Inspired - Rex Healthcare Foundation News & Annual Report 2020

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Fall 2020

News from Rex Healthcare Foundation

Community Steps Up Big with PPE New Cancer Center, Holly Springs Hospital On the Way COVID-19 Patient Shares Her Story

Includes the 2020 Gratitude Report


Inside This Issue A Message from Our President, Ernie Bovio..........................................3 A Screen Worthy Victory: Code Rocky Patient.................................... 4-5 We’ve Got You Covered: Local Chinese Community Supports UNC REX During COVID-19......................................... 6-7 Unsung Heroes in Our Midst.............................................................. 8-9 New Pediatric Unit Provides a Safe Place for Our Youngest Patients....................................................... 10-11

2020 Gratitude Report

A Message from Sylvia Hackett.......................... 12

Total Invested in Our Hospital............................. 13

Roy Tempke Heads Up New Holly Springs Hospital........................ 14-15 Gary Park to Retire.............................................................................. 15 Planting Trees for Future Generations: Generous Memorial Gift Benefits New Cancer Center............................................ 16-17 Advocating for Patients: Volunteers Lend Their Voices for Patient Advocacy.................................................... 18-19 UNC REX Healthcare Trustees.............................................................. 19 2019-2020 Acorn Pin Recipients......................................................... 20 REX Hospital Open.............................................................................. 21 Foundation Staff.................................................................................. 21 UNC REX 125th Celebration Gala.................................................. 22-23

2500 Blue Ridge Rd., Suite 325 | Raleigh, NC 27607 rex.foundation@unchealth.unc.edu | (919) 784-4424 RexHealthcareFoundation.com Editor: Jackie Leach Pierce Special acknowledgement to Laurie’s Write Touch!, Partin Design Group and Brian Strickland Photography On the cover: LOVE mural outside MSICU at UNC REX, designed and painted by local artist and UNC REX surgical tech Jamar Harris. Inside front cover: Our co-workers are true HEROES every day. Thank you from the bottom of our hearts.

Our mission

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is to provide opportunities for our community to invest resources in the excellent work of UNC REX Healthcare. The core activities through which the Foundation fulfills this mission include: advocacy, education, program development, fundraising, strategic partnerships and donor engagement.


A Message from our President, Ernie Bovio October 2020 Greetings! It has been my honor to serve as president of UNC REX Healthcare for the past year, one in which we have all faced many challenges due to the COVID-19 pandemic. I have been impressed by the resilience, dedication and compassion demonstrated by UNC REX co-workers and physicians as we strive to continue providing the excellent care our patients expect and deserve. I am humbled and sincerely grateful for the support UNC REX has received from our donors and friends. You have stepped up to the plate, even in the midst of a global pandemic, to ensure that we can continue providing outstanding care while meeting Ernie Bovio the unexpected challenges of COVID-19. Our co-workers are encouraged to know that as they continue showing up for work during these trying times, they have the backing of so many of you in the community who have contributed money or made in-kind gifts to help us fulfill our mission. Please accept a much-deserved and heartfelt thank you to each and every one of you for your support. Thanks to your generosity, coupled with the hardworking, dedicated co-workers with whom I am lucky to work, I wake up daily with a renewed sense of purpose and a desire to roll up my sleeves and get to work helping to provide excellent care to our patients. It might please you to know that our peers are taking notice of our incredible work. In March, UNC REX was recognized as one of the World’s Best Hospitals by Newsweek magazine, which compiled its list of the best medical institutions in 21 countries by analyzing several factors, including quality and safety measures, patient satisfaction data, staffing and a survey of physicians and other health professionals. In February, we once again received a Top Five-Star Rating from CMS for quality care, meaning we are in the top 9 percent of hospitals nationwide for the quality of care our patients receive, and one of 13 in North Carolina. And last November, we received another “A” in Leapfrog Group’s hospital safety report card, becoming the only hospital in North Carolina — and one of only 36 nationwide — to receive straight A’s since Leapfrog began grading hospitals for safety in 2012. Without your support, none of this would be possible. Please know that at UNC REX, we are invested in the work that lies ahead, and I thank you, sincerely, for your support. Sincerely,

Ernie Bovio President

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A Screen Worthy Victory ”Code Rocky” Patient Lisa Fernandez Perseveres Through COVID-19 Diagnosis

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fter Lisa Fernandez started feeling a little achy in late March, she chalked it up to lupus, with which she was diagnosed in 2018. Later, when she developed a scratchy throat, she figured the pollen was triggering her allergies.

Once inside, she was given a COVID-19 test, which came back positive. The next day, officials showed her how to use an Incentive Spirometer, a handheld respiratory tool that measures how much air volume the lungs can hold.

After the chest tightness and breathing trouble started, she assumed it was a recurrence of bronchitis. Fernandez was also stressed about a family member’s health condition, so she assumed the combination of factors was causing her to feel bad.

Based on how she felt, Fernandez suspected she’d be put on a ventilator, so she communicated with her family via FaceTime and recorded phone messages while she still had the ability.

On March 26, she described her symptoms to her pulmonologist, who called in a prescription. Two days later she contacted him again and he increased her dosage. When Fernandez contacted him on March 31 — the third time in five days — he advised her to go to an ER or urgent care. Fernandez went to urgent care, where a chest Xray revealed double pneumonia. The doctor informed her that her pulmonologist had been notified. “I’ve called REX’s ER and made an appointment,” the doctor told Fernandez. ”They know you’re coming.” At UNC REX, officials verified Fernandez’s ID and instructed her sons Alex, 23, and Jason, 19, to remain in the car. The only belongings she was allowed to bring inside were a credit card, an insurance card, her ID and her cell phone. As Fernandez was being wheeled into the hospital, the 53-year-old married mother of two had no idea her life was about to permanently change.

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“I told my sons if I didn’t make it I’d be there as an angel on their shoulders when they get married,” Fernandez recalls. “I encouraged them to go after their passions. I got to record only a half message to my husband Frank before it was time for them to intubate me.” Ultimately, Fernandez was in a coma 21 days and spent 55 days total at UNC REX. Registered Nurse Tommy Fayet and Speech Therapist Charity Lovette were among her primary caregivers during her stay. “Lisa is an educated woman, she asked appropriate health-related questions and understood that her condition wasn’t ideal,” Fayet says. “I noticed her anxiety, so we talked about our families so I could keep her mind off things. During her recovery from her intubation she needed to understand that it would be a slow process, but she was so motivated to move forward that she’d get frustrated and needed to be reminded about how she was on death’s doorstep and how far she’d already come.” After Fernandez’s cognitive and communication abilities were assessed,

Fernandez’s husband, Frank, illustrated a special thank you to her care team – all heroes to the Fernandez family.

