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art&culture of Palm Beach County

Fall 2014

singular style

divine comedy

the look for fall art exhibition is monochrome

cool cats

local wildlife conservation efforts make a world of difference

comics stand up and deliver

PLUS

Estelle Parsons prepares to take the stage, music education scores, puppets follow the Yellow Brick Road and more


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Color Abstraction, 1981 - 82,

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oil and acrylic on canvas, 33 x 40 inches, 133418

LEONARD NELSON (1912 - 1993)

2 0 TH C E N T U R Y A B S T R A C T E X P R E S S I O N I S M C O L L E C T I O N O N V I E W N OW


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ART WALLY FINDLAY

Abstraction 84, 1995,

acrylic on canvas, 48 x 60 inches, 128144

SIMEON BRAGUIN (1907 - 1997)

WA L LY F I N D L AY G A L L E R I E S N E W Y O R K • PA L M B E A C H

165 WORTH AVENUE • PALM BEACH FL 33480 • T: (561) 655 2090 F: (561) 655 1493 W W W . WA L LY F I N D L AY . C O M

EST. 1870

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F E AT U R E S

Fall 2014

44 50 58 62 66 a stimulating approach to wildlife conservation

monochrome: much more than 50 shades of gray

The Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society is in the forefront of change.

A new exhibition mounted by the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County celebrates the possibilities of monochromatic art.

By Christina Wood

By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

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con anima: music programs help students succeed… with feeling Music is a powerful instrument for education. By Amy Woods

recycling on a grand scale Historic buildings – and the communities where they are located – gain new life. By Joann Plockova

humor us Stand-up comedy is serious business. By Allegra Nagler


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“Banking with First Republic is a wonderful experience – I forgot this level of service existed anywhere.” P A U L TA Y L O R ’ S A M E R I C A N M O D E R N D A N C E

Paul Taylor, Choreographer

241 Royal Palm Way, Palm Beach (561) 835-8829 (877) 486-6700 or visit www.firstrepublic.com New York Stock Exchange Symbol: FRC Member FDIC and

PalmBchArtCulture Fall 14 Taylor ND2014.indd 1

Equal Housing Lender

8/27/14 3:05:18 PM


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DEPARTMENTS Fall 2014

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welcome letter Reflections on 10 years with the Cultural Council. By Rena Blades

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Hat’s off to the new season of art&culture. By Christina Wood

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editor’s note

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Upfront Art Synergy returns – because art can’t be contained. Best-selling author Jeffrey Deaver gets his hands on a&c. Delray Beach Center for the Arts and The Symphonia celebrate major milestones. Imagination is on display in Boca Raton’s Sanborn Square. Lighthouse ArtCenter helps fight hunger creatively. Dana Gioia headlines at the Palm Beach Poetry Festival. A new blockbuster exhibition at the Science Center is to die for! The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County launches a new website.

art works! The borderlands where art and science meet are fertile ground. By Christina Wood

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most wanted

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working it

Be on the lookout for fascinating fascinators, broad-brimmed bonnets and an extraordinarily entertaining variety of headgear.

Academy Award-winner Estelle Parsons prepares to take the stage at Palm Beach Dramaworks.

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34

profile The study of architecture prepared Dalia Pabón Stiller for a leadership role in the arts. By Hillary Hunter

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portrait Puppet master Emily DeCola creates a colorful cast of characters for the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. By Andrea Richard

41

calendar The fall season is full of colorful events and cool cultural offerings for all ages.

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inside culture The Cultural Council wows the Governor’s Tourism Conference with a creative collaboration, power2give empowers people to support the arts, Culture & Cocktails launches its 10th season and much more insider news. Cover Image: Joel Cohen, GMC truck at Barrett Jackson Collector Car Auction [Detail], 2014, pigment print on archival rag paper, 20 x 13 inches

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OYSTER PERPETUAL SK Y-DWELLER IN 18 KT WHITE GOLD

rolex

oyster perpetual and sky-dweller are trademarks.


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601 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, FL 33460 | 561-471-2901 | www.palmbeachculture.com President and Chief Executive Officer

It’s a Whole New Season of Fantastic Performances

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Director, Marketing and Government Affairs

Marilyn Bauer

561-687-8727 mbauer@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Mary Lewis

561-472-3340 mlewis@palmbeachculture.com

Trish Halverson

561-472-3347 thalverson@palmbeachculture.com

Debbie Calabria

561-472-3330 dcalabria@palmbeachculture.com

Kristen Smiley

561-472-3342 ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com

Nichole Hickey

561.472.3336 nhickey@palmbeachculture.com

Website and Online Marketing Manager

Dan Boudet

561-471-2902 dboudet@palmbeachculture.com

Visitor Services and Music Coordinator

Marlon Foster

561-472-3338 mfoster@palmbeachculture.com

Bebe Novick-Brodigan

561-471-1602 bbrodigan@palmbeachculture.com

Victoria Van Dam

561-472-3334 vvandam@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Administrative Assistant

Vera deChalambert

561-214-8085 vdechalambert@palmbeachculture.com

Grants Assistant

Alexandra Gitelman

561-214-8087 agitelman@palmbeachculture.com

Shani Simpson

561-471-2901 ssimpson@palmbeachculture.com

Gloria Rose

561-471-2901 grose@palmbeachculture.com

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Grants Director of Development Manager of Arts and Cultural Education Membership and Special Events Manager Development Associate Manager of Artist Services

Holiday Concert Manhattan Transfer Sunday, December 14th Sinatra Sings Sinatra Frank Sinatra Jr. Saturday, January 10th Sunday, January 1 1th One Singular Sensation Music of Marvin Hamlisch Saturday, March 7th Sunday, March 8th

Public Relations Coordinator Marketing Coordinator Bookkeeper

Executive Assistant and Administrative Support Assistant Bookkeeper Contributing Writer/Editor

Cultural Council Board of Directors Officers Berton E. Korman, Chairman Irene J. Karp, Vice Chairman Bruce A. Beal, Vice Chairman Bill Parmalee, Secretary Christopher D. Canales, Treasurer Directors Michael J. Bracci Howard Bregman Cressman Bronson

Michael D. Simon Dom A. Telesco Ethel I. Williams Ex Officios Mary Lou Berger Daniel Biaggi Jennifer Prior Brown Glenn Jergensen Sylvia Moffett

For more information, or to order tickets, please call

Cultural Council Founder

561.832.7677 .

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners

www.palmbeachpops.org. 8

Donald M. Ephraim Shirley Fiterman Roe Green Peg Greenspon Herbert S. Hoffman Raymond E. Kramer, III Robin Martin Suzanne Niedland Kelly W. Rooney Jean Sharf

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Alexander W. Dreyfoos

Priscilla A. Taylor, Mayor Paulette Burdick, Vice Mayor

Steven L. Abrams Mary Lou Berger Jess R. Santamaria

Hal R. Valeche Shelley Vana


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art&culture of Palm Beach County

Fall 2014 - volume 9, issue 1

publisher publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

561.472.8769 robert@passportpublications.com

editorial staff managing editor business editor

COURAGE UNDER

editorial coordinator

christina wood

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com

richard westlund

561.472.8768 westlund@passportpublications.com

bradley j. oyler

561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

cultural council editorial staff editorial director

1120 20 YEA YEARS R S OF FIRE F I R E RESCUE R E SC S UE

ADMISSION IS I S FREE! FREE! SSEPTEMBER EP T EMBER 9, 9 , 2014 ă JJUNE UN E 27 27,, 22015 01 5

rena blades

executive editor

marilyn bauer

contributing editor

leon m. rubin

contributing writers john loring, allegra nagler, rich pollack, anne rodgers, leon m. rubin, frederic a. sharf, thom smith, jenifer mangione vogt, christina wood, amy woods

contributing photographers harry benson, steven caras, jim fairman, jacek gancarz, michael price, robert stevens

art & design art & production director

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

rebecca m. lafita

561.472.8762 art@passportpublications.com

intern

remi lederman

561.472.8762 remi@passportpublications.com

director of advertising

richard s. wolff

561.472.8767 richard@passportpublications.com

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

richard kahn

561.906.7355 rich@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

donna l. mercenit

561.472.8773 donna@passportpublications.com

graphic designer

Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum

300 North Dixie Highway Downtown West Palm Beach

advertising sales

national advertising manager signature publications

Tues. T u ues. - Sat. 10am-5pm 10am--5pm (Closed major holidays) holidayss)

561.832.4164 www.historicalsocietypbc.org www.historicalsocietypb bc.org

senior advertising manager contract administrator

The Marshall Marshall EE.. R Rinker inker SSr.r. FFoundation, oundation, IInc. nc .

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation,

Sponsors Sp ponsors as of 9/15

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located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the County Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.


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WELCOME TO

art&culture

fromtheceo

Time has a way of sneaking up on you. It actually came as a bit of a surprise when I realized a few weeks ago that I was about to celebrate my 10th anniversary with the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County. But it has been 10 years and, as many of us are inclined to do on milestone anniversaries, I decided this would be a good time to reflect on what’s happened during the previous decade. The cultural environment in Palm Beach County has grown and improved significantly since 2004 – and I believe that the Cultural Council has played an important role through the connections that we’ve worked to inspire and nurture. The cultural community is much more collaborative than it was 10 years ago. We’re seeing many more partnerships among cultural organizations – and between the business and nonprofit sectors. We’re seeing stronger connections between the general public and the artists who live and work in our midst – and we continue to strive to ensure that children are connected with the arts in their schools, neighborhoods and towns. We have also seen the development of stronger connections between philanthropists and the beneficiaries of their generosity. A decade ago, donors were more likely to focus their most significant giving on their hometowns in other parts of the country. Today, the story is often quite different. We have seen relationships blossom over the years, resulting in more substantial

Michael Price

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philanthropic investment in Palm Beach County’s cultural institutions and organizations. The benefits of these contributions are obvious all around us. The current expansion of the N orton Museum of Art and projects being undertaken by the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society and the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium are tremendously exciting – and there are more huge announcements on the horizon. Philanthropy has played a vital role in the evolution of the Cultural Council, as well. Our move into our new headquarters in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building in Lake Worth is a direct reflection of our community’s growing generosity. The building has not only helped us to raise our own profile but also to expand our work in connecting people. I am as proud and excited to be living and working in Palm Beach County as I was when I arrived here 10 years ago. I am deeply grateful to our board, our contributors and the countless others in our cultural and business communities who have helped to make the past decade incredibly fulfilling and truly memorable. Thank you.

Rena Blades President and CEO Cultural Council of Palm Beach County


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brimming

fromthe

We just can’t keep it under our hats a moment longer! There’s simply too much good news to share about the upcoming season of entertaining, intriguing and inviting song, symphonies, drama, dance, images, ideas and countless cultural possibilities that will unfold across Palm Beach County – and the pages of art&culture – in the weeks and months ahead. The Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s new exhibition promises to be a singular sensation. Read about it in “Monochrome: Much More than 50 Shades of Gray” on page 50. The Boca Museum of Art has some interesting exhibitions on the way, too. Some of them reflect the impact the president of the museum’s board of trustees is having on the organization, as you’ll see in our profile of Dalia Pabón Stiller on page 34. There will be plenty of laughter this season, too, thanks to Lewis Black and the other stand-up comics featured in “Humor Us” on page 66. And something is brewing at the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society. You’ll learn about it – and about other important conservation efforts in our community – in “A Stimulating Approach to Wildlife Conservation” on page 44. The ability of music to transform lives isn’t limited to a single season but, with the school year now in full swing, we thought this would be an ideal time to explore the impact of music education on young lives. Regular a&c contributor Amy Woods takes us back to school in “Con Anima: Music Programs Help Students Succeed… With Feeling” on page 58. Historic school buildings are among the architectural treasures in Palm Beach County that have been given new life by innovative cultural organizations. In “Recycling on a Grand Scale” on page 62, we look at two other vintage structures that are being creatively re-imagined. This season, puppets will take to the stage at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre (meet Emily DeCola, the “puppet chef” who is creating them, in our portrait on page 38), former chairman of the National

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Endowment for the Arts Dana Gioia will headline the Palm Beach Poetry Festival (get the details on page 24) and conversations with a decidedly distinguished and diverse array of personalities ranging from James Patterson and Harry Benson to Tommy Tune will highlight the popular Culture & Cocktails series – which is celebrating its 10th anniversary (turn to page 66 for the full schedule of events). This issue of art&culture will take you on a journey that stretches from ancient Egypt (read about the Afterlife exhibit at the Science Center on page 24) to the rich territory that marks the border between the art world and the scientific community (I write about it in “Worlds Collide” on page 29). And – to introduce you to even more of the faces and places that make Palm Beach County Florida’s Cultural Capital® – we’re introducing two new departments to art&culture this season! “Working It” will take you into the studios, workshops, rehearsal halls and secret places where artists roll up their sleeves and get to work. I’m very excited to report that we’re launching this new page in grand style. Turn to page 32 and you’ll get a glimpse into the process Academy Award-winning actress Estelle Parsons will be going through as she prepares to take on the lead in Palm Beach Dramaworks’ upcoming production of My Old Lady. Our other new addition – “Most Wanted” – is a fabulously fun roundup of possibilities for those with entertaining passions. With this new feature, which debuts on page 31, you could say we’re taking our hats off to the dynamic variety of cultural organizations that make up our cultural community. Imagine!

Christina Wood Managing Editor


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Builders of the Highest Quality

It has been our mission to set the standard for excellence in construction in the spirit of the age-old builder/patron tradition. To that end, we have worked to differentiate ourselves from other contractors and have created a corporate culture that is built upon enduring relationships - a place where company personnel, clients, designers and architects are assured that quality, integrity and service are inseparable from our fundamental mission, which is to build enduring value for our clients. Palm Beach OfďŹ ce & Headquarters

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West Palm Beach, FL 33405

2 NE 40th Street, Suite 401, Miami, FL 33137

(561) 835-0401

(305) 572-1111

www.woolemsinc.com

CGC010222 | CGC01511407


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The former editor of art&culture, art enthusiast Hillary Hunter couldn’t be happier to once again write for this award-winning publication. A Lynn University graduate, her media career has spanned various industries from fashion to life science research working as an advertising executive, director of public relations and editor. Currently, she is pursuing her passion for prose as a freelance writer. When she doesn’t have her hands on a keyboard, you will find her at the theater or enjoying the great outdoors.

Alegra N agler grew up in N ew York in a creative household. Her father was an artist and, from an early age, she was exposed to working artists and the creative process. Although she did not follow in her father’s footsteps, she did develop what would become a lifelong appreciation for the arts. Today, Alegra uses her writing skills to connect with artists and the art world and is delighted to live in a region with an abundance of creative energy.

Freelance writer Joann Plockova specializes in design, architecture and culture writing – often with a social or environmental focus. Her curious nature and broad list of interests always has her on the hunt for new and important topics to cover. Among other publications, she’s written for American Craft Magazine, Conde Nast Traveller UK, the Christian Science Monitor and Green Building & Design. She has one foot in South Florida and the other in Prague, Czech Republic.

Jenifer Mangione Vogt is a writer and publicist who specializes in art, finance and Italian culture. She writes about art for many publications, including JetSet Magazine and Artlog. Jenifer also has more than 20 years of experience in corporate and nonprofit marketing, serving art organizations such as the Friends of the Uffizi Gallery, Metropolitan Museum of Art and Christie’s, as well as Fortune 500 companies, including MasterCard International and The Bank of New York.

Before launching her freelance career, Amy Woods worked as the society editor of Palm 2 Jupiter and as the editor of Notables at The Palm Beach Post, a position she held for 11 years. An experienced editor, columnist, writer and reporter, Amy’s goal is to use her experience as a journalist and skills in public relations for the benefit of our local nonprofit community.

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THE POINT IS... Surrounded by water, 10 minutes to a private airport, 45 minutes to the Palm Beaches, 60 miles to the Bahamas.

sailfish point Hutchinson Island, Florida

1MPIWSJ%XPERXMGWLSVIPMRI•2MGOPEYW7MKREXYVI+SPJ•3GIERJVSRX'SYRXV]'PYF ,IPMTEH•*MXRIWW'SQTPI\•7TE7EPSR•4VMZEXI=EGLX'PYFERH1EVMRE -259-6)%&398+9)7834436892-8-)7

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Presenting Presenting g another se season eason of exciting exciting exhibitions! exhibition ns! 2014 /2015 highlights New 2015 New lobby lobby installation installattion by by Terry Teerry Haggerty Haggerty / through thrr ough summer 20 15 Master Prints: Matisse rints: Dürer Dürrer to Master P to Matis se / nov. no v. 6, 2014 20 14 – feb. feb . 15, 2015 20 15 Coming Century Condé Coming into into FFashion: ash hion: A C entury of Photography Photography at C ondé Nast / nov. no v. 20, 2 2014 20 14 – feb. feb . 15, 2015 20 15 Klara Klara Kristalova: Kristalova:: Turning Turning into into Stone Stone / dec. de c. 2, 2 2014 20 14 – march mar ch 29, 2015 20 15 Pastures Pastures Green: Green n: The The British Passion Passion for for Landscape Lan ndscape / dec. de c. 23, 2014 20 14 – april 5, 2015 20 15 The The Triumph Triumph of o Love: Love: Beth Rudin DeWoody DeWoody Collects Collects / feb. feb . 8 – may may 3, 2015 20 15 High Tea: Tea: Glorious Glo orious Manifestations Manifestations East and a West West / feb. feb . 19 – may may 24, 2 2015 20 15 Imaging Eden: Discover Everglades julyy 12, 20 2015 Edeen: Photographers Photographers Disc over the E verglades / march mar ch 19 9 – jul 15

145 1 S. Oliv 1451 Olivee A Avenue venue e West Palm Beach, 33401 W est P alm Beach h, FL 334 01

Terryy Hagg Terry Haggerty erty (British born, 11970) 97 0 ) Untitled, Untitl led, 2009 ((detail) detail) Acrylic wall A cryllic on w all CCNOA, Brussels C CNO OA, Brus sels

www.norton.org www .norton.org


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{upfront} BY THE NUMBERS: Let the Festivities Begin

Chorus Line auditions at the Crest Theatre

Delray Beach Center for the Arts is celebrating 25 years of theater, exhibits, concerts, entertaining events and learning opportunities. Not content to rest on any laurels, however, the center will “kick” off its anniversary season with a noteworthy first. In addition to presenting an intriguing lineup of community events – ranging from photography classes and Brooklynbased art to the popular Free Friday Concert Series and a performance by a ukulele orchestra – DBCA will, for the first time, be producing a show. The highstepping Tony Award-winning musical A Chorus Line will take the stage at the historic Crest Theatre Dec. 512. Directed and choreographed by Kimberly Dawn “KD” Smith, who appeared in the original Broadway production, A Chorus Line will feature some of the top talent in South Florida.

