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The Center for University Programs Abroad

PARIS 2013/2014


CUPA

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CUPA

A unique approach to study abroad in Paris for advanced students

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The Center for University Programs Abroad

The most extensive range of course offerings available to study abroad students in Paris

Access to graduate-level seminars

Individualized academic programs designed to meet the specific interests of each student

An excellent balance between independence and support

A stimulating cultural program

Active commitment to the immersion experience

Special programs in the fine and performing arts

A unique community of exceptional students

More than just another study abroad program in Paris

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CUPA

_ About CUPA

The CUPA program uses the unique cosmopolitan background of Paris to guide its participants through a first-hand discovery of the French and European cultures. Immersion is seen not only from a situational perspective but is approached as an experience, where students engage in a series of dynamic and complex processes which evolve along the course of their semester or academic year in Paris. A mutually demanding and rewarding relationship exists between CUPA and its participants. It is based on interaction, commitment, and individual advising, as well as common values of respect, responsibility, and independence.

The CUPA Student The CUPA program's high standards are consistent with the exceptional caliber and potential of its students. Students are selected according to their individual profiles and their French language skills, and form a community of diverse, talented and motivated individuals. They are well-prepared intellectually and linguistically and seek an in-depth experience as well as a high-quality academic program during their semester or year in Paris.

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CUPA

"I think that the Orientation was incredibly helpful for me throughout the semester. It provided me with a set of fundamentals that I was able to fall back on when I needed help and it showed me the support that CUPA could give if I needed it during the semester." Jacob McIntosh, Bates College, Spring 2012

Independence and Support From the first steps of selection to the end of their stay in Paris, CUPA students are provided with resources and guidance on a continuous basis, allowing them to create the most fulfilling linguistic, cultural and personal experience possible. As their semester or year abroad evolves, students receive ongoing mentoring and support in accordance with their personality and specific goals, so as to construct a coherent academic project. CUPA students are free to choose their own level of independence; all program-sponsored activities and in-house courses are optional. The staff offers personalized opportunities for linguistic support and cultural discovery, and is always available should a question or problem arise.

A Strong Orientation Program The intensive Orientation session facilitates the transition from American campus life to the urban French university environment. In order to prepare students for their French academic experience, which favors a strongly research-oriented way of learning, the Orientation program provides exposure to French methodology, insight into the French academic mindset, and the opportunity for students to further their already solid linguistic skills in French. Practical matters, housing, and cultural life in Paris are covered in depth during Orientation meetings. Excursions within Paris and a weekend trip are also proposed to students.

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CUPA

_ The CUPA Curriculum: An Individualized Approach to Academics

Directly matriculated in the University of Paris system and in certain Grandes écoles and specialized institutes, program participants may also choose from a variety of in-house courses. With the advising and support of the CUPA staff, students select from the extensive course offerings available at partner universities and other institutions listed on pages 45-195. Academic advising takes into account the student’s level of fluency, academic background, special interests, and strengths. Students generally take four courses per semester, each carrying a credit recommendation for a full semester. In order to facilitate course selection, offerings are organized into course bulletins and supplemented with descriptions and evaluations of courses taken by previous CUPA students. Sample curricula of former students can be found on pages 8-11. Final course selection takes place during Orientation while students are becoming familiar with the university system and environment.

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CUPA

CUPA establishes direct contact with students' professors in Paris to ensure that the assigned coursework will justify the credits recommended for transfer. An academic contract is agreed upon and signed by both the student and the professor at the start of the semester, determining the workload in detail. As French professors tend to expect their students to be fairly autonomous, students are also required to devise a study project (a self-designed syllabus detailing their research and coursework for the semester). The contract and study project help to provide a sufficient amount of structure for each course.  Grades are recorded on students’ transcripts exactly as they appear on the evaluation forms completed by professors. A School of Record transcript is available upon request. While CUPA assures that coursework is sufficient to justify the transfer of credits, each student is responsible for knowing the transfer policy of the home university.

"The language support is one of the best aspects of the program - the continued support is a great and accessible tool not only for course work but also for individual progress and confidence in French." Hannah Richards, Bryn Mawr College, Spring 2012

Gaining Perspective The exceptional motivation and intellectual curiosity of CUPA students have inspired the program to develop a French Language and Methodology division. After receiving intensive training during Orientation, students may choose to continue to work individually with language and methodology coordinators to improve their academic and linguistic skills, over the course of the entire semester. Therefore, even the most advanced students of French have the opportunity to continue to progress in the language and to reinforce the academic skills they are perfecting within the immersion setting. Students may thus take their reflection a step further, and gain more perspective on their learning experience both within the French university environment, and as active participants in French culture.

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CUPA

_ Selection of student curricula from 2011-2012

CUPA students design highly individualized study programs based on their own requirements and interests. The following selection provides a few examples of representative curricula from 2011-2012. Do not hesitate to contact the program for more information on specific requests; the examples provided are by no means exhaustive.

Anthropology major, Reed College Institutions et mécanismes monétaires - Université de Paris 8 Histoire des théories architecturales 1750-1940 - Université de Paris 8 Abstraction & figurations : Architecture et arts décoratifs 1850-1950 - Université de Paris-Ouest Anthropologie historique des relations Maghreb-Afrique de l'Ouest - Université de Paris 8 Dessin - Atelier Terre et Feu

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CUPA

Architecture Major, Princeton University La racialisation en question. Constructions nationales et circulations internationales - EHESS Villes, capitales, métropoles : Le Corbusier, les écrits - EHESS Espaces Publics Émergents, usages, représentation, modes, lieux des transports - ENSAPLV L’édifice public - ENSAPLV

Cello Performance Major, Oberlin Conservatory of Music Leçons privées de viole de gambe et de violoncelle Peinture française du XIXe siècle : de l'académisme à l'expression de l'individualité - CUPA Atelier de production écrite - CUPA Dessiner et peindre - Atelier Foranim

Earth and Planetary Sciences Major, Johns Hopkins University Les éléments du climat global - Université de Paris IV L'Océan: une approche intégrée - Université de Paris IV Les poètes maudits - Université de Paris 8 Introduction aux études littéraires - Université de Paris 8

"I think Methodology is one of the most important parts of Orientation. I did two "classic" French assignments -one exposé oral and two commentaires composés - neither of which I would have done correctly without having taken the Methodology course." Elizabeth Chrystal, Yale University, Fall 2011

Film and Media Studies Major, Johns Hopkins University Mythe et cinéma - Université de Paris 3 Charles Chaplin, l'histoire plus grande que le petit vagabond (1930-1957) - Université de Paris 8 Représentations et réalités de l'Islam en France - CUPA Atelier de production écrite - CUPA

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CUPA

French and Economics Major, Bates College Atelier de production écrite - CUPA Langue française 1 : Une langue et ses usages - Université de Paris 3 Littérature, culture et société : Le diable et l'idée du mal au XIXe siècle - Univ. de Paris 3 Fiscalité - Université de Paris-Dauphine Aspects économiques de la mondialisation - Université de Paris-Dauphine

"When I left my history class for the last time, everyone who I had gotten to know and made friends with came up to me to say goodbye and wish me well. Even though I've only spent time with a handful of these people outside of class, I was amazed to realize that over half the class came over to say goodbye." Carolyn Carson, Georgetown University, Spring 2012

French Major, University of Michigan La France de Louis XIV - Université de Paris IV Paris de 1660 à 1789: les cadres de vie - Université de Paris IV Atelier d'écriture romanesque - Université de Paris IV Le cinéma français d'aujourd'hui - CUPA Danse Classique - Centre de danse du Marais

French Major, Yale University Héritage antique et littérature moderne - Université de Paris IV Aspects de la littérature de la Renaissance à nos jours - Université de Paris IV Littérature française des XIXe et XXe siècles - Université de Paris IV Littérature, idées, arts - Université de Paris IV

History Major, Kenyon College Le roman russe - Université de Paris 8 Les guerres du XXe siècle : Histoire, littérature et cinéma - Université de Paris 8 Le système international de 1815 à 1945 - Université de Paris IV Histoire de l’Égypte ancienne - Université de Paris IV

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CUPA

International Studies and Music Major, Macalester College Atelier de production écrite - CUPA Représentations et réalités de l'Islam en France - CUPA Musiques de l'Europe méditerranéenne et balkanique - Université de Paris 8 Psychologie sociale : les groupes - Université de Paris 8

Music Major, Pomona College Formation auditive - Université de Paris IV Histoire de la musique (baroque et classique) - Université de Paris IV Évolution du langage musical (XIXe siècle) - Université de Paris IV Analyse de la musique du XIXe siècle - Université de Paris IV Leçons privées de violoncelle/Camerata Baroque - Université de Paris IV

Near Eastern Languages and Civilizations Major, Harvard University Les leçons des “printemps arabes” - IRIS Introduction à la civilisation islamique - Université de Paris 8 Arabe niveau 3 - Université de Paris IV Peinture française du XIXe siècle : de l'académisme à l'expression de l'individualité - CUPA

Psychology and French Major, Bryn Mawr College Les apprentissages à l'école et leur évaluation - Université de Paris-Ouest Poésie du XXe siècle : Apollinaire et l'invention de la modernité - Université de Paris-Ouest Littératures francophones - Université de Paris-Ouest Représentations et réalités de l'Islam en France - CUPA

Written Arts and French Studies Major, Bard College Atelier de production écrite - CUPA Écrits de peintre, peinture et littérature - Université de Paris 8 Atelier d'écriture créative - Université de Paris 3 Naissances des "modernités" : autour de l'année 1912 - Université de Paris 8 Politique et société en France au XIXe siècle - Université de Paris IV

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CUPA

_ A day in the life...

The Paris university system and its teaching methods are quite different from those of virtually all American colleges. CUPA helps students to adjust to those differences and to make use of resources enabling them to construct a highly rewarding learning and cultural experience. The program also assures that the courses students select will meet the credit requirements of the most demanding American universities. CUPA offers an exceptionally wide range of academic choices to its students through affiliations with numerous academic institutions in Paris. The program develops the framework necessary for students to engage in independent study projects, if approved by their home university. CUPA is also able to place its students in a number of special programs for music, theater, fine arts, dance, and mime. 

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CUPA

Elizabeth CHRYSTAL, French Language & Literature Major, Yale University, Fall 2011

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Littérature XVIIe -XVIIIe siècles : Figures de l'imposteur - Université de Paris 3 Atelier de production écrite - CUPA • Littérature, culture et société : Le diable et l'idée du mal au XIXe siècle - Université de Paris 3 • Tourisme gourmand et œnotourisme - Université de Paris IV •

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"My Tuesdays in Paris usually begin around 8:30, when I hop on the metro to arrive at Paris III in time for my literature seminar, "Le diable et l’idée du mal." I have a quick breakfast of coffee and a croissant as I say hello to other students and get ready for our discussion. After class, I enjoy a short stroll by the Panthéon, through the Luxembourg Gardens (always packed with students, families, and runners – yes, people do run in Paris!), and up the rue Vavin to CUPA, where I have my writing workshop with about six other students. We usually start class by talking about what’s been in the news, then use the theme of the day to work on a certain grammar or stylistic lesson. Then it’s on to the café across the street to meet a French student from my master’s program in gastronomy at Paris IV to work on our exposé oral – plus some chit-chat over some delicious galettes with cheese and ratatouille, of course! Once I’m done with classes for the day, I often head out on a walk to explore a new park or quartier of the city – like the Buttes-Chaumont, the hilliest park in Paris, or the lovely covered shops of the Galerie Vivienne. I just have to keep an eye on the time to be home for dinner at 8 with my host family! As I walk in the door, I’ll immediately smell what’s cooking (quiche? lamb? leeks?) and step in the kitchen to help my host mom finish the meal and place everything on the table. After dinner, a little reading and homework, and then off to bed for another full day tomorrow!"

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CUPA

Alexandra MARESH, French and Philosophy Major, Willamette University, Year 2011-2012

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Peinture française du XIX e siècle : de l'académisme à l'expression de l'individualité - CUPA • Le cinéma français d'aujourd'hui - CUPA • Mosaïque - Atelier Solène Léglise • Comprendre l'histoire politique de la France contemporaine 1 - Université de Paris IV • Comprendre l’histoire politique de la France contemporaine 2 - Université de Paris IV • Représentations et réalités de l'Islam en France - CUPA • Phonétique - Institut Catholique de Paris • Philosophie générale : La Beauté - Institut Catholique de Paris •

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"A typical Thursday starts off rather early for me, meaning that it is quite dark when I first head out into the “City of Light”. But it’s worth it, because my 8 AM class on “Understanding Contemporary French Political History” at the Sorbonne is fascinating. To get there, I take the metro like every other parisien/ne. I have also become a fan of the city’s bike program, called the “Velib”. It’s great to get a bit of exercise in before I catch the metro! Speaking of which, my host family lives in the 16th, so I take one of the few aboveground lines. Each morning, I am treated to the sight of the Eiffel Tower and Sacré Cœur as I pass over the Seine. I try to gaze out the window as stealthily as possible, in order to not look like a tourist, but sometimes I just can’t help it! Class finishes by 10 AM and then I start my weekend. Depending on how tired I am (Wednesday is my busiest day with a museum visit in my art history class, my class on “French Cinema Today” and a course on mosaics at an atelier in the 20th), I will either go to a museum or try to catch next week’s movie for my film class. If I am feeling particularly diligent, I will head to the library. I prefer Bibliothèque Sainte Geneviève, which has charming architecture and gorgeous natural light. Then in the afternoon I might meet up with a friend to discover a popular French candy shop or a bakery. Or both. "

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CUPA

Eric FISHMAN, English Major, Yale University, Spring 2012

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Peinture française du XIXe siècle : de l'académisme à l'expression de l'individualité - CUPA • Littérature, culture et société, XIXe siècle - Poésie et contes fantastiques - Université de Paris 3 • Le gothique américain : écritures et réécritures - Université de Paris IV • Texte et image dans la littérature américaine du XIXe siècle à nos jours - Université de Paris IV •

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"At 8:30 AM my alarm goes off, and I roll out of bed and tromp out to the kitchen. Breakfast is probably a hunk of baguette with Nutella. At around nine, I head outside to the Metro. My art history class is meeting at the Louvre, but I always get off one stop early so I can walk through the Tuileries on the way. After an hour and a half of a guided tour of Neoclassical large format paintings, a few of us break off to head over to the Jewish quarter in the Marais for falafel. Afterwards, I wander around aimlessly for a while. A tartelette aux framboises is probably consumed at some point. I average around 2.5 pastries a day. Then I head back home, practice some cello and do a little reading for one of my classes. Then I go for a quick run, heading out to the Seine and then circling under la Tour Eiffel. Dinner with my host family is always quite the scene. My four host siblings (aged 7, 10, 11 and 12) and I gobble down crêpes before I run out to catch the metro again. There’s a fantastic concert at Salle Pleyel. Per usual, I don’t have a ticket, but ten minutes before the concert some extras are always released. I stroll in with my jeans and a T-shirt, pick up my ticket, and listen to the Orchestre de Paris playing Beethoven. Afterwards I head back home and have a glass of wine with my host parents before bed."

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CUPA

_ Featured CUPA Alumna...

Claire Jenson, recipient of the Forum on Education Abroad's Undergraduate Research Award 2012

With its community of outstanding students and scholars, CUPA strives to develop networks and create numerous opportunities among its alumni. CUPA proudly counts among its alumni several Fulbright and Rhodes scholars and many members of academia, as well as distinguished musicians and artists. This year's featured alumna is Claire Jenson (Oberlin College '12). Claire received the Forum on Education Abroad's Undergraduate Research Award in March 2012, an honor showcasing the most rigorous and significant undergraduate research completed while abroad, which in Claire's case, was an exploration of the history of a medieval illuminated manuscript.

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CUPA

Claire JENSON, Art History Major, Oberlin College '12, CUPA 2010-2011 "Students have been traveling to Paris to study for centuries; I, too benefited from the scholarly heritage of the Middle Ages’ foremost university city. With the art historical resources of Paris at my fingertips, and the invaluable guidance and support of generous faculty mentors, I was able to take on the task of identifying and re-ordering the separated leaves of a French illuminated missal. Unlike other textual studies, however, my work began with one serious disadvantage: I had only one leaf of the manuscript. The rich academic resources of Paris allowed me to carry out a scholarly investigation, and the experience of being an international student required me to take charge of my studies in a new, independent, way. CUPA’s organization stresses the autonomy of the student; each undergraduate creates his or her own curriculum from the offerings, including graduatelevel courses, at numerous Parisian universities. This opportunity, and the encouragement of the CUPA staff, allowed me to register for Master-level seminars. The professors I met supported my work, shared advice, suggested resources, and offered encouragement. I owe much of the success of my research to these generous scholars."

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"In appraising Claire’s achievement, I can compare her to dozens of students who have studied abroad that I have known in my thirteen years at Oberlin. Very few approached their search for a study-away program with Claire’s rigor. She also worked with me ahead of time to identify an appropriate project she could work on in her year abroad. And if few students prepared as rigorously in advance, I know of none who learned as much as she did or worked as hard during their time abroad. Claire always intended her work in Paris to relate to her overall education at Oberlin. Thus, unlike many of her peers for whom study-away is distinct from their work at home, Claire always intended it to be completely integrated into her four years as an undergraduate; In my mind she has raised the bar of what we can and should expect of students, and her example will be a guide for me as I advise students planning to study abroad in the future. Erik Inglis, Associate Professor in Medieval Art History at Oberlin College and CUPA alumnus Spring ' 88

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CUPA

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SPECIAL FOCUS PROGRAM

France, Europe et Mondes Musulmans

In 2011, CUPA implemented the special focus program France, Europe et Mondes Musulmans. Over the past twenty years, many research institutions in the French academic world have been offering courses and seminars pertaining to diaspora and transnational studies. Whether at the various Universités de Paris, the École Normale Supérieure (ENS), the École des Hautes Études en Sciences Sociales (EHESS), or the Institut National des Langues et Cultures Orientales (INALCO), Paris offers an exceptional diversity of approaches and concentration of key specialists in this field of study. This plethora of academic opportunities is enhanced by the wealth of artistic and cultural events available in Paris, including those sponsored by the Institut du Monde Arabe. .

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CUPA

The France, Europe et Mondes Musulmans program offers an in-house core seminar which incorporates lectures by renowned scholars in diasporic and transnational cultural studies, as well as direct matriculation in French universities. At the beginning of the semester, students are provided with specific course offerings related to diaspora, transnational and MiddleEastern studies in CUPA's partner universities.

"Paris is a hub for hybridization and globalization of Western and Muslim cultures. With its history, economic and strategic interests, and openness to cultural exchange, France plays a major role in the study and ongoing research relating to European-Islamic relationships. The various Muslim diasporas have been critical actors in the current renewal of French and European cultural identity. The France, Europe et Mondes Musulmans program offers a unique perspective on diaspora studies for highly-motivated students with an advanced level of French." Michel Bondurand, France, Europe et Mondes Musulmans program coordinator

Students are required to pursue or begin the study of a diasporic language of their choice (Arabic, North African and Middle Eastern colloquial Arabic, Bambara, Berber, Bosnian-Serbo-Croatian, Hebrew, Kurdish, Peul, Swahili, Turkish, Wolof or any other language relevant to the focus area). No prerequisites in any language other than French are required. For more information about France, Europe et Mondes Musulmans, please visit our website at www.cupa.paris.edu.

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CUPA

_ Participating French Universities & Institutes

ENS - ÉCOLE NORMALE SUPÉRIEURE ENCES SOCIALES

INSTITUT CATHOLIQUE DE PARIS CIVILISATIONS ORIENTALES STRATÉGIQUES

• EHESS - ÉCOLE DES HAUTES ÉTUDES EN SCI•

IHEAL - INSTITUT DES HAUTES ÉTUDES D’AMÉRIQUE LATINE

INALCO - INSTITUT NATIONAL DES LANGUES ET

IRIS – INSTITUT DE RELATIONS INTERNATIONALES ET

INSTITUT NATIONAL DU PATRIMOINE

FACULTÉ JÉSUITE

INSTI-

TUT TENRI - CENTRE CULTUREL JAPONAIS • INSTITUT CONFUCIUS - UNIVERSITÉ PARIS DIDEROT

• ESAIG - ÉCOLE ESTIENNE • ATELIER FORANIM - ARTS PLASTIQUES • ATE-

LIER LA MIROITERIE - ARTS PLASTIQUES • ATELIER SOLÈNE LÉGLISE - ÉCOLE DE MOSAÏQUE • ATELIER TERRE ET FEU - ARTS PLASTIQUES • COURS D’ART DRAMATIQUE J.-L. COCHET - THÉÂTRE PÉPINIÈRE

COURS DE THÉÂTRE FRANCINE WALTER - THÉÂTRE

LA BRUYÈRE • ACADÉMIE EUROPÉENNE DE THÉÂTRE CORPOREL - STUDIO MAGÉNIA

• • CONSERVATOIRE MUNICIPAL FRÉDÉRIC CHOPIN • CRR - CONSERVATOIRE À RAYONNEMENT RÉGIONAL DE PARIS • CENTRE DE DANSE DU MARAIS • CNSMDP - CONSERVATOIRE NATIONAL SUPÉRIEUR DE MUSIQUE DE PARIS • STUDIO HARMONIC - DANSE AND... STUDIO VERMÈS - PHOTOGRAPHIE

SPÉOS - PARIS PHOTOGRAPHIC INSTITUTE

CONSERVATOIRE MUNICIPAL CAMILLE SAINT-SAËNS

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CUPA

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Université de Paris IV - Sorbonne

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Paris-Sorbonne (Paris IV) is a descendent of the original Sorbonne, one of the first universities in the world, which dates back to the 13th century. 23,000 students pursue studies at Paris IV, in the fields of  humanities,  social sciences, art history and music. The main campus is located on the  original medieval foundations, but now extends to the Latin Quarter and other  areas in Paris. 21


CUPA

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Université de Paris 8 - Saint Denis

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Founded in 1969, Université de Paris 8 moved from its original location in Vincennes to SaintDenis in 1980. Paris 8 offers courses to its 22,000 students in the  liberal arts, humanities and social sciences, as well as  innovative fields seldom  studied in French universities such as psychoanalysis, urban planning,  geopolitics, plastic arts, and gender studies. The philosophy department was founded by Michel Foucault.


CUPA

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Université de Paris Ouest Nanterre La Défense

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Nanterre is one of the largest campuses in France. It welcomes 35,000 students every  year in all fields of study with the exception of the hard sciences.  The  presence of cultural and athletic facilities on campus, one of the cornerstones of its reputation, make it an exception among French universities.

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CUPA

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Université de Paris 3 Sorbonne Nouvelle

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Located in the heart of the Latin Quarter, Paris 3-Sorbonne Nouvelle was founded in 1968.  Its mission is to preserve the Sorbonne's cultural legacy while offering new  and innovative perspectives and majors to its 18,000  students in the fields of languages and literature, but also theater, cinema, media studies, communication, and European studies.


CUPA

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Université de Paris-Dauphine

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Created in 1968, Dauphine specializes in the fields of management, economics, law, political science, sociology, applied  mathematics, and data processing. Since its creation, Dauphine has developed a strong identity, and has enjoyed considerable autonomy in terms of scientific and pedagogical  innovations. It was granted the status of grand établissement in 2004.

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CUPA

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Université Pierre et Marie Curie

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UPMC has been a part of the Faculty of Science of the University of Paris since 1959. It  is the largest scientific and medical complex in France, with most of its 125  laboratories associated with the  Centre  national de  la recherche scientifique (CNRS). It is located on the Jussieu Campus in the  Latin Quarter  of the  5th arrondissement  in  Paris. It offers majors in  all scientific fields, including physics, biology, chemistry, and mathematics.


CUPA

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École du Louvre

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The École du Louvre is a highly selective establishment of higher education, founded in 1882. Located in the Palais du Louvre, the school is dedicated to the study  of art history, archaeology, epigraphy, and museology.  The École du Louvre  offers undergraduate, graduate and post-graduate studies and also prepares students for the highly competitive  conservateur  du patrimoine exam. NB: access is limited to full-year students, upon early request. 27


CUPA

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ENSAAMA - Olivier de Serres

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ENSAAMA, École nationale supérieure des arts appliqués et des métiers d'arts, also known as École Olivier de Serres, is a major Parisian art institution specialized in the teaching of decorative arts and design. ENSAAMA's instruction focuses on the development of autonomy, creativity, and technical, analytical and team-working skills. Art students may apply through CUPA to take classes alongside French degree-seeking students.


CUPA

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ENSAPLV - École Nationale Supérieure d'Architecture de Paris-La Villette

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Located near the Parc de la Villette and the Cité des Sciences, ENSAPLV (École nationale supérieure d'architecture Paris-La Villette) offers both graduate and undergraduate programs and confers state certification in architecture as well as accreditation in project management. Through CUPA, students of architecture may enroll at ENSAPLV for a semester or an academic year, and pursue a full-time curriculum including architectural studio courses. 29


CUPA

Paris College of Art (PCA) is a French school officially recognized by the Rectorat de Paris as a private institution of higher education. It is also a college with degree-granting authority from the state of Delaware and accreditation from the National Association of Schools of Art and Design (NASAD). PCA offers BFA and BBA degrees and has served as a study abroad destination for college students from around the world. In 2011, CUPA and PCA joined forces; CUPA students thus benefit from partnerships PCA holds with a number of the most important art and design institutions in France. The research department of PCA, led by Dr. Brigitte Borja de Mozota, publishes the research journal Collection which seeks to disseminate research and create

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a synthesis of knowledge pertaining to art and design. Interested CUPA students may apply for an internship with Collection.

CUPA and Paris College of Art Centre National d’Art et de Culture Georges Pompidou The Centre National d’Art et de Culture Georges Pompidou was the initiative of President Georges Pompidou (1911-1974), who aspired to create an original cultural institution in the heart of Paris dedicated to modern and contemporary creation, where the visual arts interact with theater, music, cinema, literature and the spoken word.

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CUPA

Bibliothèque Kandinsky, Centre de Documentation et de Recherche du Musée National d’Art Moderne, Centre de Création Industrielle The collections of this specialized, international, heritage-oriented library affiliated with the Centre Pompidou are intended for research and exhibition purposes. They are exclusively devoted to 20 th and 21 st century works of art, design, architecture, photography, film, video and new media. Originally reserved for museum curators, the library exceptionally allows associated researchers and students enrolled at Paris College

of Art and CUPA to access the collections, under the academic supervision of Paris College of Art and CUPA instructors. Paris College of Art and the Bibliothèque Kandinsky have created a joint framework which provides internship opportunities for students with strong academic merit and demonstrating proficiency in French.

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CUPA

Les Arts Décoratifs Since 1882, the institution known as "Les Arts Décoratifs" has worked to promote the applied arts and develop connections between industry, culture, and design. Their research library is dedicated to the decorative and applied arts. With its impressive collection of 120,000 publications, it is an invaluable resource for researchers and designers, and it plays an integral part in the

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institution’s missions of education, preservation, and documentation. Paris College of Art (PCA) supports the Bibliothèque des Arts Décoratifs through an annual donation dedicated to acquisitions for the collection. This partnership allows students and faculty of PCA and CUPA privileged access to the library’s resources.


CUPA

The Research Center at the Chateau de Versailles: Centre de Recherche du Château de Versailles The mission of the Centre de Recherche du Château de Versailles (CRCV) is to conduct and support multidisciplinary research on the court of Versailles and other European seats of power, with a focus on the 17th and 18th centuries. All aspects of the culture of the French court are studied, including the structure and function of curial institutions, the history of ideas, the

development of the arts and sciences, the conception of the palace and gardens, and rites and ceremony. PCA and CUPA students can access the research tools of the CRCV, receive guidance and support for their research, and apply for a two-month summer internship at the CRCV.

Université de Paris 1 Panthéon – Sorbonne Since 2011, the ACTE (Arts - Créations - Théories - Esthétiques) research center and Paris College of Art (PCA) collaborate to develop a variety of scientific projects. The ACTE research team is co-chaired by Université de Paris 1 - PanthéonSorbonne and the CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique). Laying the groundwork for this partnership, Bernard Darras (Paris 1) was the editor of the third volume of Collection, focusing on the connections between art and design and semiotics. Each year PCA and

Université de Paris 1 organize the international Ateliers de la Recherche en Design - ARD symposium. In 2012, the research symposium "Scaling Up the Design Process" took place during Designer’s Days. Through the PCA/ACTE partnership, students have access to one of the most prestigious research facilities in social science, art and design in France and have the opportunity to attend seminars and conferences and receive guidance and support for research and development of their theses.

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CUPA

_ Housing & Student Life in Paris

Housing Options CUPA allows its students to choose between a home stay with a French family or independent living arrangements.

Living with a French Family Living with a carefully selected French family is a privileged form of housing that provides students with the opportunity to establish personal relationships, use French intensively and be immersed in French culture and traditions on a daily basis. The family is a valuable resource allowing for true integration into a neighborhood, life in Paris, and France in general. Students electing this option complete a confidential questionnaire to assist CUPA in assuring a mutually rewarding match between the host family and student. Students receive breakfast daily and share five evening meals per week with their hosts.

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CUPA

Living Independently The CUPA staff provides advice to students who prefer to make their own living arrangements. Paris housing is expensive and while it is possible to find apartments at a reasonable cost, it can take time. Therefore, students who intend to search for apartments should arrange for their housing prior to the beginning of Orientation. Students who choose this option do not pay the CUPA housing fee and are solely responsible for housing, related costs and other commitments that may arise from their choice.

Cultural Offerings All CUPA-sponsored cultural activities are included in the program fee. Students are invited to participate in: • An overnight weekend trip during Orientation; • A full-day excursion or other full-day activity; • Informal gatherings held at CUPA with French students; • Visits and walking tours of Paris during the Orientation period; • Program dinners. They also receive tickets for ballet, opera and theater performances, as well as a museum pass, the “Carte Louvre Jeunes”, and entrance to a major art exhibition.

"The CUPA students aren't at all afraid of speaking French between each other, so I never felt like CUPA was in its own little bubble. And my living with my host family has been a dream. I have never felt so at home in a foreign country." Barbara Noyes, Willamette University, Fall 2011

Personal Support The CUPA staff has considerable experience dealing with any difficulties that may arise during a semester or year in Paris. Because of the intimate size of the program, the staff is able to get to know each student individually, and is always available to help work out specific issues – from the academic to the personal.

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CUPA

_ Cost of Program & Academic Calendar

Tuition Tuition covers full support services, including elaboration of a tailor-made program for each student, all instruction costs, fees at the Bibliothèque Nationale de France and other specialized libraries, and independent study projects. All studio courses are included in the cost of the program for Studio majors. Non-majors may choose one applied or performing arts class (i.e., fine arts, photography, drama, dance, music lessons) if taken as a credit-bearing elective. Tuition also includes personal liability insurance, access to CUPA's computer facilities, a Paris transportation pass and all CUPA-sponsored extra-curricular activities (excursions, cultural events…) Not covered are personal expenses, passports, visa and “titre de séjour” fees, books and study materials, musical instrument rentals, practice rooms, cell phones, personal health insurance, transatlantic transportation, and any extra-curriculars not organized by the Center.

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CUPA

"The spectacles were an amazing way to incorporate myself and to experience the French culture. Also, the spectacles allowed me to do this along with other students of the program. The quality was also impressive." Michael Brodek, Bard College, Spring 2012

Host Family Housing For students who choose a CUPA home stay, the housing fee covers room and board, breakfast daily and 5 dinners per week. Not covered are lunches, and all meals during Christmas and Spring vacations. *Details of the cost of the CUPA Program for the current year, as well as the current Academic Calendar, can be found on the website at: www.cupa.paris.edu

"The days that I was busiest — running from class to lunch with a new friend to an afternoon class followed by a quick dinner with my family and ending with a spectacle — made me realize how comfortable I have become living in another city and how much I love experiencing all that Paris has to offer." Stephanie O'Connell, Harvard University, Fall 2011

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CUPA

_ Eligibility & Admission

Eligibility Students should be undergraduates in good standing at an American college or university, and maintain at least a 3.0 grade point average. They must have a good command of both written and oral French and have successfully completed at least the equivalent of five semesters of college-level French with a grade of B+ or above. Exceptions to these requirements may be granted to particularly motivated students. Students should carefully consider the challenges involved in taking direct matriculation courses, and are strongly encouraged to study French during the semester prior to the anticipated semester or year abroad.

Application Applications must be completed and submitted by March 31 for full-year or fall-semester students and by October 15 for the spring semester. The application forms can be found on the web site: www.cupa.paris.edu - or requested from the U.S. office.

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CUPA

Admission Applications are considered for acceptance as they are received. Because the CUPA program is selective and accepts a limited number of students, applying early is highly recommended, especially for the spring semester. Late applications will be considered if space allows.

Student Visa and Travel Arrangements Upon acceptance, students receive guidelines on how to apply for their visa and how to register with Campus France. Students must obtain their student visa from a French consulate outside France before their departure and are responsible for understanding the French regulations that apply to them. Non-US citizens must inquire into the visa requirements that apply to their country.

Insurance Students must be covered by medical insurance during their stay in France. Proof of insurance is required for the visa and must be furnished upon arrival in Paris. "I appreciated that CUPA allowed us to be independent, but was immediately and thoroughly supportive and helpful whenever the need came up. If I could re-do this semester, I wouldn't have done a single thing differently. The majority of other students were intellectual and serious about learning French and appreciating French culture, which was important to me." Emily Hong, Yale University, Spring 2012

CUPA Merit Award Fund Funding is available for specific projects related to French culture. Merit awards are granted in the categories of research, travel, and cultural enrichment. Information on CUPA Merit Awards and application materials can be found on our website: www.cupa.paris.edu

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CUPA

CUPA Enrollment 2010–2011 Academic Year

Spring Semester

Alison Angoff, Tufts University Tochi Anueyiagu, Fordham University Lindsay Fusfeld, Oberlin College Claire Jenson, Oberlin College Katharine Kaneb, Fordham University Adam Kulewicz, Tufts University Suzanne Levin, Oberlin College Melissa Liu, University of California - Los Angeles Annemarie Malbon, Carnegie Mellon University Anthony Miller, Grand Valley State University Rachel Morrall, Bard College Michaela Morton, Williams College Sara Tan, Reed College Eleanor Thadani, Johns Hopkins University Bella Wang, Harvard University Philip Yiannopoulos, Reed College

Louisa Abada, Georgetown University Alyssa Barnard, Fordham University Chloe Bordewich, Princeton University Rachel Brooke, Oberlin College Alexander Caplow, Tufts University Julia Casey, Georgetown University Anila D'Mello, Georgetown University Olivia DaDalt, Bates College Hannah Dee, Georgetown University William Ellis, Princeton University Nathaniel Fleming, Princeton University Allison Fogel, Tufts University Matthew Helm, Pomona College Amy Herbert, Johns Hopkins University Paula Kift, Princeton University Thalia Kostman, Macalester College Allegra Krasznekewicz, Yale University Alycia Kravitz, Fordham University James Lassiter, Georgetown University Isabella Lores-Chavez, Yale University Margaret McCall, Yale University Catherine Murphy, Fordham University Paloma Pineda, Yale University Kimberly Rubens, Johns Hopkins University Saraswathi Shukla, Princeton University Michelle Smiley, Bryn Mawr College Maria Son, Georgetown University Diana Stern, Johns Hopkins University Jemana Theis, Reed College Hannah Ward, Georgetown University Bjorn Whitmore, Harvard University Hanna Zimnitskaya, Macalester College

Fall Semester Rebecca Arkin, Princeton University Lauren Bochicchio, Bryn Mawr College Kathryn Brown, Yale University Lydia Bunker, Harvard University Anceline Eustache, Bryn Mawr College Andrew Foley, Oberlin College Shannyn Gaughan, Princeton University Margaret Geoga, Harvard University Emily Goble, Reed College Stephanie Goddard, Johns Hopkins University Amy Hess, Oberlin College Alexandra Jabs, Johns Hopkins University Anna Kelly, Willamette University Rachel Kesselman, Bryn Mawr College Xiao Xiao Li, Oberlin College Luisa Lopez, Bard College Olivia Lucas, Johns Hopkins University Gabrielle Matuzsan, Johns Hopkins University Stephen Pastan, Reed College Mariel Perez-Santiago, Baylor University Laura Powers, Reed College Cassandra Prena, The College of William and Mary Rachel Sax, Johns Hopkins University Lindsay Shields, Reed College Paul Smith, Johns Hopkins University Paige Stabolepszy, Johns Hopkins University Carolyn Taratko, Trinity College Maxim Wilson, Yale University Liangsha Xu, Yale University

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CUPA

CUPA Enrollment 2011-2012 Academic Year Kathleen Cape, Tufts University Martha Janicki, Reed College Alexandra Maresh, Willamette University

Fall Semester Tessa Adzemovic, University of Michigan Renata Barreto, Reed College Stephanie Bastek, Reed College Aubrey Bauer, Reed College Alison Bellows, Johns Hopkins University Natalie Bray, Johns Hopkins University Elizabeth Chrystal, Yale University Monica Dodge, Harvard University ZoĂŤ Egelman, Yale University Yvanna Exarchos, Fordham University Eva Gabor-Fourcade, Reed College Monica George, Oberlin College Avery Glassman, Macalester College Ross Gruber, Johns Hopkins University Camille Hamilton, Wellesley College Anne Harold, Macalester College McCullough Kelly-Willis, Reed College Victoria Khoury-Yacoub, Fordham University Elena Light, Yale University Patrick Lyons, Reed College Elisabeth McConnell, The College of William and Mary Emily Nauman, Oberlin College Ingrid Olivia NorrmĂŠn-Smith, Bates College Barbara Noyes, Willamette University Stephanie O'Connell, Harvard University Stepan Ochodek, Bates College Nikolas Pontasch, Baylor University Marcia Schwartz, Kenyon College Michaela Shaw, Princeton University Eric Tinkerhess, Oberlin Conservatory of Music Alexander Yang, Macalester College

David Corwin, Princeton University Sara Cott, Georgetown University Janice Duncan, Johns Hopkins University Audrey Dunne, Pomona College Albert Eisenberg, Georgetown University Lilly Fisher, Tufts University Eric Fishman, Yale University Olivia Florio Roberts, Johns Hopkins University Alexandra Ganapes, Bryn Mawr College Olivia George, Georgetown University Zachary Groff, Yale University Jennifer Haak, Princeton University Tyler Helton, Reed College Kerry Herlihy, Tufts University Zachary Herz-Roiphe, Yale University Emily Hong, Yale University Eric Jennings, Reed College Lauren Johnson, Willamette University Jonathan Kesten, Georgetown University Gary Kilian, Macalester College Henry Liu, Princeton University Julia Maddera, Georgetown University Sarah Magagna, Princeton University Jacob McIntosh, Bates College Jessica Myers, Princeton University Jaqueline Noack, Tufts University Michael Pearlman, Princeton University Chloe Richard, Fordham University Hannah Richards, Bryn Mawr College Mary Ryan, Georgetown University Corinne Segal, Tufts University Laura Somenzi, Johns Hopkins University John Verkuilen, Macalester College Madeline Whittle, Yale University

Spring Semester Theresa Abrassart, Fordham University Leah Bastacky, Tufts University Laurie Billings, Villanova University Michael Brodek, Bard College Carolyn Carson, Georgetown University Casey Colodny, Macalester College Elizabeth Coquillette, Yale University

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CUPA

_ CUPA Summer

CUPA Summer is an immersion program in Paris which provides intensive work in French language, a selection of content courses in art history, literature, and the social sciences, and abundant opportunities for significant contact with the French language and culture. The program is open to undergraduate or graduate students with previous background in French and strong motivation to engage in a challenging summer program. A language pledge is signed by all participants and must be respected for the duration of the program: students are required to speak only in French both at CUPA and during all program-sponsored activities and in their homestays. Classes are held at the CUPA study center next to the Luxembourg gardens in the heart of the Montparnasse neighborhood, and within walking distance to the Quartier Latin.

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CUPA

Curriculum Students enroll in two credit-bearing courses (one in each category) among the following: • Intensive Language Course, depending on their level of competency in French • A choice of liberal arts offerings, all taught by French university faculty

Housing Students have a private room in the home of one of CUPA’s carefully selected host families, receive breakfast daily, and share 5 evening meals per week with their hosts. Students may, however, opt for independent housing if desired.

Cultural Offerings A number of activities are sponsored and organized by the program such as: • Overnight excursion: discovery of the cultural heritage of a region (e.g. Loire Valley, Strasbourg, etc.) • 2-3 performances • Guided visits of Paris neighborhoods • Co-curricular activities (e.g. Museums, cultural events, concerts...)

Other Activities • • • • •

Welcome reception Group dinner combined with lesson on winetasting Several breakfasts at the Center Soirée with French students Farewell dinner

Special requests Students who wish to pursue special interests such as research or advanced fine arts or music projects may contact CUPA to examine the possibilities of a tailor-made study program suited to their specific needs. For very advanced students, the required language course may be waived upon review. Current costs, dates and application materials for CUPA Summer can be found on the website at: www.cupa.paris.edu 43


CUPA

AMHERST COLLEGE BARD COLLEGE BATES COLLEGE BAYLOR UNIVERSITY BROWN UNIVERSITY BRYN MAWR COLLEGE CARLETON COLLEGE CARNEGIE MELLON UNIVERSITY CLAREMONT MCKENNA COLLEGE THE COLLEGE OF WILLIAM AND MARY THE COLLEGE OF WOOSTER CONNECTICUT COLLEGE FORDHAM UNIVERSITY GEORGETOWN UNIVERSITY GRAND VALLEY STATE UNIVERSITY

Participating Colleges & Universities

2000-2012

HARVARD UNIVERSITY INDIANA UNIVERSITY JOHNS HOPKINS UNIVERSITY KENYON COLLEGE MACALESTER COLLEGE NORTHWESTERN UNIVERSITY OBERLIN COLLEGE POMONA COLLEGE PRINCETON UNIVERSITY REED COLLEGE RICE UNIVERSITY ST. MARY’S COLLEGE OF MARYLAND TRINITY COLLEGE TRINITY UNIVERSITY, SAN ANTONIO TUFTS UNIVERSITY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, BERKELEY UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, LOS ANGELES UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SAN DIEGO UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA BARBARA UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA, SANTA CRUZ UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN UNIVERSITY OF NOTRE DAME UNIVERSITY OF TEXAS, AUSTIN UNIVERSITY OF WISCONSIN, MADISON VASSAR COLLEGE VILLANOVA UNIVERSITY VIRGINIA COMMONWEALTH UNIVERSITY WASHINGTON UNIVERSITY IN SAINT LOUIS WELLESLEY COLLEGE WESLEYAN UNIVERSITY WILLAMETTE UNIVERSITY WILLIAMS COLLEGE YALE UNIVERSITY

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Notre Dame Cathedral

CUPA

_ Course Descriptions 2011-2012

This booklet is not a course catalogue. It provides descriptions for the courses taken by CUPA students during 2011-2012 (courses preceded by an asterisk) and the most popular courses taken over recent years. Unless otherwise specified, all courses listed herein are taught in French and carry full semester course credit recommendation, based on criteria (number of hours and coursework requirements) established by the CUPA program and its Academic Advisory Board.

_

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CONTENTS

I.

[*] Indicates a course taken during the 2011-2012 academic year

ORIENTATION *Orientation/Methodology

II.

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS French Language *French Phonetics *French Writing Workshop: Argumentative Writing Strategies *French Creative Writing Class *Writing Workshop Writing Workshop: Creative Writing/OuLiPo *Poetry Writing Workshop History of the French Language from the Middle Ages to the 21st Century Grammar and History of the French Language History of French Lexicon *Introduction to the Study of Language Introduction to French Linguistic Analysis  Introduction to Linguistic Research Morphology: Variation of Lexical Units Phonology of French Interactional Linguistics French Linguistics: Lexical Units *French Language: A Language and its Uses Historical Sociolinguistics  Semantics *Language and Society Acquisition and Teaching of a Second Language The Brain and Language Introduction to Syntax: Method and Psychology Translation: Thème and Version Literary Translation Translation Translation of Theatrical Texts Translations Questions of Translation: Comparative Approaches to Style

III.

FRENCH LITERATURE *Introduction to Literary Studies Writing and Analyzing Texts *12th Century French Literature: The Origins of Chivalric Romance Marie de France: Les Lais Merlin: Birth and Deconstruction of a Myth *Examining Prologues in Literature: From Antiquity through the Medieval Period Advanced Studies in French Literature of the Middle Ages and the Renaissance *Medieval Literature and its Interpretation for Children Literature and Knowledge from the Middle Ages to the Enlightenment *Medieval Texts: Studying Image, Figure, and Semblance *Considering Medieval French Literature Les Essais by Montaigne Human and Divine Love in 16th-17th Century French Literature *The Impostor in 17th and 18th Century Literature 17th Century French Literature *French Literature of the 17th and 18th Centuries: Desire and Imagination 17th Century French Literature: Madness in the Theater Satirical Representations of Parisians in the 17th and 18th Centuries *18th Century French Literature: The Enlightenment and the Figure of the Philosopher

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61 61 62 62 62 62 62 62 62 63 63 63 63 63 63 64 64 64 64 64 64 65 65 65 65 65 65 65 66 66 66

67 67 67 68 68 68 68 68 68 69 69 69 69 69 69 69 70 70 70 70

Information in this document is proprietary. Communication, duplication, or reproduction of any kind is expressly prohibited without prior written consent and permission from the center for university programs abroad (CUPA).


CUPA

Art and Literature in 18th Century France The French Enlightenment through Literature *The Count of Monte Cristo  *Literature, Ideas, and Art The Myth of Pygmalion in 19th Century French Literature 19th Century French Literature: The Novel and History Genesis and Reception of the Naturalist Novel A Close Reading of Balzac's Le Père Goriot *The Poetics of Narrative Writers' Response to the Dreyfus Affair *The Figure of the Devil and the Concept of Evil in 19th Century French Literature *19th Century French Literature: Fantastic Poetry and Short Stories 19th Century French Poetry Rimbaud and Intertextuality *19th-20th Century French Literature: Writing Paris *French Literature of the 19th and 20th Centuries *Verlaine's Poètes Maudits *Birth of Modernity: around the Year 1912 Poetry and Politics: Rimbaud, Hugo and the Paris Commune *20th Century French Poetry: Apollinaire and the Invention of Modernity Introduction to the Writings of Marcel Proust: Un Amour de Swann *Writings of Sleep and Insomnia 20th Century French Poetry *The Evolution of French Surrealism *The Somber Decade of Surrealism: 1929-1939 20th Century Literature and History of Ideas: Writing During World War II *Engagements and Disengagements in 20th Century French Literature Samuel Beckett’s Molloy and 20th Century Literary Criticism *Contemporary French Literature *The Legacy of Antiquity in Modern Literature Modern Rewritings of the Œdipus Myth in 20th Century French Literature *The Literary Vocation: Autobiographical Narratives of the 20th Century *The Theme of Originality in French Theater *Evidence of the Renaissance in Literature Today *Places of Memory in Paris and in French Literature Opera and Literature *Literature and Cinema — Forms and Figures of Imprisonment *Children's Literature *Questions in Literary Theory: The Writer and His Languages Linguistic and Stylistic Analysis of French Literature

IV.

FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE *Introduction to Francophone Literature *Francophone Literature Introduction to Francophone Literature of Africa and the Caribbean A Child's Perspective on War and Other Human Atrocities The African Novel: Images of Colonization *Writing about Extreme Violence in Africa Literature and Identity in the Arab World French Orientalism and Arab Occidentalism The Representations of Revolt in Post-Colonial French Theater *Stories of Métissage *Body of Writing

CONTENTS

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78 78 78 79 79 79 79 79 80 80 80 80

Information in this document is proprietary. Communication, duplication, or reproduction of any kind is expressly prohibited without prior written consent and permission from the center for university programs abroad (CUPA).

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CONTENTS

V.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE Antigone: Sophocles and Anouilh *Bible and Literature: A Survey of Biblical Influence in Western Literature The Death of Princes in Literature Study of a Movement: The Adventure Novel The Comic Novel *Comparative Literature: Phaedra from Antiquity to Contemporary Times The Secret: Comparative Study of Two Romantic Novels *Narratives of Dreams and Childhood Memories Comparative Literature: Gogol, Melville and Kafka European Literature: Writing Consciousness 1880-1920 The Nouveau Roman in France and Latin America The Body and Illness in Literature Writing Desire: The Figure of the Male Lover in Three Works of Fiction Exile in Literature: Writing the Self’s Inner Territory Literature and Photography: L'Image-fantôme The Novel and History Literature & Science in the 19th Century: Zola's Docteur Pascal & Darwin's The Origin of Species The Non-Fiction Novel *Emigration and Disappearance in Contemporary Fiction The Political Novel of Today *The European Novel Today

VI.

GENDER STUDIES Gender as a Social Construct Theories of Gender Psychoanalysis, Sexual Differences and “Gender Studies” The Question of Femininity in the Age of Psychoanalysis *Derrida and the Sexual Difference “Idiom” *Feminism in French Literary Theory Sex and Gender in America, Or How to Read Judith Butler Orientales: Fiction and Femininity Theories of Gender and Writings about Difference Feminist Literature and Theory Class, Race, Gender and Sexual Difference *Gender Through the Arts Gender Roles in Film and Literature  *The Veil: Social and Religious Standpoints

VII.

OTHER LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES Latin for History Majors 1 Biblical Hebrew Modern Hebrew History of Arabic Language: Notions of Dialectology Arabic Grammar and Linguistics: Year 2 *Third-Year Arabic Introduction to Medieval Arabic Literature Modern Arabic Literature *Modern Arabic Thought and Culture *Introduction to Persian (Farsi) Intermediate Japanese Advanced Beginning Japanese I Advanced Oral and Written Expression in Mandarin Third-Year Chinese Vietnamese History through 1945/Introductory Vietnamese Language

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89 89 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 90 91 91 91 91 91

Information in this document is proprietary. Communication, duplication, or reproduction of any kind is expressly prohibited without prior written consent and permission from the center for university programs abroad (CUPA).


CUPA

CONTENTS

Modern Greek Italian Literature and Civilization: Dante Cesare Beccaria and the Italian Enlightenment Italian Translation of 19th and 20th Century French Texts Introduction to Latin American literature Survey of the Latin American Short Story The Poetry of Borges, 1960-1972 Roots of Brazilian Literature and Analysis of Brazilian Poetry German: Grammar II Third-year Russian Language  Advanced Russian: Listening Comprehension and Grammar *Early Russian History and Literature *Russian Cultural Studies: Painting and Cinema *Russian Literature of the 19th Century Semiotics of the Portrait in the Works of Gogol Sanskrit Literature: Kalidasa

VIII.

ENGLISH STUDIES *Theoretical Cognitive Grammar English Language, Literature and Civilization of the Middle Ages *Representing Desire in Shakespeare's Theater Knowledge and the Travel Narrative in 18th Century English Literature *American Gothic Literature: Writing and Re-Writing British Adventure Novels 1885-1925 Reading Ulysses Maps And Mazes: Depictions of the City in 20th Century Irish Literature Myths and Metamorphoses in British Literature English Literature: Poetry and Poetics Contemporary Anglophone Theater Classics of British Children's Literature The Feminist Essay and its Fictions: From Wollstonecraft to Winterson *Text and Image in American Literature from the 19th Century to Today 20th Century Writers of the American South *20th Century American Poetry *Post-Colonial Indian and Pakistani Literature 19th and 20th Century Irish Political History Current Issues in British Politics History and Culture of the American West - Fields of Gold: California and the American Dream Liberty and Slavery in the Construction of the United States *Environmental History of the United States American Minorities in History and Cinema *The Global Influence of Capitalism, Media, and Politics in the United States

IX.

HISTORY Introduction to Pharaonic Egypt: History of Egypt and the Middle Kingdom *Egypt in the 18th Dynasty Jews and Judaism in Antiquity History of the Greek City States from Croesus to Alexander (6th-4th Centuries B.C.) *Ancient Greek History The Odyssey, Yesterday and Today The Roman Empire from Caesar Augustus to Diocletian  Citizenship: Rome and the Modern Era History and Historiography of Islam *Power and Society in Al-Andalus, 9th-12th Centuries The Byzantine Empire

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Information in this document is proprietary. Communication, duplication, or reproduction of any kind is expressly prohibited without prior written consent and permission from the center for university programs abroad (CUPA).

