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HAPPY BIRTHDAY TO US!

IT’S OUR ONE YEAR ANNIVERSARY!

BEBE ZEVA SHOWS US HOW TO “VAMP” IT UP

NUCLEAR POWER FRIEND OR FOE?

THOR’S JAIMIE ALEXANDER

THIS WARRIOR GODDESS IS ABOUT TO BE YOUR NEXT CRUSH BUT WAIT! THERE’S MORE: COUTURE MASTER EZRA SANTOS ON THE VERGE: STYLISTS OVER-THE-TOP BEAUTY & MUSICAL GUEST KIDS OF 88 02 >

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W W W. R O B O T A N D B R U C L I N G . C O M

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IN THIS ISSUE

08 FROM THE EDITOR

THE LIFE 11

New York Chronicles Status accessories

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No-Good Bloodsuckers Bebe Zeva shows us how to “vamp” it up

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All That Glitters is Not Gold Extreme beauty; photographed by Remi Kozdra & Kasia Baczulis

BUZZWORTHY

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FASHION FORWARD 62

My Generation How young people invaded fashion

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Nuclear Future Nuclear power: friend or foe?

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Something Wicked This Way Comes Fashion’s dark side; photographed by Lara Jade

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Je T’aime Jaimie Meet THOR’s Jaimie Alexander (sure to be your new crush)

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New Geographies Emerging economies are changing the face of fashion

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The Remarkable Ezra Santos Master of couture

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Fashion & Literature The intersection of image and the written word

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With The Tip of Your Hat The Embellished Life’s Jessica Kelly shares her affinity for headwear

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Eccentric Summer The hottest swimwear; photographed by Mike Nguyen

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On The Verge Three wardrobe stylists who are making waves in the industry

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Dream Menswear, with a twist; photographed by Georgie Wileman

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Party Like it’s 19...88? Meet Kids of 88, this month’s musical act

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EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Hayley Maybury CREATIVE DIRECTOR Nicole Bechard MARKETING & TECHNICAL DIRECTOR Jamall Oluokun ADVERTISING DIRECTOR & PUBLISHER Shomari Miller FASHION EDITOR Nicole Herzog COPY & WEB EDITOR Nora E. S. Gilligan

GUEST BLOGGERS Jessica Kelly Bebe Zeva CONTRIBUTING WRITERS arTisTech Nicole Bechard Brittnee Cann Jake Flanagin Christine Mastrangelo Jamall Oluokun Steven Read Samantha Tyler

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Stefani Ania Toufic Araman Kasia Baczulis David Benoliel Derek Blanks Greg Brown Christine Hahn Kathryna Hancock Justin Hogan Lara Jade Remi Kozdra Laurence Laborie Alex Martinez Hannibal Mathews Alvin Nguyen Mike Nguyen Truc Nguyen Sophie Pangrazzi Kyle Reinford Alex Valerio Natalie J. Watts Georgie Wileman Saul Zanolari

ON THE COVER

Photographed by ALVIN NGUYEN

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Hair CHRISTI CAGLE for RENE FURTERER Makeup ERIN SKIPLEY for NARS Styling ALVIN STILLWELL for CELESTINE AGENCY Model ACTRESS JAIMIE ALEXANDER Jaimie wears: blouse by Phillip Lim; leather skirt by Alice + Olivia; trench coat by Pendleton Portland Collection

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FROM THE EDITOR CAN YOU BELIEVE IT’S BEEN A YEAR ALREADY?! NEITHER CAN WE!

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Editor-in-chief Hayley Maybury and creative director Nicole Bechard with cover girl Jaimie Alexander; the entire Papercut editors team (L-R: Nicole, fashion editor Nicole Herzog, advertising director Shomari Miller, marketing director Jamall Oluokun, Hayley and copy/web editor Nora Gilligan); Hayley and Nicole enjoying LA.