Lovette and Beth Cormell, UNC REX’s primary COVID-19 speech pathologists, worked with her while she was in ICU and ventilator dependent. “Lisa was vented and they also placed a tracheostomy tube which gave her the ability to voice, and that’s when we really started to delve into her communication, voice and swallow function,” Lovette says. “She went from having to be tube fed to transitioning to eating by mouth. She went from having no voice, being aphonic, to being able to regain her voice function.” The speech pathologist who has worked at UNC REX for more than 16 years says she was struck by Fernandez’s determination and upbeat attitude. “Lisa has the best personality,” Lovette recalls. “She was just so lively and she was


so engaged and had such a funny sense of humor. We’d just laugh and laugh in the room during our therapy sessions. She’s very down to earth and she worked really, really hard. I know there were times that she was anxious, and rightfully so after going through what she went through, but she was a fighter for sure.” Memory loss is common among COVID-19 patients, and Fernandez doesn’t remember everything about her nearly two-month hospital stay. “When I first woke up from being on the ventilator I had no clue where I was,” she says. “My eyes weren’t tracking and they were concerned that I had brain damage from being on the ventilator so long. I kept asking over and over and over where I was because it wasn’t clear in my head. At that point I knew only who I was. It was too hard for my oldest son, Alex, to be on the phone with me when I was like that. And I know it was really difficult for Jason to talk to me, but he did it.” Fernandez didn’t know what life would look like after she got discharged from the hospital, but she was eager to find out. “She was motivated and very much wanted to be independent, but I was direct with Lisa and told her how it was without sugarcoating anything…” Fayet says. “I think (at times) she just needed some direction to keep her on the right path.”

always paid attention, took her time and was present in the moment.” Her family appreciated McCormack as well. “They thought she was awesome,” Fernandez says. “She kept them informed about me and was very kind. She let them know how serious it was but also that it could be worse and did it in a way to ensure they were okay with the information.” Fernandez turned 54 while she was hospitalized. Over a month later, she was discharged amid much fanfare and TV cameras. “As I got wheeled out, the hospital employees started clapping,” she recalls. “But I was clapping for them — all of the doctors and nurses and therapists and everybody who treated me. My husband and my sons were looking at me. They were sort of frozen and I was sort of frozen. As I walked closer to them, they started coming towards me. We became a little square hug. Just the four of us.” Now that she’s home, Fernandez is adjusting to her new normal. She says she’s “super forgetful” and struggles with simple addition and telephone numbers. Her hair is falling out and she’s gained weight because of steroid medication. At times, other things are amiss. For example, she has mistakenly put salt in the

Besides Fayet, Lovette and a host of other hospital personnel, Fernandez is grateful to Dr. Mary McCormack. “She took her time explaining things to me and answering questions, and I never felt rushed or like she was in a hurry to get out of the room,” Fernandez says. “I was confident in her medical knowledge and how she was actively keeping up on the emerging information on the virus. She

When a COVID-19 patient is released, a “Code Rocky” is called to alert staff. Cheers and applause erupt as the patient is discharged!

Fernandez gets a warm embrace as she prepares to leave UNC REX after 55 days.

refrigerator, she can forget a thought midsentence, and a mild sore throat and slight metal taste signal it’s time for her to rest. Fernandez and her husband and sons did everything they could to remain safe, including wearing face masks long before the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommended them. Yet despite everything she’s been through, she isn’t wallowing in self-pity. She just wants people to take the coronavirus seriously and acknowledges she was fortunate to survive. Moreover, she’s immeasurably grateful to UNC REX. “There were so many good people there, like Dr. McCormack, Tommy and Charity, who were professional and good at what they did,” she says. “There were housekeepers who quietly and efficiently went about their work and weren’t intrusive. There was a nurse’s aide who helped me get into the shower when I was told I couldn’t wash my hair. “There was one nurse who came in and tidied up my room, and I felt terrific after that,” Fernandez continues. “There were the people in food service who made hospital food that was not only palatable but often very good. It was humbling to me how so many people were invested in me getting well, who risked their own lives and their families’ lives to save mine.”

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We’ve Got You Covered Local Chinese Community Supports UNC REX During COVID-19

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n March as COVID-19 spread rapidly through the country, Ping Zhang, director of the Chinese American Civic Center, was in Raleigh creating a GoFundMe page to raise money for Personal Protective Equipment (PPE) for UNC REX front-line workers. Hannah Chan, vice president of Carolinas Chinese Chamber of Commerce (CCCC), began promoting Zhang’s efforts on social media platforms. “We started collecting money and face masks,” Chan said. “People started dropping off masks at the office, and within the first week of increased marketing we raised $15,000. In all we collected almost $50,000, and we got another $50,000 in equivalent PPE donations.” As Chan and Zhang were helping UNC REX co-workers, Jianping Yang, president of the Chinese-American Friendship Association of North Carolina (CAFA), was simultaneously spearheading a donation effort for UNC REX. The money and PPE were raised during three weeks in March. “After April I think the hospital had a sufficient number of PPE, so we started buying regular masks for the general public,” Yang said. For Chan and Yang, donating PPE to UNC REX was personal: Chan’s mother is a retired nurse, her father is a retired pharmacist and Yang’s friend, Qingxiao Cheng, is a nurse at UNC REX.

When the community is hurting, we’re all hurting.

“Initially, the only place the masks could be purchased was in China because the U.S. didn’t have a supply,” said Yang. “I have friends who work for the Chinese Ministry of Health. We knew there was a shortage of PPE here so we … thought it was a good idea to fundraise for the doctors and nurses.” Chan’s respect for healthcare workers led to her involvement. “I really appreciate the doctors, nurses, delivery people, post office workers, firefighters and police

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One of many deliveries of PPE donatoins from CCCC and CAFA.

officers,” she said. “I appreciate all of the front-line workers who during this time put other people first.” Chan grew emotional while discussing reading about a nurse who worked all day yet was fearful of going home and spreading the coronavirus to her family. “The article made me think about my parents and other healthcare workers,” Chan said. “Some people can work from home, but the nurses and doctors can’t do that.” Chan said she fells good about what they have done. “When the community is hurting, we’re all hurting,” she said.


Nineteen organizations worked with Chan and Zhang on the donation effort. “Because the nurses working at REX were asking for masks, I really knew of their need,” she said. “We actually gave the most PPE to REX — ICU gowns, masks, face shields and eye goggles.”

Thank You

to our community for stepping up to help!

Cheng connected Yang with hospital facilities workers in charge of PPE. He estimates CAFA donated $13,000 to UNC REX, and more than a dozen organizations helped CAFA’s donation efforts. “A lot of people were very supportive,” Yang said. “We were in a unique position because we had a lot of connections in China. We felt very good about what we were doing because we were helping to save lives.” “A lot of the people donating money were from the Chinese community here, but some people in China also donated money,” he said. “UNC REX is a great hospital, and we were glad to help the doctors and nurses there who are helping to save lives.”

