center, ArtStage if ENTS t of cu Palm lture online Summer Cultural 2011 Beach C this su ! ou Summ mme Performing Arts er Cu nty Cultu r. ra ltura l Guid l Counci Guide is now available – l’s e is O NLIN Center, Boca Raton E! Palm and it’s packed full with Beac hCult ure.c Museum of Art, Craft om information about more Gallery, Everglades than 60 organizations Youth Conservation that host art and cultural Camp/FAU, Florida summer activities for Classical Ballet at the kids. The Summer Esther Center, JCC – Cultural Guide is Palm Camp Shalom at Duncan Beach County’s top Middle School, Kravis directory of art and Center for the Performing cultural camps for Arts, Lake Worth Playhouse, kids. It covers Lighthouse ArtCenter School camps across the county – of Art, Loggerhead Marinelife from Boca Raton to Jupiter and out to Center, Maltz Jupiter Theatre, the Everglades. Morikami Museum and Japanese To raise awareness about this valuable Gardens, Palm Beach Zoo, Pine Jog resource for parents, the Cultural Council Summer Art Camp, River Center, sponsored a contest for parents in March Schoolhouse Children’s Museum, Sol and early April. For a chance to win a Children Theatre Troupe, South Florida camp scholarship or membership to a Science Museum, Standing Ovation cultural organization, parents were asked Performing Arts, Young Singers of the to complete a brief online survey about Palm Beaches and the Cultural Council. education. Visit www.palmbeachculture.com to discover activities for kids throughout the entire summer!

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Student Art Commemorates Palm Beach Centennial

Debra Lyn Levasseur and Danny Miller

Marta Batmasian and RickGonzalez

Linda Buckley and John Loring

Susie Dwinell and Hilary Jordan

Susan Schupp, Judy Goodman, Gina and Jeff Sabean

Palm Beach County youngsters recently had the opportunity to learn about the history of their county when the Palm Beach County Cultural Council organized a student art exhibition in honor of the Palm Beach Centennial Celebration. The works were selected through a countywide contest, which was open to students in grades K-12 from public, private, homeschool and after-school programs. A variety of works were accepted, including photography. The Palm Beach Centennial exhibition was displayed in the PNC Bank lobby at 245 Royal Poinciana Way on Palm Beach

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{inside culture} cultural council news

December: Chef Andrew Roenbeck, panelist Liz Balmaseda, panelist Bill Citara and Rena Blades

December: Henry Petraki, Deanna Stepanian and Dr. Harry Horwich

through March 31. It can be seen at the Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties, 700 S. Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, through May 20. The art was produced by students from Beacon Cove Elementary School, Freedom Shores Elementary School, Palm Beach Public School, Palm Springs Middle School, Pine Jog Elementary School and Jupiter High School. The works of art in the exhibition were chosen based on originality, technical skill and historical accuracy.

Culture & Cocktails Series Draws Appreciative Fans

December: Ginny Coyle, Joe and Leah Holtzberg

February: Don Ephraim and Maxine Marks

January: Panelists Robert Glenn Ketchum, Fatima NeJame, Stephen Gibson and Miles Coon

February: Merel Cayne, Bruce Beal, Judy and Larry Schlager and Leonard DeMaio

February: Presenters Frederic A. Sharf, Pamela Parmal and Parker Ladd

January: Bobbi Horwich, Harold Jacobson and Carol Roberts Photos by Corby Kaye's Studio Palm Beach

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The Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s popular Culture & Cocktails series has continued to entertain very appreciative audiences during the 20102011 season, drawing crowds to venues in Palm Beach and Boca Raton. In December, more than 60 hungry fans descended on the Boca Beach Club of the Boca Raton Resort & Club for “Food Glorious Food − A Delicious Conversation with Restaurant Reviewers and Food Writers.” The panelists included Liz Balmaseda, restaurant reviewer for The Palm Beach Post; Bill Citara, food editor and restaurant reviewer for Boca Raton Magazine; and food writer and blogger Jan Norris of JanNorris.com. They were grilled by moderator Andrew Roenbeck, executive chef of the Boca Raton Resort & Club. January’s topic segued from taste into two other senses with “Sight and Sound − A Conversation about the Power of Photography and Poetry.” Tied-in with two major festivals in Palm Beach County (FOTOfusion and the Palm Beach Poetry Festival), this entertaining and thoughtful event included insights and anecdotes from international conservation and nature photographer Robert Glenn Ketchum, Fatima NeJame, the executive director of the Palm Beach Photographic Centre; Miles Coon, founder and director of the Palm Beach


