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art culture Fall 2010

Real Vision Artists find inspiration at the intersection of South Florida’s natural and man-made worlds By John Loring

First Class Palm Beach County’s arts-based magnet schools deliver beautiful results

True Blue Underwater photography offers a new perspective on Palm Beach County’s natural beauty

PLUS,

new works premiering on Palm Beach County stages, the local jazz scene, ballet birthdays and more

of Palm Beach County


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Feminine Perfection The Octopus Necklace A creature of deep mystique and symbol of cunning and grace under pressure, this piece of feminine perfection with luxurious pink, yellow and blue sapphires will give you a halo of pure brilliance, while mesmerizing your friends on seeing you wrapped up in these dramatic diamond encrusted tentacles. For art lovers only.

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CHANEL GUCCI RALPH LAUREN TIFFANY & CO. LOUIS VUITTON BURBERRY TORY BURCH VERA BRADLEY TOURNEAU LACOSTE COLE HAAN LULULEMON ATHLETICA J.CREW BILLABONG ZARA WILLIAMS-SONOMA MAYORS JEWELERS POTTERY BARN KIDS BROOKS BROTHERS LILLY PULITZER MICHAEL KORS TRUE RELIGION BRAND JEANS APPLE TOUS MONTBLANC STUART WEITZMAN EDWARD BEINER HAMILTON JEWELERS

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the gardens maLL Saks Fifth Avenue, Bloomingdale’s, Nordstrom, Macy’s and Sears I-95 to PGA Boulevard East in Palm Beach Gardens 561.622.2115 thegardensmall.com


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COUTURE OPTIQUE Setting the Standard for Fine Eyewear Voted “Retailer of the Year” by Eye Care Business Magazine

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features

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academy graduates A creative partnership between two young Floridians leads to a world premiere at the Maltz Jupiter Theatre. By Bill Hirschman

46

46

new synthetic realism The relationship between the natural and man-made worlds we inhabit provides inspiration for a distinctive breed of South Florida artists. By John Loring

54

underwater beauty Discover exquisite beauty and priceless gifts beneath Palm Beach County’s waves. Photographs by Christopher Pulitzer Leidy and Tony Ludovico

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68 72

a sultry sunset, a saxophone and all that jazz From its sandy shores to its relaxing restaurants, chic clubs and concert halls, Palm Beach County offers some intriguing opportunities to drink in a live jazz performance. By Christina Wood

magnetic attraction Palm Beach County’s innovative arts-based charter and choice schools put a creative spin on academic success. By M.M. Cloutier

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fall 2010

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welcome letter The Cultural Council’s participation in the South Florida Cultural Consortium’s Fellowship Program demonstrates the benefits of regional cooperation while emphasizing excellence. By Rena Blades

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editor’s note Innovation is both an art—and a science. By Christina Wood

34 20

upfront • Get away from the ordinary with an Artcation package at the Boca Raton Resort & Club. • A new play commissioned by Florida Stage ventures deep into the Everglades. • Celebration Cruise Line kicks off $250,000 Caribbean Idol Karaoke Contest. • The Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s popular Culture & Cocktails series returns for a sixth season of engaging conversation. • WXEL FM turns up the volume on South Florida’s cultural community. • The Writers Circle, a haven for serious scribblers at the Kravis Center, serves up Verbal Snacks, a tasty sampling of short stories. • Miami City Ballet, Boca Ballet Theatre and Florida Classical Ballet Theatre celebrate major milestones.

30 28

art works! Join us as we introduce a new column celebrating the many ways that artists, cultural organizations and creative partnerships are working to make life better for the people of Palm Beach County.

30

portrait Singular talent and a unique perspective make visual artist and environmental designer Michael Singer a true original.

34 20 38 77

profile For Laurie Silvers the challenge of creating something brand new – in business or the arts – is exhilarating.

calendar Our busy cultural calendar celebrates the launch of a dynamic new season with a fabulous lineup of entertaining and enlightening events stretching into the new year.

inside culture Palm Beach Dramaworks anticipates a move; “Feather Wars” chronicles fashion’s environmental impact; the Council’s annual member meeting and reception in the Robert M. Montgomery Jr. Building in Lake Worth showcases the Council’s future home; and much more insider news.

40 Cover Image:

As Above–So Below (detail) mixed media tableau (2009) by Phillip Estlund Photo by Jim Fairman

fall 2010

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R I C H T Er s

RICHTERS RARE GEMS AND ESTATE JEWELRY SINCE 1893 • 224 WORTH AVENUE, PALM BEACH, FLORIDA 33480 • (561) 655-0774


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Palm Beach County Cultural Council 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 300, West Palm Beach, FL 33401 561-471-2901 • www.palmbeachculture.com

President & Chief Executive Officer

Rena Blades

561-471-2901 rblades@palmbeachculture.com

Bill Nix

561-687-8727 bnix@palmbeachculture.com

Contributing Writer/Editor

Leon M. Rubin

561-251-8075 lmrubin@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Arts and Cultural Education

Alyx Kellington

561-471-1602 akellington@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Finance

Kathleen Alex

561-471-1368 kalex@palmbeachculture.com

Director of Membership

Mary Dunning

561-472-3330 mdunning@palmbeachculture.com

Jan Rodusky

561-471-1513 jrodusky@palmbeachculture.com

Melissa Santee

561-472-3340 msantee@palmbeachculture.com

Larry Boytano

561-471-1601 lboytano@palmbeachculture.com

Jennifer Lamont

561-471-2902 jlamont@palmbeachculture.com

Margaret Granda

561-471-0009 mgranda@palmbeachculture.com

Jean Brasch

561-471-2903 jbrasch@palmbeachculture.com

Maggie Edwards

561-472-2901 medwards@palmbeachculture.com

Vice President, Marketing & Government Affairs

Director of Grants

Director of Development

Public Relations Coordinator

Marketing Coordinator

Grants Manager

Bookkeeper

Coordinator, Development and Special Projects Volunteer

Pat Thorne

Cultural Council Board of Directors Officers Michael J. Bracci, Chairman

Cecile Draime Timothy A. Eaton

Dana T. Pickard

Berton E. Korman, Vice Chairman Michael D. Simon, Secretary Howard Bregman, Treasurer

Shirley Fiterman

Kelly Sobolewski

Craig Grant

Dom A. Telesco

Directors Clarence E. Anthony Carole Boucard Christopher D. Canales Bradford A. Deflin

Irene J. Karp

Ex Officios

Raymond E. Kramer, III

Mark Alexander

Sydelle Meyer

Roger Amidon

Jo Anne Rioli Moeller Geoff Neuhoff

Paulette Burdick

Jean Sharf

Herbert S. Hoffman

Gary P. Eliopoulos

Palm Beach County Board of County Commissioners Burt Aaronson, Chairperson Karen T. Marcus, Vice Chair

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Shelley Vana Steven L. Abrams

Jess R. Santamaria Priscilla A. Taylor


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FINE JEWELRY & ART 2 4 9 W O R T H AV E N U E , PA L M B E A C H

5 61- 4 2 0 - 8 8 6 6

JEWELRY BY:

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art&culture of Palm Beach County

fall 2010 - volume 5, issue 1

editorial staff managing editor

christina wood

561.472.8778 christina@passportpublications.com

senior verification specialist

bradley j. oyler

561.472.8765 bradley@passportpublications.com

verification specialist

jeffery archer

561.472.8776 jeffery@passportpublications.com

verification specialist

patrick gamble

561.472.8779 bradley@passportpublications.com

cultural council editorial staff editorial director

rena blades

executive editor

bill nix

managing editor

leon m. rubin

contributing writers m.m. cloutier, jan engoren, jim fairman, bill hirschman, john loring, leon m. rubin, christina wood

contributing photographers lucien capehart, steven caras, christopher fay, jim fairman, barry kinsella, christopher pulitzer leidy, tony ludovico, robert stevens, sig visions, studio palm beach

Once again, and for the seventh year in a row, in the annual U.S.News & World Report survey on America’s Best Hospitals, ophthalmologists from around the country ranked Bascom Palmer Eye Institute the best eye hospital in the United States. This honor is a great testimony to our experience and technology. More importantly, if any member of their families needed a procedure, the best eye doctors in the world would tell them to travel long distances to get here. And that makes you very lucky. Because you don’t have to.

art & design art & production director assistant production director

angelo d. lopresti

561.472.8770 angelo@passportpublications.com

nicole smith

561.472.8762 nicole@passportpublications.com

advertising sales senior advertising manager director of signature publications director of digital and print media

janice l. waterman

561.472.8775 jwaterman@passportpublications.com

simone a. desiderio

561.472.8764 simone@passportpublications.com

richard alker

561.472.8767 richarda@passportpublications.com

publisher publisher & president

robert s.c. kirschner

561.472.8778 robert@passportpublications.com

on the cover As Above–So Below (detail) mixed media tableau (2009), by Phillip Estlund Ž

Palm Beach - (561) 515-1500 7101 Fairway Dr., Palm Beach Gardens Miami U Naples U Plantation (305) 326-6000 www.bascompalmer.org

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art&culture

a passion for people & publishing

art&culture magazine is published by Passport Publications & Media Corporation, located at 1555 Palm Beach Lakes Blvd., Suite 1550, West Palm Beach, FL 33401, on behalf of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. No part of this publication may be reproduced without the expressed written consent of the publisher. All rights reserved.


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WELCOME TO

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fromtheceo

I recently had the opportunity to make one of my favorite phone calls – the one in which I notify a local artist that he or she is the Palm Beach County recipient of the annual South Florida Cultural Consortium (SFCC) Fellowship for Visual and Media Artists. This year, the person on the other end of the line was Sibel Kocabasi, a Lake Worth artist who happens to be featured in John Loring’s fascinating article on page 46. Sibel, who is known nationally and internationally for her work, received her M.F.A. in painting from Florida Atlantic University in Boca Raton and teaches art for several Palm Beach County organizations. During my conversation with Sibel, I was delighted to tell her that she is receiving a $15,000 award through the highly respected SFCC Fellowship Program, which is one of the largest such awards provided by local arts agencies in the United States. She plans to use these funds to help her expand into a new studio. It is so rewarding to be able to assist an artist in making art! Sibel is among 12 artists in five South Florida counties to receive one of the 2010 fellowships. Their collective work will be shown later this season at the Frost Museum of Art in Miami and featured in an exhibition catalog. The Palm Beach County Cultural Council is proud to join our sister arts agencies in Martin, Broward, Miami-Dade and Monroe counties to offer this

program, which stands as a shining example of the impact that can be made through regional collaboration in the arts. Just as economic development organizations have recognized the benefits of working regionally, arts and cultural organizations, too, have found that there can be strength in numbers. In addition to offering the annual fellowship program, which has been in existence for more than two decades, the SFCC is always looking ahead. Current ideas being explored include the creation of a database of teaching artists and exploration of regional funding opportunities in which arts and culture can play a part. Our Cultural Council’s participation in the SFCC Fellowship Program represents one more important way in which we emphasize excellence in arts and culture. We acknowledge and support innovative work through our grants programs. We nurture excellence through the professional assistance and educational opportunities that we provide to artists, educators and cultural organizations. We recognize exceptional contributions through our annual Muse Awards – for which we hope you will join us on February 10, 2011! Indeed, excellence is truly a driving force behind everything we do at the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. We look for ways to encourage it every day – and we always welcome your ideas and suggestions. Thank you so much for continuing to support us in our efforts.

Rena Blades President and CEO Palm Beach County Cultural Council

Michael Price

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SOMEWHERE OUT ON THE EDGE You might have heard of Max Planck. He won the Nobel Prize in Physics in 1918 for his groundbreaking work on quantum theory and has cutting-edge research centers in Germany and Palm Beach County named for him. What you might not know is that Planck was also a gifted musician who played piano, organ and cello when he wasn’t busy composing songs and operas or being one of the greatest physicists of the 20th century.

fromthe

We tend to associate innovation with science and technology but – as you’ll see when you delve into the fall issue of art&culture – innovation and creativity are two sides of the same coin. In the pages of this magazine, you will meet artists who are exploring new ideas and will discover exciting new ways of looking at the world we live in. As a visual artist and environmental designer, Michael Singer is constantly breaking new ground – all around the world and right around the corner here in Palm Beach County; arts writer Jan Engoren shows you how in a portrait on page 30. On page 34, we’ll introduce you to Laurie Silvers, a successful entrepreneur with a decidedly creative approach to business, and, in our feature on “New Synthetic Realism” on page 46, regular art&culture contributor John Loring introduces you to three South Florida artists who have something to say about the way contemporary society is affecting the natural landscape. For a breathtaking new perspective on a very distinctive part of that landscape we turn to underwater photographers Tony Ludovico and Christopher Pulitzer Leidy, who share their vision with us on page 54. In “A Sultry Sunset, a Saxophone and All That Jazz” on page 68, we celebrate musical innovation, with a fresh take on the local jazz scene.

Earlier this year, Ovation CEO Charles Segars testified before the U.S. Congress about the relationship between creativity and innovation. “I firmly believe,” he said, “that an understanding and appreciation of the arts and well-developed creative skills are central to the future of America’s workforce development. There is no question that our rapidly evolving global economy demands a dynamic and creative workforce. If we want America to stay competitive, we must invest in the arts to a greater degree.” As you’ll see in our feature “Magnetic Attraction” on page 72, arts-based magnet schools and choice programs are giving Palm Beach County students a powerful edge for the future. With every colorful page you turn in this issue of art&culture, you’ll find stories that celebrate creativity and originality. We’ve got the latest on new shows premiering in Palm Beach County theaters and on the new possibilities emerging in Lake Worth as the Palm Beach County Cultural Council prepares to move into its new home. And, as you’ll see on page 28, we’ve got a few new ideas ourselves! With this issue, we’re pleased to introduce a new department that we’re calling Art Works! Every day, the cultural community rolls up its sleeves and gets down to the business of creating jobs, generating income and touching people’s lives, often in beautiful and surprising ways. In every issue of art&culture, you can now look forward to reading more about the very real ways in which art impacts our lives and our community. Imagine!

Christina Wood Managing Editor

Jacek Gancarz

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contributors James W. Fairman

John Loring was a contributing writer and New York Bureau Chief at Architectural Digest. He served as the design director of Tiffany & Co. for 30 years and has written numerous books on style and social history. John graduated from Yale University, completed four years of graduate studies at the Ecole des Beaux Arts in Paris and has an honorary Doctorate of Fine Arts degree from Pratt Institute.

Bill Hirschman is the lead critic and cofounder of South Florida

Latte, and a good dirty martini.