Hello Papercutters, Can you believe it has been a year since I sat down to write my first editor’s letter for Papercut magazine?!? It almost seems a little surreal—to think about where we began, and where we are now...a year ago, we were Googling terms on set at our first photo shoot, just to try to keep from being yelled at (give us a break, we were new at this stuff!); now we are jet setting across the country—and even to other countries—to be on location for the wonderful shoots that are being put together for our magazine. The whole experience has been quite a whirlwind, and I absolutely love it! We have had some great adventures along the way, my favorite being Nicole and my recent trip to L.A. for this month’s cover shoot. It was such a great weekend, and we got to see some of our favs (shoutout to Mike, Kristen and Isaiah—a.k.a. Fashion Munster —for showing us a fabulous time!). Along with all the fun we had, there were some not-so-good moments... like when we missed our flight back home and got stuck in the airport for 20+ hours. Let’s just say it was a bonding experience, and I think we learned a lesson on that trip. Although, I wouldn’t mind missing the flight home on our next trip (spoiler alert!)—London is always such a hard place to leave. Anyway. With it being our one-year anniversary and all, we decided we need to bring you something fresh: we revamped our website, polished up the magazine and got a super-hot cover girl to grace our pages.

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Ms. Jaimie Alexander from the new Marvel film THOR is not only an amazing actress, she’s a killer model. You are going to love the editorial that Alvin Nguyen and his amazing team put together, along with the rest of the gorgeous editorials. Just as great are the articles we have for you in this issue—let’s just say you are going to want to read them all. In every issue we try to touch upon as many topics as we can, but this time we decided to dive a little deeper. Steven Read writes an insightful article bringing awareness to all the nuclear talk that has been going on, while Jake Flanagin opens our eyes to a world of emerging economies that are changing the fashion world. My favorite has to be Samantha Tyler’s article “My Generation”, so loved that we split it across this issue and the next—read the first half, you’ll love it too! Saving the best for last, I want to thank from the bottom of my heart all of our readers, supporters and contributors for making this past year so wonderful. You all truly inspire each of us at here at Papercut to keep making the magazine better. Thank you so much, and enjoy!


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NEW YORK CHRONICLES STATUS ACCESSORIES

Written by BRITTNEE CANN

I LIVE IN HERMÈS, AND DRIVE MY LOUBOUTINS… A person’s house and car are generally accepted as the two big-ticket items that project his or her social status. Except, of course, in a city where everyone rents a shoebox-sized apartment and either walks or takes a cab. New Yorkers have to rely on other things to express their place in society…other things like fashion. It only makes sense that statement-making accessories are the placeholders for the house and the car—the bag you carry becomes your mobile home, the shoes you wear become the car you drive and additional accessories are, well, additional status points. Seems that in the City that Never Sleeps, fashion tells more about you than just your style and personality—it also sheds a bit of light into your bigger world.   …AND WEAR MY RAY-BANS IN THE DARK… This idea might finally give an answer as to why on earth women wear certain things while they’re just running errands or shopping around the city. It would make much more sense to put on some jeans and a sweater with flats to get things done, but a lot of women opt for heels and a dress. Towering platforms are uncomfortable and completely impractical, and walking on a tilted, unsmooth sidewalk riddled with subway grates is like playing that old Hasbro game “Operation”; it is a very tricky business that requires a lot of skill and precise movement. So why don’t these women wear sneakers instead? Because—there is no doubt about it—a pair of Prada pumps makes a bigger statement than some canvas plimsolls do. Many subway travelers choose to keep their sunglasses on while riding the train, even though it is decidedly not sunny 300 feet underground. I wonder if this is the same kind of phenomenon. Perhaps people keep their sunnies on just to show off their designer shades and prove their affluence. Finally, toting around a heavy, oversized bag is miserable when you know you’ll be walking miles at a time, but women still do it. Their shoulders are screaming and their neck is sore for days afterward. Most of the things in this bag they probably won’t even need all day, but it’s important to them to have a bag that represents where they stand on the societal totem pole.                 …AND I WOULDN’T HAVE IT ANY OTHER WAY. It’s likely that a lot of people do these things without even thinking about it, so I’m inclined to believe that it all started happening in a very organic way. I can’t imagine that anyone ever set out to use fashion as a way to make up for their lack of motor vehicle—more likely than not it just naturally turned out that way. Still, though, isn’t taking a cab (sometimes) fancier than having your own car? A place where a woman can have drool-worthy shoes, bags and jewelry, and also their own driver at their beck and call…that is the place I want to be.