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cultural council news Poetry Festival; and published poet Stephen Gibson, an associate professor at Palm Beach State College. More than 90 fans of photography and poetry gathered for the event at Cafe Boulud in Palm Beach. In February, Culture & Cocktails attracted around 130 fans of fashion and haute couture to Cafe Boulud for “Arnold Scaasi − A Conversation about His Golden Years (19581969).” Sharing their memories and opinions were Pamela Parmal, the David and Roberta Logie Curator of Textile and Fashion Arts at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston; Scaasi friend and expert Frederic A. Sharf; and Parker Ladd, founder of Parker Ladd’s Author Breakfast Series and former publishing executive at Charles Scribner's Sons. Shortly after the “Conversation” started, the iconic designer himself slipped into the back of the room and occasionally interjected amusing comments to the delight of the audience and panel. The sixth season of Culture & Cocktails concluded with two gatherings in March – a first for the series. On March 7, “Private Treasures − A Conversation with Collectors of Contemporary Art” at Café Boulud was moderated by Cheryl Brutvan, the Norton Museum’s curator of contemporary art, and included noted collectors Ruth Baum and Doreen and Gilbert Bassin. They were joined by Sarah Gavlak of Gavlak Gallery, Palm Beach and New York. On March 21, author Scott Eyman was the presenter for “Hooray for Hollywood” at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. Eyman has written biographies of Cecil B. DeMille, Robert Wagner, Louis B. Mayer, Ernest Lubitch, John Ford, Ingrid Bergman and Mary Pickford. He was interviewed by Palm Beach Post pop and lifestyle reporter Leslie Gray Streeter. Culture & Cocktails is generously sponsored by The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation, with additional support from The Peter and Vicki Halmos Foundation/Palm Beach Principal Players, the Palm Beach Daily News, Café Boulud and PR-BS, a Boca Ratonbased public relations firm.

The HARID Conservatory

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cultural council news

Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades and Cultural Council Vice Chair Bert Korman

Cultural Council Joins in Regional Arts Summit

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75 Minute Tours Departing from: CityPlace, West Palm Beach, FL Singer Island

The Palm Beach County Cultural Council, in cooperation with the South Florida Cultural Consortium, hosted a recent Southeast Florida Regional Partnership Roundtable discussion with Ron Sims, deputy secretary of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development, and Rocco Landesman, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts. The topic was “Sustainable Communities: The Private Sector, Government and the Arts – A New Era of Innovative Partnerships for Regional Economic Development.” The discussion, which took place on the new Frank Gehry-designed campus of the New World Symphony in Miami, was moderated by New World Symphony Chair Neisen Kasdin and featured a panel of business leaders, including Bert Korman, vice chair of the Cultural Council’s Board of Directors. “The high point of my tenure so far at the NEA was to see a joint press release between the NEA and the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD), for this event we are at today,” Landesmen said. Added Sims, “Every community today in the world that is moving forward − cities that are on the radar screen − all include an incredible investment in the arts. And those communities that are most committed to it will be the ones that succeed in the most competitive century ever known to humankind.” Photo by JR Leshinsky


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cultural compendium Steven Caras Documentary Debuts at Kravis Center The world premiere of a new hour-long documentary about Steven Caras played to a standing room-only audience at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in February, signaling another auspicious role for the acclaimed dancer and photographer. Directed by Emmy Award-winner Deborah Novak, Steven Caras: See Them Dance tells the story of a young dancer from New Jersey who, with only three years of training, was personally invited by legendary choreographer George Balanchine to join his company, the New York City Ballet. Balanchine later took note of Caras’ gift as a photographer and granted him exclusive access to photograph all aspects of the company’s private world, including such ballet superstars as Mikhail Baryshnikov, Suzanne Farrell, Peter Martins and Patricia McBride.

