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CONTENTS 04 LETTER FROM THE EDITOR Tomorrowland. 08 R/EVOLUTION Technology Ushers in a New Age of Fashion. 13

GOODBYE FITTING ROOMS, HELLO BODY METRICS Retailers buy into a tech solution for fit problems.

14 BOW & DRAPE: BUILD-YOUR-OWN DRESS, ON DEMAND! Our EIC Hayley Maybury tries out the online bespoke service.

Photo by ANGELA MARKLEW

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DELOREAN Photography by Alvin Nguyen.

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RE: ART_ONE TO WATCH Yorgo Alexopoulos.

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RE: FASHION_ONE TO WATCH Nicki Cozzolino.

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BLUE ROSE Photography by Katya Tsyganova.

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BLOGGER BREAKDOWN Smartphone apps to simplify your business.

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IMAGINATION MACHINATION Photography by Daniel Korzewa.

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FIBER 2.0 Tech Trends in Fashion Design.

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AURAL FIXATION Doctor Jeep. DJ Kasey. Sonkin.

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DIFFUS: DESIGN FOR CHANGE The danish firm combines tech intelligence with aesthetics for a fashionable future.

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THE FUTURE IS MONOCHROME Photography by Angela Marklew.

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PIXELATE Photography by Lindsay Adler.


IN THIS ISSUE EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Hayley Maybury CHIEF OPERATING OFFICER Jamall Oluokun MARKETING DIRECTOR Shomari Miller FASHION EDITOR & COPY EDITOR Jessica Young WEB DEVELOPER Jason DePeaux INTERACTIVE MEDIA DESIGNER Lucy Nersesian GRAPHIC DESIGN INTERNS Lauren Zilm Margaret Walsh

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Lindsay Zgonina Alisha Madkins Hayley Maybury Maria Kucinski Jessica Young Alyssa Davis Lee Hershey Danielle Sipple CONTRIBUTING ARTISTS/ PHOTOGRAPHERS Alvin Nguyen Katya Tsyganova Daniel Korzewa Angela Marklew Lindsay Adler

ON THE COVER Photographed by ALVIN NGUYEN Styling ALVIN STILLWELL Hair by NIKO WEDDLE Makeup by ERIN SKIPLEY Model JOHN ZOELLER John wears jacket and shirt by RYNSHU, sunglasses by VINTAGE

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FROM THE EDITOR TOMMOROWLAND

It’s crazy to think how dependent on technology we’ve become within the past fifteen years. It started with personal computers and laptops, then mobile phones, then iPods, then smartphones and now we have iPads, tablets and ebook readers. It’s insane! Some people may complain about all these tech devices, but here at Papercut we embrace them! Lets be honest, without all these things there would be no Papercut. That’s why this month we are paying homage to technology and it’s role in shaping the future. In this month’s issue, find out which apps fashion bloggers can’t live without, what's new in electronic music and how one artist’s approach infuses traditional media with digital media. The tech scene is no longer reserved for nerds. Considering that technology is disrupting almost every discipline in the creative industry, it’s those who have the most forward-looking vision that embrace these changes, use them to innovate within their field and bring newness to the world. This issue is dedicated to the cross-section of creativity and technology. And with that, the whole new hybrid realm that’s emerging. Also this month, the Papercut team is excited to inform you that we are launching a KICKSTARTER campaign and we can’t wait for you to check it out. Get ready to experience a whole new side of Papercut with Papercut REPLAY. Check out our KICKSTARTER page for more information. Your support means a lot! Happy reading Papercutters! xx Hayley

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R/EVOLUTION

TECHNOLOGY USHERS IN A NEW AGE OF FASHION Written by LINDSAY ZGONINA

We are a generation of instant gratification. When we want something, we want it now. And thanks to technology, we can get it. It’s not all our fault. Considering the Internet wasn’t introduced to the general population until the early 1990s, many of you reading this may be younger than the World Wide Web itself. So, no one can blame you if the only way you’ve ever known to shop is by clicking through web pages and having merchandise delivered right to your door. And if you watch full episodes of your favorite fashion-focused TV shows on your computer rather than on the TV itself. And if you can’t remember a time when photos of you in your favorite outfit were taken with a 35 mm camera and put in the family photo album. Instead, they’re taken daily with a smartphone and posted to Instagram. Technology evolves so rapidly and affects virtually everything—the way we live, work, socialize and even talk—OMG! Yet, when you live in the midst of evolution, it can be difficult to assess the amount of change that is really taking place. It’s like the common phrase, “It’s hard to see the forest for the trees.” While it’s obvious that the 8

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fashion world has greatly benefitted from technology to the point of a fashion revolution, it isn’t until we take a look back that we really see just how far it’s come. Let’s go back, back, back all the way back 50 years to 1962 and see what a difference technology has made on the fashion industry in a half-century’s time. 1962 It’s a rainy Thursday afternoon and you’re standing in the checkout line at the supermarket. To your right, the latest issue of a popular fashion magazine catches your eye. You pick it up, start to flip through the pages. A pillbox hat on a model in an ad stands out. Suddenly you think, “Maybe I’ll buy a pillbox hat the next time I’m downtown.” Then you put away the magazine and continue checking out. Jump ahead to 2012 and let’s consider that same scenario: 2012 You’re in the checkout line at the grocery store browsing through the latest issue of Papercut Magazine on your


smartphone. A hat on a model in one of the editorial spreads catches your eye. Suddenly, you think, “Maybe I’ll buy that hat right now.” You jump to a website on the browser of your phone, and with a few simple clicks, you’ve ordered the hat and it will arrive on your doorstep by Saturday morning. And then you realize the checkout line is moving too slowly and you head over to the self-checkout counter to ring yourself up. Fifty years ago, shopping took a lot more effort than simply clicking a few buttons on our phones or keyboard. It required an actual outing to a store, for one thing. What else has changed since 1962? Other than the absence of online shopping, there were no e-zines, fashion bloggers or socialmedia marketing. Instead, consumers relied on newspaper and television ads, fashion magazines, department-store catalogues and fashion columnists as their source for news, trends and sales. Another big difference in 1962 is that selections were much more limited than they are today. Advances in technology, most importantly the Internet, allows

consumers access to foreign-fashion markets while also putting them face-to-digital-face with the designers and retailers they love. This accessibility leads to more diversity in personal style because consumers are influenced by so many sources. Technology also increases the speed of attainability when it comes to new fashion. Rather than having to wait for new styles to appear in fashion magazines and then trickle into retail stores, consumers can now watch live-streamed fashion shows to see what’s coming down the runway and pre-order merchandise via the Internet so that transactions are practically instantaneous. It seems hard to imagine that there is anywhere left to go from here when it comes to technology’s advances on fashion. Yet, the sky’s the limit. Check out these companies that are using technology to their advantage right now and get a glimpse of what might be to come in the future of fashion.

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YOUNG REPUBLIC Fifty years ago, a young designer had slim chances of ever making a living by their craft. The world of fashion has always been a cutthroat industry, and that has never been more truthful than it is today. However, a half-century ago, there was really no way to gain exposure other than to go out and peddle your designs yourself. Thankfully, that is no longer the case because of technology and creative minds like those behind Young Republic (www.youngrepublic. com) an online community for fashion creators and fashion lovers alike. Emerging designers and labels from international locations including, but not limited to Sydney, London, Tokyo, New York and Madrid can sign up to sell their merchandise. The community is open to anyone, so if you’re not a designer but love unique items, you can create a free account and start shopping. Young Republic uses technology to get up-andcoming designers to that “next step”, while at the same time fulfilling the consumers’ desire for new and obscure merchandise. The website bridges the gap between designer and consumer, supplying each with what they need through digital means. Without the Internet, it would be virtually impossible for emerging designers to reach consumers on a global scale so easily and so early on in their careers. Not only does Young Republic provide young designers with this unique opportunity, but it also shatters the traditional fashion model on the consumer end as well. Consumers have the freedom to instantly select what they like without having to wait around on the fashion cycle to tell them what’s popular and what’s going to be in stores this season. Fashion no longer has to be chosen for the consumer by a group of elite professionals. Consumers are given the power of choice all on their own through the magic of modern technology. THE TRUNK Thanks to modern technology, fashion no longer needs to be stationary. Forget the days of the brick-and-mortar store. In 2012, fashion is now mobile, as the founders of The Trunk in Nashville, TN, continue to prove. The Trunk is a mobile fashion boutique inspired by the explosive trend of food trucks, and carries accessories for both men and women, including the line Sleeveless (www.wearsleeveless. com) and men’s accessories from the retailer, State. The Trunk takes advantage of the popularity of social media to make their mobile business a Nashville hotspot. Fans of The Trunk can follow them on Twitter (@TheTrunkNash) or visit their website (www. thetrunknashville.com) to find out their location around the city. Owner Abigail Franklin says, Social media is a huge part of our success…through social media people find our location, our hours and our inventory. People contact us to find out if we have a certain item in stock. We post photos of new items and often sell them via Facebook before people have a chance to see them in The Trunk.We are a popup shop. If people couldn’t use the Internet and find our location we would not have nearly the traffic that we do now. We’ve had many people say to us that they came to an event because they saw our location on Facebook or Twitter. That would not be possible without the Internet. By using social media to connect with their consumers, The Trunk manages to create a sense of community amongst their followers and create a shopping experience that’s interactive and fun. It’s a nontraditional retail 10