JUSTIN HOGAN

BRITTNEE CANN is a freelance fashion journalist for StyledOn and also writes about fashion, music, art and other cultural musings on her personal blog at www.brittneecann.com.

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NO-GOOD BLOODSUCKERS THIS “METALLIC VAMPIRESS” LOOK IS TO DIE FOR. Posted and photographed by BEBE ZEVA

My best friend invited me to watch him perform a stand-up comedy routine at Hollywood Improv on Melrose a few nights ago. As a comedian and a performance artist, he explained that he’d be running through his entire act while wearing a cape and vampire makeup. I immediately wondered why I’d never thought to dress in a style reminiscent of vampires before—I’m an admitted gothic-enthusiast, so the concept of a vampy ensemble warmed up to me instantaneously. Pairing a metallic navy sheer robe with a metallic black, pink, and purple maxi skirt and crop top, I came up with “METALLIC VAMPIRESS”, the perfect look to pay homage to my best and only vampire accomplice. I’m no Lily Munster, but at least I give the likes of Bella Swan and Edward Cullen a run for their money. 12

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Secondhand hat from URBAN JUNGLE Sunglasses by PARTY CITY Feather earring handmade by THE DEATH QUEEN Secondhand robe by MUSTANG EXCHANGE Metallic crop top from GOODWILL Maxi skirt by FOREVER 21 Belt is vintage Secondhand Doc Martens from BUFFALO EXCHANGE Necklaces by ADRI LAW, JUICY COUTURE, VINTAGE “My Beautiful Rocket” lipstick by LIME CRIME


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Photography by REMI KOZDRA & KASIA BACZULIS Hair/makeup by MARIANNA JURKIEWICZ Models PATRYCJA & JUSTYNA (D’VISION MODEL MANAGEMENT)

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NEW GEOGRAPHIES

DESIGN SENSIBILITIES FROM THE WORLD’S EMERGING ECONOMIES ARE CHANGING THE FACE OF FASHION. Written by JAKE FLANAGIN New York, France, Milan, London and Tokyo: these cities, and their respective countries, are the epicenters of activity in the fashion world. From Miuccia Prada to Yohji Yamamoto, most major designers can trace their provenance or training to one of these five great metropolises. This is relatively understandable, if you consider the fashion industry to be a generally accurate reflection of the global economy. In other industrial sectors, the majority of commercial agency lies in North American, European and East Asian economies, not to mention the market for luxury goods is far more prevalent in these parts of the globe than in, let’s say, sub-Saharan Africa or Southeast Asia. If we accept that the fashion industry is a reflection of the global market, then we must in turn accept the inevitability that eventually, the geographic designation of buying power will shift. China and Russia, for example, with their rapidly expanding upper-middle classes, have become equally expansive markets for fashion retail. Appropriately, the expansion of the markets in these countries has cultivated a newfound design society through which exciting, promising talent is being fostered. For many, the coming century will be the era dominated by emerging economies. While many refer to the “Asian Tigers” in this vein, it would be foolish to ignore the burgeoning potential of the world’s other powerhousesin-development. This is in regards to global commerce, and reflexively, innovation in fashion. At the moment, the global spotlight is inarguably on Brazil. Rio de Janeiro’s major coup in the bid for the 2014 FIFA World Cup and the 2016 Summer Olympics, as well as the country’s surpassing of Mexico as the fastest growing economy in Latin America, has garnered attention the world over. This is no exception for Brazil’s fashion scene, which has long produced more top models (Giselle Bundchen and Adriana Lima, for example) than top designers. That fact is swiftly changing. The Paulistano designer Alexandre Herchcovitch garnered international laudation for his avant-garde collections, exhibiting a