Steven Caras, Deborah Novak and Wall Street Journal drama critic Terry Teachout, author of All in the Dances: A Brief Life of George Balanchine, answer questions following the screening.

The film includes interviews with Martins, McBride, Mia Michaels and Jacques d’Amboise among many dance icons. Caras’ personal narrative reveals an intimate look at the ballet world through the unique perspective of a male dancer’s personal journey of challenges and accomplishment. “Steven Caras has had a profound impact on dance in America,” Novak says. “You will see this come to life in his brilliant photographs and hear it through the voices of the world‘s greatest dancers.” Steven Caras: See Them Dance began airing nationally on PBS stations on March 9.

Active on the South Florida cultural scene for many years, Caras was ballet master and company photographer for Miami City Ballet beginning in the early 1990s. After moving to Palm Beach County, he served as director of development for Miami City Ballet and, later, as artistic liaison for Ballet Florida and director of development for Palm Beach Dramaworks.

Flagler Museum Receives Two Grants to Conserve Over-Sea Railroad Drawings Historic drawings from the “Eighth Wonder of the World” − Henry Flagler’s Over-Sea Railroad to Key West – will be preserved for posterity by the Flagler Museum thanks to a Preservation Assistance Grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities and a grant from the Robert David Lion Gardiner Foundation. The historic drawings, dating from 1904-1912, will be assessed or conserved in order to begin the process of making them accessible for research and display, thus further facilitating the study of Florida history and historic preservation. The museum will work with a consultant from Richmond Conservators of Works on Paper to examine the drawings, evaluate their storage and train curatorial staff in the conservation of the documents. The Flagler Museum Archives include several thousand documents that tell the story of the Over-Sea Railroad, described by Secretary of State and Nobel Peace Prize Winner Elihu Root as “...second only to the Panama Canal in its political and commercial importance to the United States.” The conservation of these historic drawings is especially significant since Florida will celebrate the centennial of the completion of the Over-Sea Railroad in January 2012. Despite overwhelming natural obstacles, the railroad required substantial engi-

Henry Flagler’s Over-Sea Railroad linked Miami and Key West.

neering and technical innovations documented by the drawings. On January 22, 1912, Henry Flagler’s Florida East Coast Railway company successfully finished 156 miles of track and 42 bridges connecting Miami to Key West. It was the most ambitious engineering feat ever undertaken by a private citizen and led to the development of the Florida Keys as a major American tourist destination.

South Florida Science Museum Hatches New Bugz! Exhibit The South Florida Science Museum’s newest exhibit, Bugz!, gives visitors a “bug’s eye” view of the creepy crawlies in an outsized backyard garden featuring large blades of grass, flowers, butterflies and insects painted on the walls. Talking microscopes with insect slides and large magnifying glasses allow visitors to examine the museum’s large collection of foreign and domestic moths and butterflies. While checking out the museum’s butterfly habitat, visitors can watch the butterfly metamorphosis process from chrysalis to full flight − up close and firsthand. Eventually, the museum will offer butterfly releases outdoors on the Nature Trail.

Left Photo by Alicia Donelan; Right Photo ©Flagler Museum Archives

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cultural compendium a non-profit organization dedicated to exciting curiosity and furthering the understanding and appreciation of science and technology. For more information, call (561) 832-1988 or visit www.sfsm.org.

Carbonell Nominations Are Plentiful for Palm Beach County Theaters (From left) Mickey Nolen, Mandy Nolen and Lew Crampton dedicate the Bugz! exhibit at the South Florida Science Museum. Nozzle Nolen is the presenting sponsor.