Peter Dong-Kyun Kim, president and CEO (left) and Anna Kim, COO (far right) of Daedong-USA, Inc.- KIOTI, present 10,000 N-95 masks as well as a K9 2440 utility vehicle to UNC REX leadership members, Sylvia Hackett and Andy Zukowski.

Multiple Chinese American organizations came together to provide UNC REX essential PPE: • RTP Chinese American Physician Association • International Leadersihp Foundation • NC Asian American Coalition • Asian Americans for Dan Forest • Chinese American Association of Charlotte • Greenboro Chinese Association • Greensboro Chinese School • Wilmington Chinese American Culture Association • Myrtle Beach Chinese Business Association • Myrtle Beach Chinese Community • North American News Channel • Chinese Press, Chinese News Headliner Company & World Journalism

The NC Woodworker Forum donated hand-carved wooden angels to our “angels” on the front line. Members of the lab show off their gifts!

Local GNC franchise owners Laura and Carter Dalton made a donation to the health care providers working on the front lines. GNC donated 1,000 energy drinks, 1,000 protein bars, and 1,000 vitamin C chews to UNC REX to help keep doctors and nurses nourished as they help fight the virus.

The Rex Wellness Center of Raleigh served as a PPE donation drop off location during March and April. Many generous community members delivered!

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Unsung Heroes in Our Midst

Members of the Environmental Services team: Daya Watelski, Orlando Reyes (Director) and Daniel McIlvaine

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f people are hospitalized or visiting someone who is, they expect patient rooms, waiting areas and restrooms to be clean without putting much thought into who’s responsible for making that happen. But in wake of the COVID-19 pandemic, UNC REX Environmental Services Director Orlando Reyes thinks about little else these days. He supervises 150 people who work tirelessly to ensure UNC REX patients and families can take comfort in knowing the rooms are safe, sanitized and secure. “We provide at least two touches to each room per day,” Reyes said. “We visit in the morning and introduce ourselves to tell them we’ll be emptying their trash, stocking their supplies and coming in later to clean their room. It’s sort of like the nurse coming in and announcing herself or himself for the day.” Environmental Services (EVS) employees do much more than clean patient rooms. “We’re not there to draw blood or give them medication or to do any of the clinical stuff,” Reyes said. “We’re there to clean and sanitize the room and also to have an interaction with them to establish a relationship where they can feel comfortable. In some cases, if they don’t have family, we might spend additional time with them so they can feel that somebody is there for them.” Interacting with patients didn’t just start with the COVID-19 pandemic but has long been a part of Environmental Services’ protocol.

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“When we hire our EVS technicians, what we look for during the interview process are customer service skills,” Reyes said. “We can show them the technical part any day … but the customer service piece, you’re either born with it or you’re not. We look for that because it’s very important for us to provide that patient care to every patient that comes to REX.” Technician Daya Watelski’s demeanor matches the standard Reyes wants his employees to exemplify. “I come in with a positive attitude and just do what I have to do,” Watelski said. “My patients love me and I love them back. You have to make them feel at home. I may be a stranger and yes, I’m a housekeeper, but we’re all family here.” Watelski loves her job but nowadays is taking extra precautions. For example, if a patient isn’t wearing a mask, she gently asks whether he or she would be more comfortable with one. “When I first enter the room, I write my name on the door, tell them I’m going to be working from 7 a.m. to 3:30 p.m., ask whether everything is okay with the room and tell them I’m going to sanitize their phone, bed, rail, table, etc.” When cleaning the room of a patient who’s waiting on COVID-19 test results, Watelski wears a helmet with a face shield and doubles up on her gloves. “I cover my hair because I don’t want to have to go home every day and wash it,” she said.


Watelski says she doesn’t feel nervous when entering a patient’s room because she could contract the virus from a grocery store or another establishment. “I actually feel safe working in the hospital because we have all of the personal protection equipment we need.” Daniel McIlvaine has worked at UNC REX for two years and likes seeing patients marvel at a floor or hallway after he’s cleaned it. He noted that contract workers from other hospitals have complimented EVS staff by saying they “never see floors as clean and shiny as the ones here at REX.” McIlvaine said EVS co-workers have always worked diligently to ensure the hospital is clean, but “right now it’s more important than ever that we do our job and do it correctly. Honestly, if we don’t do what we need to do, how can anybody else at the hospital really do their job?”

If you have not visited the Rex Healthcare Foundation website in a while, click on over to

rexhealthcarefoundation.com to check out the brand new look! Streamlined information and donor stories, plus easy donation giving in just a few clicks. We hope you will take a look and visit often!

He admits being a little nervous about working in a hospital during a pandemic but says he’s confident UNC REX officials are doing everything they can to ensure patient and employee safety. “Since the beginning of everything with the pandemic, our leadership has always had our backs and kept us informed of everything that’s going on,” McIlvaine said. “Especially when it comes to the chemicals we use to clean the rooms, the UV lights we use to sterilize the rooms and just PPE in general. They make sure we have it in stock on a daily basis, and I really feel safer here than I do outside in the world.” Reyes and his management team make rounds like doctors, asking patients whether their rooms are cleaned appropriately and if housekeepers are coming by at least twice a day. The pandemic has significantly increased the number of hours he and his managers are putting in, but Reyes isn’t complaining. “The staff is pretty much working their normal eight-hour shifts, although some of them have taken on extra shifts or hours if needed,” Reyes said. “The important thing for us as managers is to support our team members and make them feel safe.” Reyes is proud that only six of his employees, or less than 5%, have quit over concerns about contracting the coronavirus. He’s also glad their hard work hasn’t gone unnoticed. “Different restaurants have provided free meals to us on occasion,” he said. “REX management has come around and thanked my staff, and we’ve received multiple emails from different units and staff thanking us. Our front-line co-workers are the ones who are making things happen, and we have to take care of them so they can take care of our patients. That’s why what we’re doing in Environmental Services is more critical now than ever.”

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Peds Story New Pediatric Unit Provides a Safe Place for Our Youngest Patients

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hen parents have a sick child in the hospital, there’s no end to the number of things they worry about. At UNC REX, the clinical team doesn’t want the care that child receives to be one of them. UNC REX’s family-centered, 10-bed Pediatric Unit aims to provide high-quality care for children in a friendly, welcoming environment. Associate Vice President of Operations Megan Lumley, whose daughter, Kiera, was a patient in the PEDS Unit in early August, says it is fulfilling its purpose. “I love REX, but I love it even more now that I know they have what I need for my kids right here,” Lumley says. “We didn’t have to go to Wake Med or UNC. We stayed right here and got all of the care Kiera required. Dr. Emilee Lewis went out of her way to call Kiera’s allergy and asthma specialist at his office to talk to him before she discharged Kiera, and worked with him to make sure they did everything they needed to do for Kiera. That really impressed me. That was huge.” Lumley’s daughter spent several hours in the emergency room before being admitted to the PEDS Unit in the wee hours of Aug. 3. “It was 4 a.m. by the time we got in the room, but it was very safe,” Lumley says. “It was locked down so nobody could get in or out of that area without a badge. The nurses’ station was near us, and it was very organized, clean and secure. Even at 4 a.m., a nurse came to our room and made us feel very comfortable.”