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The debut issue of Vogue Turkey (top); a look from Paulistano designer Alexandre Herchcovitch’s F/W collection (right).

uniquely Brazilian design sensibility for combining the practical with the whimsical. Along with peers Carlos Miele and Oskar Metsavaht (of Osklen), Brazilian brands are becoming frequent features in American and European magazines and participants in various Fashion Week events. Fashion in Turkey is taking off so quickly that Condé Nast launched their most recent international edition of Vogue there. Atil Kutoglu’s designs are reminiscent of the Ottoman golden age, incorporating silhouettes derivative of antiquated, Turkish garb: tunics, harem pants and iconic Turkish blues. In 2009, Kutoglu told the Associated Press, “I use Ottoman, Turkish and Byzantine inspirations from our culture and present them in a very modern way.” And, of course, as the secular headquarters of the Islamic world, Turkish designers will certainly wield a monopoly on the restriction-ridden female clothing market in the Middle East. Designers like Thulare Monareng are putting South Africa on the sartorial map, through lively but elegant designs that abstain from cultural clichés of African aesthetic. Monareng subtly incorporates black South African culture into her versatile designs, which have been featured

GREG BROWN

in Marie Claire, Elle, The Los Angeles Times and other widely read publications. She and fellow designers like Jacques van der Watt of Black Coffee and Gugu Mlambo Msombi of Gugulam, are championing the vibrant but much overlooked design community in South Africa, that is bursting for global recognition. Clearly, the grip of the “first world” on fashion is slipping, and that’s a good thing. True, nothing will ever replace suppleness of Italian leather goods, or the envelope-pushing radicality of Japanese street wear. But frankly, an injection of new talent and cultural inspiration might be exactly what the industry needs to kick it into the next century. Who’s to say there isn’t enough room on the global runway for everyone?


FASHION & LITERATURE THE INTERSECTION OF IMAGE AND THE WRITTEN WORD. Written by CHRISTINE MASTRANGELO

There is no doubt that our favorite and most enduring literary heroes and heroines possess the element of flair to reach some greater goal, whether it is purported by speaking one’s mind, taking action at the moment or grappling with some intimidating, incendiary force. Flair is often brought forth through a character’s clothing or extension of clothing—the accessory; his black cape swirls in the wind on a dark night, or she enters the courtroom with her head held high in a blood red dress. A character’s greatest moments are often marked by what she is wearing. Here, the author becomes akin to the stylist—choosing what the protagonist will wear in a scene of great importance. Dress, or more aptly, fashion, heightens a work of literature and creates characters we will remember. If the character is in luck, he or she will be brought further to life through film-making, which is often how we immortalize literary characters. Charles Perrault’s Cinderella becomes Disney’s girl with a bun and a crystal blue gown; Margaret Mitchell’s Scarlett O’Hara is Vivien Leigh, with perfectly arched brows and a velvet green dress swathing her body like the curtains it is made from. Fashion in literature fascinates because the following questions are constantly played with: how does the character view herself, how does the character want to be viewed, how is the character viewed by other characters and how is the character viewed by the reader? This image-conscious scenario opens the imagination, creating the complexity and layers that great literary works contain. An enjoyable part of the reading process is when readers create images in their minds of favorite characters and essentially dress them with their imagination. One fashion blogger does this wonderfully for us. John Jannuzzi of TEXTBOOK (http://textbook.tumblr.com/) imagines what beloved characters wear during important moments in their literary history. The heroes and heroines are completely modernized—he takes images from Style.com and juxtaposes them together in Photoshop; his Juliet Capulet wears Luella, Erin Fetherston and Chanel, for example. TEXTBOOK is a visual delight for literary fans, and testament to our fascination with fashion and literature. I’ve often been struck by the powerful images authors create with their characters’ clothing. Here’s my list of favorite moments, when fashion intersects with literature: SAPPHO The women of Sappho’s poetry—their hair, skirts and figures—form lovely, dreamy imagery. A stylist could create a whole editorial on the images the author conjures. Only fragments of her poetry survive, and the details she writes of the Grecian women of 6th century BC are like pieces of treasure for poetry lovers. I’ll let the following fragment speak for itself: Don’t ask me what to wear / I have no embroidered / headband from Sardis to / give you, Cleis, such as / I wore / and my mother / always said that in her / day a purple ribbon / looped in the hair was thought / to be high style indeed / but we were dark: / a girl / whose hair is yellower than / torchlight should wear no / headdress but fresh flowers