Theater Review, an Internet site dedicated to comprehensive coverage of the region’s theater with reviews, news, updated show schedules and a blog (Southfloridatheaterreview.com). Bill was a theater critic for the Sun-Sentinel for 10 years; his work has also been published in Variety and The Miami Herald as well as art&culture. He is also writing crime novels, an outgrowth of 40 years as a reporter in Florida, New York and the Midwest, and has created a net-based radio/television program about theater, Aisle Say.

New York native Jim Fairman was introduced to photography in high school and has rarely put his camera down since. The West Palm Beach resident is a busy freelance photographer who captures a diverse array of subjects from yachts and exotic cars to high fashion and flowers. Fairman has been a contibuting team member to

art&culture since day one.

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Jan Engoren is a freelance writer living in Boca Raton. Growing up with an artist father, Jan was exposed to art, culture and travel from an early age. She spent a year abroad studying French and traveling throughout Europe, Mexico and parts of the Middle East. After college, Engoren worked for the art auction house, Sotheby’s, where her appreciation of art was furthered. Though art is in her genes, Jan’s talent is writing; she combines her two interests by writing about art and culture. She is currently working on a future best-seller and in her spare time enjoys tennis, her two cats, Blanca and

M.M. Cloutier is a West Palm Beach-based freelance writer who has written extensively about art and culture in Palm Beach County and elsewhere. Throughout her career, she has also written numerous profiles and covered business, cuisine, fashion and more for such newspapers as The New York Times, The Miami Herald, The Palm Beach Post and Palm Beach Daily News, among others, and for several magazines, including reporting for Time.

With a lifelong interest in the arts inspired largely by his highly creative parents, Leon Rubin has been writing about arts and culture for more than three decades. A Boca Raton resident for almost 17 years, Leon was actively involved in children’s theater and helped to establish the Boca Raton Cultural Consortium. He now contributes to art&culture virtually from the home that he and his wife, Suzi, share in the mountains above Dahlonega, Georgia.


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a m e d l e y o f w h a t ’s h o t o n t h e l o c a l a r t & c u l t u r e s c e n e

Outside the Box G e t A w a y f r o m t h e O r d i n a r y w i t h a n A R Tc a t i o n at the Boca Raton Resort & Club The historic Boca Raton Resort & Club has been perfecting the fine art of hospitality for decades. Its latest masterpiece is a colorful Artcation Package, which showcases the Resort’s innovative sculpture program and features complimentary or discounted admission to area museums, exhibitions and theater performances. Guests may also opt for a private painting session with the Resort’s artist-in-residence, Lynn Travis Stender, an exhibiting member of the Boca Raton Museum of Art. Classic statues have graced the grounds of the Resort since its opening in 1926. Now, thanks to a partnership with Boca Raton’s Elaine Baker Gallery – celebrated for its ever-changing collection of contemporary works by international artists – an intriguing array of museum-quality work is on display throughout the 365-acre Resort. The two-night Artcation Package brings these sculptures to life while introducing guests to other cultural attractions in the area, including the Caldwell Theatre Company, the Boca Raton Symphonia and the Boca Raton Museum of Art. “We are pleased to have formed this creative partnership with the Elaine Baker Gallery. It’s a great platform for developing ongoing arts-related activities that engage and delight enthusiasts and collectors of all ages and interests,” Boca Raton Resort & Club President Stephen Ast says.

FOR

more information call 888-543-1286 or visit www.BocaResort.com

Now Showing New Play Set in the ’Glades Storms into the Kravis Center As part of its mission to develop and produce new work for the American theater, Florida Stage is commissioning a collection of plays that explore essential issues in the Sunshine State. The first installment in The Florida Cycle, as the collection is called, will open the company’s 24th season. Cane, written by Florida Stage Playwright-in-Residence Andrew Rosendorf, is a gripping mystery set in the ’Glades that probes the nature of our relationship with one of the state’s Andrew Rosendorf most vital and fragile resources: water. The story begins as the devastating hurricane of 1928 is approaching. Past and present are deeply connected – with the help of some extraordinary special effects – in a tale of betrayal and bloodshed, water, wind, family and fortune. Cane, which opens October 29 and runs through November 28, also represents the opening of Florida Stage’s first season as the resident company in the Rinker Playhouse at the call (561) 585-3433 Kravis Center for the Performing Arts. or visit www.floridastage.org

FOR

more information

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Spotlight On High Cs on the High Seas

Celebration Cruise Line, which offers two-night Bahamas cruises from Palm Beach, has created a unique opportunity for talented singers. The cruise line has kicked off a $250,000 Caribbean Idol Karaoke Contest. “One of the most popular activities on our ship is karaoke,” said Glenn Ryerson, sales and marketing senior vice president for Celebration. “We just decided to increase the stakes a bit by adding $10,000 monthly winners and a $100,000 grand prize.” The contest is open to all non-professional singers ages 14 and up. Auditions sessions are held on the ship. Each session has a winner, as voted on by the audience, and the session winners compete for a free cruise and the opportunity to move on to the month end semi-finals, with a $10,000 cash prize. There will be nine $10,000 winners chosen between September and May. All of the semi-finalists will be invited to compete for the $100,000 Grand Prize in June along with other rewards. Singers are urged to sign up when they book their cruise. Given the significant prize money, audition spots are expected to fill up quickly!

FOR

more information call 800-995-3254 or visit www.BahamasCelebration.com

Now Showing Culture & Cocktails Inspires Conversation

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Mordes, owner of Whitespace – The Mordes Collection; with panel moderator Kara Walker-Tomé, an independent curator

Corby Kaye, Studio Palm Beach

FOR

more information

Corby Kaye, Studio Palm Beach

The Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s popular Culture & Cocktails series returns for a sixth year. The 2010-2011 season kicks off on November 8 at Café Boulud in Palm Beach; the topic for a panel of show business insiders will be Backstage Whispers. On December 6, a delicious conversation will be simmering at the Boca Raton Resort & Club as a professional panel discusses Food Glorious Food. The series returns to Café Boulud on January 10, for a conversation about the power of photography and poetry. “Once again, Culture & Cocktails will be a very entertaining way to learn about some of the exciting elements in our cultural community and the people behind them,” Burt Reynolds at a 2009 Culture & Cocktails event says Rena Blades, president and chief executive officer of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. The series, which continues through April, is generously sponsored by The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation. Additional support is provided by The Peter and Vicki Halmos Family Foundation / Palm Beach Principal Players, Palm Beach Daily News and PR-BS, a Boca Raton-based public relations firm. All Culture & Cocktails events are free for members of the Cultural Council ($175 level and above). The price for non-members is $35 per person, with all proceeds benefiting the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. Each event runs from 5 to 7 p.m., with registration and cocktails from 5 to 5:45 p.m.; the call (561) 472-3330 “Conversation” begins at 5:45 and is (L-R) Cheryl Brutvan, curator of Contemporary Art at the Norton or visit www.palmbeachculture.com followed by an audience Q&A. Museum of Art; Tim Eaton, owner of Eaton Fine Art; and Elayne


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Spotlight On

W X E L FM Tu r n s u p t h e Vo l u m e o n S o u t h F l o r i d a’s C u l t u ra l C o m m u n i t y

Every week, local public radio station WXEL 90.7 FM celebrates the people, places and events that fill our local cultural calendar with color and character. South Florida Artsview, an hour-long program hosted by Caroline Breder-Watts and Bill Nix, vice president for marketing and government affairs at the Palm Beach County Cultural Council, airs on Bill Nix Caroline Breder-Watts Fridays from 12 noon to 1 pm. The show, which is made possible with support from the Cultural Council, features behind-the-scenes interviews, insightful commentary and live performances. Installments from an exciting new project developed by Boynton Beach-based 2Watts Productions in partnership with Sherron Long and the Florida Cultural Alliance’s Cultural Heritage Project have recently been added to the lineup. Timesteps: The Florida Arts Oral History Project seeks to create a lasting record by capturing the distinctive voices and meaningful memories that have shaped the cultural life of our community. Phase one of the project is focused on the cultural life of South Florida. Excerpts of conversations between artists who have been active in the Florida arts scene for at least 10 years, interviews with cultural leaders and impromptu performances recorded as part of the project can be heard exclusively on WXEL FM and HD1; complete interviews will be available as podcasts on the ArtsRadioNetwork.com. Breder-Watts, who has happy memories of a time when the Burt Reynolds Dinner Theatre and the West Palm Beach Auditorium dominated the cultural landscape, is passionate call (561) 737-8000 or visit www.wxel.org about preserving the past. “I don’t want that to be forgotten,” she says.

FOR

more information

Literary Devices T h e K r a v i s C e n t e r S h o w c a s e s Ta l e n t o n t h e P a g e a s w e l l a s t h e S t a g e Nancy S. Sims of Palm Beach Gardens joined the Writers’ Circle at the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts six years ago. This year, she became the first in the group to see her work published. Verbal Snacks, an eclectic collection of short stories, was recently released and represents the Kravis Center’s preliminary foray into the world of publishing. The Writers’ Circle developed as a haven for serious writers under the guidance of noted biographer, novelist and playwright Julie Gilbert, whose creative writing workshops, offered as part of the Kravis Centers’ ArtSmart series, have evolved into Nancy Sims

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the Writers’ Academy. The program, which is designed to encourage, develop and showcase talented writers of all ages, will start a new session in January. The Kravis Center hopes to continue its role as publisher with a second book penned by a Julie Gilbert member of the Writers’ Circle tentatively scheduled to hit shelves in 2011.

FOR

more information call (561) 832-7469 or visit www.kravis.org


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(67$7(&2//(&7,21 DEFINING THE ESSENCE OF HISTORICAL BEAUTY Estate Raymond C. Yard Ruby & Diamond Double Clip Brooch Set in platinum, with two cushion-cut rubies, accented by smaller rubies and diamonds. Signed Raymond C. Yard.


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By the Numbers Happy Birthday to Miami City Ballet, Boca Ballet Theatre and Florida Classical Ballet Theatre

Three local dance companies are marking major milestones this season. Miami City Ballet will celebrate its 25th anniversary with the return of live music, in the form of the Opus One Orchestra led by award-winning principal conductor Maestro Gary Sheldon. (www.miamicityballet.org) Boca Ballet Theatre has been creating opportunities for aspiring young dancers and internationally acclaimed professionals to work and grow together for 20 years. (www.bocaballet.org) Florida Classical Ballet Theatre has been keeping audiences on their toes for 10 years. (www.fcbt.org) As the birthday celebrations continue with a variety of performances scheduled throughout the season, it is local audiences that will be receiving the greatest gift.

Boca Ballet Theatre, Play Ball! Dancer: Bobby Briscoe Photo by: David Seabrooke

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Florida Classical Ballet Theatre, The Nutcracker Dancer: Lily Ojea

Miami City Ballet, Renato Penteado in Fanfare. Photo by: Lois Greenfield


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Justinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s of Palm Beach Salon & Spa (Located at the Midtown shopping plaza) A

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{upfront art works!}

art rt works! look around you

art works! for you

The arts are making a difference in people’s lives every day – all across our community. It’s not just about pretty pictures; the arts are putting people to work, boosting academic achievement, inspiring creativity in the workplace, opening doors and touching hearts. As Rocco Landesman, chairman of the National Endowment for the Arts, says, “Art works.” According to a comprehensive study conducted by Americans for the Arts, the nonprofit arts and culture industry in the U.S. generates $166.2 billion in economic activity every year – $63.1 billion in spending by organizations and an additional $103.1 billion in event-related spending by their audiences. Every year in Palm Beach County, the study reports that the nonprofit arts and culture industry generates: • 4,812 full-time equivalent jobs • $97,235,000 million in household income • $9.9 million in local government tax revenues • $9.6 million in state government tax revenues And, every year, neighborhoods and urban environments are transformed, drop-out rates among high school students are reduced, blood pressure readings improve and creative solutions are found to the challenges we share.

Here at art&culture, we’re excited to introduce a new column that will focus on the many ways that artists, cultural organizations and creative partnerships are working for the people of Palm Beach County. We’re calling it Art Works! In every issue, we’ll demonstrate the powerful impact the arts have on our community and highlight innovative projects, programs and people that are tapping into that power to make beautiful things happen – through outreach, economic activity and personal achievement. Palm Beach County boasts some of the finest art and history museums, dance and theater companies, performing arts venues, festivals and nature-based attractions in all of Florida. Join us as we celebrate the many contributions they make to our community and to the quality of life we are fortunate to enjoy here.

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West Palm Beach Waterfront at Clematis Street

The

Projected South Cove Ecological Regeneration

singular michael

singer By Jan Engoren

West Palm Beach Waterfront at Clematis Street

Alterra Institute for Environmental Research - Netherlands Top right photo: Rendering by Jason Bregman (for Michael Singer Studio) Top and bottom left photos: Robert Stevens; Bottom right photo: Edwin Walwisch

As a child, Vermont-based artist and designer Michael Singer wanted to be Thelonius Monk. His piano teacher took him to New York’s Greenwich Village to see Monk perform live. Once he heard the jazz virtuoso’s inimitable style, he realized there could only be one Thelonius Monk. And thus began Singer’s illustrious career as a visual artist. More than an artist, Singer is an environmental designer and architect who brings creative thinking and a vision of urban ecosustainable living environments to the public arena. An admirer of out-of-the-box thinking, Singer is always questioning the status quo. He contemplates, “What is the role of a visual artist in contemporary life?” Singer is part of a movement called Regenerative Design, which goes beyond the green movement’s efforts at sustainability and looks to create not just efficient systems, but effective ones. “I look for the relationship between the design and the natural world and interconnect the two,” says Singer, who served as the

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Dorothy F. Schmidt Eminent Scholar in the Arts at Florida Atlantic University from 2002 to 2006 and as a special consultant to the university’s dean of Arts and Humanities from 2006 to 2010. “We take sustainable to another level. My landscape designs incorporate environmental regeneration. My design philosophy helps our eco-systems grow and change in a positive way and promotes health and growth.” Singer, a part-time resident of South Florida, worked handin-hand with West Palm Beach Mayor Lois Frankel to re-envision the waterfront area at Clematis Street. The re-imagined waterfront, completed in February, includes a multi-use park, double-seated swings hanging from vine-covered pergolas, seven water gardens, piers, a “living” dock with live oyster beds that functions as a water-filtration system and a solar-paneled pavilion. “The Florida environment is unique and presents special challenges: the prevailing easterly winds, the light, the lack of


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West Palm Beach Waterfront, Living Docks Photo: David Stansbury

elevation and the indigenous flora and fauna,” Singer says. He comprising 13 acres of grass, trails and palm trees, encourages converted the concrete roadway and seawall into a green, and reflects the natural Florida environment. Singer’s biggest challenge? “Making people aware of Florida’s pedestrian-friendly, one-mile expanse of modern design bursting unique bio-diversity, the benefits of culturing native with indigenous flora, such as salt palmetto, begonias, plants, recycling water and learning to live in firecrackers, tabebuia, wild petunias, mangroves, Royal “I look for the harmony with nature.” Poincianas, gumbo-limbos and 10 species of palms. relationship After three decades of accomplishments in “Michael has a unique ability to incorporate functionality, between the architecture, infrastructure, site-specific environmental health and aesthetics into design,” says installations, indoor and outdoor sculptures, public Frankel, who first met Singer in 2002 when he was working design and commissions and land-use planning in both the US with the Armory Art Center in West Palm Beach on an the natural and Europe, does Singer have a favorite project? innovative design for Howard Park. As one of the first world and “Yes,” he says. “My favorite project is always my recipients of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s Artistinterconnect current project.” Currently, he is working with the in-Residence Grant, Singer brought new vision to the park, the two” architectural firm of Kimley-Horn and Associates Inc., bringing new life to its relationship with the Armory and the assisting the City of Lake Worth to redesign its surrounding communities in the process. “He transformed a mundane storm water project into a waterfront and take advantage of a $5 million grant from the county. beautiful, revitalized city park,” Frankel marvels. The park, The project will be completed in 2013.