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CONTENTS

*History of the Ottoman Empire in Arab Lands: 1516-1830 The Middle Ages in the West History of the Carolingian Empire *Introduction to the History of World Civilizations in the 5th-12th Centuries *Culture and Society in the Middle Ages (13th-15th Century) Church and Society in the West from 1215 to 1450 Life, Love and Death in the Late Middle Ages *History of Childhood and Children in France Conditions of Illness and Death in French Society 16th-19th Centuries History of the French Renaissance: War and Faith under Francois Ier and Henri II *Social and Political History of Italy in the Early Renaissance (1380-1500) *Italy during the 16th and 17th Centuries History of 17th Century France *The Reign of Louis XIV *France during the Reign of Louis XIV France in the Reign of Louis XV The Ancien Regime in France: 16th-18th Centuries *A Social History of Parisian Lifestyles from 1660 to 1789 *Modern Mentalities: Church and State in Modern France Introduction to Modern Ways of Thought: Love and Hatred of Kings The Creation of the United States and Europe Introduction to Urban History in the 17th and 18th Centuries *The History of Central Europe in the Modern Era 18th Century France: Economy and Society *Maritime Merchants and Trade Political and Philosophical History of 17th and 18th Century International Relations From the Ancien RÊgime to the Revolution Historiography of the French Revolution The French Revolution in History and Memory The French Revolution 1789-1799: A Sociological and Philosophical Perspective Europe at War: History of Revolution and the Empire 1792-1815 The Birth of the American Republic, 1765-1820 *Paris and London in the 18th Century Economic and Political History of Great Britain and France in the 19th Century Introduction to 19th Century European History History of 19th Century Economic and Social Thought *Politics and Society in 19th Century France History of Napoleonic France Cultural and Social History of France 1815-1830  Politics and Society in France during the Belle Époque (1871-1918) *The French System of Defense The Culture of the Elite in France: Memory, Cultural Heritage, Social Life and Private Life Immigration and Mass Migrations in the 19th and 20th Centuries *Urban History During the 19th and 20th Centuries WWI and its Cultural Impact on Europe  Political Life in France from 1880 to 1940 Politics and Society in 20th Century France *Understanding Contemporary French Political History, 1815-Present *20th Century History of France  Economic and Political History of 20th Century France  Wars and Crises in France Vichy France Authoritarian and Totalitarian Regimes *The International System from 1815 to the Present  History of Colonization

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Information in this document is proprietary. Communication, duplication, or reproduction of any kind is expressly prohibited without prior written consent and permission from the center for university programs abroad (CUPA).


CUPA

The Modernization of the Middle East 1920-1950 Colonization and Decolonization of Africa from 1919 to the Present History and Historiography of Decolonization The Middle East in the 20th Century *History of the Middle East in the 20th Century The United States and the World in the 20th Century Europe in the 20th Century (1900-1945) *Europe and Its Nations from 1914 to 1945 *Fascism and Nazism in Europe The International System since 1945 History of Germany, 1945-1969 History of European Construction Geopolitics and Analysis of the European Union from its Foundations to Modern Times European Politics from De Gaulle to Chirac *Post-War Media, Information and Telecommunications in the United States *History and Cinema *Wars of the 20th Century: History and Cinema Introduction to the History of Science

X.

ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE Mesoamerican Art Archeology and Iconography of Pharaonic Egypt Art of the Islamic World *Arts of the Far East Gallo-Roman Archeology Art History and Archaeology of the Roman Empire Romanesque and Gothic Art and Architecture (1000-1400) Art of the Middle Ages from the 12th to the 16th Century *Medieval Art: Painting and Funerary Art in France, 13th-15th Centuries History of Manuscript Illumination in Western Europe Recent Research in Medieval Art and Architecture Topics in Medieval Monumental Architecture: Gothic Sculptures and Spaces Topics in Medieval Iconography: Van Eyck's Arnolfini Portrait Painting in Venice during the Early Renaissance *Introduction to Art History of the European Renaissance Art of the Italian Renaissance *Modern Art and Architecture: The Birth of the Classical Style in France Urban Planning and Architectural Development: Paris and Venice, 1585-1755 History of French Architecture: 16th-18th Century Myths and History in 17th Century French Painting & French Painting in the 18th Century *Modern Art 1: Allegory in French Art of the 17th Century Art, State and Public in the 17th and 18th Centuries *A Critical History of the Genres of 17th and 18th Century Painting Introduction to 18th Century European Art Art under the Ancien RĂŠgime *Late 18th and Early 19th Century French Art 19th Century Art: Monet The History of French Painting from David through Courbet *Major Movements in 19th Century French Painting Art of Modern Times: The 19th and 20th Centuries *Decorative Arts and Architecture in Europe and the United States, 1850-1940 20th Century Art History Artistic avant-gardes in Paris (1900-1939) French Cultural Heritage The History of Artistic Avant-Garde Movements

CONTENTS

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CONTENTS

History of 20th Century Art Mir贸: Line and Color Kandinsky and the Path to Abstraction Mondrian and De Stijl *Japan and the West: Reciprocal Regards Introduction to Contemporary Art Modernism & the Avant-Garde: Representations of the Body in 20th & 21st Century Western Art Photography: A History of Visual Influence, 1878-2000s. History of Photography 1839-1914 History of Contemporary Photography Reading Photography: Semiological and Narrative Approaches Expressionism and Contemporary Photography Monumental Sculpture in the Contemporary City Arts, Nature, and Architecture Art and Invisibility The Role of the Viewer in Art, Past and Present Introduction to Modern Aesthetic Theory Techniques of Artistic Creation: Prints, Painting, Sculpture, Architecture, Ceramics, Drawing, Photography, Contemporary Art, Furniture Introduction to Museum Studies and Iconography 1 *Museum Professions Beginner's Black and White Photography *Black and White Film Photography *Advanced Photography Studio *Painting and Drawing *Figure Drawing *Drawing Workshop Studio Art: The Art of the Comic Strip  *Drawing with Live Models *Drawing and Painting Studio *Painting and Drawing Workshop Contemporary Painting Introduction to Color Medical and Scientific Illustration Graphic Design  Clay Sculpture Studio *Sculpting *Mosaics *Pottery and Ceramics Printmaking  Studio Art: Articulation & Duration  Mail Art and Communication

XI.

FILM STUDIES History of Cinema 1928-1965 *Semiology in Film Theory Cinematographers on Theory Cinematography: Text and Voice Film Narrative Film Analysis *French Cinema Expressionist and Avant-Garde Cinema French Avant-Garde Cinema of the 1920s  History of Cinema: Soviet Avant-Garde Cinema of the 1920s *The Later Works of Charles Chaplin (1930-1957)

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CUPA

Tod Browning: Cinema and Teratology The Life and Films of Fritz Lang  *Hollywood Comedies in the 1930s  Classic French Cinema: 1930-1960 Analysis of Film Noir History of American Independent Cinema from Shadows to the Sundance Film Festival The Films of François Truffaut Modern French Cinema: from the Nouvelle Vague to Militant Cinema *French New Wave Cinema *Robert Bresson, Filmmaker and Theorist Women Filmmakers in France from 1970 to the Present Agnès Varda: 50 Years of French Cinema *The French New Wave and New World Cinemas *French Cinema Today Indian Cinema Spanish Cinema: The Civil War, Franco, and Evolution The Cinema of Abbas Kiarostami: Ancient, Modern, Post-Modern The Cinema of Little Italy Forms of Suspense Anxiety in Cinema *Myth and Cinema The Theme of Painting in Fantasy Cinema History of the Documentary: Portraits of Cities and the Modern World Parody and Pastiche in Film *France/Hollywood: A Cultural Analysis of Cinematic Exchange Philosophies of Film *Audio-Vision: Culture or Nature? Light, Color and Mise en Scène: A History of Cinematography Theories and Functions of Frame and Off-Screen Space in Cinema Advanced Screenplay Writing Workshop Cinema on Stage Video Art from 1963 to the Present *Cinema and Multimedia

XII.

THEATER History of Theater: The Historical Tragedy to 1700 Baroque Dramaturgy of the Tragicomedy History of Theatrical Aesthetics Analysis of Theatrical Works Drama Theory: Writing and Memory The Tools of Theater - Theater and Cinema Photography and the Theater Theatrical Analysis: Models for Directing Dada and Surrealist Theater The History of the Moscow Art Theater From Text to Stage: Chekhov’s The Cherry Orchard Theater Arts: Monsters and Monstrosity Theater and Storytelling Risk and Value Analysis of Theatrical Projects The Magenia Program - Dance, Corporeal Theater and Mime Cours Jean-Laurent Cochet: Professional Training Program Intensive Acting Workshop: Classical French Texts Acting Workshop : Scene Study *Practical Approach to Mime Actor’s Workshop: Approaching Space, Speech and Movement

CONTENTS

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CONTENTS

Theater Workshop: Autobiography/Fiction With Antonin Artaud *Introduction to Performance Scene Design Workshop

XIII.

MUSIC Medieval Musical Notation The Compositional Œuvre of Guillaume de Machaut History of Music (Middle Ages and Renaissance) Music and Poetry of the 16th Century Chanson History of Music in the 17th Century Marc-Antoine Charpentier and Baroque Sources *History of Music 17th - 19th Centuries Opera in the Age of Mozart Gluck's Reform of Opera in 18th Century Paris/Rhetoricity and Tonal Analysis *Evolution of 19th Century Musical Language  Opera and Drama in the 19th Century The Theme of the Night in Music of the Romantic Period  Berlioz: An Exploration of Symphonic Forms The History of 19th and 20th Century Opera The Invention of Opéra Comique Music and Modernity at the Turn of the 20th Century *Music History (1900-1950) and Developments in the Symphonic Orchestra throughout the 20th Century *Music Theory and its Applications *Evolution of Musical Language: Schenkerian Analysis and Commentary in 20th Century Music *Transcription for Ear Training Jazz Techniques and Styles Psychoacoustics Introduction to Ethnomusicology *Music of the Balkan and Mediterranean Regions *Composition Lessons *Piano - Individual Lessons *Violin Private Violin Lessons *Cello Lessons Private Cello Study Private Viola Study *Private Study - Viola da Gamba Flute Flute Lessons Clarinet Chamber Music Ensemble Symphony Orchestra Voice Lessons Jazz Combo Grand Chœur de la Sorbonne: The Sorbonne Choral Society *Baroque Chorus and Orchestra

XIV.

DANCE History of Contemporary Dance *Ballet *French Classical Ballet Advanced Ballet Technique *Ballet and Jazz Techniques

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CUPA

*Modern Jazz Modern Dance: Martha Graham Technique Advanced Modern Technique

XV.

ARCHITECTURE *History of Architectural Theories, 1750-1950 *Le Corbusier, the Written Works Long-Span Structural Systems *Architectural Studio: Scenography and Architecture of Performance Spaces City and Environment: Historical and Critical Perspectives Architecture, Environment, and Sustainable Development Architectural Studio: Sustainable Development and Youth Housing in Vitry-Sur-Seine An Exercise in Spatiality: Art in situ Space, Light, Color Images in Perspective: Philosophy and Cognitive Science *Emerging Public Space: Use and Perceptions of Transportation Systems *Space and Urban Dynamics *Public Edifice

XVI.

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS A History of Political Thought in Europe Political Sociology Fundamental Political Concepts *Theories of Democracy Comparative Political Institutions and Constitutions *History and Analysis of French Elections Communication and Politics Political Theory: Social Classes and Political Action History of Action and Leadership Norms and Practices of Citizenship  *International Relations, Human Rights and Judicial Systems International Relations Political Issues of Globalization  *International Organizations and Institutions *Discrimination, Diversity, and Anti-Discrimination Politics The Cultural Construction of National Identity in Europe *European Construction Policies and Coordination of the European Union Common Market *European Institutions Foreign Policy of the European Union Major Geopolitical Problems of the Contemporary World Contemporary Issues of Sovereignty *Empire, Colonialism and Post-Colonialism  *African Politics and Government *The Arab Spring Sociopolitical Movements in Latin America Contemporary Issues in Latin American Democracies State and Society in Latin America Eastern Europe: From Communism to Post-Communism *History of Economic Theories *History of Economic Thought *Social and Economic History Political Economy in France Since 1945 *Economic and Social Issues in the Modern World *International Economics

CONTENTS

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CONTENTS

International Political Economy Economics of the European Union Economy of European Labor Markets *Development Economics *International Economics and Globalization *Economic Aspects of Globalization European Economic Integration Public Economics  Labor Economics *Social Economics Microeconomics Intermediate Microeconomics *Economics of Financial Markets Financial Products and Markets *Monetary Institutions and Mechanisms *Taxation Asian Economies and their Relationship with the EU Economic Relations between Europe and Latin America Economics of Corruption

XVII.

SOCIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY Marx for Beginners  The Frankfurt School Sociology of Political Ideologies Sociology of Globalization Sociology of Social Movements *Sociology of Gender *Sociology of Deviance Sociology: Secularism and Inequality *History and Social Sciences: Globalization Introduction to the Sociology of Immigration *Socio-Racial Circulations and Dynamics in the Age of Colonialism/American Minorities : Historiographical Debates and Political Controversies. *The Question of Race: National Constructs and Transnational Circulations *Representations and Realities of Islam in France Representations of Poverty and Exclusion in Anglo-Saxon Societies Sociology of the City Public Space and the Urban Theater Urban Sociology Ecology of the City, Ecology in the City Urban Segregation Introduction to Demography: Population Studies and Immigration in France The Demographics of Family Politics Habitat, Family and Social Practices in Post-WWII France Evolution of French Society Since 1950 Sociology of Education: International Comparisons *The Sociology of Art Sociology of Religion and Society  Divination and Ritual Possession in Africa *Introduction to Sociology of Latin America Anthropology of Environment in Latin America Anthropology of Nomadism in the Middle East Anthropology of the Balkans Anthropology of the Berbers *Introduction to Islamic Civilizations

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CUPA

CONTENTS

*Economic and Historical Anthropology of Maghreb-West African Relations *European Writings on Madagascar and Cultural Anthropology of the Western Indian Ocean *Anthropology of East Asia: China, Korea and Japan Materialist Feminist Interpretations of Classical French Anthropological Works Anthropological Studies in an Urban Setting Aesthetic Anthropology: Native American and First Nation Populations *Historical Anthropology: The Silk Roads and Globalization Anthropological Approaches to Globalization *Evolution, Diffusion, and Globalization Anthropology of Global Systems Introduction to the Anthropology of Health and Disease Anthropology of Health Ethno-Medicine Ethno-Sciences Ethnographic Cinema Ethnology and Field Work Ethnological Approaches to African Religions Ethnology of Dance

XVIII.

GEOGRAPHY AND FOOD STUDIES International Migrations Geography of Language *Geopolitics and Geo-Strategies Geo-History of Urbanism Geography and Society in the African Sahel Geography of Water *Oceans: A Global Study *Climatology *Environmental Risks and Vulnerable Populations An Integrated Approach to Environment *The Geography of Food *New Consumer Models: Cuisine, Gastronomy, and Restaurants in France *Gastrotourism and Oenotourism The Anthropology of Food

XIX.

PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE Cognitive Neuroscience of Emotion *Introduction to Computational Neuroscience Neuropharmacology and Brain Plasticity The Cognitive Aspects of Memory and Learning Neuropsychology and Language *Language Processes Cognitive Psychology *Cognitive Functioning *Learning at School: Processes and Assessment Methods School Failure and Remediation Development of Emotional, Gestured, Postural and Verbal Communication Developmental Psychology *Development of Children and Adolescents Development of Personality in Childhood and Adolescence The Development of Friendship and Relationships Genetics and Behavior *Introduction to Social Psychology Social Psychology *Group Thinking and Social Psychology

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CONTENTS

*Social Psychology: Opinion, Beliefs, and Collective Life Social Psychology of Health *Introduction to Clinical Psychology and Psychopathology Introduction to Clinical Psychology Clinical Psychology: Traumatic Experiences Approaches to Psychological Disorders Evaluating Personality in a Clinical Setting through Projective Methods and Questionnaires Psychology of Consumer Behavior The Psychology of Food and Nutrition Psychology of Space and Environment The Psychology of Music

XX.

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION Definitions of Philosophy The Philosophy of Nature Philosophy of Animal and Man Philosophy of Love *General Philosophy: Beauty Philosophy of Art: What Is Modern Art? Kant: Critique of Pure Reason History of Contemporary Philosophy: Marx, Nietzsche and Freud Philosophy of Mind and Cognitive Science: The Concept of a priori Epistemology of the Human Sciences *Submission Perception, Imagination, and Memory The Philosophy of Science *Philosophy of Science and Technology Hegel and Heidegger: Identity and Difference Introduction to Modern and Contemporary Philosophy: Being and Subjectivity Bergson and French Culture 1914-1940 History of Contemporary Philosophy from Fichte to Kierkegaard Ethics and Morals Introduction to Ethical and Political Issues  Moral and Political Philosophy II Introduction to Political Philosophy Political Philosophy: The Question of Sovereignty of the Individual  Globalization: The End of the Nation-State? *Philosophy of Economics Liberalism: A European Philosophical Response Ethics and Society Metaphysics: Faith and Knowledge  Indian Philosophy Symbols, Myths and Rites in Religions Islam in France *Christians and Muslims in History Foundations of Buddhism Buddhism’s Relationship with Christianity Introduction to Hinduism The Doctrine of the Trinity

XXI.

SCIENCES Mathematics for Economics and Management Measure Theory and Integration Algebraic Topology *Diophantine Geometry

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CUPA

*Multizeta Values and the Fundamental Group *Abelian Varieties Probability and Statistics Discrete Probability Geophysics Cellular Biology From the Molecule to Medication Organic Chemistry Human Physiology Human Cellular Function Molecular Biology and Genetics Molecular Biology and Genetics 2 Interactions between Plants and their Environments Integrative Ecology: Fundamentals and Applications Thermodynamics and Wave Phenomena Fluid Mechanics

XXII.

INTERNSHIPS/INDEPENDENT STUDIES/SPECIAL COURSES Urban Renewal in the Parisian Banlieue Independent Study: Evolution of French Cuisine in the 1920s Internship at MusÊe d’Orsay Independent Study: Research at the Quai Branly Museum on the Relationship between the Collections and the Public OECD Internship/Independent Study in Economics Research internship: International Arms Trade and Political Strategy: the US, Russia, and China and the Sale of Weapons to the Middle East, Israel, and Western Africa The New Anti-Semitism in France Traditional Authorities and the Evolution of State and Democracy in Africa Internship: The Role of Exclusive Breastfeeding in the Prevention of Obesity, Infectious Disease and Immune Diseases Study of the Lute and Renaissance Music Cultural Policymaking Internship Student Teaching Internship

CONTENTS

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[*] Indicates a course taken during the 2011-2012 academic year

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CUPA

Paris Metro Map

ORIENTATION

I.

*ORIENTATION/METHODOLOGY

ORIENTATION

The orientation session is obligatory for all program students. Orientation lasts for three weeks and includes intensive classes devoted to 1) the methodology used in the French university classes that students must master 2) specific grammar review and conversation practice 3) assignments using the French methodology and in particular the commentaire composĂŠ and the dissertation. Students must also attend the complete series of supplementary lectures/visits that will expose them to the French University, the educational system, registration procedures, culture in Paris, practical information, security in Paris, etc. 50 hours total over a 3-week period.

Center for University Programs Abroad

Professors Boisdron, Bondurand, Petitjean Scattolin and Wynant.

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FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS

Notre Dame Cathedral

CUPA

II. FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS AND LINGUISTICS

FRENCH LANGUAGE Institut Catholique (Institut de Langue et de Culture Françaises) A full semester of French language instruction for foreign students, featuring intensive work on grammar and composition and additional classes in oral practice and in literature. This program is available to year students if they need to attain the advanced level in order to proceed to direct matriculation second semester. It is proposed as a means to move on to direct matriculation second semester, to particularly motivated students who may not have attained the advanced level in French and who have been admitted to the CUPA program on a “conditional” basis (i.e. a semester of French language work prior to direct matriculation during second semester). A commitment to a year in Paris is therefore obligatory. The four parts of the course are: Intermediate French Grammar; Intermediate French Composition; Oral Expression in French; Introduction to French Literature/History of French Cinema. ILCF teaching staff.

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CUPA

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS

*FRENCH PHONETICS Institut Catholique de Paris This course on French phonetics introduces students to the rules of standard French pronunciation, elements of the International Phonetic Alphabet, and approaches to standard French pronunciation. Students work on phonetic transcriptions and decode works of prose, poems and theater from a phonetic transcription into standard written French. Three main areas of study are covered: 1. Study of the voice and formation of sounds; 2. Articulation and detailed study of each sound; 3. Diction - rhythm of phrases and intonation structure. Pronunciation problems are identified and addressed during weekly sessions in the language laboratory, as students work to distinguish sounds in spoken French, identify sounds in written French, and repeat prose. Professor Razakamanana.

*FRENCH WRITING WORKSHOP: ARGUMENTATIVE WRITING STRATEGIES Center for University Programs Abroad An intensive writing workshop designed for students who wish to perfect their written French, with a focus on the techniques of strategic and argumentative writing. In order to improve sentence construction, encourage vocabulary building, and better understand complex structures in French grammar, students work on analytical writing assignments of various lengths for each class meeting: dissertations, persuasive essays, written reactions to current events, and a research report. By examining the methods of rhetoric and argumentation, students refine their ability to create a convincing discourse in French. Professor Petitjean.

*FRENCH CREATIVE WRITING CLASS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course allowed students to acquire greater ease in writing French through creative-writing exercises. Examples from French authors accompany the exercises in order to illustrate the potential of each particular assignment. Christian Oster's books: Paul Au Téléphone, Mon Grand Appartement and Loin d'Odile are used as the main literary references. Professor Barberis.

*WRITING WORKSHOP Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Weekly writing assignments, to be composed dur62

ing the course session, and which may be continued outside of class, constitute the core of this course. Diverse sources triggers triggering inspiration are provided and are investigated, such as class trips to exhibits, specific photographs, quotes from authors, and films. The purpose of the course is to help students find an independent, developed and functioning approach to the written arts, and to discuss what it is to be a writer in today's world.. Professor Bécuwe.

WRITING WORKSHOP: CREATIVE WRITING/OULIPO Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This writing workshop focuses on creative fiction and poetry but with constraints as proposed by the literary movement OuLiPo. In each class, students compose a text with constraints in order to produce literature through a process that, according to the Oulipiens, is much like “a rat that constructs his own labyrinth from which he intends to exit.” Professor Montalbetti.

*POETRY WRITING WORKSHOP Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This class introduces students to the art of writing poetry in French and is taught by two accomplished poets. Each week one of the professors discusses a given topic or type of poem and presents a collection of poetry related to the theme. Students are then asked to write poetry inspired by that theme, and to share their work in class. While students are encouraged to express originality, emphasis is still placed on their mastering the classical forms of French poetry. Professor Gardes-Tamine and Ber.

HISTORY OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE 21ST CENTURY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A course tracing the roots and evolution of the French language, from the period just before the Middle Ages to the present day. Bernard Cerquiglini’s La naissance du français offers an introduction to the origins and transformation of French, beginning with the monumental Serment de Strasbourg. Emphasis is placed on etymology, instabilities and reforms of the French language, and the use of language as a means of establishing ideology, political dogma, and above all socio-economic division.

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CUPA

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS

The French of Francophone countries is given particular attention in the second half of the semester..

INTRODUCTION TO FRENCH LINGUISTIC ANALYSIS

Professor Séguy.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

GRAMMAR AND HISTORY OF THE FRENCH LANGUAGE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is a crash-course in IPA (the international phonetic alphabet) and a comprehensive study of French grammar, including its syntactic and semantic components. Students become familiar with the IPA and learn to transcribe passages. After understanding the phonological or ideological qualities of the phonemes considered in class, students move on to the sentence. The semantic, morphological, and syntactic values for each of the elements underlined in the sentence are important concepts to understand. Whether it is a noun, an adverb, or just a conjunction, their function in the French sentence is significant and must be properly explained. Professor Badiou.

HISTORY OF FRENCH LEXICON Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This study of the history of the French lexicon addresses the core issue of the origins of French and the emergence of etymological thought in the 16th century. Diachronic description of the lexicon includes the approaches used for the first dictionaries and etymological dictionaries, the contributing changes to the formation of the French lexicon from both the morphological and semantic points of view, as well as the diverse forces that participated in changing the course of the French lexicon since its origins. Professor Demartini.

*INTRODUCTION TO THE STUDY OF LANGUAGE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course is an introduction to neurolinguistics, sociolinguistics and psycholinguistics. The following questions are examined: What is language? How does the brain function in terms of language? How do children acquire their maternal language? How does language compare to other systems of communication? The course also examines how language changes as a function of social context or as a function of time. Finally, the course looks at the more formal fields of linguistics, such as phonology, morphology, and semantics.

A comprehensive course pertaining to all founding aspects of French linguistic analysis. Main themes include phonetics, phonology, morphology and orthography. Sentences and words are deconstructed while working through each of these themes in order to provide better understanding of the formation of the language and how it functions by its construction. Historical perspectives as well as those currently used and those developing, are explored, providing further insight to the functions of linguistics and linguists in society today. Professor Candea.

INTRODUCTION TO LINGUISTIC RESEARCH Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course trains students to analyze both spoken and written language from the perspective of a professional linguist. Students explore the question of syntactical and semantic choice and discover how and why modern grammar rules function the way they do. Class time is split between interactive discussions, lectures, and problem solving exercises in groups. Using current newspaper articles, speeches, and novels, students examine both the interior and exterior functions of each major grammatical category including nouns, pronouns, verbs, and prepositions. In addition, students perform research and language experiments outside of the classroom both individually and in groups with the goal of formulating a researched hypothesis to explain everyday language usage. Professors Guerin and Desmets.

MORPHOLOGY: VARIATION OF LEXICAL UNITS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course studies flexional phenomena, the variations of lexical units and their insertion in specific environments (syntactic combination, etc.) The course examines how these variations are organized in languages (through paradigms and eventually flexional classes), and specifically describes verbal morphemes in French. It also touches upon the functions of flexional marks in a phrase and the conditions they impose. Professor Valma.

Professors Grezka and Bellier.

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CUPA

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS

PHONOLOGY OF FRENCH Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Dedicated to a description of the phonetics of French, this course concentrates on three areas: principles and techniques of phonological analysis, the phonetic and phonological system of French, and characteristics in the pronunciation of words and syntagma in French. Starting with the basics of phonology, including the concept of phoneme, allophone, free variants, and sounds, the phonology of French is examined through corpus studies to find out the phonological systems in French regarding the vowels, consonants, and liaison. The course also explores syllables and the prosodic structure of French. Professor Nesterenko.

INTERACTIONAL LINGUISTICS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course covers the theories and methods of conversational analysis, using an orchestral approach to interaction, in order to cover various phenomena including: the turn-taking system, the non-verbal resources of interaction, intentionality, preference, face-work, narration and its sequential and participational formats, social and discursive identities, pathology in interaction, speech as action and as culture. The models discussed in this course are those of Hymes, Goffman, Sacks, and Phillips. In sections, students analyze a corpus of interactions, and train in the transcription of verbal and non-verbal interaction. Weekly readings are taken from works by Goffman, Ochs and Capps, Duranti and Sacks.. Professor Greco.

FRENCH LINGUISTICS: LEXICAL UNITS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This linguistics course provides the basics of syntactic and semantic analysis. The semantic section introduces students to lexical analysis, and discusses various linguistic phenomena such as polysemy or prototype structures. Word play and poetic or commercial use of language are also analyzed. The syntactic analysis section treats different methods of linguistic description so as to reveal fundamental syntactic relations. Professor Grinshpun.

*FRENCH LANGUAGE: A LANGUAGE AND ITS USES Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle There are three objectives in this course; to illustrate the main tasks of the French language and its importance for understanding the world around us; to realize that language as a system cannot be reduced to a concrete science; and to realize that this system is not homogeneous nor does it follow a specific pattern of change, as it is subject to variation. The following issues are addressed: problems concerning syntax (discussed through the comparison of normative syntax and that of popular French), phonic structure (how to describe the sounds of language), morphology and the difference between oral and written language (with emergence of new forms of oral language based on modern technologies taken into account) and linguistic diversity relating to types of speech. Professor Reetz.

HISTORICAL SOCIOLINGUISTICS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course focuses on linguistic variation in the French language from the 17th century to the present day. It aims to define the nature of linguistic evolution and the contributing socio-discursive parameters, through the study of two connected disciplines: sociolinguistics and discourse analysis. The perspective of sociolinguistics reflects on how society manages its relationship with language throughout history, and focuses on the link between social factors and the standardization of French language policy in France since the 16th century, the problems of co-linguism, etc. The perspective of discourse analysis attempts to articulate the emergence of discourses on language observable in dictionaries, grammars and textbooks with social practices and types of speech. Professor Grinshpun.

SEMANTICS ENS Introduction to contemporary formal semantics. Precisely and methodically reviewing the foundations of truth-conditional semantics, this course presents the principal theoretical and technical aspects of the paradigm of formal semantic analysis put forth in the works of Montague, amongst other semanticists. Professor Roussarie.

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CUPA

*LANGUAGE AND SOCIETY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS

INTRODUCTION TO SYNTAX: METHOD AND PSYCHOLOGY

By adopting a scientific point of view of linguistics (a descriptive point of view rather than a prescriptive point of view) this course addresses the study of events, from daily observation of the French language, that correspond to the linguistic practices of the speaker and to the fundamental reality that the linguist must be able to describe: the different notions of the norm, and the use of these different norms, the notion of a mistake, variation, multilingualism, and of the linguistic policy.

ENS

Professor Pauleau-Delautre.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

ACQUISITION AND TEACHING OF A SECOND LANGUAGE

This master’s level seminar focuses on improving students’ translation skills, both from and into English and French, working on excerpts from novels, but also translating poetry and theater. Students analyze the choices they make and the tension existing between target comprehension and fidelity to the original text. Research is also an important part of the course.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course offered in the department of applied linguistics offers a broad overview of various theories related to the acquisition of a second language. Emphasis is placed on the study of the transitional competences anticipated in Chomsky’s Theory of Universal Grammar. The qualities of an inter-language are also seen. Focus on psycholinguistics and the learner, motivation, environment, the Critical Period Hypothesis, study of errors, definitions of competence.

The goal of this class is to present the big questions that guide contemporary linguistic research. What is it to know a language? How does one acquire this knowledge? Are there properties common to all languages? How does one rigorously describe the grammar of a language? Professors Sportiche and Charnavel.

TRANSLATION: THÈME AND VERSION

Professor Lefevre.

LITERARY TRANSLATION Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

THE BRAIN AND LANGUAGE

This course focuses on improving students’ ability to translate from French into English, focusing on both the accurate translation of texts and the attempt to maintain a level of literary sophistication.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Oustinoff.

This course is a linguistics-based introduction to cognitive science. Major theories regarding the origin, nature, and study of language in humans are covered in lectures and the following questions are raised: What is human language and how does it differ from animal communication? When did language originate and why? How is the cerebral basis of language studied? How does hemispheric specialization affect language comprehension and production? What is brain aphasia and what are its consequences? What is the cerebral basis of the written word? What are some of the most common language troubles that arise in humans? These questions are answered throughout the course of the semester.

TRANSLATION

Professors Klinger and Coydon.

Professor Colonna.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The objective of this seminar is to provide students with the practical tools to produce literary translations from English to French and from French to English. Students perform a variety of exercises, translating texts excerpted from both classic and contemporary French and English literature, as well as news features, children's books, nonfiction and essays. Students strengthen their textual interpretation as well as their linguistic proficiency, achieving subtlety and nuance in their comprehension of both languages, particularly in grammar and punctuation and experience firsthand the translator's work, finding practical responses to questions of authorial intention, textual fidelity, and creative liberty. Professor Karsky.

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FRENCH LANGUAGE AND LINGUISTICS

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TRANSLATION OF THEATRICAL TEXTS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This class is a workshop dedicated to the translation of theater from English into French. Students are expected to prepare translations of scenes from wellknown Anglophone playwrights, which are then discussed in class, comparing theoretical approaches and choices as well as existing translations. Emphasis is placed on oral tradition and diction, as well as vocabulary and translation theory. Professor Génin.

TRANSLATIONS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The role of translation in literature, its identity as an art unto itself and its influence on literature. Close study of translations of Œdipus, plus briefer studies of modern authors and translations. Coursework involves translation of two long American poems, which are published in a student publication at the end of the semester. Professor Samoyault.

QUESTIONS OF TRANSLATION: COMPARATIVE APPROACHES TO STYLE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The objective of this seminar is to introduce students to the critical analysis of texts and their translations. Employing a technical and linguistic perspective, students are invited to examine the tools of translation with an eye to syntactic constraints, organization of the text, and ultimately, the creative imperative of the translator. In considering translated excerpts from well-known English texts from Brontë to Ralph Ellison, Fitzgerald to Toni Morrison, students grapple with questions of absence, equivalence, and approximation to assess the proximity of translated texts to their originals. They also encounter common linguistic operations and analyze their values and consequences for literary analysis. This work informs an understanding of how literary assumptions and social and cultural contexts influence (and constrain) translators' choices. Professor Raguet.

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French National Library: François Mitterand

FRENCH LITERATURE

III.

*INTRODUCTION TO LITERARY STUDIES

FRENCH LITERATURE

This course is a survey of French literature and its critiques. It starts by touching on structuralist thought and practice, and progresses historically, examining various movements in literary thought. Suggested readings are given during each session, in relation to poetry, history, philosophy, important literary movements and the masterpieces of French literature. Authors include Baudelaire, Todorov, Jakobson, Lévi-Strauss, Starobinski, Sainte-Beuve, Sartre, and Duras. The methods of compte-rendu, lecture analytique and commentaire composé are explained.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Delacomptée.

WRITING AND ANALYZING TEXTS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course is an introduction to critical analysis of classic French literature. Prose and poetry are analyzed through close readings with emphasis placed on the French methodology of writing commentaires composés. Professor Bertrand.

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*12TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE: THE ORIGINS OF CHIVALRIC ROMANCE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course explores the rich history of medieval (predominantly 12th century) French literature, with special focus on differentiating the specific genres that were prevalent during this period. In addition to reading Chrétien de Troyes' Chevalier de la Charette, students are expected to read one romance of Antiquity (Le roman de Thèbes, Le roman d'Enéas, Le roman de Troie, Le roman d'Alexandre). The course focuses on the notion of roman - a word that implies both a hearkening back to Antiquity (Rome) and a shift to a vernacular written form. The course aims to help students identify the major characteristics of this unique and widely known genre of French literature. Professor Tanniou.

MARIE DE FRANCE: LES LAIS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The twelve lais attributed to Marie de France, written in the 12th century are studied in this course which focuses on specific themes and uses close reading techniques to look at the ambiguities and meanings lost in the translation from ancient French to modern French.

*EXAMINING PROLOGUES IN LITERATURE: FROM ANTIQUITY THROUGH THE MEDIEVAL PERIOD Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis In close reading and study of the numerous prologues contained in ancient and medieval works, this course examines the principal arguments and methods developed therein to justify the work's existence. It also analyzes various motifs placing the origin of a work in an instance of granted divine authority, or in the duty to preserve and transmit knowledge (such as the inspiration of the Muse(s) and also analyzes the symbolism linked to the rise of written texts and libraries. Texts studied include epic poetry, short stories and tales, the novel, fables, and lyric poetry. Classical works include those of Homer, Hesiod, Plato, Virgil, Ovid, and Thucydides, while medieval French works include those of Saint-Jérôme, Marie de France, Chrétien de Troyes, Guillaume IX of Aquitaine, Jaufré Rudel, La Chanson de Roland (author unknown), and the Saga of Charlemagne (author unknown). Professor Lucken.

ADVANCED STUDIES IN FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE MIDDLE AGES AND THE RENAISSANCE

Professor Séguy.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

MERLIN: BIRTH AND DECONSTRUCTION OF A MYTH

This course provides a focused look at several works from the Middle Ages as well as the Renaissance periods. Works studied include Guillaume de Lorris’ Le Roman de la rose, an allegorical novel in verse that recounts a dream in which the art of courtly love is espoused, as well as the epistles of Marot, poems in the form of letters.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Two works are used to compare and contrast the theme of the figure of Merlin in literature: Robert de Boron’s Merlin en prose from the 13th century and a contemporary text, Michel Rio’s Merlin (1989). The medieval text, which furnishes an example of a founding text of the Arthurian legend in terms of the representation of power, royalty, lineage, and the origins of the legend and fictional writing, is compared with Michel Rio’s version of the work. Rio’s text is examined in the light of its being considered a “scandalous appropriation” of the original, a distortion of the esthetic and political questions underlying the medieval text. Also seen is the question of a complex intertextuality existing between medieval and 20th century texts. Professor Rosenthal.

Professors Monferran, Dauphant and Abed.

*MEDIEVAL LITERATURE AND ITS INTERPRETATION FOR CHILDREN Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course examines classic French medieval literature. The rise of literature as a genre is studied through examination of three or four texts, with discussion of their historical context. The re-interpretation of medieval literature for children is also discussed at length, with samples taken from all age groups and literary genres. Professors Milland-Bove and Pocquet.

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FRENCH LITERATURE

LITERATURE AND KNOWLEDGE FROM THE MIDDLE AGES TO THE ENLIGHTENMENT

HUMAN AND DIVINE LOVE IN 16TH-17TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

The representations of human and divine love in the 16th and 17th centuries are seen in this course, which examines prose, poetry, and theater and analyzes the literary and cultural norms of this period. Works include L'Heptaméron by Marguerite de Navarre, Polyeucte by Corneille, La Princesse de Clèves by Madame de Lafayette, and Les amours de Psyché et Cupidon by La Fontaine. Human and divine love are examined separately and comparatively with much focus on the historical context in which the works were written.

Until the 18th century, literary activity was intimately meshed with intellectual life. Literature, philosophy, sciences, history and theology nourish the image of honnête homme, and the permanent exchanges between these different domains placed literature in the heart of the culture of the Ancient Regime. This course presents the fundamental elements of this relationship between literature and knowledge through the study of specific excerpts. Professors Croizy-Naquet and Adda.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Professor Nancy.

*MEDIEVAL TEXTS: STUDYING IMAGE, FIGURE, AND SEMBLANCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course focuses on the status of the image in the Middle Ages, with a focus on France, Great Britain and Italy. It analyzes the complex and ever-changing relationship between text and image, as well as the importance of image, figure and semblance in a religious context. Professor Ducos.

*CONSIDERING MEDIEVAL FRENCH LITERATURE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is an overview of medieval French literature as well as its interpretation. Broaching a variety of theoretical questions, it tackles the notion of “medieval literature” which leads to an attempt to answer a more general theoretical question: “What is literature?" Professors Camps and Cerquiglini-Toulet.

LES ESSAIS BY MONTAIGNE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines the writing style and thematic nature of Montaigne in Livre Trois of Les Essais. Each class meeting focuses on an essay as a whole and on close analysis (close reading) of a short extract. Special focus is given to Montaigne's use of rhetoric and to the idea of contradictions and paradoxes within his narrative. Professor Rosenthal.

*THE IMPOSTOR IN 17TH AND 18TH CENTURY LITERATURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle More than a liar, more than a hypocrite, Tartuffe is an impostor: a type of Don Juan who disguises himself with religion, ruining a family by profiting from their blindness and gullibility. This character of the impostor reappears throughout the literature of the Enlightenment. Marivaux, in his play Les Fausses Confidences, recasts Tartuffe as Dubois, a servantimpostor who is even more troubling since he acts without the incentive of financial gain, and Diderot also creates several variations of the character of Tartuffe in his philosophical novel Jacques le Fataliste. Students read and analyze three major texts of the period: Tartuffe (Molière), Les Fausses Confidences (Marivaux), and Jacques le Fataliste (Diderot) in order to gain a better understanding of the imposter as a major figure of 18th century literature. Professor Kremer.

17TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course is an introduction to classical literature, presenting important French works of the 17th century. After a brief overview, focus is on two works illustrating the technique of painting “the human heart” through literature. First, L'École des femmes, by Molière (1662), is studied, in order to understand the changing theater of the 17th century; this play was revolutionary for its time in its ability to invoke laughter by illustrating relationships and in its portrayal of human nature. Next, theoretical debates about the theater and aesthetics of the time are seen through La critique de l'École des femmes and

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L'Impromptu de Versailles by Molière, followed by a study of Lettres portugaises (1669), a text that exemplifies, in a very brief narrative, the “ravages of love” movement influencing novels during the latter half of the century. Students see how the much-studied “rhetoric of passion” evolved from natural events and ideas of the time.

Caractères by La Bruyère and the epistolary novels of Rousseau and Montesquieu are treated in detail.

Professor Mortgat-Longuet.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

*FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 17TH AND 18TH CENTURIES: DESIRE AND IMAGINATION Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Through an intensive study of Corneille's La Place royale, Molière's L'École des femmes, Racine's Andromaque, Crébillon's Le Sylphe, Marmontel's Le Mari sylphe, and Cazotte's Le Diable amoureux, this course interrogates the treatment of desire and imagination across the changing social and political landscape of the 17th and 18th centuries in France. What is the meaning of imagination in classical theater and novels? What is the role of illusion in romantic desire? Professors Cagnat, Delon and Forestier.

17TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE: MADNESS IN THE THEATER Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Three major plays by 17th century authors (Corneille, Tristan L’Hermite, Molière) explore the theme of madness in France. Several key passages from specific plays are seen in detail and examined in the context of the history of madness. The development and evolution of the conception of madness is discussed after reading short excerpts from the texts of influential thinkers such as Aristotle, Plato, and Descartes. Professor d’Angelo.

SATIRICAL REPRESENTATIONS OF PARISIANS IN THE 17TH AND 18TH CENTURIES Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines French satire with a focus on representations of the citizens of Paris. Works by La Bruyère, Montesquieu, Rousseau, Dufresny, Marivaux, and Boileau are used to understand the perspective of the moralist in the unique setting of the urban environment during the Age of Enlightenment. In addition to the social context behind these texts, the technical elements of the satirical style are discussed. Various literary techniques found in the 70

Professor Escola.

*18TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE: THE ENLIGHTENMENT AND THE FIGURE OF THE PHILOSOPHER The course objective is to examine 18th century French literature, taking a cursory view of its overall chronology and analyzing in depth several works whose importance rests paramount to the study of the literary period. Rather than taking a broad, second-hand approach to 18th century literature, the course constitutes a personal journey through several key works, allowing students to examine the various forces at the heart of the Enlightenment, sometimes in agreement, often in conflict, and always in motion. The figure of the philosopher is the focus of the course; because this year marks the three hundredth anniversary of the birth of JeanJacques Rousseau, the course texts are The Discours sur les sciences et les arts (1750), Discours sur les origines et les fondements de l'inégalité parmi les hommes (1755), Les Rêveries d'un promeneur solitaire (1778). Professor Brasart.

ART AND LITERATURE IN 18TH CENTURY FRANCE Université dme Paris IV-Sorbonne In this course, the artistic and literary movements of the 18th century are studied through an in-depth examination of celebrated French artistic and literary works. Emphasis is placed on the works of Rousseau, Diderot, Chardin, Boucher, and Fragonard. Literary movements such as the development of the novel, the encyclopedia, and the emergence of epistolary novels, are discussed through the works of Abbé Prévost, Rousseau, and Laclos. Artistic movements of the 18th century are evaluated through examination of engravings, paintings, sculpture, architecture and interior design. Professor Llort-Llopart.

THE FRENCH ENLIGHTENMENT THROUGH LITERATURE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A study of the representative works of the key writers of the French Enlightenment, including historical, philosophical and literary significance of the works.

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Texts studied include Voltaire: L’Ingénu, Rousseau: Discours sur les sciences et les arts, Vivant Denon: Point de lendemain, and Diderot: Supplément au voyage de Bougainville. Overview of the major literary works of the French Enlightenment and organized class-trip to an exhibit at the Bibliothèque Nationale. Professor Brasart.

*THE COUNT OF MONTE CRISTO Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This literature course takes a psychoanalytical approach to the study of The Count of Monte Cristo by Alexandre Dumas, with focus on the theories of Freud and Lacan. Students gain an understanding of how the particular themes and characters of Monte Cristo fit certain psychological profiles and theories, including the idea of the self, consciousness, guilt, and desire. Professor Bayard.

*LITERATURE, IDEAS, AND ART Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines the links between literature and art in the 18th and 19th centuries, placing emphasis on the historical, political, and social context of the works of Diderot and Balzac, and exploring the role of institutions and the status of the artist in Paris. Diderot readings include his Essais sur la peinture, as well as his writings on the Salons of 1761, 1763 and 1765. Balzac readings include short stories that make up his greatest work, La Comédie Humaine. They include Le Chef-d'œuvre inconnu and Pierre Grassou. Diderot is analyzed as the first writer-critic, presenting art criticism for the first time as a genre in its own right, while Balzac is studied as an artist among writers, not only depicting living artists in his fictional works, but crafting a number of his own fictional characters. Professors Cavallaro, Marchal and Vouilloux.

THE MYTH OF PYGMALION IN 19TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Different reiterations of the myth of Pygmalion in 19th century French literature are studied in the following works: Balzac's Le Chef-d'œuvre inconnu, Gautier's La Toison d'or, Le Roi Candaule, and Mademoiselle de Maupin, and Villiers de L'Isle-Adam's L'Ève future. More than just a tale, the myth explores the themes of perfection, love, beauty, and madness as related to art. Professor Gnassounou.

FRENCH LITERATURE

19TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE: THE NOVEL AND HISTORY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The novel plays a particular role in the formation of a modern historical conscience. Through study of the various forms and figures, relationship with historical events, and historicity of societies, the function of the novel is seen as a means to elaborate representation and interpretation of history. Both novelistic and historical texts are studied. Main literary texts include Balzac’s L’Envers de l’histoire contemporaine, Flaubert’s Salammbô, and Zola’s La Débâcle. Professor Neefs.

GENESIS AND RECEPTION OF THE NATURALIST NOVEL Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This master‘s level seminar explores the creation of novels, specifically of the Naturalist movement, with a focus on Emile Zola’s series Les Rougon-Macquart. It first provides an introduction to the study of the Dossiers préparatoires, the drafts, notes, correspondence, etc. that contain elements related to the development of the novels, and also introduction to the study of the reception of the works. Students are required to complete their own in-depth study, to be presented to the class and the professor. Professor Pagès.

A CLOSE READING OF BALZAC'S LE PÈRE GORIOT Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis It is widely said that Balzac is the father of the modern novel, and Le Père Goriot is often given as the example of his style and poetic originality. The novel was also his first after conceiving the idea for La Comédie Humaine. This course is an introduction to Balzac, his universe, and his theoretical opinions. It examines the relationship between a literary work and its historical, social, political and cultural context, and exposes students to critiques inspired by Le Père Goriot, from Marcel Proust to René Girard. Professor Clément.

*THE POETICS OF NARRATIVE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course takes an in-depth look at the theory of narrative within Flaubert's Madame Bovary. The explanation and uncovering of narrative is undertaken

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FRENCH LITERATURE

through an investigation of language and semiotics, and more specifically through the significance of the “proper noun” and names within Madame Bovary. Professor Dessons.

WRITERS' RESPONSE TO THE DREYFUS AFFAIR Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines the political and cultural climate in French society through the lens of the Dreyfus Affair and the many writers who took a particular interest in writing about the Dreyfus Affair. The main author studied is Émile Zola but other readings include Proust, Anatole France, Octave Mirbeau and Maurice Barrès. Through these writers the course focuses on the foundations and manifestations of anti-Semitism in France at the turn of the 20th century and how the polarizing effect of the Dreyfus Affair set the ground for a volatile political climate in the years to come.

Professor Compère or Philippot.

19TH CENTURY FRENCH POETRY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

*THE FIGURE OF THE DEVIL AND THE CONCEPT OF EVIL IN 19TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE

An analytical look into Victor Hugo’s Les Orientales, from the early 19th century. The collection of poetry is approached in a methodical way, analyzing individual poems using a number of devices appropriate to poetic analysis such as literary figures, rhyme, meter, the narrator/orator, enunciative subject, etc. Various themes are also studied such as: Hugo’s view of oriental culture, his perception of himself as intermediary in the world of the poet, or the rapport between man and his environment. The author’s own analyses of his poems are also seen.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Professor Loubier.

Professors Basch and Charpentier-Poisson or Piantoni.

This course examines the representations of the devil and of evil throughout Romantic literature, through a diverse corpus of poetry, prose, and plays including Théophile Gautier's La Morte amoureuse and Deux acteurs pour un rôle, Barbey d'Aurevilly's Les Diaboliques, Goethe's Faust and Hugo's vast epic poem “La Fin de Satan”. These texts are supplemented by readings that show earlier representations of the devil, such as excerpts from Milton's “Paradise Lost”, and contemporary retellings of the myth of Satan, such as Vigny's “Eloa”. Emphasis is also placed on the study of poetics and literary theory, through analysis of the studied texts. Professor Philippot.

*19TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE: FANTASTIC POETRY AND SHORT STORIES Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle In the 19th century, the current of the fantasy genre, marked in a large part by Hoffmann's tales, inspired an unprecedented wealth of poetry and short stories from French authors echoing these themes. The study of these diverse texts allows students to better understand the fantasy genre, whose authors are as different as Hugo, Dumas, Mérimée and Mau72

passant. Each author approached the genre from a different angle and shed light on it using various motifs, such as the waking dead, double vision, and life after death. Philosophical, political, and scientific movements of the time are also discussed, in an attempt to understand why this genre, which appealed to emotion over reason, appeared in the aftermath of the industrial revolution, at a time when technology had become a standard force in everyday life.

RIMBAUD AND INTERTEXTUALITY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines how poet Arthur Rimbaud subverts and surpasses the poetic conventions of his time and of the past in his poems, to produce a completely original œuvre. The course focuses on examining the influences of other poets on Rimbaud by analyzing the inter-textual references found in Rimbaud's poetry. The first few weeks of class focus on Rimbaud's subversion of the idyllic genre by demonstrating how his poetry introduces the cruelty and violence of reality into a writing style centered on the ideal and pastoral. The course also tries to understand the context of Rimbaud's work, and the historical traumas that affected him, such as the Paris Commune of 1870 and the French war with Prussia in 1871. Professor Illouz.

*19TH-20TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE: WRITING PARIS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle For many writers of the 19th century, the city of Paris, which is a crucial hub for exchange and pas-

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sage, represents a symbol of modern times. Paris is a place that allows many writers to thrive intellectually, and a place of creation, contemplation and reflection. This course examines how poets, such as Baudelaire, Aragon and Perec represent and articulate this social and architectural reality.

FRENCH LITERATURE

*FRENCH LITERATURE OF THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES

the effervescence of pre-war Europe, we observe the commencement of modernity in literature, painting, and music, in which Paris appears as the hub for a new mixture of arts, and the birthplace of a more globally focused culture and society. Analyzing the above works (among others) in the context of historical events, such as the tragedy of the Titanic and the Dreyfus Affair, this class explores the beginnings of modernity, along with an investigation of how, in fact, an époque may be characterized and defined.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Professor Gosselin-Noat.

Professor Campaignolle-Catel.

This course explores the relationship between travel writing, fiction, and art, through literary works from the 19th and 20th centuries. Théophile Gautier's Récits fantastiques and Le Roman de la momie are analyzed, focusing on the author's relationship with Antiquity, Egyptology, and ancient Greece and Rome. The course then focuses on Maurice Barrès' Voyage de Sparte to pursue the study of the relationship between literature and archeology into the 20th century.

POETRY AND POLITICS: RIMBAUD, HUGO AND THE PARIS COMMUNE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

*VERLAINE'S POÈTES MAUDITS

This course focuses on the revolutionary time of the Commune and the birth of Surrealism through the shift from Parnasse to Symbolism embodied by Rimbaud; it also examines the similarities and differences between Rimbaud and Hugo. The main focus is on how history and politics have influenced and shaped Rimbaud and Hugo's works such as Une saison en enfer and L'année terrible.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Illouz.

Professors Evesque and Basch.

In the Lutèce review during the 1880s Paul Verlaine published a series of three literary portraits, under the title Cursed Poets: Tristan Corbière, Arthur Rimbaud, and Stéphane Mallarmé. Within a few years he included Marceline Desbordes-Valmore, Villiers de Lisle-Adam, and himself (as Pauvre Lélian). This course examines the importance of this publication in the disintegration of the Parnasse school and the birth of symbolism. It also explores the question of how the author becomes the object of his writing: Verlaine's work is analyzed in relation to images of the same literary group in paintings, as well as art influenced by their poetry. The course finally discusses romantic bohemian literature. Professor Illouz.