FOR ADDITIONAL INFORMATION DelrayArts.org To mark its 10th anniversary season – which will kick off on Dec. 21 with a concert featuring Corelli, Bach and Vivaldi at the Roberts Theatre at Saint Andrews School in Boca Raton – The Symphonia is introducing the Apollo Award for Musical Excellence to honor contemporary music writers and performers. Recognizing the synergy between art and music, internationally renowned sculptor Stephen Vince is donating his time, materials and design skills to create the award, which will be presented in November.

FOR ADDITION AL IN FORMATION BocaSymphonia.org

LOOK WHO’S READING A&C From XO, which follows a young country western singer who is stalked, to The October List, which uses original photographs as clues, many of author Jeffrey Deaver’s 32 novels are populated by characters whose lives are entwined with or enriched by the arts. His most recent work also features an artist – of sorts. In The Skin Collector, fictional detective Lincoln Rhymes (who was powerfully portrayed by Denzel Washington in the hit movie The Bone Collector) must face off against a tattoo artist whose masterpieces are made with poison rather than ink. The arts also play an important role in Deaver’s own life. The bestselling author is passionate about photography. He’s also tried his hand at songwriting. “There’s nothing like music,” he says. “It’s seductive, it’s all-consuming, it’s emotional, it’s infinitely creative.” On a recent book tour, New York Times best-selling author Jeffrey Deaver made a stop at Murder on the Beach, an independent bookstore in Delray Beach specializing in mysteries and thrillers.

SPOTLIGHT ON:

Here, There And Everywhere Artists and art districts will serve as ambassadors from the wonderful world of Palm Beach County culture as Art Synergy returns for a second year. From Jan. 21 through 25, satellite exhibitions, art walks, after-hours entertainment, popup events and panel discussions will be held across the county in conjunction with ArtPalmBeach, an influential contemporary art fair held annually at the Palm Beach County Convention Center. “Our membership has grown tremendously,” says Art Synergy cofounder Rolando Chang Barrero. “We are now eight cities strong. Delray Art Synergy Co-Founders Rolando Chang Barrero (Boynton Beach Art District) and Craig McInnis (Northwood's Lot 23) Beach, Lake Park, Tequesta and Palm Beach Gardens have joined Boynton Beach, Lake Worth, Palm Beach and West Palm Beach to provide one of the most outstanding experiences for local and international guests who will be attending ArtPalmBeach 2015.” Art Synergy: ARTWEEK 2015 will kick off at the grand opening reception of ArtPalmBeach 2015 as Lee Ann Lester, ArtPalmBeach organizer, joins Art Synergy co-founders Barrero and Craig McInnis to host the second annual Art Synergy Exhibition of Palm Beach County’s Best Visual Artists.

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N The Symphonia on stage

ArtSynergyPBC.com

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{upfront} ON THE MAP: Word Play According to Albert Einstein, “Imagination is more important than knowledge. Knowledge,” the great man said, “is limited to all we now know and understand, while imagination embraces the entire world.” Inspired by his words, Australianborn artist Emma Anna is encouraging people around the world to step into that embrace. As part of an international tour, her wordplay sculpture “imag_ne” is making its U.S. debut in Boca Raton. Close to 3 feet high and almost 14 feet wide, the interactive artwork is composed of large Scrabble-like letters that spell out the word “imagine” – with a blank space where the second “i” should be. Since, as Einstein could have told you, nature abhors a vacuum, that space lures viewers to physically engage with the work. See yourself more imaginatively at Sanborn Square (on Federal Highway just north of Palmetto Park Road), where Anna’s sculpture is on display through Nov. 30.

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N (561) 393-7995, myboca.us

OUTSIDE THE BOX: Bowled Over

palmbeachculture.com 

Reserve your seat for the next Culture & Cocktails conversation with James and Sue Patterson.



Check out the video of Vanilla Ice performing with the Palm Beach Symphony and Ballet Palm Beach produced by the Cultural Council.



Get all the details on our current exhibition, Monochrome, and other Cultural Council programming.

At the Lighthouse ArtCenter in Tequesta, you can feed the artist within while helping fight hunger in our community. One thousand ceramic bowls are needed for an upcoming Empty Bowls event benefitting the Palm Beach County Food Bank. From now until the thousandth bowl is completed, the Lighthouse ArtCenter is offering free ceramics workshops on Wednesday evenings from 6 to 9 p.m. and on Saturdays from 1 to 4 p.m. During a two-day event in February, the bowls will be filled with a number of signature soups being created for the occasion by renowned local restaurants and chefs. After enjoying a simple – but delicious – meal of bread and soup, donors will take the ceramic artworks home as a reminder of all the bowls that go unfilled in Palm Beach County every day. “You don’t need to know how to throw on the wheel; pinch pots and coil built are great, too, and we will show you how!” says Katie Deits, executive director of the Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum, Gallery & School of Art. “It is a fun, enriching experience for all. We’ve had groups of friends and clubs come up and make bowls.” Deits strongly encourages aspiring bowl-ers to make reservations to ensure sufficient studio space and supplies will be available. Experienced ceramic artists may sign up for studio time at the Lighthouse ArtCenter School of Art – which now offers four different firing methods: electric, gas, raku and soda – or simply drop off completed bowls.

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N (561) 748-8737, LighthouseArts.org

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SUPPORTING THE ARTS

in our

COMMUNITY

Palm Beach County Boca Raton: 1180 N Federal Hwy | Delray Beach: 900 SE 6th Ave | Boynton Beach: 1101 N Congress Ave West Palm Beach: 605 N Olive Ave | Jupiter: 1315 W Indiantown Rd Broward County Fort Lauderdale: 1201 S Andrews Ave | 200 E Las Olas Blvd, Ste 2000 | Wilton Manors: 2465 Wilton Dr www.iberiabank.com | Member FDIC


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{upfront} LITERARY DEVICES: Word Perfect When the Palm Beach Poetry Festival returns to Delray Beach in January, Dana Gioia, former chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, will be the star attraction. A poet, critic and internationally recognized man of letters, Gioia recently published his fourth volume of poems, Pity the Beautiful; his poetry collection Interrogations at Noon won the 2002 American Book Award. In total, 14 notable poets will conduct workshops, readings and panel discussions and otherwise share their love of the written word during the festival, which runs Jan. 19-24. “In addition to serving the writing community through our professional workshops, the Palm Beach Poetry Festival will once again offer numerous opportunities for the public to hear truly great poetry written by some of our nation’s finest and most engaging poets,” says Susan R. Williamson, the festival director. “Once again, the festival is presenting a very diverse group of poets, ethnically, demographically and aesthetically but what they all have in common is extraordinary insight and the ability to express it so beautifully.”

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N PalmBeachPoetryFestival.org

NOW SHOWING:

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The South Florida Science Center and Aquarium in West Palm Beach is taking visitors on a journey thousands of years in the making with the North American premier of Afterlife: Tombs & Treasures of Ancient Egypt. Among the treasures included in the highly anticipated exhibition, which will be on display until April 18, are precious gold tongue and eye pieces, which the ancient Egyptians believed would allow them to see and speak in the afterlife, animal-headed canopic jars to preserve their vital organs and royal burial linen finer than anything that can be made today – as well as exquisitely painted coffins and masks – all meant to smooth the path leading to the afterworld. The exhibition – and the adventure – culminates as visitors follow the siren call of history into a full-size reconstruction of the burial chamber of the great warrior king, Pharaoh Thutmose III, complete with one of the best-preserved mummies in existence. The 3,000-year-old mummy, recently examined with the use of a computerized tomography (CT) scan on an episode of “Mummy Forensics” on The History Channel, is believed to be the son of Ramses II. Keeping him company in the exhibition are several other mummies, including those of a woman and a young girl. “The afterlife is thrilling,” says Lew Crampton, Science Center CEO. “Every culture has particular beliefs and customs about what happens when we die, with the Egyptians known for some of the most interesting and elaborate traditions. Preparations for the Pharaohs’ tombs were incredibly intricate and embodied their deeply rooted beliefs in life beyond the physical world. Excavated directly from the Egyptian tombs and towns, including the Valley of the Kings at Luxor, this is the largest touring exhibition of Egyptian material currently available.”

F O R A D D I T I O N A L I N F O R M AT I O N (561) 832-1988, SFScienceCenter.org

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411 601

the

Looking for information on the exhibits, events and excitement brewing at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters at 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth? We’ve got it!

New Council Website Points the Way: Where to Go, What to Do in the Arts

on

Lightning Strikes Twice for Local Artists Vanessa Diaz and Mumbi O’Brien are Palm Beach County’s two recipients of the 2014 South Florida Cultural Consortium Fellowship for Visual and Media Artists. Each will receive a $7,500 fellowship award to use as they wish to support their work. You can see why they were selected for yourself. Work by the two artists is on display in the Cultural Council’s Sallie and Berton E. Korman Education Training Center for the next several months. Diaz is an interdisciplinary artist working in sculpture and sitespecific installation. O’Brien works primarily in the performative arts, utilizing the third and fourth dimensions to create live paintings. The South Florida Cultural Mumbi O’Brien, Yellow, 2012, photograph, 24 x 18 inches Consortium is a partnership among the local arts agencies of Broward, Martin, Miami-Dade, Monroe and Palm Beach counties. The Consortium’s Fellowship program is intended to nurture the development of professional artists. Vanessa Diaz, Erasing the Footpath, 2013, photograph, 24 x 18 inches

Horns Are Made to Be Blown This summer, art&culture brought home honors in four individual categories in the Florida Magazine Association’s 2014 Charlie Awards competition:  Charlie (Gold) – Best Photographic Essay (The Deep and the Shallow)  Charlie (Gold) – Best Overall Design  Silver – Best Overall Use of Photography  Bronze – Best Overall Magazine art&culture is published by the Cultural Council in collaboration with Passport Publications. Congrats go to the hardworking team responsible for producing a&c, including Robert S.C. Kirschner, Passport’s publisher and president; Angelo D. Lopresti, art and production director; Christina Wood, managing editor; and Leon M. Rubin, contributing writer and editor for the Cultural Council – as well as our talented pool of writers and photographers. And thanks go to you for inspiring us.

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Connecting with art and culture in Palm Beach County just got easier thanks to the Cultural Council’s dynamic new website. Now, when you visit palmbeachculture.com, you’ll find stunning photos and bold graphics that highlight the latest cultural events and opportunities – and you can click right through to get more information and discount offers. Visitors and residents alike can use the site as a one-stop source to decide where to go tonight or plan cultural itineraries in the future. You can navigate and search by types of things to do as well as cities throughout the county – and the site will work seamlessly on all your mobile devices. The Council’s advertising agency, Levatas, created the design and is adding lots of new content, including video, blogs and even links to art&culture magazine articles. “It’s the authentic source of information about arts and culture in Palm Beach County,” says Marilyn Bauer, director of marketing and government affairs for the Cultural Council. “You’ll see information here that you can’t find anywhere else. It’s an engaging new hub to help people explore the amazing variety of all that we have to offer.”


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art rt

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Collide

WHEN WORLDS

By Christina Wood

Tom Brodigan / Brodigan Photography

“The wall between art and engineering exists only in the mind,” says The Earth’s in-between places hold power and promise. The shoreartist Theo Jansen, who participated in the City of Boynton Beach’s 2013 line, where sea and sand meet, draws us. The mountain peak surging to meet the sky compels us to climb higher. The dream of a desert oasis has Kinetic Art Exhibit and Symposium. Kinetic artists push the boundaries of static art, encouraging the mind to wander on a moving journey of inspired madness and myth. discovery. In September, artists from around the country began installing The borderlands where art and science collide are just as potent. artworks powered by the wind, the sun and human interaction along Artists like Terry Haggerty have made this fertile ground their home. Working in the tradition of geometric abstraction, Haggerty has trans- South Seacrest Boulevard and East Ocean Avenue. By the time the city’s 2015 event – which will culminate with a two-day community formed the Norton Museum of Art’s lobby. His untitled work, the fourth site-specific artwork commissioned for the West Palm Beach museum’s happening scheduled for Feb. 6-8 – is held, a total of 14 sculptures will lobby – and the first to find inspiration in the lobby’s unusual dimensions be on display. Haggerty, Feuerman and the kinetic artists whose work graces the – creates a sense of depth through lines precisely plotted and painted in streets of Boynton Beach all draw on the sciences in their work. The flow a single bold color that stretch, flow, bend and explore the space, which is, in itself, another gateway. In the world outside the doors of the N orton, we tend to look straight ahead or, in so many situations and on so many days, down. Stepping into the lobby, Haggerty’s elegant lines lead the eye upward. The bright, dynamic space allows us to refocus before greeting the friendly faces in frames and inviting forms that inhabit the landscape of the Norton. Carole Feuerman, known for her hyper-realistic sculptures, is comfortable pitching her tent at the intersection of surface and structure. She Terry Haggerty’s untitled work at the Norton Museum of Art Bloomer Tree by kinetic artist Edwin Cheong worked with a structural engineer to of energy and ideas between the seemingly disparate worlds goes both create “The Golden Mean,” a 16-foot statue recently installed at the ways, though. While mathematical ratios, geometry and perspective entrance to the Boca Beach Club. “A sculpture that is hyper realistic is infuse a dizzying array of artworks, art and artists stimulate the creativity not merely defined by physical forms and special fields that blend necessary to raise scientific inquiry, medical research and engineering together but also by inner relationships composed as much by the challenges to a new level. unseen as by the seen,” she says. Robert Hoekstra, an associate professor of industrial engineering at Her inspiration for the towering bronze – which weighs nearly two the University of Central Florida, recently brought a class full of graduate tons and depicts a male diver balancing almost impossibly on his hands, students in engineering to the Norton Museum for an exercise designed as if about to launch himself into a triple somersault high above the pool – originated with the ancient Greek concept of the “golden mean.” To to spur innovation. The students, perched on tiny folding stools, sat in front of first an Impressionist painting and then a Post-Impressionist Aristotle it was a desirable middle between two extremes. “To lean too painting, staring at each for 45 minutes. With the passing of time, they far in either direction might cause one to fall but to achieve the ‘golden were able to see beyond their logical left-brain view of the colors laid mean’ is to strive for perfect balance, the path to enlightenment and down on the canvas and let the art lead them to a more intuitive rightvirtue,” Feuerman says. Philosophers and poets explain it in the words of John Keats: brain experience. “The world’s most pressing problems don’t have a right answer,” “Beauty is truth, truth beauty.” “The ‘golden mean’ describes proportion but it is not merely a Hoekstra says. The quest for solutions, he believes, passes through the galleries of the Norton Museum. term,” Feuerman says. “It’s an actual ratio.”

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MOST WANTED Be on the lookout for fascinating fascinators and broad-brimmed

PICTURE PERFECT A stylish new exhibition at the Norton Museum of Art in West Palm Beach showcases nearly 100 years of fashion imagery from the pages of Vogue, Glamour, W and more. Coming into Fashion: A Century of Photography at Condé Nast will be on display Nov. 20 through Feb. 15. (Norton.org)

bonnets amid the extraordinarily entertaining variety of headgear dotting Palm Beach County’s cultural landscape. © 1943 Condé Nast

© Kyle Froman

HEAD TO TOE Miami City Ballet’s season at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach opens with a grand production of Romeo and Juliet. The tragic tale, which many consider to be Shakespeare’s crowning glory, can be seen Nov. 21 through 23. (MiamiCityBallet.org)

ALWAYS ON TOP Alexander the Great was never one to sit still; his ancient empire stretched from Greece to Egypt and on into present-day Pakistan. His shadow now stretches all the way to Palm Beach, where the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens hosts In the Footsteps of

C Wood

John Rawlings, American Vogue, March 1943

A FLAIR FOR THE DRAMATIC The Costume Museum at the Wick Theatre in Boca Raton houses an astonishing collection of captivating caps, capes and costumes, all of which once graced the Broadway stage. (TheWick.org)

Alexander the Great, an exhibition of classical antiquities, from Oct. 22 through Nov. 23. (ANSG.org)

Insider’s Tip: While sipping Earl Grey and nibbling scones at the Serenity Garden Tea House in West Palm Beach, try on one of the many vintage hats strewn about – right along with the attitude that comes with it. Fear not; proprietor Audrey Farrelly assures us in her lovely Irish brogue, “What happens at the tea shop stays at the tea shop.” (SerenityGardenTea.com)

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What a Character:

E S T E L L E P A R S O N S Honors the Art of Acting

By Christina Wood

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WITH FIVE TONY AWARD NOMINATIONS AND AN OSCAR – AS WELL AS A nomination for a second – Estelle Parsons can afford to be choosy about the roles she takes on. Currently, she is preparing to walk onto the stage at Palm Beach Dramaworks as Mathilde in Israel Horovitz’s My Old Lady, which opens in West Palm Beach on Dec. 5. “I thought it would be really fun to see if I could play a French woman,” she says, by way of explaining her decision to do the show. “I love the character. She’s everything you hope a French woman will be.” Parsons rolls up her sleeves and gets to work long before the formal rehearsal process begins. “I read a script a few times and then it just kind of takes me over,” she says. After gently slipping the skin of a new persona on for size, she gradually begins to flesh the character out. “I kind of watch myself and see what’s going to happen.” As she has gotten to know Mathilde, Parsons says she has felt a growing sense of serenity in her own life. “It’s interesting to me that I feel that way. I feel very accepting of a lot of things, which is I think the way she is. She seems to be this really serene person. She listens carefully and is very intellectually alert.” At times, Parsons sounds like she is referring to a flesh-and-blood woman she has had the good fortune to meet rather than a character in a play. She laughs often and expresses her admiration for Mathilde’s accomplishments. “I think she’s quite a person actually, which doesn’t show up in the play but will show up in the characterization,” she says. The playwright may have given birth to the character but it is up to Parsons to bring her to life on the stage. In order to do that, she has been brushing up on all things French; reading, listening to tapes, thinking trés deep thoughts. “She [Mathilde] has already made me feel like a much more interesting person than I am – just from working on the play a little bit.” Most would agree that Parsons is plenty interesting without having to utter a single word of French or raise a single eyebrow in that quintessential way French women have. She has intrigued, intimidated and inspired movie, TV and theater audiences for more than five decades. She herself has been inspired by director Arthur Penn (“My work just blossomed with him,” she says.) and Lee Strasberg, the legendary artistic director of the Actors Studio (“Twenty years of the Studio working for him or just sitting there in the sessions listening to him changed my ideas about theater and the depth and beauty of acting as an art form.”). Parsons eventually followed in Strasberg’s footsteps, serving as artistic director of the Actors Studio from 1998 to 2003. In 2004, she was inducted into the American Theatre Hall of Fame. To say she is still going strong is an understatement. She works out six days a week (“On the seventh day I rest,” she says. “I thought the Lord had a good idea there.”). She doesn’t consider the physical conditioning part of her preparation process for taking the stage, though. “I’ve never done much in preparation for a performance specifically but lie down and take a nap,” she says. “When I was younger, I was so nervous before I worked, I’d have to lie down. Otherwise I thought my heart would just break in my body; it was pounding so hard. It’s not stage fright exactly; it’s just the anticipation of trying to achieve something.”