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Lumley’s words are music to the ears of PEDS Unit Clinical Manager Stacey Thompson, who says UNC REX’s intention is to provide children with a safe place for treatment in a family environment. The PEDS Unit features the hospitalist model, with a team of doctors who split their time between it and UNC REX’s newborn nursery. “When children are hospitalized, it’s very stressful on parents,” Thompson says. “We worked very hard to develop support to make this PEDS Unit family-centered because we recognize that we’re not just taking care of a sick child; we’re taking care of the family as a whole.” Each room in the new PEDS Unit has a different color scheme, animal theme and communication board used for the child’s treatment plan. The featured animals are chicken, deer, flamingo, giraffe, koala, monkey, panda, penguin, raccoon and zebra. Kiera was in the raccoon room during her two-day stay. “We chose to do that so kids can say, ‘I’m in the giraffe room or I’m in the monkey room,’” Thompson says. “We want to motivate kids to come out of their room to take a walk down the hall. For example, we might ask a child in one room to find a different animal room as a form of exercise.” The PEDS Unit has a playroom and also a family support space with a computer and charging station, which affords parents a quiet place to make important phone calls or simply get a respite.


PEDS Unit Clinical Manager, Stacey Thompson

PEDS Unit Playroom

Lewis is a pediatric hospitalist, medical director for hospital pediatrics and vice chair of pediatrics for UNC REX. She has been affiliated with the hospital since the new PEDS Unit opened in late January. “This is a great opportunity for UNC REX to open the Pediatric Unit, which allows for children who require hospitalization and live in Wake County and the surrounding areas to remain closer to home,” Lewis says. “Prior to the opening of our unit, many children who live in the eastern part of the state would travel to Chapel Hill to be admitted to the hospital, but now many can be admitted at UNC REX.” Board-certified pediatricians who are hospitalists within the Division of Hospital Pediatrics at UNC staff the PEDS Unit, providing 24-hour care. “There are six pediatric hospitalists who work primarily at UNC REX, and we have very quickly become a cohesive group,” Lewis says. “We all have ties to North Carolina, but most of us have recently returned to the state … and it’s nice to learn from each other and work together.” On Jan. 21, community physicians with a longstanding relationship to UNC REX attended a grand opening for the new PEDS Unit, dedicated in memory of Dr. Frederick Douglas Burroughs (left), the hospital’s first African American attending physician. Burroughs treated tens of thousands of children during his extensive career and in 2016 published his autobiography, “Sharing My Journey to a Career in Medicine in a Transitioning South,” for which a book signing was held at UNC REX. For years, the pediatric program at UNC REX was run primarily by community pediatricians.

PEDS Unit Patient Room

“We have an experienced and dedicated team of physicians and nurses who are excited and motivated to build this new program,” Lewis says. “As a small unit, we have the capacity to provide personalized care and attention for our patients and families. We have received a lot of positive feedback, including that we were thoughtful in our care plans, are attentive to the needs of patients and families, and are providing high quality care for children.” The PEDS Unit’s playroom has been temporarily closed because of the coronavirus, but toys are provided for the children to play with in their rooms and parents can bring toys or other items from home. For example, Kiera’s father, Sean Lumley, met her mom in the hospital parking lot to drop off toiletry items and Kiera’s favorite “comfy” throw. Kiera, a sophomore and member of the cross country team at Cardinal Gibbons High School in Raleigh, said the nurses who treated her “were really nice.” She also liked the food and said she wasn’t nervous during her first ever hospital stay. Children are referred to the PEDS Unit by primary care physicians or pediatric sub-specialists. Or, like Kiera, they come in through UNC REX’s emergency room or an urgent care facility. “We have established a new multidisciplinary pediatric service line that meets monthly to work on new initiatives to improve care for pediatric patients,” Lewis says. “It’s nice to now be able to tell families who deliver their babies in the Women’s Center that they can bring their children back to UNC REX if they were ever to need to be admitted to the hospital.”

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2020 Gratitude Report

Thank You October 2020 Inspirational writer William Arthur Ward once said, “Feeling gratitude and not expressing it is like wrapping a present and not giving it.� I am humbled to take advantage of this opportunity to give out presents by saying a heartfelt thank you to each of you for your stalwart support of the Rex Healthcare Foundation. Unquestionably, 2020 has been one of the most challenging years we have faced in recent memory. The COVID-19 pandemic has brought unprecedented changes to many industries, particularly those of us in healthcare. Like other health care organizations, we have had to continuously adjust and adapt; however, because of your generosity and support, UNC REX has not missed a beat. Support comes in a variety of ways, and yours has been exceptional. The Foundation is grateful for every dollar you have contributed. But you have done much more than sign checks. You have donated your time, personal protective equipment, hand sanitizer, and meals to ensure our frontline workers can come to work and safely perform their jobs. One Wendell company even delivered face coverings in a utility vehicle. As further evidence of your support, when our wellness center was closed, many of you did not request refunds and instead redirected your membership fees to the Foundation so those dollars could be used for COVID-19 relief for our frontline workers. Your contributions to the Foundation this year have been truly unbelievable. You have come through for UNC REX time and again, and I just want to thank you. I hope you and your family and friends remain safe as researchers work diligently to develop a COVID-19 vaccine. I also hope you find ways to enjoy the upcoming holiday season while knowing that all of us at the Rex Healthcare Foundation are eternally grateful to you. Sincerely,

Sylvia Hackett Vice President, Rex Healthcare Foundation

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By the Numbers

Total Invested in Our Hospital in FY20: $1.05 Million

= approx. $1,000

Our FY20 Donors 2,078 Donors 113 Grateful Patient donors 427 Co-worker donors 101 Rex Society donors 511 Tribute gifts (in honor/memory) 1,223 New donors 983 Wellness Center fees donated* $32,769 Given from Wellness Center fees* * April - June 2020

Disbursements to UNC REX Construction/Renovation $414,273.20 Mobile Mammography Unit

$238,824.21

Patient Assistance & Support

$174,021.69

Cancer Support Programs

$116,194.37

Staff Education/Resources

$72,556.65

Equipment $38,753.71 Total FY20 Disbursements to support UNC REX

$1,054,623.83

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Roy Tempke To Lead New Holly Springs Hospital