Elsewhere, ants in the ant farm will entertain visitors with the complexity and organization of the colonies they create. In addition, the museum is presenting a new full-dome planetarium, Bugs! A Rainforest Adventure, daily at noon. Celebrating its 50th anniversary this year, the South Florida Science Museum is

Palm Beach County theater companies garnered 36 nominations in the competition for the 35th Annual Carbonell Awards, which celebrate the best work in South Florida’s professional theater world. Together, the Maltz Jupiter Theatre (18), Palm Beach Dramaworks (9), Florida Stage (8) and Caldwell Theatre Company (1) combined to snare 36 nominations – tied with Miami-Dade County. Broward County theaters received 27 nominations. The Carbonell Awards are scheduled

SUMMER MER ER THE THEATRE EATRE Fes Fe F estiiviva es vvaal R Rep epp FAU SUMM J UUNE N E 24 2 4 –J UULYL Y 30, 3 0 , 2011 2 01 01

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A Tribute to the Best Movie Musicals of All Time

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Tickets Tickets | $20, group grouup rates available 1-800-564-9539 | www.fauevents.com www.fauevents.com

to be presented on April 4 at the Broward Center for the Performing Arts in Fort Lauderdale. The Palm Beach County nominees (listed by category) included: • Best New Work: Christopher DemosBrown, When the Sun Shone Brighter, Florida Stage; Karen Hartman, Goldie, Max & Milk, Florida Stage Plays: • Best Production: Twelve Angry Men, Maltz Jupiter Theatre; American Buffalo, Palm Beach Dramaworks • Best Director: Frank Galati, Twelve Angry Men, Maltz; William Hayes, American Buffalo, Dramaworks • Best Actor: Dennis Creaghan, Freud’s Last Session, Dramaworks • Best Actress: Beth Dixon, Three Tall Women, Dramaworks • Best Supporting Actor: Will Connolly, Candida, Dramaworks; Michael McKeever, Distracted, Caldwell Theatre Company. • Best Supporting Actress: Angie Radosh, Three Tall Women, Dramaworks; Deborah L. Sherman, Goldie, Max & Milk, Florida Stage Musicals: • Best Production: Academy, Maltz; La Cage aux Folles, Maltz • Best Director: Mark Martino, La Cage aux Folles, Maltz; Marcia Milgrom Dodge, Anything Goes, Maltz • Best Actor: Mark Jacoby, La Cage aux Folles, Maltz; Bret Shuford, Anything Goes, Maltz • Best Actress: Irene Adjan, Dr. Radio, Florida Stage; Tari Kelly, Anything Goes, Maltz • Best Supporting Actor: Tom Beckett, Anything Goes, Maltz; Nick Duckart, Dr. Radio, Florida Stage • Best Musical Direction: Helen Gregory, Anything Goes, Maltz; Phil Reno, La Cage aux Folles, Maltz; Alexander Rovang, Academy, Maltz • Best Choreography: Denis Jones, La Cage aux Folles, Maltz; Marcia Milgrom Dodge, Anything Goes, Maltz


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{inside culture} briefly noted Design: •

Best Scenic

Design: Michael Amico, American

Buffalo, Dramaworks • Best Lighting: Ron Burns, The Gin Game, Dramaworks; Suzanne Jones, Cane, Florida Stage Angie Radosh (left) and • Best Costume Beth Dixon, who starred in Palm Beach Dramaworks’ Design: Gail production of Edward Baldoni, Anything Albee’s Three Tall Women, were both nominated for Goes, Maltz; Brian Carbonell Awards. O’Keefe, Candida, Dramaworks; Jose M. Rivera, La Cage aux Folles, Maltz • Best Sound Design: Matt Kelly, Dr. Radio and Cane, Florida Stage • Best Ensemble: Twelve Angry Men, Maltz