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Christas South Seashells A&C Fall 10:Layout 1

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Laurie Silvers: Out of this World By Christina Wood

Laurie Silvers has a hard time putting her BlackBerry away. She’s not proud of the fact but she’s unhesitatingly honest about it. “We’re busier than we used to be and it’s not good,” the Boca Raton resident says. “We’re in constant motion.” Everyday, we are bombarded with emails; besieged by phone calls. Text messages won’t wait. Deadlines loom. Business negotiations that once took weeks to mature now develop within days. “That,” Silvers says, “is why the arts are so important.”

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As a successful executive, incurable entrepreneur and dedicated member of the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts’ board of directors as well as a full-fledged member of the sandwich generation and the 2010 chair of the Economic Council of Palm Beach County, Silvers is busier than most. “We all need down time,” she says. “We need time to nurture our souls and to enjoy our humanity and all those precious things our technology takes away from us.” The colors of a painting, the notes of an opera and the passion of a live performance all have the power to transform our lives. “The whole [artistic] spectrum is important in terms of enriching the human experience,” Silvers says unequivocally. “I think it’s as necessary as good drinking water.” Silvers grew up in Springfield, Illinois, in a house where music was more than a pleasant companion. Her father, Gordon Sherman, was a broadcaster who owned radio and television stations in the Midwest. “Without question it affected me and gave me an appreciation for what it really means to bring music to people,” she says. The family moved to Florida when her father had the opportunity to buy several stations in the state, fulfilling a dream to live in the sunshine that he had harbored since he’d sat behind the microphone as a young man, calling the action for the St. Louis Cardinals during spring training. “I thought this was just the best place ever,” Silvers recalls. She went to high school in Miami Beach

 Laurie Silvers with her husband, Mitchell Rubenstein, at the 2007 Kravis Center Gala.

before heading to the University of Miami, where she received both her undergraduate and law degrees. After enduring Midwestern winters and a spate of tornados, one of which destroyed the family’s home in Illinois, she says, “I didn’t want to ever leave South Florida.” Silvers made the move to Boca Raton in search of opportunity in the early 1980s, opening a law office on Glades Road in the days when the West Palm Beach Auditorium was one of the few landmarks on the cultural landscape. Palm Beach County still doesn’t have the highly evolved cultural traditions of Philadelphia, New York or Boston and, as far as Silvers is concerned, that’s just fine. “Much of what they have has been there for generations,” she says. “I think it’s great for

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 Mitchell Rubenstein, Laurie Silvers and Billy Crystal at the Kravis Center’s 2009-2010 Gala

this community that everything has grown up recently. We’re all about what’s new and exciting because this is the generation that has created it. We’re constantly looking for ways to grow and improve, constantly looking to stretch, never resting on our laurels.” As Silvers points out, “We don’t have any laurels.” “We are fortunate that Laurie is on our board of directors,” says Judith A. Mitchell, the Kravis Center’s chief executive officer. “She is so actively engaged and brings tremendous energy, passion and enthusiasm to whatever project she undertakes or committee she chairs or serves on.” After practicing law for 10 years, Silvers’ early exposure to the broadcast industry combined with an entrepreneurial itch that demanded to be scratched. In 1989, she and a partner set out to create a cable network devoted to science fiction. “It took us four and a half years but, when we launched it in 1992, the SciFi Channel was in 10 million households; it was the second largest launch of a cable network ever.” She remembers the experience fondly. “Those years were truly glory years,” she says. “As an entrepreneur, whenever you’re doing anything for the first time it can be very scary. You look back and say, ‘Wow, I was really brave back then.’” The SciFi Channel was sold in 1992. From there Silvers went on to become a co-founder of Hollywood Media and has served as its vicechairman, president and secretary since its inception. “Her business acumen and people skills are truly impressive,” Mitchell says. “She is a phenomenal CEO and wonderful professional resource for me, always willing to be a sounding board for ideas and issues.” For Silvers, the challenge of creating something brand new – in business or the arts – is exhilarating. “If you watch most performers on the stage, they’re alive. When those lights go on, it’s their moment to open up and their spirit comes out. I get it,” she says, with an entrepreneur’s insight into the creative spirit. “You have to be a risk-taker; you have to be willing to say I can do this and to push yourself and to be a nervous wreck. You have to want it so much you can’t wait to do it.”


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Q&A

Why do you make time in a busy schedule to serve on the board of directors at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts? I’m a big believer that the arts are just so important, probably more so now than ever. We’re human beings; we need beauty. We need to listen to music or be brought to tears by a great performance. Have you ever been to a play or an opera or a symphony and when it’s over you want to talk about it with somebody because it was so wonderful? There’s a pleasure that lives on after the lights go up and you leave; that’s part of it, too. We should be supporting the arts through philanthropy. Our cities, our state, our government should be supporting the arts. It’s just so critically important. How did you originally become involved with the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts? I started going to performances! What types of performance events do you enjoy most at the Kravis Center? I love them all but I do love listening to a philharmonic. What I like about that the most is that it’s so personal. You close your eyes and the music creates a world that exists only in your head. I do really enjoy that experience. Do the arts contribute to the economic life of our community as well as to its cultural life? Absolutely. When you’re talking about supporting the economy of a community, you not only want to support the existing businesses but you also want to attract new business. If you’re competing for significant businesses to come into an area such as ours, they’re going to look at quality of life issues. Is there a performing arts center? Are there art galleries? What are the schools like? If a community doesn’t have those things, I don’t think you’re going to be competitive. But it all goes hand-inglove. You’ve got to have a strong economic foundation in a community to support a lot of things and obviously the arts are right up there. You can’t have one without the other. I almost view it as foundational. What was the most surprising aspect of your experience in creating the SciFi Channel? I really came to appreciate the diversity of the viewing audience. I understood the business of science fiction; I understood how much money science fiction movies made at the box office but I didn’t really understand the love, the passion, the cult of science fiction. They don’t all dress up as Spock or Captain Kirk. For the most part in science fiction, these are highly intelligent people. Most of the writers that you find writing the screenplays or the books in science fiction are excellent writers. They have to be! They’re creating universes that don’t exist. It takes talent to create another world. You’re not just dealing with boy meets girl; these are very complicated, rich stories. How deeply did you venture into the world of science fiction? I had the incredible gift of meeting and befriending Isaac Asimov during the creation of the SciFi Channel and that’s something that can never be replicated. He had a business card that said, “Isaac Asimov,” and underneath it said “National Treasure.” He would hand you his card and kind of wink. That was him; that was his funny genius. He is the supreme example of the level of intelligence that you find in that genre.

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November

Maestro Bob Lappin takes the audience on a musical journey through the Beatles songbook in the Palm Beach Pops’ season debut. Guest artists The Nylons are best known for their hits “Kiss Him Goodbye,” “Chain Gang” and “Happy Together.” Nov. 1-3 at FAU in Boca Raton, Nov. 5-6 at the Kravis Center, Nov. 7 at Eissey Campus Theatre; 561-832-7677 or www.palmbeachpops.com. The Nylons

The Palm Beach Center for Jewish Art presents a multi-media show featuring 15 major local, national and international Jewish artists whose works deal with issues about Jewish time. Hebrew Zodiac: 12 Tribes, 12 Months, 12 Astrological Signs continues through Nov. 19. Classes and workshops also available. VI Living, 2792 Donnelly Drive, Lantana; 561 742-4080 or www.centerforjewish.org. 12 Tribes, Shoshannah Brombacher

Natural Selection: Common Beauty, an exhibition by contemporary realist Ted Matz, includes paintings and drawings inspired by the Ann Norton Sculpture Gardens. Ted’s hope is that his artwork will draw attention to the beauty most people overlook and take for granted in daily life. Opening reception Nov. 4; through Nov. 28. 253 Barcelona Road, West Palm Beach; 561-832-5328 or www.ansg.org. Ted Matz, Lily Pond

The smash musical hit Vices: A Love Story is back at Caldwell Theatre Company by popular demand. Fueled by innovative dancing and driven by distinct and eclectic music by Michael Heitzman, Ilene Reid, Everett Bradley and Susan Draus, Vices proclaims its originality every step of the way. Nov. 7-Dec. 12. 7901 N. Federal Highway, Boca Raton; 561-241-7432 or www.caldwelltheatre.com. Photo credit: Sean Lawson

The 3rd Annual France Cinema Floride Film Festival comes to Sunrise Cinemas in Boca Raton’s Mizner Park from Nov. 12-14 with 10 widely diverse films by well-known French directors as well as new talents. France Cinema Floride’s mission is to strengthen the cultural bridge between French language and culture and the US through cinema. 561-368-7744 or www.francecinemafloride.com. A scene from All That Glitters (Tout ce qui brille)

South Florida piano sensation Copeland Davis helps

Copeland Davis

launch the Indian River Pops Orchestra’s new season. His special blend of showmanship, combined with his vast musical skills, have electrified audiences around the country for decades. Owen Seward conducts the Indian River Pops. Eissey Campus Theatre, 3160 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens; 561-207-5900 or www.indianriverpops.org.

The Nutcracker is all around us!

Boca Ballet's Nutcracker

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Boca Ballet Theatre presents its annual production of the timeless classic on Nov. 26-28 at Olympics Heights Performing Arts Center, 20101 Lyons Road, Boca Raton; 561-995-0709 or www.bocaballet.org. Florida Classical Ballet Theatre offers its Nutcracker on Nov. 26-27 at Eissey Campus Theater, Palm Beach Gardens; 561-207-5900 or www.fcbt.org. Miami City Ballet brings its version to life at the Kravis Center Dec. 3-5; 877-929-7010 or www.miamicityballet.org.


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December

The Palm Beach Jewish Film Festival turns 21 with the American premiere of Gei-Oni (Valley of Fortitude), the Southeast premiere of Jews and Baseball: An American Love Story plus about three dozen other award-winning international and independent films. Showings at theaters throughout the county from Dec. 1-12; 561-712-5204 or www.palmbeachjewishfilm.org. Al Rosen, the "Hebrew Hammer," is featured in Jews and Baseball.

The Delray Beach Chorale proudly heralds its 29th year in South Florida with its annual holiday concert. The 70-member chorus with orchestral accompaniment will feature Vivaldi’s “Gloria,“ Mozart’s “Te Deum” and Handel’s stirring “Hallelujah Chorus” sung by Chorale and audience. First Presbyterian Church of Delray Beach, 33 Gleason St.; 800-984-7282 or www.delraybeachchorale.org.

The Delray String Quartet’s seventh season begins with a program of Haydn’s Quartet in C major, op 33, “The Bird;” Kenneth Fuchs’ String Quartet #4 and Brahms’ Quartet in A minor, op 51, no 2. The musicians are violinists Mei Mei Luo and Tomas Cotik, violist Richard Fleischman and cellist Claudio Jaffé. Colony Hotel, 525 E. Atlantic Ave., Delray Beach; 561-213-4138 or www.delraystringquartet.com. The Delray String Quartet

Photographer Lynn Goldsmith’s vast body of work testifies to her passion for rock and roll. With subjects ranging from the Rolling Stones and Bruce Springsteen to Kiss, her award-winning work can be seen at the Palm Beach Photographic Centre from Nov. 2 through Jan. 2. Goldsmith will give a free public lecture on Dec. 8. 415 Clematis St., West Palm Beach; 561-253-2600 or www.workshop.org. Tina Turner, Perfect Dancing Legs Spread; Photo by Lynn Goldsmith

The HARID Conservatory presents its annual gift to the community with its Holiday Dance Performances on Dec. 11 and 12. The varied program spotlights the conservatory’s talented students in classical ballet, character and modern dance; plus HARID’s holiday tradition: The Nutcracker, Act II! Countess de Hoernle Theater, 5100 Jog Road, Boca Raton; 561-998-8038. From Mark Godden’s contemporary ballet Mantis-cide Straight Up, Photo Credit: ©Alex Srb

Under the direction of Dr. Gerald J. Luongo, the popular Boca Raton Singers return for their sixth season with three concerts: They’re featured on Dec. 11 and 12 at Mizner Park Cultural Arts Center, 201 Plaza Real; and return on Dec. 19 for a “Music and Candlelight” performance at Boca Raton’s Grace Community Church, 600 W. Camino Real. 561-866-1868 or www.BocaratonSingers.org.

Richard Hayman and the Florida Sunshine Pops – along with veteran performers Teri Dale Hansen, Rosena Hill and Ron Bohmer – spotlight music from The Phantom of the Opera and other Andrew Lloyd Webber hits along with numerous other favorites. Dec. 12 at FAU in Boca Raton, 800-564-9539; and Dec. 13 at Eissey Campus Theatre in Palm Beach Gardens, 561-278-7677; or www.sunsetet.com.

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January

What was it like to be a dinosaur?

Interactive elements bring dinosaurs to life in Boca Raton.

The Children’s Science Explorium at Sugar Sand Park helps to answer that question and more with “Be the Dinosaur.” From Oct. 1 through Jan. 10, this first-of-its-kind traveling exhibit combines traditional dinosaur elements with sophisticated computer simulation. 300 S. Military Trail, Boca Raton; 561- 347- 3913 or www.ScienceExplorium.org.

The Silver Screen comes to life in a stunning

Clarence Sinclair Bull (18951979), Alfred Hitchcock with the MGM Lion, MGM, 1958 Gelatin silver print

new exhibition at the Norton Museum of Art. In 94 images by more than 50 photographers, Made in Hollywood: Photographs from the John Kobal Foundation reveals the importance of photography in manufacturing the myth of Hollywood. Appearing from Dec. 12 through March 6. 1451 S. Olive Ave., West Palm Beach; 561-832-5196 or www.norton.org.