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ince 1992 when he became a physical therapist at UNC REX, Roy Tempke has held several positions within the organization. Now he’s taking on inarguably his most challenging role — Chief Operating Officer of the new Holly Springs Hospital. “I applied because this is an opportunity for me to build something from the ground up, which is very rare in healthcare,” Tempke says. “My career has been built on going into new departments or areas where there may be some dysfunction and working to fix that. In this instance, I’m responsible for funding the departments, building the leadership team and ensuring the construction is completed on time. I have responsibility for every aspect of this project.” The new facility in southern Wake County is slated to open in 2021 with 50 beds. It has a capacity for 74 beds and is expected to serve people in Holly Springs, Fuquay-Varina, Apex, Lillington and even as far away as Fayetteville. “We will brings jobs, obviously,” Tempke says of the facility’s economic impact. “We’re looking at roughly 400 new jobs, with a minimum base salary of $15 an hour. The jobs will come with good

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benefits. Of course as we recruit physicians, hopefully that will cause a boon to the real estate market…” Tempke is excited about stepping into the COO role at the new Holly Springs Hospital and very grateful for the opportunity. “Throughout my career, each and every time I was ready and asked to do more, they engaged me and allowed me to grow,” he says. “At REX there’s constant planning about developing our leaders, whether through internal training or leadership classes.” For Tempke, life at home is equally full of various activities. He shares that he loves cooking all types of cuisine and making his own sauces. In fact, when he manages to get home by 7, he cooks the family meal. He also enjoys running, including participating in an occasional 10K to keep fit. Lately, however, most of his time is spent planning for the opening of the new Holly Springs Hospital, to which he brings an impressive skill set. He has lead departments in pharmacy, skilled nursing, rehabilitation, respiratory therapy, case management and social work — all of which are heavy in operations.


“My talent is that I have a lot of experience and I enjoy problem solving and bringing together disparate teams and trying to engage them on common ground,” Tempke says. “I have to work within UNC Health, the UNC REX Healthcare leadership, the town of Holly Springs and the construction company to ensure that we’re building a quality hospital and delivering it as on time as possible within budget. The other piece is that it opens ready to take care of people with a plan to operate safely and efficiently.” Vice President of Medical Affairs and Chief Medical Officer Dr. Linda Butler has no doubt Tempke is the right man for the top job. “It has a lot to do with how he builds relationships,” says Butler, who has previously supervised Tempke. “He’ll spend a lot of time getting to know the leadership and citizens of Holly Springs. He’ll invest that time and work on integrating himself into that community and will know every inch of that facility. He’ll own it like it is his hospital, and I think the people of Holly Springs will be pleased with the UNC REX Holly Springs campus and will be pleased with Roy as the COO of that facility.” Although the facility is roughly 30 minutes from the UNC REX main campus in Raleigh, Butler thinks Tempke will be successful at replicating the hospital’s mission in Holly Springs. “We’re building a facility with a REX culture, but it’s not going to have all of the services as we have at REX,” she says. “You want to make sure you get it right, and I’m confident Roy can do that.” Tempke says the support he gets from his wife, Michele, a former elementary school teacher who’s now an assistant principal, and their sons, Ryan, who attends the University of North Carolina at Charlotte, and Nicholas, a high school student, is more important now than ever. “Family’s a huge part of my life,” he says. “I couldn’t do all of this without their grace and patience and support.” So what lies ahead? “I have an office on site now, which allows me to go to face-to-face meetings with residents, the construction team, the designers, the architect and the engineers. We’re giving tours as it’s beginning to take shape, and you can begin to envision yourself working there. It’s very exciting.” For more information about supporting the new Holly Springs Hospital, contact Jackie Pierce at jacqueline.pierce@unchealth.unc.edu.

Gary Park to Retire Gary Park has announced his retirement effective Feb. 28, 2021. Park is a former President and CEO of UNC REX Healthcare. Currently, Park serves as Chief Operating Officer of UNC Health, overseeing Triangle and statewide hospital and Gary Park ambulatory operations, including UNC REX and other affiliated hospitals in the UNC Health System. He has held his current post since the fall of 2019. Before becoming COO of UNC Health last fall, Park served as President of UNC Hospitals from 2004 to 2019. Under his leadership, UNC Hospitals built and opened the N.C. Cancer Hospital and the Hillsborough Campus, expanded mental health services in Raleigh with the Wakebrook campus, won countless awards and honors for excellence in clinical care and patient satisfaction, and achieved recognition as one of the best places to work in America. From 2001 until he left in 2004 to become President of UNC Hospitals, Park served as President and CEO of UNC REX Healthcare. He was instrumental in leading UNC REX through a pivotal time of transition as it joined the UNC Health System in the early 2000s. From October 1997 to December 2000, Park served as Executive Vice President and Chief Operating Officer of Moses Cone Health System. He also served as President of Wesley Long Community Hospital from November 1992 until September 1997, when Wesley Long merged with Moses Cone. Prior to his position at Wesley Long, Park was President of Thomas Memorial Hospital in South Charleston, West Virginia, from 1986 to 1992. Park, who holds undergraduate and a graduate degrees from West Virginia University, spearheaded the growth and development of the UNC Health System into a renowned statewide network of hospitals and clinics. Please join us at the Rex Healthcare Foundation in thanking Park for his years of dedicated service and in wishing him well in retirement.

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Planting Trees for Future Generations

Generous Memorial Gift Benefits New Cancer Center

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an Wyck Webb Jr. and Susan Hill dated for many years, enjoying a loving, happy relationship. They ate out, watched movies together, spent time in the mountains and at the beach and traveled to London and Spain on separate occasions.

“The nature component of it and having a place for respite and healing for people who are suffering with cancer was what appealed to him,” Bobbie said. “It’s not just the patient who’s ill and needs comfort; it’s also those who are involved daily with their care. He really wanted to honor Susan in this way.”

Hill was a staunch advocate of women’s rights who worked tirelessly for women’s reproductive health throughout the country. Slowing down wasn’t an option for her — until she was diagnosed with breast cancer, becoming a cancer patient at UNC REX under the care of Dr. Jeff Crane.

The Cancer Center is under construction and scheduled for completion in December 2021. The four-story, 144,000 square foot facility is expected to enhance and expand UNC REX’s full range of clinical oncology services, including infusion, radiation therapy and clinical trials. The new center will also provide increased space for a host of new services.

Sadly, she passed away at age 61 in 2010. “I’ve always been appreciative of what Dr. Crane did for Susan and think he helped her survive three years longer than she would have otherwise,” said Webb, who was devastated by her death. “I didn’t get to know him that well, but Susan very much counted on him for his expertise and decided she wasn’t going to try to find anybody else to treat her. She felt like he really cared.” To demonstrate his gratitude to UNC REX and to honor Hill, Webb, who is a retired insurance agency owner, has made one of the largest single lead gifts to the Cancer Center Campaign. “It is an honor to work with donors like Van Webb to personalize areas of the Cancer Center,” said Kay Taylor, Director of Strategic Philanthropy. “The garden space named for Susan Hill will create a place of beauty and healing for patients and caregivers far into the future.” Using his gift to create a garden makes perfect sense given Webb’s love of the outdoors and Hill’s love for gardening, said Frances Bobbie, his first cousin and financial advisor. She helped facilitate his gift to UNC REX.