Left Photo by Steven Caras

Carver Middle School Students Create Whimsical Sculpture Garden in Delray Beach Artist in Residence Sharon Koskoff worked with the Carver Middle School Morning Program youth to create a threedimensional sculpture garden installation inspired by reading Frank McKinney’s book Dead Fred, Flying Lunch Boxes and the Good Luck Circle. Recycled materials and eco-art practices were used to design the fantasy environment from a story that takes place locally in Delray Beach. The students did everything from pouring concrete to making stepping stones, installing and grouting tile lettering, painting fish and planting the garden. “I think this was the most exciting project I have ever worked on to get kids interested in reading” says Koskoff. Principal Lena Roundtree-Wallace was very support-

ive and allowed a Good Luck Circle (where every child can find inner strength) to be painted on the pavement. Carver Middle School volunteer Debbie Kaiser and Jennifer Buce of the City of Delray Beach also worked alongside the students. A mayoral dedication and symbolic rock-signing award ceremony are planned for the spring. The project was supported by author Frank McKinney, the City of Delray Beach, Target and Dollar General Stores.

Carver Middle School in Delray Beach is home to a colorful new sculpture garden created by its students and artist Sharon Koskoff.

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{inside culture} briefly noted Kristie Liebel of Boca Raton, a junior at Boca Raton Community High School, received first place for her untitled haiku in the Palm Beach Poetry Festival’s annual High School Poetry Contest. The contest judge, Jeff Morgan of Lynn University’s Department of English, praised the winning work for its “beautiful image and some fine consonance.” More than 200 entries were submitted by Palm Beach County public and private high school students. The runners-up were Mandy Bartmess, a senior at Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts, for her poem, Fragments; Brandon Dickerson, a junior at Spanish River High School, for his poem, Mannequin; Debra Marcus, a junior at Wellington High School, for her poem, History; and Jeffnick Philippe, a senior at Lake Worth Community High School, for his poem, My Home, After. Liebel’s winning haiku: (From left) Miles Coon, Mandy Bartmess, Brandon Dickerson, Debra Marcus, Kristie Liebel, Dr. Blaise Allen

She who had swallowed a falling star, that sweet nymph, her beauty glistens.

The winners of the second annual Kids’ Dreams Inc. Alan Lebow Award for Excellence in Shakespearean Performance, featuring selected Title One high school students, were Brendan Gardner, a sophomore at Boynton Beach High School, and Johnson Sinophat, a sophomore at Palm Beach Lakes High School. Presented in honor of the late Alan Lebow, the award was inspired by his “lifelong love of Shakespeare, poetry, art, literature and music,” says his widow, attorney Patricia Lebow. “I know he would be so proud of what we (From left) Brendan Gardner, Patricia Lebow and Johnson Sinophat are doing in his memory.” Rood Emmanuel, a freshman at Inlet Grove High School, and Angel Padua, a sophomore at Palm Beach Lakes High School, received honorable mentions. The winners and participants were celebrated at a special reception at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts.

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{inside culture} briefly noted

Regina Porten’s bronze sculpture Our Flag, which was created in the foundry of the Armory Art Center, was displayed recently at the John F. Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts in Washington, D.C., as part of the 50th Anniversary of John F. Kennedy’s Inauguration. Porten’s sculpture − her interpretation of the American flag – is engraved on the reverse side with words from President Kennedy’s inaugural address: “My fellow citizens of the world, ask not what America can do for you. But what together, we can do for the Freedom of Man.” Porten has studied sculpture at the Armory Art Center for more than 10 years. She is represented by Gasiunasen Galleries in Palm Beach, which recently featured her in a one-woman show. Regina Porten with her sculpture, Our Flag

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{inside culture} briefly noted The Delray String Quartet has commissioned American composer Kenneth Fuchs to compose String Quartet No. 5 for its 2011-2012 season. Currently professor of composition at the University of Connecticut, Fuchs studied at Julliard Delray String Quartet with David Diamond, Milton Babbitt and Vincent Persichetti. The quartet opened the 2010-2011 season with Fuchs’ String Quartet No. 4, commissioned for the University of Miami’s Frost School of Music and its resident Bergonzi String Quartet. The Delray String Quartet is composed of Mei Mei Luo, violin; Tomas Cotik, violin; Richard Fleischman, viola; and Claudio Jaffé, cello.