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“Some day, I want to paint like that.” When we see great art, it can spark our creativity and imagination and helps us see the world in a different way.

Wells Fargo celebrates the arts throughout Palm Beach County.

wellsfargo.com © 2014 Wells Fargo Bank, N.A. All rights reserved. Member FDIC. (1209620_13009)


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Dalia

Pabón Stiller

Building a Life in the Arts By Hillary Hunter

Dalia Pabón Stiller in Italy as a college student

Pabón Stiller with daughter, Cristina, and husband, Duane, at the Duane and Dalia Stiller Arcade at Cornell University

At 9 years old, with her art teacher in Puerto Rico

The Boca Museum of Art has learned that creative thinking on its board of trustees is just as important as the creativity showcased in its collection. Being able to resourcefully manipulate materials and see things from a new perspective has allowed the board’s current president, Dalia Pabón Stiller, to succeed as an architect, designing structures that are both inspired and functional. It has also enabled her to make a distinctive mark on Palm Beach County’s cultural landscape.

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Pab贸n Stiller with Mangrove Trees from Angels & Ancestors I by Wendy Wischer at the Boca Museum of Art

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{upfront-profile} “I am a problem solver, which is the most essential part of being an architect,” Pabón Stiller says. She credits her background in the arts – she studied painting, drawing and sculpting as a young girl in her native Puerto Rico – with the ability to solve those problems in a very different way, though. As a child, Pabón Stiller loved to draw. Although her family struggled financially, her parents understood the importance of the arts and encouraged her to follow her dreams. Highly intelligent, she began to read at age 3, eventually skipping a grade in school, learning English as a second language and entering Pabón Stiller at daughter Cristina's graduation Cornell University at age 16. “I from Cornell in 2012 would not have been able to attend Cornell without financial assistance and a full scholarship,” she notes. When Pabón Stiller began studying architecture at the Ivy League school, she was one of only three women in the program.

Pabón Stiller has several goals – not the least of which is making the Boca Museum of Art the center of culture in the city. “Right now, some people say the museum is the hidden gem of Boca Raton. I don’t want it to be the hidden gem; I want it to become the gem,” she says. “I want it to be known as the center of culture in our community, to be a welcoming place that will bring more and more relevant exhibits and expand the demographics of visitors and patrons.” In collaboration with fellow board members, Pabón Stiller has worked on a number of new initiatives to bring the goal Peg Greenspon, Jody Harrison Grass, Dalia Pabón closer to reality, focusing on Stiller and Mary Jane Pollack at the Boca Museum of Art's Pop Art exhibit more diverse and relevant programs and exhibitions designed to expand the museum’s audience. Free museum entrance on select Thursday evenings, doodling classes and flexible class enrollment are just a few of the innovative ideas now being offered. Many new guests – including both first-time sketchers and accomplished artists – have turned out to sketch at the museum on Thursday nights. “The event has great energy. The museum is

“I believe it is diversity and culture that make the world a more interesting place.” – Dalia Pabón Stiller

“Architecture was a man’s world, but I wasn’t intimidated,” she says. After graduating with honors, she began her career in New York, designing office spaces and hotels. Today she handles the visionary role at Woolbright Development, the Boca Raton-based company she founded with her husband, Duane Stiller, that has grown to become one of the top owners of retail real estate in Florida. Grateful to those who helped her find her way and provided opportunities throughout her life, Pabón Stiller is naturally inclined to give back. She currently gives time to numerous organizations, including Impact 100 Palm Beach County, the International Women’s Forum and her alma mater. “I’m involved with Cornell University now because they put faith in me,” she says. Pabón Stiller was introduced to the Boca Museum of Art in the 1990s when her daughter, Cristina, began taking art classes there. (Like both of her parents, Cristina is now a Cornell graduate and began law school at New York University this fall.) Little by little, year after year, Pabón Stiller became more involved until, eventually, she stepped into her current role. “Dalia comes to us with a wealth of knowledge but – probably the most important thing is – she comes to us with a great deal of energy and believes in the arts and the power of the arts to communicate to the public,” says Irvin Lippman, the museum’s executive director. As the president of the organization’s board of trustees,

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full of people enjoying themselves, being exposed to different cultures and points of view, which is very close to my heart,” Pabón Stiller says. “I believe it is diversity and culture that make the world a more interesting place.” “Under her leadership the museum has become invigorated with fresh new ideas, innovative exhibitions and activities that will continue to develop and evolve long into the future,” says Peg Greenspon, who serves alongside Pabón Stiller as secretary of the museum’s Board of Trustees. “As an architect, I think Dalia has a very clear and precise vision in matters that are both tangible and intangible,” Greenspon adds. “Studying architecture was my training for a leadership role in the arts,” Pabón Stiller reflects. It’s a role she is happy to fill. “The arts are essential to make us human and understand the world. If we didn’t have the arts, this world wouldn’t exist as Pabón Stiller and Puerto Rican painter Arnaldo we know it.” Roche at El Museo del Barrio in New York


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QA with

How would you describe your style of leadership as president of the Boca Museum of Art’s Board of Trustees? The museum has had other women presidents, but I am the first one in a long time. We women pay attention to a lot of detail. I think I am the kind of person that as a leader likes to include everyone. I like to hear other people’s ideas. I work a lot out of consensus and think outside the box – I think that is the architect in me. I try to get to the goal and that is the most important aspect of my leadership. Do you think the arts are more welcoming to women? In the architecture and arts world, women and diversity have always been more welcome. They are fields where people tend to think more openly and give you the chance to have a voice. Once they give you that chance, that is all you need. What surprised you most when you began to see what goes on behind the scenes at the museum? One of the first things was how small the staff is to get all the things done that have to get done. In a big museum such as ours, everything is perfect and well organized, so you would think there are more people. Our staff is not big, but very efficient.

Peg Greenspon, Jody Harrison Grass and Dalia Pabón Stiller at the Boca Museum of Art's Pop Art exhibit

What is your favorite piece of art currently on exhibit at the Boca Museum of Art? My favorite work of art from the museum’s permanent collection is a new acquisition by the artist Wendy Wischer from Miami titled Mangrove Trees from Angels & Ancestors I. What speaks to me about this piece is how whimsical and playful it is. The glittery finish makes everything around it sparkle. You cannot help but feel happy when you are around it. To me, it resembles a couple walking hand in hand, together through life. What exhibit are you most looking forward to during the 2014-2015 season? There are a couple that I am very much looking forward to this season. One is a video installation by a woman named Shizuka Yokomizo entitled Forever (and Again), which features a Chopin waltz performed by elderly pianists [Nov. 9 – Jan. 11]. Another is from Cornell University and titled Surrealism and Magic. I had a little bit of a connection there and I’m so glad this exhibit is coming to us at the Boca Museum of Art. It is the connection of surrealist paintings and the magical aspects of them. The exhibit will be really colorful and very imaginative [Jan. 26 – April 5].

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cookingupa

STORM Puppet Chef Emily DeCola creates a colorful cast of characters for The Wiz

By Andrea Richard

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Emily DeCola calls herself a chef but she doesn’t whip up dishes. She’s a crafty puppet master, designing out of a cozy work space where marionettes, string puppets and furry creatures come to life. DeCola and her business partners Michael Schupbach and Eric Wright run The Puppet Kitchen, a tasty little company specializing in hybrid and custom puppetry and mask creation. Founded in 2008, the Puppet Kitchen, which is housed in a former commercial bakery in New York’s East Village, has earned a host of film, TV and stage credits working with clients such as Disney Theme Parks, Royal Caribbean Cruise Lines, The Bronx Zoo, CollegeHumor.com and, locally, The Maltz Jupiter Theatre. The puppet “chef” is among a small niche group of working professionals who adeptly blend artistry and engineering to build kinetic props. They are artists, engineers, producers but – most of all – they’re storytellers with a keen ability to turn moveable body parts – arms, legs, hands, fingers and faces – into whimsical characters that captivate audiences. DeCola studied pre-med at the McGill University in Montreal before discovering her creative calling. “I was really interested in movement and how bodies work,” she recalls. “Puppets are a moving sculpture and, from a philosophical perspective, there’s such poetry in movement and how we communicate as people, so deeply with our bodies.” During her undergrad studies, a humanities course introduced DeCola to Bunraku, a Japanese style of puppet. Her life would never be the same. “It was an arresting moment,” she says. A week later, she saw a marionette show and knew she had to try her hand at it. It wasn’t long before she dropped her pre-med studies and took up a dual major in anthropology of performance and critical theory of theater. The animated brunette went on to learn puppet design and construction techniques through a prestigious – and intense – threemonth mentorship with Master Marionettist Albrecht Roser in Germany in the mid-2000s. She has also studied with Dan Hurlin and the SITI company and has won grants from the Jim Henson Foundation and the Union Internationale de la Marionnette.

According to DeCola, puppetry, which was once considered a children’s entertainment, has seen a spike in popularity among more mature audiences – especially in the United States. “I think Americans are starting to really enjoy the imaginative process that puppetry can bring to a production – mixing fantasy and reality in a way that wonderfully, illuminates possibilities emotionally connected to what’s going on on stage.” Earlier this year, the Maltz’s producing artistic director, Andrew Kato, hired the Puppet Kitchen to construct puppets for The King and I. When he wanted to up the wow factor for an upcoming production of The Wiz, he once again called on DeCola and her colleagues. “Frank Baum’s story is full of imagery and imagination and requires that same commitment if one chooses to adapt it,” Kato says. “When I decided to direct The Wiz, I knew it would require the integration of various storytelling components, which would include projections, aerial flying and puppetry, among others. Integrating these unique art forms in a seamless narrative is something I enjoy and makes a project of this genre come magically to life.” For the show, DeCola is blending elements of string puppets, Bunraku and shadow puppetry. “[The puppet’s] bodies are incredibly expressive and huge. On the stage, one person might be controlling his head and another other is controlling his arms and legs,” DeCola says. “It’s about creating a unique kind of kinetic poetry that’s very show-specific.” The very specific tornado winds that will whip the stage, breaking characters apart and sending them flying when The Wiz opens at the Maltz on Jan. 13, are the least of DeCola’s worries. “The challenge has been that there is this iconic imagery that everyone is familiar with,” she says. “People have an idea what the great and powerful Oz looks like. Coming up with a new kind of visual storytelling in that context is a challenge.”

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April W. Davis has always found her artistic inspiration in the splendor of the surrounding natural environment. Since moving to Florida 15 years ago, Davis has become known for her brilliant tropical landscapes. Her acrylic paintings are featured through Dec. 18 in “Windows into Nature,” the current GardensArt exhibition in the lobby of Palm Beach Gardens City Hall, 10500 N. Military Trail; (561) 630-1116 or pbgfl.com. April W. Davis, Gateway to Paradise IV - Jupiter Inlet

Commemorating the centennial of the Panama Canal, the Flagler Museum presents its fall exhibition, Kiss of the Oceans: The Meeting of the Atlantic and the Pacific. Artifacts, photographs and documents illustrate the fascinating story of the development and construction of one of the world’s great technological achievements. Through Jan. 4; Cocoanut Row and Whitehall Way, Palm Beach; (561) 655-2833 or flaglermuseum.us. Birds-eye view of Gatun Locks, Panama Canal, ca. 1915. Postcard. Henry Morrison Flagler Museum Archives.

The Second Annual Palm Beach Chamber Music Fall Festival presents three concerts featuring works by Marshall Turkin, George Onslow and Felix Mendelssohn. Performances Nov. 5, Lighthouse ArtCenter Museum, Tequesta, and Nov. 7, St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, Lake Worth; (800) 330-6874 or pbcmf.org. Nov. 6 performance, Amarnick-Goldstein Concert Hall, Lynn University, Boca Raton; (561) 237-9000 or lynn.edu/tickets. Festival Founders Karen Dixon, flute; Michael Ellert, bassoon; and Michael Forte, clarinet

The 2010 Tony-nominated musical Everyday Rapture chronicles the story of a young woman’s rise from small-town Kansas to Broadway star. Presented by the Boca Raton Theatre Guild from Nov. 7 to 23, the show features a live band and music from Judy Garland, Roberta Flack, The Band, Harry Nilsson, David Byrne and even Mr. Rogers. Willow Theatre, Sugar Sand Park, 300 S. Military Trail, Boca Raton; (561) 347-3948 or willowtheatre.org.

One of Europe’s most electrifying and original violinists, Edvin Marton is “The Prince of the Violin.” His unique arrangements of classical, rock and his own original hits have made him a gold and platinum artist in Europe, Russia and China and the winner of the 2008 Eurovision Song Contest and a 2008 MTV Europe Award. Dolly Hand Cultural Arts Center, Palm Beach State College, 1977 College Drive, Belle Glade; (561) 993-1160 or dollyhand.org.

Internationally acclaimed Piano Duo Gastesi-Bezerra has delighted audiences for more than a decade with exciting programs of traditional and contemporary music. The official piano-duo-in-residence of Palm Beach Atlantic University, they will join the Palm Beach Atlantic Symphony for “Premieres and Finales,” directed by Lloyd Mims. DeSantis Family Chapel, 300 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; (561) 803-2970 or ticketcentral@pba.edu.

Estibaliz Gastesi and Márcio Bezerra

Boca Ballet Theatre’s unique version of “The Nutcracker” showcases choreography by Co-Artistic Director Dan Guin, a cast of more than 100 dancers, magical sets, sparkling costumes and world-renowned guest artists. Set to music by Tchaikovsky, this holiday classic is a special treat for all ages. Nov. 28-30, Olympic Heights Performing Arts Theater, 20101 Lyons Road, Boca Raton; (561) 995-0709 or bocaballet.org.

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December

Beautiful and bedazzling, magical and mysterious, the Mediaeval Baebes will seduce you and transport you to an enchanting world with their interpretation of mediaeval music and poetry. They sing in an impressive array of languages – from Latin, Middle English, Mediaeval French, Italian and German to the more quaint and obscure Cornish and Mediaeval Welsh. Duncan Theatre, Palm Beach State College, 4200 Congress Ave., Lake Worth; (561) 868-3309 or pbcc.edu/arts/duncan.

The art of Henri Toulouse-Lautrec epitomizes many of the “modern” tendencies in French art at the turn of the 19th century. “Toulouse-Lautrec and La Vie Moderne: Paris 1880-1910” comprises some 200 works that present a kaleidoscopic view of Toulouse-Lautrec and his contemporaries. Through Jan. 11; Society of the Four Arts, 2 Four Arts Plaza, Palm Beach; (561) 655-7226 or fourarts.org. Pierre Vidal (1849-1929), Cover for La Vie à Montmartre (Montmartre Life), 1897, Color lithograph, 11 7/8 x 20 ¼ in.

Celebrate Christmas with the Tenors at the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts. Clifton Murray, Victor Micallef, Remigio Pereira and Fraser Walters thrill audiences worldwide with their powerful voices and memorable melodies. This special holiday program features such favorites as “Ave Maria,” “What Child Is This” and “O Holy Night.” 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; (561) 832-7469 or kravis.org.

It wouldn’t be December without the HARID Conservatory’s winter performances. The Dec. 13 and 14 concerts feature Gypsy Dance from Esmeralda, the Mazurka from Coppelia, the premiere of a modern dance piece choreographed by Danielle Armstrong and divertissements from The Nutcracker, Act II. Countess de Hoernle Theater, Spanish River Community High School, 5100 Jog Road, Boca Raton; (561) 998-8038 or harid.edu/performances. Gypsy Dance from Esmeralda, Photo credit: ©Alex Srb

The Countess de Hoernle Singers continue their tradition of “Bringing the Community Together Through Song” as they celebrate the holidays with a diverse program of favorite music ranging from Handel to Bing Crosby. Allie Mair, who joined the chorus last season as artistic director, has performed with the Cleveland Orchestra, Andrea Bocelli and Itzhak Perlman. Grace Church, 600 W. Camino Real, Boca Raton; (561) 706-7667 or bocaratonsingers.org. Allie Mair

Drawn from the collections of the National Museum Wales, “Pastures Green: The British Passion for Landscape” offers some 65 works by artists including Claude Lorrain, Salvador Rosa, Thomas Gainsborough, Joseph Wright of Derby, JMW Turner, John Constable, Claude Monet, Alfred Sisley, Augustus John, Graham Sutherland, John Piper and Richard Long. Through April 5, Norton Museum of Art, 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach; (561) 832-5196 or norton.org. Claude Monet, Charing Cross Bridge, 1902, oil on canvas, 25 3/4 x 32 in., National Museum Wales

With heart-pumping music by rock legend Phil Collins and a book by Tony Award-winning playwright David Henry Hwang, Disney’s Tarzan swings onto the stage from Dec. 23 to Jan. 4. High-flying excitement and hits like the Academy Award-winning “You’ll Be in My Heart” make Tarzan an unforgettable theatrical experience. Presented by KWP Productions, Borland Center for Performing Arts, 4885 PGA Boulevard, Palm Beach Gardens; kwpproductions.com. Sean Gogan prepares to swing into the role of Tarzan.

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The Atlantic City Boys ring in the new year with an enjoyable musical journey back to the ‘60s, when the falsetto and smooth harmonies were popular and rock ‘n’ roll was at the top of the charts. Featuring the music of Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, the Bee Gees, the Beach Boys, the Rat Pack and more chart-topping hits! Maltz Jupiter Theatre, 1001 E. Indiantown Rd., Jupiter; (561) 575-2223 or jupitertheatre.org.

Now in its 11th season, the Delray String Quartet – Tomas Cotik, violin; Memei Luo, violin; Claudio Jaffe, cello; and Richard Fleischman, viola – offers a program including Schubert: Quartet No. 10 in E flat major; Respighi: “Ancient Airs and Dances,” Suite No. 3; and Richard Danielpour: Quartet No. 6 (“Addio”). Colony Hotel, 525 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach; (561) 213-4138 or delraystringquartet.com.