All Aboard for the Boca Express Train Museum Tour! The Boca Raton Historical Society offers guided tours of its two 1947 Seaboard Air Line streamliners − restored to their original splendor − at the historic F.E.C. Railway Station, Count de Hoernle Pavilion, on the first Friday of every month from November through May. 747 S. Dixie Highway, Boca Raton; 561-395-6766 or www.bocahistory.org. Photo Credit: Peter Lorber

Now in its 33rd year at the Morikami, Oshogatsu − the traditional Japanese New Year festival – is celebrated with games and entertainment. Activities include rice-pounding, making mochi rice cakes, a sado tea ceremony, hands-on calligraphy, New Year’s card making, fortune telling and visits by shishimai, the lion dancer, at the Delray Beach museum and gardens; 561-495-0233 or www.morikami.org. Morikami visitors will encounter traditional Japanese characters during Oshogatsu.

Hailed by critics everywhere, Noche Flamenca is recognized as the most authentic flamenco touring company today. The company will be performing La Stada, an unparalleled ensemble of dancers, singers and guitarists based on the story made famous by Federico Felini in his film of the same name. Duncan Theatre, 4200 S. Congress Ave., Lake Worth; 561-868-3309 or www.duncantheatre.org. Photo Credit: Zarmik Moqtaderi

The Seventh Annual Palm Beach Poetry Festival takes up residence at Old School Square from Jan. 17-22 with a mix of writing workshops, readings, talks and a lively panel discussion. A special guest is Robert Pinsky, former United States Poet Laureate, who will read his poems solo and accompanied by local jazz musicians on Jan. 19. For the full schedule, visit www.palmbeachpoetryfestival.org. Robert Pinsky

Ramón Tebar leads the Palm Beach Symphony as music director for its 37th season. This program includes diverse works including Introduction and Allegro for Harp by Maurice Ravel, Beethoven’s Coriolan Overture and Franz Schubert’s Symphony No. 6. Bethesda-By-The-Sea Episcopal Church, 141 S. County Road, Palm Beach; 561-655-2657 or www.palmbeachsymphony.com. Palm Beach Symphony

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Dates are subject to change. For an up-to-the-minute, searchable calendar of cultural events, please visit the Palm Beach County Cultural Council's website at www.palmbeachculture.com. For more information about individual organizations' schedules, please visit the websites noted in each item.


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ACADEMY GRADUATES By Bill Hirschman

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A

A creative partnership between two young Floridians with a love of musical theater began in Jupiter 23 years ago. Their journey returns to Jupiter this winter with the world premiere of Academy, a melodic drama whose workshop performances already have won awards from competitions in New York City and South Korea. Academy was conceived and developed by Andrew Kato, the artistic director of the Maltz Jupiter Theatre, and written by composer/lyricist/librettist John Mercurio. After 10 years of rewriting, Academy will have its first full staging December 7 to 19 at the Maltz. The pop chamber musical is set in the insular world of a prestigious all-male prep school in the northeast. Two seniors intrigued by the Faust legend bet on whether they can tempt a freshman to break school rules in order to succeed. When the transaction veers out of control, the boys fight for their own academic and personal survival. The plot harbors interlocking themes about growing up, taking responsibility, father-son relationships, betrayal and honor in a world where venerable tradition and modern pragmatism collide. Kato and Mercurio first met while working in the kitchen and dining rooms at Burt Reynolds’ Dinner Theater in 1987. They penned the musical Switch! shortly thereafter and have worked on at least four shows together since. The Palm Beach County Cultural Council played a key role in their first success. “In 1987, when we were starting our careers, (the Council), to our amazement, put our show Switch! on the cover of their magazine…. At that time, we needed to raise $10,000 of enhancement money to produce the show and this exposure helped us to accomplish that lofty goal,” Kato said. The idea of a musical in a boys’ school occurred to Kato as he watched a boys’ chorus performing Michael Jackson’s Thriller a cappella in 1997. Neither man had any experience with classic northeastern prep schools but the larger themes resonated for them. Kato attended Jupiter High School and Mercurio attended The Benjamin School in Palm Beach Gardens “when it was much smaller.” The duo reconceived the show through numerous readings and workshops, hitting a milestone in the fall of 2008 when a grant from the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation underwrote Academy’s further development through the Maltz’s Emerging Artist Series. In that incarnation, the work was slimmed to 45 minutes and featured a boys’ choir and the 20-piece Palm Beach Youth Orchestra. An expanded version was mounted last fall at the New York Musical Theater Festival, where it won awards for outstanding musical and best ensemble. That success won Academy a berth at South Korea’s Daegu International Musical Festival, where it took the top prize for best musical against 23 other entries from around the world. The journey reaches another landmark this December with a new production, directed by Kato and featuring the core New York cast of seven actors, another 14 boys singing in the background as fellow students and a 10-piece orchestra. The show is now 85 minutes long but the theme of adolescents challenged by crisis remains intact and its greatest strength. “The rite of passage is something pretty timeless,” Mercurio said. For more information, visit jupitertheatre.org or call (561) 743-2666. Andrew Kato at the Tony Awards, where he serves as coordinating producer

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New

Synthetic realism By John Loring Photographs by Jim Fairman

With the relentless collisions of civilization and nature so flagrantly evident in southern Florida, Palm Beach County artists have, not surprisingly, taken up the theme of human impact on the environment. In the wake of the real estate speculation boom and bust of all-toorecent memory, they are sending messages of both hope and warning by “creating something out of the corners of the world going upside down,” as award-winning Lake Worth painter Sibel Kocabasi expresses it. In their works, they find humor – but precious little comforting equilibrium – between the natural and the man-made. “In Florida the natural and the synthetic play out in a way the synthetic almost takes on the appearance of nature and vice-versa,” observes Kocabasi’s fellow Lake Worth artist Phillip Estlund, whose corrosively witty collages of extreme if scenic forms of nature juxtaposed with extreme human behavior and lifestyle are direct descendants of the Pop Art surrealism of British master of the postDuchampian Richard Hamilton. Marcel Duchamp created now-iconic (if once iconoclastic) artworks by taking, as he stated, “an ordinary article of life [combined with] a new thought for that object” to both create and question art. Hamilton, in fastidiously constructed collages of the ubiquitous and ordinary and even kitsch in popular American culture of the 1950s and ’60s, nailed the disturbing, even spooky, claustrophobic nature of that culture in such works as Just What Is It that Makes Today’s Home so Different, so Appealing?, his 1956 mini-masterpiece.

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 As Aboveâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;So Below (detail) mixed media tableau (2009), by Phillip Estlund

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 Phillip Estlund in his Lake Worth studio with Wash Out wall assemblage sculpture of demolition refuse (2010), and collages from Home Invasion Series, Insane Terrain and Adventures in Interior Design series (2007-2010)

Estlund, in both his Home Invasion Series and Adventures in Interior Design of 2007, created witty and disquieting images of nature-made vs. man-made. Instead of invasions of appliances, gadgets and junk foods like Hamilton, giant sea anemones or fungi dwarf interiors clipped from 1950s design magazines and anachronistic human intruders, such as African refugee children or skateboarders from Thrasher magazine, are dwarfed by seemingly monumental interior furnishings through abrupt, Alice-inWonderland-like shifts of scale. In Estlund’s recent exhibition at Art Basel Miami Beach (December 2009), Insane Terrain, flamboyant figures from the

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extreme human behavior found in the pages of Wrestle Mania intrude on collaged images of extreme nature in the form of postcard perfect mountain views or details of glacial ice from Climbing magazine. Estlund’s collages are infused with a beauty and playfulness all their own. As Hamilton once said of his own work, they are, “in spite of their contrived sophistication, curiously ingenuous.” His assemblage pieces are made from ordinary materials collected from local demolition sites – rusted appliance doors, broken plywood or composition board, aluminum slat window blinds, plaster lath – all in advanced stages of decrepitude. “The


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 Retreat, construction of recycled building materials (2009)

 Collages from Insane Terrain series (2009-2010)

Florida climate hastens their degeneration,” Estlund observes. The uninhabitable habitats and environments constructed from all this detritus give a darker picture of the man-made akin to the burnt out or otherwise terminally disfigured tableaux of Pop artist Edward Kienholtz; and, like Kienholtz’s works, they are devoid of the satiric visual humor of Surrealism that Estlund exhibits in his collages. They suggest through their “ad absurdum” visual argument that we don’t have to accept all this degradation. There is hope. There is also humor as seen in the title of Estlund’s wall piece of intersection fragments from two flimsily constructed contractor houses, Conjoined, a Total Loss (2009).

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 Sibel Kocabasi in her Lake Worth studio

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 Top: Red Dear (2010); Bottom left: Your Backyard; Bottom right: You Say You Have Been Hurt Before (2009) mixed media

Kocabasi’s fanciful art has vastly different foundations. Born and educated in Istanbul, where she studied everything from Turkish calligraphy to carpet design, her youthful vision was not informed by American television, movies and disposable pop culture. “I read a lot of science fiction and I wrote,” she recalls. “I’d read everything; we didn’t have TV. Local storytellers would come to the house and tell us beautiful stories, like those in the Arabian Nights, that created vivid images in my mind like fairytale illustrations. “I love fairytale illustration. When I dream I create another world with amazing architecture and amazing underwater cities; and, in times like these, we all need a good fairytale to take us to another place where anything is possible. There’s beauty in the world; it’s not dead yet.” Illustrating her conviction that “beauty and hope are the

strongest ways to protest injustice in the world in all its forms, including environmental,” tracer bullets can turn to jewels in her paintings of ethereal dreamscapes populated with radical, often bellicose, miniaturized human intrusions almost hidden in their folds. In her recent more solidly constructed, if still fluidly layered, picture planes, protesting, screaming animals – those fellow travelers Kocabasi sees as “forgotten by technology” – are more often than not overlaid with graceful arabesques of calligraphy derived from the intricate patterns of the chapter headings of Koran illumination. The beauty of Kocabasi’s painted calligraphy is there, she points out, “to say it’s enough; it’s not forever. They keep some beauty in there to symbolize hope. “In painting, I’m creating games. I’m not an activist, but those little hidden messages make me feel that I can do something.”

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 Life Boat, watercolor, 15” x 22” (2009)

 Perpetuity, watercolor, 40” x 60” (2008)

 Sanctuary, watercolor, 22” x 30” (2009)

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 Richard Frank in his West Palm Beach studio

The complex and minutely detailed landscapes and seascapes of renowned veteran West Palm Beach painter Richard Frank tell their own stories of our transformative presence in nature in subtle ways. “My paintings are a bridge between our times and 19thcentury art such as the Hudson River School, when nature was seen as a godlike force in largely untouched America. The encroachments of man are in the large overview. “Today few have experience of the wild and natural. They don’t realize that they are not seeing native forests or landscapes but imported nature that is really an encroachment on nature. When you look at the details in my work, you see alterations to nature,” Frank says. “I create landscapes in which the element of time, specifically the past and the present, can exist simultaneously in the complete image. The landscapes are of real places that record a history of that place that can be accessed by looking. By merging, slicing and using traditional devices, I can introduce different perspectives of the place, creating a sense of transient time

and, simultaneously, permanence. Within these melded images, I can include depictions and fragments of objects that strike me as important to understanding the place. By layering the objects and images I can create a random sequence of discoveries not unlike the archaeologist peeling back layers of time.” Throughout Frank’s layered work there is a fascination with the complexities of nature in patterns of growth, in the intricacies of leaves and flowers or of scales and feathers. The way nature put together fish and birds fascinates him, as does the oldfashioned way manmade structures like a wooden boat or a fieldstone hut are put together. As Frank’s paintings draw us into his isolated concentration on a sense of place that speaks of the soul of things in nature, there is always the manmade object – the small wooden cargo ketch plying off a desolate rocky seacoast, an abandoned rowboat on a grassy shore, a conical or other geometric device, an unnatural light source – to remind us that our very presence alters the nature we perceive.

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UNDERWATER

BEAUTY TREASURES FROM OUR DEEP BLUE Photography by Tony Ludovico and Christopher Pulitzer Leidy

With 47 miles of pristine beaches, Palm Beach County has much to boast about. However, few of us have the opportunity to personally experience the natural beauty that's found beneath the waves or to meet our underwater friends and seasonal visitors first-hand. The following pages will introduce you to the remarkable world that lies just east of the surf through the lenses of two world-famous underwater photographers: Tony Ludovico and Christopher Pulitzer Leidy.

“Nature photography is a great challenge. There are unpredictable conditions of weather and the even more unpredictable behaviors of wildlife. On land, a photographer might spend months in search of the perfect shot. But underwater the challenges multiply exponentially. With no solid footing, you depend on luck and your own buoyancy to steady yourself as you set up for a shot. Then you have to make constant adjustments to light, which, by the way, changes by the second as the surface waves refract the sun. A good underwater photographer deals with extreme diving, currents, big animal behaviors, and the ever-present danger of working ten stories below the surface. It’s never easy, never routine. But, with patience and care, the end result can be stunning in ways almost impossible to imagine. The photographer’s lens can literally change human perception of a species – even one as great as a humpback whale. That’s what fulfills you and keeps you going back for more.” — Wyland (An accomplished painter, sculptor, photographer, writer and scuba diver whose work captures the raw power and beauty of the undersea universe.)

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Photograph by Tony Ludovico

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Photograph above and right page by Christopher Pulitzer Leidy

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“From sea to hammock to swamp, Florida is blessed with an abundance of beauty. These things which we erroneously call natural resources – sunlight, air, water and flora and fauna – must be embraced as essential and transubstantial facets of our own being to live on in future generations of all living things.” — Mike Zewe Development Officer, Friends of Gumbo Limbo Nature Center

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Photograph by Tony Ludovico

“Florida’s sparkling waters have served as an inspiration for many great American poets, past and present, including Elizabeth Bishop, Wallace Stevens and Campbell McGrath.” — Miles Coon Director of the Palm Beach Poetry Festival, which will be held Jan. 17 through 22 at Old School Square in Delray Beach

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Tony Ludovico

Photograph by Tony Ludovico

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Campbell McGrath, one of Florida’s greatest living poets, has said, “Living in South Florida is like living on another planet, just in terms of the physicality alone – the light, the moisture, the colors of the flowers and sky.”