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experience that pops up in different locations adding an element of surprise for shoppers. In a sense, catching a glimpse of the truck en route evokes similar feelings that you had as a kid when you heard the enticing sound of the ice cream truck in your neighborhood. The Trunk is sort of like the ice cream truck for adults; only, thanks to social media, you don’t have to wait around wondering if your street is going to be the chosen one upon which it will grace its presence.You can track it down yourself. Imagine if we could’ve done that with the ice cream truck as kids! Needless to say, this approach must be working, as The Trunk was recently named “Best New Retail Store” and “Best Local Jewelry Store” by local consumers. TRUE & CO. Hate bra shopping? You’re not alone. Whether it’s the task of sifting through styles to find one you like in your size, or the invasion of personal space with those awkward in-store fittings, bra shopping is one of the most loathed retail experiences by women. But now, thanks to the Internet and the creative minds behind the brand True & Co., you can breathe easier—and more comfortably in a well-fitting bra. The best part is there’s no measuring tape required. Users can simply go to the brand’s website (www. trueandco.com) and take a short quiz to receive personal recommendations based on their true size and style selections.The user then selects three bras they like and True & Co. ships their selections, along with two expert picks, straight to their home to try on. Keep what you like, ship the rest back for free, and only pay for what you keep. Simple as that! True & Co. takes the bra shopping experience and simplifies it into a digital process. Consumers still receive


Photographed by ABIGAIL FRANKLIN

Photographed by LINDSAY ZGONINA

TECHNOLOGY HAS ALLOWED FOR THE EVOLUTION AND GROWTH OF THE FASHION INDUSTRY TO THE POINT THAT THE POSSIBILITIES SEEM LIMITLESS.

excellent customer service and a personalized experience like they would in a brick-and-mortar store, but without having to compromise their privacy when shopping for delicates.They’ve managed to take the stress out of the process by allowing the consumer to shop and try on within the comfort of their own home without any obligations or strings attached—a digital solution to an age-old problem. ACUSTOM APPAREL You know those body scanners at the airport that have been the subject of so much controversy over the past couple years? They may be the answer to finding the perfect pair of jeans. At least, that’s what the people at Acustom Apparel believe. Founder and CEO Jamal Motlagh came up with the idea of using digital-scanning technology as a solution to his own fit problems and as an alternative to high-priced custom design. To get started, customers first need to visit the website to schedule a body scan (www.fittedfashion. com). After that, they are able to choose from a variety of custom cuts and washes for their tailor-made trousers. And there’s more than just jeans. Acustom Apparel also offers men’s suiting as well. For consumers, this means an end to carrying stacks of jeans into the fitting room only to exit empty-handed or

relying on the neighborhood tailor to get that just-right fit. Vanity sizing, variance in sizing across brands and generalization of sizes by designers is no longer a problem. Instead of trying to make yourself fit the jeans, you can now have the jeans made to fit you. MAKERBOT If there is any question about the direction in which technology is propelling fashion, the answer can be found in MakerBot. According to its press release, MakerBot is the global leader in 3-D desktop printing, currently with four generations of 3-D desktop printers in the market. You’ve probably heard about 3-D printing at some point over the past couple of years as the concept has gained in popularity. However, it’s MakerBot that’s creating a new level of awareness with their affordability for consumers, their ease of use and “Thingiverse” (www.thingiverse. com)—their “universe of things” as they like to call it. Thingiverse is a community forum for users to upload and share their 3-D designs with other users—everything from models of buildings, to jewelry designs, to tools, toys and replications of sculptures. If you can think it, you can make it.

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You may find the idea of digital 3-D printing a little hard to grasp, as I did at first, but it’s actually quite simple. Using the MakerWare software that accompanies the MakerBot printer, users can upload their own 3-D design from any design software, or download a completed design from thingiverse.com. MakerWare allows the user to prepare their design for printing and then communicates with the printer to tell it what to make. The printer uses a filament called PLA that it heats and extrudes into layers until the design is complete. In terms of fashion, this means that soon enough you may be able to create a design, or download one from thingiverse.com, print it out yourself and make your own clothing, shoes and accessories. Essentially, anyone can become a fashion designer without any schooling or typical training for the job. Talk about revolutionary! Thingiverse already contains designs for a variety of fashion items including shoes, jewelry and accessories. And if that isn’t enough to prove that this is a product guaranteed to revolutionize the fashion industry, you may be interested to know that designer Asher Levine recognized its potential and collaborated with MakerBot to create sunglasses to accompany his Fall/Winter 2012 collection that showed in New York City this year. Perhaps the future is already here. Had you asked someone in 1962 what the future of fashion would be, there’s a good chance that they may have told you that in fifty years we would all be wearing silver jumpsuits and our main mode of transportation would be the flying car. That couldn’t be farther from the truth. Technology has allowed for the evolution and growth of the fashion industry to the point that the possibilities seem limitless. A once-simplified process in regards to the fashion cycle has now been replaced with shortcuts and detours leading to instant gratification for consumers, who appear to be the greatest beneficiaries of this revolution. Consumers no longer have to rely on industry professionals 12

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to dictate the fashion economy, but can decide for themselves what they want and have the means of attaining it. But does all this disruption in the traditional fashion model come without a price? What will happen to the middle man that’s being cut out? And what about the fashion industry hierarchy—will it eventually crumble under the impact of the digital revolution, or evolve in conjunction with innovation? If only answering these pending questions were as simple as hopping in our DeLorean, programming the year to 2062, and accelerating to 88 miles per hour…


GOODBYE FITTING ROOMS, HELLO BODY METRICS RETAILERS BUY INTO A TECH SOLUTION FOR FIT PROBLEMS. Written by ALISHA MADKINS

Ever spend an entire day shopping only to realize that nothing fits? Or, how about online shopping? There are a ton of cute items available but hesitancy to purchase is due to uncertainty of size. The issue of fit is a pervasive problem for consumers and retailers know it exists. But what if you could stand inside a magical machine and it would quickly calculate your body measurements? Sounds too good to be true, huh? Well it’s not! This magical machine exists and it might be the answer to every shoppers dream. The device is called Bodymetrics (BM), which is the product of a privately-owned company that teamed with Microsoft Kinect™ to strategically analyze your body measurements in seconds. The body-mapping service is designed to help customers find clothing that fits their unique physique and style. Bodymetrics originally provided their service within the denim department at Selfridges, (a London-based luxury retailer) which, according to the BM site, helped their store gross more than $5,000 per square foot making it one of the most successful retail formats in the world. Since it worked there, why not bring it to the United States? Bodymetrics chose to launch its official “Body-Sizing Pod” in Northern California at the Bloomingdales Stanford Shopping Center store in Palo Alto strictly targeting denim products. Earlier that year, the company proved successful during a pilot program at Bloomingdales in Century City, Los Angeles enabling consumers to find the perfect jeans. With this revolutionary machine at hand, how can one

not take advantage? Let’s be honest, who wants to deal with the fit factor? A “medium” in Forever 21 could be an “extra small” in any given department store. And lets face it; models look great in everything so how can one properly ascertain if the same attire will flatter them when shopping online? Luckily, Bodymetrics not only understands this but also wants to provide a solution. "Retail customers are not happy with buy-try-and-return," says Bodymetrics CEO Suran Goonatilake. "Customers lack confidence in purchasing clothes online because they can't try them on. Bodymetrics allows shoppers to buy apparel online with confidence, while enhancing revenue options for retailers," states Goonatilake. Later this year, he plans to make it possible for Kinect™ users to scan their bodies in their home. I hate trying on clothes in crowded departments stores only to leave disappointed. Not to mention, I religiously shop online sales and many times purchase a pair of jeans with a perfect fitting waist yet the inseams are too short! Goonatilake is right, shopping and having confidence is an issue all consumers deal with. He reassures customers that BM measurements are accurate down to a centimeter which is technically more precise than a tailor. Technology is growing rapidly and carving out a place in the trending world of fashion. BodyMetrics has a fit solution for all consumers around the world. The next time you need a new outfit for an event and are crunched for time, rest assured BM can have you looking fabulously chic by the click of a button. 13