The Palm Beach Symphony’s first concert of 2015 includes works by Wagner and Bruckner’s Symphony No. 4. The German word “Zukunftsmusik,” translated in English to “music of the future,” is how Wagner’s music was defined. Bruckner, an heir of this “new” music, makes the pairing of these composers most appropriate. DeSantis Family Chapel, Palm Beach Atlantic University, 300 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; (561) 655-2657 or palmbeachsymphony.org. Ramón Tebar, artistic and music director

The son of Old Blue Eyes is back in “Sinatra Sings Sinatra.” Frank Sinatra Jr. joins the Palm Beach Pops to pay homage to his father’s 100 years, singing the original music scores that define the Sinatra legend. Jan. 10, Boca Raton Community Church, 470 NW 4th Ave., Boca Raton; (561) 832-7677; and Jan. 11, Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; (561) 832-7469 or kravis.org.

Rodgers and Hammerstein’s epic musical romance, South Pacific, tunefully tells the tales of Arkansas native Nellie Forbush, French plantation owner Emile de Becque and a colorful cast of characters stationed on a tropical island in World War II. The Lake Worth Playhouse production, presented through Feb. 1, features “Some Enchanted Evening” and many other classics. 713 Lake Ave., Lake Worth; (561) 586-6410 or lakeworthplayhouse.org.

Palm Beach Opera’s La Bohème has it all: the beauty of love at first sight, the magic of good friends during tough times and the heart-wrenching pain of an untimely death. The production of the Giacomo Puccini classic, on stage Jan. 16-18, combines passionate, gripping music and world-class singers in a stirring opera experience. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts, 701 Okeechobee Blvd., West Palm Beach; (561) 833-7888 or pbopera.org.

You won’t want to miss The Hit Men! If you loved Frankie Valli and the Four Seasons, Tommy James and the Shondells, Carly Simon, Cat Stevens, Elton John and Jim Croce, you’ll enjoy this amazing ride through rock and roll history with songs like “Oh What a Night,“ “Who Loves You” and “Crocodile Rock.“ Eissey Campus Theatre, Palm Beach State College, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; (561) 207-5900 or pbcc.edu/arts/eissey. Dates are subject to change. For an up-to-the-minute, searchable calendar of cultural events, please visit the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County's website at palmbeachculture.com. For more information about individual organizations' schedules, please visit the websites noted in each item.

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A Stimulating Approach to

Wildlife Conservation The Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society offers visitors something to chew on By Christina Wood

The

bite of a jaguar is so strong it can penetrate a bowling ball. These fabled apex predators – the largest cats in the Western Hemisphere – dine on turtles, alligators and, really, just about anything they might have a craving for. Your choice of coffee, however, may be enough to bring to them to their knees. Wildlife conservation isn’t about heroic efforts in farflung corners of the world; it’s about little changes we can all make in our day-to-day lives – including the choice of what kind of coffee to drink. Just ask the folks at the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society in West Palm Beach, who are in the forefront as zoos take on a new role in wildlife conservation, blazing a trail through education and awareness.



Izel, one of five jaguar cubs born at the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society Photo by: Katharine Bank

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 Proud jaguar mamma Nabalam relaxes at the Palm Beach Zoo.

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Change is Brewing The Palm Beach Zoo has one of the most successful zoo jaguar husbandry and breeding programs in North America. To date, it is responsible for bringing five cubs into the world, including Izel, who, along with his mother, Nabalam, still calls West Palm Beach home. “They are endangered and their habitat is diminishing,” says Jan Steele, general curator at the Palm Beach Zoo. “We have to do everything we can to develop conservation awareness through education, breed the cats as part of the national program and support field work where these cats live.” In September, two representatives from the zoo traveled to the lowlands of Bolivia in conjunction with a conservation program managed by the Wildlife Conservation Society, which the zoo supports. For seven days, they used GPS tracking to help collect data on jaguars, anteaters, tapirs, spider monkeys and a number of other animals featured in the zoo’s award-winning Tropics of the Americas exhibition. Perhaps more importantly for the survival of these glorious creatures, however, is what the zoo keepers do 363 days of the year – without leaving the zip code. They talk to visitors about the jaguars in their care, about the threat to their habitat and about the simple steps that can be taken right here at home that will make a difference. “Clear cutting the tree canopy in the rainforest so that we can expand coffee production is not a good thing for the jaguar,” says Andrew Aiken, president and CEO of the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society. “If we’re coffee drinkers, it’s important for us to know that there is shade-grown coffee and bird-friendly coffee.” The zoo isn’t out to point fingers. “We never say that’s a bad company, those are bad farmers, don’t buy that,” Aiken emphasizes. They look for solutions, he says, identifying companies that are interested in environmental – as well as economic – sustainability. “N obody has to go live in a cave and swear off deodorant and processed food for the rest of their life to save animals,” says Steele, who drives a Prius and favors native landscaping at home but has no plans to give up her Diet Coke. “There are a lot of little things that people can do. If everyone chooses what’s comfortable for them, that’s all that we can ask.”

Stirring it Up Budge Jamison

Giving visitors a handy pocket-sized guide to coffee choices that will help get the jaguars’ day off to a better start is a far cry from the early mission zoos pursued. “Zoos have been around for hundreds and hundreds of years,” Steele says. “They started out as a way for very wealthy, very influential people to impress others.” Royal menageries were often stocked with a single, and one must assume sad, example of the rare and exotic creatures that had piqued an aristocrat’s fancy.

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 The Palm Beach Zoo participates in global Species Survival Plans for its jaguars, siamangs and some 50 other species. Jaguar photo by Budge Jamison. Siamang photo by C Wood.

In the Victorian age, scientists seized on the opportunity to more interested in the animals than the people visiting them. study the animals in captivity. Valuable data was collected and “Animal people don’t tend to know how to manage people; researchers gained a better understanding of the relationship they don’t tend to deal well with people on a lot of occasions,” between different species but, as Steele points out, “It Steele admits. “That’s what’s been holding zoos back. wasn’t about the animals.” With time zoo gates opened wider, There was this big gap. We focus on our animals; we forget attracting families, becoming what Steele calls borderline about the visitor.” Part of her job is teaching the keepers educational institutions and, eventually, she supervises how to effectively channel enhancing animal enclosures. their passion so that they can inspire the army Soul searching has been the order of a new of families, school groups, grandparents, day for responsible zoos around the world. visiting aunts and uncles and animal lovers of “What are zoos really supposed to be doing?” every stripe who walk through the gates of Steele says that’s the question she and her the Palm Beach Zoo every day. colleagues have been asking themselves. And, On arrival, zoo visitors now receive a she says, they’ve reached some important colorful handout with a map on one side and conclusions. “The thing that zoos do well is a schedule of the shows, keeper talks and we connect people with wildlife, we get animal encounters offered every day. Early people enamored with animals.” birds can flock to the Flamingo Habitat at 10 Then, she says, the question became: “Can a.m., where they will learn that flamingo we use that to start changing their behaviors?” chicks are born gray or white with a straight And she’s not talking about training the bush bill (the bill will develop its curve after a few dogs, river otters or howler monkeys. months but it can take up to three years for The problem isn’t that people don’t care the birds’ signature color to emerge). The about animals, Steele is quick to point out. Florida Wetlands Habitat is the place to be Most of us simply don’t realize that the – Jan Steele, General Curator as 12:30 p.m., if you’re interested in Black coffee we buy has an impact on anteaters at the Palm Beach Zoo Bears. The popular Malayan Tiger Talk and jaguars or that the ice cream, peanut butter and countless other products made with palm oil lining the begins at 3 p.m. The full schedule features a variety of opportunities for the grocery store shelves are pushing the Malayan Tigers to the brink keepers to demonstrate their newly discovered storytelling of extinction. “Everything is interconnected,” Steele says. abilities, weaving a web of fascinating – and often surprising – facts with a compelling conservation message and a few simple suggestions their listeners can act on and that could very well The problem may actually be that some people care too make all the difference in the world. “That,” Steele says, “is what zoos can do really well.” much. In other words, zoo keepers have, traditionally, been

“We have to do everything we can to develop conservation awareness through education”

Grounds for Optimism

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Lions and Tigers and… Mice?

Oh, My.

We

can, as consumers, make choices that will help lions and tigers and bears the world over but there are species closer to home that our everyday actions may impact even more. Thanks to the efforts of three zoos, including the Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society in West Palm Beach, the Perdido Key Mouse has been successfully reintroduced to the wild after Hurricanes Erin and Opal nearly wiped out the entire population in the mid-1990s. Fearing the worst, the Florida Wildlife Commission captured eight mice – including a pregnant female – as Hurricane Ivan approached the Florida coast in 2004. Those mice provided the foundation for a zoo breeding program that has enabled the species to rebound. Why should we celebrate the survival of a mouse? Well, as it turns out, the Perdido Key Mouse plays a critical role in stabilizing sand dunes. “If you don’t have beach mice, eventually your beach just gets worn away,” Jan Steele, general curator at the Palm Beach Zoo, says. She compares the broad issue of conservation to an airplane. The plane will be fine if it loses one bolt, two bolts, maybe even a handful. At some point, however, you’ll reach the point where the loss of just one more bolt will cause the plane’s wing to fall off. “Which species is going to be that turning point?” she asks. “All species are connected in one way or another,” says Kristin Child, environmental program coordinator at the Gumbo Limbo Nature Center in Boca Raton. “If one were to go extinct, you don’t know what the ripple effect would be and how that would affect the rest of the world.”

Gumbo Limbo’s 20 acres of protected barrier island provide a refuge to a variety of plants and animals, some rare or endangered – including our beloved sea turtles. “Sea turtles have been around for thousands of years,” Child notes. Because they have managed to survive eons of change, the hardy creatures can be seen as something of a canary in a coal mine. “If they’re having problems, those problems must be pretty severe and we might want to take a look at that.” Gumbo Limbo is part of a sea turtle conservation effort that spans the globe. Florida boasts some of the most important nesting beaches for loggerhead sea turtles in the world and also attracts green and leatherback sea turtles as well as the occasional Kemp’s Ridley or Hawksbill. The waters off Palm Beach County’s coast offer important habitat for juvenile turtles before they venture out into the Gulfstream, where they will be swept away to begin lives in the open ocean. “Our turtle program has monitored Boca’s beaches for about 35 years,” Child says. Nests are watched over. Injured and ill sea turtles are rehabilitated. The impacts of beach re-nourishment and climate change are studied. Regulations regarding light pollution are developed and implemented in partnership with local governments. Data is collected and shared. “It’s a trickle up effect,” Child likes to say. Of all the work being conducted at Gumbo Limbo, however, the most important might be education. “It matters so much,” Child says. “People have to be involved and have to be willing to make little changes. Every little bit helps.”

For more information on wildlife conservation efforts in Palm Beach County and what you can do to help, contact: The Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge LoxahatcheeFriends.com The Busch Wildlife Sanctuary BuschWildlife.org Gumbo Limbo Nature Center GumboLimbo.org Loggerhead Marinelife Center Marinelife.org The Palm Beach Zoo & Conservation Society PalmBeachZoo.org  Loggerhead sea turtle. Courtesy of Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

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Much more than 50 shades of gray By Jenifer Mangione Vogt

 Jacek Gancarz, San Francisco, The Castro District, Tram, 2012, Archival pigment print, 11 x 16 1/2 inches

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“You can’t look at a photograph in black and white the same way you would [one] in color,” says West Palm Beachbased photographer Joel Cohen, one of 14 artists whose work is featured in Monochrome, an exhibition on display at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s headquarters in Lake Worth. “When you remove the color you’re dealing with contrasts and those contrasts tell your story.” The term “monochrome” applies to a work of art predominantly of a single color or tone. Monochromatic art can be of any medium; the work in this show includes painting, drawing, sculpture, mixed media and photography. For many artists, working in monochrome is a temporary phase in the development of their personal style. For others, it is a signature style. Either way, it is generally the vehicle for a conceptual statement. N ichole Hickey, manager of artist services for the Cultural Council and curator of the exhibition – which is on display Oct. 31 through Dec. 6 – looks for opportunities to highlight local talent from a new and fresh perspective when developing shows in order to engage and inspire their diverse audience of artists, patrons and arts appreciators. “Monochromatic work, though seemingly simple, can be quite complex in terms of how a work is created – from the media that is used for painting or the angle that is chosen for a photograph,” she explains. Cohen counseled Hickey in selecting artists for this exhibition. He sees the show as a welcome opportunity to


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 Joel Cohen,

GMC Truck at Barrett Jackson Collector Car Auction, 2014, Pigment print on archival rag paper, 20 x 13 inches

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 Mark Forman, #225, 2013, Acrylic on canvas, 60 x 48 inches

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 Michael Price, White Truck, 2014, photographic paper, 55 x 15 inches

do something slightly different. “When I moved to Florida almost 16 years ago, I saw all the intense colors here and abandoned monochrome for many years. Well,” he says, “I got it [color] out of my system and went back to my first love of black and white.” His monochromatic work reduces imagery to bare elements, the “soul” of composition and form, as is evident in his 2014 work, “GMC truck at Barrett Jackson Collector Car Auction,” which is included in the exhibition. As Hickey notes, “Cohen utilizes minimal manipulation and preserves his composition to maintain the integrity of the image.” “When the end result will be black and white, colors become different shades of gray and you must ‘see’ differently to create an interesting image. It’s an entirely different discipline than shooting color,” Cohen says. “For me that is the essence of the creative process.”  Kandy Lopez, Lauren in Miami, 2013, Monotype print, 24 x 18 inches

INTO THE VOID Monochromatic art has been a stalwart of avantgarde visual art throughout the 20th and 21st centuries. One of the earliest examples of monochromatic art is Russian painter Kazimir Malevich’s 1918 painting, “Suprematist Composition: White on White,” which is in the permanent collection of the Museum of Modern

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 Joel Cohen, 42nd Street Scaffolding, 2014, Pigment on archival rag paper, 20 x 13 inches

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Scherer & Ouporov, Celestial Tree, 2014, Gold leaf, Swarovski crystals on wood panel, 13 1/2 x 13 1/2 inches

Art in New York. For Malevich, who created this work one year after the Russian Revolution, aesthetics were about “the supremacy of pure feeling or perception in the pictorial arts.” While at first this work seems are stark, it’s not devoid of emotion. When viewing the work up close, the artist’s brushwork is evident as is texture and subtle variations in the shade of whites. The white canvas evokes a sense of infinite space, rather than containment. Part of the charm of monochrome art is precisely what Malevich demonstrates; when an artist works in just one color, the exploration can result in expressivity of texture and nuance, sometimes giving the surface of a work greater meaning than its content. While the starkness of singular color seems banal, monochrome works are also often meant to evoke an emotional response with their expressiveness being contained in elements apart from what is ordinarily associated with color, such as shape and form. For Boca Raton painter Mark Forman, whose work is included in the show, the monochromatic theme is a continuation of his oeuvre. “I always work in a monochromatic style or with some small amount of selected other color,” he explains. “My work is best defined by the search for truth utilizing reductive and profound concepts interpreted through minimally variable colorations and subtle textures. All traces of objectivity are absent. They are meant to be both intellectually stimulating and contemplative.” Hickey adds, “Forman’s large scale canvases are reminiscent of Mark Rothko but give their own personal, unique impression. His paintings are formulated with reductive and expressionistic techniques while painting with acrylic and other mixed media to create layers and textures that are unexpected until close inspection.”

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 Misoo Filan, I am the Barrier, 2014, India ink and pencil on paper, 60 x 96 inches

DISTINCT PERSPECTIVE While monochrome is not a dominant mode, there are some artists who have committed to it in interesting ways. The range of interpretation for their work is what makes the style so interesting and engaging – to artists, critics, writers and observers. Kandy Lopez, who recently earned a Master of Fine Arts in Visual Art from Florida Atlantic University, has a series of figurative monotype prints displayed in Monochrome. She says that the nostalgic theme of her current work makes monochrome the perfect vehicle. “I’m playing with the idea of the silhouette in urban environments, specifically Miami,” she explains. “I’m in love with body language and how something as simple as propping your left hand on your hip references contrapposto and can communicate many things. I’m also interested in how the silhouette refers to a person’s

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environment and how that environment shapes the person or holds them back.” While each artist’s approach to monochrome differs, depending on their preferred medium and personal style, the strengths of the individual artists combine to make for a strong and unique exhibit that compels viewers to look closer and deeper. Not all of the artists work primarily in monochrome; the monochromatic artwork featured in the exhibit clearly indicates that that this mode opens up new possibilities and explorations for each of them. The opportunity to explore seems to strengthen the artist’s overall oeuvre and work while compelling viewers to contemplate art from a different perspective. As Hickey says, “Monochromatic work can be very abstract or conceptual but also straightforward and enlightening. A work can be moving or evoke an experience that the viewer may not have otherwise expected.”


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MONOCHROME on display Oct. 31 through Dec. 6 at the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County 601 Lake Ave. in Lake Worth Curator: Nichole Hickey, Manager of Artist Services for the Cultural Council

Featured Artists:  Harvey Zipkin, Tivoli Gardens (Copenhagen), 2012, Ultrachrome archival print 13 X 19 inches

Vincent Cacace Joel Cohen Misoo Filan Mark Forman Stephen Futej Jacek Gancarz William Halliday

Mimie Langlois Kandy Lopez Sally Ordile Michael Price Scherer & Ouporov Thomas L. Tribby Harvey Zipkin

The exhibition is open to the public free of charge from 10 a.m. to 5 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays.

Lectures: In association with the exhibition, the Cultural Council will offer an opportunity to delve deeper into the subject. These lectures are open to the public and will be held at Council’s headquarters in Lake Worth. Lectures are free to Council members; $10 for non-members. November 8 at 3 p.m.  Thomas L. Tribby, Girl in Black and White, 2006, Monotype, 11 1/2 x 15 1/4 inches

“Is It Art or Is It Soup?” with Joel Cohen An exploration of what makes fine art

December 20 at 3 p.m. “A Discussion on Monochromatic Art” With Mark Forman, William Halliday, Sally Ordile, Mimie Langlois Moderated by Joel Cohen For information, call (561) 471-2901 or visit www.palmbeachculture.com

 Vincent Cacace, Moonlight Sonata, 2013, Oil on canvas, 48 x 60 inches

 William Halliday, Streamliner Hammerhead, 2014, Polished aluminum, 67 inches long

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Music programs help students succeed‌ with feeling

By Amy Woods

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Young Singers of the Palm Beaches


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“Music is a more potent instrument than any other for education, because rhythm and harmony find their way into the inward places of the soul,� Plato wrote in 380 B.C. in The Republic. A Boynton Beach Community High School student who will graduate in 2015 has proved the ancient Greek philosopher right. art&culture

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Singer, pianist and violinist Florence Brown started her freshman year at the school with few friends, low self-esteem and soon-to-topple grades. “I felt like I was alone all the time,” she says. “It was to the point where I stopped caring about school. I stopped caring about my studies. I just didn’t have the drive anymore.” Sophomore year, she joined Dimensional Harmony Choir, an award-winning music ensemble – hiply known as “DH” among

Dimensional Harmony Choir

the kids. She met with Choir Director Sterling Frederick, earned a spot on the roster and started studying so she could keep it. Her Cs and Ds turned into As and Bs. Counting time, reading measures and tapping out a tempo have helped Brown with her hardest subject: math. “Music theory is basic math,” she says. “If you can add, subtract, divide, you can do almost anything with music.”