Walking back along the beach I mark the signs of erosion, bide the usual flotsam of seagrass and fan coral, a float from somebody’s fishing boat, crusted with sponge and barnacles, and then I find the orange. Single irradiant sphere on the sand, tidewashed, glistening as if new born, golden orb, miraculous ur-fruit, in all that sweep of horizon the only point of color. Cross-legged on my town I let the juice course and mingle with the film of salt on my lips and the sand in my beard as I steadily peel and eat it. Considering the ancient lineage of this fruit, the long history of its dispersal around the globe on currents of animal and human migration, and in light of the importance of the citrus industry to the state of Florida, I will not claim it was the best and sweetest orange in the world, though it was, o great salt water of eternity, o strange and bountiful orchard. — from “The Orange” by Campbell McGrath

Photograph by Tony Ludovico

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Photograph by Christopher Pulitzer Leidy

"In Palm Beach County, we live among the wetlands, perched between the lakes and the sea. Our waters are our playground, a source of wonder to cherish and to share." â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Daniel Bates Director of the Palm Beach County Environmental Enhancement and Restoration Division

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Photograph by Christopher Pulitzer Leidy

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Photograph by Tony Ludovico

“The abundance and diversity in our local waters of marine wildlife creates an underwater paradise. It is important that we conserve and preserve this precious resource for future generations.” — Nanette Lawrenson President, Loggerhead Marinelife Center Foundation

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Photograph by Christopher Pulitzer Leidy

Tony Ludovico www.tonyludovico.com

Christopher Pulitzer Leidy www.leidyimages.com

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Important gold, platinum, emerald and diamond David Webb Chimera bracelet. Price upon request. Richters 224 Worth Avenue Palm Bach 561.655.0774

Seaman Schepps Snuff Bottle Bracelet in jadeite, rock crystal, and emerald mounted in 18K gold. Trianon/Seaman Schepps 237 A Worth Avenue, Palm Beach 561.802.4410 www.seamanschepps.com Franck Muller, the Master of Complications, is proud to introduce the Conquistador Grand Prix. This extraordinary new design, engineered with the most advanced alloys, represents a powerful fusion of elegance and sport, giving the renowned Classic Cintree Curvex a revolutionary new look. Trinity Collection 27 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach 561.659.3364

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The “Dancing Duo Seahorse Necklace” The seahorse, symbol of eternal love, is a legendary and sacred animal. Seahorses bond for life, and together, both partners honor that love with daily courtship displays - one partner will change color to “become” the other. Being a free spirit, the sky blue topaz gemstone cradles the two in this universal harmony upon a delicate wave of white gold and diamonds. The seahorse centerpieces represent the true union of man and woman that is born of equality and respect, bringing the wearer balance and harmony in their special love relationship. (27.4cts Sky Blue Topaz, 3.56cts of VG/F/VVS Diamond Brilliants in 18k White Gold) Kaufmann de Suisse 210 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach 561.832.4918 www.kaufmanndesuisse.com

18kt white gold and diamond Bamboo Spring bracelet

Shell Brooch in diamond, platinum and gold by Verdura. $29,500.

Gucci The Gardens Mall 3101 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens 561.694.1463 www.gucci.com

Betteridge 236 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach 561.655.5850 www.betteridge.com

150 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach 561.655.6955 www.gucci.com

A.R.T. brings celebrity jewelry designers and artists to Worth Avenue. Celebrating its one year anniversary this November, A.R.T. showcases a combination of jewelry and art highlighting the jewelry designs of Neil Lane, Loree Rodkin, Sylva and Cie. and many others. Fine art curated by Jane Holzer is on display and for sale featuring Andy Warhol, Damien Hirst, Claude Lalanne and others. Rough Diamond Bangle set in 18k White Gold from Neil Lane A.R.T. Fine Jewelry & Art 249 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach 561.420.8866 www.artworthavenue.com

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A sultry sunset,

a saxophone

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jazz

and all that

By Christina Wood

what is jazz? “That’s a tough question,” says veteran radio personality Stu Grant, host of Jazz Impressions on WXEL 90.7 FM. “There are so many facets to the music and so many offshoots, from smooth jazz to straight ahead and Afro-Cuban.” Jazz is an upright bass racing through the night with the longing of a lyric and the sweet truth of a piano in pursuit. It’s a big band in a concert hall and a trio by the beach. Jazz is a saxophone heard celebrating the start of the weekend through the open door of a club or going down easily with a chilled mimosa at a Sunday brunch. A dictionary-style definition might refer to the music’s syncopated rhythms and varying degrees of improvisation but Grant says it best: “It’s cool.”

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(Left) The FAU Ratz Faculty Quintet (Right) Live entertainment at the Blue Anchor on Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach

Jazz is an original American art form, tracing its roots to the musical melting pot of New Orleans. According to Wynton Marsalis, Grammy-award winning trumpeter and artistic director of Jazz at Lincoln Center, by the early 1900s, the Big Easy had firmly embraced a celebratory attitude towards life. “Opera, military marching bands, folk music, the blues, different types of church music, ragtime, echoes of traditional African drumming and all of the dance styles that went with this music could be heard and seen throughout the city,” he explains. “When all of these kinds of music blended into one, jazz was born.” Here in Palm Beach County, Susan Merritt is on a mission to make sure the music continues to live a long and healthy life. She is the president of the Jazz Arts Music Society of Palm Beach Inc. (JAMS), a nonprofit organization formed to encourage the performance, promotion, preservation and perpetuation of the music she loves. The group’s members believe that jazz should be defined in broad enough terms to include all the eras, styles and artists that embrace the elements that distinguish jazz as a unique art form – one that has been recognized by the U.S. Congress as a national treasure. Education is central to the group’s mission. “We’re trying to reach out to the community and get people involved and interested,” Merritt explains. “It’s not just about going to a concert and being entertained. Beyond trying to create gigs for musicians, we’re really interested in trying to develop an audience.” In addition to sponsoring an annual concert series at the Harriet Himmel Theater at CityPlace in West Palm Beach, JAMS provides scholarships to young musicians; two will be awarded in January, when the organization celebrates its 11th birthday with a concert performance by the Norman Simmons Trio, featuring

saxman Houston Person. The scholarship recipients (one is a graduate of the Dreyfoos School of the Arts, the other attended Jupiter High School) came under the wing of the jazz society when they started showing up at the group’s jam sessions. “I am convinced that those kids – and others across the country just like them – are always going to find a way to play their music,” Merritt says; she is pleased to offer encouragement and guidance to a new generation but she’d like to see more emphasis on jazz education for the audience as well as the musicians. “There are generations of kids out there who have never even seen real musicians play let alone understand what jazz is,” she laments. “There are just as many great jazz musicians as there ever were,” says Tim Walters, director of jazz studies at Florida Atlantic University, rattling off the names of greats like Wayne Shorter, Ira Sullivan and Duffy Jackson who are no strangers to the Sunshine State. What he and Merritt and others like them say is in dwindling supply are places where you can hear them play. Economics bear some of the blame, so does the technology that entertains us at the flick of an overly convenient switch but, as Merritt points out, the musicians have a responsibility as well. Intimate jazz clubs and swinging dance halls were once packed with crowds and alive with the sounds of popular, mainstream jazz tunes. When the music evolved from the big band sound into smaller ensembles where musicians could flex their creative muscles in an exploration of harmonies and rhythm, the crowds thinned out. “You started losing people because it was no longer just something fun to dance to; it was becoming a little bit more cerebral,” Merritt explains.



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(Left) The FAU Jazz Ratz Big Band (Right) Lawvawn the Saxman entertains at Lola’s Sunday Jazz Brunch in Delray Beach.

A 45-minute John Coltrane track isn’t everyone’s cup of tea; for those who prefer coffee, a cold soda or, perhaps, a classic cocktail, Palm Beach County offers some intriguing opportunities to drink in a live jazz performance. Sit by the water at the Four Seasons in Palm Beach and listen to Merritt and her trio weave their spell or grab a ticket to a concert at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts in West Palm Beach, find your seat and let the music take you away. FAU boasts jazz ensembles of various sizes as well as student recitals. Sink your teeth into a tasty jazz brunch at Lola in Delray Beach or enjoy a serving from the Great American Songbook, served up hot on Wednesday nights at 264 the Grill in Palm Beach. The Colony Hotel’s Royal Room provides a deliciously intimate setting for cabaret on the island. The West Palm Beach Public Library sponsors a popular jazz series. In February, the Maltz Jupiter Theatre will host a tribute to Louis Armstrong. Live jazz can be heard Downtown at the Gardens in Palm Beach Gardens, on Atlantic Avenue in Delray Beach and along the waterfront in downtown West Palm. From Monday nights at the Palm Beach Steakhouse to high-energy weekends in our bars and restaurants, jazz – with its lush melodies and swinging eighth notes – gets around in Palm Beach County. Walters admits his favorite place to listen to jazz these days is in a comfortable chair at home. Merritt enjoys the moments in her car spent listening to Jazz Impressions on the radio as she drives down scenic State Road A1A on the way to her Saturday night gig at the Four Seasons. As for Grant, while he prefers the spontaneity of a smaller venue, he’s happy whenever the jazz fills the air in Palm Beach County. While it was the songwriting team of Marilyn Bergman, Alan Bergman and Johnny Mandel that declared “salty days and sultry nights” a haven for jazz, Grant agrees. “I think our surroundings are ideal,” he says.

What Does Jazz Mean to You? There’s only one way to find out! Let the music take you away. In Palm Beach County, you’ll find this delightfully diverse and uniquely American art form celebrated in clubs and restaurants, on concert stages and at waterfront parks. To begin your journey, you can tune in to Jazz Impressions on WXEL 90.7 FM on Saturday evenings from 6 to 10 p.m. If you can’t wait for the weekend, start exploring online with a visit to one of these websites: The Jazz Arts Music Society of Palm Beach (JAMS) www.jamsociety.org South Florida JAZZ www.southfloridajazz.org You’ll also find jazz concerts and events listed on the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s calendar at www.palmbeachculture.com.

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Magnetic Attraction By M.M. Cloutier

Palm Beach Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s innovative arts-based charter and choice schools earn rave reviews

Dreyfoos School of the Arts

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When Amber Pelayo and Devon Hernandez dance, something remarkable happens. Their passion digs in and holds fast, fortifying the 10-year-olds for math class, where they discover that, like the dance movements they’re learning, there’s a rhythm to multiplication and long division. As the arts help turn scholastic keys for these young girls at Plumosa School of the Arts – Palm Beach County’s newest artsbased school – Amber wonders about possibilities. Maybe one day she’ll dance for a local troupe or on Broadway. “I want to do all of that!” she says. Amber and Devon are representative of subtle yet sweeping indicators that arts-based schools in the county are thriving, fueled by a supportive school board and a growing number of parents and students stoked by the schools’ unique educational approach. Amid a dyspeptic economy that has taken a bite out of the arts, that’s not only refreshing but cause for applause. “Are we on the cutting edge here with our arts-based schools and programs?” Superintendent Art Johnson, a longtime

proponent of school arts-integration, echoes an inquiry. “Really, is it cutting edge or is it simply great teachers, high-quality instruction and highly motivated students pursuing interests that release their creativity in all that they do?” Arts-based schools like Plumosa are designated as “choice” schools, which specialize in a host of disciplines with additional resources and innovative teaching techniques focused on individual talents or interests – in this case, the arts. Also known as magnet schools, arts-based choice schools and programs in the county have expanded and prospered since they first entered the scene in the early and mid-1990s, when internationally known Dreyfoos School of the Arts, Bak Middle School of the Arts and U.B. Kinsey/Palmview Elementary School of the Arts opened. Since then, more than 20 public elementary, middle and high schools in the county have integrated arts-centric choice programs – often referred to as academies – ranging from theater, dance and vocal programs to the culinary arts, fashion and graphic design and film and TV production.

Students from the G-Star School of the Arts work on a film.

The soundstage at G-Star School of the Arts

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The Smart Choice The arts aren’t these schools’ only common thread. They’re smart, too. In many cases, arts-based choice schools are producing some of the county’s academically highest performing students and clocking graduation rates averaging around 95 percent. Some have an advantage – namely, proprietary nonprofit fundraising foundations to enhance programming beyond school-district funding – but as Johnson points out, there’s a fundamental reason why all arts-based schools tend to excel. According to Johnson, who began his collegiate career as a music major, it has to do with “an understanding of the interrelationship between the arts and the worlds of, say, science and math.” Think Leonardo da Vinci, he says, or a fired-up left-brain right-brain synergy. Elizabeth Kennedy, principal of Bak Middle School of the Arts, echoes Johnson’s sentiments. “Our students have an interest in the arts and they’re here for the arts. Our teachers in all disciplines tap into that engagement and it works.” Natalie Johnson is a seventh-grader at Palm Springs Community Middle School, where choice programs include communication arts, dance, band, hand bells, orchestral strings, vocals, theater and visual arts. “I started with drama and that gave me confidence and I did better in school and had more confidence with tests and certain subjects,” she says. Nine-year-old Firnel Beaufrere is striding down a similar path. On a recent school day at Plumosa, the fourth-grader began learning how to make a self-portrait via a computer. In band, he has mastered “Frere Jacques” on the clarinet and, armed with his budding music-reading skills, has advanced to more challenging songs. Plumosa’s new 27-acre Delray Beach campus, which opened its doors in August, features soundproof music rooms lined with digital keyboards and varnished violins, a visual-arts studio with kilns, television studio, choral room with risers, digital Mac lab for desktop publishing, sculpture garden and more. All of the buildings, built to green standards emphasizing energy-saving features and recycled materials, are new except for the 850-seat auditorium and cafeteria; both are extensively renovated holdovers from when Atlantic High School occupied the site. A long-term goal for Plumosa is a middle-school expansion, creating a natural feeder pattern for nearby Boynton Beach Community High School, where arts academies boast, among other things, a nationally acclaimed choral group, an 800-seat auditorium and a new 100-seat black-box theater. Top photo courtesy of Plumosa Elementary School; Bottom photo courtesy of U.B. Kinsey Elementary

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The Movie Version Not all arts-based schools in the county fall under the choice rubric. Broadening the horizon are arts-based school district-sponsored charter schools, which function independently but are held strictly accountable for their academic and financial performance. One in particular – G-Star School of the Arts for Motion Picture Broadcasting in Palm Springs, a well-established charter school with concentrations in film, television and acting – reflects the dynamism for which arts-based schools in the county are known. Just ask Anastasia Placido, one of only two college freshmen who qualified for the University of Florida’s BFA acting program and a 2009 G-Star graduate. “My high-school experience there was jam-packed, fun-filled and academically rigorous. There were times I was reading books by authors like Kafka and Camus while working on film projects and acting in Twelfth Night.” G-Star boasts a graduation rate of 95-plus percent and is the only school of its kind with a movie studio on campus. This year, the school unveiled a new $5 million motion-picture soundstage – the largest in Florida and among the most technologically advanced anywhere – that is equal in size to the Los Angeles facilities where Jurassic Park III and a host of other films and television shows have been shot. The sound stage, which can convert into an enormous theater, is luring film and television producers and, since they’re required to engage oncampus interns, G-Star’s students gain valuable hands-on industry experience. Greg Hauptner, G-Star’s founder, CEO and CFO, says, “You can have a straight-A book worm or a straight-A actor or filmmaker and each will communicate differently with the world... What’s unique about movies and a lot of projects we do is that everyone works in crews and what you learn is that if one person drops the ball, the others have to pick it up so no one fails.” Incoming freshmen at G-Star often are ensconced in the school’s art and academic ethos – referred to as “artademics” – long before the first day of school. Many spend the summer constructing sets and researching, creating and rehearsing story lines for G-Star’s annual October extravaganza called X-Scream Halloween, an on-campus fundraiser that unleashes 60,000-plus square feet of haunted attractions. When asked about the connection between the arts and successful schooling, Hauptner considers the equation a no-brainer. “Just look around. It has been proven over and over again.” Top photo courtesy of U.B. Kinsey Elementary; Bottom photo courtesy of Plumosa Elementary School

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a&cmarketplace the art of

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C U LT U R A L COUNCIL NEWS

INSIDE culture

cultural compendium

briefly noted

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Proceeds from the 2011 Muse Awards will benefit the Cultural Council’s Arts and Cultural Education Fund. Tickets to the gala are $300 and numerous sponsorship packages are available. For more information, visit www.palmbeachculture.com/museawards2011 or call Melissa Santee, Development Associate at (561) 471-2901 ext. 310. (To read about one way in which the Muse Awards benefit local students, please see page 83.)