Make Way, photograph by Malcolm McKenzie

Malcolm McKenzie received the Best of Show award for his photo Make Way in the recent juried Wildlife Photography exhibition at Lighthouse ArtCenter in Tequesta. The exhibition was judged by professional photographer and Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art instructor Robert Swinson. Also receiving awards were Barbara Phillips, First Place, for Mealtime; Melinda Moore, Second Place, for Friends Forever; Craig Houdeshell, Third Place, for Launch; Stephen Fitzgerald, Fourth Place, for Mandarin Duck; Phyllis Weekes, Honorable Mention, for Motherhood; Linda Mathison, Honorable Mention, for Bob; Tom Kuzma, Honorable Mention, for Dragonfly Lineup; and Paul Ehrenworth, Honorable Mention, for Butterfly on Leaf. All the winning artists live in Palm Beach County except for Weekes, who resides in Martin County.

Experience One of America’s Great House Museums When it was completed in 1902, Whitehall, Henry Flagler’s Gilded Age estate in Palm Beach, was hailed by the New York Herald as “more wonderful than any palace in Europe, grander and more magnificent than any other private dwelling in the world.” Today, Whitehall is a National Historic Landmark, and is open to the public as the Flagler Museum. Upcoming events at the Museum include:

Bluegrass in The Pavilion Concert Saturday, April 9th

Easter Egg Hunt and Egg Roll Saturday, April 23rd

Mother’s Day Weekend Saturday, May 7th and Sunday, May 8th

Founder’s Day Sunday, June 5th - Free admission for all

h e n r y

m o r r i s o n

FLAGLER MUSEUM palm beach, florida

A National Historic Landmark

“An absolute must-see for visitors to Palm Beach” ~ National Geographic Traveler

Grandparents’ Day Sunday, September 11th

For more information call (561) 655-2833 or visit www.flaglermuseum.us 72 | art&culture


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briefly noted

GCPRC Vice President Judy Joffe presents the Bernays Award for Best Campaign by or for a Nonprofit Organization to Daisy Fulton, executive director of the Spady Cultural Heritage Museum

Four local cultural organizations were among the winners of the 7th annual Bernays Awards, presented by the Gold Coast PR Council. The Bernays Awards honor excellence in local PR and marketing campaigns. The recipients included the Spady Cultural Heritage Museum, Delray Beach, Project by or for a Non-profit Organization (Living Heritage Day Festival 2010); the Colony Hotel, Palm Beach, Branding or Image Campaign (10th Anniversary of Royal Room Cabaret); Norton Museum of Art, West Palm Beach, Online Campaign (The Mystery Guest Challenge); and the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, West Palm Beach, Collateral Material (2010-2011 Season Brochure). The Gold Coast PR Council’s annual Bernays Awards are named after Edward Bernays, the recognized founder of the modern public relations industry.

Students at the Boca Raton Museum of Art The Art School participated in a competition to create a signature art image the 2011 Boca Bacchanal, a fundraising event benefitting the Boca Raton Historical Society. The winner, Vino Divino, an acrylic by Patricia Maguire, was used on this year’s poster and other promotional materials. Maguire teaches painting at the Cornell Museum of Art in Delray Beach and is a Signature Member of the Artists’ Guild of the Boca Raton Museum of Art, the Delray Art League and Women in the Visual Arts. A South Florida resident for more than 23 years, she has a particular affinity for landscape painting and is a founding member of the Florida ‘Scape Artists. Vino Divino by Patricia Maguire Top Photo by Barbara McCormick

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{inside culture} briefly noted The E.M. Lynn Foundation, the Bay Branch Foundation and the Schmidt Family Foundation donated $600,000 to establish the Lynn, Wold and Schmidt Peace Studies Endowment, the first permanent endowment for Florida Atlantic University’s peace studies program in the Dorothy F. Schmidt College of Arts and Letters. The gift is eligible for matching by the State of Florida University Major Gifts Program and the FAU Clearwire matching gift program, making the total value of the endowment $1.44 million. The fund will provide scholarships and fellowships to students pursuing academic studies in the peace program; fund distinguished speakers and events that enhance peace and understanding for the benefit of students and the community; and support community enrichment activities including workshops, seminars and cultural activities related to peace.