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Now a senior, Brown says, “I don’t know where I would be academically right now if it wasn’t for this group. I went from being somebody who didn’t care to somebody who cared so much.”

HITTING THE RIGHT NOTE Frederick founded Dimensional Harmony in 2001 – the year Boynton Beach Community High School opened. Since then, he has shepherded his students to stages at Palm Beach State College and The Mar-a-Lago Club as well as the studios of local public television station WXEL. In 2010, the chorus got its big break when viewers of N BC’s Today show named it tops in the nation. “We beat 1,000 choirs,” Frederick says. “Since then, we’ve had a lot of doors open.” In 2011, the 45 members of the group walked through one of those doors and onto the stage at N ew York City’s Carnegie Hall, where they performed in a concert by arranger and composer Tim Janis featuring the E Street Band’s Steven Van Zandt. The students – many of whom had never heard of the Bruce Springsteen guitarist – sang “Rockin’ Around the Christmas Tree” with the legendary “Little Steven.” Earlier this year, Dimensional Harmony participated in a national choral competition in Nashville sponsored by Music in


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the Parks and collected a trio of trophies. Festival judges awarded ONCE MORE, FROM THE TOP the Boynton Beach singers not only the first-place prize but also Humberto “Junior” Iglesias, another senior at Boynton Beach best overall and most-spirited. Community High School, has been making music with Dimensional Frederick attributes his students’ artistic achievements to a Harmony for a relatively short time. Since the end of 11th grade, his classroom culture of hard work and the fact that they don’t know trouble with reading has eased because of skills sharpened by the meaning of the word quit. “With that attitude, we are able to singing. “Every time you sing notes… it’s the same thing as accomplish whatever we set out to accomplish,” he says. “I reading,” he says. “I learned now that reading is my friend.” get students who have never sung. What music does is it Dimensional Harmony also has boosted his zeal for school. “DH gives them confidence. Because of their confidence, it spills over is a really great experience,” Iglesias says. “I love singing. With into their school. When they feel better music, life is a little more exciting.” about themselves, they go to class and they Dimensional Harmony epitomizes the pay attention.” powerful impact music – and the arts in Such success stories strike a familiar general – have on students, says Shawn Berry, chord with educators who, year after year, founder of Young Singers of the Palm see the benefits of curricular music play out Beaches. “Music is literacy,” Berry says. “As on campuses across the county. “Research children, we sang our ABCs – and there was a has shown that a strong arts program leads reason for that.” to high academics,” says Edrick Rhodes, the Students who sing in school choruses Palm Beach County School District’s arts often bring home higher SAT scores than education administrator. “It’s very evident in those with no participation in the arts, reports a lot of the programs that we have.” the College Board in its annual College-Bound Rhodes oversees chorus – as well as Seniors analysis. “I know it’s because students –Shawn Berry, founder of Young Singers dance, drama, theater and visual arts – in the in voice and in the arts are using both halves of the Palm Beaches district’s 107 elementary, 33 middle and 23 of their brain,” Berry says. “They’re using the high schools. “Our district for choral is very expression side and the mathematical side. strong,” he says, attributing the excellence Study after study shows these things.” According to one particular study conducted by the advocacy to quality teaching and administrative support. “They have a clear vison of how they want the students to perform and they execute and research organization Chorus America, an estimated 80 percent of educators said student participation in vocal-music at the highest levels.” A former band director, Rhodes has seen the enlightening programs resulted in better grades. Another 90 percent said it effects that come from beating a drum, finding a key and hitting kept teens engaged in school. “A lot of us went to school because of the music groups we were a high note. “Music is a discipline,” he says. “The attention to in,” says Berry, who leads 350 singers in six choirs. “Some people detail that we use in the choral and band rooms – we make sure those kids transfer that into other core classes. If they focus on remained in school for that reason – graduated from school because they had this group they were a part of. It’s a community.” that attention to detail, it will make their grades improve.”

“Music is literacy.

As children, we

sang our ABCs – and there was a

reason for that.”

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RECYCLING on a Grand Scale By Joann Plockova

When the Center for Creative Education first moved into its new home in the Northwood Village neighborhood of West Palm Beach, instead of exploring the hallways, some of the employees strapped on their rollerblades. The nonprofit arts and education organization had found a unique new home in a 1947 roller skating rink.

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When architecture is recycled, historic buildings, such as this one housing the Center for Creative Education, and the communities surrounding them gain new life.

CCE isn’t alone in having made the choice to create a home in an existing building. Throughout Palm Beach County, a number of innovative organizations have repurposed unused, often historic spaces and given them new life. Along with offering a distinctive space where they can develop and function, the buildings represent an opportunity to contribute to the preservation and cultivation of the historic and cultural value of the neighborhoods where they reside. In a former life, the CCE building was “Skateland,” a roller rink built in 1947. In the early 1960s, emerging entertainers were brought in – including the Beach Boys and, rumor has it, Donna Summers. Before CCE purchased the property in 2005, the oncerocking – and rolling – facility was being used as a record storage facility. But it was the unique attributes remaining from its rollerrink days that attracted CCE to the space. “Structurally the building was a great find,” says Robert Hamon, the organization’s CEO. The north and south walls bear the building’s weight; there are no interior columns or walls. “It was truly a blank sheet of paper.” According to Glen Blount of Clearspan Construction, the contractor on the renovation project, the building was also chosen for features like its bow girder truss system, a type of construction prevalent in the ’30s and ’40s. The trusses – massive triangular

steel structures – support the domed ceiling that loomed over skaters much like the stone arches of a medieval cathedral. Today, the girders are painted a striking red and attract the attention they deserve – as does the 70-year-old Dade Countypine ceiling that runs north to south in what is now CCE’s gallery. Outside at the entry way, red comes into play again in the painted metal awning that hangs over the front door, reinforcing the building’s Art Deco look. “About every other person that comes into the building that grew up in Florida will say, ‘Oh, my gosh! I used to skate here!’” says Hamon. Helping to trigger their memories are the wood floors from the former skating rink, which CCE will do its best to maintain. Forty percent of the 18,000-square-foot building has now been completely renovated. CCE is raising money to complete the next phase of the project. Along with being pleased that the building “allows the Center to have a center,” as Hamon says, CCE is delighted that the space is playing a role in contributing to the evolving economic development of Northwood Village. “If the building continued to be a record storage facility, it would have a very different contribution to the neighborhood,” he says. “Because we came in and made it a kind of cultural hub for the community, it really does give a different sense of belonging.”

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RECYCLING

The Florida East Coast Railway Train Depot in Lake Worth will soon be given new life as the home of the Benzaiten Center for Creative Arts.

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Palm Beach County is home to a number of repurposed buildings, whose cultural and historic value provide rich fuel for the area’s economic engine; among them are:

RE-IMAGINE The Delray Beach Center for the Arts at Old School Square The campus includes the Cornell Museum of Art and American Culture, housed in the restored 1913 Delray Elementary School, and the Crest Theatre, located in the former 1925 Delray High School – both of which are listed on the National Register of Historic Places – as well as the 1926 Vintage Gymnasium.

The Schoolhouse Children’s Museum Learning Center The Boynton Elementary School was built in 1913. The building was listed on the National Register of Historic Places in 1994 and was given new life as a children’s museum in 2001.

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The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County The Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building, a 1940 Streamline Moderne building that originally opened as the Lake Theater, provides distinctive space for the galleries, gift shop, visitor center and offices of the Cultural Council.

The Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum Following its restoration in 2008, the 1916 Courthouse in downtown West Palm Beach has found new life as a history museum and as the headquarters for the Historical Society of Palm Beach County.


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The former Skateland in Northwood Village has been transformed into a vibrant space where the Center for Creative Education offers a variety of activities.

The former Skateland in Northwood Village has been transformed into a vibrant space where the Center for Creative Education offers a variety of activities.

A little further south, another evolving cultural community is poised to get a boost from the renovation of an historic building. The Florida East Coast Railway Train Depot in Lake Worth – a locally designated historic landmark built in 1926 – is being transformed into the home of the Benzaiten Center for Creative Arts, an urban arts space where artists can create and the community can gain an understanding and appreciation for their work and the process behind making it. The property was granted to the City of Lake Worth in 2011 by William Thies & Sons, beer distributors who had been utilizing the depot as a warehouse since 1994. Strategically located within the borders of LULA, the city’s art district, the space has itself become a blank canvas. “The building allows the city to highlight the important history that exists within [Lake Worth],” says Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency Executive Director Joan Oliva. “[It] also provides an opportunity for the building to be a catalyst for revitalization that is already underway that includes celebrating the local arts scene and providing additional opportunities for artisans.” Where once cases of beer were stacked high, glass blowers will soon practice their craft. The Benzaiten team is hoping renovation will be completed in time for a grand opening in the early part of 2015. The Living Arts Foundation, a nonprofit organization formed to fund arts projects like Benzaiten, plans to leave the outside of the building as is and simply modify the interior for its purposes. The building’s bay doors, which allow for cross ventilation, as well as the loading docks and ample open space – approximately

10,000 square feet of it sprawls beneath high ceilings supported by steel trusses – will be ideal for Benzaiten’s glassworks studio and metal foundry, according to local artist and entrepreneur JoAnne Berkow, founder and president of Benzaiten and the Living Arts Foundation. Berkow knew she wanted to give the train depot a new life from the moment she saw it. “It was absolutely perfect,” she says. Introduced to the building by Oliva through an aerial photograph, she made her initial visit in the company of two associates from the Museum of Glass in Tacoma, Wash., including Joanna Sikes, who once helped renowned glass artist Dale Chihuly locate studio space. According to Berkow, on seeing the building, Sikes said, “This is better than any building I ever found for Dale.” Oliva says there is potential to continue the city’s partnership with the Living Arts Foundation to repurpose abandoned and foreclosed homes in the arts district with the hope of providing even more opportunities for artists – including housing. The CRA also sees potential in a 15,000-square-foot building that dates from 1925 that the city owns. Oliva says plans for this LULA-based building include its “restoration and return as a commercial or mixed-use building with an arts component.” Both CCE and Benzaiten recognized significant cost savings by renovating existing buildings rather than breaking ground for new construction – despite the fees associated with bringing the buildings up to code. Of the numerous benefits of repurposing historic buildings, however, bringing the soul of these spaces back to life is the most visible. As Berkow says, “It offers a certain strength and character to our building that new construction would not.”

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Stand-up comedians stand out By Allegra Nagler

Comedy makes us – the audience – laugh. But for those on stage, comedy is serious business. Life in the world of stand-up is tough and competitive, for both up-and-coming comedians as well as the household names.

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he established, irreverent – and always angry – comedian Lewis Black, who will be appearing at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach on Dec. 13, is on the road 150 days of the year. Black, whose career began to take off in the mid1980s, claims his biggest success is that he’s still here and still going strong. His humor draws on the multitude of things that annoy him – politicians and politics, Republicans and Democrats, religion and humanity’s general stupidity. “If you’re with the Tea Party – don’t bother [coming to the show],” he says. “You’ll be really offended.” Someone once told Black he should yell when he’s on stage. It was the best advice he ever got, the Grammy- and EmmyAward winner says. “It you’re angry and you’re not yelling, it’s weird,” he figures. The Lewis Black persona, an iconoclast banging on the doors of civilization to be heard, is channeling the cathartic voice of the disillusioned and disenfranchised. Not trying to change the world, he just hopes to make it interesting. On the phone Black is amiable and forthcoming but describes himself as angry, irritable and, strangely enough, optimistic. “I’m angry because I know things can be better,” he says. “But I’m optimistic because I know where we should be and where we are. That’s what makes me angry.”

catching on Black follows in a long line of social commentators-cum-comedians that stretches from Charlie Chaplin to contemporary comedians such as Bill Maher, Jon Stewart, Chris Rock and Stephen Colbert, all of whom use humor to bring home their societal critiques. Black, a Yale Universityeducated dramatist (his play “One Slight Hitch” will have an engagement in Fort Myers at the Florida Repertory Theatre in January), says he doesn’t write his material but reads the paper for inspiration and expresses how he feels on stage. “I’m writing on stage as I go,” he says. Dressed in jeans and a suit jacket, sipping water on stage, he gesticulates wildly to emphasize his point.

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By highlighting social issues, giving voice to unspoken cultural taboos and saying what other people only think, comedians do more than make us laugh. They guide us to common ground and help us laugh at ourselves. “It’s all about making connections,” says DC Benny, a New York-based comedian and former contestant on NBC’s comedy competition “Last Comic Standing.” Benny was the first comedian to take the stage in a new Catch a Rising Star series at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts, which premiered in October. “Anyone under 30 doesn’t know that Catch a Rising Star is responsible for some of the biggest names in comedy, such as Jerry Seinfeld, Billy Crystal and Rosie O’Donnell,” says Melissa Carter, director of marketing and public relations at DBCA. “We want to introduce a younger generation to it and engage them with social media.” DBCA now offers live stand up in two venues – the historic gymnasium and the Crest Theatre. “The vintage gymnasium at the Delray Beach Center for the Arts is the perfect venue for my act,” says Benny from his home in Brooklyn. “I prefer small venues; my style is intimate. I like to tell stories and act out the characters. It helps to see who I’m talking to and if something happens in the moment, I’ll interact with the audience. Plus,” he quips, “none of my punch lines get stepped on.”

a dream come true Former Saturday Night Live comedian Jon Lovitz called stand up “an infinite art form.” Always expanding to embrace new voices and new themes, stand-up comedy is an American innovation that traces its roots to the burlesque shows of the late19th and early-20th centuries. “In a room filled with people, the comedian is the only one facing the wrong way. He’s also the only one who isn’t laughing,” Jimmy Carr and Lucy Greeves note in their book Only Joking: What’s So Funny about Making People Laugh. “For normal people that’s a nightmare, not a career aspiration.” Comedian N ikki Carr has been in the business for 17 years. “All my comedy is personal,” she says. “I can’t forget my material; that’s my life.” That life hasn’t been easy.  Lewis Black


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 Lachlan Patterson (left) and Nikki Carr (second from right) are among the comedians who will be performing in the Last Comic Standing Live Tour.

Although she has performed at the New York Comedy Club and made her television debut on BET’s “Comic View” in 2000, she still struggles to get to the next level and pay her bills. She hopes her top-three finish on the most recent season of “Last Comic Standing,” which featured celebrity judges Roseanne Barr, Keenen Ivory Wayans and Russell Peters, will be a steppingstone to a full-fledged career. “I want somebody to say ‘That’s her! That’s who I’ve been looking for,’” she says. Lachlan Patterson, another finalist on the show, says he knew he had made it when he was able to give up his day job as a bartender. “I push myself,” he says. “Thanks to the show, I’m no longer the underdog but there’s new pressure on me. I have to show them what I can do.” The genial and self-deprecating comic remembers his first experience on stage at the age of 19 as humiliating. “I put on thermal underwear and glasses and started telling jokes,” he says. “It was devastating. People were laughing at me – and not in a good way.” Patterson realized he had to write his jokes and earn respect to become a writer’s comedian. He keeps a notepad and pen with him at all times, even at the gym. At the end of the day, he types the notes into his computer. “Making people laugh is important, but it’s therapeutic to write about your experiences,” he says. “It’s important to say what’s on your mind.” He’ll be doing that – as will Carr and other top finishers from the televised competition – as part of the Last Comic Standing Live Tour, which makes a stop at the Kravis Center on Nov. 2.

seriously, though Saying what’s on his mind comes naturally to Will Watkins, 28, a Florida native who teaches a comedy class at the Improv, a stand-up comedy club in West Palm Beach. “I can’t teach people to be funny,” he says. “But I can be the training wheels for you and help flesh out your type of comedy. You need a stage persona – you, only more,” he explains. “Create a character. It’s the same as an actor creating a character – you are larger than life.” Comedy classes at the Improv teach students to write, edit and structure a joke, where to stop, how not to overwrite and to find your voice. “I’m a fan of the writing aspect of comedy,” says Watkins, who also performs. Like Patterson, he carries a small notepad in a back pocket. “I never try to force the funny. It has to come naturally or it’s not honest.” The old joke about how you get to Carnegie Hall – practice, practice, practice – works because it is painfully honest. “Successful people make practicing their craft their main focus and there’s no other option,” Watkins says. “Do it again, do it again, do it again, do it again, do it again,” is Black’s advice for aspiring comedians. “Just do it.” Patterson once asked the late comedian Mitch Mullany for his advice. “I asked him, ‘Will I ever make it?’ He said, ‘Are you going to quit?’ When I said no, he said, ‘Then you’ll make it.’” The advice Patterson gives is, “Push yourself. If it’s something you love, you’ll make it.” And that’s no joke.

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Don’t Tell Freedom (That’s My Dog) That I Have Another “Best Friendâ€? In Jupiter Medical Center. Harold “Budâ€? Stambaugh is a retired Marine, and Freedom is his trained service dog and best friend. When Bud discovered he had lung cancer, he reached out to Dr. K. Adam Lee, one of the nation’s leading experts and pioneers in minimally-invasive robotic surgery for lung cancer, and the ďŹ rst lung surgeon in Florida to perform robotic-assisted thoracic surgery.

“I told Dr. Lee I needed somebody to not only cure my lung cancer, but to take me through the whole process.� – Harold “Bud� Stambaugh & Freedom

Bud called Dawn Bitgood, ARNP, Oncology Care Specialist, and she walked him through the entire experience – from pre-op, to surgery and rehabilitation. Today, Bud is cancer-free and credits the entire Thoracic Surgery and Lung Program team at Jupiter Medical Center with saving his life. To learn more about our comprehensive Thoracic Surgery & Lung Program, call Dawn Bitgood at (561) 263-3604 or visit jupitermed.com/lung.

Over 80% Of Lung Cancers Have A Chance To Be Cured If Detected At An Early Stage. CT Lung Screening Gives You That Chance. If you’re a smoker or former smoker, early detection of lung cancer is the key to preventing more serious problems later. Low-dose CT lung screening at Jupiter Medical Center gives you the ability to take that positive ďŹ rst step to safeguard your health. Based on the National Lung Screening Trial guidelines, recommendations are: tUPZFBSTPMEt/PQFSTPOBMIJTUPSZPGDBODFSt$VSSFOUPSGPSNFSIFBWZTNPLFST t/PTJHOTPSTZNQUPNTPGMVOHEJTFBTFt-FTTUIBOZFBSTTJODFRVJUUJOH The charge for the screening is $99. As with many screenings, most insurance companies do not cover this procedure. Please DBMM   to schedule an appointment.