*BIRTH OF MODERNITY: AROUND THE YEAR 1912 Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis 1912 is the year of “Le Pont Mirabeau” by Apollinaire, Pâques à New York by Blaise Cendrars, Stèles by Victor Segalen, and L'Annonce faite à Marie by Paul Claudel. It is also the year that L'Après-midi d'un faune was created by the Russian Ballet, to the music of Debussy, the year of Pierrot lunaire by Schönberg, and of Nu descendant l'escalier by Duchamp, not to mention the works of Picasso and Proust. In

*20TH CENTURY FRENCH POETRY: APOLLINAIRE AND THE INVENTION OF MODERNITY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course proposes a study of the works of Guillaume Apollinaire, seen as a figure of modernity and innovation in 20th century French literature, focusing in particular on his rupture with the classical poetic form. Selected poems from Alcools and Caligrammes introduce students to the diversity of Apollinaire's work, with special focus on important poems such as “La Chanson du Mal-Aimé”, “La Synagogue”, and “Zone”. Apollinaire's poetry is studied in an attempt to fully understand the underlying themes and motivations created by the poet, and key aspects of Apollinaire's innovations are identified, such as rhythm and sonority of each verse, his themes of eroticism, the removal of punctuation, and the organization of poems. Apollinaire's contribution to the liberation of poetry as literary expression, in its ultimate rupture with traditional form, is also seen. Works by Stéphane Mallarmé and Paul Verlaine are also examined, and parallels with theories of cubist and surrealist art are drawn to discuss emerging modernity in the 20th century. Professor Conort.

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FRENCH LITERATURE

INTRODUCTION TO THE WRITINGS OF MARCEL PROUST: UN AMOUR DE SWANN

the integral role that French poetry captured and perpetuated over the course of the 20th century.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Conort.

Through a close reading of Un Amour de Swann, students are introduced to the major themes of À la Recherche du temps perdu and Proust's other writings. Students examine the themes of jealousy, identity, solipsism, and capacity for love/desire that play an essential role in Proust's writings, as well as important motifs found throughout La Recherche, from references to color, vegetation, and aesthetics. While providing students with a comprehensive study of Un Amour de Swann, the course equips students with important foundations for further readings of Proust.

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

*WRITINGS OF SLEEP AND INSOMNIA

This course examines the roots of French surrealism by analyzing several works and excerpts from André Breton and Louis Aragon. The origins and historical context of Surrealism are analyzed, as well as its defining features as a literary genre. This survey includes a study of the Dadaist movement, and an overview of artistic representations with surrealist elements. The course mostly focuses on Aragon's Le Paysan de Paris, which provides an interesting opportunity to physically visit the parts of Paris that are pivotal to Aragon's redefinition of human purpose.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Rubio.

Professor Delacomptée.

Proust's novel, The Remembrance of Things Past (À la recherche du temps perdu), shows the disturbing circles of waking and sleeping, in addition to the notorious theme of vigilance, and all of the political and intimate implications that the word carries. This course examines the links between the writings of sleep and waking from the 20th century. From the writings of Kafka, who stayed up all night writing, literature belongs in many ways to a society of insomniacs, who often comment on, theorize about, cultivate, and draw from their nocturnal thoughts and images from dreams. In addition to Proust and Kafka, students read excerpts from Les Chants de Maldoror by Lautréamont, Les Champs magnétiques by Breton, Cahiers by Valéry, and Façons d'endormi, façons d'éveillé by Michaux.

*THE SOMBER DECADE OF SURREALISM: 1929-1939 ENS André Breton's Second Manifest of Surrealism and Aragon's Introduction to 1930 introduce a decade in crisis, in which the progress made by surrealist writers in the preceding decade will be questioned, abandoned, and sometimes dialectically reevaluated. New actors and new objects become part of the movement, and the ideological and artistic landscape of the avant-garde becomes more and more complex. The seminar tries to better understand this somber decade, in terms of the exile of certain members, the deterritorialization of the movement, and its ghostly survival.

Professor Doumet.

Professor Murat.

20TH CENTURY FRENCH POETRY

20TH CENTURY LITERATURE AND HISTORY OF IDEAS: WRITING DURING WORLD WAR II

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course examines two of the greatest and most influential works of French poetry of the 20th century. First, Alcools (1913), the noted work of Guillaume Apollinaire, is explored. It affirms the brilliant, new cosmopolitan lyricism that the author infused into his poetry. Great emphasis is placed on the broader influence he had upon society, particularly in light of the society’s changing political and artistic scene. The course then moves on to a study of La nuit remue (1967), by Henri Michaux, a collection of poems noted for its formal variety and strange and inventive curiosity. Together, these two works reaffirm 74

*THE EVOLUTION OF FRENCH SURREALISM

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This class, which focuses heavily on theory and semiotics, examines the relationship between the intentions of political literature and the perception of specific works during and after World War II. The texts studied include Jean-Paul Sartre’s Les Mains sales, Albert Camus’ La Peste, and Vercors’ Le Silence de la Mer. Each piece of writing represents a different interpretation of the events of the 1940s in France. The literary significance of the three works is seen in depth, as is the political significance. Also

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studied is the relationship between the authors and public perception of the writers, and more specifically the relationship between Jean-Paul Sartre and Albert Camus. Professor Brun or Guérin.

*ENGAGEMENTS AND DISENGAGEMENTS IN 20TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines conceptions of social, political and artistic engagement and disengagement in 20th century French literature and theory. Historical context and explanations of central theories of intellectualism, engagement/disengagement and social progress are discussed, in order to provide a comprehensive understanding of the era and texts in question. Professor Noudelmann.

SAMUEL BECKETT’S MOLLOY AND 20TH CENTURY LITERARY CRITICISM Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A course introducing students to the works of Samuel Beckett and 20th century literary criticism, through close study of Beckett’s Molloy. Students are introduced to the major themes of the novel and of Beckett's writing through a variety of exercises including close readings of his other works. An important aspect of the course is its attention to literary criticism and philosophical debate; the novel and its trilogy are studied within the context of literary criticism and theory, with particular attention paid to the writings of Georges Bataille and Maurice Blanchot, in order to emphasize the role of philosophical discourse in Beckett's works, as well as their role in the history of the novel and literary theory. Professor Clément.

*CONTEMPORARY FRENCH LITERATURE Institut Catholique de Paris This course presents a literary journey from the major French and francophone works of the 20th century to the French literary scene of today. The first part of this course focuses on the study of works and excerpts from 20th century literature that gather around the notions of memory and identity (Proust, Céline, Cioran, Némirovsky, Duras, Gary and Modiano). These readings create the foundation needed to question and understand the nature and the role of literature in establishing connections with the historical, social, and artistic context of a century

FRENCH LITERATURE

marked by wars. In the second part of the course, each student presents a contemporary novel, chosen at the beginning of the semester from a list of suggested works and authors (J.M.G. Le Clézio, Marie N'Diaye, Pascal Quignard, Michel Houellebecq, Laurent Mauvignier). These works, whose authors have been particularly present in the French literary scene within the past decade, echo the themes proposed by the collection of excerpts read in class. Professor Boisdron.

*THE LEGACY OF ANTIQUITY IN MODERN LITERATURE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course in comparative literature explores the themes of passion, death, and transfiguration in classical, baroque, and modern drama. The two Latin texts, read in the original, include Hercules Oetaeus by Seneca, a Roman stoic philosopher and playwright from the 1st century AD, as well as Jesu Jephtias Tragoedia by the Jesuit latinist Jakob Balde from the 17th century. The legacy of these stoic and baroque authors is studied in two modern French dramas, Tête d'Or by Paul Claudel and Ellys et Thanatos by André Suarès. The course develops the comparative method of close reading of the four texts contemporaneously. Professors Estève-Devaux and Millet.

MODERN REWRITINGS OF THE ŒDIPUS MYTH IN 20TH CENTURY FRENCH LITERATURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle La machine infernale by Jean Cocteau and Les Gommes by Robbe-Grillet are studied in depth in the context of the study of myths, and in particular the importance of different versions of the Œdipus myth in 20th century French literature. Themes include: Sophocles’ interpretation of this narrative, the adaptations of the myth to speak to the modern condition, conflict between mythical world and modern world, the relevance of irrational myths today. Professor Boblet or Brun.

*THE LITERARY VOCATION: AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL NARRATIVES OF THE 20TH CENTURY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course proposes an exploration of the question of the writer, relying on diverse critical theoretical works to interrogate the construction of an autho-

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FRENCH LITERATURE

*THE THEME OF ORIGINALITY IN FRENCH THEATER

goal of the course is to reflect upon and understand the ways in which members of a society remember the shared elements of their past. The course is supplemented by historical texts (by authors such as Baudelaire, Balzac, and Hugo) that describe or portray the locations in question (which include Notre Dame de Paris, the Pantheon, the covered passageways, and the Marais, among others).

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Professor Mégevand.

rial identity in “autobiographical” narratives of the 20th century. Works studied are Albert Cohen, Ô vous frères humains; Nathalie Sarraute, Enfance, and Pierre Guyotat, Formation. Professors Coudurier and Alexandre.

This course focuses on a character study of several well-known protagonists from French theater: Molière's Alceste from Le Misanthrope and Ionesco's Bérenger from Rhinoceros. Mainly at stake is the idea of “originality”, or how these protagonists maintain their individuality in the face of extreme pressures of conformity. While the works are taken from different time periods, and necessarily explore different types of pressure, both provide interesting insight on society at large, and the place of the individual within it.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course focuses on the rapport between literature and opera. Through analysis of Puccini's Tosca and Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro, it examines the choices made in adapting the original literary sources to the operatic medium. Additionally, various productions of the same opera are compared and contrasted. Visits are organized to a diverse array of operatic performances in Paris.

Professor Picciola.

Professor Laster.

*EVIDENCE OF THE RENAISSANCE IN LITERATURE TODAY

*LITERATURE AND CINEMA — FORMS AND FIGURES OF IMPRISONMENT

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

This course traces the relationship between Ronsard, Renaissance poet of the 16th century, and 19th century French poet Baudelaire. With Les Amours, Ronsard published the most celebrated collection of love poetry of the French Renaissance. The course first explores how questions of beauty and poetic inspiration are intimately connected with the poetic form he invented for the French tradition. Three centuries later, Baudelaire would develop a familiarity with and appreciation for Ronsard's sonnets. In many ways, Baudelaire's Fleurs du Mal would become a modern and paradoxical take on Les Amours. The course reflects on the parallels and differences between the Renaissance and modern collections of poetry.

Imprisonment is a major theme both in literature and cinema. Starting with Sartre's Huis Clos, this course explores how the different forms of imprisonment are interpreted in literary and cinematic works. Through various movies and literary works, students examine how defined spaces are represented, spaces where boundaries may be intangible or even shifting, and try to understand how the dialectic between exterior and interior spaces is articulated, and how characters socially evolve and interact with each other in these enclosed spaces.

Professors Monferran and Millet.

*PLACES OF MEMORY IN PARIS AND IN FRENCH LITERATURE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis While offering a treatment of various theories of cultural memory by such scholars as Assmann, Halbwachs, Bergson, and Ricœur, this course proposes various metaphors and descriptions of society's collective memory. These metaphors are examined and evaluated through on-site visits in Paris. The 76

OPERA AND LITERATURE

Professors Labbé and Jeannelle.

*CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course discusses the unique mode of communication and transmission found in children's literature between an adult author and a child reader. It seeks to identify the unique literary traits and authorial positions associated with this genre, by examining four works: Peter Pan, Alice in Wonderland, Les Contes bleus du chat perché, and The Wizard of Oz. These four works are connected through the concept of le merveilleux, roughly translated as wonder or marvel, which is realized and expressed by a child protagonist. The course also explores the

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FRENCH LITERATURE

idea of childhood as a cultural creation, and the influence of society on authors and their work. Professor Letourneux.

*QUESTIONS IN LITERARY THEORY: THE WRITER AND HIS LANGUAGES ENS This course interrogates the relationship between writers and the language they employ. From that founding question, the course explores the power of language in politics and history, taking a look at colonialism (especially French colonialism), as well as the “problem� of bilingualism. Professor Combe.

LINGUISTIC AND STYLISTIC ANALYSIS OF FRENCH LITERATURE ENS Both a pragmatic treatment of French linguistics and a course in stylistic analysis of standard French works, including texts by Beaumarchais, Bossuet, Zola, Proust and Pagnol, this course gives students the bases from which to work on close analysis of stylistic devices in literary texts. Linguistic and stylistic vocabulary, and language theory and its effect on textual analysis are covered, as are choice of mode and tense, stylistic and thematic coherence of a text. Professor Paillet.

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The Pantheon

FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE

IV. FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE

*INTRODUCTION TO FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A world-spanning look at French-writing authors, as well as the history of the French-speaking world and the literature that has been produced are all covered in this course. Topics discussed include French dominance in the literary world, as well as the role of francophone literature through the lens of language security and post-colonial writings and theories. Professor Simasotchi-Brones.

*FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Through close study of two novels: Les Écailles du ciel by Tierno Monénémbo, a Guinean author, and Les Sept Solitudes de Lorsa Lopez by Sony Labou Tansi, a Congolese author, this course attempts to better understand francophone literature. Analysis of these two works consists of a rigorous examination of the thematic and esthetic convergence between the novels, as well as the literary choices 78

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made by each author in relation to the French language and against European literary models, while also noting their profound differences, most particularly in their relation to actual historical events. The linguistic geography of the francophone world is examined, as well as the institutions that govern it. Through the themes of colonization and conflict, the course investigates the relation between the francophone author and the French language, discovers a linguistic diversity within the French language, and explores the question of ethnic, national, and linguistic identity. The question of what differentiates “French literature” from “francophone literature” is also addressed, as well as the problems associated with these limiting determinations in the diffusion of francophone literature. Professor Paravy.

INTRODUCTION TO FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE OF AFRICA AND THE CARIBBEAN Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course follows the evolution of Francophone literature from its beginnings in the 1920s until the Négritude movement and the first Congress of Black Writers and Artists. Four novels are studied René Maran’s Batouala, Camara Laye’s L’Enfant noir, Jacques Roumain’s Gouverneurs de la rosée, and Joseph Zobel’s La Rue Cases-nègres - supplemented by a study of Aimé Césaire’s Discours sur le colonialisme and documents from the first Congress. The course relies on close-reading and pays close attention to the place of each text in the history of Francophone literatures of Africa and the Caribbean. Issues and themes considered include: classification of French and Francophone literatures and the distinction and tensions between them; usage of the French language; the concept of Francophonie; the relationship between oral traditions and literary texts; the relationship of the individual to history; the legacy of colonialism; education, exile, and nostalgia; and post-colonialism. Professor Simasotchi-Brones.

A CHILD'S PERSPECTIVE ON WAR AND OTHER HUMAN ATROCITIES Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course concentrates most specifically on the use of child soldiers in the civil wars of African countries. However, time is also allocated towards discussing the phenomenon of genocide. The main

FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE

themes of the class include the culpability and innocence of children who perpetrate violent acts during times of extreme violence and the limit to which humanity can engage in acts of tremendous brutality and still be considered human. Furthermore, these large questions are considered to the degree with which they affect a child's perspective on ideas such as family and religion. Professor Coquio.

THE AFRICAN NOVEL: IMAGES OF COLONIZATION Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense A course examining the works of African novelists and the arrival of African authors in the French literary arena. The themes of imperialism and primitivism are explored and the idea of White colonial oppression is discussed, as is the role of African leaders in the exploitation of their own people. African perspectives on World War II are also seen. Texts include René Maran’s Batouala, and Kourouma’s Monnè, Outrages, Défis. Professor Deltel.

*WRITING ABOUT EXTREME VIOLENCE IN AFRICA Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The course covers six texts that relate to acts of extreme violence in contemporary African history. The first two, Moisson de crânes (Waberi) and L'ombre d'Imana (Tadjo) are an attempt to find words to describe the Rwandan genocide in the mid-1990s. The last four, Le rapt (Benmalek), Le Blanc de l'Algérie (Djebar), Et maintenant ils peuvent venir (Mellal), and Moze (Rahmani), bring to life the stories of the Algerian civil war in the late 20th century. The course attempts the answer the questions: How does one write about such disastrous events of human terror and destruction? What purpose does writing serve in such extreme circumstances? Professor Ali-Benali.

LITERATURE AND IDENTITY IN THE ARAB WORLD Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle An introduction to Arabic literature, focusing on 20th century Arabic literature and its role in developing an Arab identity. The course attempts to examine whether the Arab identity indeed exists, and how clearly and coherently such an identity could be formulated through different forms of Arabic literature.

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FRANCOPHONE LITERATURE

Discussion of the ideas of post-colonial identity, the idea of nationalism versus anti-colonialism, and the degree to which post-colonial Arabic literature can give us an insight into Franco-Arab relations.

cheur d'Afrique by Henri Lopes. These works cover different time periods, countries, and characters, yet all demonstrate the struggles faced by individuals of mixed heritage.

Professor Ben Lagha.

Professor Shango-Lokoho.

FRENCH ORIENTALISM AND ARAB OCCIDENTALISM

*BODY OF WRITING

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

This course tackles issues of feminine, francophone voice and post-colonial subaltern theory. Three novels by Maryse Condé, Marie N'Diaye and Assia Djebar are analyzed in depth, with a focus on the effect of the author's voice and culture on the construction and format of her writing. The class investigates notions of alterity, gender relations and colonialism.

This course studies the evasive concepts of the “Orient” and “Occident” through “Orientalist” and “Occidentalist” literature: that is, European authors who write about their concept of the Orient, and Arab authors who used their concept of the Occident as inspiration as well. The first half of the semester is devoted to studying Victor Hugo’s book of poems: Les Orientales. Through study of this and other works by authors such as Chateaubriand and Taha Hussein, the class attempts to discover what “orient” and “occident” mean to each author, and how that author’s view was formed. Theories of “Orientalism” and “Occidentalism” (such as Said’s Orientalism and Huntington’s Clash of Civilizations) are also taken into account.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Ali-Benali.

Professor Horchani.

THE REPRESENTATIONS OF REVOLT IN POST-COLONIAL FRENCH THEATER Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The work of Francophone writers during the period of decolonization (1950 - mid 1960s) is studied in depth, in order to better understand post-colonial theory. Students familiarize themselves with the post-colonial theorists Franz Fanon and Albert Memmi, and study the theatrical works of Aimé Césaire, Léopold Sedar-Senghor, Kateb Yacine, and Bernard Dadié, among others. Specifically, the course addresses the theme of revolt present throughout these works and seeks to define the common attitude and philosophy that groups these theorists together. Professor Mégevand.

*STORIES OF MÉTISSAGE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course focuses on the issues faced by individuals of mixed race, through the study of texts that represent and theorize this idea of métissage. Three main works are studied in order to ground discussion of this very broad topic: Mestizo by Élisabeth Delaygne, Galadio by Didier Daeninckx, and Le Cher80

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Sorbonne Square

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

V.

ANTIGONE: SOPHOCLES AND ANOUILH

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

This course explores the similarities and differences between the play Antigone written by Sophocles in the 5th century BC, and the play of the same name written by French playwright Jean Anouilh in 1942. The different social and political contexts of the two works are emphasized to explain the ways in which Anouilh reinterpreted the classic Greek myth. In-depth analysis of the two texts and exercises in close reading of pertinent excerpts are used to identify important elements of both plays. Themes explored include happiness, purity, compromise, childhood, family, obligation, freedom and honor.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Professor Djuric.

*BIBLE AND LITERATURE: A SURVEY OF BIBLICAL INFLUENCE IN WESTERN LITERATURE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course identifies and analyzes biblical themes that permeate the history of Western literature. In

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COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

addition to a brief lesson on the history of the Bible, the course visits a number of major works that shaped European literature including texts from Milton, Voltaire, Baudelaire, Hugo, Kafka, Dostoevsky and Thomas Mann. These works and their biblical themes are analyzed through a logical progression of the Bible's major episodes (Creation, Cain and Abel, sacrifice of Isaac, the life of Moses, the life of Christ, the Passion, etc.) Students are expected to read and have a working knowledge of all parts of the Bible that correspond to these chapters, so as to make the most of this study in biblical-Western intertextuality. Professor Zard.

THE DEATH OF PRINCES IN LITERATURE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The death of royalty in literature is analyzed and compared, using the works of Eschyle, Marlowe, Alfieri, Brecht and Musset. The act of murdering princes or other royalty in literature is discussed in depth, including the planning of the murder, the guilty parties, the actual act of murder, as well as the aftermath of the murder. Students are encouraged to also read Shakespeare's Macbeth and Racine's Andromaque for comparison. The course also takes into account the way murder is presented in each play through the evaluation of stage directions, or lack thereof, and how murder of princes in theater is represented in general. Professors Lecercle and Desmouliere.

STUDY OF A MOVEMENT: THE ADVENTURE NOVEL

Professor Tran-Gervat.

*COMPARATIVE LITERATURE: PHAEDRA FROM ANTIQUITY TO CONTEMPORARY TIMES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The course focuses on two rewrites of the ancient tragedy Phèdre, which involves the issue of incest, the place of women, and the question of desire. The course proposes a close reading of the original as well as the two rewrites but also includes multiple other interpretations of the Phaedra myth. Professors Pfister and Gély.

THE SECRET: COMPARATIVE STUDY OF TWO ROMANTIC NOVELS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

This course examines classic “adventure novels” of Alexandre Dumas and Robert Louis Stevenson. Students read and discuss The Three Musketeers and Kidnapped in order to better understand what constitutes an adventure novel. In addition to close analysis of various passages, the course involves a deeper analysis of how these authors combine historical and fictional events within their works. The biographical information of the author and the historical contexts and influences of their works are also considered.

This course is a close comparative study of the two romantic novels The Scarlet Letter by Nathaniel Hawthorne and The Marquise of O… by Heinrich von Kleist. Two different women, outcast by society for the secret they hold, the secret of a name – but for one of these women, that name is unknown even to her. Each meeting focuses on a new theme as seen through the two different works of the authors. Main themes covered include a study of the representation of the female body, the conflict between desire and sublime virtue, and most especially the great mystery or secret of conception. The problem of reading texts in translation is also addressed.

Professors Letourneux and Dumoulié.

Professor Labia.

THE COMIC NOVEL

*NARRATIVES OF DREAMS AND CHILDHOOD MEMORIES

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The development of the comic novel as a literary genre is studied through three works in this course: Don Quichotte I by Michel de Cervantes, Le Roman 82

Comique by Paul Scarron, and Joseph Andrews by Henry Fielding. Each novel is evaluated within its historical context, its placement within the body of works by the author and its relation to other literary works of its time. Furthermore, the course analyzes how each novel fits into the framework of the “comic novel” and contributes to its definition. The genre is characterized by the elements of comedy, parody, satire, and the burlesque, and these themes, as well as their corresponding, stereotypic characters, such as the cavalier, are studied in detail through selected passages. Traditional literary devices, including characterization and irony, are evaluated to understand how these works succeeded as novels.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course begins with an introduction to Freud's Interpretation of Dreams. Freud's work forms a ba-

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sis to understanding how beliefs about the purpose and meaning of dreams have evolved and how these beliefs have made an impact on writers. The course then goes beyond the psychological context and analyzes the function and use of dreams in comparative literature. Texts such as W. Jensen's Gradiva, and excerpts from Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, Racine's Athalie, Rousseau's La Nouvelle Heloïse, Jainendra Kumar's Un amour sans mesure, Virginia Woolf's Mrs. Dalloway, Herman Hesse's Narcissus and Goldmund and Goethe's Poésie et vérité, are examined to understand how one can determine the significance of dreams in literary works. Professor Le Blanc.

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE: GOGOL, MELVILLE AND KAFKA Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Selected novellas and short stories studied in this literature seminar included works by Gogol, Melville and Kafka. The course comprehensively reviews each of the selected works, and evaluates the historical and artistic context of the period. Discussion is focused on the notion of fantastic, as all three of the works share unusual plot elements. Professor Labia.

EUROPEAN LITERATURE: WRITING CONSCIOUSNESS 1880-1920 ENS A comparative literature seminar considering the narration of consciousness in three texts and using the theme of jealousy (and of the jealous man as central character), thus exploring how authors employ direct speech and indirect modes in order to render the “consciousness” of their characters. Main texts: Svevo’s Senilità, Tolstoy’s La Sonate à Kreutzer and Proust’s Un Amour de Swann. Specific focus on the internal monologue, and the structuring/destructuring of it by each author. Painting and music (and sculpture in the case of Senilità) also provide examples of consciousness. Professor Lévy-Bertherat.

THE NOUVEAU ROMAN IN FRANCE AND LATIN AMERICA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The literary movement of the New Novel in France and Latin America forms the focus of this seminar, which presents the crisis in the 20th century novel as well as stylistic innovations brought about by

COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

this crisis. Main themes examined are: the material aspect of literature and the illusion of references to reality in fiction. Detailed analysis of Le Chantier by Juan Carlos Onetti and La Jalousie by Robbe-Grillet. Professor Saad.

THE BODY AND ILLNESS IN LITERATURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course examines the role of the body and the theme of illness in the world of literature. Introductory lectures/discussions focus on how good health and illness were perceived from as far back as the 12th century. Negativity, isolation, anger and loneliness are a few of the main themes examined during the course of the semester. Much emphasis is also placed on how relationships are described by writers affected by illness. As a result, thought-provoking questions are raised on how we perceive sickness today. Readings from Arthur Schnitzler and Hervé Guibert. Professor Salabert.

WRITING DESIRE: THE FIGURE OF THE MALE LOVER IN THREE WORKS OF FICTION Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This comparative literature course covers three works whose theme is male desire: Un Amour de Swann by Marcel Proust, Le Tunnel, by Ernesto Sabato, and Lolita by Vladimir Nabokov. While stylistic differences are noted and appreciated, the focus of the course is to unite the texts through their thematic similarity, namely the illusory quality of the protagonists’ desire for the various female characters. Methodology of comparative literature is emphasized and used to exploit these three very different texts. Professor Blasquez.

EXILE IN LITERATURE: WRITING THE SELF’S INNER TERRITORY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course concentrates on in-depth analysis of Nabokov’s The Real Life of Sebastian Knight and Le Clézio’s Onitsha. Themes common to both works are explored, including (self)-exile, language, the art of writing, the boundaries between self and other, subject and object, and similarity/foreignness. Comparison is made between the original English text by Nabokov and the French translation in terms of syntax, expression, and grammatical structure. The patterns and enigmas that lie within each of the texts are discussed. Professor Savova.

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COMPARATIVE LITERATURE

LITERATURE AND PHOTOGRAPHY: L'IMAGE-FANTÔME

*EMIGRATION AND DISAPPEARANCE IN CONTEMPORARY FICTION

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

The main objective of this course is to explore two different media of expression: photography and literature. Each session is dedicated to a different broad topic, in conjunction with several short texts from influential writers who are either concerned with photography or who have incorporated photography into their work. Important to this class is the idea of ghost imagery and its relation to literature; the idea of photography as furnishing irrefutable proof, as opposed to literature's capacity to create false imagery, is also seen.

THE NOVEL AND HISTORY

History and narrative are inextricably intertwined, from personal recollections to narratives on a worldwide scale. Each of the texts studied in this course is a personal story that takes part in the larger narrative of human history, with World War II and the Holocaust as the central reference. What is the relationship between narrative, identity, and history, especially when the identities in question are characterized by their absence rather than their presence? All three of the novels studied - The Invention of Solitude by Paul Auster, Dora Bruder by Patrick Modiano, and Les Emigrés by W.G. Sebald - take as their point of departure an absence of some kind, whether death, disappearance, or emigration.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Professor Matheron.

Professor Zenetti.

This course centers around the novel in relation to history, focusing on the novel's depiction of historical events and how the novelist perceives the reality of history as compared to how it is fictionalized and contained in books. The primary texts seen in this course are Sartre's La Nausée, Manzoni's Les Fiancés, and Carlotto's Plus rien. Professor Gaudeaux.

LITERATURE & SCIENCE IN THE 19TH CENTURY: ZOLA'S DOCTEUR PASCAL & DARWIN'S THE ORIGIN OF SPECIES Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis An exploration of the literary presence of scientific thought regarding heredity in the 19th century, this course focuses on the relationship between Darwin's The Origin of Species and Zola's Docteur Pascal. Docteur Pascal is discussed at length as a work fiction that includes scientific thought, and its own generational status as the last novel in Zola's Rougon-Macquart series is examined. Professor Noudelmann.

THE NON-FICTION NOVEL Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course focuses on the non-fiction novel and its place in the literary world of today. Truman Capote's In Cold Blood, the first written work attributed to the genre, is the main topic of the course; Roberto Saviano's Gomorra is also studied, with comparison of the two works. The definition of the “non-fiction novel” is also explored.

THE POLITICAL NOVEL OF TODAY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A comparative literature course that analyzes the political, philosophical and cultural implications of the novel in contemporary society. The focus is on one work from each of the following authors: Don DeLillo, Enrique Bolaños and Antoine Volodine. Much outside material is also used during lectures to enhance comprehension and stimulate analysis of the times in which these novels were written as well as to provide a broader analysis of contemporary society in general. Professor Ruffel.

*THE EUROPEAN NOVEL TODAY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle What are the major themes of contemporary European literature? This course seeks to answer the question through the analysis of two novels written in the past twenty years: Dans le musée de Reims by Daniele del Giudice and Le Retour by Bernhard Schlink. Issues of memory, history, and identity are questioned through discussion of the past century of literary history, with special emphasis on the aftermath of World War II and the Nouveau Roman. The course often relies on literary and critical theory, using Paul Ricœur's Temps et récit as a central reference. Professor Daros.

Professor Ruffel. 84

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GENDER STUDIES

VI.

GENDER AS A SOCIAL CONSTRUCT

GENDER STUDIES

Discussion of how gender as a social construct can help us to better understand French society and culture. The topics covered include gender and socialization; the persistence of discrimination in socialization; gender and work (in France); gender and society (in France); gender and politics (in France); feminist movements and gender (comparison between France and the US); alternative genders/sexualities; gender as philosophy; and gender from a European perspective. Authors include major French and American gender theorists.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Achin.

THEORIES OF GENDER Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course seeks to examine the idea of gender, as an ordering principle and category of analysis in political and social sciences. The main question the course seeks to answer with all works studied is: “How did this work change the thinking of relations

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between the sexes in terms of social relations?” From a historical and interdisciplinary perspective, examination of the diverse theories of sexual difference and the pertinence of these theories in France and other countries. The status of women with regard to the relationship between gender and sexuality in political theory and social sciences is also discussed, as are the connections between gender and other forms of social categorization and oppression (racism, nationalism, division of class). Also evoked are the possibilities theories of gender offer for rethinking categories and classical distinctions in the social sciences and political theory. Principal authors studied include Mary Astell, Olympe de Gouge, Mary Wollstonecraft, Elisabeth Martinengou, Claire Démar, Denise Riley, Claire de Duras, Soujourner Truth, and Viola Klein. Professor Varikas.

PSYCHOANALYSIS, SEXUAL DIFFERENCES AND “GENDER STUDIES” Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Gender studies as seen through the lens of psychoanalysis. Starting with Freud, students work their way through several important theorists (including Lacan, De Beauvoir, and Butler) whose work touches on both of these subjects. Each text examines the ways in which the emergence and development of the field of psychoanalysis has affected that of gender studies. Students are asked to reflect upon the ways in which gender identity and the differences between genders can be psychoanalyzed, as well as how gender is defined in individuals from infancy. Professor Berger.

THE QUESTION OF FEMININITY IN THE AGE OF PSYCHOANALYSIS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course proposes a synthetic look at the problems and questions concerning femininity raised with the advent of psychoanalysis, most famously in the case of Sigmund Freud. The professor discusses several different theorists (including Lacan) while focusing specifically on the questions provoked by Freudian analysis. This overview of the work of several theorists allows the class to construct a real dialogue around the issues and to understand how the writers at hand were in conversation and, often, in conflict with each other. Professor Duroux.

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*DERRIDA AND THE SEXUAL DIFFERENCE “IDIOM” Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Texts by Derrida and his contemporaries are studied in depth to explore the treatment of the issue of sexual difference. The corpus of texts ranges from philosophical to literary to social, and though they represent a wide berth of media and purposes, the division of humans into two sexes serves as a constant focus. Professor Berger.

*FEMINISM IN FRENCH LITERARY THEORY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course begins by examining the texts of Freud and Lacan that have served as the basis for future feminist and gender theory. The texts of post-structuralist writers such as Hélène Cixous, Jacques Derrida, Julia Kristeva, and Luce Irigaray are analyzed in order to understand how they challenged and re-appropriated these theories of psychoanalysis in the context of gender theory. Strong emphasis is placed on literary theory as these French writers question the use of language as a critical component of the feminist revolution during the 1960s and 1970s. Professor Negrón.

SEX AND GENDER IN AMERICA, OR HOW TO READ JUDITH BUTLER Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This cross-disciplinary seminar looks at the ways in which American feminist intellectuals read and reformulate French feminist theory and culture. By reading both the foundational French texts and subsequent American discussions and studies, modern debates such as “essentialism” versus “equality” and the relationship between Feminism and Queer Theory are traced from their (French) roots to their modern (American) incarnations, with close attention paid to the cultural implications of the differences between the French and American manifestations of various ideas. Syllabus includes texts by Judith Butler, Jacques Derrida, Christie V. MacDonald, Michel Foucault, Marjorie Garber, Peggy Kamuf, Levi-Strauss, Nancy Miller, Gayle Rubin, Naomi Schor, Joan Scott, Eve Sedgwick, Gayatri Spivak, and Ann Snitow. Professor Berger.

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GENDER STUDIES

ORIENTALES: FICTION AND FEMININITY

FEMINIST LITERATURE AND THEORY

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

If, as Edward Said claimed in his book, Orientalism, the Orient is a construction of the Occident, whether imagined or theorized, the exotic experience is seen as having contributed to the founding of modern discourse on culture, community, diversity, and identity. A European genre is created: the Oriental or Orientalist novel, and it is not an accident that the “Orient” of fiction lifts the veil from the hidden woman in history. This seminar investigates how certain 18th century French authors depict Eastern cultures in their works and how those depictions correspond to their vision of womanhood and gender relations. Some of the specific questions raised in the seminar are: how does this type of novel problematize the links between fiction, femininity, sexuality, and alterity? In what way does it contribute to the elaboration (and the complication) of an intellectual and political program of the Enlightenment? Works studied in the course include Les Lettres persanes by Montesquieu, Histoire d'une grecque moderne by Prévost, and Les Bijoux indiscrets by Diderot, as well as a number of recommended theoretical works such as Foucault's Histoire de la sexualité and Said's Orientalism.

A comprehensive seminar focusing on the treatment of sexual difference in psychoanalysis, feminist literature, and philosophical works which begins with an in-depth examination of Freud’s sexual theory, notably his treatment of female sexuality. Other important psychoanalysts focusing on sexuality are also mentioned or discussed, including Melanie Klein and Lacan as well as their critics, for example, Sarah Kofman. A number of feminist writers are studied, including Luce Irigaray, Antoinette Fouque and Hélène Cixous. Suggested readings include Lectures de la différence sexuelle, a collection tied to a Saint-Denis University colloquium; Il y a deux sexes by Fouque; Speculum de l’autre femme and Éthique de la différence sexuelle by Irigaray; L’énigme de la femme by Sarah Kofman; and numerous works by Cixous with emphasis on her general philosophy, her study of other writers, notably the Brazilian Clarice Lispector and her dialogue with Jacques Derrida. Suggested readings include “Le rire de la méduse”, La jeune née, Entre l’écriture, L’heure de Clarice Lispector, and Portrait de Jacques Derrida en jeune saint juif by Cixous, “Fourmis”, Marges de la philosophie and La Dissémination by Derrida; Voiles by Cixous and Derrida and short stories by Clarice Lispector.

Professor Berger.

THEORIES OF GENDER AND WRITINGS ABOUT DIFFERENCE

Professor Setti.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

CLASS, RACE, GENDER AND SEXUAL DIFFERENCE

This seminar focuses on a series of theoretical and poetic works that question subjectivity, the concept of gender and sexual difference. Texts proposed are situated at the intersection of philosophy, psychoanalysis and literature. The goal of the course is to provide better knowledge of European and American theoretical productions and to extend their reflection to other experiences. Discussion of the derivations and ruptures often manifest in the elaboration of modular conceptions of difference, in the contexts of culture, history and contemporary politics. Also seen are the problematic of sexual and gender difference and the relation between literature and femininity in traversing theoretical and fictional texts. Works include those of de Beauvoir, Butler, Freud, Fouque, Derrida, Irigaray, Wittig and Lacan. Professor Setti.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A graduate-level seminar providing both an investigation and a discussion of race, class, gender and sex, from Marx to today. Issues include the tradition of material feminism, the concept of gender throughout history, the question of science and gender, the sexual body, sexuality, history of “heterosexuality”, the phenomenology of domination, transidentity, sex and power, inter-sexuality, epistemology of resistance, semiotics of power and violence. Professor Dorlin.

*GENDER THROUGH THE ARTS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course explores gender disparity in Western Europe and its effect on different artistic domains. The influence of gender politics is studied in the fields of dance, visual arts, literature, and music, from the

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Middle Ages until present times. Readings of art historians today are an integral part of the course.. Professor Marquié.

GENDER ROLES IN FILM AND LITERATURE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The treatment of gender both in film and literature is seen in this course, with a focus on female characters and the portrayal of transgendered characters. How do films turn certain women into icons? What is the general pattern in which women are portrayed in films? Is the male role more or equally important as that of the female? How does this relate to literature? Through viewing certain films such as M. Butterfly, The Misfits and Adèle H, reading various texts from Queer Theory to Cinema history, and attending a festival of films directed by women, the course analyzes the evolution of gender in films in relation to social theory. Professors Setti and Brard.

*THE VEIL: SOCIAL AND RELIGIOUS STANDPOINTS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course deals with the veil, both in a symbolic and a religious context, to reflect on the meaning it takes in different cultures at different times. Professor Honicker.

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OTHER LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

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VII. OTHER LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

N.B.: the study of another foreign language while abroad is generally not recommended to students who do not already possess a very good knowledge of French, unless it is essential for their major requirements.

LATIN FOR HISTORY MAJORS 1 Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense The object of this course is to introduce non-Latin majors, and those majoring in History in particular, to Latin texts that may be useful to them in their field of study. The choice of texts is shaped around the needs of the students, as well as around a common theme. Texts are drawn from various authors from Late Antiquity and the Early Middle Ages, including Gregory of Tours, the Venerable Bede, Sulpicius Severus, Wandalbert of Prüm, and the pilgrim Egeria. Professors Destephen and Barbier.

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OTHER LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

BIBLICAL HEBREW Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Study of Biblical Hebrew and its alphabet, grammatical structure and evolution in a historical context. Introduction to reading and writing in the language. Professor Hadas-Lebel.

MODERN HEBREW Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The second half of an introductory course in the Hebrew language. Students focus on oral learning, and each student must participate in Hebrew during each class. Vocabulary building and grammar. Professor Friedman.

HISTORY OF ARABIC LANGUAGE: NOTIONS OF DIALECTOLOGY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course offers an introduction into the study of Arabic dialects from a linguistic perspective. Current dialect trends are discussed and various theories on the development of this multifaceted language are presented. Professor Lagrange.

ARABIC GRAMMAR AND LINGUISTICS: YEAR 2 Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This second-year grammar course addresses the grammatical structures found in verbal sentences and simple and complex nominal sentences. Students learn to analyze sentences, identifying the part of speech served by each word. The linguistics component of the course begins with the pre-Islamic roots of the Arabic language and covers its subsequent evolution into different dialects, ultimately serving as a sociological component of the Arabicspeaking world. Professor Ben Gharbia.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A survey of the key genres of classical Arabic literature from its pre-Islamic beginnings through approximately the 10th century. Topics include the qasida of the jahiliyya, the muallaqat of Imru' al-Qays, the ghazal, or love poetry, of the 6th and 7th centuries, excerpts from the Arabian Nights, and more. It is taught in French, with primary sources in Arabic and secondary sources in both languages. The Arabic texts are analyzed in depth, with attention to the development of the language (and comparisons with modern usage) as well as their content. Professors Lagrange and Mlih.

MODERN ARABIC LITERATURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The course traces the evolution of Arabic literature from the 19th century to the present, examining the emergence of the modern novel, theater and poetry in Egypt, North Africa and the Levant region. Particular emphasis is placed on analyzing the themes of modernity vs. tradition and East vs. West. Professor Toelle.

*MODERN ARABIC THOUGHT AND CULTURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course analyzes cultural heritage, westernization, Arabization, secularization, tradition, and technological progress of contemporary Arabic societies. It then applies these aspects to the political ideology governing Arab states, and asks whether a move to modernity is possible with Islam as its guide. The course focuses on the works of Nasr Abu Zayd, Burhan Ghalioun and Denys Cuche. Professor Hamda.

*INTRODUCTION TO PERSIAN (FARSI)

*THIRD-YEAR ARABIC

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

This introductory course in Farsi begins with an introduction to the Arabo-Persian script, and delves into elementary-level vocabulary and grammar points. It covers the present, past, subjunctive, and imperative tenses, as well as vocabulary for basic conversation and communication. It also presents the word order and syntax unique to Persian.

This course focuses on the grammatical study of modern standard Arabic for third-year students of the language. Through translations of relevant texts, students work on finer points of Arabic grammar and build their vocabulary. Professor Alchami.

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INTRODUCTION TO MEDIEVAL ARABIC LITERATURE

Professor Hotz.

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INTERMEDIATE JAPANESE Institut Tenri The course covers topics in intermediate-level Japanese using lessons 6 through 10 of the textbook Shin-nihongo no chuu-kyuu written by the Association for Overseas Technical Scholarship (AOTS). Areas of study include formulas used in social situations: visiting a superior's house, writing a polite letter of self-introduction, explaining one's symptoms at a hospital, buying and returning items at a store, asking for and understanding directions, giving directions, understanding abbreviated language on signs, understanding user manuals for simple appliances, asking precise questions when one does not understand, and writing or explaining one's own recipe. Students learn to read and write 100 kanji. Professor Watanabe.

ADVANCED BEGINNING JAPANESE I Institut Tenri This course that uses the text and audiovisual materials of Shin-nihongo no chuu-kyuu in conjunction with a grammar manual and Kanji workbook, places equal emphasis on comprehension, reading and written/verbal expression. Drill-oriented. Each class begins with a dictation quiz, and regular homework assignments are given. Professor Shinoda.

ADVANCED ORAL AND WRITTEN EXPRESSION IN MANDARIN INALCO A course that aims to improve the quality of students’ written expression in Chinese by focusing on different essay forms. Students read a variety of collected essays that will serve as models for their own work. Students read and discuss each other’s work and also read works by Lu Xun, including his short story “Zhu Fu”. Students focus on the manifestation of the Confucian principles within Lu Xun’s work. Professors Chen and Li.

THIRD-YEAR CHINESE Institut Confucius - Université Paris Diderot This course provides a comprehensive method to improving students' facility with spoken and written Chinese, as well as oral comprehension. News articles, video clips, and discussion of current events help students to master advanced grammar and sentence structure, while at the same time familiarizing them

OTHER LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

with useful vocabulary and idiomatic expressions. Students are also expected to complete written exercises each week and watch or listen to Chinese media to reinforce the themes addressed in class. Professor Zhou.

VIETNAMESE HISTORY THROUGH 1945/ INTRODUCTORY VIETNAMESE LANGUAGE INALCO A course providing Vietnamese history from the prehistoric legendary beginnings in 2879 B.C. with the Huong Kings to Vietnam at the end of World War II, in addition to language instruction in Vietnamese. Using chronological progression through dynasties, students learn about Chinese invasions and occupations, the influence of European missionaries, the French intervention and formation of the Vietnamese identity. The cultural, archeological, political, economic and intellectual history of Vietnam is seen in depth. Focus is also on Vietnam’s relationship with China. The intensive language instruction introduces pronunciation, with peripheral focus on vocabulary and grammar. Lessons highlight various aspects of the Vietnamese alphabet. Emphasis on oral skills. Professors Guillaume and Fournié.

MODERN GREEK Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Study of Modern Greek grammar and vocabulary. Texts are read and analyzed, and grammar exercises are assigned. Approaches to Greek art cover the works of Theophilos Chatzimichaîl. Translation of texts by Séféris, Elytis, Tsarouchis, Sikélianos, Tériade, and viewing of several films. Five contemporary Greek artists are also seen in class: Dimitri Alithinos, Nicos Kessanlis, Chryssa Romanos, Anton Niocoglou and Ianna Andréadis. Professors Lassithiotakis and Karkayanni-Karabelias.

ITALIAN LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION: DANTE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle An in-depth study of Dante’s work and culture. The course, taught in the original language, starts with his minor works and political writings and proceeds to an analysis of the Inferno, Purgatory and Paradise. Convivio, Monarchia, and some minor writings are also studied, looking at cultural themes, major influences in Dante’s life and the political situation of his time period. Professor Guimbard.

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CESARE BECCARIA AND THE ITALIAN ENLIGHTENMENT

THE POETRY OF BORGES, 1960-1972

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

This class, taught in Spanish, discusses the poetry written by Jorge-Luis Borges from 1960 to 1972 (the works contained in Obras Poéticas 2). Specific poems are discussed in terms of literary devices used and recurring themes. The course also examines how Borges re-wrote his own poetry and the prologues and epilogues to each of the books of poetry he published in this time period.

Examining the main work of Cesare Beccaria, Of Crime and Punishment, from a literary, cultural and historic viewpoint, this course highlights the great importance of this work. First situating the work in its time period, the Italian Enlightenment, it then analyzes its reception in Europe, then goes so far as to review its reception and uses up until the late 20th century with the debate on the abolition of the death penalty in France. Professor Tabet.

ITALIAN TRANSLATION OF 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY FRENCH TEXTS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course aims to translate excerpts of famous French literature (mainly from the 19th and 20th centuries) into Italian, with special attention to idiomatic expressions and their cultural context. Students perform exercises in sight translation.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Professors de Catellus and Izquierdo.

ROOTS OF BRAZILIAN LITERATURE AND ANALYSIS OF BRAZILIAN POETRY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The course begins with the earliest Brazilian literature and follows the development of the different schools up to Romanticism. Emphasis is given to the analysis of poetry as the representation of the country’s literary development. Substantial knowledge of the technical elements of poetry is stressed. Professor Toledo.

Professor Ferro.

INTRODUCTION TO LATIN AMERICAN LITERATURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course provides an overview of Latin American literature, especially poetry in the 20th century. Authors are examined thematically, including the modernist and postmodernist movements, the Latin American avant-garde, political texts, and the fantastic genre. The course concludes with an in-depth study of a novella by Gabriel Garcia Marquez. Professors Larrue and Di Ciò.

SURVEY OF THE LATIN AMERICAN SHORT STORY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Through the use of an anthology, this course studies the major works of the principal short-story writers of Latin America during the 20th century, including but not limited to Rubén Dario, Julio Cortázar, and Gabriel Garcia Márquez. Emphasis is placed on the study of elements such as technical construction, the author's background as reflected in his work, and the study of elements characterizing a specific style or movement. The course also contextualizes these stories through an examination of the major literary and historical movements that form their backdrop. Professor Premat. 92

GERMAN: GRAMMAR II Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A revision of essential elements of German grammar, such as the subjunctive, the use of prepositions in combination with nouns and adjectives, subordinate and coordinate conjunctions, etc. Review is done through drills and exercises. Professor Robin.

THIRD-YEAR RUSSIAN LANGUAGE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Study of the Russian language, as well as its literature and grammar. In terms of literature, the course deals with the lives of the Russian writers Bunin and Chekhov and covers several short stories by each. The grammar topics discussed range from a review of prefixed verbs of motion, to gerunds and participles. A laboratory period is also part of the course. Professor Mouratova.

ADVANCED RUSSIAN: LISTENING COMPREHENSION AND GRAMMAR Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course covers the recognition and formation of participles, past and present, active and passive. Gerunds and short-form adjectives are also taught. Watching a Russian soap-opera supplements this

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grammar study with general vocabulary, improves listening comprehension, and opportunities for oral expression. Weekly oral presentations on the content of this soap opera count towards the final grade.

OTHER LANGUAGES AND LITERATURES

the 19th century to the present. Examination of the metamorphoses of Gogol’s œuvre through shifts in critical reception. Focus is on semiotic interpretations of character portraits. Professor Buhks.

Professor Mouratova.

SANSKRIT LITERATURE: KALIDASA *EARLY RUSSIAN HISTORY AND LITERATURE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course discusses Russian history, from the earliest traces of Russia (Kievan Rus') up to the formation of the Russian state of Muscovy; cultural and social aspects are studied alongside the historic timeline, and the history of Russian literature from its origins (though many centuries later) is also studied in depth.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Selected readings from Kalidasa’s Kumarasamblhava. The course also covers the social and aesthetic aspects of Kalidasa’s works. Professor Fezas.

Professors Gonneau and Coldfey-Faucard.

*RUSSIAN CULTURAL STUDIES: PAINTING AND CINEMA Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Russian culture is the focus of this course, which places strong emphasis on the portrait in Russian painting and in the history of Russian film. Specific artists and styles are highlighted in order do gain depth as well as breadth of understanding. This course also attempts to put the paintings and films in perspective by drawing from other themes and events. Professor Epelboin.

*RUSSIAN LITERATURE OF THE 19TH CENTURY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Study of 19th century Russian prose fiction, through a close-reading of three major texts: Tolstoy's Master and Man, Chekhov's Room 6, and Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment. Complementary readings such as The Snowstorm by Pushkin enhance the understanding of Russian literary style and themes. For contextual purposes, this course also examines Russian history in parallel to the development of Russian literature and culture. Professor Epelboin.

SEMIOTICS OF THE PORTRAIT IN THE WORKS OF GOGOL Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A doctoral-level seminar presenting successive theoretical interpretations of Gogol’s Dead Souls, from

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ENGLISH STUDIES

VIII.

N.B.:

ENGLISH STUDIES

*THEORETICAL COGNITIVE GRAMMAR

Students may take courses in this field at the graduate level only.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This seminar explores past and current research in the realms of cognitive grammar and construction grammar and the relation between semantics and syntax. It focuses on the English language, but usually compares its history and constructions to other romance languages, especially French. Professor Cotte.

ENGLISH LANGUAGE, LITERATURE AND CIVILIZATION OF THE MIDDLE AGES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course studies English literature from the period 1100-1500, a period rich in poetry and vernacular prose. The course explores many different genres of literature from this time, including novels, alliterative poems, social allegories, and dramatic writings, among others. Classes consist of student presentations followed by class discussion of the week’s 94

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text. Texts studied include Chaucer’s The Parliament of Foules, The York Crucifixion Play, The Owl and the Nightingale, The prioress’ Tale, Troilus and Criseyde, Piers Plowman, St. Erkenwald, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, and Sir Orfeo.

recent authors such as Flannery O'Connor and Joyce Carol Oates.

Professor Carruthers.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

*REPRESENTING DESIRE IN SHAKESPEARE'S THEATER Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle In this masters-level seminar, students explore the works of one of the greatest authors in the English language, from a French perspective. Through extensive research and discussion of four of Shakespeare's most iconic plays - Romeo and Juliet, Antony and Cleopatra, Othello and The Taming of the Shrew - the class explores themes such as: desire and conflict in Romeo and Juliet, political ambition and romantic passion in Antony and Cleopatra, and female sexuality in Othello and The Taming of the Shrew. Professor Laroque.

KNOWLEDGE AND THE TRAVEL NARRATIVE IN 18TH CENTURY ENGLISH LITERATURE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The works of different 18th century English authors, including Gulliver's Travels by Jonathan Swift and Robinson Crusoe by Daniel Defoe, are discussed and analyzed along with relevant concepts in England during the same time period in this graduate seminar devoted to the concept the travel narrative novel and its impact on the time of each text's publication. The Royal Society and the growing interest in science and experimentation during the 18th century in England are also presented and discussed along. The concept of the main character being presented as the author is also of considerable importance and is a common theme among the novels read in class. Professor Tadié.

*AMERICAN GOTHIC LITERATURE: WRITING AND RE-WRITING Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This masters-level seminar explores the origins and development of gothic American literature, beginning with early writers such as Nathaniel Hawthorne and Edgar Allen Poe and progressing to more

Professor Amfreville.

BRITISH ADVENTURE NOVELS 1885-1925 This class explores the British adventure novel during the time of British colonialism from the late 1800s to the early 1900s. It explores typical Victorian themes such as the exploration of virgin territory and colonization, primarily in Africa and India. Many themes from the “imperial gothic novel” are also explored, like imaginary kingdoms, hunts for treasures, and lost worlds. Main works include: Haggard’s King Solomon’s Mines, Conrad’s Heart of Darkness, The Secret Sharer, and The Tale, Stevenson’s Treasure Island and The Beach of Falsea, and Kipling’s The Man Who Would Be King. Professor Naugrette.

READING ULYSSES Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Through the close reading of six episodes within James Joyce’s Ulysses (“Nestor”, “Proteus”, “Calypso”, “Cyclops”, “Nausicaa”, and “Penelope”), this seminar introduces students to the study and understanding of the multi-level inner workings of such a reputably difficult masterpiece. In an attempt to master the text, the course takes the form of a “reading workshop” favoring a polymorphous and open reading, attempting to show that far from being hermetic, this work can be considered a locus communis for European literature, where each student finds within the embryonic, programmatic, or proliferating state, the mirror of his or her own individual readings. Professor Topia.