THE WIFE OF BATH IN THE CANTERBURY TALES BY GEOFFREY CHAUCER Was not reading the “Wife of Bath” the most fun you had in English Literature 101? She is a woman who marries five times, like a 14th century Elizabeth Taylor, and is just as glamorous. Indeed, marriage to five husbands allowed for a sexual freedom born out of her duties as a wife. The Wife of Bath duly states that she “nil envy no virginitee” (meaning, she will not envy any virgin) and that her husband “shal it han both eve and morwe” (she’ll have sex with her husband any time of the day). Chaucer dresses her in scarlet red hosen, a textured headdress and new, supple shoes—who wouldn’t want to marry her? LUCY WESTENRA IN DRACULA BY BRAM STOKER “Is this really Lucy’s body, or only a demon in her shape?” Poor Lucy’s most memorable adornment becomes the pinpricked marks on her neck that oddly never close or heal. She wears sweet, white lawn frocks, and her hair spreads against her pillow in sunny ripples—until she becomes un-dead and clothed in “cerements of the grave.” Her hair has darkened and blood drips from her lips, staining her “death robe.” Alas, a stake must be driven into Lucy’s heart. ANNE SHIRLEY OF ANNE OF THE ISLAND BY L.M. MONTGOMERY Anne Shirley and Gilbert Blythe are Canada’s Elizabeth Bennett and Mr. Darcy. Gilbert loves Anne, but she refuses his proposal flat out and dates Roy, the very handsome, very rich man on campus. Anne is a farm girl and studies to be a school mistress—she says she’s poor more than once, but she sews her own clothes and is able to afford pretty material. Little does she know, what she wears tortures Gilbert: “Gilbert was looking at Anne, as she walked along. In her white dress, with her slender delicacy, she made him think of a white iris.”

HOLLY GOLIGHTLY IN BREAKFAST AT TIFFANY’S BY TRUMAN CAPOTE Think Audrey Hepburn and the film’s team of costume designers were responsible for the little black dress? Truman Capote wrote Holly wearing “a slim black dress, black sandals, a pearl choker.” She finishes her look with “a pair of dark glasses” and wears “lizard shoes.” Capote immediately created an icon. We are only lucky enough that Hepburn was able to step into his heroine’s shoes with such grace. Who are your literary fashion icons? Talk to us, at the all-new www.papercutmag.com!

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ECCENTRIC SUMMER Photography by MIKE NGUYEN Hair/makeup by BARBARA YNIGUEZ (CURRENT STUDIOS LA) using I.C.O.N. Styling and manicures by KRISTEN M. STUART Styling assistant NADINE PEREZ Model MALENE SØNDERGAARD JENSEN

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THIS PAGE AND PREVIOUS Bikini by TAVIK; necklace and ring by CHARLES ALBERT; sunglasses by MERCURA

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THIS PAGE Bathing suit by TAVIK; bow tie by HOUSE OF PAPILLON OPPOSITE Bikini by LAUREN ELAINE; bow tie by HOUSE OF PAPILLON; ring by CHARLES ALBERT; sunglasses by MERCURA

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Bathing suit from MYHOTSHOES.COM; necklace by and ring from CHARLES ALBERT; sunglasses from MERCURA