Thoracic Surgery & Lung Program 1240 S. Old Dixie Hwy., Jupiter, FL 33458 • jupitermed.com/lung • (561) 263-3604

So Much More Than Medicine


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INSIDE culture

C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U L T U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U L T U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U L T U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U L T U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M | B R I E F LY N O T E D | C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S | C U LT U R A L

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C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S power2give Empowers People to Support Arts & Culture

Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades (right) discusses power2give with Daryn Macaulay Kirchfeld of Northern Trust (left), a Palm Beach Dramaworks board member, and Jack Lighton, president and CEO of Loggerhead Marinelife Center.

The Cultural Council’s newly deployed install a new rehearsal hall floor to replace an power2give fundraising platform empowers existing floor that had fallen into disrepair. people to donate any amount of money directly to  Marimba Mambo #5 − $6,820 was raised to projects created by arts and cultural organizations purchase a five-octave marimba for the Bak in Palm Beach County. Middle School of the Arts. No middle or high On September 10, the Council launched a school in Palm Beach County has a five-octave specially designed website that showcases new marimba; in fact, the closest one is located at and innovative arts programs spearheaded by Palm Florida Atlantic University. Beach County arts organizations. “We’ve been  Help Keep Us On Our Toes! Sponsor a Dancer! working for quite some time with – Contributors gave $10,000 to assist many of our organizations to in sponsoring Ballet Palm Beach’s identify projects that have great mainstage productions of Giselle on impact on the people served and Oct. 24 and The Nutcracker on Nov. our community and will inspire 28-29. individuals to support them,” says “Our research has shown Jan Rodusky, the Cultural Council’s charitable giving to specific director of grants. “These projects projects is an especially important need only modest funding, yet will factor to the millennial generation help build the capacity within so − who want to be more directly many worthwhile organizations.” connected with programs they Power2give has generated financially support,” says Cultural millions of dollars for nonprofit Council President and CEO Rena organizations across the country. Blades. “We are fortunate to have Thomas Lockett from Janssen When potential donors visit extraordinarily generous people Pharmaceuticals explores the power2give fundraising platform. power2give.org/palmbeachcounty, in our community, including an they can read about these projects and see photos anonymous philanthropist who has set aside nearly and videos before deciding on making a donation $70,000 to match the public’s donations to our of as little as $5. local groups. That brings tremendous giving Response to the program was quick and power to Palm Beach County.” enthusiastic. Within the first few days following the Any nonprofit cultural organization that is a launch, three projects were fully funded: member of the Cultural Council or a past recipient of a Council grant is eligible to participate in the  Operation: Happy Feet – Donors contributed crowd-funding program, as long as its project costs $4,430 to enable Lake Worth Playhouse to less than $10,000 and can be funded within 90 days.

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{inside culture} C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S Cultural Council Wows Governor’s Tourism Conference

The Palm Beach Symphony’s Alfredo Oliva clearly enjoys playing his orchestral arrangement of “Ice Ice Baby.”

The program began with the Palm Beach Symphony, founded more than 40 years ago, performing “Concerto in D minor for Two Violins and Orchestra” by Johann Sebastian Bach. They were then joined on stage by Ballet Palm Beach, who danced to Tchaikovsky’s “Serenade for Strings Op 48, II.” Suddenly, to the sounds of snare drum and a driving bass guitar, the ballerinas whipped off their skirts while the symphony transitioned to the opening refrain of the rap song “Ice Ice Baby.” Vanilla Ice took the stage while the dancers, now dressed dramatically in black leotards, broke

Bill Barbosa Photography

When more than 1,000 guests attending the 47th Annual Florida Governor’s Conference on Tourism settled into their seats for the Chairman’s Dinner at the Boca Raton Resort & Club, a gala evening highlighting the state’s incomparable attractions, they had no idea what the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County had in store for them. When the Cultural Council was given the opportunity to provide the entertainment for the evening, it pulled out all the stops in highlighting the cultural excellence found within our borders. The Council produced a spectacular show featuring symphonic music, classical ballet − and a surprise appearance by Vanilla Ice, the wellknown rapper and television personality who lives in Wellington. “The Cultural Council is very engaged in cultural tourism,” said Marilyn Bauer, director of marketing and government affairs. “We are leading the nation in innovative marketing programs created to attract this rapidly growing segment of the tourism pie. Our symphony and ballet are extraordinary and Vanilla Ice is extraordinary not only musically but also in his enthusiastic support of art and culture in the county.”

Rapper – and Palm Beach County resident – Vanilla Ice performs with members of the Palm Beach Symphony and Ballet Palm Beach during his surprise appearance produced by the Cultural Council at the Florida Governor’s Conference on Tourism.

into an original modern dance choreographed by Colleen Smith, artistic director of Ballet Palm Beach, and danced to a version of the rap song arranged by Alfredo Oliva of the Palm Beach Symphony. The audience was on its feet joining in on this once-in-a-lifetime coming together of three distinct art forms. The performance drew the attention of local and national media, including The Washington Post. After his performance, The Palm Beach Post reported, Vanilla Ice boasted about the county’s tourism landmarks and cultural hot spots. “I live here in Palm Beach County with my teenage daughters and we love it here,” he said. Social media played a large role when the YouTube video of the performance went viral − attracting thousands of first-time visitors to the Council’s various platforms. The Cultural Council’s role in the Governor’s Conference extended well beyond the Chairman’s Dinner performance. It also included music by Women of N ote, an a capella choir, during a Fifties Poolside Bash the next evening and a Ballet Palm Beach flash mob during the breakfast on the conference’s closing day. During the poolside reception, attendees were given custom fedora hats sporting an orange band and adorned with pins promoting the Cultural Council along with the county’s Sports Commission, Film Commission and the Palm Beach County Convention Center. Wearers of the hats had the opportunity to win a Palm Beach County prize pack with tickets to cultural attractions and events.

The Florida Governor’s Conference on Tourism is the premier annual educational conference for the Florida tourism industry. It’s presented by VISIT FLORIDA, the Official Tourism Marketing Corporation for the state. Attendees included representatives from Florida destinations, attractions, hotels, resorts, parks, convention centers, government officials, media representatives, advertising agencies and other organizations. “We are making art in Palm Beach County,” Bauer said. “The 200 organizations we support are world class. What we have, you can’t find anywhere else.”

One of the stars of the Governor’s Conference was Giavanna Calabria, who modeled a very special dress that incorporates covers from past issues of art&culture magazine.

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{inside culture} C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S Culture & Cocktails Launches 10th Anniversary Season ambassador at large at Barneys New York. They live in New York and are part-time residents of Palm Beach. March 2 − Film and Fashion: A Conversation with Charles and Clo Cohen − Charles Cohen is owner, chairman and CEO of Cohen Media Group, which distributes independent and international films in the U.S., including most current French films. As president and CEO of Cohen Brothers Realty, he controls more than 12 million square feet of Class A office, retail and design showroom space nationwide, including DCOTA (Design Center of the Americas) in Dania Beach. Clo Cohen is a former model and advertising/marketing executive who worked with ©Harry Benson

Hilary and Wilbur Ross

designers Tom Ford and Gucci in London and Jimmy Choo in the U.S. April 6 – Song and Dance: A Conversation with Tommy Tune – Broadway’s only nine-time

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s

Magazine, People, Vanity Fair and more, and the

Tony Award winner, Tune has been awarded the

popular Culture & Cocktails series is celebrating

author of 14 books. Gigi Benson has been wife,

National Medal of the Arts, eight Drama Desk

its 10th anniversary season with five fascinating

partner, editor and organizer of his photographic

Awards, three Astaire Awards, the Society of

conversations at The Colony Hotel Pavilion in

work for more than 30 years.

Directors and Choreographers’ George Abbott

February 2 – Design: A Conversation with

Award for Lifetime Achievement, a star on the

November 3 − Literature and Photography:

Jonathan Adler and Simon Doonan – Iconic

Hollywood Walk of Fame and has been

A Conversation with James and Sue Patterson:

potter, designer and author Jonathan Adler has

designated a Living Landmark by the New York

James Patterson has sold 300 million books

more than 25 stores worldwide and is dedicated

Landmarks Conservancy. His film credits include

worldwide and holds the Guinness World Record

to bringing style, craft and joy to people’s lives.

“Hello Dolly” and Ken Russell’s “The Boyfriend.”

for the most #1 New York Times Bestsellers. He

Writer, bon-vivant, window dresser and fashion

Each Culture & Cocktails event also includes

has donated more than 500,000 books to soldiers

commentator Simon Doonan has worked in

a trunk show featuring works by selected local

at home and abroad and has awarded $5 million

fashion for more than 35 years and is the creative

artists.

Palm Beach. The 2014-2015 season includes:

in teacher education scholarships at 22 colleges

Free to Cultural Council members at the $250

and universities. Sue Patterson is an award-

level and above, the conversations also are open

winning photographer working with her husband

to the public at a cost of $60 in advance and $75

on a new documentary (“Murder of a Small

at the door. All proceeds are used to support artist

Town”) about Belle Glade, Fla., and Newburgh,

programs of the Council. Each event will run from

N.Y., two of the most violent cities in the United

5 to 7 p.m., with registration and cocktails from 5

States.

to 5:45 p.m. and the conversation from 5:45 to 7

January 12 − Palm Beach: A Conversation

p.m., including audience questions.

with Wilbur and Hilary Ross and Harry and Gigi

Culture & Cocktails is generously sponsored

Benson – Ross is a prominent American business

by The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation.

leader known for successfully restructuring

Additional support for the series is provided by The

industries and leveraged buyouts, and is a major

Roe Green Foundation, Roe Green, founder, The

art lover whose collection includes Western

Palm Beach Post / Palm Beach Daily News and PR-

surrealists, contemporary Eastern sculptures and

BS, a Boca Raton-based public relations firm.

more than two dozen works by artist René

The Colony Hotel will serve complimentary

Magritte. Hilary Ross is the society editor for Quest

beverages and an array of specially prepared

and Q magazines, a columnist for the website New

hors’ d’oeuvres. It also offers free valet parking

York Social Diary and author of the new book Palm

to Culture & Cocktails guests. For full details,

Beach People, with photography by Harry Benson,

visit palmbeachculture.com or call the Cultural

the world famous photojournalist for Life

Council at (561) 472-3330 to make reservations. Harry and Gigi Benson

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C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S SmARTBiz Summit 2014 Highlights Relationship Between Arts and Businesses The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is hosting its 2014 SmARTBiz Summit on Oct. 28 at the Palm Beach County Convention Center. The event, which is sponsored by PNC Bank, annually attracts hundreds of participants for a full day of seminars and interactive learning. SmARTBiz is designed specifically for Palm Beach County businesses, nonprofit cultural organizations and, for the first time this year, professional artists. The event focuses on the vibrancy of Ben Cameron the relationship between the business and arts communities and explores how these partnerships are a driving economic force in Palm Beach County. This year’s two keynote speakers are Ben Cameron, program director for the arts at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation in New York, and Matt Lehrman, principal at Audience Avenue LLC. Both men have a deep knowledge of the business of the arts. Cameron supervises a $14-

million grants program focusing on organizations and artists in the theater, contemporary dance, jazz and presenting fields. Lehrman’s expertise is in revealing a nonprofit’s options and opportunities when viewed from the audience-side of its mission statement. Their participation in SmARTBiz pays tribute to the stature of the Cultural Council both regionally and nationally. Another highlight of the SmARTBiz Summit will be the announcement of the Matt Lehrman 2014 recipients of the Cultural Council’s SmARTBiz grants. This program is based on the philosophy that “Good Arts in a Community = Good Quality of Life = Strong Business Development.“ Grants of up to $5,000 each directly support cultural endeavors by building the capacity of local cultural organizations. To learn more about the SmARTBiz Summit 2014, visit palmbeachculture.com.

Best of the Country Clubs Exhibition Nov. 17, 2014 - Jan. 10, 2015

art&culture is Everywhere! When acclaimed actor John Lithgow (center) visited Palm Beach County earlier this year for an event sponsored by the Palm Beach State College Foundation, art&culture magazine was on the scene – literally! Pictured with Lithgow (and our award-winning magazine) are Shawn Berry, the Cultural Council’s former manager of arts and cultural education (left) and Marilyn Bauer, director of marketing and government affairs.

Charlie and Linda Riggs Ceramics Exhibition: Nov. 17, 2014 - Jan. 10, 2015 Workshop: Jan. 16 & 17, 2015 Museum: 373 Tequesta Drive Tequesta, FL (561) 746-3101 Open Monday - Friday, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Saturday, 10 a.m. to 2 p.m.

Classes for Adults and Children School of Art: 395 Seabrook Road Tequesta, FL (561) 748-8737 LighthouseArts.org

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{inside culture} C U LT U R A L C O U N C I L N E W S Council Plays Role in New Jupiter, West Palm Beach Cultural Projects Beach, the district is designed to create an atmosphere where the public can experience a wide variety of cultural and artistic activities, galleries, shops and restaurants. The Council is assisting with planning the entertainment for the opening event, which is expected to include a variety of art installations, visual performances, live

murals,

concerts

and

other

cultural

presentations. More information can be found at downtownwpbarts.com. Meanwhile, in Jupiter, the Council is partnering with the developers of Harbourside Place to organize a cultural day in conjunction with the Robert Stevens

project’s grand opening on Dec. 4. The event will be capped by a holiday performance by the Palm Beach Symphony and a fireworks display. Harbourside, located at 200 U.S. Highway 1,

The Cultural Council is playing an important

encompasses two waterfront hotels, approxi-

participate in the arts.

role in the introduction of two significant new

On N ov. 13, the Council will be actively

mately 66,000 square feet of retail space, 55,000

projects in the county as it continues to help raise

involved with the launch of the West Palm Beach

square feet of office space, restaurants with out-

the

and

Arts & Entertainment District. An initiative of the

door seating, a marina and an amphitheater. Visit

encourage residents and visitors alike to

Downtown Development Authority of West Palm

harboursideplace.com to learn more.

profile

of

cultural

organizations

a sensational start to the season... Two new installations Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock, This Color is Great Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt, The Pursuit of Happiness

November 9, 2014 - January 11, 2015 Theresa Ferber Bernstein: A Century in Art | Elliot Erwitt Photography Top Left : Theresa Ferber Bernstein, Rogers Street, 1920s. Oil on canvas. Top Right: Renata Stih and Frieder Schnock, What a Painting, 2014.

Bryan Drury: Terrestrial Visions | Video installations: Cory Arcangel, Janet Biggs, Trine Lise Nedreaas, Robin Rhode, Shizuka Yokomizo.

Above: Bryan Drury, Sripad BV Vishnu Maharaja, Hindi, Badger, California, 2014.

Discover an artful way to shop for the holidays

Left: Elliott Erwitt, New York City (Two Bulldogs) 2000. ŠElliott Erwitt/MAGNUM PHOTOS

the new Museum Store features one of-a-kind and limited edition

Designed by Miami architects Roberto Behar and Rosario Marquardt, works by local, national, and international artists and artisans.

501 Plaza Real | Mizner Park | Boca Raton | FL 33432 | 561.392.2500 | bocamuseum.org

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Spotlighting Local Talent

As part of its ongoing efforts to create opportunities for local artists and promote their outstanding work, the Cultural Council featured “Dreamscapes, Blue,” a photograph by West Palm Beach photographer Cheryl Maeder, on the cover of its 2013 annual report. To view and download the report, visit the Cultural Council’s website at palmbeachculture.com. More of Maeder’s work can be seen at maederphotography.com.

palmbeachculture.com The authentic source of information about arts and culture in Palm Beach County!

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Armory Art Center Expands Into New Annex

I am ... a writer a filmmaker a dancer a sculptor an actor a musician

... an artist. The first group of Armory Annex Studio Residency Artists includes (from left) Molly Aubry, Shani Simpson and Julia Longwell.

Creative Writing • Dance • Motion Picture Arts Music • Theatre • Visual Arts

FINE ARTS BOARDING HIGH SCHOOL Grades 9-12 • September - May Offering the highest quality artistic training combined with comprehensive college-preparatory academics.

SUMMER ARTS PROGRAMS Grades 3-12 • June - August The world’s premier summer arts camp

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The Armory Art Center began offering classes in its new expanded location – the Armory Lake Worth Annex − in September. The Lake Worth Community Redevelopment Agency awarded a year-long lease of the 5,000-square-foot building at 1121 Lucerne Ave. − known to locals as the shuffleboard courts. The September sessions included both one-time Art on the Go! workshops and eight-week classes in drawing, painting, mixed media and photography for both youth and adults. “The Armory’s goals for the annex are to target local artists with teaching experience to be instructors and to have offerings that will appeal to a diverse community,” said Liza Niles, director of education. Exhibits are also in the planning stages. “The Lake Worth Annex allows us to complement our existing exhibition programming with more alternative, experimental and community-based exhibits and programs,” said Hans Evers, director of exhibitions and external programming. “We look forward to working very directly with the vibrant local and tri-county arts communities.” The Armory Annex also includes four individual studio spaces for local artists that offer 24/7 access as well as access to large shared studio spaces. To learn more about the classes and studio space, visit armoryart.org/annex or call (561) 832-1776, ext. 33.


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{inside culture} C U LT U R A L C O M P E N D I U M

The Burt Reynolds Institute for Film & Theatre recently hosted a film shoot with screen legend Burt Reynolds discussing the films White Lightning and its sequel, Gator. White Lightning, which introduced Reynolds’ iconic Southern character Gator McKlusky, is credited with being the first southern-themed film to break through cultural barriers and become a hit outside the South. Gator, which was released in 1976, was Reynolds’ first directorial feature film effort. Interviews with Reynolds and fellow Gator cast members Dudley Remus and Patrick Moody were conducted at the historic Lake Park Mirror Ballroom − the actual site of Reynolds’ stage debut − and will be used as bonus material in the upcoming Blu-ray releases of both White Lightning and Gator. The actors recalled anecdotes about the film, as well as off-screen memories involving cast members Jerry Reed, Jack Weston and Alice Ghostley, stuntman Hal N eedham and Reynolds’ mentor, Watson B Duncan III. Duncan, who was responsible for Reynolds becoming an actor, had a cameo role in Gator as a governmental official. “Without Duncan getting me into acting right here, in this room, on this stage, none of this would’ve ever happened,” Reynolds said. The Burt Reynolds Institute for Film & Theatre is a not-for-profit organization offering a variety of programs, including classes in acting and filmmaking as well as seminars and lectures by experts in the film industry and celebrities. For more information about the Institute, call 561-746-9955 or visit BurtReynoldsInstitute.org.