BOW & DRAPE: BUILD-YOUROWN DRESS, ON DEMAND! OUR EIC HAYLEY MAYBURY TRIES OUT THE ONLINE BESPOKE SERVICE Written by HAYLEY MAYBURY Photography by MARGARET WALSH This is a problem I run into quite often. You have an idea in your mind for the perfect outfit. You venture out with high hopes and after countless hours and numerous store visits (some of which you don’t even like) you decide to give up, defeated! Luckily, there is a solution and a brilliant one at that! The answer is Bow & Drape. Bow & Drape is a website created by Aubrie Pagano that’ll completely satisfy your perfect-outfit dreams. Bow & Drape allows you to create original dresses from the ground up. Yep, that’s right! It’s a pretty spectacular experience and coming from a design background I never had so much fun designing a dress without having to worry about sticking myself with pins or re-threading my sewing machine. Here’s how it works. When you enter the site it gives you two different options. You can choose from pre-designed dresses that the Bow & Drape design team. Or, if you are in a creative mood and want to have some fun you can opt for “designing your own” and choose from ten different silhouettes and tons of great detail options. If you have a question about which style would flatter you best, you can plug in your measurements and it will suggest the best dresses for your body. Worried about choosing the wrong size? Bow & Drape can send out a Fit Kit to make sure you order the right size before creating your piece that’s then custom made. Give it a couple weeks and voila, you have a gorgeous new outfit that fits you flawlessly. How cool will it be when your friends say, “OMG, I love your dress. Where did you get it?” And you can respond, “Oh this...I designed it myself! With the help of Bow & Drape, of course.” I had the chance to create my own Bow & Drape dress a couple of weeks ago. It was so much fun mixing and matching different colors and adding on the details. I choose the The Jackie, a classic style that is great for all occasions. I went through all the different options and it was hard to choose because they were all must-haves. The other thing that’s amazing about the concept is that all orders are manufactured here in the U.S. by seamstresses in New York City's garment district. Aubrie says, “This is a fact we are so proud of and I think it separates our brand from others. Quality is sewn into every stitch and turnaround times are kept low.” The Bow & Drape team wants women to have a relationship with their clothing again, which I think is spot on. Instead of rushing to buy the next trend or spending money on cheap things only to wear once, why not invest in a wardrobe with good quality, classic pieces that last forever? When I asked Aubrie how she came up with the concept for Bow & Drape she simply answered, “I was looking for a dress to wear to my boyfriend’s family wedding and nothing fit the bill.” Her solution? “I did something 14

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WITH PEPLUM


totally irrational and actually designed and sewed my own dress. I convinced myself that I was not the only woman who wished she had more control over her garments. So, I set out to create clothing with personality for all women.� Made possible by the Internet, Bow & Drape solves an ageold issue for women everywhere. Not everyone has a design background but most women know what they want when they set out to shop.With Bow & Drape, now they have a single destination to design something they’ll really love and attain the dress of their dreams. After all, fashion should be fun not frustrating!

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DELOREAN Photography by ALVIN NGUYEN Styling by ALVIN STILLWELL Hair by NIKO WEDDLE Makeup by ERIN SKIPLEY Model JOHN ZOELLER

THIS PAGE Shirt by‐HYDEN YOO Jumper by‐CREEP BY HIROSHI AWAI Rings by JANA BREVICK

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THIS PAGE Shirt by‐GUILIANO FUJIWARA Jacket by‐WOOYOUNG MI Sunglasses by VINTAGE OPPOSITE Jumper by CALVIN KLEIN COLLECTION

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OPPOSITE Jacket and Shirt by‐RYNSHU Sunglasses by‐VINTAGE THIS PAGE Shirt by UMIT BENAN Jacket by TOPSHOP

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RE: ART_ONE TO WATCH YORGO ALEXOPOULOS Interviewed by MARIA KUCINSKI

Yorgo Alexopoulos is a New York-based artist best known for his innovative use of new media and technology. His artistic approach fuses traditional media such as painting, photography, film and sculpture with digital media. Exploring transcendental themes, Alexopoulos creates experiential video installations using animation software with techniques learned as a visual effects animator. He recently mounted his most ambitious project to date, a 24-panel mosaic video wall at the Cristin Tierney Gallery. He is a graduate of the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Alexopoulos is represented by Cristin Tierney in New York. YOU ORIGINALLY STARTED AS A PAINTER, MOSTLY DOING GRAFFITI IN ITS HEYDAY IN LOS ANGELES, WHAT GOT YOU INTERESTED IN USING DIGITAL MEDIA IN YOUR ARTWORK? After making the transition from graffiti to traditional painting after high school I was accepted into the School of the Art Institute of Chicago. Once there, I was exposed to all sorts of possibilities outside of painting. This was 1992 and the heyday of digital art. I quickly embraced the technological departments that the school offered and no longer saw a point in making paintings while I had access to the abundant facilities that I was suddenly surrounded by. I saw this as an opportunity to experiment and it was during this time that I started to realize the potential of combining traditional media with new media. I also attribute this transition to my early childhood as I was brought up in an environment surrounded by electronics and engineers. My father was an electronics R&D scientist and he had a laboratory in our garage. I spent hours playing with components and looking at astronomy books growing up. One of my first summer jobs as a teenager was made possible by my uncle who was the Chairman of Electrical Engineering Department at UCLA. I worked on soldering circuit boards and assembling electronic components for graduate students’ thesis projects in the school of electrical engineering. I have always been interested in creating new 22

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ways of experiencing art so naturally I saw using digital means to achieve this effect could yield wonderful results. VIDEO IS A MEDIUM THAT ARTISTS HAVE BEEN USING SINCE THE LATE 1960S, EARLY 1970S SO THE MEDIUM ITSELF IS NOT NEW, BUT YOUR APPROACH SEEMS TO TAKE PAINTERLY ASPECTS IN THE FINE ART MANNER, AND INFUSE DIGITAL TECHNOLOGY INTO SOMETHING GREATER THAN A SUM OF CODE. CAN YOU DESCRIBE WHAT YOUR ARTISTIC PROCESS IS AND HOW YOU CONVEY THIS THROUGH THIS MEDIUM? My process always begins by working backwards. I start by asking myself, “What is the effect I want my artwork to have on the viewer?” When working in video there are two initial obstacles, the artwork and the technology. I typically deal with the technology first since that is my canvas so to speak. Prepping the canvas for me means ascertaining all of the technical specifications of the systems that I will be using: testing cables and media players, setting up the computers for production, etc. As for the artwork itself, after the concept is in place I work like a painter. I create a first layer or a first pass, and then a second, then a third and I keep building on to the last. From there I take away and then I add more. I create and destroy what I’ve made


YORGO ALEXOPOULOS, TRANSMIGRATIONS, 2012 24 channel video installation with sound. Cristin Tierney Gallery installation view.

YORGO ALEXOPOULOS, NO FEELING IS FINAL, 2009 Computer animation / high definition video with sound. 13 minute continuous loop. Installation at the Torrance Art Museum.

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until I get to a point where I feel that the effect I am looking for has come to fruition. A good example of what I’m talking about is portrayed in the film The Mystery of Picasso. In this film you see how he creates and destroys what he makes along the way until he get’s to a place where he feels finished. I approach making video art in the same exact way, creating and destroying. Whether this is ultimately conveyed to the viewer is not necessarily relevant but that is my process. YOUR WORK OFTEN DEALS WITH METAPHYSICAL AND TRANSCENDENTAL THEMES, HOW DO YOU THINK YOUR WORK IS ABLE TO TRANSLATE THESE IDEAS THAT MAY SEEM ROOTED IN TEXT AND MORE BASIC FORMS OF EXPRESSION? I understand that each person who sees my work brings their own subjective experiences and worldview into the equation. The pieces I make fuse my interests and worldview into an artwork that has some mystery or abstraction but enough common symbolism that anybody can relate to. Ultimately, the audience makes their own 24

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interpretation but along the way the artist and viewer share a collective experience. When creating an artwork, I first seek to make something that is visually compelling to draw the audience into the work. Once drawn in visually and the technical effect has taken root, the viewer can begin to peel away the many layered concepts and themes that are assimilated into the piece. My themes are universal and deeply rooted in our collective psyche. The common thread is aimed at getting the audience to transcend their own egos to experience things bigger than themselves. I use color, light, sound, representation, abstraction, adapted imagery, photography, film and anything necessary to achieve the effect I want the viewer to experience. YOU SEEM LIKE A BIT OF A TECH GEEK, AND I KNOW WE NERDED OUT ABOUT ELECTRICAL OUTPUT AND HDMI CORDS AND MONITOR LUMINOSITY FOR YOUR INSTALLATION, TRANSMIGRATIONS AT CRISTIN TIERNEY IN THE SPRING OF 2012. SO, HOW DOES THE TECHNICAL COMPONENT OUTSIDE OF SOFTWARE FACTOR INTO YOUR WORK? DO YOU ENVISION THE


YORGO ALEXOPOULOS, TRANSMIGRATIONS, 2012 24 channel video installation with sound. Cristin Tierney Gallery installation view.