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OPPOSITE Tankini by LAUREN ELIANE; bow tie by HOUSE OF PAPILLON; necklace and ring by CHARLES ALBERT; sunglasses by MERCURA THIS PAGE AND NEXT Bathing suit by TAVIK; necklace and cuff BY CHARLES ALBERT

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THIS MONTH WE BRING YOU THREE INSANELY TALENTED STYLISTS WHO HAVE WORKED WITH EVERYONE (AND EVERYTHING) FROM VOGUE TO GOOGLE TO CELEBRITIES. HOW DO SUCH INDIVIDUALS GET THESE GREAT GIGS? FROM WHAT WE’VE LEARNED IT TAKES A LOT OF HARD WORK, ORGANIZATION AND MANY TRIPS TO STARBUCKS. READ ON FOR THEIR INSPIRING STORIES.

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STEFANI ANIA 39


HANNIBAL MATHEWS

BALANCING ACT

TOYE ADEDIPE HAS HIS HANDS FULL WITH ENVIABLE EDITORIAL AND CELEBRITY PROJECTS. Interview by NICOLE BECHARD

STEFANI ANIA

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Let’s start with the basics: name and where you’re from? Hi! I’m Toye Adedipe. I’m originally from San Jose, California, and now reside [back and forth] between coasts.

to the design of the magazine cover, style “her” and direct the behind-the-scenes video clip of the shoot. I even picked the theme song! It was a true honor, but this is only a glimpse of what’s to come.

Education credentials? I went to school at Florida A&M University and graduated top of my class with a Bachelors in Fine Art and a Minor in Graphic Art/Design. But all that means nothing, now that I’m a rock star (just kidding people—I love my Alma Mater!). 

As you are trained in both fields, do you see styling as more of a form of art or design (or both)? For me, it’s both. I can’t have great styling if I don’t look at my finished projects as “great” works of art, and I can’t create works of art if I don’t design great styling.  At the end of the day, I’m a freelance stylist that stays humble and hungry for my next gig. I feel if I don’t look at my craft as absolute expression, then I have failed my mission. So whether I’m styling a client or directing a spread, in order for me to be successful, I have to look at my talent as a means to produce my highest potential, and luckily it’s garnered a great response. 

You have quite the client base! Who are you currently collaborating with? This is true. I’ve had the pleasure of styling everyone [and everything] from Jennifer Hudson to Ocean Drive Magazine.  At this point, I’m balancing my craft between editorial and celebrity projects. I have a couple of fashion spreads due to hit the stands; my latest project was serving as a creative director for a spread featuring Laurieann Gibson. She’s the powerhouse choreographer behind Nicki Minaj, Lady Gaga and Keri Hilson to name a few, and currently has a reality show in the works on E!. [Working on] the spread was awesome. I got to select the team, contribute

We’ve heard one of your trade “secrets” is utilizing the field of art history in your work. Are there any particular periods or movements you’re especially drawn to? Yes! I’m totally into Art History as a reference point, to be inspired from the past.


I love the Rococo period of the 18th century, and get excited to see modernism that dates back to the 1860s, but what really gets me geeked is collage. Romare Bearden is my favorite collage artist of that time period, and when you look at my body of work, what I would like people to see is my eye for detail, contrast and proportion. I’m a huge fan of layering, and that truly speaks to the other artists that have come before and inspire me.

authenticity that can’t be duplicated. When I focus on my true self and the talent that I was created to do, I find myself becoming more successful, and gaining a deeper understanding of how far my craft was intended to go. I think my clients see that. Don’t get me wrong, they may all have different reasons why they’re drawn to me. But the principal is all the same—I dig deep to produce great work.

Aside from styling, do you have any other hobbies (or maybe even hidden talents)? Believe it or not, several years ago I took up boxing as a way to relieve stress, and actually got pretty good at it. Aside from that, when I’m in California I hike to clear my mind, or horseback riding when I’m in Georgia. Anything active and challenging is a good way to engage my spirit.