Aaron Wells

Burt Reynolds Returns to his Gator Roots

(From left) Burt Reynolds, Dudley Remus and Patrick Moody reminisce about their experiences in the 1976 film, Gator.

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B R I E F LY

N O T E D

David W. Breneman will

become the

new president and CEO of the Society of the Four Arts on Jan. 1. Breneman is currently the University Professor and N ewton and Rita Meyers Professor in Economics of Education and Public Policy at the University of Virginia. He succeeds Ervin S. Duggan, who is retiring. Breneman has been a visiting professor at Harvard and a visiting fellow at the Brookings Institution

and

served

as

president

of

Kalamazoo College. “When I read Ervin Duggan’s comment that Four Arts is a small liberal arts college with the community as the student body, I was hooked,” Breneman said. “Our new president has the background and experience to increase the Four Arts’ outreach to our community,” said Four Arts chairman Patrick Henry. “He will be a great asset as we continue to grow the Campus on the Lake and our other offerings.”

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SAVE THE DATE

Middle School of the Arts Foundation Presents The N orthern Palm Beaches Cultural Alliance elected new officers and members to its board of directors. The officers, who were elected to one-year terms, are: Roger Buckwalter, chair; Linda White, vice chair; Carol Davis, secretary; and Nancy Denholm, treasurer. Buckwalter is a retired journalist.

White is

owner and artistic director of ArtStage Performing Arts Center. Davis is curator of the Edna Hibel Museum, while Denholm is the the-

January 10, 2015 • 7-11 p.m.

Eissey Campus. The organizations elected to

City of West Palm Beach Waterfront Pavilion

two-year terms as board members are: the Burt

Presenting Sponsor:

ater director at the Palm Beach State College

Reynolds Institute for Film and Theatre, ArtStage Performing Arts Center, Florida Atlantic University/MacArthur Campus, the Town of Juno Beach, the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, the Jupiter Courier N ewsweekly, Loggerhead Marinelife Center, Florida Weekly, Clicking In and Mainstreet at Midtown. To learn more

®

JAE Restaurant Group For sponsorship opportunities contact Susy Diaz at 561.882.3828 or msoafoundation@msn.com www.savetheartsmsoa.org • Follow us at www.facebook.com/msoafoundation

about the alliance and its work, visit npbculturalalliance.org.

Roger Buckwalter and Kami Barrett of the Florida Atlantic University Lifelong Learning Society distribute members’ literature at a recent event.

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G Grandparents Day Sunday, September Septem mber 7th, 12:00 p.m. to 5:00 p. .m. p.m. Share your family history h by celebrating Gran ndparents Grandparents Day at the Flagler Museum. M Tour Whitehall wit th a Tour with and Activity Guide forr Kids KidsDQGWKHQYLVLWWKH)ODJOHU.HQDQ  DQG WKHQ YLVLW WKH )ODJOOHU .HQDQ 3DYLOLRQ WR WR HQMR\ HQMR\ WKH WKHH IDPLO\IULHQGO\ IDPLO\IULHQGO\ DFWLYLWLHV DFWLYLWLHV LQFOXGLQJ L PDNLQJ PDNLQJDIDPLO\WUHHEHLQWHUYLHZHGE\\RXUJUDQGFKLOGUHQ D IDPLO\WUHHEH LQWHUYLHZHGE\ \RXUJUDQG GFKLOGUHQ PDNHDVFUDSERRNSDJ PDNHDVFUDSERRNSDJHDQGKDYHDIDPLO\SKRWRWDNHQ JHDQGKDYHDIDPLO\SKRWRWDDNHQ m o r r i s o n

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For more informati information ion and tickets call (561) ( 655-2833 or visi visit it www.FlaglerMuse www.FlaglerMuseum.us eum.us 82

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N O T E D

MALTZ JUPITER THEATRE PRESENTS

A HILARIOUS AMERICAN COMEDY CLASSIC!

OCT 26 - NOV 9, 2014

SPONSORED BY:

TONY AWARD®–WINNING CLASSIC FAMILY MUSICAL

PRISCILLA HEUBLEIN AND KATHY & JOE SAVARESE

DECEMBER 2 - 21, 2014 Sean Dough (left) and Chris Felix

Florida Atlantic University students Sean Darch and Chris Bazelais – known professionally as Sean Dough and Chris Felix – won the 2014 American Songwriting Award in the Hip Hop category. Their song, titled “Change Your Mood,” was featured on CompOWLation Volume 3, recently released by FAU’s Hoot/Wisdom Recordings – FAU’s student-run/faculty supervised record label. Felix, who wrote the music, is a commercial music major and Dough, who wrote the lyrics and performs on the track, is a political science major and commercial music minor. The song was produced, mixed and recorded at FAU. Other students involved in recording “Change Your Mood” include: Ilana Armida, lead singer; John Frasca, guitar; Reid Santiago and Quincy Knowles, engineering; and Grace Kimmel, Leonia Coleman, Anthony Vincent and David Duque, additional vocals. You can hear the song at http://compowlation.bandcamp.com/track/change-your-mood blue-album.

SPONSORED BY:

IN LOVING MEMORY OF ART & MEG NIEDLAND

CONTEMPORARY FAMILY ROCK GOSPEL AND SOUL MUSICAL

JAN 13 - FEB 1, 2015

SPONSORED BY:

The Schmidt Family Center for the Arts named Joanna Marie Kaye director of the award-winning Festival of the Arts BOCA. Kaye, known to area public radio listeners as the long-time host of WXEL’s Classical Variations, returned to South Florida following two years as managing director of Classical WQED-FM in Pittsburgh. Kaye’s background as a vocalist and arts advocate infuses her professional career with musical insight and personal passion. “It is an absolute pleasure to have such a well-respected, artistic professional on our team. Joanna’s experience in the arts makes her a key player in helping in the leadership of this organization,” said Festival of the Arts BOCA Chairman Charlie Siemon. The Ninth Annual Festival of the Arts BOCA is scheduled for March 6-15 at the Mizner Park Amphitheater and Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center in Boca Raton.

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B R I E F LY

a

N O T E D

Junie B. Jones Sa Saturday aturday Novem November mber 8 at at 11am

Robert Stevens

November 13 Edvin Marton: “The The Prince of th the he Violin” Violin ! November 22 EE FR Derrick Hadley & The Motowners Motow wners December 6 & 7 Living Christmas TTree ree e December 18 American Big Band’s Band’s Home for the Holidayss January 6 Stormy Weather: Weather: e The Music of Lena Horn Horne ne January 15 How to Succeed on Broadway Broad dway January 29 David Phelps February 6 The Mayhem Poets February 9 The Doo W Wop op o Projectt February 19 Rock Legends: People’s People’s Choice Ch hoice February 28 Valerie a Tyson Tyyson Band d FREEE! The Valerie March 3 Jekyll & Hyde March 23 Seven Brides for Seven Brothers Bro others March 28 Galo’s TTribute ribute to Santan Santana na FREE! Galo’s April 14 Nashville Chicks with Hits Hiits April 23-24 Extreme Vegas: Vegas: e A Magical Cirque Spectacular! Spectacu ular! May 9 The Jungle Book

The Henry Morrison Flagler Museum in Palm Beach has been

re-accredited by

the American Alliance of Museums. Accreditation by the AAM is the highest honor achievable by an American museum. Accreditation recognizes high standards in individual museums and insures that these organizations continue to uphold the public trust. “The Flagler Museum takes great pride in achieving reaccreditation,” says Executive Director John Blades. “This recognition is a reflection of the quality of work performed at the museum on a daily basis and our institution’s drive to provide outstanding exhibitions and valuable educational programming and resources for our community and a national audience.” The Flagler Museum is one of only four sites in the nation to be awarded all three of the highest honors given to historic sites: designation as a National Historic Landmark, accreditation by the AAM and recognition with the Ross Merrill Award for outstanding commitment to the preservation and care of collections.

A troupe of 15 Ballet Palm Beach

dancers (seven company members and eight student

dancers ages 14-18) spent seven days traveling throughout Cuba in July through the organization’s international outreach program, Ballet Ambassadors. The entourage included Ballet Palm Beach’s principal dancer, Rogelio Corrales, a native of Cuba. With sponsorship from First Presbyterian Church of N orth Palm Beach, the dancers not only performed in theaters, churches and orphanages but also volunteered with children in remote villages and donated gently used ballet and pointe shoes, as well as costumes to some of the host churches. One of the performances took place in Corrales’ hometown.

In previous years,

Ballet Palm Beach dancers have traveled to Hungary, Cuba, Russia, Croatia, France and Bosnia-Herzegovina. “Art is a way to touch and connect with people,” says Ballet Palm Beach Artistic Director Colleen Smith.

1977 COLLE COLLEGE EGE DRIVE LADE, F L 33430 BELLE G GLADE, FL

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(From left) Dancers Madeleine Miller and Megan Dunn, a Cuban child, and dancers Lily Ojea and Callie Hamilton

Ron Hilliard

BOX OFFICE 561.993.1160 561.993.1160


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Luxury Designers

B R I E F LY

and

N O T E D

Cultural Consignments

Classic Collections Palm Beach

John Abbott

118 North County Road • Palm Beach 561.833.3633 | www.classiccollectionsofpalmbeach.com

The Creative City Collaborative announced that Todd Barkan will be the new programming director for Arts Garage in Delray Beach as well as special series and festivals in Pompano Beach. Barkan is a well respected talent in the jazz world and has served as both the artistic administrator at Jazz at Lincoln Center and the programming director of Dizzy’s Club Coca-Cola. Known for his quote, “Take care of the music, and the music will take care of you,” the Ohio native’s first jazz concerts were with luminaries such as The Modern Jazz Quartet, Dizzy Gillespie and Miles Davis. “I feel very honored and blessed in becoming a member of such a wonderful artistic family and look forward to many years of very creatively productive work that will benefit the communities we serve in countless positive and uplifting ways,” Barkan said. For more information, visit artsgarage.org.

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{cultural cuisine guide}

Cultural Cuisine Between Food and Culture

I n s p i r a t i o n s f r o m P a l m B e a c h C o u n t y ’s F i n e s t R e s t a u r a n t s & E a t e r i e s

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{dining out} C U LT U R A L C U I S I N E Voted Best Italian 2010, 2012, 2013 Best Brunch 2012

Best Wine List 2012 Wine Spectator Award Winning Wine List 2003-2013

“The Italian Restaurant on the Beach”

561-274-9404 Open 7 days serving Breakfast, Lunch, Dinner and Weekend Brunch

34 South Ocean Blvd, Delray Beach, FL 33483 caffelunarosa.com facebook.com/caffelunarosa

Don Ramon Restaurant

The Finest In Cuban Cuisine Since 1990

 3800 OCEAN Palm Beach Marriott Singer Island Beach Resort & Spa 3800 North Ocean Drive, Singer Island 561.340.1795 Discover an inspiring menu that echoes Chef Max’s dedication to simplicity, intense flavor and farm-to-table cuisine.  BB KING’S BLUES CLUB CityPlace, WPB 561.420.8600 Live music venue. Experience it today and “Let The Good Times Roll.”  BLUE MARTINI CityPlace, WPB 561.835.8601 An upscale martini bar featuring more than 20 of the hottest specialty martinis complemented by a sensational light menu.  BOGART’S BAR & GRILLE 3200 Airport Road, Boca Raton 561.544.3044 Bogart’s Bar & Grille, located at the Premier Level at Cinemark Palace in Boca Raton, is the ultimate dinner-and-a-movie experience.  BREWZZI Glades Plaza, 2222 Glades Road, Boca Raton 561.392.2739 Italian-American Bistro with upscalecasual dining for lunch and dinner, featuring a state-of-the-art, gold medal microbrewery.  BUCA DI BEPPO WELLINGTON 2025 Wellington Green Drive, Wellington 561.790.3287 In the spirit of Italian culture, our dishes are served family-style and meant to be shared by everyone at the table.

561.547.8704 | donramonrestaurant.com 7101 South Dixie Highway, West Palm Beach, FL

all our steaks are

served tender, juicy and

sizzling. Private Dining & Catering Available for groups up to 300 people.

Boca Raton | 561.392.6746

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 BURGER BAR 4650 Donald Ross Road, PB Gardens 561.630.4545 Indulge in hand-crafted signature gourmet burgers, specially fashioned from Angus beef.

 CITY OYSTER 213 East Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.272.0220 A traditional American seafood restaurant. Fresh, simple and delicious seafood selections.  CORDON BLEU CATERING 561.339.2444 Dinner parties, cocktail parties, yacht charters, wine tastings/pairings. European culinary excellence.  DAVE’S LAST RESORT 632 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.588.5208 Dave's has a Key West atmosphere in the heart of the Palm Beaches. Tropical drinks, a great raw bar and fantastic service.  DECK 84 840 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.665.8484 As the Avenue’s first waterfront dining concept of its kind, Deck 84 provides a stimulating waterfront dining experience.  DON RAMON RESTAURANT 7101 S. Dixie Highway, WPB 561.547.8704 Open daily for lunch and dinner. Come with family and friends and enjoy a great atmosphere and the finest in Cuban cuisine.  GREASE BURGER BAR 213 Clematis St., WPB 561.651.1075 Grease Burger Bar offers a selection of fresh ground-daily, hand-shaped, 10-ounce juicy burgers.  HENRY’S 16850 Jog Road, Delray Beach 561.638.1949 The ultimate location for gourmet American comfort food in Delray Beach. Henry’s combines substance and style for lunch and dinner.

 CAFÉ CHARDONNAY 4533 PGA Blvd., PB Gardens 561.627.2662 We delight you with the finest American cuisine. Chef Frank is constantly creating new foods to satify your every culinary desire.

 IRONWOOD STEAK & SEAFOOD PGA National Resort & Spa, PB Gardens 561.627.4852 Offering classic American cuisine with contemporary influences, serving up tantalizing menu selections.

 CAFÉ LUNA ROSA 34 South Ocean Blvd., Delray Beach 561.274.9404 We offer a memorable and authentic Italian dining experience, designed on two levels with alfresco seating and an elevated open-air dining room.

 LA BONNE BOUCHE BISTRO 516 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth 561.533.0840 Enjoy a sun-kissed lunch or a Frenchy breakfast on our outdoor patio or dinner in our cozy, très Parisian bistro-esque dining room!

 CITY CELLAR WINE BAR & GRILL CityPlace, WPB 561.366.0071 A diverse menu featuring steaks, chops, fish and pasta complements a huge 5,000-bottle wine collection.

 LEOPARD LOUNGE AND RESTAURANT The Chesterfield Hotel, PB 561.659.5800 Eclectic, “N ew American” gourmet cuisine offered in an elegant, yet playful atmosphere, with dancing and live entertainment.

Palm Beach County Location Reference  Southern |  Central |  Northern art&culture


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FRESH SEAFOOD SPECIALTIES • OCEAN FRONT DINING SUNDAY BRUNCH • HAPPY HOUR

Reserve Online at Muer.com 561.659.1500 • 456 S. Ocean Blvd.


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{dining out}

y

C U LT U R A L C U I S I N E

Now Offering

Casual yet sophisticated, Outstanding food, expertly prepared Great wines, Live music nightly. Seasonally inspired dining... 52 weeks a year!

BOCA RATON PALM BEACH GARDENS FT LAUDERDALE

For details, visit www.seasons52.com

Friends, Family & Neighbors All Gather at ...

Monday - Thursday 11 a.m. – 10 p.m. Saturday 11 a.m. – 11 p.m. Sunday 12 p.m. – 10 p.m. Dine In

Delivery

Catering

Take Out

Outdoor Seating Available 701 Lake Avenue, Lake Worth, Florida 561-296-9190 Just 2 Doors from the Playhouse Serving Veal, Chicken, Gourmet Pastas, Pizza, Subs, Salads & Sauces Made From Scratch

Casual Dining on Worth Avenue

Open 7 days Lunch/Dinner Sunday Brunch Continuous Dining 11am - 10pm 221 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach

835.3500

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 MORTON’S THE STEAKHOUSE 777 South Flagler Drive, WPB 561.820.8125 USDA Prime aged beef, live Maine lobsters, fresh fish, hand-selected vegetables and elegant desserts.

 ROTELLI 701 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.296.9190 Rotelli is pure Italian food, with classic dishes from traditional spaghetti and lasagna to shrimp scampi.

 MULLIGAN’S BEACH HOUSE BAR & GRILL 10 S. Ocean Blvd., Lake Worth 561.588.4133 Open seven days a week, 365 days a year for breakfast, lunch and dinner. We offer an array of daily drink and food specials.

 ROYAL ROOM CABARET The Colony Hotel, PB 561.655.5430 The Royal Room features top-name cabaret performers. Enjoy dinner and a show or just the show.

 THE OFFICE 201 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.276.3600 A place where whimsy and gastronomical delights go hand in hand, The Office is a modern American gastropub.  PADDOCK RESTAURANT Palm Beach Kennel Club, Suite 150, WPB 561.683.2222, Ext. 199 A unique dining experience – fine dining and an exciting show in an elegant dining room with a commanding view of the track.  PAMPAS GRILLE CITYPLACE 651 Okeechobee Blvd., WPB 561.791.6487 The menu at Pampas Brazilian Grille is as diverse as the Brazilian culture.  PARADISO RISTORANTE OF LAKE WORTH 625 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth 561.547.2500 Fish, seafood, steaks, full bar, wine cellar, private dining rooms, wine cellar dining. Prix fixe menu and a la carte.  POLO STEAKHOUSE RESTAURANT The Colony Hotel, PB 561.655.5430 Full-service restaurant specializing in prime dry-aged beef. Breakfast, lunch, dinner and cocktails.  RED BRICK GRILLE 4775 Lyons Road, Delray Beach 561.454.8002 Full-service casual dining experience featuring contemporary American cuisine featuring appetizers, gourmet pizzas, pasta, mouth-watering burgers, handcrafted sandwiches, fresh salads and more.  RENATO’S 87 Via Mizner, PB 561.655.9752 Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with a dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls.  ROCCO’S TACOS AND TEQUILA BAR 224 Clematis St., WPB 561.650.1001 Rocco’s Tacos offers a true taste of Mexico in a fun, casual environment.