MAPS AND MAZES: DEPICTIONS OF THE CITY IN 20TH CENTURY IRISH LITERATURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle “Maps and Mazes” is a course in Irish Literature focusing around two works, Joyce's classic novel A Portrait of the Artist as a Young Man and Cieran Carson's book of poetry Belfast Confetti. According to the professor, both of these authors were heavily influenced by an ancient technique developed by Greek Philosophers called the “Art of Memory”, by which an individual associates facts with different parts (streets, stores, corners, parks etc.) of a city,

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thereby allowing the individual to remember vastly more information than through memorization alone. In both Joyce's and Carson's works characters have a seemingly innate knowledge of their urban surroundings. In this course the students explore this idea of an “Art of Memory” and the implications of this technique in both works. Through analyzing the facts or memories associated with each geographical location mentioned, the students are able to better understand historical, philosophical, religious, and literary allusions. Professor Bonafous-Murat.

MYTHS AND METAMORPHOSES IN BRITISH LITERATURE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course focuses on Shakespeare’s Henry V and Shelley’s Prometheus Unbound. Themes such as hero worship and patriotism, irony and satire, and the play as an epic are discussed, and the romantic vision of Prometheus, as well as politics and revolution, quest figures, quest patterns and allegorical figures are analyzed within passages from each of the works. Professor Déprats.

ENGLISH LITERATURE: POETRY AND POETICS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This seminar taught in French aims to give students a firm grip on important theoretical texts and methodological approaches to literary analysis. Lectures treat definitions and elements of poetic/narrative structure as elaborated by Barthes, Genette and others. The linguistic work of Benveniste and Jakobson is also considered. Students present specific textual examples using the modes of analysis seen, and do exercises in close reading. Active seminar-style discussion. Professor Aquien.

CONTEMPORARY ANGLOPHONE THEATER Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This seminar studies a body of Irish, English and American works, dating from 1900 to the present day, and focusing for the most part on experimental theater and the reworking of the genre. By examining works from authors including Beckett, Brecht, Crimp, Pinter and Kane, students discover how mod-

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ern works have deconstructed the traditional “play”, and how new and diverse systems of representation have been formed, ranging from neo-absurdism to the “theater of voices” to the “in-yer-face” genre. The seminar is supplemented with attendance of several performances throughout the semester. Professor Angel-Perez.

CLASSICS OF BRITISH CHILDREN'S LITERATURE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The course comprises the study of four classics of modern children's fiction, a genre often relegated to the margins of literary study, but today widely recognized in the ranks of major literatures. Through readings of Tolkien's The Hobbit, Carroll's Alice's Adventures in Wonderland and Through the Looking Glass, and Philip Pullman's Northern Lights students interrogate the nature of a classic as represented by Italo Calvino and others, distinguishing between elements of youthfulness and juvenilia, to properly situate children's classics in their wider field. Contextualizing these major works in terms of the canon of English literature, students draw inspiration from a range of critical perspectives, from Darnton to Empson, from Frye to LeGuin, through C.S. Lewis and Jackie Wullschléger. Notably, “mythologies of childhood”, are analyzed, as well as archetypes of the epic and the hunt, interactions with the animal world, the psychoanalysis of fairy tales, and the rapport between story and illustration. This intensive study of childhood favorites is meant to disprove Michel Zink's proposition that “only children know how to read.” Professor Porée.

THE FEMINIST ESSAY AND ITS FICTIONS: FROM WOLLSTONECRAFT TO WINTERSON Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is an analysis of feminist essays originating in Great Britain or its colonies, beginning in the 19th century and up to the present day. Primary source documents and novels are studied, as well as history and law surrounding the feminist movement. Authors include Mary Wollstonecraft and Judith Butler. Professor Regard.

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*TEXT AND IMAGE IN AMERICAN LITERATURE FROM THE 19TH CENTURY TO TODAY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This masters-level seminar explores the concept of ekphrasis: how does one describe an image with words? Working with picture theory and exploring works by Edith Wharton, Paul Auster, Andy Olsen, John Cage, Robert Coover, and others, the course also tackles some of the issues underlying movie adaptations of literature, art criticism, revolutionary artistic layout design, and other related subjects. Professor Sammarcelli.

20TH CENTURY WRITERS OF THE AMERICAN SOUTH Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Two American Southern writers, William Faulkner and Flannery O’Connor, are studied in detail in this graduate seminar. Required readings include one of Faulkner’s novels and about twenty of O’Connor’s short stories. Themes and motifs in the novel are discussed at length with close examination of specific passages. Flannery O’Connor’s works are studied from the point of view of her beliefs, and students are highly encouraged to read her correspondence.

ENGLISH STUDIES

tory of India and Pakistan as well as contemporary events and pop culture such as Bollywood movies. Professor Tadié.

19TH AND 20TH CENTURY IRISH POLITICAL HISTORY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle A Master’s level seminar taught in English, with discussion of the political history of Ireland from 1800 to 1920. All major political figures are seen and films and slides complement the lectures. Professor Hutchinson.

CURRENT ISSUES IN BRITISH POLITICS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course is an analysis of three facets of current politics in Great Britain: constitutional reform, its successes and failures; the composition of the Parliament and reasons for its lack of diversity; and the involvement of the government in the British Media. The current state of British politics as well as the future direction of the British government is discussed. The course is complemented by a series of lectures on the history of Great Britain. Professors Lefebvre d’Hellencourt and Broglin.

*20TH CENTURY AMERICAN POETRY

HISTORY AND CULTURE OF THE AMERICAN WEST - FIELDS OF GOLD: CALIFORNIA AND THE AMERICAN DREAM

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

In this course, students learn about modes of literary criticism that are applicable to the analysis of 20th century American poetry. Lectures do not usually focus on specific poets, but rather on the discourse surrounding the literary world in 20th century America. Examples of lecture topics include new criticism and word experiments by Gertrude Stein.

This course takes an in-depth survey of California as a unique cultural and historical entity. The state's crucial role in creating the American nation and identity is revealed through the study of topics such as Silicon Valley, Yellowstone National Park, or William Randolph Hearst & Yellow Journalism. By the end of the course students gain a profound knowledge of the entire history of California and its importance in the making of contemporary American culture.

Professor Lemardeley.

Professor Aji.

*POST-COLONIAL INDIAN AND PAKISTANI LITERATURE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This class is an in-depth study of three novels: Clear Light of Day, by Anita Desai; In Other Rooms, Other Wonders by Daniyal Mueenuddin; and The Enchantress of Florence by Salman Rushdie, along with a variety of short stories and theoretical essays. It mostly concentrates on literary theory and fiction, but also discussed are the colonial and modern his-

Professor Lagayette.

LIBERTY AND SLAVERY IN THE CONSTRUCTION OF THE UNITED STATES Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This seminar focuses on the inherent contradictions of liberty and slavery in the construction of the United States. The course concentrates on issues concerning the 18th and 19th centuries, and aims to unrav-

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el the ideological workings of American democracy, particularly the role of the State in a “liberal democracy” that institutionalized a system of slavery. The course charts the evolution of a young republic built on liberty that nonetheless afforded this liberty to only a very few, focusing on a historiographical approach to the questions being discussed. Professor Wulf.

*ENVIRONMENTAL HISTORY OF THE UNITED STATES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

*THE GLOBAL INFLUENCE OF CAPITALISM, MEDIA, AND POLITICS IN THE UNITED STATES Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense In this course, the global influence of American capitalism is studied. The curriculum traces the major events in recent US history and examines the global repercussions of its economic system and how the media has helped spread this influence. Attention is also given to the evolution of the US media and their impact and perception abroad. Professors Arnaud and Cusset.

This Masters level seminar is dedicated to the environmental history of the United States, from the Colonial period to modern day. The goal of environmental history is to discern and analyze the effects of natural constraints on the development of human societies. The course thus explores and analyzes the fluctuations of the often problematic and ambiguous relationship between Americans and their natural environment. Subjects discussed include the symbolic dimensions of this relationship, the issues regarding the representation of nature, the economic exploitation of natural resources, and important regional variations, past, present, and future. Students examine what is at stake in the preservation and the development of the American natural space, in order to gain a better understanding of the debates on ecology, environment, and the perspective of sustainable development. Professor Figuereido.

AMERICAN MINORITIES IN HISTORY AND CINEMA Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense A survey of the history of racial and sexual minorities in the United States in addition to a study of their presence or portrayal in American cinema. Cinema is such a large part of American society, and Hollywood holds such a powerful influence that one can really trace the attitudes of the larger dominating society towards minorities through film. Learning the history alongside the study of cinema facilitates critique and pinpoints issues of race, class and gender. Professors Rolland-Diamond and Crémieux.

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IX. HISTORY

INTRODUCTION TO PHARAONIC EGYPT: HISTORY OF EGYPT AND THE MIDDLE KINGDOM UniversitĂŠ de Paris IV-Sorbonne A course providing an introduction to geography, sources, terminology and periodization of Ancient Egyptian history. Also covered in depth are the role played by religion in Egyptian life and the influence and power of Egypt, seen chronologically from the beginning of the Middle Kingdom up to the Ramesside period. Analysis of historical sources, such as the tomb of Ramose, the Great Harris papyrus and the tomb of Amenhotep II at Giza. An extensive bibliography for the course covers general history, architecture, art history, civilization, and religion. Professor Pfirsch.

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*EGYPT IN THE 18TH DYNASTY

*ANCIENT GREEK HISTORY

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

This course takes a close look at the beginning of the New Kingdom in Egypt, with a focus on the 18th Dynasty. Beginning with the turmoil of the Second Intermediate Period, the course covers the life, accomplishments and legacy of each pharaoh (Thutmose I, II, III, Hatshepsut, Tutankhamen and Akhenaton) of the 18th dynasty. In addition, students examine the international politics of Egypt, its festivals and ceremonies, and Egyptian architecture of the time period. Primary source readings range from tablets to tomb engravings and are an integral part of in-class commentary.

This course covers Greek history from 360 B.C. to the death of Alexander the Great. The history of this period is analyzed from a military social, economic, and political point of view.

Professors Somaglino and Valbelle.

JEWS AND JUDAISM IN ANTIQUITY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne History of Judea from the arrival of the Romans in 63 B.C. to 60 A.D. Focus is on the struggle for power among leaders and their relations with the various Roman emperors and their representatives in Judea. Popular religious and social movements are covered, as is the question of the status of Jews in the Diaspora in Egypt, Greece, Asia Minor and Italy. The course relies heavily on primary sources, notably the writings of Flavius Josephus. The origins of Jewish identity are studied in detail. Professors Prévot and Hadas-Lebel or Bendavid.

HISTORY OF THE GREEK CITY STATES FROM CROESUS TO ALEXANDER (6TH-4TH CENTURIES B.C.) Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course follows the political, social and economic development of Greek city states and their relations with each other and rival empires from Croesus to Alexander. It examines the creation of the Ionian league as well as the league of Delos, and explores the central role of Athens and its mounting imperialism toward other city states in the League of Delos. This course also examines the role of Sparta in its roles as a counterweight and rival to Athens. In tracing these histories, the course relies mainly upon ancient sources such as Thucydides, Herodotus, Plutarch, etc. Professors Marcellesi and Couvenhes.

Professors Queyrel and Marcellesi.

THE ODYSSEY, YESTERDAY AND TODAY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis In this course, Homer's Odyssey, its historical background and basic ancient Greek history are discussed, and its modern interpretations are presented. Professor Schnapp.

THE ROMAN EMPIRE FROM CAESAR AUGUSTUS TO DIOCLETIAN Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course explores the creation of the Roman Empire in the aftermath of the civil wars at Rome and the increasing prominence of Octavian. After examining the foundations of the empire established by Caesar Augustus, the course then focuses on the social and economic institutions of the empire. It studies the agricultural methods used throughout the Empire and examines the production, trade and consumption of the three stables of the roman economy: wheat, olive oil and the vine. It also explores the artisanal industries throughout the provinces and examines the different levels of production throughout the empire using archaeological evidence. In examining the social institutions, this course studies the evolving relationships between the plebe, the senate and the emperor as well as the role in society of underrepresented classes such as women and slaves. Professors Le Bohec and Vigourt.

CITIZENSHIP: ROME AND THE MODERN ERA Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course is a discussion of ancient Greek and Roman civilizations and conceptions of citizenship and how these notions were carried out in practice. Readings include works by Aristotle and historians of the time. The second half of the course concentrates on political thought in the modern era, focusing on the idea of citizenship, including readings from Rousseau and Benjamin Constant. Professor Moatti.

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HISTORY AND HISTORIOGRAPHY OF ISLAM

*HISTORY OF THE OTTOMAN EMPIRE IN ARAB LANDS: 1516-1830

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

This course concentrates on the period starting with the birth of Islam and ending with the breakup of the Islamic empire in the 10th century, with particular emphasis on the period of the prophet, the Umayyad caliphs, and the Abbasid caliphs. Facing the scientific problems posed by Muslim sources from the beginning of Islam, the course also focuses on historiographical questions, ancient and modern.

This course examines the impact of the expansion of the Ottoman Empire into Arab lands, focusing on North-Africa, Egypt and the Eastern Mediterranean. These areas are studied with respect to their individual histories prior to Ottoman invasion and the evolving relationship with the center of the empire. Themes include the expansion of the Ottoman Empire through the region via conquest, the demographic composition of the provinces, the integration of Ottoman and local culture, and the disintegration of the Empire.

Professor Borrut.

*POWER AND SOCIETY IN AL-ANDALUS, 9TH-12TH CENTURIES Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The relationship between power and society in AlAndalus between the 9th and 12th centuries is examined in this course. After a brief introduction to the expansion of the Muslim empire under Umayyad rule, the course proceeds chronologically, from the arrival of Abd ah-Rahman I in 756 to the decline of the Almohades in the 12th century. The three centuries are studied by looking at each major regime in turn: the Umayyads, the taifa kingdoms, the Almoravids, and the Almohades. The methods used by each of these regimes to legitimize and enact political power are examined in detail, as are similarities and differences between each regime. Students work with primary source documents and learn how to better analyze and employ diverse sources (including letters, inscriptions, architecture, and coins) in writing history.

Professor Lellouch.

THE MIDDLE AGES IN THE WEST ENS

THE BYZANTINE EMPIRE

This course begins with two sessions serving as a survey of medieval history, from the last days of the Roman Empire until just before the start of the period recognized as the Renaissance in Italy. After this, each week will be devoted to a major theme. Themes to be covered include religious history, the development of national identities (specifically in France and Germany), the culture of chivalry and courtly love, as well as an examination of shifting property relations. This course contains a strong historiographical component, as students will look at changes in scholarship over the years. The reference texts for this course are Le Moyen Âge en Occident, by M. Balard, J-P Genet and M. Rouche; and La Civilisation de L'Occident Médiéval by Jacques Le Goff, to be supplemented by additional topic-specific readings.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Professors Menant and Lassalmonie.

Professor Chandelier.

A course focusing on Constantinople itself, the development of the Byzantine court, its culture, customs and diplomacy, starting in late Antiquity and ending in the early modern era. Of special importance are different observations that show how culture within the city changed over time and how the power of the emperor was projected and translated into symbols and ceremonies such as his clothing and his coronation. Also of importance are the economic organization and taxation of the city. Professors Cheynet and Caseau.

HISTORY OF THE CAROLINGIAN EMPIRE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course deals with the Carolingian Renaissance, namely, the dissemination of texts, religious practices and ideas from Italy, their incubation in the court of Charlemagne, the growth of monasteries, and the flowering of literacy. It closely examines how different cultural objects (writings, buildings, etc) were integrated into Carolingian rulers’ strategies of power. Professors Shimahara and Sot.

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*INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF WORLD CIVILIZATIONS IN THE 5TH-12TH CENTURIES

LIFE, LOVE AND DEATH IN THE LATE MIDDLE AGES

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

This course covers Great Britain, France and Italy from the 14th century to the Renaissance. Three chronological distinctions are made: the period prior to the Black Death, the period of the Black Death and its aftermath. Primary texts covering examples from the three countries and analysis of specific phenomena are used, with a strong emphasis on the themes of lineage, marriage and childhood. The work of Georges Duby is also largely used.

This course examines the history of civilizations from a global perspective, focusing on the Arab, Byzantine, and Occidental Roman empires after the fall of Rome in 476 AD. By exploring the intermingling histories of these three empires, often rivals, the course challenges the dominant notion of a powerful Western Europe subjugating other regions of the world. Reflecting on the histories of four regions - Asia, Africa, Europe and the Middle East - this class investigates the evolution of civilizations in the Middle-Ages, an era that was diverse and important, serving as an incubator for the growth of the modern Church, the Islamic empire, the feudal system and the great empires of Europe. Professor Lusset and Bougard.

*CULTURE AND SOCIETY IN THE MIDDLE AGES (13TH-15TH CENTURY) Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course looks at the cultural roles of religion, education, childhood, art and literature in the 13th15th centuries. Professors Mœglin and Troadec.

CHURCH AND SOCIETY IN THE WEST FROM 1215 TO 1450 Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense The class provides the fundamentals necessary to an understanding of the history of the institutional Church, religious practices, and social diffusion of Christianity, between the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215, the culmination of the Gregorian reform and turning point in the Western Church, and the middle of the 15th century, when papal power recovered from the crisis of the Great Schism, 1378-1417. Courses and complementary discussion groups will allow students to become familiar with the realities of western Christianity: the institutions in periods of development and centralization; the various ways of life consequently generated; the new orders, notably the mendicant Franciscans and Dominicans; the ways in which clergy and laity appropriated the Christian message; and the abundant and diverse spiritual experiences that span this rich period. Professors Vincent and Sère.

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Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Professor Dauphant or Vissière.

*HISTORY OF CHILDHOOD AND CHILDREN IN FRANCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A history of societal treatment and attitudes toward children, using qualitative and quantitative sources such as letters, notary records, court proceedings, and birth records in French hospitals. The class discusses the placement of orphans in guardianships and orphanages, changes in rates of child abandonment, the evolution of family structure, and relationships of children with various family members from the 16th to the 18th centuries in France. Professor Robin-Romero.

CONDITIONS OF ILLNESS AND DEATH IN FRENCH SOCIETY 16TH-19TH CENTURIES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The conditions related to illness, suffering and death in traditional society are the focus of this course. Statistical analysis is used, as well as a number of texts allowing students to better understand the history of medical discoveries, their evolution, and their impact on society. Examples of texts studied: Le choléra raconté par Chateaubriand, La peste à Digne and Paracelse et les médecins. Professors Bardet and Le Person.

HISTORY OF THE FRENCH RENAISSANCE: WAR AND FAITH UNDER FRANCOIS IER AND HENRI II Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne In this course, major political, social, cultural and religious developments in France during the Renaissance period are seen. The course covers the disastrous effects of the Italian wars on young Francois

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Ier’s reign, followed by the steady centralization of monarchical authority. Life at the French court, reforms in the judicial system, the state of governmental finances, and the effect of the Reform are closely analyzed using primary sources. Art of the period and popular reactions to major events are also covered. Professors Crouzet and Le Roux.

*SOCIAL AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF ITALY IN THE EARLY RENAISSANCE (13801500) Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course looks at demographic, economic, and political circumstances in Italy at the end of the Middle Ages and attempts to nuance the vision of an emerging Italian renaissance in the 14th and 15th centuries. Particular focus is given to the political and economic dynamics between major cities, prominent families, and surrounding empires. The discussion section focuses on topics such as the political influence of humanist teaching, the concepts of marriage and education, death, and civic ideals in Italy between the 13th and the 15th centuries. Professors Dutour and Crouzet-Pavan.

*ITALY DURING THE 16TH AND 17TH CENTURIES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course follows the history of Italy during the 16th and 17th centuries with focus on the political and economic dynamics between major cities, prominent families, and surrounding empires. The study of major wars, times of peace, commerce and trade, major powers and aristocracies allows students to look into what Italian society was like during the 16th and 17th centuries. Students also take an in-depth look at Chapters XVIII - XX of La Storia dell'Italia by Guicciardini. Professors Callard and Tallon.

HISTORY OF 17TH CENTURY FRANCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This class covers the religious history of France during the 17th century, with an emphasis on Protestantism, religious persecution, and the transition to a multifarious religious community. Study of numerous primary historical documents. Professors Souriac and Tallon.

HISTORY

*THE REIGN OF LOUIS XIV Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course covers French political, cultural, and social history during the life of Louis XIV, the “Sun King.” Themes covered include the Fronde, absolute monarchy, religious conflict, the construction of the modern state, and the experience of war in 17th century France. The construction of Versailles and the court culture of Louis XIV's famous palace receive significant focus, and strong emphasis is placed on analyzing primary sources in French.. Professor Cornette.

*FRANCE DURING THE REIGN OF LOUIS XIV Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines the reign of Louis XIV, providing a multi-directional approach to the military and social history of France during his reign. Topics include Louis XIV's absolutist government, wars under Louis XIV and French expansion, the formation of the French army, the revocation of the Edict of Nantes, the Glorious Revolution and its impact on diplomacy, the War of Spanish Succession, and peace negotiations in the early 18th century. The influence of specific events on the rest of Western Europe is also an important component of the course material. Professors Pialoux and Bély.

FRANCE IN THE REIGN OF LOUIS XV Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course deals primarily with the set-up of the French monarchy and government, with a focus on policy-making rather than cultural issues. Main topics include a brief introduction to Louis XV’s personal history, the French court, and the structure and hierarchy of the king’s men, ranging from his ministers to his men dispersed throughout France to uphold law and order. The course also deals with foreign relations and war during the reign of Louis XV, from the viewpoint of Louis XV and his advisors. Professors Vajda and Chaline.

THE ANCIEN REGIME IN FRANCE: 16TH18TH CENTURIES Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course presents France during the 16th through 18th centuries. It presents structural characteristics of the period and devotes specific attention to their

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evolution as well as to important conjunctures. After presenting the physical and demographic framework of the country, political institutions and the characteristics of the economy, as well as societal changes, are seen. The final focus is on major religious and cultural conflicts looking at examples, across French history of specific traits of the preRenaissance period. Professors Meyzie and Duma.

*A SOCIAL HISTORY OF PARISIAN LIFESTYLES FROM 1660 TO 1789 Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines Paris over the last century of the Ancient Regime, from Louis XIV to Louis XVI, during a century that witnessed a multitude of important changes in the social and administrative structure of the city, such as the construction of the Hôtel de Ville, Châtelet, and the Parliament, the fiscal system, and religious institutions. These themes guide the course lectures, split into three broad categories: crucial historical moments in the capital, influential Parisians, and important places in the capital. The goal of this course is to broaden students' knowledge of the particularities of Parisian life in the 18th century and to heighten their ability to critically examine primary and secondary historical documents dating from this time period. Professors Richard and Abad.

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN WAYS OF THOUGHT: LOVE AND HATRED OF KINGS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course examines the relationship between a monarch and his subjects during the early modern period. In particular, the class studies the genesis, evolution, and historical significance of the hatred of a king. With a focus on French history, students study the ways in which sovereigns become despised in the eyes of the people and the consequences that this public ire have on a king's reign. The course presents its theme through the use of numerous examples that illustrate the contrasts and similarities between public opposition to the king in different places and times. Class meetings consist of lectures presenting the historical events that led to and occurred during a period of displeasure with a specific monarch as well as an analysis of the importance of these events. Time for discussion is allowed at the end of class. Students read selections from four books over the course of the semester: Les rois thaumaturges by Marc Bloch, Le roi caché by Yves-Marie Bercé, Les rois de papier by Annie Duprat and La vie politique en France XVIe, XVIIe, XVIIIe siècles by Monique Cottret. Professor Cottret.

THE CREATION OF THE UNITED STATES AND EUROPE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

*MODERN MENTALITIES: CHURCH AND STATE IN MODERN FRANCE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course examines the changing relationship between Church and State in the modern period of French history (1500-1789). Conflicts between Protestants and Catholics, and between Jansenists and Jesuits are examined as the vehicle of the evolution of the relationship between Church and State. The course begins with a short introduction to the relationship between the monarchy and religious power in France at the beginning of the 16th century. It then proceeds chronologically, with a focus on major influential events such as the Edict of Nantes and its revocation, while also discussing the effects of Enlightenment philosophy on the relationship between Church and State. The mindsets of people of all social strata throughout the modern period are also seen, and the question of tolerance is seen in particular. Professor Cottret.

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This course explores the relationship between Europe and the United States at the time of the latter's formation, examining the exchange of ideas across the Atlantic and their consequences for the geopolitics of the time. The course consists of weekly lectures to provide background in the topic, which is expanded upon though readings. At minimum, students are expected to read D. Lacorne's L'invention de république, B. Cottret's La Révolution américaine, and the first section of A. Sy-Wonyu's Les États-Unis et le monde au XIXe siècle, as well as various primary source documents provided by the professor. Professor Belissa.

INTRODUCTION TO URBAN HISTORY IN THE 17TH AND 18TH CENTURIES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This courses focuses on the social and spatial aspects of urban history of modern France and examines the historical methods, tools and sources used to develop the history of individuals, family, and so-

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cial groups within French cities of the 17th and 18th centuries, in order to gain a better and holistic understanding of French urban history of the period. The traditional primary sources of social urban history (marriage contracts, testaments, inventories, diagrams, maps) are presented and studied but emphasis is placed on the important development of innovative documents, such as private writings (diaries, personal journals, memoirs, autobiographies). The focus of the course is French cities but English and Spanish cities are also mentioned. Professor Ruggiu.

*THE HISTORY OF CENTRAL EUROPE IN THE MODERN ERA Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines the social, economical, and political trends in central Europe in the 17th and 18th centuries. It draws from urban geography and planning of central European cities during the Baroque period to examine the spread of Counter reform ideals and political ambition. The course also looks at the role of Rome and the Papacy and its impact on the European political stage. Particular cities in Central Europe are used as case studies. Professors Vajda and Chaline.

18TH CENTURY FRANCE: ECONOMY AND SOCIETY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course aims to go beyond the chronology and the facts about 18th century history, looking at France during the Ancien régime from a cultural rather than historical perspective. The time period covered is the 18th century prior to the French Revolution, with a view to understanding the conditions in France at this time that may have led to a conflict. The course looks at the role of Paris as a commercial center, the function of smaller towns and villages in the countryside and on the sea. On a more anthropological and detailed level, the professor explains the social hierarchy and the dynamics of everyday life in France, whether it be through a study of education, family, high society or commercial life. The class requires certain prior knowledge of the main events of the 18th century, as a framework for what is a much more detailed study of the individual people of France and how it functioned as a collective, yet also often divided, body. Professors Richard and Abad.

HISTORY

*MARITIME MERCHANTS AND TRADE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The 18th century marked an important change in the globalized maritime market. This course studies the maritime trade and great commerce of the oceans, the merchant circuits and the new attitudes that brought about the industrial revolution. It then analyzes how the maritime trade of that period has affected the current maritime market. The second part of the course focuses on present day global economic systems and trade networks, and the evolution of maritime society and culture. Finally it examines the relationship between cities and the sea from a cultural and environmental standpoint.. Professor Minard.

POLITICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL HISTORY OF 17TH AND 18TH CENTURY INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines political and theoretical frameworks in the historical analysis of international relations between major European powers in the 17th and 18th centuries. It reviews, in historical progression, the most significant events and conflicts in the realm of international relations in Europe during that period, such as the conquests by France, Spain, and the Ottoman Empire and the eventual rise of Russia and the Kingdom of Prussia. Key influences and theories are also presented, used as a theoretical lens for the study of the advent of international relations in the 17th century, when the issues of sovereignty, diplomacy, and the nation-state began to appear after the Peace of Westphalia of 1648. Theorists studied include Hobbes, Machiavelli, Locke, Montesquieu, Voltaire, Rousseau, and Hume. Professor Bély.

FROM THE ANCIEN RÉGIME TO THE REVOLUTION Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course deals with the history and historiography of the French Revolution, its origins, its major themes, and its causes and effects. Topics proceed chronologically but are presented in a thematic manner rather than according to the sequence of events, in an attempt to address major questions in the historiography of the French Revolution. Was it part of a larger Atlantic Revolution? What was the role of the Enlightenment? Was the period of radicalization inevitable? The treatment of issues and

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differing analyses by different historians are always emphasized, as it is their interpretations are that drive the study of the subject. Authors referenced include Jacques Godechot, François Furet, Georges Lefebvre, Timothy Tackett, Timothy Blanning, and Jean-Pierre Jessenne. Proper historiographical methods are also reviewed. Professor Dunyach.

HISTORIOGRAPHY OF THE FRENCH REVOLUTION Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This master's seminar is designed as an introduction to the historiography of the French Revolution. Each week guest lecturers focus on a different aspect of this question. Topics include: Enlightenment and Revolution, teaching the French Revolution, diplomacy and the French Revolution, the French Revolution and the colonies, gender during the Revolution, republicanism(s), and the question of the French Revolution as a cultural Revolution. Professor Belissa.

THE FRENCH REVOLUTION IN HISTORY AND MEMORY

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course explores the period at the end of the French Revolution and the transitional period leading up to the Napoleonic Empire, through the study of the Revolutionary and Napoleonic Wars, key figures involved, and economic and social changes of the era. It examines the period chronologically through primary documents such as treaties, letters from soldiers and key military leaders, descriptions of specific events, such as the battles of Valmy and Waterloo, and documents written by important figures of the time such as Saint-Just, Napoleon and William Pitt. A number of secondary sources are also used outside of class (Boudon, Jean-Paul Bertaud, Jean Tulard, and others). Professors Boudon and Hême de Lacotte or Anceau.

THE BIRTH OF THE AMERICAN REPUBLIC, 1765-1820 Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

THE FRENCH REVOLUTION 1789-1799: A SOCIOLOGICAL AND PHILOSOPHICAL PERSPECTIVE

Providing an overview of early American history, this course first covers the American colonies, particularly their founding and their religious backgrounds. It then examines the pre-war and war periods, concentrating on the philosophical underpinnings of the Declaration of Independence as well as the French contributions to the war effort. The main focus is on the period between the end of the war and the turn of the 19th century. Through primary source readings, the evolution of the American government system, from the Articles of Confederation to the Constitution, is analyzed in great detail. The second part of the course concentrates on the implications of the new Constitution, particularly as it pertains to the lingering question of slavery and the growing divide between the Northern and Southern states.

EHESS

Professor Broglin.

EHESS Designed to explore the representations, popular and artistic as well as historiographical, of the French Revolution from the event itself until today, this master's seminar examines subjects such as teaching human rights after the Holocaust, transmitting the French Revolution in a post-colonial context, representations of the assassination of Marat, the socialist historiography of the French Revolution, and the French Revolution in film. Professor Wahnich.

An in-depth doctoral-level seminar held over the course of the year on the French Revolution, assuming significant background knowledge on the part of the students, enabling them to make philosophical and sociological analyses of events. It covers 1789-1799, with emphasis on the period of Terror. Professor Guéniffey.

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EUROPE AT WAR: HISTORY OF REVOLUTION AND THE EMPIRE 17921815

*PARIS AND LONDON IN THE 18TH CENTURY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course covers the social and political factors of the great transformation that Paris and London underwent in the 18th century and how the city officials attempted to control their expansion. It focuses on the people of the two cities: the mutation of the urban landscape, municipal and parochial manage-

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HISTORY

ment of the “undesirables”, informal economies and methods of subsistence, and police and criminality.

toration to the Third Republic. Strong emphasis is placed on primary documents.

Professor Vaillant.

Professors Hême de Lacotte and Dasque.

ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF GREAT BRITAIN AND FRANCE IN THE 19TH CENTURY

HISTORY OF NAPOLEONIC FRANCE

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne History of Great Britain and France, and specifically the relationship between the histories of these two nations, is studied with special reference to economic developments in the 19th century. Sources consulted include political treatises and works of visual art. Professors Mathis and Barjot.

INTRODUCTION TO 19TH CENTURY EUROPEAN HISTORY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A seminar on European history, from the fall of Napoleon and the Congress of Vienna to the beginning of World War I. A majority of class-time is devoted to discussion and presentation of historical texts. Professor Ripa.

HISTORY OF 19TH CENTURY ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL THOUGHT Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course provides an overview of principal economic and social thinkers of the 19th century. To better contextualize the 19th century discussion, the course begins with a quick survey of the major schools of thought preceding the institutionalization of moral philosophy and political economy as disciplines. Readings from Montchrestien, Quesnay, Turgot, and Rousseau are followed by a study of the foundation and development of liberal economics. Works by Malthus, Smith, Bentham, Constant and Say consequently lead past the discussion of classical economics and anticipate the birth of socialist thought. The course ends with the development of socialist theory: Saint-Simon, Comte, Tocqueville, Fourier, Proudhon, Bastiat, Molinari, Cabet, Bakunin and Marx. Professors Grondeux and Barjot.

*POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN 19TH CENTURY FRANCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course in French history covers the evolutions of politics and society in the country from the Res-

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne French society under the Consulate and the Empire (1799-1815) is seen in this course providing a social history of educational, administrative and religious reforms and covering the question of the elite formed by Napoleon during this period. Topics include: the Civil Code, the Concordat, the press, Imperial nobility and conscription. Readings in political and military history provide background relevant to Napoleon’s conquests and European empire. Professors Boudon and Anceau.

CULTURAL AND SOCIAL HISTORY OF FRANCE 1815-1830 Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne An exploration of the transitional Romantic period in France from 1815 to 1830. The class covers political events such as the collapse of Napoleon’s French Empire and the Restoration of the French monarchy. Historical events are seen through the eyes of writers and artists from the period such as Hugo and Chateaubriand. Professors Chaline and Duval.

POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN FRANCE DURING THE BELLE ÉPOQUE (1871-1918) Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course chronicles the politics and society in France from 1871 to 1918. The study of political life starts with the unstable beginning of the Third Republic after the defeat in the Franco-Prussian War. The Belle Époque is a time of competitive political factions, such as republicans and monarchists. Also discussed are the socialist, radical, moderate, and conservative platforms. Through analysis of pivotal events like the Dreyfus Affair, major political themes are explored. The second main theme of the course is the rapport between social groups, including factory workers, the bourgeoisie, Catholics, and nationalists. Major social reforms of the time are closely examined, including the separation of Church and State, the rising unionization of workers, and a surge of exclusive nationalism. The course closes by linking these social and political developments of the Belle Époque with the First World War. Professors Grondeux and Dasque or Duval.

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*THE FRENCH SYSTEM OF DEFENSE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The course proposes to study the French defense system, starting from the early 1800s up through modern times. This class includes topics such as the Spanish campaign of 1823, the war against Abd elKader, French colonization and its characteristics, the French military service, French security, French nationalism, the Force Noire, Galliéni, Verdun, Pétain, Foch, and the German Army. Professors Davion and Frémeaux.

THE CULTURE OF THE ELITE IN FRANCE: MEMORY, CULTURAL HERITAGE, SOCIAL LIFE AND PRIVATE LIFE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The goal of this course is to examine the social and political structures of the aristocratic and elite classes in French Society. Starting from the birth of the French nobility in the Middle Ages to modern political and financial struggles, the course highlights specific developments and changes that gradually affect the institution. In addition to the bibliography provided, students deepen their understanding of the subject through examination of autobiographical literature and several readings from selected authors such as Balzac and Baudelaire. Professor Mension-Rigau.

IMMIGRATION AND MASS MIGRATIONS IN THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course explores patterns of migration in Western Europe, notably France, as well as its historiography. It starts in the latter half of the 19th century with what can be called “white migrations”, but also explores colonization/decolonization and North African immigrants in France. Professor Blanc-Chaléard.

*URBAN HISTORY DURING THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course aims to understand the patterns of urban change through history by examining the development of urbanization in the United States and in Europe during the 19th and 20th centuries. Urbanization was influenced by many factors, such as the industrial revolution or the emergence of contem108

porary art. Furthermore, extreme political powers in Europe catalyzed migratory movements of artists and urban planners to the United States (hence the creation of the Chicago School), or to Israel and Palestine. Also examined are the post-war movements, and the impact of imperialism in Moroccan and Syrian cities. Professor Hudemann..

WWI AND ITS CULTURAL IMPACT ON EUROPE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne An in-depth look at the way in which the First World War shaped the political and social landscape of Europe in the 1920s and 1930s, leading up to WWII. In particular, this class focuses on the way in which the Treaty of Versailles not only changed the international political landscape, but created much tension among European countries, leading to the rise of Hitler's Germany in the 1930s and the disintegration of the French political system. Other topics explored include the commemoration of the First World War, the change in the hierarchical structure of French family life, and the way in which WWI was portrayed in cinema during the 1920s and 1930s. Professors Mension-Rigau, Houte and Dasque.

POLITICAL LIFE IN FRANCE FROM 1880 TO 1940 Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course covers political life in France during the years 1880-1940, beginning with the formation of the Third Republic and ending with the German invasion of France and the installation of the Vichy Government. Major themes include the formation of different political groups and their influence on political life. These include religious forces, the worker movement, the creation of the SFIO, the extreme right and the creation of Action française. Other key areas of study include the scandals that dominated French political life at the end of the nineteenth century, that often times gave rise to certain political groups. The books by historian René Rémond were a major resource for this course as were primary documents such as actual programs for certain political groups and laws at the time. Professors Grondeux and Houte.

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POLITICS AND SOCIETY IN 20TH CENTURY FRANCE

ECONOMIC AND POLITICAL HISTORY OF 20TH CENTURY FRANCE

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

This course focuses on the general sociopolitical history of France's Third Republic, limiting its scope from 1880 to 1918. It seeks to define whether the French society of this period truly was republican in nature. The class serves as a broad survey of all principal events and issues of this period in French history. Among the major topics are the creation of the Third Republic and the legislation that defined it, the rise of socialism, and the Great War. Markers of society are also taken into account: medical practices, demographical information, gender roles, recreational activities, arts and entertainment. Students make use of a course packet containing various primary and secondary sources, and are expected to read from both general studies of the period (such as Michel Leymarie's De la Belle Époque à la Grande Guerre) as well as more specialized works on particular events (such as World War I).

This class focuses on the economic and political aspects of French history from 1914 until the period known as the Trente Glorieuses (1945-1975). The economy in relation to the changing political dynamics of the 20th century is studied chronologically, covering topics such as: the consequences of the First World War, the crisis of 1929, the Front Populaire, economic policy under German occupation, reconstruction after World War II, and finally the postwar decades leading up to the turn of the century.

Professors Houte and Grondeux.

*UNDERSTANDING CONTEMPORARY FRENCH POLITICAL HISTORY, 1815-PRESENT Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course proposes a panoramic view of the evolution of historiographical trends over the past twenty years, starting with Rene Rémond's Pour une histoire politique contemporaine in 1988. Each session focuses on a period of French contemporary history, and is organized into three parts: historical points, a presentation of methods and an inventory of principal advances, thus allowing students to discover a major work of the last quarter century. Strong emphasis is placed on political regimes. Themes discussed include: monarchies (1815-1848), democratic apprenticeship (1848-1870), the Third Republic (18791940), the Franco-Prussian War and the two World Wars, constitutions and institutions, the State and public politics, the concept of Nation, politics and religion, colonial politics, history and memory.

Professor Verheyde.

WARS AND CRISES IN FRANCE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A course focusing on European crises from the beginning of the 20th century until the end of the 1940s. Throughout the semester, the course material analyzes the political, economic, financial, and social causes and effects of various crises within the European and global political system. Questions discussed include: How did the Great War begin? What were the foreign policy failures that brought about its outbreak? What was the origin, the expansion, and the forms of the Great Depression of 1929? What social and political consequences did it generate? The course also studies the Second World War and examines operations from the Liberation up to the Marshall Plan. Professor Verheyde.

VICHY FRANCE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course explores Vichy France from its creation to its effect on the present. Specific areas studied include Collaboration, the economic and financial management, daily life under the Vichy government, French opinion, discrimination, and the aftermath of Vichy. Bibliographical resources include: Le syndrome de Vichy (Rousso), La France de Vichy (Paxton), and De Munich à la libération (Azéma)..

Professor Anceau.

Professor Verheyde.

*20TH CENTURY HISTORY OF FRANCE

AUTHORITARIAN AND TOTALITARIAN REGIMES

Institut Catholique de Paris Providing a chronological overview of 20th century French cultural, political, and social history, this course focuses strongly on the First and Second World Wars. Professor Quilici.

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Providing a history and historiography of totalitarian and authoritarian regimes, with specific focus on Nazi Germany and Fascist Italy, this course discuss-

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es the following questions: What is fascism and how do we define it? What is the role of the charismatic leader? What are the philosophical and sociological theories behind fascist movements? Professor Musiedlak.

*THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM FROM 1815 TO THE PRESENT Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course offers an extensive overview of international relations from 1815 to the present, covering topics including but not limited to the notion of an international system and the European concert, the Berlin Conference, the Munich Conference, European immigration to the Americas, the question of prisoners of war, the League of Nations, Bolshevik Russia, Japan as a partner to Europe, fascism, communism, and the Locarno Conference. Professors Dasque or Davion and Forcade.

HISTORY OF COLONIZATION Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Study of the European colonization of Africa between the Conference of Berlin in 1885 and the Treaty of Versailles in 1919, through general lectures on the subject, and analysis of texts by contemporary European journalists and colonists. The class deals principally with French and British imperial advances in the region. Assigned readings include primary sources such as extracts from treaties, letters and testimonials of European officers. Professors Dasque and Frémeaux.

THE MODERNIZATION OF THE MIDDLE EAST 1920-1950 Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne While exploring the end of the Mandate system of countries in the Middle East, this course focuses on the political, social, and economic climates surrounding the process of emancipation in Saudi Arabia, Iran, Palestine, Lebanon, Jordan and Egypt. It also covers the birth of the Arab League of States in 1945, and the creation of the State of Israel.

period. Course material focuses primarily on the 20th century and attempts to uncover the economic and political objectives of colonial acquisition. Specifically, what brought about the end of European colonial empires? How and why did the European powers eventually relinquish power? Under what circumstances were colonial empires given independence? When were violent means used and to what end? Finally, the course also examines the former colonies in the present day and discusses which of these former colonies have found political, economic, or social success, and which have struggled. Professors Beucher and Frémeaux.

HISTORY AND HISTORIOGRAPHY OF DECOLONIZATION Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense By looking at specific historic moments in the 20th century, this course attempts to build student knowledge of fundamental moments in contemporary history and to create a cohesive timeline of the global phenomenon of decolonization. Beginning with a review of colonizing processes, this class moves through topics quickly to capture the essentials, and finishes by problematizing decolonization and its effects on our modern world. Professor Sellin-Catta.

THE MIDDLE EAST IN THE 20TH CENTURY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course provides an in-depth analysis of the history of the Middle East in the 20th century. It begins with the post-World War I fall of the Ottoman Empire and the following division of the Middle East region between western powers. Students learn how cultural, historical, political, economic, and religious elements shaped the region. By chronicling the century, and focusing on a wide range of subjects including European presence and imperialism, the foundation of Israel and the resulting religious and political polemic with the Muslim world, the internal transformations of nations in the region, and the radicalization of Islam are all seen in depth. Professor Kévonian.

Professors Frémeaux, d'Andurain and Dupont.

COLONIZATION AND DECOLONIZATION OF AFRICA FROM 1919 TO THE PRESENT Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A course which examines the foreign policy aims of the great European powers throughout the colonial 110

*HISTORY OF THE MIDDLE EAST IN THE 20TH CENTURY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course begins with the year 1948, with the creation of the Israeli state, then moves into present times. Each week focuses on a different region,

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following a chronological progression. The course analyzes the interplay between the powers of the Middle Eastern states, as well as the ways in which the great Western powers pulled them apart but also pushed them together in defiance. Professors Piquet and Dupont.

HISTORY

litical movements and international relations. The traditional treaties, dates, and historical figures are studied and the economic, sociological, and international challenges faced by the European community, during some of the darkest decades of its modern history, are examined. Professor Manigand.

THE UNITED STATES AND THE WORLD IN THE 20TH CENTURY

*FASCISM AND NAZISM IN EUROPE

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

This course is an overview of American foreign and diplomatic policy in the 20th century, with a focus on political trends and interactions, from the end of the 19th century to the end of the 20th century. It also examines the social history of the United States as it relates to the decisions made in the realm of foreign policy.

This course examines the development of fascist movements in Europe in the first half of the 20th century. The fascism of Italy and the Nazism of Germany are the privileged examples, but other countries, such as Spain, Romania, France, and Belgium are touched on as well. Tracing the beginnings of fascist movements back to the industrialization, nationalism, and imperialism of the 19th century, the course then examines the social and political impact of World War I and the Treaty of Versailles on European nations, and sees how these two factors contributed to the spread of fascism. Critically examining the spread of fascism in European countries during the inter-war period, the course makes sure to complexify common stereotypes and misconceptions about the rise of fascism, such as Mussolini's “coup d'état” and Hitler's “landslide electoral victory.” Different aspects of the fascist state are also critically examined as the course tries to determine the elements necessary for the success of a fascist state Finally, the course analyzes how fascist states interfaced with the war effort during World War II, and traces their eventual decline.

Professor Portes.

EUROPE IN THE 20TH CENTURY (19001945) Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Beginning with an introduction to Europe at the start of the 20th century, just before World War I, this course examines the economic, social, and political aspects concerning the periods before, during, and after both World Wars. The context of World War I, and in particular the apparent “security” of the European countries and their nationalism, patriotism and pacifism, are exposed and followed by a more detailed study of the war itself. Aspects of the Treaty of Versailles and the economic and political effects of World War I are then explored. An investigation of the period between the two World Wars and specifically the newly defined powers in Europe, the Crisis of the 1930s, and the implications and sources of totalitarianism, are also examined, followed by a more detailed look at the Second World War, and the effects of Germany's domination. Professors Jeannesson and Nardelli.

*EUROPE AND ITS NATIONS FROM 1914 TO 1945 Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course focuses on the domestic politics and international relations of European nations during World Wars I and II and the interwar period. While adhering to chronology, it takes a “cause and effect” approach to the important events taking place during the period. Significant attention is paid to social and cultural upheaval in the aftermath of World War I, as well as to the complexity of domestic po-

Professor Pattieu.

THE INTERNATIONAL SYSTEM SINCE 1945 Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course provides an overview of the fundamental changes in the international system since 1945. Topics discussed include the Cold War and the bipolar nature of the international system, the reconstruction of Europe, the development of human rights, the evolution of the refugee status, decolonization, and the role of religion after WWII. Professors Fourcade and Sibre or Catros.

HISTORY OF GERMANY, 1945-1969 Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course focuses on the history of Germany from the end of the Second World War through 1969. Top-

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ics studied include postwar reconstruction plans, the zones of occupation, the division of Germany, the role of Germany in the Cold War, the Berlin Blockade, the construction of the Berlin Wall, and the student movement. The political, administrative, economic, and cultural trends in both East and West Germany between 1945 and 1969 are seen in depth. Required readings include a number of primary sources such as official documents, speeches, treaties, letters, photographs, and charts. Students also read books by historians such as Alfred Wahl, Georges-Henri Soutou, and Dennis Bark. Professors Dubois and Bled.

HISTORY OF EUROPEAN CONSTRUCTION Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A course on the construction of the European Union including the history and process of its creation. The many controversies that arose as national sovereignty was being transferred to supra-national institutions, and the effects on economic, social, historic and cultural domains of the European continent are discussed. Main topics include the idea of a united Europe, the beginning of the European construction (1950-1954), the Treaty of Rome and the common market, French politics and the creation of a united Europe (1960), the Maastricht Treaty and the monetary union; current controversy involving institutional and political problems; and controversy over economic problems. Readings from Jean Monnet, Churchill, and de Gaulle as well as various other texts of influential figures behind the making and organization of the European Union. Professor Jeannesson.

acceptable constitution, and the place of the European Union as a counterbalance and partner to American power. Professors Thom and Maelstaf.

EUROPEAN POLITICS FROM DE GAULLE TO CHIRAC Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A course on the European politics of France beginning with De Gaulle and ending with the policies of president Giscard d’Estaing. The course extensively covers the concepts and origins of the European Union, the important treaties, policies and laws, as well as the historical events that affected the European Union and its overall evolution. Professors Saint-Gilles and Bussière.

*POST-WAR MEDIA, INFORMATION AND TELECOMMUNICATIONS IN THE UNITED STATES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course explores the history of information and communication (the development of mass media and networked communications) from the 1940s through the first decade of the 21st century in the United States. It draws on a variety historical contexts, broaching questions relating to culture, society, politics, technology and economics. A diversity of historical actors are explored: inventors, the state, industry, consumers and citizens. Professors Schafer and Griset.

*HISTORY AND CINEMA Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

GEOPOLITICS AND ANALYSIS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION FROM ITS FOUNDATIONS TO MODERN TIMES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A study of the major evolutions of the European system - its successes, failures, institutions, expansion - from the end of the 18th century to current times. Starting with the initial philosophical ideas of a pan-European community, the course follows the various influences that pushed European nations together or drew them apart: the World Wars, the introduction of the Eurozone, and the expansion of NATO after the dissolution of the Soviet Union, among other factors. The study culminates in a discussion of current Eastern European membership expansion, the failure to establish an

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This course is a comparative study of films produced by various nationalities and cultures. It analyzes the differing cultural, political and economic factors affecting filmmakers as they deal with basic human concerns such as individual self-worth, relationships, freedom and conformity, and values and moral choice. The objective of this course is to bring to light the utilization of culture and history in films from various countries, with special focus on Greek culture and Greco-Turkish relations, as well as the relations created between Greece and the Middle East. Contemporary films are analyzed in order to evaluate the manner in which Greek culture transpired throughout several other cultures, and how the Middle East is described and perceived through these films. Since most of the directors are Ameri-

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HISTORY

can, different American perspectives on the Middle East are also evoked. Professor Kyriakidis.

*WARS OF THE 20TH CENTURY: HISTORY AND CINEMA UniversitĂŠ de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines the history of modern warfare through its cinematic depiction, and also how war films reflect both the time period in which they were made, and the wars themselves. It starts with the American Civil War and the Paris Commune of 1871 - two of the first displays of modern warfare. While no films were made during these two conflicts, the films Birth of a Nation, Gone With the Wind and Peter Watkins' The Commune address not only the events of the time but also their later perception in the period in which they were made. The final two wars examined are the First and Second World Wars with their respective films ranging from censured propaganda to the modern day blockbuster. Professor Pattieu.

INTRODUCTION TO THE HISTORY OF SCIENCE ENS An introductory course to the history of science examining the evolution of scientific inquiry from the Renaissance to the contemporary period. The seminar takes into account both literary and scientific aspects, and analyzes the issues and methods that constitute a historian's approach to the sciences. The themes studied in depth include the myth of Galileo, the invention of the printing press, Darwin and The Origin of Species, Mendel, scientific collections, replication of experiments, Émile Duclaux and the Pasteur institute, N rays, and the discovery of DNA. Professors Pinon and Morange.

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The Louvre Pyramid

ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

X. ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

HISTORY AND THEORY MESOAMERICAN ART Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course is a survey of Mexican and Central American art and architecture from the pre-classic period until the Spanish conquest, including lectures on the Olmecs, Maya, and Aztecs. The section on Mesopotamian Art places heavy emphasis on the cities of southern Iraq during the 3rd millennium B.C. This course is not limited to the discussion of objects of art; rather it explores topics such as the birth of the city and the invention of writing. Professor Fauvet-Berthelot.

ARCHEOLOGY AND ICONOGRAPHY OF PHARAONIC EGYPT Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Major architectural and iconographical innovations throughout Egypt, from the Old Kingdom through the Middle and New Kingdoms are seen in this course which focuses on building projects, architec114

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ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

tural innovation, and iconography throughout all three kingdoms.

during the Medieval Period up to the end of the 15th century.

Pofessors Tallet and Payraudeau.

Professor Blondeau.

ART OF THE ISLAMIC WORLD

ART OF THE MIDDLE AGES FROM THE 12TH TO THE 16TH CENTURY

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A study of artistic and architectural elements of the Islamic World, beginning in the 9th century and continuing up to the modern era. Major components are religious buildings, such as mosques and mausoleums. These are analyzed through different lenses, such as that of a region (Cairo, India or the Maghreb), or by separate architectural elements such as decorative and structural composition and epigraphy. The evolution of Islam in society is also seen. Professors Van Staëvel, Brac de la Perrière and Aube.

*ARTS OF THE FAR EAST Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course focuses on several different topics pertaining to Chinese and Japanese art. Main themes studied include literary motifs in Chinese painting, the architecture of the Forbidden City, and Japanese architecture. Professors Cluzel, Lefebvre and Gournay.

GALLO-ROMAN ARCHEOLOGY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course discusses Roman lifestyle in France and in Rome, with a concentration on Latin technical terms and structural elements. Gallo-Roman Paris is seen in depth. Professors Joly and Mérot.