FULL PICTURE BEFORE? DOES IT COME TOGETHER IN PIECES? The technology behind any of my work is usually thoroughly figured out beforehand. It’s the artwork, or content, that incubates and goes through a series of transformations along the way. Like I mentioned before, it’s very much like working in paint, done over the course of multiple passes. From the moment you make the first mark you take on the role of “fixing” the piece. When I make a painting I am basically trying to fix an image as I work through it. It’s very much the same when I work in video or animation. Making art is like forcing yourself to fix something. You have to fix what you start or you abandon it and the piece dies. NOW THAT YOU HAVE EXPLORED MULTI-CHANNEL, IMMERSIVE ENVIRONMENTS, WHAT’S NEXT? HOW DO YOU PUSH THE BOUNDARY ON SOMETHING ESSENTIALLY ROOTED AND BOUND TO A TECHNOLOGY FRAMEWORK?

I don’t consider my artwork bound or rooted to technology. I see it the other way around. Though I use technology, my work is rooted in traditional media. In the past few years, I’ve been very immersed in working with synchronized video installations and animated video artworks. But over the years I have worked in a variety of media. Each time I make a work I am not just considering the artwork I am making, I am also considering how the work fits into the overall arch of art history. As an artist you have two audiences, artists and everyone else. I ask myself, how can I change the way people experience art and how can I help change the medium? How can I change or inspire how other artists work? I am currently exploring paintings using chemicals and mediums that are self-illuminating as well as a slew of new video and LED sculptures for 2013.

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RE: FASHION_ONE TO WATCH NICKI COZZOLINO Written by JESSICA YOUNG

BLACKEYE

Photographed by MARIO DE ARMAS Designs by NICKI COZZOLINO Styling by MICHAEL RAY SOLIS Hair by STEFANO GRECO Makeup by VICTOR HENAO Photo Assistant CHRIS LINN Wardrobe Assistant EWA KARCZ Models ALICE & ANDREIA CONTREIRAS @ Q MANAGEMENT

Anyone worth their fashion cred has probably overused the phrase “effortless-chic”. The ultimate accolade within fashion journalism’s obsessive use of hyphenated adjectives, “effortless-chic” is a sort of oxymoronic style pinnacle that when both sides are precariously balanced, fashion magic happens. In relation to standout collections, it is the nuanced equilibrium between design-for-design and design-forfunction that’s so married together it’s almost impossible to discern between the two. It’s not every day a contemporary collection champions “effortless-chic” in both senses. Built to endlessly mix and match like any collection worth its premium pricing, Nicki Cozzolino’s eponymous label debuts to the NYC contemporary scene this fall. Like the cool, new girl at school that everyone’s mesmerized with but not sure why, Nicki Cozzolino exudes that je ne sais quoi that’s best served with subtlety.

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Drawing upon a trip to Turkey, Nicki Cozzolino’s FW 2012 collection is founded upon Old World ideas that transcend into New York City modernity. Picking up inspiration from stars on the Turkish flag, sun streaming through holes in market fabric and bright-white silk cocoons submerged in a carpet-factory vat, all of these emanating light symbols converge to create her signature star and splatter prints that shine with urban edge. Adding a bit of sassy attitude, Turkish street cats strut across pants, sweaters and dresses in peppered patterns and silk appliqués. As her prints are a nod to byzantine traditions, her silhouettes are distinctly downtown. A cool combination of sophistication and slouchiness, each piece is built upon clean lines with an inherent insouciance. Her slim-cut ankle pants are perfectly relaxed; however, fit uber-flattering to create a long, lean look. Her tops and sweaters come in a variety of fits to encourage layering for dimension and contrast within outfitting. Taking a cue from the creative industry’s love of personalization and styling, Nicki Cozzolino includes distinctive details that imbue versatility into the garment. A notable chiffon blouse’s vertical striping doubles as clever tunnels with which the wearer can string satin ribbon or chains (of their choice) to cinch and adjust the style depending on desired look. Perhaps the biggest surprise of all, is how incredibly comfortable each piece is to wear. Crafted from the softest stretch georgette, chiffon and stretch satin, each polished

item could potentially double as pajamas. Her plush outerwear is not only statement-making, but the butteryleather jackets and fluffy-fur vest could be mistaken as cuddle buddies…with a utilitarian purpose! Cozzolino acutely understands that a garment that’s equal parts easy-to-wear and functional as it is fashionable will most likely be the wardrobe favorite. Cozzolino certainly draws upon her experiences as a woman and her relationship with clothing to inform her design decisions. Equipped with a BA in Fine Arts and Psychology and then later going on to study at Parson’s New School of Design, her desire for artistic expression and inherent interest in people converge in her love of creating clothing. A balance between both worlds, the result taps into the woman’s psyche and delivers a line that seamlessly moves between casual and dressy instances that serves the city girl’s lifestyle. Cozzolino’s love for adventure and internal confidence comes through in the collection’s justright touch of irreverence and fun. This complex mix of inspirational elements and personal passions combine for a collection that has that certain je ne sais quoi that makes it both a fashion splurge yet reasonable investment all at once. Clearly destined to become the uniform of those that easily put the effortless in chic, Nicki Cozzolino’s stellar ability to strike a balance in almost every dichotomy makes it truly desirable.

Photographed by ARAM BEDROSSIAN

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BLUE ROSE Photography by KATYA TSYGANOVA Hair and Makeup by IRINA SAPTSOVA Model EKATERINA ZUEVA and JUSTINS LUCKDEST Clothing by VICTORIA PROKHOROVA

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BLOGGER BREAKDOWN SMARTPHONE APPS TO SIMPLIFY YOUR BUSINESS Written by ALYSSA DAVIS Photography by JACOB BENJAMIN TAYLOR

In today’s society, blogs are the most reliable source for current fashion events. When it's fashion week and we’re stuck at our day jobs, we turn to our favorite bloggers to fill us in on the details of the most exclusive parties and behind-the-scenes footage from New York, to Paris, to Milan, to London and beyond. If you’re a blogger, you know the stress that can erupt from the influx of social media outlets. How must one photograph and post their current outfit while reporting on current shows; while checking in on Foursquare, Twitter and Facebook; all at the same time while keeping their cool? Unfortunately, we can’t always walk around with our Cannon EOS Rebel T3i and 50mm lens and laptop, so the easiest solution is to turn to our most faithful and compact friend, the smartphone, in tight situations. Mobile technology is crucial to fashion and photography blogging and the right smartphone apps delineate successful bloggers from the rest of the pack. With zero lead time, information and content needs to be produced immediately so here are a few apps that help bloggers juggle their blogging business. SOCIAL MEDIA APPS: THE IDEA OF BEING FOUR PLACES AT ONCE IS POSSIBLE AND INCREDIBLY SIMPLE. With all of the different social media platforms out there, are bloggers burning themselves out to keep up with the latest social media trends? The answer might be yes if the traditional options to updating these platforms were all that existed. Luckily, there is no need to pick and choose. HootSuite allows users to create numerous social network streams and view them in a clean, friendly interface, dispatching messages to multiple networks such as Twitter, Facebook and Foursquare simultaneously, which is great for a fashion blogger looking to update multiple platforms at once. “I use Hootsuite's mobile app throughout the day!” says Kristen of The Boston Fashionista, “I love it.” The mobile app also complements your web account, migrating all the content onto your phone. Jen of the Boston Bachelorette is a long-time Hootsuite user. “I have been using Hootsuite for about five years. Since I manage three personal Twitter accounts (one for each blog) and a few accounts for work – it’s a valuable time saver. It's a very quick way to spread the word.” Three blogs? Thankfully apps like Hootsuite create a simple way to manage multiple blogs on multiple platforms, so one can write about pretty much anything that comes to mind and disperse it everywhere in seconds! Tweetdeck is another popular option within the blogging community. When you're on the go, it's a pain to log into different apps to do the same thing. Lei Ann of Lei Ann Off Duty says, “During Boston Fashion Week, while watching runway shows at the Tent at the Mandarin Oriental using Tweetdeck, I will simultaneously check in on Foursquare which shows up on both my Twitter and 40