New Muse Awards Categories to Debut for 2011 Event Exciting changes are in store for the Palm Beach County Cultural Council’s 2011 Muse Awards. First, new award categories were developed to further connect the cultural community. Second, award recipients will be announced prior to being honored at the gala event, which takes place on February 10 from 6 to 9 p.m. at the Kravis Center’s Cohen Pavilion. Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos are the honorary chairs. Co-chaired by Irene Karp and Jean Sharf, the Muse Awards gala honors outstanding individuals and organizations for their contributions to arts and culture throughout Palm Beach County. The annual event includes exciting performances and dynamic presentations that highlight some of the most engaged organizations, artists and cultural supporters in the county. The new Muse Awards categories include: • Excellence in Historical and Cultural Heritage, which will honor an organization that has produced a program that demonstrates appreciation for a significant historical theme or preserves and carries on the cultural traditions of a diverse population. • Excellence in Arts and Cultural Outreach, recognizing an organization that has made a significant impact providing outreach of arts and cultural programming to underserved populations that traditionally did not have access to arts and culture. • Excellence in Arts Integrated Education, which will recognize an arts and cultural organization, principal or teacher who provides quality arts integrated curriculum using visual or performing arts in a traditional classroom setting or aftercare program. • Outstanding Festival, honoring an

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Philanthropist and community volunteer Helen K. Persson was honored as Civic Leader of the Year at the 2010 Muse Awards.

organization presenting a festival that demonstrates cultural excellence, broad appeal, cultural diversity and outreach to the greater community. • Outstanding Collaboration, which will recognize a cultural organization engaging in a strategic and significant collaboration with at least one other partner, which may be another nonprofit organization, corporation, school, government entity, municipality, etc. • Outstanding Philanthropist, honoring an individual or corporation that demonstrates outstanding commitment to arts and culture through financial support, in-kind support or relationship-building to increase community involvement. Also due to be presented in 2011 are the Clyde Fyfe Award for Performing Artists, which recognizes a performing artist whose life and work emulates excellence in the field and contributes to the advancement of our quality of life in Palm Beach County by mentoring, teaching or sharing work methods with others in our community, and the Council’s Choice Award, which honors an individual or institution the Council deems worthy of recognition for an effort or accomplishment not honored in another category.

Cultural Council Receives NEA Education Grant For the second year in a row, the Palm Beach County Cultural Council has received a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts. “The Arts Education Invitational Grant Initiative is one of the most prestigious awards in the industry. Our $10,000 grant represents a vote of confidence from our national arts funder and an endorsement for our work in arts and cultural education,” states Cultural Council President and CEO Rena Blades. “It is significant that the staff of the NEA invited the Council to apply for this grant for our work training and providing professional development to non-profit arts educators in arts integrated education.” The grant period extends from October 1 through September 11, 2011. Alyx Kellington, the council’s director for arts and cultural education, will manage the grant.

art&culture Earns Two New Charlie Awards art&culture of Palm Beach County, the official magazine of the Palm Beach County Cultural Council, received two coveted Charlie Awards from the Florida Magazine Association (FMA). Published and produced in collaboration with Passport Publications & Media Corporation, art&culture has now earned a total of seven Charlie Awards in its Top photo: Jacek Gancarz


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There Is No Teacher For Love. (But there is one for bonsai, ikebana flower arrangement, nature photography and Japanese language)

first four years. The magazine received a bronze award for Best Overall Design as well as a bronze award for Best Illustration (for the Burt Reynolds cover on the Spring 2009 issue). “Since art&culture’s founding four years ago, it quickly developed a reputation of excellence,” says Rena Blades, Cultural Council president and CEO. “The entire magazine staff works very hard to create each dynamic issue and bring the wonderful elements of Palm Beach County culture to life on the printed page.” More than 600 entries from 70 publishing firms in Florida were submitted for the 2010 Charlie Awards. Winning entries were evaluated by judges from across the country who specialize in magazine publication, many of whom are journalism professors. Says Robert Kirschner, Passport Publications’ publisher, “We are extremely proud to work with the cultural community to produce a beautiful and dynamic magazine such as art&culture. Our editors, writers, photographers, designers and marketing team have worked extremely hard to create a compelling portrait of Palm Beach County’s cultural landscape.” art&culture is published three times a year with a circulation of 15,000 copies for each issue. The free magazine is distributed to more than 300 locations, which include various cultural venues, businesses, universities, hotels, country clubs, key government outlets and chambers of commerce. It is also mailed to Cultural Council members, plus local and national travel, hospitality and media professionals.

MUSEUM GARDENS CULTURE CUISINE

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{inside culture} cultural council news Teacher’s Guide Expands Culture in the Classroom The fifth edition of the Cultural Council’s Teacher’s Guide to Art and Culture in Palm Beach County went to school this August. The guide for K-12 teachers contains vital information about art education programs at 64 non-profit cultural organizations, all of which are Cultural Council members. Many of their programs are free or low-cost and are available through curriculum-based field trips or in-school presentations. In the guide, teachers can find grade levels served, cost, contact information, program details and which

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programs meet 2010-11 Sunshine State Standards. “The Teacher’s Guide can help all Palm Beach County teachers take advantage of relationships the Cultural Council has developed with the School District and many of Palm Beach County’s art and cultural organizations,” says Alyx Kellington, the Cultural Council’s director of arts and cultural education. “The information in this guide cannot be found anywhere else and is a teacher’s top source for cultural programs available to students.” The Office Depot Foundation sponsored the printing of 12,000 copies of the guide, which is also available on the Cultural Council’s website at www.palmbeachculture.com.

New Signs Herald A Taste of Things to Come in Lake Worth Visitors to downtown Lake Worth are getting the message about the Cultural Council’s impending move to its new home in the summer of 2011. The Council’s Marketing Department designed and produced several attractive posters for the windows of the

Posters tell the story of the Cultural Council’s upcoming move to Lake Worth.


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{inside culture} cultural council news Robert M. Montgomery Jr. Building at 601 Lake Avenue. “These graphically beautiful posters describe our mission and our work as well as the history of that beautiful building, in addition to providing notice that we will be there in summer 2011,” notes President and CEO Rena Blades. “The results are absolutely gorgeous.” The Art Deco building began life as the Lake Theater in 1940 and is the former home of the Palm Beach Institute of Contemporary Art.

DCOTA DesignHouse to Benefit Cultural Council When the 2011 DesignHouse exhibition at DCOTA – the Design Center of the Americas – in Fort Lauderdale opens on January 19, the Palm Beach County Cultural Council will be one of three prominent South Florida cultural organizations to benefit. The DesignHouse will showcase nearly 20 installations created by area designers based on the theme, “The Golden Age of Hollywood.” According to DCOTA, “DesignHouse showcases the most exquisite resources of DCOTA Showrooms as seen through the industry’s most talented minds. All resources will be cataloged in the DesignHouse Program and most will be available for orders and purchase, with a percentage benefiting the organizations.” DesignHouse will be open from January 19 through July 15. Tickets to see the show are $15 with 100 percent of all funds raised benefiting the Cultural Council, the Wolfsonian Museum in Miami and the Museum of Art | Fort Lauderdale. Related events will be featured throughout the show, including screenings, lectures, luncheons, presentations and private tours. A special Preview Benefit Gala will take place on January 18. Tickets are $125 and will also benefit the Council. (Attendees will be able to designate the organization they wish to support when they purchase their tickets.) For more information, call the Cultural Council at (561) 471-2901 or visit www.palmbeachculture.com

A room from the 2009 DCOTA DesignHouse

Annual Meeting Showcases Council’s Future Home Some 150 members and guests got an inside look at the Cultural Council’s future headquarters during the Council’s annual member meeting and reception in the Robert M. Montgomery Jr. Building in Lake Worth. In addition to the beauty of the building itself, members enjoyed the Alexander W. Dreyfoos Jr. School of the Arts’ 17th Annual Visual Arts Senior

Exhibition. The event was sponsored by Frank Crystal & Company and Ovations Catering. As guests entered the bright lobby featuring the Tom Otterness frieze Battle of the Sexes they were greeted with passed drinks. They then strolled into the main room with its soaring ceiling, enjoyed passed hors d’oeuvres from Ovations Catering and meandered throughout the space, which was brimming with the engaging art.

Victoria Skinner and Walter Hnatysh

Mary Montgomery and Rena Blades

Katrina and Steven Lee

Dana Donaty and Ora Sorensen

Bottom photos: Jacek Gancarz

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{inside culture} cultural council news Yuppie Auction Supports Cultural Council, Design Forward One never knows what to expect at an auction â&#x20AC;&#x201C; and this was undeniably true for the 60 young urban professionals and young-at-heart yuppie supporters who enjoyed the 2010 Yuppie Auction and

Mary Brittain Cheatham, Sarah Scheffer, Clemente Mimun and Cara Mimum

Dinner Party at the Omphoy Ocean Resort. The event benefited Design Forward 2011 and the Palm Beach County Cultural Council. Following a greeting by Cultural Council

Larry Boytano

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Cultural Councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s upcoming move to Lake Worth has created a lot of excitement in the community,â&#x20AC;? said Katrina Lee, director at Frank Crystal & Company. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There was a tangible enthusiasm in the air at the membership reception and it was wonderful to be part of it.â&#x20AC;? Rena Blades, Cultural Council president and CEO, briefly addressed the members and asked them to approve the board of directorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; officers for 2010-2011: Chairman Mike Bracci, Vice Chairman Bert Korman, Secretary Mike Simon and Treasurer Howard Bregman. All officers were approved. The Dreyfoos exhibition, which featured the work of 75 visual artists and 21 digital media majors in the schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s 2010 graduating class, included drawing, painting, printmaking, installation, architecture, sculpture, photography, film and animation.

Larry Boytano

eum

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President and CEO Rena Blades, Design Forward Chairs Hilary Jordan and Dack Patriarca greeted the crowd, saluted their support and explained how the auction was structured: party-goers at the six tables were asked to think of auction items they could donate in order to create a package that would be auctioned that night!

Tommy Morrison, Sarah Scheffer, Dack Patriarca and Hilary Jordan

The crowd didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know they would be such an integral part of the auction. As champagne was poured and delicious food served, the creative juices flowed and some

Experience One of Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Great House Museums When it was completed in 1902, Whitehall, Henry Flaglerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Gilded Age estate in Palm Beach, was hailed by the New York Herald as â&#x20AC;&#x153;more wonderful than any palace LQ(XURSHJUDQGHUDQGPRUHPDJQLĂ&#x20AC;FHQWWKDQDQ\RWKHU private dwelling in the world.â&#x20AC;? Today, Whitehall is a National Historic Landmark, and is open to the public as the Flagler Museum. For a complete 2010/2011 Season Program Guide, please call  RUYLVLWZZZĂ DJOHUPXVHXPXV The Fall Exhibition Mizner Mediterranean: The Origins of Palm Beach Style will be open from October 12, 2010 to January 2, 2011.

h e n r y

m o r r i s o n

FLAGLER MUSEUM palm beach, florida

A National Historic Landmark â&#x20AC;&#x153;An absolute must-see for visitors to Palm Beachâ&#x20AC;? ~ National Geographic Traveler

The Everglades Club, designed by Addison Mizner. Š Historical Society of PBC.

For more information call (561) 655-2833 or visit www.flaglermuseum.us 82 | art&culture


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{inside culture} cultural council news

Jay Holmes and Rena Blades

Ashley Boccia, Douglas E.J. Fredricks and Tara Tobin

Josh and Cindy Teverow with Hilary Jordan

Kathryn Martin, Caryna Nina and Angela Culveyhouse

truly imaginative and distinctive items were developed for seven packages that raised more than $8,500! The packages − and the generous people who donated them – included: • An after-hour party for 10 complete with Sunrise Bellinis, donated by Tommy Morrison. • Polo lessons with a professional polo player, donated by Andrew Steel. • A shopping day on Worth Avenue in a chauffeured Rolls Royce, donated by Josh Teverow. • Lunch for four with Lilly Pulitzer, donated by Bobby Leidy. • An original vintage Lilly Pulitzer or Pucci outfit, donated by Douglas E.J. Fredricks. • Memberships to the Flagler Museum, Kravis Center and the Israel Cancer Association, donated by Ellis and Nancy Parker. The tables were in competition to raise the most funds and the biggest money winners received custom screen-printed “Yuppie Grab Bags” with iconic items such

as Yuppie Handbooks, American Psycho DVDs, candles from Mary Mahoney and bottles of Veuve Clicquot. The Yuppie Auction chairman was Jay Holmes. Committee members included Mary Brittain Cheatham, Kevin Clark, Benjamin and Christina Macfarland, Bertram and Kathryn Martin, Andrew Steel, Tara Tobin and Erik Waldin. Sponsors included the Omphoy Ocean Resort, Palm Beach Philanthropy, Real Good Designs, Fusedog Media and Mary Mahoney.

Kimberly Denney and Katherine Kress

Jacki Campany and Wyatt Koch

from Plumosa Elementary School and travel to the Flagler Museum for two classes from Palmetto Elementary School. “The Muse Awards’ guests and sponsors enabled these young students to experience the interactive creative programs at Resource Depot and learn about the Flagler Museum’s wonderful history,” says Alyx Kellington, director of arts and cultural education. “These field trip experiences will stay with the students for a very long time.”