Noemi Marin, director of FAU’s peace studies program; Dick Schmidt; Barbara Schmidt; Christine Lynn

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Muriel and Ralph Saltzman with student honoree Erika Sauer

The Maltz Jupiter Theatre’s Conservatory of Performing Arts announced the winners of its annual Conservatory Awards, which recognize students for their hard work, positive attitudes and willingness to go the extra mile. The honorees included Frances Weissler, the Mary Ellen and Dermot Healey Award for Leadership; Erika Sauer, the Jodi Ann Saltzman Memorial Award for “Most Spirited;” Olivia Perrin, the Dr. Bernard and Phyllis Eisenstein Cultural Award; Charly Hamann, the O’Hagan Family Award for Outstanding Improvement; Caiti Marlowe, the Maltz Jupiter Theatre Guild Award; and Nicky Wood, the Rick and Peggy Katz Award for Outstanding Achievement. The conservatory offers classes, workshops and master classes that give students an opportunity to learn first-hand about the world of theater from nationally known composers and performers, agents and local instructors.


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{inside culture} In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and greater help us accomplish our mission Dr. Stan Althof and Mrs. Marcie Gorman Althof

Donald M. Ephrain Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson

Mr. & Mrs. Jack Farber

Ms. Kathleen Azzez

Mr. and Mrs. Milton Fine

Bank of America

Mrs. Marjorie S. Fisher Marjorie S. Fisher Fund

Ms. Carol Barnett Publix Supermarket Charities

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kushnick

Mr. Dack Patriarca

Ms. Margo Lefton

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Midtown Payson Galleries

Mr. Marc Leder Mr. Paul N. Leone The Breakers

Mrs. Helen K. Persson Mr. Jorge Pesquera Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Mr. and Mrs. Melvin Levine

Ms. Ruth Baum

Mrs. Shirley Fiterman Miles & Shirley Fiterman Charitable Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. James Batmasian

Frank Crystal & Company

Mrs. Ellen F. Liman The Liman Foundation

Mr. Bruce A. Beal

Ms. Jennifer Garrigues Jennifer Garrigues Interior Design

Mr. John Loring

Belle Glade Chamber of Commerce Ms. Joanne Berkow

Mr. Robert Gittlin JKG Group

Mr. Don Kiselewski Florida Power & Light

Mr. Jeffrey E. Berman

Mr. J. Arthur Goldberg

Mr. and Mrs. Donald C. Malasky

Dr. A. Carter Pottash

Mr. and Mrs. Rick Gonzalez

Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Puder

Mr. Stephan Richter Richters of Palm Beach

Mr. Robert A. Lewis

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Benson

Mr. Craig D. Grant PNC Bank

Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Maltz The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. John Blades

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Graziotto

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph A. Marks

Ms. Carole Boucard Boca Raton Resort & Club

Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce

Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews

Mr. Michael J. Bracci Northern Trust Bank of Florida, N.A.

Greater Boynton Beach Chamber of Commerce

Mr. Howard Bregman Greenberg Traurig, P.A.

Mr. Richard S. Bernstein

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews

Ms. Lisa H. Peterfreund Merrill G. & Emita E. Hastings Foundation Ms. Susy Petros Mr. Dana T. Pickard Edwards, Angell, Palmer, Dodge, LLP PNC Foundation

Ms. Joyce Reingold Palm Beach Daily News

Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Rodusky

Mr. Ross W. Meltzer

Mr. Leon M. Rubin Rubin Communications Group

Ms. Roe Green

Mrs. Sydelle Meyer

Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation

Gunster

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Meyer

Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager

Peter and Vicki Halmos Family Foundation

Ms. Beverlee Miller

Mr. Lewis M. Schott

Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand

Mrs. Sydell L. Miller

Mr. Gary Schweikhart PR-BS, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Douglas S. Brown