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Facebook feeds and also allows me to post pictures of the current fashion scene. It lets my followers (who are most often also blog readers) know what I'm doing and they can often expect more pictures and details in an upcoming blog post.” In this case, Tweetdeck is a great business tool. By capturing a fashionable moment in seconds, you’re getting your job done with the option of going back to the topic later with more in-depth details. And what if you’re on the other side, just trying to stay up to date? There’s an app for that too. “I use the Bloglovin’ app, which lets me track bloggers I follow as well as my own blog,” says Ann, a photographer and blogger for My Thoughtlessness. “I think the most important thing in blogging is always knowing what’s going on in the blogosphere. No one wants to be caught summarizing what a similar blogger said five minutes ago. With Bloglovin’, it’s easy to see what’s going on with other blogs and keep up with the game.” VIDEO APPS: YOU JUST MASTERED THE COOLEST NAIL ART OF ALL TIME (THINK KATIE-PERRY-MEETS-NAVAJOBARBIE-TRIBAL-SENSATION WITH POPS OF COLOR) AND YOU NEED TO SHOW THE REST OF THE WORLD HOW THIS CAME TO BE. VIDEO APPS CAN HELP YOU CREATE HOWTO VIDEOS IN SECONDS! Video blogging has never been easier thanks to Videofy.Me, a mobile video app that favorite bloggers are using to show off their favorite shops and give outfit breakdowns to their viewers. Just ask Chloe of The Chicest Degree. “The evolution of Videofy.Me has made a huge impact on reaching new readers of my former blog, Walking In Heels. It has made my fashion blogging much more expedient and efficient.” And haven’t you ever wondered how bloggers get their behind-the-scenes footage uploaded instantly? “I can give readers a glimpse into my life as I capture behind-the-scenes footage for my style posts and it acts as a visual diary, documenting my evolution as an influential personality in the fashion world. Videofy.Me is an extremely useful app during New York Fashion Week - I get to instantly share with my readers the inside scoop while reporting live from some of their favorite designer’s runway shows,” says Chloe. Viddy is also taking the blogging world by storm and has been described as the Instagram for videos. Viddy is unique because it lets you take a short video, add filters and edit it all on a smartphone. With mobile video, there are so many opportunities for creative content created on the spot. OUTFIT-POST APPS: PART OF BEING A FASHION BLOGGER IS NOT ONLY REPORTING ON GREAT STYLE BUT SHOWING OFF YOUR OWN. HERE ARE TWO FAVORITES. Just ask Kara of Stylefixx. “I’ve used both Stylebook and Go Try it On and both makes the process a lot easier


when putting together my own outfit posts,” says Kara, “these outfit-oriented apps help you stay organized.” How? By ensuring that you are making the most out of your wardrobe while also allowing you to communicate with other fashionistas before making an outfit post public! Have you ever thought it would be nice to have a second opinion when shopping by yourself? Especially before you bought that lace and animal-print mess of a jumpsuit? Go Try It On is your second-opinion fashion app that you can turn to when your BFF gets held up in the shoe department and you need advice now! Further explanation needed? Simply snap a shot of you wearing any item you wish you buy, upload it to the Go Try It On app and let strangers or friends decide the fate of that maxi skirt versus LBD for the upcoming blogger event. Not only can you get the scoop on what others think of your threads before you make the outfit public, you can also do your fair share of critiquing their fashion choices whenever the mood strikes. There is often the misconception that bloggers need to have an endless bank account, allowing them to always shop the latest designer must-haves to stay on top of trends. That couldn’t be farther from the truth! Think of Stylebook as your really hip fashion accountant and also the closest thing to a computerized outfit coordinator. Remember those endless color-coded conveyer-belt racks that belonged to Cher from Clueless? Now you can stop envying and start cataloging! The Stylebook app will catalogue every single item of clothing in your closet and pair clothing with shoes, purses and accessories to take the confusion out of your morning-dress routine -- plus leaving you with a ton more outfit options! Combine items you never thought would work and create a dozen fabulous, brand new looks in your fashion arsenal. To get going with Stylebook, all you need to do is load images of your clothing and accessory items onto your smartphone. Discover that forgotten item tucked away in the back of your closet that just may be the key piece to a new look or the next trend! There you have it, the low down on the top blogging apps you’ll want to check out. From social-media overhaul to outfit-posting organization, you’ll begin to look at your smartphone in a whole new way. Next time you have an upcoming blogger event, try out these little lifesavers that’ll surely get your posts out in a timely matter and give us your feedback! Not sure where to start? Send us a short video of your experience (using Videofy.Me or Viddy) and link it up to our Facebook page (facebook.com/ papercutmag). Happy updating!

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IMAGINATION MACHINATION Photography by DANIEL KORZEWA @ facebook.com/korzewa Styling by KASIA CYGANSKA Hair by DARIUSZ TESIOROWSKI @ facebook.com/bariusztesiorowskihairstylist Makeup by VIKA MAY @ vika-may.pl/ Model PAULINA H. @ brodybookings Designers JAROSŁAW EWERT @ facebook.com/jaroslawewert LUIZA KIMAK @ facebook.com/luizakimak Backstage video by BARTŁOMIEJ BARTOSIEWICZ Production by MAGDALENA MUSIAŁ

THIS SPREAD Necklace from JAROSŁAW EWERT

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THIS SPREAD Coat and Bracelet from JAROSナ、W EWERT Blouse LUZIA KIMAK

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THIS PAGE Dress from JAROSナ、W EWERT Coat by LUIZA KIMAK Ring is STYLISTS OWN OPPOSITE Blouse by JAROSナ、W EWERT

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THIS SPREAD Necklace by JAROSナ、W EWERT

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THIS SPREAD Necklace by JAROSナ、W EWERT

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OPPOSITE Pants LUIZA KIMAK Dress and Necklace by JAROSナ、W EWERT THIS PAGE Blouse by JAROSナ、W EWERT

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THIS SPREAD Coat and bracelet by JAROSナ、W EWERT Blouse by LUZIA KIMAK

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THIS SPREAD Coat by JAROSナ、W EWERT Necklace STYLISTS OWN

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FIBER 2.0

TECH TRENDS IN FASHION DESIGN Written by LEE HERSHEY

FASHION-FORWARD PRINTING: 3-D & LASER Last year, I interviewed Andreia Chaves, a Brazilian shoe designer, who designs and creates shoes using 3-D printing technology. She is best known for her Invisible Shoe which features a mirrored surface that reflects its environment and ultimately “disappears”. For 3-D printing, also known as additive manufacturing, items are built by depositing material, creating the product layer by layer. The machine reads data from CAD or animationmodeling software and lays down liquid, powder or material until the model is complete. In this way, 3-D printing essentially introduces a new material to the textile world, by transforming liquids or powders into solid usable or wearable products. In terms of economics, 3-D printing technology is fast, less expensive and has the ability to produce at the same cost per item; certainly more efficient than traditional manufacturing. 3-D printing also has the ability to manufacture shapes that traditional manufacturing cannot compete with, such as crafting artificial limbs and customizing it to the individual. The versatility of this material goes well beyond shoes. It’s also being used to produce other accessories as well as swimsuits. Designed by Mary Huang and Jenna Fizel of Continuum Fashion, the N12 bikini is 3-D printed and snaps together, thereby eliminating sewing and the need for closures. The N12 bikini uses Nylon 12, which explores the technical challenges of creating a flexible, durable and waterproof surface out of nylon. While not yet on the market, the N12 will be available at an approachable price point attesting to the cost-reducing potential 3-D printing will have for the future of the fashion industry. 58

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CHROMAT Photographed by LAUREN DUQUE

The loom replaced the weavers, and the sewing machine the loom. Long-term trends in fashion are often driven by advancements in technology. The cuts and styles may seem immediately important in defining fashion trends, but fashion technology principally sets out to manufacture with the most efficiency and use of resources available. A large complaint about the industry is that it is wasteful, cheap garments offer little functionality in terms of longevity and design, plus many synthetic textiles are not biodegradable. Thus, the technologies that advance the apparel industry today need to address not only the efficiency of manufacturing, but the ways that they can produce clothes using the cleanest processes to effectively maintain and interact with the environment. It is apparent that the fashion industry can do so much more with incorporating intelligent design to better serve designers, consumers and the overall environment. Here is a rundown of some of latest technological trends and innovations that are pushing fashion design and manufacturing into the future.