Muse Awards Help Students Experience Art and Culture More than 130 children from underserved communities were able to experience cultural field trips thanks to patrons of the Cultural Council’s Muse Awards, which support the Council’s education programs. A portion of these funds paid for travel to Resource Depot for two classes Palmetto Elementary School students visit the Flagler Museum.

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{inside culture} cultural compendium feature a new work by Jinyoung Lee that was specially created in collaboration with Cave and Grammy-nominated composer Michael Moses Tirsch to showcase the “Soundsuits,” which are named for the sounds they make when worn in performance. The performances will take place in the Borland Center Theater, 4885 PGA Blvd., Palm Beach Gardens. Visit www.pba.edu/performances for more information.

Palm Beach Dramaworks Eyes New Home at Cuillo Centre

Norton’s ‘Soundsuits’ Exhibition Comes to Life Through PBA Dancers in Fall Concert Nick Cave: Meet Me at the Center of the Earth − an unusual Norton Museum of Art exhibition featuring approximately 40 of Nick Cave’s multi-layered, mixed media, wearable sculptures known as “Soundsuits” – will come to life on November 19 and 20 when the Palm Beach Atlantic University Dance Ensemble takes the stage for its fall concert. The Norton Museum notes that the “Soundsuits” are “as reminiscent of African, Mardi Gras and religious ceremonial costumes as they are of haute couture. They explore ceremony, ritual, myth and identity through a subtle layering of references expressed through highly skilled techniques, varied traditions and an array of ordinary, scavenged yet seductive materials. By transforming discarded objects into works of art, Nick Cave encourages the viewer to connect with the pre-history of the objects as well as the potent imagery of the Soundsuits themselves.” The exhibition is on view through January 9. The PBA Dance Ensemble concert will

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Shel Shanak

Soundsuit, 2009; Human hair, metal armature, 99” h x 31” w x 27” d, Courtesy of the artist and Jack Shainman Gallery

West Palm Beach’s oldest resident professional theater, Palm Beach Dramaworks, is preparing to take its shows on the road to a new home – the Cuillo Centre for the Arts in downtown West Palm Beach. In September, the city’s Community Redevelopment Agency (CRA) voted to conditionally approve the purchase of the landmark theater and enter into a long-term lease agreement with Palm Beach Dramaworks. Once agreements are finalized, Dramaworks plans to renovate the interior theater and audience chamber, with a grand opening planned for November 2011.

“We look forward to presenting plays that our current tiny venue prohibits us from producing,” notes Dramaworks’ Producing Artistic Director William Hayes. “We are excited about the opportunity and the challenge of expanding our artistic horizons, and accommodating our everincreasing audience base, while carefully maintaining the powerfully intimate setting, which has become a trademark for our organization.” Added Mark Perlberg, Dramaworks’ board chairman, “This raises the curtain on an important act of the development of our theater, and is another essential step in the revitalization of downtown West Palm Beach. We are very thankful to Mayor Frankel, the City Commission, and the CRA for recognizing the arts as a crucial component to the economic and social health of our community.” For over 10 years, Palm Beach Dramaworks has worked out of a small space on Banyan Boulevard, between Dixie Highway and Olive Avenue. Opened in 1999, the 377-seat Cuillo theater is located on Clematis Street at the gateway to the newly established waterfront and West Palm’s restored downtown.

Barbara Bradshaw and Peter Haig in Palm Beach Dramaworks’ recent production of The Gin Game


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Marilyn Rudinsky of Delray Beach, Sheffield MacIntyre of Miami and Elaine Anderson of Delray Beach provided vintage Lilly Pulitzer clothing for display in “For the Love of LILLY” at the Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History.

Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History Spotlights Lilly Pulitzer For the Love of LILLY, a retrospective of the life and designs of Lilly Pulitzer, has taken up residence at the Museum of Lifestyle & Fashion History in the Boynton Beach Mall. The exhibit, which was organized and developed by the museum and curated by Lori J. Durante, will continue through May 31. Included are more than 100 vintage Lilly Pulitzer items for women, men and children as well as fabrics, accessories, a limited edition Lilly juice carton and animal crackers, galoshes, cocktail trays, napkins and photos that have been provided by more than 20 collectors from throughout Florida and across the country. The exhibition is chronological beginning with the family history of Lilly Pulitzer to the present. Private group tours are offered and school field trips are available through the museum’s Mathematics in Design and History program for grades pre-K through 6. Mathematical geometric shapes are highlighted as part of the exhibit for the field trips. For more information, call (561) 243-2662.

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{inside culture} cultural compendium Core Ensemble Brings Mona Lisa to Life in New Work The always intriguing, Lake Worthbased Core Ensemble is planning a season that

encompasses

national

touring,

educational programming and the creation of a new work. The centerpiece of the Dara Seitzman will appear as Mona Lisa in the newest Core Ensemble chamber music theater work.

season is the world premiere of Mona Lisa Speaks: Bemused by the Follies of Men. This new chamber music theater

7KH&XOWXUDO&RXQFLO·V

2011 MUSE AWARDS Celebrating excellence in arts and culture in Palm Beach County PREMIER BENEFACTOR

Event Chairpersons Irene Karp and Jean Sharf

Honorary Chairpersons Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos

JOIN US FEBRUARY 10, 2011 Cohen Pavilion at the Kravis Center for the Performing Arts

For tickets and information call 561-471-2901 or visit palmbeachculture.com Sponsorship opportunities available 3URFHHGVEHQHILWWKH&XOWXUDO&RXQFLO·VDUWVDQGFXOWXUDOHGXFDWLRQSURJUDP

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performance will premiere in March at Friend Recital Hall in Boston as part of the 100th Anniversary Season of the Community Music Center of Boston, followed by a performance at the University of South Carolina and the Florida premiere at the Raymond F. Kravis Center for the Performing Arts on April 21, 2011. Mona Lisa Speaks is a musical and theatrical exploration of a unique incident in the history of one of the world’s greatest works of art. Scored for solo singing actress (Dara Seitzman) and the Core Ensemble trio of cello, piano and percussion, the show is set in 1911 Paris after the theft of the Mona Lisa from the Louvre by an unknown Italian laborer. Mona Lisa comes to life in the apartment where she is held captive. The narrative explores her interaction with many of the powerful and not so powerful men who have been obsessed by her, including Leonardo da Vinci, Pablo Picasso and her kidnapper. The musical score includes works from 1911 (Debussy, Stravinsky, Satie), songs from the Italian Renaissance and new music written for the Core Ensemble. The script is by Jenny Lyn Bader, scriptwriter of the internet drama Watercooler (MSN). For more information about the Core Ensemble, call (561) 582-0603 or visit www.core-ensemble.cc.

‘Feather Wars’ Exhibit Chronicles Fashion’s Environmental Impact “Feather Wars: Surviving Fashion 1870-1920” − a new temporary exhibition in the Richard and Pat Johnson Palm Beach County History Museum in downtown West Palm Beach − examines the extraordinary period of South Florida history in which a worldwide trend in women’s hats created a rush to riches for ordinary people and near devastation for a population of splendid birds who inhabited the tropical wilderness.


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Visitors to the exhibition will be immersed in the plume-hunting chapter of Palm Beach County’s history and gain a thorough understanding of the scale of the industry and the impact it had on the county. Plume hunting was an activity almost anyone who owned a gun could do. The beautiful down plumage of a Snowy Egret hen nursing her chicks was highly prized and brought the same price-perounce as gold. For approximately 50 years, the birds were pursued to near extinction − a phenomenon that inspired some of the earliest and most critical legislation in the area of environmental protection. The exhibition will be on view from November 20 through June 30, 2011, at the museum, which is open Tuesday through Saturday. For more information, please call (561) 832-4164 or visit www.historicalsocietypbc.org.

The HARID Conservatory

2010-11 Performance Season December 11, & 12, 2010

O

May 27, 28, & 29, 2011

Flagler Museum Exhibition Explores the Genius of Addison Mizner The Flagler Museum’s fall exhibition, Mizner Mediterranean: The Origins of Palm Beach Style, examines the genius of renowned architect Addison Mizner, who

Alex Srb ©

Classical & contemporary ballets; character & modern dance. See what all the fuss is about! Call 561-998-8038 for tickets. info@harid.edu

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cultural compendium For those interested in delving deeper into the life, influences and legacy of Addison Mizner, the museum will host a gallery talk with Chief Curator Tracy Kamerer on December 7 at 12:15 p.m. The exhibition is free with museum admission. For more information, call (561) 655-2833 or visit www.flaglermuseum.us.

At the West Palm Beach Green Market

New Waterfront Welcomes Popular West Palm Beach Events

Addison Mizner, Residence for Edward T. Stotesbury, El Mirasol, built in 1919, patio (demolished).

created Palm Beach’s classic Mediterranean Revival style and helped fashion Palm Beach into an alluring destination. In honor of the 100th anniversary of the incorporation of the Town of Palm Beach, Mizner Mediterranean explores the town’s signature style through Mizner’s most significant projects. The exhibition examines the many facets of Mizner’s talent and explores his

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architectural office as well as his other companies, Mizner Industries and Las Manos pottery. The exhibition presents architectural drawings, photographs, furniture, metalwork, ceramics, decorative tiles and sculpture produced or imported by Mizner’s companies. The wide range of objects on display brings to life the fashionable and exotic environments the architect created for his patrons in this tropical paradise.

The stunning new West Palm Beach Waterfront is extending a warm welcome to two exceptionally popular downtown events − the West Palm Beach GreenMarket and Clematis by Night. The traditional farmer’s market will have a wide variety of vendors on hand when it opens for the season on October 16. Guests are invited to stroll through the beautiful new setting as they browse the farm-fresh produce, beautiful orchids and flowers, tasty breads and other fresh foods and listen to music, enjoy coffee or breakfast outdoors or just soak in the downtown waterfront scenery. The GreenMarket takes place every Saturday from 8 a.m. to 1 p.m. Free parking is offered in the Banyan Street garage during market hours. For more information, visit wpb.org/greenmarket. Meanwhile, the award-winning Clematis by Night concert series also has a new look and feel. To enhance the Clematis by Night experience and fully embrace the new downtown waterfront, the Clematis by

Left photo courtesy Historical Society of Palm Beach County.


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cultural compendium Night stage has been rotated 180 degrees and now faces the great lawn to the east of the Clematis Street fountain. In addition to new seating and a new beverage area, the free weekly Thursday night event will feature added activities, including visits from the eclectic and unique merchants of Northwood Village on the third Thursday of each month and art and photography exhibitions and displays from the Armory Art Center and the Palm Beach Photographic Centre on the fourth Thursday of each month. More details are available at clematisbynight.net.

Living Room Theater Complex to Open at FAU

The new Living Room Theater Complex on the Florida Atlantic University campus in Boca Raton.

The

NUTCRACKER Music by Tchaikovsky

Eissey Campus Theatre at Palm Beach State College 11051 Campus Drive, PB Gardens Friday, Nov 26th 2 & 7:30 pm Saturday, Nov 27th 2 & 7:30 pm $22 – $32

TICKETS 561.207.5900 www.fcbt.org

Photo: Jamilah Thet

Florida Atlantic University’s new movie complex in Boca Raton, operated by Living Room Theaters (LRT), is scheduled to open its doors in October. The complex will include four 50-seat theaters that will be used during the day by FAU’s film study program in the School of Communication and Multimedia Studies. Students will study film in a true cinema setting with outstanding picture and sound quality. On nights and weekends, the theaters will show a full schedule of foreign, classic and independent films, emphasizing new releases from around the world. The all-digital theaters employ LRT’s proprietary digitizing technology, which enables even first-time directors and producers to distribute independent films without the prohibitively high costs of making and shipping traditional celluloid prints. FAU’s Boca Raton campus will be the second site for LRT, which also operates a foreign/independent cinema in Portland, Ore. “This is a very exciting opportunity for our faculty and film study students,” said Susan Reilly, director of FAU’s School of Communications and Multimedia Studies. “Faculty will collaborate on special film series and students will learn how to operate cinemas, how to write film reviews and how to introduce foreign and independent film to new audiences.”

Colleen Smith Artistic Director

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The Chesterfield Hotel

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Located in the heart of Palm Beach just steps from Worth Avenue, The Chesterfield features 52 beautiful guest rooms and uniquely decorated suites, a library and a heated pool and hot tub spa.

The world-famous Leopard Lounge and Restaurant offers breakfast, “Executive Lunch,” afternoon tea, dinner, dessert, and late menus every day, and dancing to live entertainment every night.

From Robert Cottingham: Twenty Ways to See a Star

Boca Museum Freshens Up, Marks 10th Year in Mizner Park It hardly seems possible, but it’s been almost 10 years since the Boca Raton Museum of Art opened its 44,000-square-foot facility in Mizner Park. In January 2001, the Boca Museum moved into its new home from what is now the Museum Art School building on Palmetto Park Road. Over the past decade, the museum has welcomed nearly 1 million visitors

363 Cocoanut Row (561) 659-5800 • (Fax) 659-6707 Reservations (800) 243-7871 Email: ChesterfieldPB@aol.com or visit us online at www.ChesterfieldPB.com

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and has organized more than 200 exhibitions. After temporarily closing its galleries to the public to complete several upgrades and renovations, the museum was set to re-open to the public on October 12 with three exceptional exhibitions: a retrospective of more than four decades of work by Valerio Adami, an acclaimed Italian New Realist/Pop

Artist; Robert Cottingham: Twenty Ways to See a Star, which features 20 eye-popping, monumental photorealism paintings by this renowned artist; and Romanticism to Modernism: Graphic Masterpieces from Piranesi to Picasso, showing the development of European Modernism through the achievements of significant graphic artists beginning with Piranesi and culminating in the work of Pablo Picasso. More information is available at www.bocamuseum.org. “We are grateful that the community has embraced this museum so positively over the past 10 years,” said Executive Director George S. Bolge. “We consider it an extraordinary measure of our success to have to retrofit our facility because of the wear and tear it has received due to the continued use by our members and guests.”


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{inside culture} briefly noted The Boca Raton Children’s Museum kicked off its Capital Key Campaign to raise $1.4 million dollars to expand its campus − beginning with the building of a replica of the historic Captain T.M. Rickards House, one of the first homes built in Boca Raton in 1897. The building will include meeting areas, offices and Jason’s Music Hall, where after-school music and arts programs will be provided for children. The museum has received a $330,000 grant towards construction costs through the Palm Beach County Cultural Development Bond. Ron and Kathy Assaf, long-time supporters of the Children’s Museum, were the first to support the idea with a generous donation towards the historic interiors. The Assafs recently received special recognition from the museum with an official brass key for opening day. (Clockwise from left) Board Member Michael Thorson, Executive Director Poppi Mercier, Ron Assaf, Kathy Assaf, Christian Ayala and Board Member Anita Detert

The School District of Palm Beach County received a $1.2 million grant from the U.S. Department of Education for the Arts in Education Model Development and Dissemination Project (AIDP). This project will promote student achievement by integrating art skills and knowledge into the core curriculum. Students in kindergarten through fifth grade at two Title I schools, Belvedere and South Grade, will be served. It is estimated that during the four-year grant period, the project will impact more than 2,000 elementary students. Spearheaded by Dr. Tom Pearson, K-12 arts education administrator for the school district, this highly competitive grant is a huge boost to the students, teachers and community. Jeff Fessler, the 2009-2010 Palm Beach County Teacher of the Year and 2010 Muse Awards Arts Educator of the Year, has been named as the Arts Integration Project Manager of AIDP.