ART HISTORY AND ARCHAEOLOGY OF THE ROMAN EMPIRE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense A study of Roman art (from the empire of Augustus to Severus), this course focuses on how Roman art developed from Greek precedents in visual forms. It covers some archaeological theories in addition to art history. Professors Rouveret and Augris.

ROMANESQUE AND GOTHIC ART AND ARCHITECTURE (1000-1400)

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This is a close study of the art and architecture of Europe during the 12th-16th centuries. Study of architectural terms, medieval iconography, and the history of objects and structures of the time. Professors Joubert and Berger.

*MEDIEVAL ART: PAINTING AND FUNERARY ART IN FRANCE, 13TH-15TH CENTURIES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The first half of this two-part course searches to define the nature of French painting during the 15th century, devoting particular attention to the historiography of the field. The political and social history of France throughout the century is discussed in an attempt to understand artistic shifts and currents in France. In the second half of the course, historiography is problematized and used to analyze funerary monuments. The funerary monument and the surrounding practices and ceremonies for the dead are examined in an attempt to understand medieval society and culture. Particular attention is devoted to the idea of the monarchy and the political aspects of funerary practices. Professors Ferré and Lorentz..

HISTORY OF MANUSCRIPT ILLUMINATION IN WESTERN EUROPE Institut National du Patrimoine The purpose of this advanced course is to introduce students to Western European manuscript illumination in the Middle Ages, from its origins before the invention of the codex, to its height in the 15th century. Organized chronologically, the class treats each period (Early Christian, Carolingian, Romanesque, Gothic and Late Gothic) on three levels: technical, iconographic, and stylistic. Particular interest is accorded to the technical aspect of the works examined, revealing the illuminators' materials, methods and workshops. Professor Blondeau.

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense A survey course, which examines civil and religious architecture and iconographic programs in Europe

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ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

RECENT RESEARCH IN MEDIEVAL ART AND ARCHITECTURE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Each session of this full-year course has two parts: the first half presents the art historical or archeological research of a master's-level student enrolled in the class, followed by discussion of the student's work; in the second part of the class, the professor addresses a topic related to current research in the discipline. Particular emphasis is placed on the medieval appropriation of models from Greek and Roman antiquity, as well as the artistic communication between the medieval East and West. Professor Caillet.

TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL MONUMENTAL ARCHITECTURE: GOTHIC SCULPTURES AND SPACES Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This master seminar treats medieval monumental architecture's important themes, focusing on gothic sculpture, its clerical patrons, and its place in the framework of the medieval understanding of the city. The study of historiography is central to the course, which is designed to improve the students' scholarly critical skills. The meetings of the seminar are either discussion or visit. Discussion sessions include a student's oral presentation of his or her analysis of an art historical article, followed by a group discussion of the article, which the professor develops in her synthesis of the subject. During the visit sessions, students are exposed to the rich resources available for their research in Paris, including the archives at the Bibliothèque de l'Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, the Prints and Photographs Collection at the Musée Carnavalet, and the archaeological site and laboratory in Saint-Denis. Professor Volti.

TOPICS IN MEDIEVAL ICONOGRAPHY: VAN EYCK'S ARNOLFINI PORTRAIT Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This master seminar deepens the students' understanding of important themes in religious iconography, focusing on the enigmatic Arnolfini Portrait by Jan van Eyck, and the equally complex history of its 20th century interpreters. The study of historiography is central to the course, which is designed to improve the students' scholarly critical skills. The meetings of the seminar are either discussion sessions, or visits. During the visit sessions, students 116

are exposed to the rich resources available for their research in Paris, including the archives at the Bibliothèque de l'Institut National d'Histoire de l'Art, the Prints and Photographs Collection at the Musée Carnavalet, and the archeological site and laboratory in Saint-Denis. Professor Blondeau.

PAINTING IN VENICE DURING THE EARLY RENAISSANCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne An in-depth analysis of painting in Venice during the Renaissance with lectures on historical context, influences, artistic manner and iconography. Both public works and private commissions are seen. Artists include: Georgione, Titian, Sebastiano del Piombo, Bellini, Dürer and Carpaccio. Professor Merot.

*INTRODUCTION TO ART HISTORY OF THE EUROPEAN RENAISSANCE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course gives an overview of major schools and artists during the Renaissance, focusing on Italy as the center of the artistic revolution, but also on the dissemination of the Renaissance to other European nations. The major issues of modern art, such as the statute of the artist, the creation of the notion of “art” and the relations between art and politics, and between art and religion, are highlighted. Various forms of art are discussed, including sculpture, painting and architecture, as well as the techniques used to produce such works. Professors Valin and Le Pas de Sécheval.

ART OF THE ITALIAN RENAISSANCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Major artistic innovations in the architecture, painting and sculpture of the Italian Renaissance during the Quattrocento. Major themes are: the Florentine masters – Brunelleschi, Masaccio and Donatello, development of linear perspective, chiaroscuro, urban architecture, important patrons of the arts, and the influence of Flemish portraiture. Professors Gady and Peng.

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*MODERN ART AND ARCHITECTURE: THE BIRTH OF THE CLASSICAL STYLE IN FRANCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The first part of this course proposes an overview of architecture in 16th century Europe as well as an introduction to French architecture of the same period, through in-depth analysis of the works of Serlio, Delorme, Lescot, and Du Cerceau. Particular attention is given to architectural method and theory and to the development of a French architectural language. The second part of the course explores 18th century French artist François Boucher's artistic innovations and his role in the birth of a new artistic genre. Professors Gouzi, Gerard-Powell and Mignot.

URBAN PLANNING AND ARCHITECTURAL DEVELOPMENT: PARIS AND VENICE, 1585-1755

ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

to 17th century French painters examines the work of Vouet, Nicolas Poussin, the Le Nain brothers, Jacques Blanchard, Laurent de La Hyre, Philippe de Champaigne, Eustache Le Sueur, Jacques Stella, Michel Corneille the Younger, Sébastien Bourdon and Nicolas Mignard. It addresses their contributions to history painting and monumental décor under the reign of Louis XIV as well as the iconography of 17th century French painting and the nature of commissions and artist/patron relationships. Supplemented by a chronological, in-depth examination of important themes in 18th century French painting, the course continues on to address the works of artists such as Coypel, Watteau, Lancret, Lemoyne, de Troy, Boucher, Desportes, Oudry, Chardin, Fragonard, Vernet, Greuze, Vien and David. Professor Milovanovic, Bélime-Droguet, Rabier.

*MODERN ART 1: ALLEGORY IN FRENCH ART OF THE 17TH CENTURY

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

The course focuses on the birth of modern cities, with Paris and Venice as primary examples. Covering the period between the late 16th century and the early 18th century, students examine the emergence of urbanism and its effects on the architecture and structure of cities.

This course examines allegorical art in the 17th century, focusing on French artists but also drawing from Italian and Northern European examples. Sculptures adorning cathedrals, frescoes from Versailles, Italian history paintings and Dutch interiors are all use allegorical figures whose meanings this course seeks to illuminate. Using Cesare Ripa's 16th century text Iconologia as a starting point, students learn the visual language of allegory. A supplemental course is offered about chinoiserie in the court of Louis XIV.

Professors Mignot and Gady.

HISTORY OF FRENCH ARCHITECTURE: 16TH-18TH CENTURY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Detailed study of French architecture from the 16th to the 18th century (the early modern period). Major constructions of the era including castles, hôtels particuliers, and religious buildings are discussed in detail, as are the architects who designed them. The history surrounding each construction is explored: the building’s purpose, inhabitants, renovations, current function, etc. The architectural structure and details of each building are also discussed. Students receive training in the methods of formally analyzing the architecture of a variety of constructions. Professor Massounie.

MYTHS AND HISTORY IN 17TH CENTURY FRENCH PAINTING & FRENCH PAINTING IN THE 18TH CENTURY

Professors Gouzi, Mérot and Wolvesperges.

ART, STATE AND PUBLIC IN THE 17TH AND 18TH CENTURIES Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense A course covering secular art in the 17th and 18th centuries in Western Europe, specifically in Spain, Holland, France and Italy. Art is viewed through the development of art markets, political ties between countries, and the foundation of institutions such as the Academy of Painting and Sculpture, and the gradual rise of the stature of artists from artisans to intellectuals. An extensive bibliography is studied, with texts on individual artists and on the periods covered. Professors Le Pas de Sécheval and Mazel.

École du Louvre Beginning with the return of Simon Vouet to France in 1627, the portion of this course dedicated

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*A CRITICAL HISTORY OF THE GENRES OF 17TH AND 18TH CENTURY PAINTING Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The accession to the throne of Louis XIV, accompanied by the ambitious politics of patronage implemented by his minister Colbert, gave birth to new institutions under the guidance of theorists and artists aiming to control, monitor, and orient new artistic productions. During the 17th century, the hierarchy of painting genres was given structure by the Royal Academy of Painting and Sculpting in Paris. This course analyzes the social, political, and moral function of the classification of subjects. In addition, the hierarchy of genres is studied through the lens of art history, beginning with the Greeks and Romans, in order to better understand the developments of the 17th and 18th centuries. A brief study of the Flanders, whose development allowed for of a new market for art in the 16th century, explains the appearance of certain genres considered minor in other parts of Europe. Altogether, the class tackles the relationship between public power and painters. Professor Faure-Carricaburu.

INTRODUCTION TO 18TH CENTURY EUROPEAN ART Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne Unlike many periods in the history of art, the 18th century – the century of Boucher, Hogarth, and Houdon – does not inspire one coherent narrative of development but is rather characterized by the disunity of its artistic output across boundaries of geography, medium, and genre. This survey class thus explores the diversity of artistic production in 18th century Europe from the end of Louis XIV’s reign through the rise of Neo-Classicism and Romanticism with David and Goya. Primary attention is given to painting and sculpture, as well as architecture in France, Italy, England, and Spain. Themes considered include the heritage of the 17th century, the hierarchy of genres, the myth of the Rococo, the impact of tourism, and the role of patronage and the court. Special attention is devoted to works at Paris sites and in Parisian collections. Professors Magnier and Gérard-Powell.

ART UNDER THE ANCIEN RÉGIME Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis An art history course exploring the artistic hierarchy under the Ancien Régime. The main focus is the his118

torical context for various works of art that serves to deepen students' understanding of each work's social, historical, and artistic significance. Professor Faure-Carricaburu.

*LATE 18TH AND EARLY 19TH CENTURY FRENCH ART Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The main focus of this two-part course is European landscape painting in the first half of the 19th century. The political aspects of monuments in France in the first half of the 19th century are also examined. Professors Ameille, Laugée and Jobert.

19TH CENTURY ART: MONET Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This is a course that focuses on the life of Monet: his early years in Le Havre, his influences, and the development of his artistic style. Professors Jobert and Zeisler.

THE HISTORY OF FRENCH PAINTING FROM DAVID THROUGH COURBET Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne French painting from the end of the 18th century to the 19th century, from Jacques-Louis David to Gustave Courbet, is studied through a historical and artistic analysis of painters and their works. The integral role that French painting played over the course of the 19th century is seen, and in particular the importance of a talented and bold group of French painters who sought to represent and encourage the political, social, and cultural change of their era. By examining the rise - and subsequently the divergence from Romanticism and Neo-classicism - of artistic movements of this time period, students learn to recognize how accurately the artwork produced during this time articulated the radically changing nature of society.. Professors Goetz and Tonnet or Cordier.

*MAJOR MOVEMENTS IN 19TH CENTURY FRENCH PAINTING Center for University Programs Abroad Beginning with Neoclassicism and covering the movements of Romanticism, Realism, Impressionism, Post-Impressionism and Symbolism, this course follows major movements in French painting of the 19th century as they relate to the expression of the individual and to artistic institutions and conven-

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tions. It examines the socio-political context and its influence on the artists, with strong emphasis on analysis of style, technique, color, and light. Half of the course is held on site at museums (Le Louvre, Musée d'Orsay, Musée Marmottan, Musée Gustave Moreau and Musée de L'Orangerie). Readings include excerpts from Baudelaire's Écrits sur l'Art and Zola's Écrits sur l'Art, as well as Pierre Francastel's Études de sociologie de l'art and Jean-Louis Ferrier's Brève Histoire de l'art. Professor Baudouin.

ART OF MODERN TIMES: THE 19TH AND 20TH CENTURIES École du Louvre This course examines the major artists and developments of the 19th and 20th centuries. Themes treated include: art during the French Revolution, art of the French Empires, art of the World's Fairs, Fauvism, Cubism, Futurism, Dada, Surrealism, the New York School and Land Art. Artists examined include: Clodion, Constable, Chinard, Guérin, Ingres, Labrouste, Barye, Géricault, Delacroix, Carpeaux, Rodin, Manet, Garnier, Degas, Monet, Seurat, Guimard, Gauguin, Matisse, Derain, Vlaminck, Picasso, Braque, Balla, Boccioni, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Malevitch, Duchamp, Miró, Magritte, Pollock, de Kooning, Rothko, Hamilton, Rauschenberg, Warhol, Lichtenstein, Judd, Oppenheim and Smithson. Professors Lobstein and Morando.

*DECORATIVE ARTS AND ARCHITECTURE IN EUROPE AND THE UNITED STATES, 1850-1940 Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Between the end of the 19th century and the period between the two World Wars, the theories, techniques, and forms of the “decorative” arts experienced drastic transformations directly correlated to those impacting architecture such as industrialism, urbanism, and international political unrest. This course explores the relationship between architecture and “modern” decorative arts. A certain number of emblematic moments are chronologically explored: in Britain (Arts & Crafts), in France (Art Nouveau, Art Déco), in the Germanic countries (Secession, Werkbund, Bauhaus), in Russia (Constructivism), in the Netherlands (De Stijl), and in the United States (Chicago School, Streamline). The course provides a basis for understanding class politics, urban-

ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

ism, and the ethics of aesthetics and their continued influence on Western material culture. Professor Labrusse.

20TH CENTURY ART HISTORY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The course introduces students to the various art movements of the 20th century, beginning with Futurism and continuing to the present day. Particular attention is given to the major European movements, though their context and influence in the US are also discussed. The course focuses mainly on the movement toward abstraction in the visual arts, combining a study of major art works and the principle theoretical texts that founded them. Among others, major texts include Kandinsky's Concerning the Spiritual in Art as well as the Futurist Manifestos. Professor De Barros.

ARTISTIC AVANT-GARDES IN PARIS (19001939) Center for University Programs Abroad An art history course that explores the development of art in Paris as a cradle for the avant-garde painters, from Fauvism at the dawn of the century to Surrealism in the pre-war period. Painters studied include Matisse, Derain, Vlaminck, Cézanne, Picasso, Kandinsky, Mondrian, Malevich, Duchamp, Picabia, De Chirico and Masson, among others. Thematic conferences are supplemented by weekly museum visits (Musée d’Orsay, Centre G. Pompidou, Musée Picasso, Musée d’art moderne de la ville de Paris) Professor Baudouin.

FRENCH CULTURAL HERITAGE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This two-part course combines the study of the museum as an institution, and a survey of Paris since Haussmann's 19th century changes to the city's landscape. The first part, through a study of individual sites, examines fundamental questions surrounding the museum: commercialism, display, the public, representing/preserving/effacing artistic and cultural history. In the second part, the development of Paris is examined through iconic sites within the city: Grand Palais/Petit Palais/Pont Alexandre III, Le Corbusier plans, La Défense, peripheral neighborhoods, and public gardens. Professors Baudez, Texier and Claass.

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THE HISTORY OF ARTISTIC AVANT-GARDE MOVEMENTS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The purpose of this course is to give an overview of the different artistic movements that developed between 1900 and 1945, while challenging the traditional discourse that defines modern art as a closed, self-referential system. An analysis of the various pictorial vocabularies developed by these movements proves that innovative aspects of avantgarde art stemmed not from a hermetic enclosure, but rather from an unprecedented opening to other cultures allowing the artist to assimilate new representational possibilities. Professor Fagnart.

HISTORY OF 20TH CENTURY ART Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is an overview of major artistic movements such as Abstract Expressionism, New Realism, Neo Dadaism, Minimalism, and Conceptual Art. It focuses on themes such as transformability and metamorphosis, and the evolution of movement in op art and cinematic art after 1945, involving a wide range of media and experiments, from optical illusions to innovations with color and mixed media that encourage the participation of the spectator. Beginning with artists such as Duchamp, Agam, and Tinguely, the course progresses until the end of the 20th century with the integration of cinematic movement in art. Professors Pierre and Simoniello.

MIRÓ: LINE AND COLOR Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Analysis of the relationship between literature and the visual arts using the work of Miró as a starting point. His collaborations with three French poets, André Breton, René Char, and Claude Simon, are studied as well. Professor Créac’h.

KANDINSKY AND THE PATH TO ABSTRACTION Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course traces Kandinsky’s life, focusing on his path to abstraction, and his gradual move away from figurative elements. It also covers Malevich’s influence on the work of Kandinsky, as well as their different approaches. Five texts are used in class,

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most of them being Kandinsky’s writings on art. Indepth analysis of the rapport between Kandinsky’s theories and his own work. Professor Morizot.

MONDRIAN AND DE STIJL Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The evolution of Mondrian’s artistic practices is traced from his early landscapes through his Cubist period, the development of the doctrine of Neoplasticism, to the complex Boogie-Woogie series before his death in 1944. Attention is given to both formalist interpretations of Mondrian’s art, as well as the spiritual and philosophical aspects of his work within the framework of his theoretical writings. Mondrian’s role in the group De Stijl provides the impetus for the second portion of the class, in which the realization of a “new plasticity” in painting, sculpture, architecture, typography, and furniture is studied. Emphasis on key members of De Stijl’s group including Van Doesburg, Vantongerloo, and Rietveld; the ideal of the synthesis of the arts; and the relationship between De Stijl and other avant-garde movements. The lecture component of the class is accompanied by a section contextualizing Mondrian’s work within the history of abstraction in the first half of the 20th century. Professors Poirier, Pierre and Ducros.

*JAPAN AND THE WEST: RECIPROCAL REGARDS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines the interplay between Western and Japanese art and the parallels between “japonisme” in Europe and “Occidentalism” in Japan, in an attempt to understand what each culture seeks in the art of the other. The history of artistic exchange between Japan and Europe is explored, beginning with the preliminary interactions between East and West, a byproduct of commerce and missionary activity in the 16th century, and picking up again after the opening of Japan in the 19th century. Topics include the influence of Japanese woodblocks on 19th century French artists, the portrayal of Westerners in Japanese art, different conceptions of space by the cultures of East and West, and the experience of avant-garde artists in dealing with the tensions between their respective traditions and modernity. Professor Charrier.

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INTRODUCTION TO CONTEMPORARY ART Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course is an introduction to contemporary art, from the 1960s to present day. Every week an artist and his/her work are discussed, supplemented by documentaries. Students are also required to see current exhibitions in Paris. Artists include Maurizio Cattelan, Francis Alÿs, Olafur Eliasson, Mariko Mori, Bill Viola, Anish Kapoor, Claude Lévêque, Jeff Koons, Daniel Buren, Chen Zhen, Sarah Lucas, Paul McCarthy, Huang Yong Ping, Matthew Barney, Sam Samore, Annette Messager, Pipilotti Rist, Fischli & Weiss, Joseph Kosuth, Wang Du. Professor Segond.

MODERNISM & THE AVANT-GARDE: REPRESENTATIONS OF THE BODY IN 20TH & 21ST CENTURY WESTERN ART Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A lecture-class on the history of representations of the body in 20th and 21st century Western art, from 1907 to the present day. Students are required to participate in class discussions, undertake a midterm exam, and either present an oral presentation on a modern or contemporary artwork about the body recently seen in an exhibition by the student, or present a written assignment on the subject.

ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

ute response to a previously unseen photograph, in front of their peers. Professor Meizel.

HISTORY OF PHOTOGRAPHY 1839-1914 Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The history of photography is seen from the invention of the daguerreotype in 1839 up until the First World War. In addition to studying the inventions and photos of major 19th century photographers such as Daguerre, Talbot, Nadar, and Disderi, this course focuses specifically on the social, political, and cultural impacts of photography and looks critically at how the concepts of “photography” and the “photographer” emerged and developed in the 19th and early 20th century. Professor Roubert.

HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course explores the history and evolution of the medium of photography since WWII. It discusses the theories and attitudes towards the creation of contemporary photographic images, documentary vs. artistic photography, and the historical context and significance of photographs.

Professor Rinuy.

Professor Roubert.

PHOTOGRAPHY: A HISTORY OF VISUAL INFLUENCE, 1878-2000S.

READING PHOTOGRAPHY: SEMIOLOGICAL AND NARRATIVE APPROACHES

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Center for University Programs Abroad

This class on the history of photography from 1878 to the 2000s focuses on the way various photographers and photographic movements have visually influenced each other. Emphasis is placed on discussion, where students are asked to draw visual comparisons between works that can be historically supported. Students are invited to participate in this history of visual influence, by taking turns to produce photographs that are contextually relevant to today's society, whilst maintaining an evident visual rapport with the historic photographs studied in the week's lecture. Students are also asked to produce an essay critiquing a pre-existing textual history of photography, by drawing comparisons with the history provided during class lectures as well as those discovered in their own independent research. Finally, students are required to pass a 'blind oral' exam, where they must utilize their skills developed and provide a spontaneous, 10-20 min-

This course presents an introduction to semiological and narrative readings of the photographic image, incorporating creation and manipulation of images by the students themselves in the aim of enhancing theoretical knowledge of the creative practice. Through study of the ontology of the photograph and how theoretical implications of this ontology influence its analysis, specific techniques are seen, such as surcadrage, framing, and lines of force, among others. The ideas of Roland Barthes in La Chambre claire furnish a theoretical vocabulary and framework, and the different roles of photography are discussed, with a focus on photography as documentary reporting versus photography as art. The relationship between the subject and the photographer is also seen. Readings include authors and photographers such as Bazin, Cartier-Bresson, Calle and Proust. Professor Bondurand.

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EXPRESSIONISM AND CONTEMPORARY PHOTOGRAPHY

ART AND INVISIBILITY

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

This course in art theory and history entertains the theme of the visible versus the invisible in art, these themes manifesting themselves literally, as examples of modern exhibitions that feature art that cannot be seen, or through more subtle forms of invisibility such as art catering to certain audiences. Students visit exhibitions in Paris and examine how the viewer is led through the exhibition and what the viewer is able to see.

Photography is seen as a medium in contemporary art. Topics include the history of photography as art, trends and concepts of photography, and the implications of using photography as a medium. Major contemporary artists studied include Jess Wall and Cindy Sherman. In-depth study of the Expressionist movement in art, presenting artists in their historical contexts. Both art history and art theory, the course covers major expressionists and their work.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Desmet.

Professors Le Gall and Tonnet.

MONUMENTAL SCULPTURE IN THE CONTEMPORARY CITY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis An exploration of contemporary large-scale sculpture from 1968 to present day, with a focus on works found specifically in Paris or around France. A range of artists and works are explored, beginning with Rodin’s radical innovations and continuing with the study of Jean Dubuffet, Christo and Jeanne-Claude, Claes Oldenburg, and others. One artist and one of his/her key-works are discussed each week, in the context of his/her other works, influences, and related movements, and many visual examples are given. The importance of environment and collective memory in monumental sculpture is an important discussion topic in this course. Professor Rinuy.

THE ROLE OF THE VIEWER IN ART, PAST AND PRESENT Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The course examines the role of the viewer in the comprehension and appreciation of art, with a special emphasis on the interaction between art and the public on the contemporary art scene. The class focuses on the notions of artistic commitment, militant artists, and the transgression of the public from passive viewer to active participant. Lectures are based on major texts of modern art theory and history, as well as regular museum visits and gallery tours. The political, social, and/or esthetical commitment of selected artists from the 1900s to the present is studied, and students create a portfolio based on both research and creative work introducing three fictional works of art that commit the viewer to active participation. Professor Lauraire.

ARTS, NATURE, AND ARCHITECTURE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course attempts to organize the contemporary situation of creating territories by critically analyzing contemporary spaces. It focuses on four themes: a survey of countryside, the postmodern problem of the “city,” the place of the individual body within this framework, and the different modalities of the “mass body”. Products of our contemporaries, technological projects, places, and events that “manifest” landscapes, from the smallest scale to the found object (and gesture) up to those of nature and the planet Earth, create a symbolic order. In seminar style, students explore the philosophy of art and architecture. Images complement the lectures and are critically analyzed and discussed in class. Readings include Charles Jencks, Rem Koolhaas and Edward T. Hall.

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN AESTHETIC THEORY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course provides students with an introduction to aesthetic theory and the philosophy of art, exploring questions such as: What is art? When does an object take on an aesthetic value? What are the criteria for evaluating art? To what extent are the intention of the artist and the reception of the public significant in our aesthetic judgment? Readings come from the anthologies Esthétique contemporaine, Philosophie analytique et esthétique de l'art, and Questions d'esthétique and include authors such as Nelson Goodman, Arthur Danto, Alex Neill, Dominic Lopez, W.K. Wimsatt, and Monroe Beardsley. Professor Popelard.

Professor Nys.

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TECHNIQUES OF ARTISTIC CREATION: PRINTS, PAINTING, SCULPTURE, ARCHITECTURE, CERAMICS, DRAWING, PHOTOGRAPHY, CONTEMPORARY ART, FURNITURE

ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

tured different guest speakers such as a curator of the Musée du Quai Branly or an officer in France's Ministry of Culture. Students prepare questions and interview professionals of their choosing. Professor Camart.

École du Louvre Taught by curators and scholars from French museums and institutions including the Louvre, the Château de Versailles and the Musée d'Orsay, this course aims to enrich students' understanding of works of art by detailing the techniques behind their creations. Mediums addressed include printmaking, painting, sculpture, architectural construction, ceramics, porcelain, glass-making, photography, furniture and the production of contemporary art. Each lecture on a specific technique is enriched with discussion of works of art from the 17th through 20th centuries. Professors Baudequin, Menu, Leroy-Jay-Lemaistre, Markovics, de Rochebrune, Salé, Lavédrine and Barabant.

INTRODUCTION TO MUSEUM STUDIES AND ICONOGRAPHY 1 École du Louvre Iconography of Western art is examined through the discussion of works from the 17th through 19th centuries. Themes treated include: romantic relations of the gods and goddesses of the ancient Roman and Greek traditions, depictions of Roman history from its founding to the end of the monarchy, iconography from La Jerusalem délivrée by Françoise Graziani, art of the Catholic Reformation and comparative iconography in ancient and modern art. The second part of the course, takes place on-site in Parisian museums, and consists of lectures on the holdings of French collections. Themes treated include: French sculpture of the 17th-19th centuries (The Louvre), art of the French Court at Versailles (The Château de Versailles), art of the 19th century in France (Musée d'Orsay, Petit Palais and Musée Rodin), and French decorative arts of the 17th19th centuries (at the Louvre, Musée Carnavalet, and the Musée des Arts Décoratifs). Professors Violette, Villanueva Puig, Dufoulon, Enfedaque, Rousseau and Paragot

*MUSEUM PROFESSIONS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course introduces students to the many professions represented in the museum world and fea-

STUDIO COURSES BEGINNER'S BLACK AND WHITE PHOTOGRAPHY Studio Vermès Students receive a hands-on introduction into the world of black-and-white 35-mm photography. With weekly instruction classes, meetings around different neighborhoods in Paris, and personal help in the darkroom, students are able to become comfortable and experiment with different techniques. During weekly darkroom lab sessions, students learn to develop their film and print their own photos while developing a personal style. The course provides an immersion into the photography community as well, as students must attend photo exhibits and openings around Paris and becoming familiar with modern photographers. The semester culminates in an exposition of the students' personal work. A written project is also submitted. Professors Vermès and Béard.

*BLACK AND WHITE FILM PHOTOGRAPHY Spéos In this course, students learn how to shoot, develop, and print black and white film, and are given a different topic to shoot every week. A group critique takes place each month. At the end of the course students select their best prints and submit a final portfolio. Professor Banisadr.

*ADVANCED PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO Studio Vermès This advanced-level photography course is intended for students who are already familiar with the basics of using a camera and comfortable with darkroom work. The aim of the class is to help the students develop a critical sense and allow them to establish a more coherent personal style, working in a fully equipped indoor studio. Students learn how to use

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all equipment: backdrops, flashes, lights, light meters, tripods, digital cameras, different types of film cameras, and large format view cameras, and experiment in class using different lighting techniques. Professors Vermès and Béard.

*PAINTING AND DRAWING Atelier Foranim This course focuses on improving painting and drawing skills in a studio environment. To improve technique, students copy famous works of art, but they are also welcome to bring in material (e.g. their own photographs) to paint or draw. Various materials, such as acrylic paint, oil, charcoal, pencil and ink are used. Professor Jeunon or Lemaire.

*FIGURE DRAWING Atelier Terre et Feu The nude figure offers an unceasing challenge to the student of drawing as it presents a constant exercise of proportion, line, weight, and contour. This course requires students to practice the most basic elements of figure drawing, limiting the time spent on each sketch. Emphasis is placed on developing a process for constructing and executing drawings in a fluid and consistent manner. Professor Pestarque.

*DRAWING WORKSHOP Atelier Helena Hamer This art course covers basic drawing, perspective, still life, shading and dimension studies. After completion of the beginning stage of basic skills, options are provided in technique (acrylics, water color, chalk, sketch, or pastels) and form (portrait, abstract, body form, still-life…) on a weekly basis. Professor Hamer.

STUDIO ART: THE ART OF THE COMIC STRIP Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Various styles, conventions, and uses of the comic strip medium are studied, with a particular concentration each week. Subjects covered include simple visual conventions as well as more complex issues such as adaptation and portrayal of the lapse of time. Professor Oiry.

*DRAWING WITH LIVE MODELS Atelier Foranim This course provides practice for artists of all skill levels. Each week, the instructor presents a movement in art history and assigns an exercise involving the style of this particular movement. Materials used include charcoal, chalk, pen and ink, and pencil. A live model is present every other week. Students maintain a weekly sketchbook. Professor Jeunon.

*DRAWING AND PAINTING STUDIO Atelier Terre et Feu In this art studio, either drawing (pencil, charcoal, conte) or painting (oil, watercolor, acrylic) can be chosen each week, depending on the student's individual preference. The instructor provides feedback over the course of the semester, and topics vary each session, ranging from still life to nude studies, and various poses. Professor André.

*PAINTING AND DRAWING WORKSHOP Atelier La Miroiterie Students develop techniques in drawing and painting while working from both live models and stilllife objects arranged in the studio. Sketches, reproductions, and multiple drafts serve as learning tools and furnish the means to develop a personal style. Students understand the elements of composition in a painting, work with color values and blending techniques, and gain exposure through art instruction that focuses on the individual expression of the artist. Professor Chauveau.

CONTEMPORARY PAINTING Atelier Terre et Feu This painting course is open to all levels of experience. It focuses on the technique and precision of contemporary painting. Students are encouraged to explore different styles and create freely. The professor guides them towards further development of their work by offering critique and suggesting references to professional artists, both contemporary and historical. The goal of the class is to sharpen painting skills and explore new ideas, allowing students to produce a cohesive portfolio of work. Professor Chompré.

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ART - HISTORY, THEORY AND PRACTICE

INTRODUCTION TO COLOR

CLAY SCULPTURE STUDIO

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Atelier Foranim

A color class designed for entry-level fine art students. Students discover, through in-class exercises, how to manipulate paint to produce every color in the spectrum. Students are then required to present all of their work at the end of the course to the teacher; a research assignment is also required, on the subject of Monochrome. Students also pursue a personal project that takes their investigation of color mixing to a more practical level. The personal project may be in any studio discipline.

A studio art class in sculpture accommodating a wide level of competence. Working with clay, this course explores the representation of volume, and students begin by using the human body as subject. More abstract and personal pieces are encouraged as the semester progresses.

Professor Molina-Martinez.

MEDICAL AND SCIENTIFIC ILLUSTRATION ESAIG-École Estienne This course trains the student in the production of imagery according to the didactic aesthetic used in the medical and scientific illustration profession. Emphasis is placed on the accuracy of representational imagery produced in order to convey scientific ideas. Two brochures are produced using both traditional and digital media. The first concerns flight: its mechanics and physical principles, the history of human flight, as well as the anatomy of bird wings and that of other flying creatures. The second addresses a type of alternative energy, such as photovoltaic solar energy, in order to present its history, applications, and potential for future usage to a young audience. A final poster is created presenting the spinal column and its pathologies. This course is part of a full time comprehensive graphic arts curriculum at the Ecole Estienne. Professor Barnaud.

GRAPHIC DESIGN ESAIG-École Estienne A course in which the use of type and image are studied as conveyors of information. The anatomy of letterforms, the histories of the basic type families, and the impact of fonts are covered and related to their use as tools in advertising and other public contexts. Coursework includes the identification of various letterforms and their parts, a presentation of the basic type families, a poster designed for the Mairie de Paris’ “R'Éduc-Sport” publicity campaign which aims to attract the Parisian youth to join sports clubs in the city. This course is part of a full time comprehensive graphic arts curriculum at the Ecole Estienne. Professor Quellet.

Professor Ottaviani.

*SCULPTING Atelier Terre et Feu This course, which welcomes beginning and advanced artists alike, focuses on capturing individual impressions of 2D models (paintings, drawings) in clay. The themes of movement and emotion are emphasized, and an individual creative process is encouraged. The class works on one given model at a time, although each student is encouraged to create his/her own interpretation of the subject. The subjects are usually depictions of the human form, but can also be very abstract, and allow for more individual artistic interpretation. Sculpting anatomically perfect replicas is not the goal of this course, in which an atmosphere of modern creativity gives the artist the freedom to develop his/her own style under the direction of a professional sculptor. Professors Massa or Oulès.

*MOSAICS Atelier Solène Léglise This class teaches the fundamentals of creating mosaics, including how to use various tools and different techniques, and the basics of color and design needed to construct an aesthetically pleasing mosaic. Students learn how the techniques of preparing and placing tiles create different textures and effects, and work on a mosaic of their own design using different types of colored tiles. Professor Léglise.

*POTTERY AND CERAMICS Atelier Terre et Feu This course provides an in-depth introduction to the arts of pottery and ceramics, with subjects explored such as: pottery and the wheel, manipulation of craft, mixing varieties of clay, basic sculpture, and glazing techniques. Over the course of the semester, students move from basic pottery techniques - the creation of a simple cylinder - on to more advanced

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shapes and styles, from bowls to a variety of vases.

PRINTMAKING

art exhibitions are encouraged. Artists working in this medium are brought in to contribute to the discussion, and numerous examples of mail art are presented.

ESAIG-École Estienne

Professor Hamard-Wang.

Professor Lance.

An introduction to lithography, silk-screening and typesetting. The history of printing and the varied approaches to printing are addressed in order to inform the approach to the course's final project: the production of an artist's book utilizing the afore-mentioned printing techniques. Coursework includes the production of an artist's book, using a French poem with an accompanying English translation as the text, and the student's illustrations. The type is set using the School's extensive collection of fonts; the illustrations are executed using lithographical and silk-screening techniques. This course is part of a full time comprehensive graphic arts curriculum at the Ecole Estienne. Professor Caine.

STUDIO ART: ARTICULATION & DURATION Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The course explores duration in art by means of studio practice. Students experiment with the notion of time that puts into motion, delays, constructs, reveals, and connects images, sounds, objects, and words. The first project is based on the progression of “action - repetition - articulation”, proposed both as creative process and as theme of reflection. The second project should lead to a “conversation” of various media on the same topic or, conversely, of various ideas subordinated to a dominating material. In both bodies of work, the challenge is to make all the elements co-habit the art space and uphold a time frame. All media are acceptable. Students will draw on the theoretical framework of French philosopher Gilles Deleuze, as well as on relevant examples in contemporary art, music, and dance. Professor Coenon-André.

MAIL ART AND COMMUNICATION Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A studio art class focused on the mail art trend, with discussions of the manifestos and radical aspirations of mail artists, and their explorations into modes of communication. The history of mail art in France, the US, and other countries is covered, along with other movements like copy art. Visits to the Paris postal museum and participation in mail

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Montmartre-Sacré Coeur

FILM STUDIES

XI.

HISTORY OF CINEMA 1928-1965

FILM STUDIES

This course examines the invention of sound in cinema and its subsequent impact on the cinema industry in terms of film production. Students also examine the issues and new esthetics brought about by the arrival of sound in cinematographic production up to the French New-Wave films.

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Professors Droin and Godier.

*SEMIOLOGY IN FILM THEORY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course offers an introduction to the theory of semiology, looking at its objectives and methodology, and focusing in particular on its application to film theory. Students engage in close readings of fundamental theoretical texts in the semiology of cinema, including works by Roland Barthes and Christian Metz. Professor Grünberg.

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CINEMATOGRAPHERS ON THEORY

*FRENCH CINEMA

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Institut Catholique de Paris

Study of the major cinematographers who influenced the realm of film theory. Extensive reading and discussion of theory and how it relates to the art of filmmaking, and the relationship between the art of film and its theorization by those who create film.

This course follows the path and evolution of French cinema from its birth in the early 1900s to its most recent forms. It covers all genres of French cinema and analyzes how French culture and life were represented while commenting on specific films that now form an integral part of French culture.

Professor Aumont.

Professor Vidal-Naquet.

CINEMATOGRAPHY: TEXT AND VOICE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle A seminar in film theory, requiring students to do extensive reading and research in order to be able to discuss how text informs cinematic representation and how text is given voice through adaptation, characterization, and other important aspects of filmmaking. Professor Tesson.

EXPRESSIONIST AND AVANT-GARDE CINEMA Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This class explores classic European films from the 1920s. Films such as Nosferatu, Metropolis and The Cabinet of Doctor Caligari are analyzed for their individual merits and their place in the Expressionist and avant-garde œuvre. Professor Hillairet.

FILM NARRATIVE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense A film course designed to provide in-depth analysis of the narrative structure of various films and value of the narrative itself to the film. The course addresses problems of temporality, space, and metaphor, as well as visual, rhetorical, dialogue, sound and narrative elements. It also discusses perspective, flashbacks, rhythm, character, point of view, and adaptations of literary works for the cinema, through a study of the following films and texts: Nosferatu, Citizen Kane, Hiroshima mon amour, Pulp Fiction, The Cabinet of Dr Caligari, The Seven Samurais, Rashomon.

FRENCH AVANT-GARDE CINEMA OF THE 1920S Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

FILM ANALYSIS

Exploration of the themes inherent to the French avant-garde cinema movement of the 1920s and in particular the themes of cinema and modernity. The birth of cinema in 1895, and the cinema of Edison and the Lumière brothers are discussed, leading into the study of Impressionist, Surrealist, Dada, and documentary schools of cinema, and analysis of the themes of technology, landscape, and urbanism and the idea of “pure cinema”. Directors studied are: Delluc, Dulac, L'Herbier, Gance, Epstein, Clair, Buñuel, Cocteau, and Painlevé. The course ties diverse ideas and opinions together through the notion of cinema as “movement”.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Hillairet.

Professor Sallenave.

This intermediate film-analysis course requires its students to develop their own analytical skills rather than simply learning film structure and analytical terms. The following themes are studied: the actor's performance in film, opening/introductory sequence (and how genre/plot are introduced differently), the Hitchcockian hero, the face in film, the subjective sequence, and the reoccurring theme of the vampire in cinema. Professor Risterucci.

HISTORY OF CINEMA: SOVIET AVANTGARDE CINEMA OF THE 1920S Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course involves a detailed study of the Soviet Avant-Garde cinema of the 1920s. General history of the USSR after the Bolshevik revolution is linked to cinematic accomplishments through observing and researching the works of Vertov, the F.E.K.S., Eisenstein and others. Professor Demarcy.

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FILM STUDIES

*THE LATER WORKS OF CHARLES CHAPLIN (1930-1957)

CLASSIC FRENCH CINEMA: 1930-1960

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Between 1930 and 1960, French directors created and directed films that were extremely different, but as a group they collectively collaborated, in order to represent the imagination of their time, outlining the intricacies of France’s cultural identity, and enabling today’s society to understand this period’s history and dreams. This course concerns itself in particular with two legendary filmmakers, Jean Renoir and Marcel Carné, each of whom contributed in his own manner to the constitution of the classic school of thought in French filmmaking.

This course is an in depth analysis of the later works of Charles Chaplin and his representations of American life. It studies the historical, cultural, and personal background of his feature film career from 1930 to 1957. Films viewed are: A Woman of Paris, City Lights, Modern Times, The Great Dictator, Limelight, Monsieur Verdoux, and A King in New York, as well as numerous documentaries and extras. Professor Delage.

TOD BROWNING: CINEMA AND TERATOLOGY

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Professor Godier.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

ANALYSIS OF FILM NOIR

The œuvre of Tod Browning, director of the absurd, carnivalesque and bizarre is examined in this course which also discusses the history of the monster in philosophy, art and cinema. Sigmund Freud’s The Uncanny and Foucault’s Abnormal (lectures at the Collège de France) serve as touchstone texts for the course. Studies of Browning’s films The Unholy Three, The Unknown, and Freaks, as well as extracts from other films in his career (1921-1939) present cinema’s origins in the world of the freak show and Victorian voyeurism. Browning is seen as a precursor of the Film Noir genre as well as the fantastic filmmaking of Tim Burton and David Lynch.

Film Noir is more of a style than a genre. This class examines its thematic, narrative, and aesthetic characteristics, as well as its cinematic and historical influences. Additionally the class analyzes the historical implications of its appearance at the end of World War II and its influence on cinematic trends of the 1960s and 1970s. Films studied include: The Killers (Siodmak); The Killers (Siegel); Citizen Kane (Welles); Laura (Preminger); Vertigo (Hitchcock); The Long Goodbye (Altman); Point Blank (Boorman); Rebecca (Hitchcock).

Professor Risterucci.

THE LIFE AND FILMS OF FRITZ LANG Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course delves deeply into some of the major works of Fritz Lang, and examines his influences and techniques, discussing not only Fritz Lang as a director but also as a scriptwriter. Fritz Lang's films are seen in relation to the time period and to major historical references. Professor Kleinberger.

*HOLLYWOOD COMEDIES IN THE 1930S Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A cinema class that discusses the various comic genres of the 1930s (musical comedies, burlesque, screwball, romantic), the evolution of these genres, and the influence of many famous actors, actresses, directors, and filmmakers. Lectures are complemented by weekly film viewings.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

Professor Niney.

HISTORY OF AMERICAN INDEPENDENT CINEMA FROM SHADOWS TO THE SUNDANCE FILM FESTIVAL Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis At the end of the 1950s, far from Hollywood, a new generation of American directors (John Cassavetes, Alfred Leslie, Robert Frank, and Jonas Mekas) was filming with total independence. Today, the label “independent cinema” refers primarily to films shown at the Sundance festival. How has independent American cinema evolved over the past 50 years? The goal of this course is to retrace this history by focusing on one or two cinematic works each week, starting with Shadows and working chronologically until the present, with a heavy focus on Midnight Movies from the 1960s and 1970s. The course also deals with the notion of “independent film” and how use of the term has changed over the years. Professor Ivanovic.

Professor Dreux.

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THE FILMS OF FRANÇOIS TRUFFAUT Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle An analytical study of French filmmaker François Truffaut, encompassing nineteen out of his twentyone films; biographical elements, production of his works and dialogues, and images from his films are analyzed in depth, as is Truffaut’s role in the cinema of the New Wave in France. Films studied include: Les 400 coups, Jules et Jim, Fahrenheit 451, La sirène du Mississippi, Les deux Anglaises et le continent, La nuit américaine, La femme d’à côté. Professor Gillain.

WOMEN FILMMAKERS IN FRANCE FROM 1970 TO THE PRESENT Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle One of the most important developments in modern French cinema has been the contribution of female directors (A. Varda, C. Serreau, C. Breillat, C. Denis, among others) to different genres in French cinema (documentary, thriller, drama, comedy…) because of their unique perspective. The goal of this course is to study the work of some major female directors, contextualizing their films within modern French society, and addressing the themes of social and political commentary, equality and gender.

MODERN FRENCH CINEMA: FROM THE NOUVELLE VAGUE TO MILITANT CINEMA

Professor Rollet.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

AGNÈS VARDA: 50 YEARS OF FRENCH CINEMA

Exploration of aspects of the Nouvelle Vague from the late 1950s to the early 1970s. These aspects include the growth and decline in popularity of the Nouvelle Vague and the subsequent emergence of cinéma militant. The course closely examines the films of the Nouvelle Vague in style, content, acting, cinematography, and script. Professor Schweitzer.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course is an in-depth look at the work of Agnès Varda and her relationship to French cinema, from the Nouvelle Vague to the present day, using extracts and entire films. There is extensive classroom discussion of films and of French cinema in general, based on the motifs present in Varda's oeuvre. Professor Le Pallec-Marand.

*FRENCH NEW WAVE CINEMA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The directors of La Nouvelle Vague are well known for having “re-invented” cinema at a time of stylistic stagnation. However, Truffaut, Godard, and their compatriots at the Cahiers du Cinéma also wrote copious amounts of film criticism. This course is an introduction to this critical period of film history, but also specifically orients itself around the relationship between the films and the critical texts produced during the Nouvelle Vague. Articles by all of the main Nouvelle Vague directors are analyzed in conjunction with clips from their films, in order to examine the connections between them. Professor Guigue.

*ROBERT BRESSON, FILMMAKER AND THEORIST Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This cinema course studies Robert Bresson as both a filmmaker and as a theorist, specifically focusing on his Notes on Cinematography. The class looks at his entire career, from his influences to the filmmakers he eventually influenced. Professor Villain.

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*THE FRENCH NEW WAVE AND NEW WORLD CINEMAS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This cinema course studies the chronological history of the emergence and development of the French New Wave, and its subsequent influence on new cinemas around the world (including Japan, Brazil, Eastern Europe, Italy, and Canada). There is an emphasis on film criticism, personal expression, politics, and the influence of the New Wave on cinema today. Professor Lavin.

*FRENCH CINEMA TODAY Center for University Programs Abroad This course on French cinema production today is a unique opportunity to study the most contemporary form of French cinema, based on a selection of currently running films, ranging from French “blockbuster” movies to experimental cinema and contemporary works of great French directors. Students are required to attend a screening of a new film each week in the Parisian cinemas, then examine how the films relate to other works by the director and to larger film movements, and study the relationship

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between cinema itself and theories and tendencies in the critique of cinema. Lectures elaborate on specific cinematic figures or movements, introducing students to specific terms related to criticism and film analysis. The class uses interviews with directors, critiques, past works and previous influential films to add context and appreciation to the films..

FILM STUDIES

Ambiguities and distinctions between recurring themes, including juxtapositions of documentary and fiction, childhood and children, physical journey and personal quest, are discussed in the context of cinematography and narrative. Genre is briefly examined. Professor Sabouraud.

Professor Bondurand.

INDIAN CINEMA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Exploration of the chronological history of Indian cinema through lectures and film clips, beginning with the origins (silent films brought over from Europe and the United States). Students become familiar with the works of several prominent Indian filmmakers, actors and producers, and explore the influence of music in cinema and in Indian society. Themes include the early genre of “devotional film”, the dubbing technique of the omnipresent playback singers, regional differences in Indian cinema caused by linguistic and cultural diversity, the “Golden Age” of the 1930s and 1940s, and the latterday Americanization of both the musical and visual aesthetics. Important figures studied include Mehboob Uhan, Raj Kapoor, Gurn Dutt and Nargis. Professor Tesson.

SPANISH CINEMA: THE CIVIL WAR, FRANCO, AND EVOLUTION Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course follows the transformation of Spanish cinema in its national challenge of dealing with the legacy of the Spanish Civil War, Franco’s forty-year rule, and the transition to democracy. Also seen is the way in which film served to propagate a myth of Spanish glory and eternity, set forth by Franco, and how censure operated during the dictator’s reign. The bulk of the work will explore the theme of history and memory, studying more contemporary film and the way it incorporates the scars from the Civil War and Francoism, while putting forth a new image of Spain. Professor Feenstra.

THE CINEMA OF ABBAS KIAROSTAMI: ANCIENT, MODERN, POST-MODERN Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis An in-depth course on the films of world-renowned director Abbas Kiarostami. Beginning with the director’s early career, including short films, the course then explores sources influencing his later work.

THE CINEMA OF LITTLE ITALY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle From Martin Scorsese and Francis Ford Coppola to Abel Ferrara, contemporary American cinema has reserved a special place for the Italian-American community, its locales and its characters. By examining recurrent themes, which might even be seen as stereotypes, the course attempts to define the outlines of the mythic image that has been created in the last three decades. The notion of genre will be debated (can one speak of the mafia film as a genre?) as well as the notion of the cult film, which will be more precisely defined. Professor Gendrault.

FORMS OF SUSPENSE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Suspense, which is different from enigma and surprise, is considered in this course, as a mechanism that was first made popular by theater and novels before being used in the cinema. The course explores the different methods used, with focus on Hitchcock (who alternates notably between formula and experimentation), remakes (Cat People, Village of the Damned, The Man Who Knew Too Much), comparison between cinema and literature, and historical evolution of the genre and its methods. Professor Aubert.

ANXIETY IN CINEMA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course studies anxiety in film, focusing on film techniques as well as content Theory relating to anxiety, by writers such as Freud, is studied lending framework to the analysis of the film itself. Anxiety in other art forms is also addressed. Professor Lévy.

*MYTH AND CINEMA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course is an interactive deconstruction of myths that have been popularized in traditional

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and contemporary cinema, ranging from the myths of the femme fatale to vampire myths. Professor Gournay.

behind parody and pastiche is, at its essence, a literary theory, the course seeks to present the extent to which a film may be parsed as a complex text. Professor Sorin.

THE THEME OF PAINTING IN FANTASY CINEMA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course is dedicated to exploring the different ways in which painting appears in the heart of fantasy cinema (Jean Epstein, Albert Lewin, Alfred Hitchcock, Fritz Lang, Joseph L. Mankiewicz, Ken Russell, Dario Argento, the Quay brothers, etc.). In so doing, the course examines varying representations of “frightening strangeness” that appear in fantasy literature and the cinematic forms that they borrow: living paintings, superimpositions, reflections, voice over, “ghostly colors”, etc. Relevant artworks are studied to inform aesthetic analysis of films discussed in class, and the concept of fantasy as a genre is addressed. Professor Grünberg.

*FRANCE/HOLLYWOOD: A CULTURAL ANALYSIS OF CINEMATIC EXCHANGE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course explores the complex and impassioned cultural exchanges that took place between French and Hollywood film industries during the twentieth century. Topics include: representations of the French or American “Other” within the two cinemas; the question of the remake; the cross-cultural careers of French and American actors and directors; and more generally, the context of simultaneous rejection, distrust, and fascination within which these exchanges occurred. Professor Moine.

PHILOSOPHIES OF FILM ENS

HISTORY OF THE DOCUMENTARY: PORTRAITS OF CITIES AND THE MODERN WORLD Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis In the 1920s a group of filmmakers, under the tutelage of Dziga Vertov, created the first documentaries. Instead of keeping with the tradition of simply filming a theatrical narrative in black and white, these filmmakers experimented with the medium of film itself and its ability to capture the modern world. This course investigates the early theory and practice these filmmakers employed in order to analyze more current narrative and documentary films that use a sense of place, in particular urban environments, to locate their viewers and relate the story to the world. Professor Dereux.

PARODY AND PASTICHE IN FILM Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Complex and nuanced practices of parody and pastiche are examined in this course. Relying at once on a theoretical approach and on film analysis, it presents the various forms that parody and pastiche can assume in a film, and how they may be distinguished from one another. The goal is to understand the motivations behind the use of these techniques, and to see how they enrich the viewer's understanding of the work of art. Moreover, because the theory 132

A seminar essentially dedicated to the work of four philosophers: André Bazin, Christian Metz, Gilles Deleuze, and Stanley Cavell, but also seeking to create a greater reference frame by including other thinkers who have either extended or contested their theories. Having considered the foundational dimension of André Bazin's work, specifically with regard to the problems posed by the relationship of the cinematographic image to reality, language, and other forms of image, the course examines the way in which these problems are reconsidered, transformed, and deepened by authors belonging to different philosophic traditions. Professor Renouard.

*AUDIO-VISION: CULTURE OR NATURE? Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course provides an in-depth introduction to the description and analysis of cinematic effects created through the association of sound and image, as well as the history and practice of this association. Topics include the relation between audio-visual effects and the workings of human perception, and the role of technology in shaping these effects. Professor Chion.

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FILM STUDIES

LIGHT, COLOR AND MISE EN SCÈNE: A HISTORY OF CINEMATOGRAPHY

films and analyze effective scene changes, dialogue and active plots.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Parent-Altier.