While the full potential of 3-D printing is still in its infancy, mainstream retailers and designers are using laser printing to etch designs in clothing. Design student Alba Prat uses laser etching in her Synthetic Oceans collection, which consisted of laser-cut neoprene. “With laser-cutting, you can cut fabric very precisely and also engrave on the surface,” Prat says. The process is very effective in reducing manufacturing because, “You save a lot of time and the results are always perfect.” Typically, a single seamstress or designer would have to cut a garment from a pattern using scissors leaving room for error. However, enabled by the specific calculations from Illustrator files, a laser-cutter reduces time while produces more. In overall business management, laser-cutting could certainly lower manufacturing costs.


NOT JUST FASHIONABLE, BUT INTERACTIVE Fashion and technology are moving towards intelligent design. Ying Gao’s interactive designs, such as Playtime, exists at the intersection of fashion design and media arts. Reactive and photosensitive, the garments create an interactive experience that encompasses the garments themselves, the spectator and the environment. She creates dresses that are sensor-equipped and respond to external signals such as flashing lights or the wearer’s breath. With regards to the technological role in her fashion designs, Gao says, “Both technology and fashion embody the most fragile and ephemeral aspects of our culture, insofar as what is cutting-edge today will be old news tomorrow. Fashion designers have known for a long time that they are working with a fleeting material that will never be timeless; however,

the integration of electronic technology seems to modify the creative process, both in terms of the surface and the structure of garments.” GOING GREEN Designers are creating kinetic clothes that express a relationship between the garment and its surroundings, especially to assert a consciousness for the environment. Eco-conscious and self-sustaining business practices within fashion are promising trends. Recycling and upcycling has been popular for awhile, as seen with Canadian designer Janice Louise Miller and her line Glaciermilk, or New Zealander Emma Whiteside, who crafted a gown out of radiator copper. Eco-friendly technology offers textiles that are safe for the environment, as well as clothes that self59


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STRUCTURAL COLOUR A/W 12 Photographed by FLORA DEBORAH, Designer RAINBOW WINTERS


clean when exposed to sunlight. Innovative-technology firm Diffus engages fashion with the environment as well as making both a political statement and considering the relationship of fashion and the body. Their Climate Dress monitors air pollution levels around the wearer and provide feedback in the form of LED lights. The lights within the dress pulsate quickly to alert the wearer that the air is heavily polluted. Diffus sought to translate CO2 levels from the human breath by using the light pulsation to interpret the sensory information. The embroidery is the most distinctive element of the dress because it is created using wireless circuiting while remaining decorative. For centuries, embroidery has been an aesthetic detail in fashion, without functionality. The embroidered design in the Climate Dress, however, argues practicality and necessity to transmit power and communicate the CO2 levels to the circuits making them flash. Diffus co-founder Michel Guglielmi points out that the embroidery in the dress introduces a new use for design ornamentation in fashion, as well as integrating electronic functionality into textiles. By providing interactivity that expands into healthrelated issues, Diffus’ Climate Dress engages its wearer to consider the effects of their actions on their immediate and future environment. The dress is used to protect, in the same manner that gloves or fire-retardant suits protect our skin. Our unconscious actions—breathing—become readily more conscious when threatened by hazardous CO2 levels. WEARING THE RAINBOW Then there is Amy Winters of Rainbow Winters who also experiments with the way fibers respond to light, water and sound. She employs a various palette of technologies: from sun and water reactive inks, printed electronics, sensors and nanotechnology to create experimental and playful innovation. But unlike Ying Gao or diffus’ designs which respond through movement or light activity, Rainbow Winters offers a line of interactive clothing featuring printed designs that change colors when they’re exposed to sunlight or water. The Rainforest dress, for example, transforms from black and white to color when exposed to sunlight and water. Other designs like Picasso Explosion and Thunderstorm react to sound volumes. Some of the dresses use LEDs, like diffus’ designs, but also feature holographic fabrics and fiber-optic woven fabrics. “Primarily technology is incorporated in a poetic and natural way,” Amy Winters says. “My main inspirations come directly from nature; either wild thunderstorms or the saturated colors of the rainforest…Therefore, by introducing the poetic and natural inspiration to technology, it makes it almost magical.” (RE)STRUCTURING: TECHNOLOGY RESHAPES THE BODY Just as the convergence of fashion and technology is asking us to rethink the construction of clothes, it also challenges us to explore the possibility of restructuring the body. Designer Becca MacCharen of Chromat brings her architectural background to her pieces. Her interest in scaffolding and wearable exoskeletons is explored in her structural designs. Each collection reforms the contours of undergarments or reverses the construction of the design, turning it inside out, just like the Musée de Pompidou. Designer and multi-media artist Lucy MacRae also

explores how the body fits and interacts with clothing. But unlike Chromat, who investigates how textiles can conform to a shape, MacRae uses the human body as a canvas. Her subjects are coated, injected, bathed and adorned to create new shapes, new bodies. Her visual delights combine science and nature, such as her Swallow-able Perfume or Liquid Textile. Using nano-technology and bio-tech structure, her Liquid Textile was utilized to wrap musician Robyn’s body in her “Indestructible” music video. MacRae says, “As a body architect, I find ways to extending the body beyond its physical and biological edge, manipulating the natural silhouette with materials that are draped, injected, or bathed over the skin. The outcome can sometimes be surprisingly morbid, imperfect or grotesque, and each time I’m never anticipating the final result.” Both MacRae and Becca MacCharen rely on the technology of computer software to generate the initial designs and prototypes before construction. MacCharen points that this technology will allow more precision. Her designs emphasize the hips, bust and breasts of the female body offering a hyperbole to the expected feminine silhouette. Wearers will “celebrate the body shape and contours” rather than hide them. Chromat uses technology to restructure our concept of the body form, while MacRae navigates the utter transformation of the human body, taking it to the next level. As new materials merge with the old, technology goes beyond branding and marketing strategies to offer more efficient production and manufacturing. Innovations such as clothes that are sensitive to the shifting environment; tools that provide designers to rethink, reconstruct and reform the human body are just the tip of the iceberg of the potential within the convergence of fashion and technology. With the Internet, fashion is becoming more accessible: from viewing the runway, to trying on clothes and to shopping. As Rainbow Winters comments, “Technology is already part of fashion and has made a disruptive change through various social networking applications,” providing a new interactive and individual experience for the consumer. However, the technological advances in the fashion industry go beyond software programs and social networking. It’s ingrained in the fibers. Fashion rarely seems practical. It serves to be worn and adored, and maybe sometime long ago provided necessities like heat, protection and covering. The technologies integrated into clothing today aims to heighten the original purpose of clothing—functionality. The fashion and technology marriage challenges our perception of our surroundings and their relationship to us. It engages us to interact. The flashing lights, the changing colors and movement—they are all decorative and amusing. Because beyond being intelligent design, technology can be fun too, like fashion!