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Susan Hill

When UNC REX opened its Cancer Center on the main campus in 1987 in response to a growing need in Wake County, it was a pioneering step for the organization. At that time, only a handful of oncologists practiced in Wake County. Today, dozens of physicians treat 3,000 patients annually at the main campus Cancer Center plus five satellite locations across Wake County. Associate Vice President for UNC REX Cancer Care Tom Grates said the new facility is vital to the continuation of the excellent care for which UNC REX is known. “The building that we’re currently operating out of was constructed 33 years ago,” Grates said. “It was a state-of-theart building at that time, but the number of patients that we’re caring for now has outgrown the limitations of the building. This new facility will be a state-of-the-art building but will be much larger and more attractive to our patients so that we can continue providing the same care but in a more conducive environment.” Grates is aware of Webb’s gift and says he thinks the Cancer Center will continue garnering strong community support.


“I think the fact that the campaign has already generated as much enthusiasm and response as it has, even though the building itself is still quite a ways off, is a very positive sign,” he said. “I think because of the excellent reputation that UNC REX Cancer Care enjoys in the community, a program that’s always been very well supported, the public is rallying behind our campaign.” To realize the broad vision of a comprehensive facility, UNC REX has created a campaign to fund and name critical components, including conference rooms, lobbies, gardens, a boutique, an urgent care facility, a family respite area and an arts initiative — among others. Philanthropy from the community is expected to play a significant role in creating these important, transformative spaces. “The vision for this important new center will be realized through philanthropy,” Taylor said. “The leadership and financial generosity of caring donors will ensure the best possible cancer care for Wake County and the surrounding area. Grates said administrators spent over a year soliciting input from cancer patients, survivors and co-workers when designing the building because they thought it was important. “I think that’s going to make a big difference once the building is completed,” he said. Webb isn’t surprised to hear that input from cancer patients and survivors was considered as officials designed the building that will host thousands of patients and visitors each year and include a significant arts presence to promote a calm environment focused on wellness. The new UNC REX Cancer Center is slated to be completed in December 2021.

When Taylor invited him and Frances to UNC REX to discuss his donation, he said she was very interested in hearing about Hill and how he wanted to honor her. “Susan loved to garden, and Kay and I started talking about the possibility of having some kind of garden at the Cancer Center in Susan’s memory,” Webb said. “I feel good that I’m able to do it, and for me it’s the right thing to do. I think it’s great that they’re building a new Cancer Center at UNC REX. If they can provide more and more care to people that have cancer, I’m in favor of it.” Kevin Anderson, who is serving in a volunteer leadership capacity as chair of the Cancer Center Campaign Advisory Committee, agrees with Webb. “As a cancer survivor, I am keenly aware of the challenges in patient care during all phases of cancer treatment,” Anderson said. “The new UNC REX Cancer Center will be a remarkable resource for our community, bringing the pinnacle of healthcare technology, joined with unparalleled personal care, to meet the needs and concerns of the patient, empower the healthcare team in their delivery of remarkable care and support the critical role of family and friends as caregivers. “Philanthropy makes a critical contribution to elevate the combined experience of patient, healthcare worker and caregiver from excellent to exceptional,” Anderson continued. “We hope the community will continue to join in support of this project as we all work together to deliver hope and bright futures to everyone touched by cancer.

For additional information on supporting the Cancer Center, please contact Kay Taylor at (919) 883-6314; kay.taylor2@unchealth.unc.edu.

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Advocating for Patients

Volunteers Lend Their Voices for Patient Advocacy

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athy Arsenault had fought obesity her entire life, trying different diets or weight-loss programs to no avail. After deciding to undergo bariatric surgery in 2012, she had to find the right doctor and the right hospital. “When I came to REX, that was the first time I’d felt hope,” Arsenault recalls. “They have a way of putting their arms around you and saying, ‘You know what, we’re going to do this together,’ and that’s exactly what they did. I went to two other North Carolina hospitals, but I just wasn’t getting that warm and fuzzy feeling until that evening at REX.” Arsenault lost 150 pounds after her transformative surgery and accepted a volunteer position on the bariatric service line. She later joined UNC REX’s Patient Family Advisory Council (PFAC), which she co-chairs with Director of Patient Experience Deb Stargardt. Created in 2014, the PFAC meets quarterly and is comprised of former patients and family members who listen to patient/family concerns about everything from arrival to discharge and advocate for change. “I’m a big advocate of bringing the voice of the patient and family into decision making,” Stargardt says. “It was one of the first things I looked for when I came to REX — whether they had an active PFAC in place. PFAC members speak on behalf of the patients to make things better.” UNC REX also has a Patient Family Advisory Council for its Neonatal Intensive Care Unit and Cancer Center.

Collaboration with PFAC and NICU Healthcare team on Kangaroo Care education.

NICU Reunion volunteers.

“The Neonatal Intensive Care Unit PFAC was formed to provide an avenue for parent alumni to contribute their time and support on behalf of parents whose children are currently in the hospital,” says NICU Clinical Manager Michelle Clements. “Parents are in need of support from other parents that have been through the NICU experience … a valuable voice that we can’t provide.” Besides offering a listening ear and proposed changes, PFAC members provide care packages, meals, gas cards and baby clothes. “They raise money for equipment, like a new swing for the playroom,” Clement says. “In September they held a cookie drive for NICU staff, and when the COVID-19 pandemic started, they brought about $1,000 worth of nutritional snacks and drinks to the NICU medical and nursing staff.” Cancer Center PFAC members are just as dedicated, says chairperson Lou Arp, a retired pharmaceutical executive and former cancer patient. “We make our rounds, spending several hours every other month in a clinic with patients for face-to-face discussions,” Arp says. “We also have evening meetings with our board where we debrief management on our observations and suggestions. It’s a worthwhile time commitment.” Arp says the Cancer Center PFAC has focused on reducing the stress on patients between diagnosis and the start of treatment. “When you’re diagnosed with cancer there’s going to be some stress, but if we do things right we can eliminate some of the unnecessary stress,” he says. “What we’ve found is once you have a treatment plan, even though you have a serious diagnosis your focus becomes the plan and not the cancer.”

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Community Heroes Lead the Way

Arp is also a member of the hospital PFAC, which Arsenault says is indicative of the compassion that permeates UNC REX. “Administration values our information and allows it to influence decisions,” she says. Cathy Arsenault, UNC REX Lou Arp, UNC REX “It doesn’t mean it’s PFAC Co-Chair Cancer Center PFAC Chairman always going to go as we suggest, but they weigh what we say and welcome us at the table.”

2020 Trustees of UNC REX Healthcare Catharine B. Arrowood Parker Poe Teresa C. Artis ComCounsel

Stargardt says PFAC’s influence is seen around the hospital in various ways, including directional signage. “How easy is it to navigate from one part of the hospital to another?” she asks. “Our PFAC advisors see things that we don’t necessarily notice anymore.”