This course outlines a history of cinematography and surveys basic lighting and camera techniques. The curriculum is chronological but not comprehensive; it addresses certain directors of photography in depth: Lee Garmes, Gregg Toland, Joseph Ruttenberg, and Michael Ballhaus. The professor places priority on their technical and aesthetic innovations: Garmes’ work with Joseph von Sternberg in filling the “dead zone” between the lens and subject, Toland’s depth of field work, Ruttenberg’s use of fog and mist, and Ballhaus’ camera movement and techniques involving mirrors. Transcribed interviews with cinematographers and directors, as well as the books they wrote themselves, supplement weekly screenings. Professor Luciani.

THEORIES AND FUNCTIONS OF FRAME AND OFF-SCREEN SPACE IN CINEMA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle From the first films by the Lumière brothers to the complexities of modern cinema, the concept of the cinematic frame and the resulting issues of on and offscreen space have been a crucial area of artistic and formal development, and a starting point for philosophical inquiry into the cinema. The various theories put forth by philosophers and filmmakers such as Noël Burch, Gilles Deleuze, Pascale Bonitzer, Sergei Eisenstein and Roland Barthes are examined as are their applications to films by Hitchcock, Lynch and others, in order to see how these concepts can open up new representative and figurative possibilities for the cinema. Professor Vancheri.

CINEMA ON STAGE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This studio course explores the relationship and creative interaction between theater and cinema, with a focus on acting techniques, screenwriting/playwriting techniques, and improvisational skills for the actor. Students create scenes and work in front of and behind the camera. Films discussed include Paris Texas by Wim Wenders, Natural Born Killers by Oliver Stone, The Virgin Suicides by Sofia Coppola. C.R.A.Z.Y by Vallée, Sweety by Jane Campion, L'humanité by Bruno Dumont, C'est arrivé près de chez vous by Belveau and Bonzel, Seul contre tous by Gaspard Noé, Le Fils by the Dardenne brothers, Bowling for Columbine by Michael Moore, Festen by Thomas Vinterberg, Elephant by Gus Van Sant, 4 mois, 3 semaines et 2 jours by Christian Mungiu, Un prophète by Jacques Audiard. The course culminates in an original audiovisual performance open to the public. Professor Decaux.

VIDEO ART FROM 1963 TO THE PRESENT Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Since 1963, artists have been using and manipulating video (images and sound) as a medium for their art. This course explores the field of video art, from its origins to the works of contemporary video artists. It also explores the incorporation of video in installation and performance art. Each week, new artists and their work are discussed including Paik, Viola, Kuntzel, Nyst, Vasulka, Jaffrennou, Cahen, Sorin and Jean-Dit-Pannel. Professor Fargier .

ADVANCED SCREENPLAY WRITING WORKSHOP

*CINEMA AND MULTIMEDIA

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

An intensive writing workshop in screenplay writing, requiring students to write a full-length screenplay by the end of the semester. Students work on characterization, scene changes, imagery and development of an active storyline, as well as the need to write a script that “effaces” itself smoothly in its final state, leaving way to the film itself. Lectures cover scene composition, constructing a protagonist, scenes of revelations, conflict and resolution, and the role of the reader/spectator. Students view

The relationship between cinema and multimedia poses many economic and technological problems, punctuating the whole course of a film, from conception to diffusion. The class also examines the issues arising in French cinema due to the development of new media. It also highlights the richness of narrative and aesthetic interactions between film and multimedia. Professor Derhy Kurtz.

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The Moulin Rouge

THEATER

XII. THEATER

HISTORY AND THEORY HISTORY OF THEATER: THE HISTORICAL TRAGEDY TO 1700 Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense An exploration of tragic themes in the theatre from its origins up to 1700, this course teaches students to compare and contrast characters and their tragic flaws. In-depth analysis of specific tragic themes in various plays, for example the theme of melancholy in Richard II. How does the tragic character develop and what are the principal elements of tragedy? Major works are studied, including Richard II, Richard III, and Edward II. Professor Déprats.

BAROQUE DRAMATURGY OF THE TRAGICOMEDY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course examines and compares the 17th century tragicomedies of England, France and Spain with attention to both literary analysis and history

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of performance. In grappling with conflicting definitions of tragicomedy as proposed by critics and playwrights, students attempt to make sense of a fascinating if often underappreciated genre. Professor Cavaillé.

HISTORY OF THEATRICAL AESTHETICS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle An overview of the major texts in theatrical aesthetics from ancient times to the present. Several seminars are devoted to Plato’s Republic and Aristotle’s Poetics, and a strong basis is laid for the examination of theater aesthetics during the age of French Classicism and the Enlightenment. In the modern age, the course focuses on a more international range of theoreticians, such as Antoine (France), Stanislavski (Russia), Craig (Great Britain) and Brecht (Germany). Main themes include: mimesis in the theater, styles of acting, directing, and the importance of the aesthetic tradition. Professor Garcia.

ANALYSIS OF THEATRICAL WORKS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

THEATER

THE TOOLS OF THEATER - THEATER AND CINEMA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course compares the forms of representation of theater and cinema, with a special focus on France. Through an intense comparative study of technical aspects of both media, it provides a complete background on the advent of cinema in France, coupled with a study of the influences of theater on cinema as a new form of media and art. Professors Deutsch and Robic-Diaz.

PHOTOGRAPHY AND THE THEATER Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course focuses on the history of photography in the theater and studies the work of theater photographers. The terminology of photography/ camera terms is studied. Students learn to analyze a theatrical photograph, interview theater photographers and analyze their work. The question of how photography techniques pertain to the theater is discussed in depth. Professor Meyer-Plantureux.

Students learn how to analyze works of theater through discussion of six plays that all students attend. The goal of this class is for students to be able to analyze dramatic scenes from a performance perspective. The study of a dramatic text implies a specific type of analysis because of the fact that the text exists primarily in order to be presented on stage. It is therefore necessary to draw out the “latent representations” within the text: analysis of space, scenic time span, theatrical role of certain objects (set, costumes, props, etc.), dramatic relationships between characters, the referential and symbolic function of dramatic elements, and options for performance.

THEATRICAL ANALYSIS: MODELS FOR DIRECTING

Professor Zerarga.

This course is conducted as a theater workshop; students are asked to improvise their own skits based on Dada theory. Lectures on drama theory and the Dada movement provide a basis for the students’ work. Class time is primarily devoted to physical exercises in which students use Dada principles to inform their own spontaneous decisions. Students are also asked to imagine their own Dada happenings that are acted out and critiqued by the class.

DRAMA THEORY: WRITING AND MEMORY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course examines, from a theoretical point of view, texts written for the contemporary theater which seek to externalize memory. Ten plays are studied throughout the semester, with a group of students presenting each play orally. Analysis of time, characters, subjects and space. Authors include Beckett, Botho Strauss, Koltès, Noëlle Renaude and others.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle A different director is the subject of each week’s lecture, with focus on specific plays and history of theater from 1967 to 1977, and concentration on French directors. Different movements of the period are studied in the discussion section of the course such as the Théâtre du Soleil, Grotowski, and Wilson. Professors Rivière and Ertel.

DADA AND SURREALIST THEATER Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Noury.

Professor Lesage.

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THEATER

THE HISTORY OF THE MOSCOW ART THEATER Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle A course tracing the rise of Constantin Stanislavski and his creation of the Moscow Art Theatre in the early part of the 20th century. The course looks at his biography and that of his partners, with study of some of the work of his contemporaries. The principal text used is Ma vie dans l’art, Stanislavski’s autobiography. Professor Autant-Mathieu.

FROM TEXT TO STAGE: CHEKHOV’S THE CHERRY ORCHARD Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle A course concerning major productions of The Cherry Orchard since its publication. How does one mount a live production while keeping in mind the literary imperatives of the play? Study of the characters, motifs and settings of the play, and discussions of each director’s interpretations. Students watch and analyze clips of numerous videotaped productions, including that of Peter Brook. Professor Banu.

THEATER ARTS: MONSTERS AND MONSTROSITY Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle An in-depth exploration of both the historical image and the manifestation of the monster as its theatrical counterpart. Examination of what was considered monstrous at various points in history and how this influenced and gave birth to the theatrical monster. By examining various theatrical traditions, and from the analysis of various plays such as Les Bacchantes by Euripides, Cromwell by Hugo, or La Machine Infernale by Cocteau, the course proposes a journey into the themes of the monster and the monstrous from ancient times to the present day. Professor Hersant.

THEATER AND STORYTELLING Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course mixes theory and practice in order to explore the different ways stories are told in the theater. Whether referring to a narrator, an actor or an author, all theater artists are seen as coming together to create and present stories. Student participation is necessary, as the professor refers to the class as a “research group”, examining the different ways

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theater is used to present stories and ideas. The class focuses on socio-cultural elements of theater, and how to present these complex ideas on the stage. Professor Haddad.

RISK AND VALUE ANALYSIS OF THEATRICAL PROJECTS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Taking a theoretical approach to theater, this course looks at the history of theater performances originating in ancient Greece and Rome and their impact on society. Part of the class is devoted to conducting an economic cost-benefit analysis of plays or other types of art performance. The following questions are raised: what are the financial risks involved? What are the personal risks one may take? Do the benefits outweigh the risks? Finally, is the demand for theater today sufficiently strong so that directors and producers are willing to take these risks? Professor Mikol.

PRACTICE THE MAGENIA PROGRAM - DANCE, CORPOREAL THEATER AND MIME Studio Magenia The Magenia Program teaches corporeal theater: theater of the body, and of movement. Ella Jaroszewicz created a new form of movement, which is a combination of dance and mime. In her studio, the acting body is trained in various ways, so that performers may improve their strength, body control, and presence. Disciplines studied include modern dance, Dahara muscle-training, voice, classical dance, corporeal body-control work-outs and mime. In all forms of movement, the body is trained to energize bodily tension and tighten the core, while appearing to move in a balanced and elegant manner. When students perform solo and paired works for the class, they are expected to show precise movement technique, emotion, musicality, and presence. After skit performances, students are critiqued both by the professor and by their fellow students, and are expected to rework their successful scenes throughout the program duration. A week-long intensive history workshop is also required, in which students learn about the history of pantomime, dance, and other forms of theatrical movement. Professors Jaroscewicz, Delaunay and Veschi.

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COURS JEAN-LAURENT COCHET: PROFESSIONAL TRAINING PROGRAM Cours Jean-Laurent Cochet In texts from the French literary and dramatic canon (from La Fontaine to Hugo, from Corneille to Racine, from Molière to Anouilh), students find rich fodder for the application of theatrical principles throughout this conservatory-style course.With special emphasis on text and technique - breathing, physical presence, poetic quality, natural speech rhythms - and above all, practice, the student is empowered to produce just, truthful characterization and lively and consistent performance. The course consists of daily acting/text classes with Jean-Laurent Cochet (a luminary of French theater, Chevalier de la Légion d'honneur, director, actor, author, and master teacher, and his assistants, bi-weekly breathing classes, and monthly presentations for the public. Each student is expected to pursue his/her own professional projects, as well as spend significant time reading and rehearsing in preparation for class. Professors Cochet, Blind-Capdeville, Cristalle, Darnay, Delavène, Le Gars, Leymarie.

THEATER

studied are taken from a repertoire of classic and modern texts and include passages from Britannicus, Roberto Zucco, and Macbeth. Professor Walter.

*PRACTICAL APPROACH TO MIME Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The objective of this course is to explore the technical principles and dramaturgical concepts of mime. The course focuses around three themes: evocation, identification, and metamorphosis. To gain a greater understanding, the course touches on the practices of different masters of mime - principally Decroux and Marcel Marceau. Themes studied include the history of mime, dramatic breathing, segmentation of the body and articulation of movement, rhythm, muscular comedy, study of characters, placement of the body in space, and the relation between mime and the other living arts. Students explore creativity and physical play through improvisations, semiimprovisations and, eventually, creations, solo and in groups. Professor Turjman.

INTENSIVE ACTING WORKSHOP: CLASSICAL FRENCH TEXTS

ACTOR’S WORKSHOP: APPROACHING SPACE, SPEECH AND MOVEMENT

Cours Jean-Laurent Cochet

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

This weeklong intensive workshop offers actors six hours a day of rigorous classical formation. In texts from the French literary and dramatic canon (La Fontaine to Victor Hugo, Molière to Montherlant), students will find rich fodder for the application of theatrical principles - respiration, physical presence, poetic quality, natural speech rhythms - in the service of just, truthful characterization and lively and consistent performance. Taught by the faculty of Jean-Laurent Cochet (former students: Gérard Depardieu, Isabelle Huppert, etc.) Students are expected to memorize three to four fables, scenes, or monologues over the course of the week, to be rehearsed under the guidance of faculty in a masterclass setting.

A survey of the varying concepts of space and the relationship to the actor. Using a theoretical approach that outlines the history of the use of space in art, literature and the theater, the course incorporates varying ideas such as the emotional experience of space, geographical space, nocturnal space, distance, and the rhythmic composition of space into a practical tool for the theater.

Professors Leymarie, Cochet, Cristalle, Delavene and Capdeville.

ACTING WORKSHOP : SCENE STUDY Théâtre de la Bruyère A workshop where troupe members practice selected scenes on stage under the direction of Francine Walter. Offstage, actors are asked to watch others perform and to critique the performances. Scenes

Professor Villemaine.

THEATER WORKSHOP: AUTOBIOGRAPHY/ FICTION Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle A workshop that helps theater students examine the space between autobiographical expression and fictional performance, through improvisation, personal writing and performance-based assignments. Through the elaboration, on stage, of autobiographical elements from the actor’s own life, the course aspires to help the actor create a more convincing fictional representation in non-autobiographical situations. In-depth work on capturing “real moments” on stage, through exercises such as reading personal letters for the first time in order

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THEATER

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to capture “moment of realization” in front of the audience, and develop this portrayal in the fictional context. Professor Recoing.

WITH ANTONIN ARTAUD Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This theater class is generally divided into three segments. The first hour is dedicated to visual art that has relation to Artaud's ideas. The next two hours are dedicated to working with texts from Artaud, through exercises or discussion. The last segment is related to music and physical interpretation. Professor Villemaine.

*INTRODUCTION TO PERFORMANCE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis In this experimental theater course, students' own textual explorations nourish their creation and performance of a group theater play. Students are asked to find, propose and develop a text into a play and all plays are then assembled into a single, fulllength experimental theatre performance. During the in-class sessions, students coach each other in the disciplines of dance, body movement and voice, as well as the use of various 'materials' in their work, be it textual, physical or emotional. Professor Kokosowski.

SCENE DESIGN WORKSHOP Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course introduces students to the art of scene design. Through the careful reading and analysis of one work of theater, students learn how to represent concepts of space on the stage, reflect the themes of a play in their scene design, present their concepts to a larger group, and construct a model of their design. Professor Chevanne.

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Bastille Opera House

MUSIC

XIII. MUSIC

THEORY MEDIEVAL MUSICAL NOTATION Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne In this upper-level musicology course, students investigate the development of Western musical notation from approximately the 9th century through the end of the Middle Ages, learning to identify and read different types of notation while discovering how and why these notations developed musically and historically. Transcription and investigations of manuscripts are assigned weekly, and students are expected to supplement their learning with readings from the bibliography. Professor Ragnard.

THE COMPOSITIONAL ŒUVRE OF GUILLAUME DE MACHAUT Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The course begins with a historical account of Machaut’s career as a singer and prolific composer and delves quickly into his compositional œuvre, from

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MUSIC

Le Remède de Fortune to his 5-voice motets. The two assigned projects are designed to gauge the level of the student’s understanding of how to approach and analyze vocal works such as Machaut’s in the mid-14th century context, and also to sharpen the student’s listening in terms of contemporary recordings.

HISTORY OF MUSIC (MIDDLE AGES AND RENAISSANCE)

covers both secular music and religious music of the epoch, with attention to both text and music. Composers include Monteverdi, Bach, Schütz and Purcell. The course operates on two levels: the first is a conceptual explanation of the elements of the music with attention to the cultural and historical context, while the second involves close listening of the music itself; the professor isolates certain passages and plays them on the piano to draw attention to certain aspects. The course covers music from 1600 to 1750.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Professor Accaoui.

Professor Ragnard.

This course provides an overview of musical development throughout both the Middle Ages and the Renaissance, and practice in transcribing music from each of these eras into modern notation, with particular focus on the composer Guillaume DuFay. Basic knowledge of music theory is applied to analyses of the pieces of music that are studied. A final project asks students to transcribe into modern notation a madrigal by Luca Marenzio. Professors Deutsch and Tacaille.

MUSIC AND POETRY OF THE 16TH CENTURY CHANSON Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is a survey of the historical, political, and religious developments of the 16th century and their impact on secular song in France. A hands-on introduction to the textual and musical sources reinforces the cultural context for the artistic output of formative poets, musicians, and printers such as Ronsard, Marot, Scève, Attaingnant, and Janequin. Weekly transcription and text setting assignments require an in-depth understanding of French Renaissance verse and mensural notation. A workshop in Finale and Sibelius provides discussion of the pitfalls and issues of transcribing, formatting, and preparing editions of this repertoire. The historical and practical components culminate in the presentation of a portfolio of settings of two poems from Ronsard's Amours as formatting templates, and a transcription of an unpublished chanson along with a commentary on its historical and cultural significance. Professor Tacaille.

HISTORY OF MUSIC IN THE 17TH CENTURY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Beginning with the madrigal of the 17th century and continuing on to the evolution of opera, this course 140

MARC-ANTOINE CHARPENTIER AND BAROQUE SOURCES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The career and music of Marc-Antoine Charpentier are used as a case study of the musical and theoretical problems of the second half of the 17th century. Despite being considered as representative of the “Italian” style, Charpentier spent his entire career working at various institutions in Paris. Through description, study and comparison of baroque sources, including manuscripts, printed editions and texts, students' understanding of 17th century musical repertoire is enriched. The ability to analyze and contextualize sources is emphasized. These skills are applied through visits to the music research department of the Bibliothèque nationale de France. Professors Psychoyou and Ruffatti.

*HISTORY OF MUSIC 17TH - 19TH CENTURIES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is divided into two parts, one focusing on the second half of the baroque period, the other focusing on the second half of the classical period. Both follow the chronological development of opera during these eras, and in particular the evolution of the recitative, arioso, and aria. Other vocal genres such as the oratorio and the motet are also studied. The course proceeds with the study of instrumental music, placing emphasis on the development of symphony. It uses examples from works by Purcell, Porpora, Rameau, Bach, Handel, Hasse, Haydn, Pergolesi, Jommelli, Gluck, Mozart, and Beethoven and also draws from the writing of contemporary authors, such as Jean-Jacques Rousseau and Charles Burney.. Professors Deutsch and Monnier.

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OPERA IN THE AGE OF MOZART Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The evolution of opera between 1760 and the 1790s is seen in this course, including applied musicology exercises such as analyses of formal aspects of an aria, tonal plan of an act’s finale, the function of a choir in a dramatic context, etc. The course covers operas by Mozart, Gluck, Cherubini, and Grétry, among other figures that created a specific style of opera in the second half of the 18th century. Students are expected to be able to demonstrate historical facts through musical examples, for instance the reformation of opera that started with Gluck or the creation of a new national style such as the German singspiel. Professor Noiray.

GLUCK'S REFORM OF OPERA IN 18TH CENTURY PARIS/RHETORICITY AND TONAL ANALYSIS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne An examination of the operatic reform that took place in the 1770s in Paris through a close study of his two revolutionary operas, Orphée and Alceste, and the music reviews, treatises, and polemics that surrounded their performances. Lectures focus on late 18th century transformations in choreography, dance, music, and singing through primary and secondary materials. The course is supplemented by a master's seminar, taken in conjunction with this course, which explores the application of semiotics and linguistic models to tonal analysis. Professor Bartoli.

*EVOLUTION OF 19TH CENTURY MUSICAL LANGUAGE

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sis and commentary include: Berlioz, Beethoven, Weber, Mendelssohn, Schumann, Schubert, Brahms, Liszt, Chopin, Dvorak, Mahler, Wagner, and Strauss. Professor Roger and Bartoli.

OPERA AND DRAMA IN THE 19TH CENTURY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A survey of 19th century Romantic opera, beginning with the Italian bel canto tradition, the German folkloric roots and the French privilège, and observing the evolution of each tradition. The course covers the shift in aesthetic goals of music, from extolling the virtuosity of the singer towards realism and emotional resonance, from recitative secco towards the predominance of the role of the orchestra, from traditional mythological themes to fantasy and folklore, from pride in national tradition to a combination of traditions. Themes also include the French structure, the importance of Italian melody and German rich harmonic structure, and the forming of the Grand Opéra Historique. Composers include Glück, Rossini, Meyerbeer, Bellini, Spontini, Wagner, Berlioz, Bizet, Puccini and Debussy. Professor Velly.

THE THEME OF THE NIGHT IN MUSIC OF THE ROMANTIC PERIOD Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A romantic-era musicology/theory course focusing on the themes of music and the night. Key pieces studied include the Chopin Nocturnes, Berlioz's Symphonie fantastique, Mélodies, and the majority of the piano works of Schumann. Professor Pistone.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is divided into three parts: lecture, analysis, and commentary. The course lecture looks at formal structure, and more specifically at the evolution of sonata form and harmonic vocabulary, examining in particular the increased use and variety of 7th and 9th chords. This analysis requires students to apply the vocabulary discussed in lecture in the context of specific works. Roman numeral analysis, structural diagrams, and short written analyses, with respect to harmony, instrumentation, orchestration, motivic development, and text representation (in the case of lied and opera) are all seen. Commentary requires students to discuss form, motivic development, and basic harmonic structure after listening to an unidentified excerpt. Composers studied in analy-

BERLIOZ: AN EXPLORATION OF SYMPHONIC FORMS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course explores the compositional style of Berlioz, taking into consideration his unique position as a true innovator in 19th century music. Discussions cover his unusual treatment of themes (including his well-known idée fixe), novel harmonic devices, unique methods of development, programmatic content, and grand forms, as well as his use of stylistic devices, such as coloration and timbre. In addition, Berlioz’s position as a master of orchestration is seen. Principal works studied include La Symphonie fantastique, Harold en Italie and Roméo et Juliette. Professor Bartoli.

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THE HISTORY OF 19TH AND 20TH CENTURY OPERA Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course looks at the changing styles and movements in opera over the course of the 19th and 20th centuries. By studying historical documents from the period, as well as the text and composition of a variety of well-known works, students develop a better understanding and appreciation of how opera has been created and how it has evolved over the past two centuries. Professor Agnello.

THE INVENTION OF OPÉRA COMIQUE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course covers the invention of a new musical and theatrical genre in Paris in the 1700s: the opéra comique, through a study of individual authors, composers and work as well as the historical and social contents surrounding the development of the genre, its merging with the Italian theater in Paris and its diffusion in Europe. Readings are drawn from a selection of contemporary critics, compilations of composers’ works and specialized documents. Professor Legrand.

MUSIC AND MODERNITY AT THE TURN OF THE 20TH CENTURY

European modernists, new textures in the orchestra, influences of popular music, regionalism, inclusion of other music in the symphonic orchestra, developments in acoustic instruments and electronic lutherie Professors Bossis, Viel, Velly and Fischer.

*MUSIC THEORY AND ITS APPLICATIONS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The first section of this course explores all aspects of the development of the pianoforte during the classical period, including the history of manufacture of the instrument, the use of pedal by performers of the era, improvisational and compositional styles, especially the fantasia (la fantaisie). Discussion of works by C.P.E. Bach, Czerny, W.F. Bach, Müttel, D. Scarlatti, Paradisi, J.C. Bach, Busby, Clementi, Dussek, Field and others. The second section of this course focuses on a single complete work from the 19th century repertoire, with relevant discussion of other works within the genre and timeframe. The primary work analyzed is Mussorgsky's Pictures at an Exhibition for solo piano, with numerous discussions of both Russian and Western influences, including Balakirev, Dargomyszhsky, Glinka, Liszt, and Schumann, as well as other works by Mussorgsky. Analysis includes some application of Schenker, set theory, Riemann and other advanced techniques. Professors Roudet and Douche.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A detailed introduction to the music of the 20th century in Europe, this course systematically studies the Second Viennese School (Schoenberg, Berg, and Webern) and Igor Stravinsky, through selected musical examples. Particular attention is devoted to Schoenberg's musical development. Professor Corre.

*MUSIC HISTORY (1900-1950) AND DEVELOPMENTS IN THE SYMPHONIC ORCHESTRA THROUGHOUT THE 20TH CENTURY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This two-part course is composed of a lecture series on composers, styles, influences and other evolutions in music history during the first half of the 20th century, and a work session focusing on developments in the symphonic orchestra. Students learn about general music history from 1900 to approximately 1990 in Europe and the United States. and cover topics such as the American ultramodernists, 142

*EVOLUTION OF MUSICAL LANGUAGE: SCHENKERIAN ANALYSIS AND COMMENTARY IN 20TH CENTURY MUSIC Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The first half of the semester covers analysis of tonal music with the Schenkerian method, i.e. reducing tonal pieces to their most fundamental elements and rendering them in visual graph form. The second half of the course covers analysis of 20th century music: general music culture, methodology in music analysis and listening commentaries, esthetics, developments in musical language, polytonality, atonality, dodecaphonism and serialism, and composers' text. Over the course of the semester, students write analyses of music with scores as well as listening commentaries, in which they are asked to listen to a piece of music without the score and write about its structure, harmony, etc. Professors Beduschi and Segond.

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*TRANSCRIPTION FOR EAR TRAINING Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course consists entirely of transcription exercises taken from works relevant to the eras studied in History of Music for the same course level (Baroque and Classical). Exercises include transcription of a solo or melodic voice, of the solo voice and bass line, or of four voices (in the case of a chorale); roman numeral analysis is often required. Rhythmic dictation and memorization (listening, followed by transcription) are also practiced. Excerpts are taken from both vocal and instrumental repertoire, including chamber music, symphonies, cantatas and chorales, and solo piano works, by composers such as Bach, Haendel, Haydn, Mozart and Beethoven.

MUSIC

standard elements of music such as rhythm, timbre, and melody. Professor Félix.

*MUSIC OF THE BALKAN AND MEDITERRANEAN REGIONS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines the music of the Balkan and Mediterranean regions from a theoretical and cultural standpoint. The class is divided into anthropological and musical lessons. Professor Borneuf.

PRACTICE

Professor Ungureanu.

JAZZ TECHNIQUES AND STYLES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course covers the history of Jazz from the viewpoint of musicology, through an overview of the changing styles of jazz throughout the last century, and particular focus on five personalities within that time-period. Students analyze numerous pieces, taking into account melody, instrumentation, style, influences, rhythms, and harmony. Professor Baudoin.

PSYCHOACOUSTICS

*COMPOSITION LESSONS Private Instruction Private composition lessons. Professor Lemaitre.

*PIANO - INDIVIDUAL LESSONS Private Instruction During individual lessons, the professor teaches technique, interpretation and performance skills to help the student advance their mastery of their instrument. The final exam is an audition at one of the Parisian Conservatories. Professor Balevic-Gasparian.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course focuses on the physiology of the ear and how it interprets sound. The class ranges from minute details of the structure of the ear to explanations of different forms of deafness and different reactions to sound levels by varying age groups. Through explanation of logarithms and sound tests, interpretation of rhythm, tones, sound, timbre, duration, and intensity are presented. Professor Léothaud.

INTRODUCTION TO ETHNOMUSICOLOGY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course offers a survey of ethnomusicology from a French perspective. The anthropological and musicological origins of ethnomusicology are discussed, as well as the birth of the discipline. The three ethnomusicological schools are introduced, as well as eminent ethnomusicologists, such as Jérôme Cler and Alan Miriam. The course also offers a thorough examination of ethnomusicological approaches to

*VIOLIN Private Instruction Study and performance of selections from the standard violin repertoire. Development of technique through études and caprices such as those of Rode and Dont in addition to scale studies and double-stop exercises. Through individual meetings with MarieChristine Millière, professor at the CRR (Paris conservatory), and intensive practice outside of class, the student works to improve stage presence, increase richness of tone, and expand palette of musical colors. Performance in master classes and participation in competitions is based on the student’s motivation. Professor Millière.

PRIVATE VIOLIN LESSONS Private Instruction Concert violinist and professor at the CNSMDP (national conservatory), Olivier Charlier gave intensive instruction over a period of 10 months. Work

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over each semester included the development of a more beautiful tone, a more solid technique, and most importantly, the development of finesse and a polished, nuanced performance. Principal works studied included Ernest Chausson’s Poème, Ysaÿe’s Sonata n° 3, Prokofiev’s Violin Concerto n° 2 in g minor and Beethoven’s Violin Concerto. Professor Charlier.

*CELLO LESSONS

Private Instruction Private study of Viola da Gamba with multiple gambists. A range of techniques and methods of interpretation is explored, along with a substantial body of repertoire. History of music allows for deeper understanding of the works performed. Students develop bow technique and left-hand precision. Professors Bernfeld, Cheatham, Sakai and Coin.

Private Instruction

FLUTE

Study of one scale, as well as thirds and octaves, Popper études, and one to two solo works (sonatas, concertos, Bach suites) are covered during private instruction in Cello. Strong emphasis is placed on technique, particularly of the left hand. Study of at least one work by a French composer (e.g. Debussy) is highly encouraged, as is performance in a student recital at the end of the semester.

Private Instruction

Professor Bailly.

PRIVATE CELLO STUDY Private Instruction Private cello study was undertaken with renowned cellist Jérôme Pernoo and included exploration of a range of techniques and methods of interpretation. Traditional French-school playing styles are developed, such as left-hand articulation, keeping right-hand knuckles parallel to bow, and shifting before the bow change. So as to improve interpretation, an actor's mentality is developed so that one searches for the character of the music within and uses memory of personal experience to trigger the correct physical movements. Study of a variety of repertoire, such as Chopin's Introduction and Polonaise, Poulenc's Sonata, Bach's Suite n° 6, Paganini's Caprice n° 6, Popper's Étude n° 9, Carter's Figment, and more. Professors Pernoo and Simpson.

PRIVATE VIOLA STUDY Private Instruction Private study with two prominent French violists from the CNSMDP (national conservatory). Repertoire studied includes Stravinsky’s Élegie, Bartok’s Concerto, Bach’s Cello Suite III in C, Kreisler’s Preludium and Allegro, Rode’s Caprices, and Kreuzter’s Études. Coursework focuses on sound production, bow speed/distribution, octaves, scales, arpeggios, physical setup, and shifting. Professors Xuereb and Caussé.

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*PRIVATE STUDY - VIOLA DA GAMBA

Private Lessons with Catherine Cantin of the Opéra National de Paris. Objectives for the semester were to improve and refine technique (speed), achieve equal balance of all registers, increase precision of articulation and finally, attain the expressivity of a singer with the precision of a pianist. Repertoire: André Jolivet, Concerto; J.S. Bach, Partita; C.P.E. Bach, Sonata; S. Prokofiev, Sonata; Kohler, Études. Professor Cantin.

FLUTE LESSONS CRR Weekly Flute Lessons with Magali Mosnier, of the Orchestre Philarmonique de Radio France, with a focus on improving sonority and attaining a homogenous tone in all registers. Specific activities include the preparation of various orchestral excerpts and solos for orchestra auditions. Professor Mosnier.

CLARINET Private Instruction Instruction and demonstration with emphasis on improving technique and tone through study of repertoire. The approach stresses the importance of the body, especially respiration in making music. Principal works studied and performed: the first two movements of Saint-Saëns’ Sonata for clarinet and piano, Schubert’s Shepherd on the Rock, and the Adagio from Mozart’s clarinet concert. Intensive training in technique including chromatic scales, tonguing exercises and various scale patterns in all keys. Professor Morel.

CHAMBER MUSIC ENSEMBLE Conservatoire municipal du 8e arrondissement Focus on technique and performance skills in the simultaneous presence of different instruments.

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Live audition performances: a rigorous repertoire is prepared throughout the semester to be judged by the teaching staff and administration of the conservatory.

Verdi Requiem for repetition in an individual exam and performance in a group concert.

Professors Jeandroz and Sun-Perge.

*BAROQUE CHORUS AND ORCHESTRA

Professor Rouger.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA CRR The student participates in a concert cycle at the Conservatoire à Rayonnement Régional, in which over 40 hours of sectionals and rehearsals are conducted over an intensive 2-week period. Students are required to acquire and learn all parts before the first rehearsal. The success of the student, as well as of the entire ensemble, depends on the student's comprehension in a timely and thorough manner of what the conductor, sectional coach, or section leader requires. Through rehearsals and interaction with other French conservatory students, the student learns how to better converse about music and how conservatories and orchestras function in France, compared to those in the United States. Application to the concert cycle must be made in the spring semester prior to participation.

This course has for object the exploration of the baroque repertoire by a group of 30-40 singers and instrumentalists. The repertoire is chosen based on the instruments and tessitura of the participants, as well as students' skill level, with some opportunity for solos. The orchestra is divided into two groups, one with modern instruments and one with baroque instruments. The two groups rehearse different works with the chorus. One to two concerts take place at the end of the semester. The main work studied this semester was Come Ye Sons of Art by Purcell. Professors Silvio and Monnier.

Professor Durand.

VOICE LESSONS Conservatoire Municipal Camille Saint-Saëns Weekly 2-hour voice lessons; work on technique and study of 3 songs to be performed in front of a jury. This course was taken in conjunction with choir rehearsals at the Sorbonne. Professor Sullé.

JAZZ COMBO Conservatoire Municipal Frédéric Chopin In this 5-8 person combo, styles played include straight-ahead standards, Latin, odd-time signatures, and some pop. Students perform in two concerts, and complete one individual project transcribing a solo of their choice. Professor Patrois.

GRAND CHŒUR DE LA SORBONNE: THE SORBONNE CHORAL SOCIETY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A standard choral singing class, in which students learn sight-singing, vocal technique, dynamic control, and harmonization. Students memorize the

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Opera Garnier

DANCE

XIV.

N.B.: Students may take classes in modern dance and ballet or other dance forms at approved studios in Paris. The number of hours

DANCE

depends upon each student’s home university requirements.

THEORY HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY DANCE UniversitĂŠ de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines major movements, pieces, and choreographers in the history of dance, beginning with the development of the ballet Gisele at the Paris Opera in 1841. Primary focus is given to French, Russian, German, and American work. Through video recordings, readings, and outings to current Parisian performances, students analyze the development and transmission of dance. Guiding questions for the course include: How/why does choreography get transmitted? What is the role of the historian in the preservation and continuation of the arts? Professor Launay.

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DANCE

PRACTICE

MODERN DANCE: MARTHA GRAHAM TECHNIQUE

*BALLET

Centre de Danse du Marais

Centre de danse du Marais This studio course in classical ballet meets twice a week, providing barre and floor work, with a strong focus on technique and acquisition of strength and flexibility.

An interactive course in technique, focusing on contractions as the foundation of movement, through center exercises and combinations. Correction and intense practice during each session to develop flexibility, grace and rhythm.

Professor Rajchmann.

Professor Gatecloud.

*FRENCH CLASSICAL BALLET

ADVANCED MODERN TECHNIQUE

Centre de danse du Marais

Studio Harmonic

This class focuses on the technicalities of French classical ballet. Each session is broken up into three sections: barre, adagio, and allegro.

Corinne Lanselle teaches an advanced modern technique and repertory course for men and women. She focuses on solo work, working to maximize a dancer’s control, natural flow, and dynamic range. Floor and center work help build strength and flexibility. Daily choreographed combinations aid in performance skills. The class helps students gain sophisticated understanding of artistry in modern dance. For the experienced dancer only.

Professor Lazzarelli.

ADVANCED BALLET TECHNIQUE Studio Harmonic Professor Wayne Byars teaches this advanced ballet course for men and women with a focus on gaining a theoretical and practical understanding of ballet technique. Study and in-class rehearsal of ballet technique from the Danish and American schools is designed to provide a sophisticated understanding of the skills that produce a high level of artistic excellence in rehearsal and performance. For the experienced dancer only; women on pointe and on flat.

Professor Lanselle.

Professor Byars.

*BALLET AND JAZZ TECHNIQUES Centre de Danse du Marais This ballet class focuses on technique and precision at the bar and center floor. The fundamentals are continually practiced to ensure a solid basis. The Jazz component of this course is a more contemporary form of jazz, a combination of classical jazz and modern hip-hop, with a focus on beat, emotion, and rhythm. Professors Lazzarelli and Frye.

*MODERN JAZZ Centre de Danse du Marais A modern jazz class at a beginning-intermediate level. Professor Wattincourt.

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Pont Alexandre III

ARCHITECTURE

XV. ARCHITECTURE

*HISTORY OF ARCHITECTURAL THEORIES, 1750-1950 UniversitĂŠ de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Against the backdrop of contemporary architectural practice and theory, this course explores the major evolutions of western architectural theory over the past two centuries - from the advent of Neo-classicism in France to the Chicago and Prairie Schools in the United States - as well as their pertinence in the practice of architectural and urban production today. Focus is placed on the examination of important architectural works in their historical and theoretical context, and the development of a comprehensive understanding of basic technical elements such as construction, decoration, and proportion, and their historical significance. The course provides indispensable contextualization for the study of contemporary architecture and the arrangement of space. Students also participate in lectures and seminars with architects and professionals involved in the field today. Professor Leygonie.

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*LE CORBUSIER, THE WRITTEN WORKS EHESS This course examines all of Le Corbusier's writings on urbanism, beginning with his formative “grand tour” through Eastern Europe and the Near East, and ending with his late plans for the reorganization of Paris. Researchers from multiple universities in and around Paris are invited to present on one of Le Corbusier's texts from the most read works such as Vers une architecture to his more obscure works such as Sur les 4 routes.

ARCHITECTURE

tic arts. This course analyzes the architectural history of the theater through an in-depth study. Since the birth of perspective and the proscenium stage to the present, theatrical architecture, in its relationship between the auditorium and the stage, has undergone significant changes. The study of these various typologies of the auditorium and the stage show the evolution of these spaces and provide important tools for their modern design. Professors Mazlouman, Chassard and Gautel.

Professor Tsiomis.

CITY AND ENVIRONMENT: HISTORICAL AND CRITICAL PERSPECTIVES

LONG-SPAN STRUCTURAL SYSTEMS

ENSAPLV

ENSAPLV

Some theoreticians of environmental history propose to define the city as a “metabolism”, characterized by the functions of nourishment, digestion, and excretion. This course studies the facilities established underground and above ground to perform these functions - supply of water, food, and energy, transformation and production, transportation and waste - in terms of formal expression and impact on the urban form. How have the facilities for these functions evolved with the industrial transformations of the last two centuries? What can be their place in our current environment? The course proposes to strengthen and develop the student's knowledge of the history of the city while exploring another dimension which questions the subjects and disciplines involved in the fabrication of the city. Students engage both their historical knowledge and their critical skills, addressing the multiple and often contradictory sources that evoke the many environmental issues related to the city today.

From the pantheons of ancient Greece to the stadiums and factories of today, architects and engineers have worked to solve the problem of increasingly longer spanning structures. This course begins with a historical look at the solutions to these problems, the evolution of the arch in particular, and how these ancient solutions are applied today. Structures are presented through the three categories: wood, metal, and concrete and are analyzed at multiple scales from the overall forces of the building to the joints and connections that compose the individual components. Organized site visits (both in and outside of Paris) allow students to personally observe and better understand these systems. In addition to site visits and lectures, each student is given an individual system to study and must propose several structural solutions to be corrected through the duration of the course. Professor Albertani.

Professor Bowie.

*ARCHITECTURAL STUDIO: SCENOGRAPHY AND ARCHITECTURE OF PERFORMANCE SPACES

ARCHITECTURE, ENVIRONMENT, AND SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT

ENSAPLV

ENSAPLV

The program of performance spaces is, through its functional and technical complexity, a rich field for study within the architectural studio. It requires focus on hierarchy and articulation of the interior and the exterior, as well as an understanding of set design and its architectural and urban application. This course studies the material and technical issues of performances and the relationship with their creative representation through a series of exercises concerning the theater spaces and the application of scenography to architecture in the broader sense: theater, choreography, and the plas-

This course discusses the conditions needed to better contextualize architectural projects in their environment. It presents the tools and approaches needed to fully consider the environment and conditions for implementing strategies of regional sustainable development. The seminar asks students to research a topic and produce a critical reflection on their chosen theme and issues. This includes a critical analysis of various environmental approaches, disciplines, and expertise. The seminar seeks to prepare students for this multiple perspective by investigating in depth the relationship between

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architectural interventions at different scales and their bio-physical, social, economic, and cultural environments. Professors d'Orazio, Heland, Tufano, Naviner, ZetlaouiLéger and Giolitti.

ARCHITECTURAL STUDIO: SUSTAINABLE DEVELOPMENT AND YOUTH HOUSING IN VITRY-SUR-SEINE ENSAPLV Vitry-sur-Seine, just fifteen minutes outside of Paris, is currently undergoing urbanization and as such is an ideal location to study the arising conditions of development. This studio seeks to understand and develop the unique relations between youth and public spaces, in particular the questions of youthcentered housing as it fits into the larger urban fabric. Analyzing spatial relationships such as circulation, access, and thresholds, in a hierarchy from private to public, the studio focuses on the global nature of everyday life rather than the disjunction of the private and the public. The studio seeks to define architectural and urban solutions that allow youth to become the actors in entirety in their quarter, so that their presence describes their environment and avoids the risk of spatial and social segregation. Beginning with urban and environmental analysis from several dimensions and scales (the politics of the city, the quarter, the neighborhood, and the building) the students then go into depth at the technical and environmental scale with an individual design that meets HQE standards. Professors Biriotti and Philippe.

AN EXERCISE IN SPATIALITY: ART IN SITU ENSAPLV The emergence of what is known as Land-Art in the 1960s and 1970s has re-established our perception of space and questioned our experience of spatiality. Through films and other publications, this class explores the approaches and processes of several artists (R. Smithson, J. Turrell, R. Serra, G. Penone, W. de Maria, R. Long, G. Rousse and many others) which have opened new avenues of thought surrounding the basic parameters found in the experience of space, scale, time, point of view, motion, solid and void, light, and material. These discussions help students to identify their own approaches on-site when confronted with the natural landscape (in Kerguehennec) or the urban landscape (in Moulin) during intensive workshops.

SPACE, LIGHT, COLOR ENSAPLV Through a succession of exercises, this course presents a direct confrontation with color. Students develop their perceptions, analysis, and comprehensions of the phenomenon of color, while putting these basic concepts into dialogue with painters and paintings whose investigations concern primarily light, color, and landscape. First, students produce the basic tools of experience creating a collective palette of colors that offers the richest tonalities possible. Secondly, students manipulate, confront, compare, test, and match tonalities, observing their own qualities and the reciprocal vibrations. Thirdly, chromatic exercises of different scales are developed through various subjects and levels of perception. Throughout the course, students are asked to rid themselves of the habits of perception that don't go beyond “identity” and that thus limit the field of perception. By changing this view, displacing the intentions of perceptions and ridding oneself of the false “reality” of the object, one can see the relations and true reality of space. This conversation of light, tension, energy, composition, balance, material, void, breath, etc. also calls for familiarization and study of the works of artists such as Monet, Rothko, Yves Klein, Ryman, Matisse, Sam Francis, Morandi, and Tony Cragg among others. Professor Desmier.

IMAGES IN PERSPECTIVE: PHILOSOPHY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE ENSAPLV This course offers a general introduction to the objectives and methods of interdisciplinary cognitive science through their application in the general field of spatial representation. It then examines, from a philosophical point of view, the relationship between the representation and configuration of an image (its content and subject matter). Finally, the class addresses the following question: Is linear perspective the most appropriate method for creating representational images? The course shows that the cognitive functions for different techniques of representation are not equivalent in the perception of images. Professor Tüscher-Dokic.

Professor Desmier. 150

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ARCHITECTURE

*EMERGING PUBLIC SPACE: USE AND PERCEPTIONS OF TRANSPORTATION SYSTEMS ENSAPLV Through a sociological approach, this course seeks to understand the ways in which people inhabit transport space, and how systems of transport act on those that use them. Students are asked to choose one or two aspects of the Parisian transport system to thoroughly investigate by conducting interviews, on-site observations, recordings, and multi-media analysis. The main focus of the course is the RER (the Parisian commuter rail network), but other inquiries are also made in the metro, the buses, the tramway and the Vélib' bicycle lending system. At the conclusion of the course all students compile their findings and form a small portfolio. Professor Lefrançois.

*SPACE AND URBAN DYNAMICS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne In this course, the various paradigms of urbanization are examined through the study of major cities such as Los Angeles, Paris, Stockholm, and Hanoi but also, on a larger scale, through the study of countries such as South Africa. This geography course also helps students move toward greater understanding of the various processes that allow urbanization to take place and permit cities to evolve through history. Professor Dubucs.

*PUBLIC EDIFICE ENSAPLV This architecture studio explores the weight and presence of a public edifice, or, more specifically, a public performance space. At the beginning of the studio, students are asked to design an open-air theater, with specific attention to its structural elements. The second assignment entails beginning the design of a music school incorporation an independently functioning concert hall. Students build up to their final project by completing a series of weekly assignments focusing on certain facets of this project, such as circulation and structure. Professors Gaudin and Cornu.

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The French National Assembly

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS

XVI. POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS

A HISTORY OF POLITICAL THOUGHT IN EUROPE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course looks at the foundations of European political thought, particularly as they relate to the development of European democracy. Specific areas of interest include direct and representative democracy, criticism of the practical functioning of democratic government, and the process of democratization. Authors include Aristotle, Rousseau, Mill, Lenin, Tocqueville, and others. Professor Laquièze.

POLITICAL SOCIOLOGY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This class discusses the social trends that affect the way in which people act politically. After defining political sociology and its relation with the wider field of political science, students examine founding texts as well as recent theories in political sociology, focusing on four themes: ideology, political institutions, public action and political behavior. Professor Sintomer. 152

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FUNDAMENTAL POLITICAL CONCEPTS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This class interrogates the relationship between violence and politics from a theoretical approach. Key issues include: the difference between le politique et la politique (loosely translated as the difference between theoretical and practical politics), the role of violence in the formation of the state, violence or war as a political instrument, and political violence. It also provides a survey of some of the principal authors in this field, including Hannah Arendt, Max Weber, Karl Marx, Thomas Hobbes, Carl Schmitt, G.W.F. Hegel, Sigmund Freud and Emile Durkheim. Professor Baudot.

*THEORIES OF DEMOCRACY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The object of this course is to acquire a detailed overview of the doctrinal debates and political theory issues concerning contemporary democracy. Besides the study of canonical texts (the works of Plato, Aristotle, Rousseau, Tocqueville, and Marx), the course's main theme is the difficulty to give “democracy” an unambiguous definition. The works of contemporary authors such as Arendt, Rawls, Sen, Dworkin, Habermas, and Dahl are analyzed in order to articulate the reflections of democracy on questions of inequality, justice, and diversity (identity, community, gender, and culture). Professor Boutaleb.

COMPARATIVE POLITICAL INSTITUTIONS AND CONSTITUTIONS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course studies the major political institutions in France and their foundation in constitutional law, examining these institutions in comparison with those of the United States and other countries in the European Union. Some of the topics examined in the course include separation of powers, political party systems, the electoral process, and a comparison of parliamentary and presidential regimes. Different themes are examined through the study and discussion of academic journal articles. Professors Cadot and Meyer.

*HISTORY AND ANALYSIS OF FRENCH ELECTIONS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense The first half of this course focuses on electoral history in France, such as the first voting proce-

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS

dures and how they evolved through the different regimes. The second half of the course focuses on contemporary voting, and how factors such as geography, electronic voting, and campaign tactics affect the results of an election. Professor Voilliot.

COMMUNICATION AND POLITICS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course offers a critical examination of communication and its integral role in political processes. The notions of society of communication, propaganda and democracy are discussed. Media and politics are studied in the context of public opinion and public spaces for expression, political representation, socialization and participation. Communication transmission, reception and content (pragmatic, symbolic and structural dimensions) are addressed with an overview of theories by Adorno, Horkheimer, Marcuse, Habermas, Hall, Watzlawick, Bateson, Katz, Parsons, McLuhan and Lazarsfeld. Professor Roucaute.

POLITICAL THEORY: SOCIAL CLASSES AND POLITICAL ACTION Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This political theory course starts out with a comparison of Marx and Weber’s views on class and political action, through a discussion of the history of class conflict in Europe and the socialist and communist parties. Besides Marx and Weber, authors include Boltansky, Bourdieu, Corcuff, Dahrendorf, Tilly and Edwards. An interdisciplinary approach including political science and sociology, which covers the formation of a class, the transformation of a class into a politically active group, the role of the spokesperson, the links within a group, its politically-motivated action, and events beyond its control, as well as the different organizations states have formed to deal with class-motivated action. Professor Zalewski.

HISTORY OF ACTION AND LEADERSHIP EHESS Historical development of the ideas and practices of leadership and management throughout the 20th century are the focus of this doctoral seminar. Historical methods and theories include Marcus’ article “Ethnography In/Of the World System: the Emergence of a Multi-sited Ethnography”, and Sewell’s theory of historical events. Foucault’s theo-

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ry of governmentality and other theories of authority such as those of Hannah Arendt and Weber are also seen. These theories are studied in relation to historical periods and phenomena including Soviet history and Stalinism, development of Fordism and Taylorism, and the rise of the idea of leadership and management in European and American business. Guest historians in Soviet and French History are heard on topics such as bureaucratic practices and modes of life in Stalinist Russia, or diarists during the Stalinist period. Also seen are the cult of personality in Communist states, and the history of women in leadership roles. Professor Cohen.

NORMS AND PRACTICES OF CITIZENSHIP Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course focuses on theories and practices of citizenship throughout the world, with an emphasis on France and the European Union. The primary objectives of this course are (1) to give the student an indepth understanding of the fundamental problems and theories of citizenship throughout the world, and (2) to discuss historical shifts in norms and institutions that accompany the emergence of new types of citizenship. Themes discussed include but are not limited to: diverse concepts of citizenship in multiple nations; political systems and changing models of citizenship that emerged with the Renaissance; citizenship and its relationship with colonialism and racism; the effect of migration on citizenship and cultural preservation; and the difficulties of transnational citizenship and multiple citizenship. These themes are studied through the analysis of various examples, with special emphasis on states within the European Union and Sub-Saharan Africa. Professor Zobel.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis An introduction to international political end economic relations, the main themes studied in this course include: the formation of the Inter-State system, the diverse types of actors involved in International Relations, strategic stakes in a global political and economic system (wars, empires, decolonization, systemic inequalities, international law), and the principal theories in the field of International Relations. Professor Cohen.

POLITICAL ISSUES OF GLOBALIZATION Institut Catholique de Paris The globalized world is more fluid and interdependent than ever, but at the same time, it is more fractured. This course studies the system of globalization and its different actors, how the system has changed since the end of the Cold War and how many issues today such as immigration, the economy, security, terrorism, and the environment, must be dealt with at a global level. The theories of Henry Kissinger and Samuel Huntington are seen, in particular the “clash of civilizations”, and their detractors. The course discusses the United Nations’ potential role as the political head of the globalized world, but also examines the dire need for its reform. Also seen are the difficulties of creating internationally shared humans rights, especially without a system of international justice. Professor Boëdec.

*INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS AND INSTITUTIONS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

This class focuses on rights of man and judicial systems in France, although it also covers the American system, used as a comparison. It attempts to define the concept of human rights and liberties by analyzing primarily the preamble to both the American and French constitutions, and the Declaration of the Rights of Man. A supplementary lecture covers the development the world economic system. Topics discussed include the Genoa Conference, the creation of the World Bank and the IMF.

This course is an introduction to international organizations and institutions, beginning with a brief overview of treaties and alliances that led to the development and creation of numerous organizations in the 20th century. The infrastructure, areas of involvement and important actors of each organization are highlighted, as are case studies on issues that have required international organizations’ involvement over the past twenty years. Special emphasis is placed on the United Nations, the International Monetary Fund, the World Bank, and several types of non-governmental organizations. The course delves into the international relations of the European Union by analyzing its international status in comparison to other international organizations.

Professors Letteron and Bussière.

Professor De Blic.

*INTERNATIONAL RELATIONS, HUMAN RIGHTS AND JUDICIAL SYSTEMS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

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*DISCRIMINATION, DIVERSITY, AND ANTI-DISCRIMINATION POLITICS

POLICIES AND COORDINATION OF THE EUROPEAN UNION COMMON MARKET

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle

This masters-level seminar takes a socio-historical approach to examining discrimination and the multiple forms of domination that minority groups face in France today. The course examines how and why discrimination, previously absent from political debate in France, has now come to the fore. Topics of study include the current paradigm of integration as the French immigration model, the conflicts posed between diversity and the republican ideals of French government, the corporate co-option of diversity, and the efforts put in place by the government and associations to fight discrimination. The course also offers a comparison between French policies and affirmative action in the U.S. The professor regularly invites speakers and authors of the course readings to discuss their findings in depth.