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WHAT’S NEW IN ELECTRONIC MUSIC Written by DANIELLE SIPPLE

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DOCTOR JEEP “'Doctor Jeep' was the villain character in a novel I read when I was like seventeen - I really dug his aesthetic and thought the name was unique so I adopted it. I think it's kind of silly now but people know me as that so I'm stuck with it.” Andre Lira, musically known as Doctor Jeep, is just as unique as his name. Between his college studies dissecting the inner workings of neuroscience, this Boston-based DJ/ producer is creating original songs and stunning remixes. Adventurous in his production style, which is littered with more beats bouncing than a dance floor can handle, Jeep weaves his musical signature into all of his songs. This fall has brought the release of his third album, Turok, which proves to be one of his more club-friendly EPs, including two original tracks. “When I was fourteen, I wrote a bunch of really complex metal. At some point I started writing chiptune-influenced drum n' base-type stuff which evolved into picking up a copy of Logic and messing around with more styles of electronic music. I think looking back, I'd categorize the first few things I made...as like, trance… haha.” Slipping into production from a very technical side, Jeep was introduced to the process by way of software called Tabit. This particular software explored the manipulation of guitar tabs, and any instrument your computer could handle including drums and bass, and played them back in MIDI (musical instrument digital interface) format. With experimentation set to a maximum level within these boundaries, Jeep was arms deep in complex music production from very early on. “I like to take influences from a myriad of things I listen to... I don't really show anyone 75% of the stuff I make but it's all over the map in terms of style. People tell me they can easily identify a ‘Jeep track’.” Jeep had the great opportunity of spending half of 2012 in London through a school-based internship. When he wasn’t brushing up on his academics, he was taking in the insane electronic-music scene, sometimes witnessing multiple headlining acts in just one weekend. This kind of musical

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overload from the electronic motherland molded Jeep and influenced his production style. With school taking a major priority in his life, he still manages to find time to perform with other large-act DJs. Next year can only bring bigger and better plans for Jeep, including a West Coast tour and new track releases. Six word memoir: “Short guy gets Ableton, nerds out.” Every electronic artist finds the perfect combination of tech options that work for them both performance and production-wise, and Jeep understands his own personal musical fit. He works with Ableton for its intuitive interface while CDJs are his go-to for performance considering their almost fool-proof ability of avoiding mishaps that could happen to party-style laptops. Software that Jeep digs deep into is Massive, a program that allows for creation of synth, drum and bass from scratch. With unlimited possibilities in Massive, he is able to create sounds that give his songs standout qualities while escaping the long searches for music samples that can plague other DJs/producers. In response to a track that Doctor Jeep produced with Obey City titled “Dem Hoes”: Do you really love ‘dem hoes’? “I prefer classy women.” With a long career ahead of him, Doctor Jeep definitely knows what he likes. Doctor Jeep is a Boston-based DJ/producer who is currently part of the Banana Peel Collective. This collective consists of Jeep and three other DJs, all who share professional musical characteristics. In late 2012/early 2013, the Banana Peel Collective will be re-launching as a digitalmusic label.


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DJ KASEY “Electronic music is very universal no matter where you go. Each city has their own electro, house, dub, (insert sub-genre here) scene... That's what I love about music, it's like math, everybody understands.” Pontificating like a well-worn academic, Kasey Riot is absolutely right. The pulse and beat, especially of electronic music, is something that everyone can resonate with, whether it catches their ear or moves their feet. Vancouver-based DJ and producer Kasey Riot got her start when thrown onto some turntables in a family friend’s basement. Riot was hooked at first mix and within a short time thereafter, was mixing on her own set of tables. Moving from practicing in her locked bedroom to a crowded club was a nerve-racking experience. “My first gig ever was at a club called Canvas for a house night. I remember I planned out my set from start to finish and practiced so hard the week before. I was so nervous not to mess up during each transition, but the feeling of working a crowd was such a high, I was hooked.” Electronic-music production came with ease to Riot, but the tech-based musical genre was not her first introduction to the beat of the world. With classical training in piano at a young age and being greatly influenced by her mother’s Masters in Music, this Canadian artist was driven to explore other areas of musical theory, sustained greatly in the thrashing sound of punk rock. Connecting with the intensity of rock mixed with her family’s musical aptitude, Riot took her knowledge accrued from playing in bands over the years and transformed it into a wealth of power in her electronic-music production when building tracks and layering beats. “The #1 advice I give to anyone aspiring to do anything is that you must have persistence. Think of it this way, no matter what you do, if you put in 10,000 hours without quitting you'll be a pro. There will be ups and downs but it's the ones that keep at it that make it to the end.” Electronic music, with its gender-less technology, tends to be a male-dominated genre. Being a female DJ and part

of the LGBTQ (Lesbian/Gay/Bisexual/Transgender/Queer) community, Riot stands out amongst the best with a persistence that is only seen with true passion. With a need to prove one’s true talent, Riot succeeds and looks to other female DJ/producers that are carrying their true talent into the world. She looks to examples like Lauren Flax, Annie Mac and Lisa Lashes for continuous motivation. Her energy and the momentum of 2012 have propelled this DJ into some new and exciting territories. With residencies at multiple Vancouver clubs hitting amazing proportions, Riot turned her focus to producing original tracks, remixes and includes a new collaborative project with vocalist Quanah Style. Utilizing Ableton Live in her earlier production career, she has since turned to Reason for a broader, stronger sound, while still relying on Pioneer CDJs and a mixer with CDs for live performances. Next year hopes to bring a cross-Canadian tour with a final landing spot in New York City for Riot, which would be a refresh for the East Coast. “Inspiration is like a baby, it doesn't choose a nice seemly hour to enter the world. It's very random. But I’ve noticed that when I surround myself with art and music there will always be that one picture, or that one note or sound that makes something click and suddenly all I want to do is create.” With a six-word memoir that reads, “To help transcend through dirty beats,” Kasey Riot understands the symbiotic relationship between creator and creation, especially musically. Her growth as a DJ is molded by her movement through her audience aurally, and technologically speaking, that is the future of music. DJ Kasey Riot holds residencies at Vancouver hotspots: Dirty Thursdays at Junction, Saturdays at Oasis, Hershe Long Weekends and Sin City Fetish Nights. She can’t live without cartoons, books, friends, the ocean, sunshine, art and love.

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SONKIN “To this day, I brainstorm ideas of occupations beyond music and I am consistently unable to think of anything. It’s simply all I’ve ever wanted to do.” With a mother classically trained in piano in Moscow and a grandfather classically trained in violin, Leon Sonkin was birthed into a family that flowed music from their pores. Surrounded by such talent, it is only right that Sonkin, the name he performs under, took to electronic music and its formative production so well. Exposed to the genres of drum n’ bass and IDM while studying in Orlando, Florida in 2004, Sonkin bought turntables from a friend and since delving into what had just been a fascination, he never looked back. “I’ve experienced a lot more hardships and adversity than most should. I lost my best friend to drugs, I’ve battled depression for most of my adult life, I have a lot of experience with just awful things… but I think, because of these things, I end up making the kind of music I do.” Influenced by darker New Wave such as New Order and Depeche Mode, Sonkin combines his life experience with the sounds that inspire him. Idolizing the musical master Mike Patton, he creates morose music that vibes onto the fine lines of the darkly heartfelt and oddly bleak. Mixed in quite nicely are his non-musical inspirational elements, consisting of his love of science-fiction and his two feline friends. Sonkin channels his childhood influences, hiphop and hardcore music into his current mode of musical production. A multitude of technology and software is available nowadays for all types of production but Sonkin sticks with one religiously, Logic, having dabbled in Ableton Live and Pro Tools. In his live performances, he carries on the tried and true mixture of Serato and 1200’s for a lively, dynamic set. Concerned that his sets could be less on the “live” end of the spectrum, Sonkin performs in a way that moves him, only tailoring his structure slightly when the location switches from small club to a large festival. In accordance to the size of the audience, the energy level of the songs wage better on a higher level and Sonkin honed the ability to vibe the need for that adjustment. “It’s weird…NYC doesn’t have its own unique music scene anymore. In the ‘70s it had punk, new wave and disco. The ‘80s had hip-hop. The ‘90s saw jam bands, hardcore and electronic music. Now we seemed to have covered it all.”

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Splitting his time between New York City, Brooklyn and Philadelphia, Sonkin fleshes out his performance spectrum to adapt to the different ethos of these cities, as well as playing clubs versus festivals. While NYC/Brooklyn may be his physical home, he finds Philadelphia to be more of his musical home, especially with his monthly event Popular Science. Breaking the notion that live bands and electronic artists can only share the stage during large festivals, Sonkin created Popular Science, with his partner live-electronic band Grimace Federation, in order to fill the “void/grey area of tasteful electronic music that’s simply unrepresented in [Philadelphia].” “I don’t really pitch myself as anything. I hope that my music sounds extremely personal, and beyond that I could care less.” A fluctuating year of promising song releases, larger gigs and his monthly event, 2012 has been a learning experience for Sonkin. Weathering the growing pains that New York City can throw at any of its residents, he continues on working at growing artistically and musically while ascertaining what it means to bridge the gap between art and artist. In a six-word memoir, Sonkin states, “He really loved you all,” describing his positive nature and his steadfast advice to new artists everywhere. “Be nice to everyone. You are never bigger than anyone who helps you get to where you want to be, so by being nice and courteous, you can only advance your career in a positive way. Also, being safe is death…time off is swimming backwards.” And with that, we will always remember to never swim backwards. Sonkin curates the monthly Popular Science with Grimace Federation at the Philadelphia-based venue Kung-Fu Necktie.