Ernie L. Bovio, Jr. President, UNC REX Healthcare A. Wesley Burks, M.D. UNC Health Care and UNC-Chapel Hill School of Medicine

Patients and families are at the heart of everything UNC REX does, Stargardt says, because “healing can’t happen without involving loved ones and people who are going to support the patient once he or she goes home or to another facility.” PFAC meetings are attended by hospital leadership, sometimes even the CEO. It’s not uncommon for donors and sponsors to sit in, and patient experiences are always shared.

Ann S. Collins, M.D. Woman’s Health Alliance, PA DBA Centre Ob/Gyn

“When a patient comes to a PFAC meeting and tells what happened during his or her hospitalization, you can hear a pin drop,” Stargardt says. “It’s a wonderful complement to the work I do.” Arsenault has shared her story countless times and credits the birth of her first grandchild, Leland, as the catalyst for her bariatric surgery. In 2011 after learning her youngest daughter was pregnant with him, she knew she couldn’t continue the status quo.

Courtney A. Crowder APCO Worldwide Melissa A. Fitzpatrick Kirby Bates Associates C. Howard Nye Martin Marietta Materials, Inc.

“If I didn’t change, I wouldn’t see this boy grow up,” she explains. “I thought I was going to miss this boy’s life and that was enough for me.” Arsenault had the surgery, and now the woman who once struggled just to get out of bed enjoys bicycling with her husband, Danny, and participating in UNC REX’s sprint triathlons.

Gary L. Park UNC Hospitals Bobby T. Parker Volunteer

“The care and concern at REX never end and PFAC’s an invaluable part of REX,” she says. “I think it’s so important that the patient, the physicians, the staff and everyone has a say.” Stargardt agrees and says she looks forward to creating more diversity among the PFAC membership. “Recruiting isn’t just in numbers but in getting the right kind of people who will bring different perspectives and add value to the PFAC to enhance the good work that we’re already doing,” she says. “I’m confident we can do that.”

Rig S. Patel, M.D. UNC REX Digestive Healthcare Jason T. Sandler Curi, Inc.

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2019-2020 Acorn Pin Recipients

UNC REX Healthcare receives significant support through the Grateful Patient and Families Program. The program provides a way for patients and families to express their appreciation for the care they received by making a gift to the Rex Healthcare Foundation. An exciting feature about the program is that donors can choose to honor caregivers – nurses, doctors, technicians – as well as individuals who do not provide direct patient care, such as members of housekeeping, food services and volunteers. These tribute gifts are especially meaningful in that honored staff members receive special recognition in front of their peers, and a pewter lapel pin, shaped like an acorn, to signify this special honor. The acorn is a symbol that no matter how small the act of kindness, it makes a difference to others. The following individuals and departments received acorn pins in FY20 for their outstanding customer service and quality patient care:

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Honor/Memorial

Department

Kimberly Boyer....................... Patient Care Services Ramona Brouwer................... 5 East/Oncology Terry Brown............................ Pre-Arrival Unit Paris Bryant............................ 5E John Grant Buttram, MD........ REX Neurosurgery & ............................................... Spine Specialists Tyler Butterworth................... Cancer Center-East ............................................... Raleigh Nihan Cannon, MD................ Hospitalist Francis Castiller...................... REX Intensivists Carol Chambers...................... 7 West/General Surg Genise Chenault..................... 5E Amber Chesney...................... 5E Kristen Chiovari...................... Cancer Center Sheryl Crossley....................... Wound Care Center Leonisa Davis......................... 5 East/Oncology Amy De Stefano, MD.............. Emergency Lindasnow A Eberhardt.......... 3 Women’s David Eddleman, MD............. REX Breast Care ............................................... Specialists Charles F Eisenbeis, MD......... REX Hematology ............................................... Oncology Associates-Cary Achilles Fakiris, MD................ Cancer Center Linda Fink............................... Wound Care Center Miranda Fitzgerald................. 5E Nicole Fitzgerald..................... CICU 4HV John Foil................................. Centralized Patient ............................................... Transport Sarah Francis.......................... 4 East/Pulmonology ............................................... & Nephrology Ernest Freeman....................... Centralized Patient ............................................... Transport Benita Gardner....................... 5E Thomas Grates....................... REX Cancer Center Jessica Grunder...................... 6 HV/CV Stepdown Vijayatha Gundarapu, MD..... Hospitalist Susan Hamilton...................... 5E Sandy Haney........................... REX Radiation Oncology Todd Helton, MD.................... Boylan Clinic Annalita T Heroy..................... Oncology Infusion Angela Higdon....................... 3 Women’s Kristen Howells...................... 6 HV/CV Stepdown Edward P Hu, MD................... Hospitalist Cathie Jarvis........................... REX Radiation Oncology Stacy Jassey............................ 7 HV/Cardiac Unit Rodney Jenkins....................... Garner Wellness Center Robert L Jobe, MD.................. NC Heart & Vascular Edith Karoly............................ Staffing Response Team Christopher Kelly, MD............. NC Heart & Vascular Jessica Kircher........................ 4 East/Pulmonology ............................................... & Nephrology Doris Kruger........................... Volunteer Services Alan P Kypson, MD................. Cardiac Surgical ............................................... Specialists Jung Lee................................. 5E Judy Linzer.............................. Wound Care Center Susan Litzsinger..................... REX Radiation Oncology Kyndal Lucas........................... 5 East/Oncology Amy Luetgenau...................... Cancer Center Megan M Lumley................... Urgent Care ............................................... Administration Anne Lynch............................. Cancer Center-East ............................................... Raleigh