This course examines the consequences of enforcing and coordinating a single, common market in the European Union beginning with an overview of the establishment of free trade and a European common market, then moving on to an analysis of industrial policy and the performance of European countries in serving the general economic interest. It concludes with discussion of the politics of market competition.

Professor Tissot.

THE CULTURAL CONSTRUCTION OF NATIONAL IDENTITY IN EUROPE Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course is structured around the thesis that authors, grammarians, linguists, and anthropologists all played a fundamental role in the formation of national identity throughout Europe in the 19th century. Taking an interdisciplinary approach, the course fuses political science, history, and literature, allowing students to examine the ways in which writing or collecting stories can be considered a political act. Class topics include: the origins of a national conscience, the role of intellectual elites, national history, national language, European romanticism, national literature, the historical novel in Europe, and vectors and supports of national culture. Discussions also touch on the contemporary parallel of the struggle to create a collective European identity. Professor Moussakova.

*EUROPEAN CONSTRUCTION Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines the foundation and expansion of the EU from the end of WW2. Course material focuses on the structure of European institutions and the integration of Nation-States. In addition to the structure of the EU, the course examines the historiography of its creation and the roles of “founding fathers” from various nations. Professor Cadot.

Professor Guyader.

*EUROPEAN INSTITUTIONS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course examines the stages of the creation of the European Union, as well as the function and structure of its main institutions, such as the Commission, Council, Parliament, jurisdictional organs and various committees. It focuses on currents of thought relating to state building, federations and international cooperation. Sources of law and mechanisms of control are also discussed. Professors Morelou and Ménager or Hurtado.

FOREIGN POLICY OF THE EUROPEAN UNION Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle This course examines the history and evolution of the foreign policy of the European Union, from its origins to the present day. In particular, a distinction is made between the development of EU defense policy and other tools of foreign policy including diplomacy. The European Union's political structure and emerging EU institutions such as the Common Security and Defense Policy are seen, as well as the history of the European Union's involvement in armed conflicts and its relationship with NATO and the United States. Professor Stark.

MAJOR GEOPOLITICAL PROBLEMS OF THE CONTEMPORARY WORLD Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The course analyzes the structural elements and determining factors of the current international system, as well as the shifting balances of power that have transformed the geopolitical landscape in the late 20th and early 21st centuries. An overview of orga-

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nizational, economic, and defense issues is provided through lectures and course readings, and near the end of the semester, students undertake a closer look at developments in a particular area of the world. Professor Campagnola.

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES OF SOVEREIGNTY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course examines the problems and issues of sovereignty focusing mainly on political theory. Topics discussed include the place of sovereignty with respect to contemporary issues such as colonialism/ neocolonialism, the UN and globalization as well as more theoretical issues such as the founding of a state, law, peace, and war. In each case, the meaning of sovereignty and its limits are defined and discussed. Readings form Foucault, Schmitt, and Habermas. Professor Mairet.

*EMPIRE, COLONIALISM AND POSTCOLONIALISM Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This second-year Masters' seminar introduces the field of post-colonial studies. It explores the roots of this relatively new field of academic study, examining the works of major scholars such as Edward Said, Homi Bhabha, and Gayatri Spivak. The course attempts to understand why the fields of colonial studies and post-colonial studies developed within Anglophone universities (but not among their French counterparts) and analyzes the state of postcolonial studies in French universities today. Professor Zobel.

*AFRICAN POLITICS AND GOVERNMENT Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course considers the development of African politics, and pre- and post-colonialism, looking at a range of political systems across the continent. It contextualizes the development of democracy and civil society movements in politics, as well as modern-day realities of African society and political structures. Professor Zobel.

*THE ARAB SPRING IRIS - Institut de Relations Internationales et Stratégiques The Maghreb and the Middle East and the historic circumstances leading to changes occurring in 156

these regions is the focus of this seminar which provides a thorough analysis of complex events, starting off with the beginnings of the revolution, and including a discussion of the situation in Algeria, Morocco, Tunisia, Egypt, Libya, Syria, Saudi Arabia and the Gulf States, the Israel-Palestine conflict, and the case of Iran. Professors Bitar, Billion and Boniface.

SOCIOPOLITICAL MOVEMENTS IN LATIN AMERICA Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course studies the role of social movements in the development of Latin American democracies from 1970 to the present by examining the political, social, and cultural conditions in which they developed, with particular focus on women's movements during this time period, including populist movements, feminist movements, and indigenous movements. To this end, the study of press articles is especially emphasized. Professor Ludec.

CONTEMPORARY ISSUES IN LATIN AMERICAN DEMOCRACIES Institut des Hautes Études d’Amérique Latine Based on inter- and intra-regional comparative analysis, the first goal of this course is to define and analyze basic concepts such as democracy, authoritarianism and dictatorship, as applied to the last thirty years and in conjunction with more specific concepts such as transition, consolidation, destabilization, and populism. The second goal is to study specific cases in Latin America, an ideal region to explore the current issues that afflict modern democracies. Through students’ individual readings and interpretations, a deeper understanding of research and analysis in the field of Political Science is acquired. Professor Fregosi.

STATE AND SOCIETY IN LATIN AMERICA Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The objective of this course is to introduce the political sociology of Latin America. It approaches in particular the economic, political, and cultural structures of the region, working towards a global approach, raising the questions of common roots and the extreme diversity of Latin America. This introduction provides students with empirical tools and the opportunity to reflect more profoundly on Latin America. Major themes covered are the historical

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formation of the state in Latin America since the end of colonial rule, independence, and the formation of the modern Latin American nation-state. The class also focuses on the economic, political, and cultural structures that exist in Latin America in the modern period. A global approach is used while tackling these themes, taking into consideration both the common roots and the extreme diversity that exists in Latin America. Texts include Olivier Dabene's L'Amérique Latine au XVIIIe siècle, Alain Rouquie's L'Amérique Latine : Introduction a l'extrême occident, Eduardo Galeano's Les veines ouvertes de l'Amérique Latine, and Pierre Chaunu's Histoire de l'Amérique Latine. Professor Moreno.

EASTERN EUROPE: FROM COMMUNISM TO POST-COMMUNISM Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course explores the transition from communism to democracy in several Eastern European countries, most notably Poland, Czechoslovakia, Hungary, and Romania. The course begins with a detailed overview of the history of the Soviet Union, focusing on its influence in Eastern Europe. The characteristics of the various communist regimes of the Eastern Bloc contrasted with the characteristics of modern governments. Particular emphasis is placed on the events of the 1980s, which precipitated the fall of communism, and on the ways in which Eastern Europe transitioned to democracy and a freemarket economy. Finally, the course seeks to define the concept of a “post-communist” world. Professor Zalewski.

*HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THEORIES Université de Paris-Dauphine This course covers the fundamental economic theories proposed by philosophers throughout the centuries, beginning with Plato and Aristotle, continuing through Smith, Ricardo, Say, Pigou and Coase, then ending with Keynes and other modern-day perspectives on game theory, general equilibrium, and monetarists and neo-keynesians. Original texts by each of the economic philosophers provide the student with a general idea of the theories. Professor Bezbakh.

*HISTORY OF ECONOMIC THOUGHT Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This seminar considers contemporary work in the philosophy of economics, covering such themes as

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS

international justice, social choice, the rational actor model, utilitarianism, economy of conventions, and ecological approaches to economic questions. Some attention is given to methodological and epistemological issues in the philosophy of economics. Additional sequences discuss philosophy and game theory. Professor Rieucau.

*SOCIAL AND ECONOMIC HISTORY Université de Paris-Dauphine This course examines social and economic activity from the Roman Republic to the Industrial Revolution, covering the major turning points and transitions to different economic ideas, and their social impact. The second part of the course mainly deals with the 20th century. Over the course of the semester, students explore the origins of the Western social and economic model, its points of prosperity and its debacles. Professors Bezbakh and Chalmin.

POLITICAL ECONOMY IN FRANCE SINCE 1945 Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course is divided into four chronological parts: Reconstruction for Growth in the Fourth Republic (1944-1957), Expansionist France (1958-1973), French Political Economy in the Face of Crises (1973-1983), and the Logic of Competitive Disinflation (since 1982). Some major themes that are addressed include the French choice of a mixed economy solution between free market capitalism and social welfare, France in an international context, European construction and the problem of inflation. The analysis includes examination of economic, political and social causes and effects of these issues and their corresponding policies. Professor Oheix.

*ECONOMIC AND SOCIAL ISSUES IN THE MODERN WORLD Université de Paris-Dauphine This course attempts to situate historically, and analyze, some of the great socio-economic issues of the 20th century, namely the nature and permanence of the dominant model of economic development, the current North-South/East-West relationship, the new poverties and inequalities, the emergence of the new economic giants (BRIC countries) and the construction of new economic groups. Professor Bezbakh.

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*INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS Université de Paris-Dauphine The opening of economic barriers requires the decision-makers in companies and public services to take measures related to globalization. This course attempts to find the key elements that allow us to understand the causes, manifestations and effects of globalization. It gives students a foundation to understand international commerce and the problem of balance and unbalance in payments. The first part of the course is devoted to theories of comparative advantage, the HOS model, new international economic theories (e.g. ladder economies in imperfect competition). The second part deals with monetary and financial questions - balance of payments and macroeconomic analysis in an open economy. Professor Arestoff.

INTERNATIONAL POLITICAL ECONOMY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This class studies the making of modern international political economy by looking at its evolution over time, as well as seeing how it functions in the modern international economic system. It tackles multiple topics in international economics in political terms, making sure to differentiate approaches to international economics and international political economy. International political economic theory and questions related to the political economics of globalization are also studied. The theories studied and questions raised are used as a tool to study international business, and the international financial and banking systems. Professor Kébabdjian.

ECONOMICS OF THE EUROPEAN UNION Université de Paris-Dauphine This course is an in-depth look at the political and economic theory behind the formation of the European Union and the resulting current policies and market changes in Europe. It covers the microeconomics of customs taxes, subsidies and quotas, in particular in the context of the agricultural market since this topic is the most pertinent for France. It discusses the current policies in effect under the World Trade Organization and their tangible consequences on the European Union’s trade patterns, both internally and externally. Professors Venet and Peltrault.

ECONOMY OF EUROPEAN LABOR MARKETS Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The course starts with a general study of models for grouping social welfare states, models of social regulation, and the influence of labor unions and social dialogue on social policy-making. The second half of the course is more country-specific, covering specific EU directives, treaties, and organizations that affect Europe's social sphere. Professor Delteil.

*DEVELOPMENT ECONOMICS Université de Paris-Dauphine This course teaches the fundamental principles in the field of economic development. Topics covered include dualism, the Lewis-Ranis-Fei model, Pareto efficiency and the theory of justice, rational decision-making, the fragmentation of economy, the effects of the green revolution, etc. Professor Raffinot.

*INTERNATIONAL ECONOMICS AND GLOBALIZATION Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Providing an introduction to the effects of globalization on the international economic sphere, this course provides analysis of individual regional approaches to globalization and of the contrasts between countries in their adoption of and responses to globalization. Also discussed are the future advantages and disadvantages of globalization on various industries and parts of the world. Professor Richet.

*ECONOMIC ASPECTS OF GLOBALIZATION Université de Paris-Dauphine This calculus-based course examines the fundamental theories of international trade and analyzes their application within the context of the current debate on globalization. Other topics examined include foreign direct investments, exchange rates, the International Monetary Fund, balance of payments and international companies. Professors Legendre and Mouhoud.

EUROPEAN ECONOMIC INTEGRATION Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course studies the degree of integration of the EU and how that integration has been achieved by

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determining which areas of macroeconomic control have been concentrated on a supranational level, which have been made cooperative, and which have been left exclusively to the national arenas. Professor Coudrat.

PUBLIC ECONOMICS Université de Paris-Dauphine This course aims to help students master the concepts and analytical tools of public economics, and clarifies important contemporary debates, such as growth and pollution, competition and public services, and fiscal harmonization in Europe. Through review and study of analytical tools for public economics, students learn how to analyze important contemporary problems of public regulation. The course begins by looking at the economic roles attributed to a modern state, and the way these roles translate into public spending. Course material then progresses from an analysis of individual utility to the criteria and methods for utility aggregation. A subsequent look at public goods and their optimal production is followed by a discussion of externalities. The course concludes with a section on the theory of taxation and a section on public services.

POLITICAL SCIENCE AND ECONOMICS

MICROECONOMICS Université de Paris-Dauphine This course is a calculus-based introduction to microeconomics. Major themes discussed during the course are the theory of production (production function and constraints, demand of production factors, supply function), the consumer (preferences, marginal substitution cost, exchange, budgetary constraint, optimal choice, utility function, substitution and revenue effect) and general equilibrium. Knowledge of multivariable calculus is a prerequisite for the course. Professors Alary and Durand-Viel.

INTERMEDIATE MICROECONOMICS Université de Paris-Dauphine This course provides an in-depth analysis of the goods market, labor market, financial investments market and money supply market. Emphasis is placed on mathematical derivations of all market curves and graphical representations of changes brought about by monetary or fiscal policy or other factors. Major models and laws are reviewed, and economic growth theories are analyzed.

Professor Wittwer.

Professor Fabre.

LABOR ECONOMICS

*ECONOMICS OF FINANCIAL MARKETS

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

In this small seminar class that discusses aspects of the French labor market, particularly in comparison with other international markets, the neo-classical theory and other non-standard theories including Keynes and the economy of organizations and institutions are studied. Also studied are political and economic debates related to the labor market at large and unemployment in particular. The Phillips curve and its critique by monetarists and the theory of equilibrium unemployment are also examined.

This course analyses the workings of financial markets. It focuses on the money market, the market for stocks, the market for bonds, risk and return, and portfolio management. The quantitative component of the course requires the comprehension and correct application of mathematical models and formulas used to estimate value, price, etc. The qualitative component aims at providing an understanding of how the different markets interact and a familiarity with the specific actors in the French financial Markets.

Professor Caroli.

*SOCIAL ECONOMICS

Professor Toullec.

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

FINANCIAL PRODUCTS AND MARKETS

Specific questions raised by the field of social economics, in favor of a more democratic, egalitarian and fraternal approach to socioeconomic organizations, are discussed in this course. Students build a capacity for analysis and interpretation.

Université de Paris-Dauphine

Professor Frossard.

This course presents the institutional and technical aspects of financial markets, the environment in which they function, their main actors as well as a description of the different products that are valued and various pricing techniques used to evaluate these products. Students must have basic knowledge of statistics and single-variable calculus skills

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in order to perform risk and profit calculations and basic portfolio management computations. Professor Gillet.

*MONETARY INSTITUTIONS AND MECHANISMS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course provides the foundation and tools necessary for the comprehension of monetary mechanisms and the institutions that fuel them. Subjects reviewed include: different forms and functions of money; monetary creation and the role of the central bank; monetary aggregates; financial instruments and technologies; the circulation of money; direct and indirect financing; financial institutions and the stock market; the history of financial globalization and regulation. The course also covers important theories, such as the quantitative theory of money and Keynesianism, leading toward a better understanding of the stakes involved in contemporary debates about monetary politics. Professor Depoortere.

*TAXATION Université de Paris-Dauphine The objective of this course is to examine the fundamental principles of taxation in France and introduce the main European directives.

in Latin America in the 20th century, this seminar looks into contemporary economic relations between Europe (in particular France, England and Germany) and Latin America. Specific topics include the debt crisis of the 1980s, deterioration of exchange rates, the shift towards industrialization in Latin America, the problems of primary resources, etc. Reading materials, often from CEPAL, are distributed in class. Professor Assidon.

ECONOMICS OF CORRUPTION Institut des Hautes Études d’Amérique Latine The first part of this course introduces different kinds of corruption and presents the important questions relating to the topic. Following this introduction, the course is divided into four sections: corruption and economic efficiency; corruption and political legitimacy; corruption and legality or the relationship with the law, and corruption and development. Within each of these sections, the following theories and topics are discussed: rent-seeking activities, the theory of the New Political Economy, new Institutional Economy and the theory of Governance, corruption in clientelist systems and in bureaucratic systems, legitimacy and legality, the fight against corruption and the distributional effects of corruption. Professor Rivelois.

Professors Fayat and Borel.

ASIAN ECONOMIES AND THEIR RELATIONSHIP WITH THE EU

.

Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle The evolution of specific Asian economies, with particular attention given to Japan and China, is studied through the analysis of statistical data, such as the rates of GDP, in order to assess development within Asian countries and strike comparisons with their European counterparts. The economic trends are evaluated within the social and cultural context of each country. The course addresses the countries’ major industries and trade relationships, as well as the general position and contribution of Asia in the global economy. Professor Crochet.

ECONOMIC RELATIONS BETWEEN EUROPE AND LATIN AMERICA Institut des Hautes Études d’Amérique Latine After a historical account of economic development 160

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MARX FOR BEGINNERS

SOCIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY

This course seeks to elucidate over 150 years of arguments about Marx in order to answer that most basic question: what did Marx, the philosopher, think? Beginning with a study of Marx’s philosophical formation and early works, the course moves on to discussions of Le Manifeste du Parti Communiste, Le Capital, works on politics and the Commune, and the (critical) reception of Marx today. Major topics include Marx’s concept of history, classes and class struggle, and crisis. Special attention is brought to the following issues: the relationship of Marx to other philosophers and schools of thought (especially Hegel), history, technology, teleology (or lack thereof), utopia, dialectics, political economy, and the individual’s place in society. Principal texts include Le Manifeste, Le 18e Brumaire de Louis-Napoléon, and excerpts from Philosophies.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Bensaïd.

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THE FRANKFURT SCHOOL

*SOCIOLOGY OF GENDER

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

A sociology seminar providing an overview of the Frankfurt School. Although the sociological aspect of their work is addressed, attention is also given to philosophical implications of this movement. The first half of the course presents some background in German philosophy and intellectual history with special attention given to Kant and Marx but also other socialist thinkers.

This course seeks to study the cultural construction of gender. It examines gender differences among specific cultures and analyzes these in comparison to other cultures' study of gender. The idea of gender is also seen as an ordering principle and an analytical category in political and social sciences. The main question the course seeks to answer through its study of specific works is: “How did this work change the thinking of relations between the sexes in terms of social relations?” Diverse theories of sexual difference are explored from a historical, cultural and interdisciplinary perspective, and the pertinence of these theories in France and other countries is also investigated. The status of women, with regard to the relationship between gender and sexuality in political theory and social sciences, is also discussed, as are the connections between gender and other forms of social categorization and oppression (racism, nationalism, division of class). The course concludes with a discussion of the possibilities offered by theories of gender for rethinking categories and classical distinctions in the social sciences and political theory.

Professor Diener.

SOCIOLOGY OF POLITICAL IDEOLOGIES Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This class uses a wide range of theories (most importantly Marxist, Weberian, and Hegelian) in order to analyze potential causes and manifestations of mass ideologies in both modern and late pre-modern contexts, and seeks to deal with the phenomena of beliefs, ideas, and collective representations in strictly social terms. The reading list includes works by Karl Marx, Emile Durkheim, Max Weber, Michel Foucault, and Maurice Halbwachs. Professor Trigano.

SOCIOLOGY OF GLOBALIZATION

Professor Paperman.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

*SOCIOLOGY OF DEVIANCE

This course studies sociological aspects of the phenomenon of globalization, exploring and discussing the political, social and cultural implications of the creation of a global community. The comprehensive bibliography includes sources from the fields of economics, history and anthropology. International institutions are described and compared, and current events are discussed and situated, in the framework of globalization, seen as a historical event as well as an evolving trend.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Professor Moreno.

SOCIOLOGY OF SOCIAL MOVEMENTS

Drawing from studies and anecdotes, as well as theories linking sociology to the study of contemporary issues, this course calls into question our notions of deviance and marginality in reviewing the principal operating concepts and the different methods (statistics, observation, etc) which sociologists use to investigate this terrain. Lectures present sociological theories and expounds upon them in the context of contemporary policy, social structures and institutions as well as networks of support, education and employment. Professor Marcel.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course offers an in-depth analysis of the definition of a true social movement and how it differs from a protest or any other reactionary movement. Special emphasis is placed on the history of the social movement and its foundations in the labor movements of the early part of the 20th century. Specific examples are taken from movements in French history. Professor Vakaloulis.

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SOCIOLOGY: SECULARISM AND INEQUALITY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This Master’s level seminar examines the history and contemporary issues of secularism, focusing on France and analyzing the separation between religion and State and the different effects it has had on communities. A number of guest speakers are included in the course, such as philosopher Henri

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Peria-Ruiz, and representatives from cultural awareness and women’s rights groups. Many different views are seen in class in an attempt to find a common ground. The course has particular relevance today in France because of recent laws banning religious items (notably the Islamic veil) from schools and public places.

SOCIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY

This course examines the history of globalization from the 15th century onwards, beginning with commercial exchange and merchant networks, then surveying global migration, the spread of various technologies, and the spread of ideologies and cultural practices. Also discussed is the topic of bias toward the Western world in the context of globalization. Authors include Jerry Bentley, Richard Drayton, Pierre-Yves Saunier, and Anthony Hopkins.

continental societies of North America, without first taking into account the relations such societies developed with the Greater Caribbean. The city of New Orleans, whose rapid racialization must be explored in the context of the relations it maintained with the French Antilles, serves as an emblematic example of these themes. The relationship between imperial history and Atlantic history is thus re-examined, as are various models that historians and anthropologists have designed in order to consider the formation of new American societies in the contexts of colonialism and slavery. The second part of this course seminar broaches historical controversies in the United States concerning social groups called “minorities” (Native Americans, African Americans, Latinos, etc.) in American parlance. Issues at stake and their modes of expression are discussed, as are their political and social contexts. A significant portion of the course is devoted to the history of Black Nationalism in the United States, from the end of the 19th century to the end of the 20th .

Professor Wilfert-Portal.

Professor De Barros.

INTRODUCTION TO THE SOCIOLOGY OF IMMIGRATION

*THE QUESTION OF RACE: NATIONAL CONSTRUCTS AND TRANSNATIONAL CIRCULATIONS

Professor Meyer.

*HISTORY AND SOCIAL SCIENCES: GLOBALIZATION ENS

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis An overview of the sociology of immigration, beginning with the Chicago School in the US and Abdelmalek Sayad in France, and moving up to the present. Students use the tools and approaches they learn to perform their own interview of an immigrant.

EHESS

*SOCIO-RACIAL CIRCULATIONS AND DYNAMICS IN THE AGE OF COLONIALISM/AMERICAN MINORITIES : HISTORIOGRAPHICAL DEBATES AND POLITICAL CONTROVERSIES.

This course is taught by Eric Fassin (De la Question raciale à la question sociale) and Pap Ndiaye (La condition noire) two experts on race and minority issues on national and transnational levels. Each class addresses a different facet of the construction of minority identity. Invited guest speakers, from a variety of backgrounds, discuss topics of interest such as the racialisation of Islam in France, or the construction and origins of “whiteness” in Ireland. The main objective of the course is to break down European approaches to race, culture, and identity by engaging diverse points of view.

EHESS

Professors Fassin and Ndiaye.

Professor De Barros.

In the 1990s, the development of a new field of Atlantic historical studies in the United States began to given new life to an old debate: To what extent is the development of colonial slave societies in the Americas related to local colonial circumstances and to connections with Europe and Africa? This course demonstrates that it is imperative to take hemispherical and inter-colonial circulations into account, in addition to these transatlantic considerations. Notably, it proves that it is impossible to understand the socio-racial dynamics at work in the

*REPRESENTATIONS AND REALITIES OF ISLAM IN FRANCE Center for University Programs Abroad This course examines the presence of Islam in France as a social phenomenon, existing on two levels: as an objective reality (demographic, economic, sociological) and as a subject of representation (in the media, the arts, the academy). Students are introduced to the historical, social, religious, and cultural realities of Islam within contemporary French

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society, through an analysis of various texts, images, films, and media events from the last twenty years. The following issues, among others, are discussed: How and why has a dominant French historiography effaced previous centuries of exchange with the Islamic world? What relationships exist between Islam and gender/sexuality in France? What are the discourses between the Muslim minority and the majority? What is the reality of political Islam in France? This course draws both from history and current events to provide an in-depth analysis of Islam in France. Professor Bondurand-Mouawad.

REPRESENTATIONS OF POVERTY AND EXCLUSION IN ANGLO-SAXON SOCIETIES EHESS American and British sociologists created a field to study the causes and nature of poverty since the beginning of the 20th century, most notably in the Chicago School of Sociology. This seminar analyzes landmark studies from the early 20th century until today. What methods are used to study poverty in the US and UK? How has the nature of poverty evolved in these societies in the last century? Readings include works by Drake and Clayton, William Julius Wilson, and Étienne Balibar. Professor Duvoux.

SOCIOLOGY OF THE CITY EHESS A seminar examining the evolution of sociology’s increasingly interdisciplinary approach to studying the city as an object in itself, as opposed to a simple setting or theater of everyday life. Case studies are drawn from historians, sociologists, and anthropologists studying France and Italy from the 1950s to the present. Much emphasis is placed on Bourdieu’s influence on urban sociology. Professor Magri.

PUBLIC SPACE AND THE URBAN THEATER Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense The course investigates the use and manipulation of public space through the metaphor of the theater, treating the city as a backdrop for public expression and the citizens and residents of that city as the actors upon its stage. Themes studied include the notion of identity, the mise en scène of power, and the significance of various manifestations of power and 164

expression (such as carnivals, cafés, demonstrations and the celebration of national holidays). Authors studied include Goffman, Joseph, Habermas, Tartakowsky, Balandier and Halbwachs. Professor Raulin.

URBAN SOCIOLOGY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course first addresses the question of what constitutes a city, what are a city’s traits and how is it defined. Different theories are discussed in answering these fundamental questions, including those of Grafmeyer, Weber, Durkheim, Marx, Werth, Simmel and Park. Also studied: what constitutes a “public space”, research in the field (objectives, pitfalls) and the methodology of reading a sociological text, logements sociaux (subsidized housing), regulation of public space, partitioning of social groups and segregation. Professor Lévy-Vroelant.

ECOLOGY OF THE CITY, ECOLOGY IN THE CITY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course explores the intersection between society, the environment, and the city. General ecological and environmental concepts are discussed within the framework of the city, and dichotomies between nature/culture, modernity/tradition, and urban/rural are studied within the context of urbanization and the societal appropriation of nature. Also seen are current urban environmental issues including: the place of nature in society, environmental practices and representation are analyzed with specific attention paid to practices of energy consumption linked to the urban lifestyle. Professor Busquet.

URBAN SEGREGATION Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Study of the diversity of approaches taken by sociologists in the field of urban sociology and specifically concerning urban segregation from the 1950s to the present. The course begins with a general introduction to the study of urban segregation, and then covers how representations of the city have evolved. Themes include social division and the effects of social construction from the 1950s to the 1970s. The development of the banlieue and cités sensibles is seen through the studies of Touraine and Donzelot, and comparison is made with urban

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segregation in the U.S. The situation today and the laws passed in France during the 1990s to combat urban segregation, the future of the city and the possible effects of globalization on urban segregation are analyzed in detail. Professor Costes.

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renovations, the course examines the corresponding changes in social practices: the organization of space within the home, practices and customs of the family, and socialization and sociability. Authors studied include Marx, Chombart, Lefebvre, and Durkheim. Professor Dussart.

INTRODUCTION TO DEMOGRAPHY: POPULATION STUDIES AND IMMIGRATION IN FRANCE

EVOLUTION OF FRENCH SOCIETY SINCE 1950

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

This course focuses on the origins, philosophy, and practical consequences of social statistics, beginning with the history of demography, study of the theories and works of John Graunt and Thomas Malthus, then tracing demographic transition and immigration patterns. Debates and readings center around the polemical issue of statistics of race and ethnicity in France, and its intersection with the concept of the immigré. Students learn how to define and calculate population, mortality, fecundity, migration, and nuptiality. This course combines the mathematical procedures of statistics, census, and equations with the social and political contexts and consequences of historical and modern demography.

The course covers the evolution of the French society over the past fifty years, from a sociological point of view. Topics include demographics, the family, social relationships, the home environment, as well as questions of immigration. Coursework involves use of graphs and statistics. Professor Lévy-Vroelant.

SOCIOLOGY OF EDUCATION: INTERNATIONAL COMPARISONS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

HABITAT, FAMILY AND SOCIAL PRACTICES IN POST-WWII FRANCE

Historical, theoretical, and practical approaches to the study of the French education system, focusing primarily on the university and the place of French education in a global context. The course studies the origins and evolution of the French education system, the sociological theories that have contributed to it, and the contemporary tools used by international organizations to situate it within the global context. Three complementary axes of study are discussed: 1) theoretical approaches to defining and characterizing education and its institutions; 2) how the university institution is evaluated by the European Union and at the international level; and 3) contemporary political issues surrounding the French University system (the Pécresse law, privatization, social mobility, etc.). Readings include theory-based texts on sociology of education from Durkheim, Bourdieu, Boudon, and Dubet, as well as newspaper articles and contemporary publications by international education organizations (UNESCO, PISA, etc.)

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Professor Cussó.

Professor Cussó.

THE DEMOGRAPHICS OF FAMILY POLITICS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course is an in-depth discussion of government policies regarding family, and the effect these policies have on the demographics of a country. Multiple case studies, as well as different theories of population cause-and-effect, are explored over the course of history and in several countries. For example, one might explore how China’s “One Family, One Child” policy affects the male-female ratio in the population of that country. Professor Garcin.

The course investigates the period of reconstruction in Paris after WWII through architectural and sociological perspectives: the conflict between the bourgeois and the working class, reconciling the intellectualism of architects and the needs of the public they serve, and the evolving conceptions of “home” as opposed to “lodgment”. In light of these

*THE SOCIOLOGY OF ART ENS This course aims to complete the artistic and aesthetic education of students using an approach that focuses on art through a sociological perspective. Students try to understand art from creation

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to reception: the working conditions of artists, cultural policies and the national context of creation. Through the analysis of texts of great authors and sociological research on the world of art, students see how sociology offers a new perspective on art and culture. Professor Monier.

SOCIOLOGY OF RELIGION AND SOCIETY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense One of the first challenges that sociological theory has faced was understanding the religious phenomenon. As witnesses and actors of the passage from traditional society to modern society, sociologists deploy all of their methods to construct religion as a sociological object instead of one that is purely theological or metaphysical. The goal is to understand and analyze this theoretical work, placing emphasis on the sociological point of view of religion. Professor Trigano.

DIVINATION AND RITUAL POSSESSION IN AFRICA Institut Catholique de Paris This course examines the span of rituals and religious practices in Western Africa, mainly focusing on the Gulf of Guinea. Students explore ancient rituals of divination and healing, rituals of exorcism, and newer religious movements. Each class session focuses on a different area, examining the practices of its people through a combination of lecture and film analysis. Each week a documentary film is shown in order to help students visualize and thus better understand the practices of the people studied. Professor Duchesne.

*INTRODUCTION TO SOCIOLOGY OF LATIN AMERICA Université de Paris III-Sorbonne Nouvelle Latin America is often considered to be a social laboratory. This course presents a number of themes that are part of the sociological agenda of Latin America, such as the debate on modernity, the evolution of the social structure, employment and work, or the new and older social movements. Far from presenting a complete panorama, this course aims to help students gain a better understanding of the social changes that take place on the continent. Professors Zagefka and Dumoulin.

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ANTHROPOLOGY OF ENVIRONMENT IN LATIN AMERICA Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A course exploring the origins and domestication of important American plant species, focusing on Mesoamerica and covering the development of agricultural systems and the type of climate and topography needed for certain plant species. Also studied are the use of plants by the people who domesticated them, past and present, and the plants’ significance since the colonial era when indigenous animistic beliefs were combined with those of the Roman Catholic Church. Professor Katz.

ANTHROPOLOGY OF NOMADISM IN THE MIDDLE EAST Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A seminar dealing with the history of nomadism in the Middle East and modern problems that two of the more active groups of nomads – the Bedouins and the Iranian Bakhtiari - must face. Main focus is on ways in which these particular groups have managed to deal with pressures to become sedentary and the ways in which they deal with the modern government. The impact of ecology on nomadic populations, especially in arid mountainous regions and deserts, is analyzed. Ecological anthropology is also seen as a viable tool for social and cultural interpretation. Professors Pion and Gazagnadou.

ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE BALKANS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Offering an introduction to the history of the region and its peoples, this seminar covers many of the complex issues that have come across in the media: the war in Kosovo, the general political instability, historical animosities between Balkan nations, and their move from Communism toward the European Union. Balancing articles written by Western anthropologists with those written by Romanians, Bulgarians, Serbians, Albanians, etc., the course explores the history of war between Croats and Serbs, the way in which the communist effigies have been dealt with after 1989, the emergence of nationalism, ideological diversions of religion orchestrated by the political regimes and conflicts over split identities in places like FYROM. Taking the form of an Europeanist debate, the seminar examines current issues faced by anthropologists who study Europe, such as

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how to integrate university departments to the new social changes in response to the EU enlargement. Professors Augustins and Couroucli.

ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE BERBERS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The primary focus of this seminar is the connection between colonialism and the development of the discipline of anthropology in the 19th century as it pertains to the Berber population of North Africa. It is thus meant to shed light on the uses of anthropology for political means. Attention is also given to the organization of the Berber community, tribe, and society at large. The course deals exclusively with present-day Algeria and Morocco. It is based on the works of mostly French scholars including Robert Montagne, Germaine Tillon, and Charles-Robert Ageron. Professor Le Saout.

*INTRODUCTION TO ISLAMIC CIVILIZATIONS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The course retraces the birth of Islamic civilizations, from their origins in the Arabian Peninsula in the early 7th century among Arab societies, both nomad and sedentary. It examines the political, economic and cultural structure of Arab societies, as well as the complex relationships and interactions between these diverse Arab populations. It then discusses the status and place of the Arabic language in the 7th century, because it is at the core of the revelation of the Koran and the birth of Islam. The formation of the Koranic text (9th-11th centuries) is discussed, and the major trends of Islam - Sunni, Shi'a and Kharijite - are described. The fast expansion of Arab-Muslims out of the Arabian Peninsula (Al-Jazeera) raises many questions that are addressed in the course, especially with respect to Iran. Professor Gazagnadou.

*ECONOMIC AND HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF MAGHREB-WEST AFRICAN RELATIONS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Western ethnography in North and West Africa emerged in the 19th century as a form of knowledge defined and limited by the culture and politics of European colonialism. The relationship between power and knowledge similarly manifested itself during the period of Islamic presence in the region, beginning in the 7th century. Over the next fourteen cen-

SOCIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY

turies, the region would experience dramatic power shifts, all fundamentally characterized by the interaction between multiple cultures. How has ethnography reflected political realities across centuries and cultures? In what ways has anthropology been formed by its political history? How do universalist values affect a culture's intellectual production and economic relationships? What elements govern the reaction of societies to political domination? How does the power of narrative interact with political power, in times of hegemony as well as in times of transition? These questions are evoked through a historical survey of the field, from the Islamic conquests to the wave of uprisings in the mid-20th century, initiating the slow process of decolonization. Professor Belhachemi.

*EUROPEAN WRITINGS ON MADAGASCAR AND CULTURAL ANTHROPOLOGY OF THE WESTERN INDIAN OCEAN INALCO This course explores texts by explorers, missionaries, pirates, and politicians who wrote about Madagascar between the 16th and 19th centuries. The course is supplemented by a lecture on the economic, geographic and political causes of the waves of migration that created the ethnically and culturally diverse population of the Western Indian Ocean region. Professor Rakotoarisoa..

*ANTHROPOLOGY OF EAST ASIA: CHINA, KOREA AND JAPAN Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Providing an introduction to anthropological analysis of Chinese, Korean and Japanese society, this course examines contemporary practices through the perspective of historical traditions, with particular attention paid to the development of relations with European states during the first half of the 19th century. Topics include the history of the idea of East Asia as a cultural and political area, family and social relationships, collective or individualist ideas, and contemporary economic, social and political developments. Professor Pettier.

MATERIALIST FEMINIST INTERPRETATIONS OF CLASSICAL FRENCH ANTHROPOLOGICAL WORKS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis In this course, classic texts by French anthropolo-

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gists like Levi-Strauss, Françoise Héritier, and Claude Meillassoux, are read and discussed, along with texts by feminist anthropologists and authors such as Paola Tabet and Gayle Rubin, addressing elements of androcentrism in these works, and discussing and critiquing them. The course begins with a discussion of anthropological studies of parenté (family) and the terms used in the field, and covers different currents in anthropology such as Marxism and structuralism. Professor Feldman.

ANTHROPOLOGICAL STUDIES IN AN URBAN SETTING Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course focuses on urban anthropology in France, with strong emphasis on practice rather than theory. Students are expected to choose a site to carry out a short, necessarily limited anthropological study. The focus is on urban security measures and their effects on marginalized groups like the homeless and youths. Class sessions are used to discuss the origins of urbanism and urban anthropology in France, methods for carrying out an anthropological study, and current literature about the homeless and other urban populations in France. Students are encouraged to research, observe, take photos and video footage, and conduct interviews to carry out their study.

*HISTORICAL ANTHROPOLOGY: THE SILK ROADS AND GLOBALIZATION Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course discusses the evolution of “globalization” in the context of the commercial and cultural exchanges that occurred via the marine and terrestrial routes known as the Silk Roads. It examines the role of nomadic states, merchants, scholars, and clerics taking these routes, through several major periods of Eurasian History, between the 13th and 18th centuries. Particular attention is devoted to the sixteenth century, a milestone in the history of these routes due to the discovery of the Americas. These different periods are analyzed as different phases of globalization. Professor Gazagnadou.

ANTHROPOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO GLOBALIZATION Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This class provides an overview of Appadurai’s globalization theories as well as an analysis of invented traditions, nationalism and theories of ethnicity from an anthropological point of view, i.e. that of complex cultural dimensions that cannot be reduced to their economic aspects. The relationship between “local” and “global” is examined, as is the future of heterogeneity in a rapidly globalizing world. Professor David.

Professor Terrolle.

AESTHETIC ANTHROPOLOGY: NATIVE AMERICAN AND FIRST NATION POPULATIONS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course studies the use of costumes, art, and other visual representations of Native American and First Nation populations in the northwest region of North America. Studying primarily the works of Franz Boas and Claude Levi-Strauss, students examine how ceremonial masks and costumes, totem poles, and sculptures portray the most essential values constituting a population's fundamental beliefs. The class is held at the Musée du Quai Branly, and thus benefits from use of the museum's collections to study objects from these cultures. Also using slide shows and extracts from films, the professor discusses similarities and differences across tribes, analyzing an object's aesthetic value as well as its practical uses.

*EVOLUTION, DIFFUSION, AND GLOBALIZATION Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Globalization is not a recent phenomenon; it is a historical and technical process that has existed for a long period of time. This course examines different historical examples that illustrate the process of globalization, i.e. how different societies, from across the globe, have exchanged elements of their culture (from artistic objects to technology to ideas). Since the end of the 19th century, anthropologists have been interested in the idea of diffusion; by studying the writings of these anthropologists, this course sheds insight on globalization and the new characteristics and considerable consequences this process holds for cultures. Professor Gazagnadou.

Professor Hémond.

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SOCIOLOGY, ANTHROPOLOGY AND ETHNOLOGY

ANTHROPOLOGY OF GLOBAL SYSTEMS

ETHNO-MEDICINE

EHESS

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

A doctoral-level seminar analyzing new theoretical trends and discourses on global systems and globalization. Attention is paid to the structures, dynamics and transhistoricity of certain global phenomena and processes. Part of the course is devoted to recent studies on the hegemonic decline and its social, political and cultural parameters. Other topics include: the transformation of states and the appearance of elites and new social classes; the changes undergone by international organizations and the development of transnational networks, from NGOs to Diasporas; the relationship between class and culture; the indigenous population and problems of sovereignty and human rights.

This course is an anthropological approach to the perception of illness and its causes in different cultures. It begins with a description of our own perceptions of illness and the human body, the evolution of Western ideas and the important influence of bacteriology. Also discussed is the “therapeutic triangle” or the difference between illness, sickness and disease, before studying the perception of illness and its causes in non-western cultures, particularly in Africa and Siberia, with focus on its shamans.

Professor Friedman.

INTRODUCTION TO THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF HEALTH AND DISEASE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Focusing on the distinctions - and similarities - between medical anthropology and the wider field of the anthropology of health, this course discusses the evolution of these fields over the last century and examines the work of specific anthropologists and trends of thought. Specific issues in international health are studied, and tied into current trends in anthropology. The international AIDS crisis is dealt with in depth, as are other diseases and health trends. The course aims to introduce students to anthropology of health on both an individual and a systemic level, by analyzing the effects of individual communities and beliefs and the work of global institutions. The ties between poverty, systemic oppression and health crises are seen in depth, and possible solutions and problems are envisaged. Professor Atlani-Duault.

ANTHROPOLOGY OF HEALTH EHESS A graduate seminar that introduces different approaches to medical anthropology and how social scientists can address health, illness, drugs and the body. Besides giving detailed information on research in this field, the professor also presents case studies that are relevant to the session's theme. These include Professor Didier Fassin's work on Aids in South Africa, economics of health and French asylum policy. Professor Fassin.

Professor Lozinski.

ETHNO-SCIENCES Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Introduction to ethno-sciences. This course deals primarily with ethno-botany, or the relationship between primitive human societies and the plants of their environment. The class studies basic botany and how to classify and select plants, plant classification, and certain societies’ interaction with their environment (in Guadeloupe, in the Ardèche region of France and in Nazi Germany.) Professor Benoit.

ETHNOGRAPHIC CINEMA Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense A two-part course covering theoretical and practical aspects of the history of cinema in general and ethnographic cinema in particular, from the Lumière brothers and Pöch and Flaherty to the modern works of Jean Rouch, Bob Connolly and Stéphane Breton. It also covers basic vocabulary and concepts as well as the changes that the genre has seen since its beginnings. Students learn about technical aspects involved in making an ethnographic documentary, and work in groups to script, shoot and edit short films (10 minutes long) on a variety of ethnographic topics that are then shown and analyzed in class. Professors Roche and Connan.

ETHNOLOGY AND FIELD WORK Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course is a seminar on fieldwork in ethnology, combining theoretical readings with first-hand ethnographic fieldwork. Readings of works by Geertz, de Sardan, Descola and Schwartz allow students to learn about the ethics of ethnology and the methods for observing, interviewing and taking field

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notes. Students also choose a specific framework such as the Avicenne French-Muslim hospital just outside of Paris and base their fieldwork report on practical experience. Professor Camelin.

ETHNOLOGICAL APPROACHES TO AFRICAN RELIGIONS Institut Catholique de Paris Focus in this class is on the major threads of African cultures/civilizations through a study of religious beliefs in specific regions and in Africa. In order to reach an all-encompassing understanding of African culture, religious practices and beliefs are considered in terms of their cultural significance. In this way, religion and region, language and historical setting are linked. The bibliography for the course includes texts pertaining to anthropology and ethnology, as well as African literature, language, dance and art. Professor Coulon.

ETHNOLOGY OF DANCE UniversitĂŠ de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La DĂŠfense This class gives a general introduction to the ethnology of dance. It covers a wide variety of dances from various cultures and time periods. Analysis of the movement extends to explore the social structures and symbolism in which dance plays a part. Students are also exposed to the different forms of dance notation, and dance is studied through various mediums including texts, film, and corporal movement. Students are strongly encouraged to participate in dance activities outside of the classroom and write a memoire of these experiences. Professor Bertuzzi.

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GEOGRAPHY AND FOOD STUDIES

View of Paris from The Eiffel Tower

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XVIII.

INTERNATIONAL MIGRATIONS

GEOGRAPHY AND FOOD STUDIES

The phenomenon of international migration is seen in depth in this seminar. After an overview of the types of migration, the motives of the migrants, and the historical development of the migration process, the course examines migration networks and immigration policies of “countries of departure” and “countries of reception”, economic and political repercussions of international migration, judicial issues (including illegal/clandestine migration), and social/cultural difficulties of assimilation. While this course seeks to uncover the major tendencies of the phenomenon, emphasis is also placed on the unique character of specific migrations throughout the world. Individual case studies are presented, including Latin American migration to the United States (and the effect of labor on the country of reception), North African migration to Europe (and the presence of diasporas), and Southeast Asian migration to China (and the growing attraction of its seaboard cities).

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Professor Yapi-Diahou.

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GEOGRAPHY AND FOOD STUDIES

GEOGRAPHY OF LANGUAGE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This anthropology course combines a study of geography and history with a study of racial, social, and linguistic communities to provide a specific understanding of the composition of the world. The first part of the course explains the historical and theoretical importance of language, emphasizing how language issues (i.e. for deciding borders, intercommunity conflicts, education systems) are a major factor in a society's or a State's politics. The second part of the course consists of a global review of the history and development of all current languages (or language groups) to understand the specific interactions between social/racial groups and the languages with which they have come into contact. Professor Jeanjean.

*GEOPOLITICS AND GEO-STRATEGIES Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This class examines the relationships between contemporary political powers and geographical spaces. It focuses on spatial politics and patterns at various scales (state to international). Themes discussed include: the women trade, drug and arms trafficking, surveillance systems throughout the world, walls to create boundaries and separation, various conflicts, and resistance. Professor Milhaud.

GEO-HISTORY OF URBANISM Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The goal of this class, which begins as a general overview of the concepts of Urbanism and evolves by the end of the term into an introduction to urban development bureaucracies in France, is to establish a basic but intricate understanding of cities and other urban and rural complexes. This is achieved through a study of geography and the question of why cities develop where they do, the structural patterns that most cities adhere to, the effects of industrialization, innovation and transportation, the relationship of a city to its rural counterparts, and the city's role on a grander, more global scale. A series of dossiers, or collections of texts (graphs, charts, excerpts, etc) supplement a suggested reading list. There is specific focus on the growth and development of the French city of Orléans, which serves as a case study in examining the urban phenomenon, the evolution of the economic roles of cities and current urban development practices in France. 172

Students are expected to have basic familiarity with the urban structures commonplace in France. Professors Comin and Geppert.

GEOGRAPHY AND SOCIETY IN THE AFRICAN SAHEL Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course provides an in-depth analysis of the physical geography of the African Sahel, the swath of arid landscape stretching from Senegal to Sudan, which marks the transition from the Sahara Desert to the African savannah. Students examine the region's paleo-climate and geological evolution, as well as current climate patterns and their effect on vegetation and river systems. These themes are then used to look at how human societies in the Sahel - both throughout history and at the present time- have adapted in order to deal with this unique environment. Particular attention is given to the Niger Delta and Lake Chad regions. Professor Cariou.

GEOGRAPHY OF WATER Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course provides an advanced exploration of the mechanisms governing continental hydrology and fluvial hydrosystems. It addresses the issues of fluvial dynamics, both dynamically (that is, the phenomena of floods and droughts, and an exploration of hazards) and morphologically (in terms of fluvial adjustments). It also includes an evaluation of the impact of modifications both natural (primarily climatic) and anthropological on the form and functioning of rivers. The course also includes presentations of case studies on the physical characteristics and economic and political impacts of rivers throughout the world. Professor Gramond.

*OCEANS: A GLOBAL STUDY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is an introduction to the oceans and their interactions with the atmosphere. The ocean covers two-thirds of the surface of the Earth and plays an important role in the Earth's chemistry, water cycles and carbon cycles. The course is organized into three parts: physical properties and structure of the ocean, the process of offshore and coastal systems, and past and current ocean changes, with emphasis on the dynamic relationship between the ocean and the Earth's atmosphere. Themes include El Niño, hur-

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ricanes, tsunamis, tropical storms, and weather systems. Students learn to place major ocean currents, explain tides and varying water temperatures and the different geographical phenomena created by oceans. Climate change and its consequences in the past and the present are also discussed. Professor Bertrand.

*CLIMATOLOGY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is an introduction to the science of climatology and meteorology. Along with current concerns about global environmental change and the Earth's climate history, different aspects of weather and climate are presented, so that students may gain a basic understanding of interactions between the various parts of the Earth's atmosphere, the biosphere and hydrosphere, temperatures and the influence of the Sun and the Oceans on the Earth, the water cycle and precipitations, atmospheric pressure, and extraordinary climatic events. Defining climates and placing them geographically is an important part of the course, and students must be able to identify or define a climate based on given information. Methods of observation and analysis are covered, and there are weekly viewings of information from different weather stations throughout France. Current events are explored throughout the course. The issue of greenhouse gases and global warming is discussed. Professors Metzger and Magnier.

*ENVIRONMENTAL RISKS AND VULNERABLE POPULATIONS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines a host of environmental hazards and pending crises. Students learn the geological and geographical basis for specific environmental hazards, and expand upon this knowledge to assess regions and determine problems those regions might face. The question of whether one can call an environmental disaster “natural” is raised, and students discuss recent catastrophes in light of our failings, mistakes, inadequate preparation, and neglect of certain populations. Environmental hazards and degradation are studied in a sociological, economic and political context that allows students to recognize the causes and effects of past environmental disasters, and be better prepared to predict and manage future those of the future.

GEOGRAPHY AND FOOD STUDIES

AN INTEGRATED APPROACH TO ENVIRONMENT Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course studies the environment and how it affects multiple aspects of daily life. It explores the various definitions of the word “environment”, and settles on a double definition: the environment as a natural place and the environment as a cultural creation. It examines the risks the environment poses to humans and the damage humans do to the environment, as well as the politics surrounding both of these subjects. Students are encouraged to study the environment from a cultural, social, political and scientific perspective. Professor Méha.

*THE GEOGRAPHY OF FOOD Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course critically explores the relationship between regional geographical properties affecting food production and preparation and specific cultural, religious and social practices characterizing the region. Topics addressed include, among others: a study of international organizations governing food distribution, analysis of “butter” and “oil” cultures in France, the sociology of French luxury restaurants, and the symbolic function of food and food products across the Christian, Muslim, and Jewish faiths in France. Sources include statistical and cartographic reviews, analysis of geographers in the field, as well as primary sources, such as restaurant publications, biblical texts, etc. Professors Marcilhac and Lignon-Darmaillac.

*NEW CONSUMER MODELS: CUISINE, GASTRONOMY, AND RESTAURANTS IN FRANCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This masters-level seminar begins by offering a general overview of different types of restaurant establishments and the history of their presence in France, covering every type of institution, from high-end restaurants to fast food joints, and from the classic French bistro to different kinds of ethnic restaurants. The study of these different restaurant categories is followed by more in-depth discussion of French gastronomy and also analyzes how gastronomy relates to an establishment's location, actors, and products. Professors Marcilhac and Dubucs.

Professor Ehrmann.

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*GASTROTOURISM AND OENOTOURISM Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne With the goal of developing and promoting various terroirs, and strengthening the local development of rural regions in crisis, gastrotourism and particularly œnotourism have developed according to a variety of models throughout the world. Topics include experiences in the valorization of cultural and viticultural patrimonies, analysis of the “politics of classification” of areas of particular culinary interest, the process of UNESCO approval, the numerous touristic “seals of approval” promoting gastrotourism, the impact of large festivals and commercial events, and the cultural process of adapting local traditions for outside tourists. Professor Lignon-Darmaillac.

THE ANTHROPOLOGY OF FOOD Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This class focuses on how different cultures view food. The question of what people around the world eat, rituals surrounding food, what determines various food taboos, and why people eat, are all considered. By examining students’ own eating habits, the class aims to make hypotheses about the French food culture in order to better compare it with others countries’ food cultures around the world. Weekly readings and two films supplement the class discussions. Professor Garine.

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PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE

The Stryge overlooking the skyline of Paris

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XIX. PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE

COGNITIVE NEUROSCIENCE OF EMOTION Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course examines the neurobiological bases of human emotion, beginning with a theoretical discussion of emotion as both a biological and cognitive process. The presentation of basic human emotions (fear, pain, anger and desire) is then studied on a physiological level by examining neurological circuitry. The course then investigates the effects of attention and consciousness on emotions. Among the issues addressed are the following questions: What is consciousness? Is there an animal consciousness? What is the role of attention as a bridge between unconscious and conscious? What are the brain structures underlying the emergence of consciousness? How is impaired consciousness (agnosia, unilateral neglect, blind sight) associated with brain damage? Professors Vallet and Hallé.

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*INTRODUCTION TO COMPUTATIONAL NEUROSCIENCE ENS

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis

Exploration of the computational basis of common topics in neuroscience and behavioral science, forms the basis of the course, with particular focus on encoding of sensory information in neurons and decoding of sensory stimuli from neuronal functioning, the computational basis of behavioral conditioning, and low-level neuron firing patterns.

A graduate course beginning with a detailed study of the functions and regions of the brain and the functions of language with relations to communication in general, and the specific regions of the brain involved in communication. Also seen are problems with language functions and their neurological causes. The phenomena of aphasia, alexia and dyslexia are examined in depth.

Professors Gutkin, Deneve and Brett.