Jeff Fessler (from the 2010 Muse Awards event)

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{inside culture} briefly noted Lew Crampton is the new CEO

Donna Tucci’s Dreams Come True Dancers performing at the 2009 Holiday Showcase.

VSA Florida Palm Beach County, whose mission

of the South Florida Science Museum. A Palm Beach resident, Crampton recently moved fulltime to the area after relocating from Rockford, Ill., where he headed the Burpee Museum of Natural History for seven years. He is credited with raising significant amounts of operating and capital funds during his tenure there. He is also credited with putting Rockford and the Burpee Museum on the map with the high-profile discovery of “Jane” – the third most complete TRex skeleton ever found. Crampton’s past experience also includes two years as interim president, CEO and trustee of the Chicago Academy of Sciences, where he led a $35-million capital campaign and constructed a new museum building on the lakefront in Chicago’s Lincoln Park.

is to create a society where people with disabilities have the opportunity to learn through, participate in and enjoy the arts, will present its 20th annual Holiday Showcase on December 11 at 2 p.m. at the Duncan Theatre at Palm Beach State College in Lake Worth. The showcase will be hosted by Tiffany Kenney of WPBF News Channel 25. A two-hour tribute to dance and music, Stars and Lights Forever provides an opportunity for children, teens and adults of all abilities to share their talents with the community. VSA’s song and dance performance group, The SpotLighters, VSA’s dance residency students from Forest Hill Elementary School and Therapeutic Recreation’s Hip Hop Dance Group will be performing along with many other talented groups and individuals. For tickets call (561) 966-7025.

Palm Beach Atlantic University’s Fern Street Theatre

Palm Beach Atlantic University’s Fern Street Theatre is opening this fall, expanding the university campus north of Okeechobee Boulevard into the heart of the downtown West Palm Beach cultural district. The two-story building, located at 500 Fern St. at the corner of Fern and Quadrille, will be used by the university’s Theatre Department for faculty offices,

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Lew Crampton

classrooms and performance space. “Opening this new academic and performance space is another milestone for the university’s theater program,” said University President Lu Hardin. “Through this new facility Palm Beach Atlantic has an even greater presence in West Palm Beach and in the cultural community.” PBA’s Theatre Department is part of the university’s School of Communication and Media, which houses more than 200 students majoring in the academic divisions of communication, journalism and entertainment media, and theater.


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{inside culture} briefly noted Three former students at Jupiter High School’s Environmental Academy were among the five summer interns honored recently by the Arthur R. Marshall Foundation. The JHS alumni included James Wally, Ed Pritchard and Dylan Scott, all of whom are students at the University of Florida. Also recognized were Angelique Giraud, who attends New College of Florida, and Adrienne Smith, who is working on a master’s degree at UF. The Summer Intern Program is designed for upper-level undergraduate and graduate students interested in careers in the environmental sciences. Participants explore the ecology, geology, history and hydrology of the Florida Everglades, conduct fieldwork at the Arthur R. Marshall Loxahatchee National Wildlife Refuge in Boynton Beach and meet with key professionals and decision-makers involved in the Comprehensive Everglades Restoration Plan.

(From left) Dylan Scott, Ed Pritchard, Adrienne Smith, Angelique Giraud, Jim Wally and Marshall Foundation Chairman John Marshall

ArtStart founder and president Jeannette Pomeroy Parssi (left) with Merly Collins, LAIRO’s after-school program director and “The Lost Puppy” quilt.

The students and staff at LAIRO, the Delray Beach artist Sharon Koskoff painted a tiger in front of a live audience at Kevro’s Art Bar for the Cornell Museum exhibition.

The Cornell Museum of Art & American Culture at Old School Square pays tribute to felines in its current exhibition, The Cat’s Meow. It’s billed as “the PURRRfect celebration of cats… from mild, to wild!” Paintings, sculpture and photographs by artists from Arizona, Colorado and Florida comprise the lion’s share of the show, along with fun photos and stories from community cat owners. Artist Sharon Koskoff was set to create a 25-foot mural with seven mild to wild cats in the Children’s Interactive Gallery on the museum’s second floor. The exhibition continues through February 27 at the museum, 51 N. Swinton Ave., Delray Beach. For more information, visit www.oldschool.org.

Latin American Immigrant and Refugee Organization, were excited when their “story quilt,“ was displayed at the Schoolhouse Children’s Museum and Learning Center of Boynton Beach. Under the guidance of ArtStart’s Jeannette Pomeroy Parssi, 22 elementary school students enrolled in the LAIRO after-school program studied famed quilt artist Faith Ringgold and emulated her style by writing and illustrating the quilt, “The Lost Puppy.” Each student created a line for the story then illustrated that line on a 12” square piece of canvas. Parssi then stitched the canvas squares together and added the border. Earlier, the quilt was displayed during the LAIRO end-of-year celebration, giving the families of the young artists a chance to see their work.

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cultural council membership

join us! You’re invited to join the Cultural Council’s family of supporters and enjoy exclusive member benefits that offer incredible value. As a member, we’ll keep you informed and entertained with our award-winning publications and signature events – all year long!

art&culture magazine

Culture Card

The award-winning magazine of the Cultural Council. Enjoy in-depth features, compelling interviews, beautiful images and behind-the-scenes looks at Palm Beach County’s arts and cultural landscape. Benefit of Membership at any level.

Your passport to incredible savings! Use the card to access ticket discounts, 2-for-1 admissions and monthly specials at cultural venues in Palm Beach County. Benefit of Membership at the $125 level and above.

Culture & Cocktails Cultural Calendar The ultimate guide to arts and cultural events in Palm Beach County! Includes detailed listings for gallery and museum exhibitions, festivals, performing arts, children’s events, workshops and more. Benefit of Membership at any level.

Join our guest panelists for seven evenings of exciting cultural “conversations” on topics ranging from art and collecting, to literature and entertainment. Programs are held during season at Café Boulud in Palm Beach and the Boca Raton Resort & Club. Reservations required. For information call 561-472-3330. Benefit of Membership at the $175 level and above.

JOIN TODAY! By Phone: 561-472-3330 • Online: www.palmbeachculture.com For additional information please contact our Membership Department at 561-471-3330. The Palm Beach County Cultural Council is a 501(c)(3) not-for-profit corporation. A copy of the official registration and financial information may be obtained from the Division of Consumer Services by calling toll-free within the State of Florida 1-800-435-7352. Registration does not imply endorsement or approval.

CULTURE & COCKTAILS

Join the Palm Beach County Cultural Council for seven exciting evenings of Œž•ž›Š•ȱȃŒ˜—ŸŽ›œŠ’˜—œȄȱ˜—ȱŠ›ǰȱŒ˜••ŽŒ’—ǰȱ•’Ž›Šž›ŽǰȱŽ—Ž›Š’—–Ž—ȱŠ—ȱ–˜›Žǯȱȱ Held at the elegant Café Boulud on Palm Beach and the Boca Raton Resort & Club. For information call (561) 472-3330 or visit www.palmbeachculture.com Underwritten by

The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation Additional Support Provided by

The Peter and Vicki Halmos Family Foundation and the Palm Beach Principal Players

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{inside culture} In gratitude to our members and supporters whose generous gifts of $500 and greater help us accomplish our mission Mrs. Marjorie S. Fisher Marjorie S. Fisher Fund

Mr. Paul N. Leone The Breakers

Mr. and Mrs. Doug Anderson

Mrs. Shirley Fiterman Miles & Shirley Fiterman Charitable Foundation

Mrs. Ellen F. Liman The Liman Foundation

A.R.T.

Frank Crystal & Company

Ms. Carol Barnett Publix Supermarket Charities

Ms. Jennifer Garrigues Jennifer Garrigues Interior Design

Ms. Ruth Baum

Mr. Robert Gittlin JKG Group

1st United Bank Dr. Stan Althof and Mrs. Marcie Gorman Althof

Ms. Lisa H. Peterfreund Merrill G. & Emita E. Hastings Foundation

Mr. John Loring

Mr. Dana T. Pickard Edwards, Angell, Palmer, Dodge, LLP

Dr. Catherine Lowe

PNC Foundation

Mr. Rod Macon Florida Power & Light

Dr. A. Carter Pottash Mr. and Mrs. Robert S. Puder Ms. Joyce Reingold Palm Beach Daily News

Mr. J. Arthur Goldberg

Mr. and Mrs. Milton S. Maltz The Milton and Tamar Maltz Family Foundation

Mr. Craig D. Grant PNC Bank

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph A. Marks

Mr. and Mrs. Raymond Graziotto

Mrs. Betsy K. Matthews

Ms. Carole Boucard Boca Raton Resort & Club

Greater Boca Raton Chamber of Commerce

Mr. and Mrs. William M. Matthews

Mr. Leon M. Rubin Rubin Communications Group

Mr. Michael J. Bracci Northern Trust Bank of Florida, N.A.

Mrs. Sydelle Meyer

Greater Boynton Beach Chamber of Commerce

Mr. and Mrs. S. Lawrence Schlager

Mr. and Mrs. William A. Meyer

Mr. Lewis M. Schott

Mr. J. Daniel Brede Lawrence A. Sanders Foundation

Ms. Roe Green

Ms. Beverlee Miller

Mr. and Mrs. Homer J. Hand

Mr. Gary Schweikhart PR-BS, Inc.

Mrs. Sydell L. Miller

Hispanic Chamber of Commerce

Mrs. Herme de Wyman Miro

The Scripps Research Institute, Scripps Florida

Mr. Herbert S. Hoffman Hoffman Companies

Ms. Jane Mitchell

Mr. and Mrs. Barry Seidman

Ms. JoAnne Rioli Moeller Office Depot

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic A. Sharf

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Mr. Michael D. Simon Gunster, Yoakley & Stewart P.A.

Mr. Adam Munder Rednum Capital Partners

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Mr. Geoffrey H. Neuhoff

Ms. Kelly S. Sobolewski Bank of America

Mr. and Mrs. Stanley Katz

Ms. Suzanne Niedland and Mr. Lawrence De George

Mr. & Mrs. William J. Soter

Mr. and Mrs. Amin J. Khoury B/E Aerospace, Inc.

Northern Palm Beach County Chamber of Commerce

Mr. Robert S.C. Kirschner Passport Publications & Media Corporation

Ora Sorensen Gallery

Mrs. Patricia G. Thorne

Ms. Debby M. Oxley

Ms. Phyllis Tick

Dr. and Mrs. Ronald B. Koch

Mr. and Mrs. Ellis J. Parker Palm Beach Civic Association

Mrs. Edith R. Dixon

Mr. and Mrs. Donald H. Kohnken Kohnken Family Foundation

The Wachovia Wells Fargo Foundation

Mrs. Cecile Draime

Mr. and Mrs. Berton E. Korman

Palm Beach Jewelry, Art and Antique Show

Mr. and Mrs. Brian K. Waxman

Mr. and Mrs. Alexander W. Dreyfoos

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The Palm Beach Post

William R. Kenan Jr. Charitable Trust

Mr. Timothy A. Eaton Eaton Fine Art

Mr. Raymond E. Kramer, III Beasley, Hauser, Kramer, Leonard & Galardi, P.A.

Mr. Dack Patriarca

Ms. Sheryl G. Wood

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Payson Midtown Payson Galleries

Ms. Mary Wong Office Depot Foundation

Belle Glade Chamber of Commerce Mr. and Mrs. Harry Benson Mr. and Mrs. John Blades Mr. Jeffrey E. Berman

Mr. Howard Bregman Greenberg Traurig, P.A. Mr. and Mrs. Francois Brutsch Mr. Douglas Brown Ovations Catering Business Development Board Mr. and Mrs. Robert T. Butler Mr. Christopher D. Caneles The Palm Beach Post Mr. and Mrs. John K. Castle Chamber of Commerce of the Palm Beaches Community Foundation for Palm Beach and Martin Counties Dr. Richard P. Dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Elia Mr. Gus Davis Mr. Robert DeForest Mr. Bradford A. Delfin Wells Fargo Wealth Management

Mr. George T. Elmore Hardrives, Inc.

Ms. Judy A. Hoffman Profile Marketing Research Ms. Ann E. Howard John C. & Mary Jane Howard Foundation Ms. Hilary Jordan Mr. and Mrs. James S. Karp Mr. and Mrs. Richard J. Katz, Jr.

Mr. and Mrs. Marvin Kushnick

Mrs. Wilma Elmore

Mrs. Emily F. Landau

Mr. & Mrs. Jack Farber

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Mr. Jorge Pesquera Palm Beach County Convention and Visitors Bureau

Mr. Stephan Richter Richters of Palm Beach Mr. & Mrs. Andrew Rodusky

Ms. Muriel F. Siebert

Ms. Brenda N. Straus Mr. and Mrs. Dom A. Telesco

Mr. and Mrs. Leo Vecellio, Jr.

WXEL Ms. Ruth Young The Colony - Palm Beach

Listing as of print date

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{next issue – winter 2011}

Palm Beach in its youth, circa 1890s. Photo courtesy of James A. Ponce, Historian

aging gracefully Celebrations will fill the calendar and divine history will be made as the Town of Palm Beach celebrates its 100th birthday in January. The tiny, tony enclave stretches just 16 miles along Florida’s Atlantic coast but looms large in the state’s history and in imaginations worldwide. In the next issue of art&culture, we’ll visit the iconic island and celebrate its storied past.

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Classical S Fla Radio 89.7_Fall 10:Layout 1

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it’s alive All-classical public radio station Classical South Florida has burst onto the airwaves. Its music explodes in sonic blooms. Your pulse quickens. Your spirits soar. It’s classical music. It’s alive.

classicalsouthflorida.org

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Introducing The New 2011 Mercedes-Benz SLS Available now at Mercedes-Benz of Delray. Where you can get access to over 1000 new and Certified Pre-Owned Mercedes-Benz luxury vehicles. And they’re all competitively priced, so you can drive a Mercedes-Benz at a price you never expected.

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art&culture magazine v5i1 Fall 2010  

As the primary catalyst for Palm Beach County’s thriving cultural climate, art&culture magazine is the official publication for the communit...

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