Honor/Memorial

Department

Grady May.............................. REX IR Neurology Megan McCormick................. Emergency Brendan McNulty, MD............ REX Hematology Oncology ............................................... Associates-Garner Norwel L Mendoza................. Medical Surgical ICU Allison Miller.......................... REX Hematology Oncology Vicki Minikus.......................... 5 East/Oncology Dawn Moore.......................... Cancer Center Jacinta Moore......................... CICU 4HV Kristen Moore......................... 5E Martha L Morman.................. REX Radiation ............................................... Oncology-Wakefield Jacqueline F Murphy.............. 4 East/Pulmonology ............................................... & Nephrology Idorenyin Okon....................... 4E Oludamilola A Olajide, MD..... REX Hematology Oncology ............................................... Associates Kerry Perrin............................. CSICU 5HV Andrea Potter......................... 7 HV/Cardiac Unit John Reilly, MD....................... Cancer Center-East ............................................... Raleigh Tammy Reynolds.................... Post Anesthesia Care West Ravish Sachar, MD.................. NC Heart & Vascular Lamin Sanneh......................... 4 East/Pulmonology ............................................... & Nephrology Terri Saunders......................... Cancer Center Kara Schenk........................... CICU 4HV Dawn M Seldon...................... Physician Rev Cycle Coding Robert H. Smithson, MD......... Boylan Clinic Mark Sturdivant, MD.............. Wound Care Center Derrick Sutton........................ 7E Mary Alex Thompson.............. 4E Ray Thompson........................ Cancer Center-East ............................................... Raleigh Mary K Toma-McConnell........ 7 HV/Cardiac Unit Wilna Tropnas......................... REX Rehabilitation and ............................................... Nursing Care Center Monica Vann.......................... Patient Monitoring Julie Walker............................ Emergency Kimberly Whitaker.................. Environmental Services Danielle White........................ Women’s and Children’s Laura Willis............................. Cath Lab Kayla Work............................. Cath Lab Krista Wuchter, MD................. Hospitalist Anne Yeager, MD.................... Palliative Care Haylian York............................ REX Rehabilitation and ............................................... Nursing Care Center Zipphora Benjamin................. REX Rehabilitation and ............................................... Nursing Care Center James P Zidar, MD.................. NC Heart & Vascular Staff........................................ 4th Floor H&V CICU Staff........................................ 6th Floor Nursing Staff........................................ 7E Staff........................................ 7W Floor Staff........................................ CICU Staff and First ............................................... Responders Staff........................................ Emergency Staff........................................ Heart & Vascular Center Staff........................................ MSICU Staff........................................ NICU Staff........................................ Rex Wellness Center


2020 REX Hospital Open Canceled With Plans to Return in 2021!

Our Team Rex Healthcare Foundation Sylvia Hackett Vice President Kevin Bender

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ournament planning and fundraising were in full swing when the pandemic began back in February 2020. Fortunately, event operations were paused before the majority of expenses were incurred. The 2020 event was ultimately canceled and the Foundation worked with sponsors who had already made a payment to determine the best partnership option in this unusual circumstance. Here is a summary:

REX Hospital Open Sales Representative Vicky Coerper Administrative Associate Amy Daniels Foundation Director

• $28,000 was donated directly to the Rex Healthcare Foundation • $51,000 was rolled forward to support the 2020 Rex Healthcare Foundation Fall Challenge golf event held in September • $178,000 was committed for the 2021 REX Hospital Open Planning for the 2021 REX Hospital Open is underway. The Tournament staff is preparing for a variety of potential scenarios regarding spectators/sponsors, given the uncertainty of how our world might look in the Spring. The hope is to safely hold the 2021 event with spectators, but we will be prepared to adapt given state and CDC guidelines.

Don’t miss the excitement and fun of the 2021 REX Hospital Open:

May 31 - June 6 Stay tuned for more information on sponsorships, volunteer opportunities and more!

Dariel Dixon Database Analyst Angela Harris Program / Grants Officer Brian Krusoe REX Hospital Open Tournament Director Jackie Leach Pierce Sr. Philanthropy Officer Kay Taylor Strategic Philanthropy Director

2500 Blue Ridge Rd., Suite 325 Raleigh, NC 27607 rex.foundation@unchealth.unc.edu (919) 784-4424 RexHealthcareFoundation.com 21


UNC REX

125th Celebration Gala I

t was an unprecedented, magical night on November 10, 2019, as nearly 300 people were part of history when UNC REX celebrated its 125th year of serving the Triangle.

The hospital’s main entrance was transformed in a way that allowed guests to travel to another time, when John Rex first set his vision to create a place to care for the sick. Throughout the event, guests enjoyed making connections with friends, reminiscing about the past and looking ahead. The event focused on funding the future, showcasing the critical work of the hospital and included a high-energy live auction and paddle raise. The group’s generosity helped to raise over $370,000 that evening. Visionary Gala Co-Chairs, Marion Winston and Fairley Bell Cook, shared their gratitude by saying, “We salute our sponsors, our attendees, our volunteers and the medical staff and administrators at UNC REX. From the bottom of our hearts, we thank everyone for supporting the UNC REX 125th Celebration Gala.” Many sponsors, Board members, staff and long-time friends contributed to the success of the event. Thank you for being part of the celebration and helping UNC REX commemorate such a special milestone! Holly and Ernie Bovio, Tina and Steve Burriss, Drs. Jignasa and Ravish Sachar

Bob Winston, Charles Winston, Sr., Tracy Winston and Wil O’Neal

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Ashley Smock and Mary Catherine Grew

Performer Rory John Zak


Funding from the event is greatly impacting the patients UNC REX serves in the following four areas:

Nursing Excellence Fund

Neonatal Intensive Care Unit

Patient Assistance Fund

UNC REX nurses are the best and brightest. We are driving innovation through a focus on knowledge, expertise and learning – in a culture where genuine caring and compassion are evident. The Nursing Excellence Fund helps to retain the high-performing nursing talent that is central to our culture of excellence. This fund provides annual nursing scholarships, as well as funding for certification, recertification and professional conferences.

Each year, the UNC REX neonatology team cares for 450 to 500 newborns with critical needs. Funding supplies specialized equipment to provide the ideal environment for critically ill little ones to become strong and healthy, mom/ baby bonding support, a new resource and respite area for families and continuous staff training.

The Patient Assistance Fund helps patients in financial need. Community support gives peace of mind by allowing patients to focus on health and healing. Funding keeps patients actively participating in their treatment by providing transportation to clinics for follow up visits, medications that help prevent serious complications, nutritional supplements, and home health care equipment.

Linda Blount and Florence Winston

Furman Beckwith and David Prince

Catherine and Jonte Harris

Dr. Leon Woodruff and Dr. Ann Collins

Emergency Services When you or someone you love is in need of immediate medical care, you trust the caring and experienced physicians, nurses, technicians and specialists at UNC REX. With 24-hour emergency services and state-of-the-art technology, the Emergency Department provides superior emergency care for our patients and the community. Funding is helping to improve the Emergency Room waiting area with more comfort and efficiency, including the addition of private consult areas, as well as artwork. This enhanced patient and family experience will ease stress and add a sense of calm during an often chaotic time.

Judy Ice and Fairley Bell Cook

Audrey Galloway and Teresa Artis

Anna Donnegan, Bill Hamlin, Audrey and Jimmy Black

Cindy Park, Marion McHugh, Dr. Damian McHugh and Gary Park

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Non-Profit Org. US Postage

PAID 4420 Lake Boone Trail Raleigh, North Carolina 27607

Gifts to UNC REX Healthcare are made through the Rex Healthcare Foundation, a nonprofit 501(c)(3). The Rex Healthcare Foundation can be reached at (919) 784-4424 or rex.foundation@unchealth.unc.edu.

Uplifting messages have appeared across UNC REX locations throughout the pandemic. Staff and physicians appreciate every kind word from the community and are grateful for the ongoing support.

Raleigh, NC 27607 Permit No. 1234