Professor Lambert.

NEUROPHARMACOLOGY AND BRAIN PLASTICITY

*LANGUAGE PROCESSES

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense The first part of the class is devoted to brain plasticity, the brain's ability to change the organization of neural networks. The course then focuses on development in children and adolescents and how plasticity allows the environment to influence brain function. The acquisition of memories and expertise in adults is also studied, as well as the phenomena of recovery following a brain injury. Ways in which brain plasticity is responsible for the phenomenon of addiction, and development of plasticity, following repeated consumption of psychoactive substances, are both also studied. The second part of the course is devoted to the presentation of the short-and longterm effects of substances as well as their effects on the brain, especially in structures involved in maintaining a state of well-being and in decision-making. Professor Del Negro.

THE COGNITIVE ASPECTS OF MEMORY AND LEARNING Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course looks into two major subjects in cognitive psychology: memory and learning. Lectures are split between learning and memory. The meaning and styles of learning, past studies on conditioning, the development of mental representations, problem-solving procedures, day-to-day learning and reinforcement are some of the topics explained during the half of the class concerned with learning. During the memory portion of the course, the three different facets of human memory are described in detail. The strengths and weaknesses of these subcategories are discussed. Examples (figures or videos) are used during lectures and more hands-on exercises are mobilized during discussion sections. Professors Moscardini, Cuisinier and Imberty.

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Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Taking a cognitive approach to linguistic studies, this course concerns the theories and models of the psychology of language. Though language acquisition and language of aging adults are both mentioned, the bulk of this course focuses on the language processes of the healthy adult. Structured around experimental findings that form the backbone of teachings on constructed language models, the course provide students with a firm grasp of cognitive processing principles at three levels of language treatment: lexical, syntactical, and semantic. For each of these three parts, the current principal models and experimental paradigms are presented. Professor Guéraud.

COGNITIVE PSYCHOLOGY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course covers different mental processes behind behavior, thinking, information processing and decision-making. These include: memory, attention, perception, knowledge representation, reasoning, creativity and problem-solving. Students also discuss the evolution of psychology as a science, behaviorism, the birth of cognitive psychology, Freudian thought, the use of scientific methods, and the state of research in artificial intelligence. Professor Levillain.

*COGNITIVE FUNCTIONING Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course covers different mental processes behind behavior, thinking, information processing and decision-making. These include: memory, attention, perception, knowledge representation, reasoning, creativity and problem solving. Students also discuss the evolution of psychology as a science,

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behaviorism, the birth of cognitive psychology, and the use of scientific methods in the field of cognitive psychology. Professors Guéraud and Frey.

*LEARNING AT SCHOOL: PROCESSES AND ASSESSMENT METHODS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense How does a student construct, store, and apply what he or she learns in school? In turn, how does one evaluate this behavior? This course considers the different processes involved in learning, and their evaluation, in a school context. It explores the psychology of learning through the examination of different theories of learning and evaluation, methods and strategies used in schools, and the roles students and teachers play in a school context. Professor Bruckert.

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PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE

amined from a comprehensive perspective. Topics of the course include psychomotor development, cognitive development, language acquisition, and social interactions. Piaget's stages of development, as well as modern critiques and refinements to his theories, are treated in detail, along with the unique methodology of developmental psychology. Interacting with and evaluating a young child is a required component of the course. Professors Baudier and Zacharopoulou or Herbé.

*DEVELOPMENT OF CHILDREN AND ADOLESCENTS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense A chronological overview of studies and theories of cognitive and social development of children from the age of 2 up to adulthood, this course uses classic and modern studies to explore family relationships, early social relationships, and the biological and cognitive evolution accompanying this development.

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Professors Espiau-Nordin and Clee.

The course begins with an exploration of the history of the French school system, focusing on when and how failing school began. The different factors of school failure are presented through the diversity of different approaches within psychology. During the second part, the course reflects on the existence and the relevance of different paths of remediation.

DEVELOPMENT OF PERSONALITY IN CHILDHOOD AND ADOLESCENCE Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

DEVELOPMENTAL PSYCHOLOGY

This course covers the history of the concepts of person, personality and temperament. Starting from the role of the “person” in Greece and Rome through its perception in Christianity, the development of the individual among tribal groups and the various theories pertaining to this development are discussed in detail. The history of the issue remains the backdrop for the modern conception of the person and personality. The conception of personality as theorized by Bashaw, Cannon, Rogers and others is subsequently discussed, and their various definitions of personality are compared. The development of temperament, its origins and its interaction with the environment and personality is also a major theme of this course. Various conceptions of personality and temperament such as the model of the Big Five, those of Block and Block, Bussi and Plomen, Rothbart, and Thomas and Chess, are examined in depth. The methodology used to study personality and temperament has substantial influence on the results; consequently, the pros and cons of numerous observation/data-gathering techniques are discussed and compared.

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense

Professor Herbé.

Professors Saliba and Bruckert.

DEVELOPMENT OF EMOTIONAL, GESTURED, POSTURAL AND VERBAL COMMUNICATION Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course covers the construction of communication in relation to thought, the different developmental levels of children, and the perceptions of others. Focus is on non-verbal communication in infants and toddlers, and the development of this communication and its variation in terms of disorders, nationality, and special cases. Theories are discussed in terms of other related fields such as artificial intelligence, ethnology, ethics, sociology, linguistics, and philosophy. Professor Garritte.

In this developmental psychology course, the mental and physical growth of young children is ex-

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THE DEVELOPMENT OF FRIENDSHIP AND RELATIONSHIPS Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense The general objective of this psychology course is the acquisition of theoretical frames, concepts, methods, and a solid knowledge of the research concerning the development of friendships and romantic relationships over the course of childhood and adolescence. The course more specifically examines the conceptions of love, the perception of friendships, their relationship with sexual identity, differences according to sex, drawing friends from either the same or opposite sex, the stability of friendships, their effects on psychosocial adjustment, their relation to our understanding of others, and similarities and differences when dealing with romantic relationships as opposed to friendships. It further engages in the study of the development of romantic relationships, including differences according to sex and sexual identity, and their role in the functioning of psychosocial and emotional development. Also seen are the particularities of peer groups, romantic relationships, parents, culture, physical maturity and physical attraction. Professor Mallet.

own choices for ourselves? To what extent are our choices influenced by our need to belong through conforming to the expectations of our societal group? These are the types of questions explored in this course that uses theories developed by some of the most renowned sociologists as well as modernday examples, in order to explore a theme found in the cross-section between the fields of sociology and psychology. Professor Masse.

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is focused around the intricate issue of individual autonomy vs. conformance to societal norms, pressures and expectations. How truly free are we to make our own choices for ourselves? To what extent are our choices influenced by our need to belong through conforming to the expectations of our societal group? These are the types of questions explored in this course that uses theories developed by some of the most renowned sociologists as well as modern-day examples to explore a theme lying in the cross-section between the fields of sociology and psychology. Professor Polin.

GENETICS AND BEHAVIOR Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense The first objective of this course is the study of standard models of behavioral development in animals and humans, and the interactions that may exist between genetic predisposition and learning processes, imprinting, and theories explaining altruism among animals. The course also studies animal and human relationships and how they evolve. Moving on to ontogenesis, behavior, cognitive processes and emotions, the role of genetic and social factors during ontogenesis is also discovered. Diverse theoretical and conceptual approaches to all these topics are seen. Professors Draganoiu and Kreutzer.

*INTRODUCTION TO SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis The fundamental theoretical and methodological bases of social psychology are studied in the scope of influence and social cognition. This course is focused around the intricate issue of individual autonomy vs. conformance to societal norms, pressures and expectations. How truly free are we to make our 178

*GROUP THINKING AND SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A course that looks at historical examples of institutions, countries and other large groups and analyzes the function of responsibility, authority, power structure and organization of tasks seen from a psychological perspective. Questions and problems discussed include the idea of free will, liberty, morality and conscious introspection. Professor Kozakai.

*SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY: OPINION, BELIEFS, AND COLLECTIVE LIFE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This social psychology course focuses on concepts and theories of social cognition. It examines the psychological and social fabrications of opinion and beliefs. Strong emphasis is placed on questions of social bias: How much of what we perceive as our “reality” is actually socially constructed? How are social prejudices formed, and how are they maintained? What are the consequences of such prejudices? The course examines various psychological

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studies that provide further insight into such topics as first impressions, self-fulfilling prophecies, cognitive dissonance, attraction, judgment, and cultural/ ethnic identities. Professor Kozakai.

SOCIAL PSYCHOLOGY OF HEALTH Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense In this course, the theories, concepts, and models that constitute the field of social psychology are studied and applied to various health concepts, such as the communication of persuasion. The major theories and models of health psychology are also discussed such as the Health Belief Model, the Biomedical Model, etc. The psychological elements of health risk and prevention are studied, through analysis of the factors driving one for or against adopting behaviors that are beneficial for one's health. These psychological concepts are applied to specific social cases, such as preventative campaigns. Professors Mazé and Chekroun.

*INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY AND PSYCHOPATHOLOGY Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course deals with the history, objectives and methods of clinical psychology, through a study of various schools of psychotherapy. It focuses on four fundamental areas: classification, etiology, semiology and the diagnosis of mental disorders. Professor Molinie.

INTRODUCTION TO CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course seeks to provide a basic understanding of the theories and techniques used in clinical psychology and furnishes an overview of the historical background of clinical psychology. Three fundamental methods are explored: evaluation/investigation, intervention (psychotherapy), and evaluation of the intervention (research). Various interview methods are closely examined and discussed in the context of diagnosis. Problems and weaknesses of current diagnostic methods are also mentioned. Students are asked to analyze patient observations and determine the psychopathological characteristics that the patients present. Professors Camart and Bellais.

PSYCHOLOGY AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE

CLINICAL PSYCHOLOGY: TRAUMATIC EXPERIENCES Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis A course covering various psychological conditions resulting from traumatic experiences. Multiple psychologists’ theories are discussed and case studies are often used to demonstrate the symptoms of these disorders. Students learn what circumstances constitute traumatic events; they look at the effects of these experiences and at treatment of disorders resulting from them. Professor Sironi.

APPROACHES TO PSYCHOLOGICAL DISORDERS Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis An overview of the main approaches to mental troubles in the adult patient, this course covers psychoanalysis, behaviorism, cognitive-behavioral therapy, and medication. It focuses on the efficacy of each approach in dealing with certain sources of psychological troubles, and in particular the unconscious, neurobiology, the family, and the environment. Readings include theoretical, historical, and scientific articles by authors such as Freud and Beck, as well as more contemporary research articles. Professor Grandsard.

EVALUATING PERSONALITY IN A CLINICAL SETTING THROUGH PROJECTIVE METHODS AND QUESTIONNAIRES Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Through in-depth analysis and examples, students learn about personality tests for “abnormal” and “normal” behavior. The course begins by examining the Big-5 Factor test for “normal” personality, through readings concerning the relationship between neuroticism, extraversion, openness to experience, agreeability and consciousness, and the ten personality disorders tested by the DSM-IV. Students learn how to interpret test results by deconstructing two patients’ hypothetical responses as well as taking the exam themselves. While the larger lectures discuss other methods for determining abnormal behavior, including intelligence tests, WAIS-III, and neuropsychological exams, the discussion section walks students through an actual Rorschach exam, reemphasizing how to code and interpret each response. The course thus provides detailed introduction into several clinical tests,

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giving students the tools to begin attempting their own analyses. Professors Paillot and Petot.

PSYCHOLOGY OF CONSUMER BEHAVIOR Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Consumer psychology concerns any situation in which a consumer decides to buy a product or service in any domain (transportation, health, insurance, food, education, etc.) This course aims to shed light on the methodologies and professional practices that utilize psychology, from the research and development of a product, to studying preferences and behavior in relation to available products and services. It also seeks to understand affective, cognitive and behavioral processes that persuade a consumer to make a value judgment, to have a desire, to choose to consume a specific type of object, and even to regret his choice. Social contexts that influence such decisions, such as normal pressures, persuasive advertising influences and resources are also examined.

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF MUSIC Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense Concepts of cognitive psychology are applied to the perception as well as production of music in this course. In the first half of the course, the relationship between music and language is examined using Gestalt theory and Chomsky's theory of generative grammar. In the second half the course, the innate human predisposition to listening to and creating music is explained with the help of methodology borrowed from both developmental psychology and cognitive neuroscience. Other topics include the differences between tonal and atonal music, the emotionality of music, and the universality of music. Professors Imberty and Gratier.

Professors Meyer and N'Gbala.

THE PSYCHOLOGY OF FOOD AND NUTRITION Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course addresses human interaction with food. The first half of the semester examines basic developments in the growth of normal eating habits, such as how we develop preferences for certain foods, how our bodies register tastes, and how children develop neophobia regarding what they eat. The second half of the course examines abnormal eating behaviors covering topics such as bulimia and anorexia as well as obesity. Professor Rigal.

PSYCHOLOGY OF SPACE AND ENVIRONMENT Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense The theories behind the psychology of space form the focus of this class, which highlights some of the main concepts and research in the field. Students carry out personal research projects, collecting data in the field and/or doing a bibliographical dossier. Professor Bonnefoy.

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Notre Dame Cathedral, Statues of the Apostles

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

XX. PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

N.B.: All French students have taken philosophy courses at the secondary school level – students are thus expected to have some background in philosophy to take courses at the college level.

DEFINITIONS OF PHILOSOPHY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne An introduction to philosophical thought, posing the question “What is philosophy?” and covering the schools of thought of a handful of primary philosophers. Readings include Nietzsche's writings on Socrates, Heidegger's lecture “What is Metaphysics?”, and Montaigne's “That to Study Philosophy is to Learn to Die”. Professor Villevieille.

THE PHILOSOPHY OF NATURE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The philosophical relationship between man and nature is seen in this course, which covers many time periods and schools of thought, including the Enlightenment, American transcendentalism and the modern ecological movement. Texts studied in-

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clude classic works of Rousseau, Kant, Thoreau and others, along with modern writers in ecology such as Arne Næss and less conventional works such as graphic novels and films. In observing the physical and psychological interaction between man and nature, several central themes arise, including the debate between dominating nature, the regression to a natural state and the definition of the state of nature. Professor Gayraud.

PHILOSOPHY OF ANIMAL AND MAN Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course attempts to analyze the relationship between animal and man. Many questions are raised, such as that of the differences between the soul of man and the soul of animals, their intellects, the mind-body connection, progression between the animal world and the human world, diversity in the human and animal worlds, and the effect of diversity on our definitions of “animal” or “man”. Answers to these questions are provided from readings from Aristotle, Montaigne, Descartes and Darwin. Professors Paultre and Marmasse.

PHILOSOPHY OF LOVE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course follows the evolution of theories and perception of the question of love. Through an examination of individualism and intimacy, love in the modern age is seen through Sartre’s theory of impossible love in L’Être et le néant, and Levinas’ concept of fleeting love. Three types of love: Eros (Plato’s Banquet), Philia (Aristotle and Spinoza) and Agapé (St. Augustine) are seen. The idea of Amor Fati according to Nietzsche is also discussed as is the topic of love of ideas (philosophy itself) and links with history, literature and sociology. Professors Tavoillot and Riquier.

*GENERAL PHILOSOPHY: BEAUTY Institut Catholique de Paris Beauty is not only an aesthetic quality, but also a concept generating philosophical dilemma. Contemplating beauty philosophically can at once elevate man and keep him rooted to the living earth, where beauty resides. Beginning with Plato and ending with the French phenomenologist Henri Maldiney, this course pulls from the history of philosophy to demonstrate that the subject of beauty, far from being an exception in philosophical thought, is ac182

tually the norm across generations of philosophers. Professor De Gramont et al.

PHILOSOPHY OF ART: WHAT IS MODERN ART? Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines the foundations and development of modern art within the Western tradition, specifically the imitation of the antique model in the visual arts since the 18th century, and the definitive split with the past in the 19th century. Modernity’s aesthetic is seen as a vision of the future, the avant-garde. Approaches to the critical works of Diderot, Hegel, Baudelaire, Benjamin, Jauss, Compagnon, Fumaroli, and Starobinski, among others. Professor Darriulat.

KANT: CRITIQUE OF PURE REASON Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course is taught as a deepening of a principal course of modern philosophy focused on the idea of the critique. It consists in a close reading integral to the masterwork of Kant. It is asked of students if not to read the work in all its details, then to at least acquire a vision of the work as a whole and to understand its overarching ideas. For this, a reading of Prolegomena or, at least, a reading of Cohen's summary, is indispensable. More generally, the course attempts to understand how the first Critique is an essential source for contemporary thought, whether that be idealist, phenomenological, or analytic. Professor Cerutti.

HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY: MARX, NIETZSCHE AND FREUD Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course studies the question of civilization and culture in the works of Marx, Nietzsche and Freud, beginning with a Marxist analysis of Capitalist society and the concept of alienation. European nihilism is also covered, as is the Freudian concept of societal repression. Professor Marmasse.

PHILOSOPHY OF MIND AND COGNITIVE SCIENCE: THE CONCEPT OF A PRIORI Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense One of the distinguishing characteristics of analytic philosophy, from Frege to Quine or Kripke, is to put

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oneself in opposition to Kant. However, for these philosophers, the Kantian concept of the a priori was conserved, all else being changed, and the question of the a priori stayed a major philosophical theme of the 20th century. The goal of this course is to return to Kant, then, from a two-sided approach of philosophy of knowledge and philosophy of language, to examine the most contemporary analyses of the concept of the a priori and the problems (i.e. the issues of analytic philosophy) across which this idea was simultaneously maintained and completely reworked. Professor Halimi.

EPISTEMOLOGY OF THE HUMAN SCIENCES Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis Discussion of “the human sciences” (sociology, psychology, economics, linguistics, anthropology) from an epistemological standpoint. How do these disciplines find their objects and formulate their methods and how did they historically find these? What problems were resolved, and what problems were created? Major authors include: Gauss, Comte, Dilthey, Durkheim, Weber, Bourdieu, Levi-Strauss, following the history (especially of sociology) from positivism and neo-classical economics through the development of structuralism and methodological individualism. Professor Rey.

*SUBMISSION

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

(beliefs, social and cultural representations, our again states of imagining or remembering) on our experience. The question of the modularity of perception, in forms synchronic and diachronic, is reexamined in light of specific examples. Class meetings are linked together by texts chosen in advance and falling into the domain of philosophy and cognitive science. Professors Dokic and Arcangeli.

THE PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne The philosophical questions raised by science, specifically physics, logic, and mathematics from the time of Descartes to the theories of Einstein, and conversely the scientific questions raised by philosophical inquiries are the main focus of this course. Covering a broad range of authors, the course discusses topics such as the idea of demonstration, experience, and experimentation as it applies to mathematics, physics, and cosmology. The concepts of epistemology, induction, deduction, falsification, verification, instrumentalism, realism, and the theory of physics are all covered. Authors include Popper, Kuhn, Kant, Hume, Mill, Canguilhem, Koyré, Russel and Descartes. Professors Chareix and Cruveiller.

*PHILOSOPHY OF SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Facultés Jésuites de Paris

PERCEPTION, IMAGINATION, AND MEMORY

This course examines historical combinations of science and technology (science in ancient Greece, the astronomical revolution of the 17th century, the birth of human sciences in the late 19th century, the emergence of technoscience in the late 20th century) that had great impact on essential philosophical concepts (truth, method, causality, law, theory, model, space and time). Specific fields of culture (ethics, anthropology, religion) are discussed through contemporary issues such as evolutionary biology and ethics, medicine and ethics, ecology and ethics, neuroscience and anthropology, evolutionary biology and Christian theology.

EHESS

Professor Charmetant.

Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course explores philosophic theories regarding the submission of societies to an authoritarian government. The question of why societies willingly surrender their liberties is explored through the interpretations of Rousseau, Nietzsche, La Rochefoucauld, Hobbes, among others. What motivates submission to an ultimate authority is also examined. Professor Pingeot.

The relations between perception and other faculties or kinds of presentation and representation, (e.g. imagination and memory) are seen in this seminar, which examines the question of the influence of diverse kinds of representations and capacities traditionally thought of as exterior to perception

HEGEL AND HEIDEGGER: IDENTITY AND DIFFERENCE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne A course focusing on a comprehensive study of the history of phenomenology as created by Husserl.

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The lecture explains the historical context of Husserl and his work toward the creation of phenomenology as a philosophical method. Contemporaries such as Fichte and Heidegger are discussed in detail to help understand why Husserl works towards his particular goal; Descartes’ Méthode and philosophy as seen in Husserl’s Méditations cartésiennes are analyzed. Professor Pradelle.

INTRODUCTION TO MODERN AND CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY: BEING AND SUBJECTIVITY

HISTORY OF CONTEMPORARY PHILOSOPHY FROM FICHTE TO KIERKEGAARD Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course deals with the history of post-Kant philosophy, focusing on the question of man and the philosophies of Fichte, Schopenhauer, Hegel, Feuerbach and Kierkegaard. It offers a description of their theories, focusing on how man’s knowledge of self and the world plays a role in the philosophical system, and presents each philosopher through close readings of excerpts from his works.

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

Professor Marmasse.

Using Descartes’ Règles pour la direction de l’esprit as a starting point, this course explores different approaches to the ideas of being and subjectivity in modern philosophy. Descartes’ reference work is analyzed in great detail, but the course also places particular emphasis on interpreting this theme in Michel Foucault’s writings, especially Les mots et les choses, and in the works of other authors such as Kant and Rousseau.

ETHICS AND MORALS

Professors Wotling and Cusset.

BERGSON AND FRENCH CULTURE 19141940 EHESS The new roles assumed by Bergson starting in 1914 are the focus of this seminar, and in particular that of Ambassador of France close to the president of the United States at the beginning of World War I, and that of member of the Society of Nations during the Interwar period. While Bergson stops teaching, he certainly does not cease publishing: he produced four important books between 1919 and the time of his death. This seminar analyzes how his work penetrated into the worlds of philosophy and psychology/psychiatry. Also discussed is how the Catholic community managed reconciliation with Bergson and how artistic, literary and cultural movements of the avant-garde interacted with the thought of Bergson. Some of Bergson’s most important works, notably Matter and Memory, Creative Evolution, The Creative Mind and The Two Sources of Morality and Religion are studied. Professor Azouvi.

Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense This course is a chronological overview of ethics, starting with the Greeks, moving through the Enlightenment, and concluding with an approach to modern ethicists. Among the works studied are the major texts of Plato, Aristotle, and Kant. Professor Cohen-Halimi.

INTRODUCTION TO ETHICAL AND POLITICAL ISSUES Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course studies ethical theories, particularly insofar as they relate to political theory and practice. In studying works by Aristotle, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Rousseau, and Kant, it attempts to review and analyze a number of questions, for example the relation between ethics and practice, the value of different political regimes and the ways of life that they imply, evil as a political question, individual conscience and the legitimacy of the decisions of those in power, liberty and law, the right to resort to lies, trickery, and violence in the exercise of power, and the place for public opinion. The course considers and analyzes these works in the abstract, but also reviews their historical context, and their causes and effects in the philosophical tradition. Professor Kullashi.

MORAL AND POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY II Institut Catholique de Paris Discussion of the liberalist project through analysis of its conception and its impact on modern relationships. Specific attention is devoted to the question of the alleged moral neutrality of the liberalist project. Professors Grassin and Bonan.

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INTRODUCTION TO POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course introduces students to contemporary liberal philosophy. Although it touches on the work of classic philosophers such as Locke and Mill, the vast majority of the course focuses on 20th century philosophers. Students see, among others, the work of Harsanyi, Nozick, Habermas, and Rawls. From John Rawls' proposed veil of ignorance to Habermas' work on the ethic of discussion, students gain new insight into one of the key philosophical currents of contemporary times, and learn different perspectives on the presence of inequalities in a modern world, on social justice, and on the role of the state and individuals. Liberal political thought continues to impact today's laws and institutions, and students gain deeper insight into the diverse viewpoints that shape this philosophical tradition. Professor Lauvau.

POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY: THE QUESTION OF SOVEREIGNTY OF THE INDIVIDUAL Center for University Programs Abroad This course focuses on two themes: the accessibility of liberty, and the question of personal liberty as opposed to common good. These themes are explored in a seminar-style setting as each week a text from a different philosopher is analyzed and discussed. Philosophers include Rousseau, Seneca, Thucydides, as well as Sophocles through a study of Antigone. The course aims to find a philosophical middle ground between being sovereign over one's self (in both a personal and political sense) and one's responsibility to others. Professor Monconduit.

GLOBALIZATION: THE END OF THE NATION-STATE? Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This course examines how globalization is reworking the fabric of modern society and how mankind can reconcile a constantly shrinking global culture with the importance of preserving cultural identity. Readings include authors of the subaltern studies movement such as Dipesh Chakrabarty, classic works such as Marx and Hegel, and various other historians, sociologists, and philosophers. Specific topics include post-colonialism, cultural relativism, and the interplay between global and universal. Professor Maigne.

PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

*PHILOSOPHY OF ECONOMICS Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This masters-level seminar studies the development of economic theory from the mid-18th century to the mid-19th century. The course begins with a brief review of ancient and medieval economic thought, including that of the mercantilists. The main movements covered by the course are the Physiocrats, Classical Economics, and Socialism. Authors consulted include Quesnay, Smith, Ricardo, Say, and Marx. Professors Lauvau and Chauvier.

LIBERALISM: A EUROPEAN PHILOSOPHICAL RESPONSE Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis This course explores the history and basic tenets of the North American economic and social philosophy of liberalism from a critical point of view. A overview of the liberal model is provided through classic political texts on the subject such as John Rawl’s Theory of Justice. The failings of liberalism in the face of globalization are examined and Jurgen Habermas’ proposed alternative to the North American liberal societal model is seen through the texts Law and Democracy and The Theory of Communicative Action. Professor Poulain.

ETHICS AND SOCIETY Université de Paris Ouest - Nanterre-La Défense By analyzing the arguments at the forefront of the equality debate in its various manifestations, the course examines existing states of inequality and the legitimacy or illegitimacy of maintaining these inequalities. Topics studied include: equality as a natural and human right, slavery, equality of the sexes, Marxist views of exploitation and domination, and Affirmative Action and the notion of positive discrimination. Authors studied include: Aristotle, Plato, Rousseau, Kant and Marx. Professor Chamayou.

METAPHYSICS: FAITH AND KNOWLEDGE Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne This metaphysics course deals with the questions “What can I know?” and “How can I know?” These questions, seemingly epistemological, become metaphysical from the moment one questions the knowledge of the existence of something: “How can I know if Carthage existed? How can I know if God

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exists? Or still, how can I know if something like my inner nature (my desires, my thoughts) actually exists?” After readings of canonical texts in the tradition, students examine the relationships between belief, ontology, and epistemology. Central problematics include the relation between belief and other cognitive states, belief as a theoretical or practical attitude, logico-semantic analyses of belief, the psychology of belief (affection, desire, will), the status of the objects of belief (future/present/past; existent/inexistent; visible/invisible; demonstrable/ indemonstrable). Authors studied include Aristotle and Plato, Augustine, Thomas Aquinas, Locke, Kant, J. H. Newman, Ch. S. Pierce, W. James, Montaigne, Charron, La Mothe le Valay, Descartes and Pascal. Professors Arbib and Schmutz.

ISLAM IN FRANCE Institut Catholique de Paris This course examines both the fundamentals and history of Islam as well as the current status of Muslims in France. Course materials address the different groups that compose the Muslim population in France as well as the issues faced by Muslims living in the secular society of France: education, traditional dress and the burkha, Islamic traditions and religious practice, and funding for the Islamic community. The role of inter-religious dialogue is also discussed as one method of resolving current tensions. Professor de la Hougue.

*CHRISTIANS AND MUSLIMS IN HISTORY

INDIAN PHILOSOPHY

Institut Catholique de Paris

Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne

This course provides an overview of Christian and Muslim interactions from the birth of Islam, with a focus on comparative theologies. It examines the rise of the Islamic empire while analyzing the interactions between the Muslim peoples and Christians. Some focus is placed on Islamic practices and law, generally in comparison to Christian practices, and information is shared in order to understand current religious controversies between Abrahamic faiths today, and to find possible areas to broach dialogue between peoples.

This course provides a basic overview of Indian philosophies, focusing largely on the Hindu worldview. It also serves as an introduction to Hinduism, as Indian philosophy is in many ways entwined with religion. The course begins with ancient Hinduism and works its way through the more classical and then modern forms of Hinduism, eventually arriving at Indian Buddhism. Studies focus on philosophies rather than specific philosophers, as the former are rarely attributable to a single person or group. Professor Chenet.

SYMBOLS, MYTHS AND RITES IN RELIGIONS Institut Catholique de Paris An anthropological investigation of the major religious expressions using symbols, myths and rites. Religious language is above all symbolic, thus the importance of understanding the symbolic for the study of religions in an anthropological context. This course discusses the role of language and the meaning of a symbol; language as cultural mediation and epistemology; the difference between a sign and a symbol; the Christian use of symbols; the science of myths with allusions to different theories including those of Lévi-Strauss and Ferdinand de Saussure; the study of Greek myth, logos and organization of code systems; the human view of rituals; the specific laws and language of rites; the sacred as compared to the profane; pagan and Christian initiation rites.

Professors Marin, de la Hougue and Cherif.

FOUNDATIONS OF BUDDHISM Institut Catholique de Paris This comprehensive course traces the foundations of the Eastern religion of Buddhism. Beginning with the life of Siddhartha Gautama, Buddha himself, students learn of the doctrines that create the roots of the Buddhist world. This course will explain through dharma (Buddha's teachings) the ability to escape Dukkha (suffering) of human desires to transcend Samsara (the involuntary cycle of life and death) to reach enlightenment and inner peace. We also discover how Buddhism has evolved and changed to become a religion present the world over. Study of contemporary texts in order to understand the varying practices of modern Buddhism, from Japanese Zen to Tibetan Buddhism. Professor Courau.

Professor Chauvet.

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PHILOSOPHY AND RELIGION

BUDDHISM’S RELATIONSHIP WITH CHRISTIANITY

the relation of the doctrine of the Trinity with current social and religious situations.

Institut Catholique de Paris

Professor Fedou.

This two-part course examines Buddhism and its similarities with Christianity. The first part of the course is an introduction to Buddhism and an analysis of Buddhist texts. The second part compares Buddhism with both historical and modern Christianity. Theological differences between the two religions are analyzed in depth, by discussing the questions that one religion poses to the other in order to reach a fuller and richer understanding for both. Professor Courau.

INTRODUCTION TO HINDUISM Institut Catholique de Paris This comprehensive course analyzes important aspects of the spiritual life of the Indian sub-continent, covering the historical development of contemporary Hinduism from its earliest archeological manifestations, early Vedic philosophy, and Hinduism’s diverse contemporary forms. Its starting point is the detailed study of major Hindu texts, including the Ramayana, the Mahabarata, the Bhagavad-Gita and the Upanishads. It then moves into a closer study of Hinduism in practice today. Evolution of Vishnuism, Shivaism and goddess cults is also explored, as are the caste system, the Hindu conception of life stages and specific rites of passage. Also seen are the exclusions or counter-models to these systems such as untouchables and tantric practitioners. The interaction between contemporary Hinduism, Islam, and Christianity in India is also addressed. Professor Tardan-Masquelier.

THE DOCTRINE OF THE TRINITY Facultés Jésuites de Paris This course provides an in-depth study of the doctrine of the Trinity. Beginning with an introduction situating the doctrine in the context of the modern debate with atheism and other religions, it then looks backward to the historical development of the Church’s position on the Trinity. Excerpts from numerous writings from theologians are discussed within their historical context, and the various debates, councils and controversies that took place are examined. Formulas of the doctrine are brought forth and examined in the light of Biblical revelation. Also covered are the work of Karl Rahner and

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The Grande Galerie of Evolution

SCIENCES

XXI. SCIENCES

MATHEMATICS FOR ECONOMICS AND MANAGEMENT Université de Paris-Dauphine Exercises in mathematics pertaining to the study of economics and management. Analysis of problems and possible solutions. Professor Lounissi.

MEASURE THEORY AND INTEGRATION Université Pierre et Marie Curie A study of measure spaces: the construction of a measure, integrating with a measure, product measure, theorem of Caratheodory, characterization of measures, measures of Labesque and Stieltjes, Lp-spaces, change of variables formula, series of functions theorems, conversion, and inequalities of Hölder and Minkowski. Professors Zambotti and Paugam.

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ALGEBRAIC TOPOLOGY

*ABELIAN VARIETIES

ENS

Université Pierre et Marie Curie

This course provides a study of algebraic topology, starting with homotopy theory: fundamental groups, covering spaces, universal covering spaces, and the Van Kampen theorem. The homology theory section covers: chain complexes, homology of chain complexes, exact sequences, Mayer-Vietoris sequences, cell complexes, equivalence of simplical and cellular homology. Applications include: no retraction theorem, fixed-point theorem, degree of maps f: Sn - Sn, and uniqueness of dimension.

The course begins by studying the Jacobian of a Riemann surface, one of the most basic methods of constructing Abelian varieties. It then covers the general theory of complex tori, of which Abelian varieties form a special class, namely those arising as the complex points of an algebraic curve. Using multiple tools of complex analytic geometry, the course shows that this is equivalent to certain bilinear relations satisfied by the lattice of the torus, and their properties are thus studied.

Professor Oliver.

Professor Bertrand.

*DIOPHANTINE GEOMETRY

PROBABILITY AND STATISTICS

Université Pierre et Marie Curie

Université de Paris-Dauphine

Diophantine geometry is the study of Diophantine equations and the use of algebro-geometric methods to solve them. In this course, students examine a series of related conjectures (now theorems), the Mordell-Lang, Manin-Mumford, and André-Oort conjectures, important to the solution of many Diophantine equations. Each conjecture roughly states that a sub-variety of an algebraic variety, that contains enough “special points” of that variety, must be of a special form. Diverse ways of approaching these problems are studied, ranging from Galois theory, degrees, heights, and model theory to differential Galois theory.

Distributions and definitions of populations, variables, histograms, frequencies and functions/ curves are seen in the first half of the course, followed by problems dealing with indicators of central tendency, potion and dispersion (mean, mode, median, quartiles, range and variance). Statistical indices and distributions with two variables, correlation and least squares laws are also seen. Additional themes: chronological series, models of compositions and determinations, and probability which is largely covered in terms of laws, discrete/continuous variables, indicators and statistical models. Discrete and continuous models and their laws and distributions are also seen.

Professor Bertrand.

Professor Lada.

*MULTIZETA VALUES AND THE FUNDAMENTAL GROUP

DISCRETE PROBABILITY

Université Pierre et Marie Curie

Université de Paris-Dauphine

Multi-zeta values are real numbers given by values of the Riemann zeta function and its multivariable generalization at positive integers that go back to Euler. After lying dormant for many years, these have seen a resurgence of interest, both by mathematicians and physicists. The purpose of this course is to present a modern theory of multi-zeta values and to explain in what sense they form the first instance of a motivic Galois theory for transcendental numbers. Along the way, students encounter Chen's iterated integrals, the pro-unipotent fundamental group, and mixed Tate motives.

This course presents key concepts of probability theory and its applications. Topics covered include: sample spaces and events, independence, conditional probability, basic combinatorics, uniform probability, random variables, expectations and variances, Bernoulli trials, distributions (Bernoulli, binomial, hypergeometric, geometric, negative binomial, Poisson), joint probability functions, and covariance.

Professor Brown.

Université Pierre et Marie Curie

Professors Digne and Trashorras.

GEOPHYSICS An introductory course in the methods of geophysics, with a prerequisite in elementary physics and calculus. Prior knowledge of geology is helpful but

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not required. Topics covered include: gravimetry, seismology, mechanics of solids, electricity and magnetism, and heat flow. Professors Mechler and Santeuil.

CELLULAR BIOLOGY Université Pierre et Marie Curie This class focuses on three major themes of cell biology – signal transduction, apoptosis or programmed cell death and the mitochondria. In signal transduction, the structures of different types of receptors are seen, as are the different pathways of signal transduction, and regulation of transduction and communication between the different pathways of transduction. In the section on mitochondria, the class explores the importation of protein into the mitochondria, concentrating on the specific examples of cytochrome b2 and cytochrome C. Also seen are the role and structure of chaperon proteins and the system that controls the movement of protein across the inner and outer mitochondrial membrane (TIM and TOM). The section on apoptosis begins with the functions of apoptosis and differences between apoptosis and necrosis. Also seen are the different families of enzymes that play a role in apoptosis, their activation, and their regulation. Professors Larcher, Vergé and Bernard.

FROM THE MOLECULE TO MEDICATION Université Pierre et Marie Curie This course is carried out in two separate sections, one focusing on receptors and the other on enzymes. The section on receptors covers the structures of proteins, determination of affinity and activity of receptors and ligands, the kinetics of receptor-ligand interactions and inhibitions, and finally a few specific examples of identifying receptors and ligands in the human body. The section on enzymes addresses the structures of proteins, different types of catalysis, a few different types of enzyme inhibition (competitive and irreversible) and the kinetics of the inhibition of enzymes, all through the study of a few biological examples. In both sections, there is emphasis on using organic chemistry to achieve pharmaceutical results, so the synthesis of proteins is studied in the laboratory manner and the biological manner. Professors Ploux, Lavielle, Graffe and Karoyan.

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY Université Pierre et Marie Curie The first part of this course covers structure and reactivity of organic molecules, stereochemistry, mechanisms of reactions and methods of preparation of major classes of organic compounds (alkanes/alkenes/alkynes; alcohols; ketones/aldehydes; amines; esters, ether; derivatives of carboxylic acid, etc). Laboratory sections cover preparation and purification of such organic compounds and analysis of nuclear magnetic resonance spectra for molecule identification. The second part of the course provides a more in-depth treatment of organic chemistry: mechanisms, acid/base reactions, nucleophiles and electrophiles, redox reactions. Functional groups covered include alkenes, halogens, organometallics, alcohols, epoxides, amines, alkynes, and carbonyl derivatives. Laboratory sections include spectroscopic methods of analysis, preparation and purification of compounds and reagents covered in class. Professors Jacquot, Leduc and Poli.

HUMAN PHYSIOLOGY Université Pierre et Marie Curie The course is divided into three sections: neurology, hormonal communication and metabolism, and digestion and nutrition. Students practice calculations with equations (such as Nernst), apply theories presented during lecture sections to specific situations, and conduct experiments. Professors Orsal, Serradas, Siaussat, Grassi and Guettet.

HUMAN CELLULAR FUNCTION Université Pierre et Marie Curie Subjects approached in this course include cellular physiology, inter- and intra- cellular communication, electrically excitable cells, hormonal transduction, synapses, renal and cardiac function, metabolism regulation. Topics treated in biochemical depth, illuminating biochemical structure of cellular components as well as of cell messengers in the context of larger systems (hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, kidneys, heart). Professors Rivot and Blanc.

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS Université Pierre et Marie Curie Study of molecular biology involved in DNA transcription and replication, as well as DNA repair. Full

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study of genetics, in humans, yeast, and fly species. Topics include inheritance, independent assortment, and writing of genotypes and phenotypes. Professors Soussi, Woisard and Quignon.

MOLECULAR BIOLOGY AND GENETICS 2 Université Pierre et Marie Curie This course is designed as a continuation of the second year course, Molecular biology and genetics 1. Its objective is to study the genetic and molecular mechanisms involved in gene expression. The main themes are: DNA topology and biochemistry, DNA replication and repair, transcription and its regulation, and translation, as well as the use of eukaryotic genetic models for the functional analysis of genes, human genetics and pathologies. Professors Mouchel-Viehl and Salhi.

INTERACTIONS BETWEEN PLANTS AND THEIR ENVIRONMENTS Université Pierre et Marie Curie Exploration of different types of plants, the environments in which they are found and how these plants have adapted to their environment with particular focus on adaptation of plants in difficult environments (deserts, high soil salinity, etc.). The first section of the course is an overview of plants including xerophytes, mesophytes, aquaphytes and halophytes, and their respective adaptations; the nine major biomes, as well as C4, C3 and CAM photosynthesis, water potential and plant pathogens are also discussed. The second section focuses on more specific topics including rhizobia, mycorrhiza, protection against mildew, effects on plants caused by pollution, plants in the semi-deserts and the tropical rainforest, and the effects of heavy metals. Professors Baudouin and Jeannette.

INTEGRATIVE ECOLOGY: FUNDAMENTALS AND APPLICATIONS Université Pierre et Marie Curie This course is designed for students with basic knowledge in the concepts and the key theories in ecology. It links different concepts on the basis of transversal themes: evolution, co-evolution, and diversity; meta-populations, meta-communities and meta-ecosystems; dynamism, stability and resilience; time scales, spatial scales; biosphere, geosphere, and hydrosphere interaction. Each of these themes is sufficiently vast to develop the transversal approach desired and create links not only be-

SCIENCES

tween the different ecological concepts, but also between ecology and other life sciences disciplines. For each of the different themes, the course discusses a current issue linked to human interaction (both social and environmental) that the student grasps through readings, scientific articles, and widely circulated press articles. Professors Loeuille, Lata, Barot, Gasparini and Laloi.

THERMODYNAMICS AND WAVE PHENOMENA Université Pierre et Marie Curie First Section: Sonar and light waves. Optic geometry: application of optic systems (eyes, lenses, microscopes); Progressive and Sinusoidal waves: Propagation equations, surface waves, and Doppler Effect. Reflection and transmission of waves: light energy and scanning as well as interferences, superposition and diffractions of waves. Second section: Thermodynamics. Applications of the First law of thermodynamics, including the properties of perfect gases, as well as isobaric, isochoric, and isothermic transformations. An introduction to entropy, static and semi-static approach. Spontaneity, reversibility and irreversibility. Application of the Boltzmann formula. Application of the second thermodynamic principle and its consequences (monothermic and dithermic). Potential thermodynamics, free energy and enthalpy. Law of Laplace, Young Formula, study of capillary systems (Jurin’s law) State changes (Clapeyron). Gaussian movement, molecular diffusion, Fick’s Law. Fluid viscosity, Poiseuille’s law. Stoke’s Law. Einstein’s relationship between diffusion and viscosity. Professors Adrados and Bouret-Aubertot.

FLUID MECHANICS Université Pierre et Marie Curie The objective of this course is to give students a basic idea of the fundamentals of fluid mechanics through a general introduction, recalling thermodynamics and local equilibriums. Statics and kinematics of incompressible flow as well as compressible flow. Calculating the flow rate, divergence, gradients, and rotational of flow, in Euler and Lagrange, speed of sound and Mach, Compressible Aerodynamic flow in one dimension and Tubular flow rates are also seen. Professors Dudeck and Leib.

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Paris Roofstop, Tower of Hotel Concorde Lafayette

INTERNSHIPS/INDEPENDENT STUDIES/SPECIAL COURSES

XXII. INTERNSHIPS/ INDEPENDENT STUDIES/ SPECIAL COURSES

URBAN RENEWAL IN THE PARISIAN BANLIEUE EHESS/Independent Study Ethnographic fieldwork was conducted in this independent study, focusing on a housing project in the suburbs of Paris, examining an urban renewal project. History of urban policies in France, urban ethnography and utopian cityscapes in architecture were also studied. Research advisor: Professor Agier.

INDEPENDENT STUDY: EVOLUTION OF FRENCH CUISINE IN THE 1920S UniversitĂŠ de Paris IV-Sorbonne Participation in a doctoral seminar in the History department and faculty guidance throughout the semester in order to elaborate an independent research project on the history of French cuisine in the 1920s. Research advisor: Professor Drouard.

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INTERNSHIP AT MUSÉE D’ORSAY Musée d'Orsay A one-month internship within the department of concert and lecture programming at the Musée d’Orsay. The student intern performed a number of varying tasks: participation in the Artist welcome committee, page turner for the rehearsals of the pianists for the museum’s Brahms/Fauré weekend, attending a press conference concerning the upcoming season. Also assisted in testing acoustics and helping to welcome the conductor Kurt Masur who led the Orchestre National de France for the annual Fête de la Musique in June. Researching and editing/ translating biographies of artists for the 2007/2008 brochure was also done. Research advisor: Pierre Korzilius.

INDEPENDENT STUDY: RESEARCH AT THE QUAI BRANLY MUSEUM ON THE RELATIONSHIP BETWEEN THE COLLECTIONS AND THE PUBLIC Université de Paris 8-Saint-Denis In this project, the student undertakes a study of the ways in which museum visitors understand and interpret objects on display when these objects are presented in a manner that differs from their original context. The goal of this project is to better understand the processes of cultural translation that occur when an object is placed in a new context. The student focuses on the permanent collections at the Quai Branly Museum, an ethnographic museum in Paris that presents works from Oceania, Asia, Africa, and the Americas. The student studies the scenography and the design of the exhibition space and observes visitors as they move through the collections. He conducts brief interviews with visitors, asking them to describe their impressions of the museum and how they move about the hall. He also interviews an agent at the museum who answers visitors' questions and helps the public navigate the museum space. This latter set of interviews takes the form of discovery ethnography and gives the student a conception of the agent's experience at the museum from his own perspective. The student is thus able to understand the collections from a different point of view. If possible, the student conducts an interview with a museum curator on the subject of the display of works and the aesthetic choices that are evident in the exhibition space. The student conducts research at the Quai Branly's archives to supplement his fieldwork and meets with

INTERNSHIPS/INDEPENDENT STUDIES/SPECIAL COURSES

his project advisor, several times throughout the semester for guidance and feedback. Professor Hémond.

OECD INTERNSHIP/INDEPENDENT STUDY IN ECONOMICS OECD The student undertook research in the Structural Policy Analysis Division of the Economics Department at the OECD in the area of demographic aging and product market regulation. The former investigates the effects of an ageing population on the capital market and particularly how different policy responses influence this outcome. The latter formulates a picture of how the product market is regulated among all OECD countries. Sectors of interest include gas, electricity, post, aviation and professional services. Research advisor: Giuseppe Nicoletti.

RESEARCH INTERNSHIP: INTERNATIONAL ARMS TRADE AND POLITICAL STRATEGY: THE US, RUSSIA, AND CHINA AND THE SALE OF WEAPONS TO THE MIDDLE EAST, ISRAEL, AND WESTERN AFRICA IRIS - Institut de Relations Internationales et Stratégiques In this internship, research is conducted regarding the international sale of arms by the US, Russia, and China to the Middle East, Israel, and Western Africa, culminating in a final paper addressing how the arms trade contracts of the past decade are consistent with or contradict the political strategies of the US, Russia, and China in these regions. The presence of these contracts in light of human rights issues in these regions is also discussed. Professor Mikaïl.

THE NEW ANTI-SEMITISM IN FRANCE Independent Study/EHESS This independent study was composed of research on the rising presence of anti-Semitism in France since 2000. The press was read daily for articles pertaining to anti-Semitism, and interviews conducted with a Rabbi and several Jewish students. The question “Is anti-Semitism a real threat to French Jews?” was the research topic. Research advisor: Sylvie-Anne Goldberg.

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TRADITIONAL AUTHORITIES AND THE EVOLUTION OF STATE AND DEMOCRACY IN AFRICA Independent Study/Université de Paris I This independent study was elaborated under the direction of a specialist in African democracy from the Université de Paris I, Professor Banégas, within the context of the Sorbonne’s research center focusing on this question. An investigation was carried out on the relationship between traditional authorities and the State in Africa. By focusing on the evolution of the State from pre-colonial times to the contemporary democratic state in South Africa, Benin and Uganda, the complex political, economic and social relationships between traditional authorities and the State can be best understood. Understanding traditional governance in its historical continuity, and its simultaneous transformation as a result of its multi-faceted relationship with the State, helps to explain the complex role that traditional authorities play in the contemporary African State. Research advisor: Richard Banégas.

INTERNSHIP: THE ROLE OF EXCLUSIVE BREASTFEEDING IN THE PREVENTION OF OBESITY, INFECTIOUS DISEASE AND IMMUNE DISEASES Université de Paris XIII - Centre Hospitalier Universitaire Paris-Nord It has been suggested that exclusive breastfeeding may play a role in preventing various health conditions later in life. Under the direction of Dr Pierre Bitoun, director of SESAM (Société Européenne pour le Soutien à L’Allaitement Maternel) this in-depth reading and research project was carried out, requiring a thorough review of current research, study of biological pathways involved, and synthesis and translation of findings. The final project, a presentation of the benefits of exclusive breastfeeding to be used in breastfeeding advocacy events and training sessions, was completed entirely in French.

ble – the Sorbonne Scholars – to learn sight-reading on the instrument, and also several visits to lute makers’ workshops to study the process involved in building lutes. The second aspect of the course was related to Renaissance music concerts, which the student attended (minimum of 20 hours) in order to gain an appreciation for that period and to hear the lute played in ensembles and as a solo instrument. Comparative study of various forms of the lute, its origins, and other Renaissance instruments. Professors Iselin and Loredo.

CULTURAL POLICYMAKING INTERNSHIP Galerie Beckel-Odille-Boïcos The student is exposed to diverse aspects of the Paris art world and acquires hands-on experience. Students’ activities include: research in museums, specialized libraries, and the Internet pertaining to expertise in the acquisition of art works, contact with artists, foundations, and various cultural organizations, involvement in cultural projects (La Nuit Blanche, AIDES charity auction), attendance of openings and auctions, preparation of exhibits, and gallery work. While a majority of the work involves contemporary art, there will also be some work involving Old Masters. Research advisor: Pascal Odille.

STUDENT TEACHING INTERNSHIP Various Institutions Serious, motivated students may participate in a program that permits them to assist French professors of English in secondary schools in the teaching of spoken English, either in class with the professor or independently in small discussion groups. A graded evaluation from the school attests to satisfactory performance and sense of responsibility. Internship advisor according to institution.

Research advisor: Dr Pierre Bitoun.

STUDY OF THE LUTE AND RENAISSANCE MUSIC Université de Paris IV-Sorbonne An independent study of the 7-course lute and Renaissance music played on this instrument. Two dimensions made up the course, the first being the study of the lute itself, involving private lessons focusing on technique, and participation in an ensem194

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NOTES

This booklet is not a course catalogue. It provides descriptions for the courses taken by CUPA students during 2011-2012 (courses preceded by an asterisk) and the most popular courses taken over recent years. Unless otherwise specified, all courses listed herein are taught in French and carry full semester course credit recommendation, based on criteria (number of hours and coursework requirements) established by the CUPA program and its Academic Advisory Board.

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The Center for University Programs Abroad

CUPA USA P.O. Box 9611 North Amherst, MA 01059 T E L E P H O N E : (413) 549 6960 FA X : (413) 549 5868 E - M A I L : cupausa@cupa-paris.org www.cupa.paris.edu

CUPA USA

Program Coordinator Tary Coppola CUPA Paris

Director Mary Ann Letellier

Academic Advisory Board Grace Armstrong Professor, Department of French and Francophone Studies - Bryn Mawr College Scott Carpenter Professor of French, Department of French and Francophone Studies - Carleton College Andrew Clark Associate Professor of French and Comparative Literature, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures Fordham University (CUPA Alumnus) Lori Citti Director, Office of Study Abroad Johns Hopkins Univerity

Assistant Director CĂŠcile Hermellin

Housing & Administrative Coordinator Claire Harai

Paul DeYoung Director, International Programs - Reed College Eva Diaz Associate Director, Office of International Programs Harvard University Giorgio di Mauro Director, Study Abroad Rutgers University Karen Humphreys Principal Lecturer, Department of Language and Culture Studies - Trinity College (CUPA Alumna)

Student Life Coordinator Silvia Sabino

France, Europe et Mondes Musulmans Program Michel Bondurand

French Language Coordinator Imaad Ali

Ruth Koizim Senior Lector, Department of French - Yale University Jason Sanderson Senior Overseas Studies Advisor, Office of International Programs Georgetown University Matthew Senior Associate Professor of French, Department of French and Italian - Oberlin College


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© 2012 / CUPA / The Center for University Programs Abroad. The information published here represents the intentions of CUPA at the time of publication. CUPA reserves the right to change without notice any matter contained in this publication, including but not limited to tuition, fees, policies, academic programs, names of programs, course offerings, academic activities, academic requirements, facilities, faculty, and administrators. Payment of tuition or participation CUPA programs shall constitute a student's acceptance of the administration's rights as set forth above.

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CUPA U.S.A.

CUPA PARIS

P.O. Box 9611

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North Amherst, MA 01059

75006 Paris, France

Tel: (413) 549-6960

Tel: 011 33 (0)1 42 22 87 50

Fax: (413) 549-5868

Fax: 011 33 (0)1 45 48 23 24

E-mail: cupausa@cupa-paris.org

E-mail: info@cupa.asso.fr

www.cupa.paris.edu

Center for University Programs Abroad  

CUPA enrolls American college students in the University of Paris system and certain Grandes Écoles and specialized institutes, and offers t...

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