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DIFFUS: DESIGN FOR

THE DANISH FIRM COMBINES TECH INTELLIGENCE WITH AESTHETICS F Written by LEE HERSHEY Photography by DIFFUS DESIGNS AND ANNI NORDDASHL

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CHANGE

FOR A FASHIONABLE FUTURE

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DIFFUS Diffus was founded by Hanne Louise Johannesen and Michel Guglielmi. Johannesen teaches at IT-University in Copenhagen as an art historian with current research fields in new media and spatial body relations. Guglielmi is an architect and formerly taught at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Art, School of Architecture and Design in Copenhagen. He concentrated on digital aesthetics, installation and performance art. Calling from Denmark with Skype, Johannesen and Guglielmi noted Diffus started about ten years ago, but only evolved into a business four years ago. They have since collaborated with freelance designers, artists, engineers and other associates. Their objective is to combine digital technology with different kinds of materiality exploring the versatility of aesthetic elements. This exploration is most notably depicted with their Climate Dress and Solar Handbag that comments on the climate, the changing environment and our relationship to these elements from technological, utilitarian and aesthetic perspectives. THE CLIMATE DRESS The Climate Dress integrates electronic functionality into textiles, seamlessly blending together fashion and technology. The dress, which made its debut at the Climate Summit in Copenhagen, Denmark in 2009, senses CO2 levels in the nearby environment and reacts by wirelessly transferring the information to LED lights that reflect the air quality through light-pulsation patterns. The result is an immediate connection between the wearer, the clothing and the environment. The Climate Dress and its use of embroidery exposes the flash-circuit system. With wireless circuiting, Diffus did not concern themselves with hiding the technology, but used the dress as a platform to integrate and introduce technology into fashion. It took five weeks to create it, and the team worked night and day. It was a crazy period, Johannesen remembered, describing how sometimes the dress wouldn’t work properly, and that everything came together with a great deal of luck. The Danish design firm collaborated with the textile company Forster Rohner. They met a representative at a Frankfurt textile fair and were invited to visit the textile mill. Before they arrived, they prepared ideas for their collaboration, considering the use of solar cells in a garment. However, combining the element of solar cells would be difficult to incorporate with lights, so they refined their idea to use conductive embroidery. At first they were unsure if the collaboration would work. The subject of climate was on the forefront of discussion at the time and with the Climate Summit that summer, they were motivated to make an environmental statement. Diffus sought to understand and translate CO2 levels in the human breath by using the light pulsation to 72

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interpret the sensory information. For example, in areas with low levels of CO2, the breath is very regular. However, in areas with polluted air, individuals struggle to catch their breath and so the process is more laborious. “It’s not necessarily a bad thing,” Johannesen says, “If you went for a run or you just had sex, you struggle to catch your breath because there is not enough oxygen in the lungs. There are a lot of bad connotations to CO2 levels in the atmosphere.” Because CO2 is an actual living thing, they want to explore a sustainable balance between O2 and CO2 levels. By focusing the project on CO2 levels, Diffus brought awareness to an already hot discussion. Guglielmi states that interpretations of the dress by the media have been interesting because it was out of their control and funny to read. The dress certainly encourages a political statement regarding the climate and global warming. As people try to take meaning from the dress, they align it with climate changes, rather than acknowledge the technological aspects and the achievement of using conductive embroidery as both an aesthetic and functioning element of the dress. Diffus aims to fuse technology and fashion by integrating technology as a natural element. They sense that most technology-focused fashion incorporates a cyborglike element, which makes technology seem foreign and futuristic. Diffus, on the other hand, integrates technology as something familiar. “We get an extra surprise that it’s able to do something else,” Johannesen says, “but it’s a much more natural way of thinking about technology.” Already, technology in textiles is incorporated in


sportswear, which reacts to the body’s movement or improves fluidity of movement and offers protection. Johannesen thinks at some point fashion, haute couture and streetwear will incorporate various technologies that operate in the same manner as sportswear: providing the wearer with additional heat, sound, regulation or protection. These external elements will be integrated into the fabric and will push the future of the fashion industry forward. This level of fashion technology is less cyborg and more seamless, proving that fashion technology does not necessarily have to be futuristic-looking. Diffus is particularly interested in exploring ways to use technology without disguising it and to “just see it as it is” without trying to define any aesthetical language. The Climate Dress is the tip of the iceberg for the possibilities of investigating how technology can be used in fashion. THE SOLAR HANDBAG Another project that they are working on is a luxury handbag that functions as a portable power station. With everyone constantly relying on their iPads, smartphones and laptops throughout the day, the availability of a portable power source is necessary to keep this 24/7, onthe-go generation supplied. The bags use miniature solar cells and embroidery techniques. The design firm is again working with Forster Rohner and collaborating with the Alexandria Institute (DK) Center for Software Innovation (DK) on the project. One hundred small solar power stations are fused throughout the Solar Handbag in oversized sequins to

generate electricity to charge mobile devices. At night, the bag activates the optical fibers inside to glow, allowing the user to search easily inside the handbag. The Solar Handbag was presented at the Health Environment Climate exhibition at the Danish Royal Opera last spring, along with the Climate Dress and the UV dress project (still in progress and part of the Alexandra Institute collaboration), which just recently made its debut. The Solar Handbag is a promising development towards functional solar-cell surfaces that are furthermore incorporated into textiles. Even at low daily exposure to sunlight, the bag is able to recharge mobile devices, making the solar cells highly efficient. The Solar Handbag, like the Climate Dress, is suggestive of environmental consciousness; however, the distinguishing characteristic is the versatility of function and fashion, and the ability to give the future mobile generation the ability to recharge and go. The Climate Dress and Solar Handbag are symbolic of today’s anxieties about environmental issues, how we will need to adapt to climatic threats and our transitional society. Moreover, Diffus emphasizes that through technologyadvanced textiles, we can alter what we wear and how our garments function to adapt in this ever-changing world. In time, fashion and technology will merge more seamlessly and naturally. Intelligent textiles will shape, change and interact with their environment or wearer and smart textiles (or e-textiles)will have electronics within the fabric that enable computing, digital and electronic components to be embedded in them. 73


THE FUTURE IS MONOCHROME Photography by ANGELA MARKLEW @ fstopinertia.com Hair by ASHLEY LYNN HALL @ ashleylynnhall.com Makeup by KAT LASKEY @ katlasky.com Model ANGIE MENZE Jewelry by AEGYPTIA JEWELRY @ aegyptia.com Clothing by NBD VINTAGE @ nbdvintage.com

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PIXELATE

Photography by LINDSAY ADLER Stylist LSC @ 4Season Style Management Hair by MARQUE @ Ken Barboza Makeup by GRISELLE ROSARIO @ Ken Barboza, using Obsessive COMPULSIVE COSMETICS Model ANIA @ Major Model Management Photography Assitant JEFF ROJAS Stylist Assistant DEX ROBINSON @ 4Season Style Management

OPPOSITE Dress by KATYA LEONOVICH Necklace by DELPHINE CHARLOTTE PARMENTIER Bracelet by MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE Shoes by WALTER STEIGER

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THIS SPREAD Top, Dress and Chaps by NORISOL FERRARI Shorts by PEPE Necklace by MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE Cuff and Ring by JOOMI LIM Shoes by ANDREW KAYLA

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THIS SPREAD Top, Dress and Chaps by NORISOL FERRARI Shorts by PEPE Necklace by MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE Cuff and Ring by JOOMI LIM Shoes by ANDREW KAYLA

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THIS SPREAD Top, Dress and Chaps by NORISOL FERRARI Shorts by PEPE Necklace by MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE Cuff and Ring by JOOMI LIM Shoes by ANDREW KAYLA

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THIS SPREAD Top and Skirt by VICTOR DE SOUZA Belt by NORISOL FERRARI Necklaces by JOOMI LIM, VITA FEDE Bracelets by DELPHINE PARMENTIER, D&G Cuff by VITA FEDE Shoes by ANDREW KAYLA

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THIS SPREAD Top and Skirt by VICTOR DE SOUZA Belt by NORISOL FERRARI Necklaces by JOOMI LIM, VITA FEDE Bracelets by DELPHINE PARMENTIER, D&G Cuff by VITA FEDE Shoes by ANDREW KAYLA

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THIS SPREAD Shirt by DAWN HAN Pants by KAELEN Necklace and Cuffs by DELFINA DELETTREZ Earcuff by MARIA FRANCESCA PEPE Shoes by JIL SANDER

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November 2012 "Tomorrowland" Issue  

November 2012 "Tomorrowland" Issue