Henry Morrison Flagler Museum

Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman

Business Development Board

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Ms. Jane Mitchell

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf

Mr. Herbert S. Hoffman Hoffman Companies

Ms. JoAnne Rioli Moeller Office Depot

Ms. Judy A. Hoffman Profile Marketing Research

Mrs. Mary Montgomery

Ms. Muriel F. Siebert Mr. Michael D. Simon Gunster

Mr. and Mrs. Francois Brutsch Mr. Douglas Brown Ovations Catering

Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Butler Mr. Christopher D. Caneles The Palm Beach Post Mr. and Mrs. John K. Castle

JP Morgan Chase The Private Bank

Mr. and Mrs. Harold Smith

Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches

Ms. Ann E. Howard John C. & Mary Jane Howard Foundation

Dr. and Mrs. Lawrence H. Cohn

Ms. Hilary Jordan

Ms. Jane F. Napier

Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties

Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp

Ms. Brenda N. Straus

Mr. Geoffrey H. Neuhoff Neuhoff Communications, Inc.

Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco

Ms. Suzanne Niedland and Mr. Lawrence DeGeorge

Ms. Phyllis Tick

Mr. Miles A. Coon Dr. Richard P. D’Elia

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz, Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Katz

Mr. Adam Munder Rednum Capital Partners

Ms. Kelly S. Sobolewski Bank of America Mr. & Mrs. William J. Soter

Mrs. Patricia G. Thorne

Mr. Gus Davis

William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust

Mr. Robert DeForest

Mr. and Mrs. Amin J. Khoury B/E Aerospace, Inc.

Mr. Bradford A. Deflin Wells Fargo Wealth Management

Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce

Mr. Robert S.C. Kirschner Passport Publications & Media Corporation

Northern Trust Bank of Florida, N.A.

The Wachovia Wells Fargo Foundation

Office Depot

Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman

Ms. Debby M. Oxley

Ms. Sheryl G. Wood

Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker

Ms. Mary Wong Office Depot Foundation

Palm Beach Civic Association

WXEL

Palm Beach Jewelry, Art and Antique Show

Ms. Ruth Young The Colony - Palm Beach

The Palm Beach Post

Young Singers of the Palm Beaches

Dex Imaging, Inc. Mrs. Cecile Draime

Ms. Paige Noland

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Koch

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Kohnken Kohnken Family Foundation

Mr. Timothy A. Eaton Eaton Fine Art

Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman

Edwards Angell Palmer & Dodge LLP Mr. and Mrs. George T. Elmore Hardrives, Inc.

Mrs. Molly Foreman-Kozel Mr. Raymond E. Kramer, III Beasley, Hauser, Kramer, Leonard & Galardi, P.A.

Tiffant & Co. Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. Toll Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio, Jr.

Listing as of 4/1/2011

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LAST PAGE Spring_11:Layout 1

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{next issue – fall 2011}

The Colony Hotel’s Royal Room

life is a cabaret Cabaret goes to the heart of the Great American Songbook, basks in the warmth of a jazz standard and revels in the truth safely stowed within the glamour and glitz of a big Broadway number. With a piano for company, cabaret singers weave an intimate spell. Discover a connection with an artist, a song, a story. Come to the cabaret – Palm Beach County boasts several venues where you can enjoy this distinctive form of musical entertainment. We’ll visit them in the next issue of art&culture.

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Bella Windows & DoorsFINAL_a&c Spring 11:Layout 1

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“Where Beauty & Safety are One!�

Factory Direct Impact: Mahogany, Fiberglass, and Iron Doors Aluminum & Vinyl Windows Crown Molding & Trim Packages

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Ulysse Nardin SPRING 11:Layout 1

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The Boutique. Limited Edition. Self-winding movement. Stainless steel case with vulcanized rubber coating. Open case back. Unidirectional rotating bezel with 18 ct. gold inlays. Water-resistant to 200 m. Rubber bracelet.

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art&culture magazine v5i3 Spring 2011  

As the primary catalyst for Palm Beach County’s thriving cultural climate, art&culture magazine is the official publication for the communit...

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