 RUTH’S CHRIS STEAK HOUSE CityPlace, WPB 561.514.3544 The premier steakhouse at CityPlace in West Palm Beach. Catering service available.  SAILFISH RESTAURANT 98 Lake Drive, PB Shores 561.844.1724, Ext. 107 This exceptionally popular seafood restaurant serves breakfast, lunch and dinner daily.  SEASONS 52 11611 Ellison Wilson Road, PB Gardens 561.625.5852 Enjoy the taste of fresh food grilled over open wood fires, great wines and live piano music nightly in the wine bar.  SOUTH SHORES TAVERN & PATIO BAR 502 Lucerne Ave., Lake Worth 561.547.7656 Our moderately priced menu boasts generous portions and fresh ingredients. The cuisine is not the only thing that is fresh; so is the entertainment.  STIR LOUNGE Eau Palm Beach, Manalapan 561.533.6000 Stir Lounge offers creatively blended, muddled and stirred cocktails with a twist: Stir’s lively indoor and outdoor social scene.  SUNDY HOUSE RESTAURANT 106 S. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach 561.272.5678 Sundy House is a charming 150-seat, fine-dining establishment with accommodations nestled amid botanical gardens and waterfalls.  SURI 707 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.249.7436  TA-BOÓ, AN AMERICAN BISTRO & BAR 221 Worth Ave., PB 561.835.3500 An American bistro and bar featuring casual dining on Worth Avenue since 1941. Featuring prime steaks, Dover sole, sea bass, pizza, homemade desserts and cappuccinos.  TOOJAYS 419 Lake Ave., Lake Worth 561.582.8684 Corned beef piled high on freshly baked rye, classic Reubens and chicken noodle soup; more than 20 salads and much, much more.

Palm Beach County Location Reference  Southern |  Central |  Northern


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{dining out} C U LT U R A L C U I S I N E  TESTA’S RESTAURANT 221 Royal Poinciana Way, PB 561.832.0992 Testa’s serves Italian, American and seafood dishes. Breakfast, lunch or dinner. Testa’s is superb for a romantic getaway.  THREE (III) FORKS PRIME STEAKHOUSE PALM BEACH GARDENS 4645 PGA Blvd., PB Gardens 561.630.3660 III Forks is one of the nation’s prime steakhouses with a savvy menu featuring USDA Prime beef, seafood and local favorites.  TIDES OCEANFRONT GRILLE Palm Beach Oceanfront Inn, PB 561.855.7575 Tides Oceanfront Grille proudly boasts being the closest restaurant to the ocean in south Florida.  TEMPLE ORANGE Eau Palm Beach, Manalapan 561.540.4924 Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner, Temple Orange spotlights enlightened Florida cuisine. Infused with Mediterranean flavors and ingredients, the menus showcase healthy options right alongside comfort foods with an Eau Palm Beach twist.

87 Via Mizner, Worth Avenue, Palm Beach www.renatospalmbeach.com 561.655.9752

Renato’s is nestled in breathtaking architecture, with an intimate dining room that enchants with warm woods and fabric covered walls. Culinary delights from the classics to the eclectic are complemented with an extensive wine list and fully stocked bar.

 TIN FISH RESTAURANT 118 S. Clematis St., WPB 561.223.2497 Fresh, delicious fish, served quickly in a casual atmosphere. Try one of our seven famous fish tacos, salmon on slaw, crab cakes, fish sandwich or popular shrimp and corn chowder. Head upstairs to our Top of the Fish bar for an impressive cocktail selection and nightly drink specials.  TOWER RESTAURANT 44 Cocoanut Row, PB 561.659.3241 Tower Restaurant takes pride in its daily specials: wiener schnitzel, stuffed cabbage, pot roast and corned beef and cabbage; and monster apple pancake á la Luchows.  VIC & ANGELO’S DELRAY BEACH 290 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach 561.278.9570 From the garden to the plate, Vic & Angelo’s specializes in ingredients that are imported fresh from Italy.  THE WINE DIVE 319 Clematis St., WPB 561.318.8821 N ot just a wine bar and definitely not a dive – The Wine Dive is West Palm Beach’s goto spot for live jazz, innovative menu items, hand-crafted cocktails and, of course, more than 70 wines to be enjoyed by the flight, glass or bottle.

At Cafe Chardonnay we give center stage to local farm fresh foods and seafood. Chef Frank feels the flavor of every dish is dramatically improved by farm to table freshness.

4533 PGA Boulevard Palm Beach Gardens www.cafechardonnay.com 561.627.2662

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Jacek Gancarz

More than 200 guests attended the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County’s exhibition opening for Southern Exposure: New Work Now in June.

Jacek Gancarz

EXHIBITION OPENING: NEW WORK NOW

Stephen Backhus

Maureen Conte and Susan Dyer

EXHIBITION OPENING: RE-PURPOSED / RE-SEEN

Jacek Gancarz

Jacek Gancarz

In August, the opening of the Cultural Council's Re-purposed / Re-seen exhibition attracted approximately 200 members and friends.

Deborah Meisel and Chad Perna

Jacek Gancarz

Henriett Anri Michel’s painting, Digesting Memories #1 (2013, oil on canvas, 72 x 93 inches), is featured on the cover of the 2014-2015 Culture & Cocktails invitation. “My painting is about daily circumstances and how they affect my life,” the artist says. “The way we perceive, the way we think and the different ways we react to events will always make us unique. Digesting Memories is my interpretation of life’s many influences on each of us.” Jennifer O’Brien, Katie Deits and Susan Bardin

“ The Cultural Council has a significant impact on our community. They are able to provide assistance to some of the cultural organizations and individuals whose creativity captivates us − Sheryl Wood – Member, 16 years

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Jacek Gancarz

every day. For that they deserve our support.” Rena Blades and George S. Bolge


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JOIN THE CULTURAL COUNCIL As a member, we will keep you informed and entertained with our award-winning publications and signature events. Enjoy these exclusive benefits that offer incredible value — all year long!

Membership Benefits     

CONTRIBUTOR $600 All benefits of the Supporter membership, plus:  One additional guest pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  VIP seating at Culture & Cocktails  VIP passes to local art fairs  Two guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine

Invitations to members-only exhibition previews Free or reduced admission to select programs and events 10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store purchases Subscription to art&culture magazine and Cultural Calendar Recognition in the Council’s Annual Report

PATRON $1,000 All benefits of the Contributor membership, plus:  Two additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails  Four guest invitations to all member exhibition previews  Invitation to director’s annual event  Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building

INDIVIDUAL $65 All benefits listed above for one person HOUSEHOLD $150 Individual member benefits for two adults at the same address, plus:  CultureCard (membership discount card)

FOUNDING PATRON $2,500 AND ABOVE All the benefits of the Patron membership, plus:  Recognition on donor plaque  Private tours of special exhibitions for you and your guest upon request  Four additional guest passes to Culture & Cocktails

SUPPORTER $250 All benefits of the Household membership, plus:  One pass to each Culture & Cocktails program  One guest invitation to all member exhibition previews

To join the Cultural Council of Palm Beach County or for more information on Artist Membership visit palmbeachculture.com/jointhecouncil.

Business Arts Partner Membership Benefits

The Cultural Council of Palm Beach County is a not-for-profit agency providing artists and cultural organizations with programs and services that promote and support their individual missions. Members help us accomplish these goals and ensure our community continues to have access to quality arts programming. Our vibrant arts make our destination desirable to businesses, visitors and residents. Membership provides your business with access to valuable benefits increasing your visibility and connecting you with our donors, members and the greater community.

LEVEL OF SUPPORT

AFFILIATE STEWARD LEADER BENEFACTOR DIRECTOR CHAIRMAN $600 $1,000 $2,500 $5,000 $10,000 $25,000

Invitations to Members Only exhibition previews

Recognition in every issue of art&culture magazine and Council’s Annual Report

Discounted advertising rates for art&culture magazine

Business logo with live link on Council’s website

art&culture magazine delivered to your business (up to 20 copies per issue)

10% discount on Uniquely Palm Beach Store

Culture Card – Member discount cards for cultural organizations in Palm Beach County

2

4

6

8

10

12

Tickets to attend the Council’s SmARTBiz Summit for Arts & Business leaders

2

4

6

8

10

12

Free admissions to all Culture & Cocktails programs (includes VIP reserved seating)

2

4

6

8

10

12

Opportunity to hold a private event at the Council’s headquarters, The Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building Sponsorship of one Cultural Executives Committee Meeting* (Includes four invitations) Logo included in eblasts to all Cultural Council cultural organizations. Listing on donor plaque in the Alex and Renate Dreyfoos Entry into the galleries Private tours for 12 by advance arrangement Underwriting and exhibition sponsorships and partnerships *Based on availability

For more information, please call Debbie Calabria at (561) 472-3330.

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MEMBERS’ APPRECIATION LUNCHEON The Members’ Appreciation Luncheon was a memorable afternoon honoring members who have supported the Cultural Council for 10 years or more. Cara Young and Sydney Carbo from Young Singers of the Palm Beaches offered a delightful special performance, while guests enjoyed an amazing lunch prepared by Christafaro’s Catering. Paul Lee, managing director from Bernstein Global Wealth Management, made a special presentation on planned giving strategies. Sponsors included: Bernstein Global Wealth Management, Christafaro’s Catering and Atlas Party Rental.

Sheryl Wood and Bobbi Horwich

Martin Johnson, Essie Kaufman and Diane Johnson; George Elmore (in background)

GET A JUMP ON THE HOLIDAYS WITH A TASTE OF ART

Barry Seidman

The Cultural Council’s popular A Taste of Art trunk show event spotlights 14 artists who live and work in Palm Beach County. Enjoy delicious food, wine and dazzling company as you are among the first to see an enticing array of handmade jewelry, pottery, ceramics, candles and other items. Your support helps the Cultural Council’s continuing efforts to nurture and grow the artist community through exhibitions and professional development programming. A Taste of Art will also include raffle prizes and a photo booth. The event will take place on Nov. 14 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Cultural Council, 601 Lake Ave., Lake Worth. The cost is $25 per person. To make reservations, e-mail ksmiley@palmbeachculture.com or call (561) 472-3342. This event is generously underwritten by the Roe Green Foundation, Roe Green, Founder, with additional support provided by Banyan Printing, Boynton Beach Flower Market, Christafaro’s Catering, Paradiso Ristorante, PRP Wine International and Tito’s Handmade Vodka. A free public event will follow on Nov. 15 from 10 a.m. to 3 p.m.

SUPPORT THE CULTURAL COUNCIL’S ANNUAL FUND TODAY!

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The Cultural Council’s new Musician Memberships are open to any musician who actively performs, produces or records in Palm Beach County. To learn about available membership levels and benefits, visit palmbeachculture.com/ musician-membership.

Barry Seidman

This past year, because of Annual Fund donations, the Cultural Council was able to send 500 Belle Glade students on a field trip to Yesteryear Village, where children were able to interact with several local cultural organizations. The Council was also able to install five new exhibitions, which provided opportunities for 279 artists to exhibit their work in the Robert M. Montgomery, Jr. Building’s galleries. Your contributions to the Annual Fund support the Council’s mission to offer field trips to children in grades K-12, support artists through rotating exhibitions and provide professional development workshops for cultural organization leaders in Palm Beach County. Make your gift today by visiting palmbeachculture.com/donate.

Make Beautiful Music!


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THANK YOU In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and above help us accomplish our mission. Mrs. Pamela Acheson Myers Mr. and Mrs. Andrew M. Aiken Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson Arthur I. and Sydelle Meyer Charitable Foundation Atlas Party Rental The Azeez Foundation Audrey & Martin Gruss Foundation B/E Aerospace Ms. Dina Gustin Baker Ms. Phyllis Badesch Bank of America Banyan Printing Mr. and Mrs. R. Michael Barry Mrs. Marta Batmasian Mr. Bruce A. Beal and Mr. Francis V. Cunningham Beasley Hauser, Kramer & Galardi Mrs. JoAnne Berkow RSB Richard S. Bernstein and Associates, Inc. Bernstein Global Wealth Management Mr. and Mrs. John Blades Mr. Milton J. Block and Mrs. Leanna Landsmann Ms. Phyllis Borak The Boston Foundation Boca Raton Resort & Club Boynton Beach Flower Market Ms. Carole Boucard Mr. and Mrs. Michael J. Bracci Mr. Geoffrey Bradfield The Breakers Palm Beach Mr. and Mrs. Howard Bregman, Esq. The Ann K. and Douglas S. Brown Family Foundation Camilla Dietz/Bergeron, Ltd. Business Development Board Mr. Andrzej Bytnar Mr. Christopher D. Caneles and Mr. Stephen Nesbitt Ms. Laurie Carney Ms. Rose Carpenter The Colony Hotel Celia Lipton and Victor W. Farris Foundation Charlotte Pelton & Associates Christafaro’s Catering Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan The Community Foundation of Louisville Mr. and Mrs. Miles A. Coon Credit Suisse Crystal & Company Mr. and Mrs. Peter D. Cummings Mr. William R. Cummings Ms. Kathy Daigler Mr. Gus Davis Listing as of print date

Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro Mr. Bradford A. Deflin Dr. Richard P. D’Elia Divers Direct Mrs. Edith R. Dixon Mr. and Mrs. John T. Dougherty, Jr. Mrs. Cecile Draime Ms. Beatrice Doone-Merena Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos Dupuytren Foundation Earle I. Mack Foundation, Inc. Ms. Suzi K. Edwards Mr. George T. Elmore Donald M. Ephraim Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Jack Farber Film and Television Commission The Fine Foundation Mrs. Shirley Fiterman Mr. and Mrs. Charles E. Flack Florida Power & Light Company Flower Market Dr. and Mrs. Robert Flucke Mrs. Jack M. Friedland The Gardens Mall Mr. Jacek Gancarz The GE Foundation Ms. Beatriz A. Ford Fox Rothschild LLP Mrs. Jack M. Friedland Goldberg Foundation Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Craig D. Grant Mr. Raymond Graziotto The Roe Green Foundation Ms. Roe Green Greenberg Traurig, P.A. Hon. and Mrs. William Greenberg Ms. Peg Greenspon Gunster Henry L. Kimelman Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand Merrill G. and Emita E. Hastings Foundation Ms. Priscilla Heublein Mr. and Mrs. Herbert S. Hoffman Holyfield & Thomas, LLC John C. and Mary Jane Howard Foundation Ms. Lisa Huertas International Society of Palm Beach Ms. Melanie Jacobson Jasteka Foundation Inc. Jewish Federation of Greater Pittsburgh Johnson’s Custom Cakes and More JP Morgan Chase, The Private Bank Mr. Bertrand Jubert Ms. Muriel Kaplan Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp Ms. Jacqueline Kato and Mr. Howard Smith Katz Family Foundation

Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz Jr. Mr. and Mrs. Christopher G. Kellogg Kohnken Family Foundation Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman Mr. and Mrs. Leonard I. Korman Mr. and Mrs. Raymond E. Kramer Mrs. Emily F. Landau Geo. Zoltan Lefton Family Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Gerard Lemongello, DDS Mr. and Mrs. Harold Lenfest Mrs. Mary G. Lewis Ms. Syndie T. Levien Mrs. Claire M. Levine The Liman Foundation Loggerhead Marina Ms. Susan Lloyd Catherine Lowe M.D., LL.D. Ms. Adrianna Luchechko Mr. Peter Lunder The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation The Maltz Family Foundation Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews Ms. Elaine Meier Mrs. Sydelle Meyer Miami-Dade County Department of Cultural Affairs Mr. and Mrs. George J. Michel Jr. Ms. Nancy Miller Sydell and Arnold Miller Foundation Mrs. Sydell L. Miller Ms. Jane Mitchell Mrs. Mary Montgomery Ms. Virginia C. Mossburg Mrs. Elizabeth Neuhoff Mrs. Suzanne Niedland and Lawrence F. DeGeorge Ms. Paige Noland Northern Trust Office Depot Office Depot Foundation Olympusat, Inc. Mrs. Jane Osgood and Mr. Ted Hilles Mrs. Jane Osgood Oxbow Carbon and Minerals LLC Ms. Anka Palitz Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau Palm Beach Daily News Palm Beach County Film and Television Commission Palm Beach Kennel Club The Palm Beach Post The Park Foundation Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker Mr. and Mrs. William Parmelee Passport Publications & Media Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Dr. Henry J. Petraki PGA National Resort & Spa PNC Bank

PNC Foundation Port of Palm Beach District Dr. and Mrs. Carter Pottash Mr. and Mrs. John Preston PRP Wine International Publix Supermarket Charities Mrs. Tamara Rabil REG Architects Inc. Richard and Peggy Greenfield Foundation Rose Marie and Ted J. Miller Family Foundation Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Andrew Rodusky Mr. David Rogers Dr. and Mrs. Joseph Rooney Mr. and Mrs. Jay Rosenkranz Mr. and Ms. Wilbur L. Ross Jr. Dr. and Mrs. Marvin Rosenberg Mr. and Mrs. Leon M. Rubin Mr. and Mrs. Stanley M. Rumbough Jr. Ms. Diane Rutledge Mr. and Mrs. Ralph Saltzman Ms. Pamela Saba Dr. Edward W. Sandall and Mrs. Marie Hale Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager The Lewis Schott Foundation Mr. Gary Schweikhart Sargent Architectural Photography Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf Mr. Harold Smith Mr. Lawrence Sosnow Mr. and Mrs. Bob Stiller Tanks A lot Aquarium, Inc. Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco Telesco Family Foundation The Mary Alice Fortin Foundation, Inc. The Vecellio Family Foundation, Inc. Mrs. Sandra Thompson Ms. Patricia G. Thorne Tito’s Handmade Vodka Mr. and Mrs. Bruce E. Toll Mrs. Phyllis Tick United Way of Palm Beach County William R. Kenan, Jr. Charitable Trust Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio Jr. Baroness Jeane von Oppenheim Ms. Linda Wartow Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman Ms. Maryanne Webber West Palm Beach Downtown Development Authority Dr. Mark Hayden Widick Winston Art Group WorldMark Entertainment Ms. Susy Witt Mrs. Lee Wolf Ms. Sheryl G. Wood, Esq. Zissu Family Foundation Ms. Anne Zuckerberg

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This mummy, dating from the Third Intermediate (1069-664 BCE) to Late Period (664-332 BCE), is among the priceless Egyptian artifacts making their North American debut at the South Florida Science Center.

an open and shut case What does it take to get a mummy from ancient Egypt to the South Florida Science Center and Aquarium? In the next issue of art&culture, we’ll go behind the scenes at some of this season’s most exciting exhibitions – including Afterlife: Tombs & Treasures of Ancient Egypt at the Science Center – to explore the essential relationships and logistics involved in mounting a major show. We’ll also introduce you to those who dare to dream of bringing new ideas, broader horizons and a pharaoh’s treasure to Palm Beach County.

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Classical Music. It’s In Our Nature. Just like all of us, classical music lives and breathes. Make it part of your lifestyle. Tune to Classical South Florida on the radio or online. It’s in your nature.

classicalsouthflorida.org


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art&culture magazine v9i1 Fall 2014  

As the primary catalyst for Palm Beach County’s thriving cultural climate, art&culture magazine is the official publication for the Cultural...

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