How about a styling tip for our dear readers? Accentuate, don’t exaggerate, your best features! And take some time to figure out what does, and most importantly does not work for your body type.

What do you feel you bring differently to your styling that maybe others don’t? To be straight up with you, I try not to compare myself because the only thing I know how to do is “create.” It’s my

What can we expect to see from you in the future? Do you have any big events coming up? Definitely! Right now I’m becoming more focused on branding, now that I have a diverse body of work to market. I’ve been so awesomely blessed to even have the chance to work; it makes me want to show the industry—and more importantly, myself—that I’m just scratching the tip of the surface. [Branding is] an

essential tool that everyone should and can use to make a name for themselves and establish their consumer base. Part of that is giving back to my community as well. I get a lot of requests to explain how I became a fashion stylist, and I know a lot of aspiring stylists want to jump in the market but don’t know how. So, in the future I may host a class or create a “true” internship program with the possibility of assignment. The future is so bright it burns! Links and other self-promotion? Catch me if you can: I’m on Twitter at @toyeadedipe; catch my lookbook of some of the hautest shoes on tumblr: www.toyeadedipe.tumblr.com; and if all that’s not enough you can Facebook me: http://www.facebook.com/ToyeAdedipe.

DEREK BLANKS

ALEX MARTINEZ

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VISUAL REALITY

REQUEST, PULL, PICK-UP, REPEAT. STYLIST ASHLEY PRUITT HAS GOT IT DOWN. Interview by JAMALL OLUOKUN

Education credentials? The school of life.

You have styled for Spanish Vogue, what was that like? Yes, one of my old bosses was a contributing editor for the publication. It was the first large-scale client I worked with. At that stage I was learning and growing; really getting to know the process. I have some crazy memories from those days.

So, for some of the rookies out there: according to you, what exactly is a stylist? A stylist interprets trends and concepts into a visual reality. For example, on a shoot I get the merchandise together, I get hair and makeup going, and then I work alongside the photographer and model to create the perfect image.

What does a typical day now look like for you? It all depends on if I’m prepping for a job or shooting. The morning always consists of replying to all the emails on my Blackberry, drinking tons of iced green tea from Starbucks and then running around like crazy! Requests, pulls, pick ups, shoot, returns and then all over again!

How did you first get involved with styling? I mean, it’s not like there is some sort of school for this, right? Well, I grew up in this insanity of an industry, but on the business side of it (my family runs a retail consulting firm). I always knew I was going to be in this industry—it was in my blood. I started out in buying when I was in high school and worked with my first mentor, Carol Hoffman, who owns a prestigious buying office here in New York. I became insanely addicted to the business, so I graduated a year early and started working with her company full time, which then lead me into different avenues; I decided to play the field a bit. I stopped working with Carol and landed internships with Barneys, Dolce & Gabbana and then W magazine, which is what led into assisting different freelance stylists in New York and Paris.

How do you come up with outfits, looks, concepts, etc. for your clients? It all depends on who the client is. For example, if I am doing an editorial I start looking for signs of inspiration and put together concept boards and then start organizing my requested looks from the runway shows. Overall, it’s about efficiency for me.

The basics: name, age and where you’re from? Ashley Pruitt, 22. I am from Boston, MA and live between New York City and Los Angeles now.

Most people think of Rachel Zoe when they think of stylists, and that the job is just dressing people and going to fashion shows all day. What’s one thing people probably don’t know about being a stylist? That there is a tremendous amount of prep and organization that goes into a job. Also: plastic shoe bags, pins and Delancy Car Service are your best friends. Let’s just say [the industry is] not for the faint-hearted.

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Do you focus primarily on creative photo shoots, ad campaigns, personal styling, or a combination of all of them? A combination. It also depends on where in the season I am. There are certain time frames for shooting for each client category. I also work very closely alongside a designer as her consultant; this has become an important part of my repertoire. When did you decide it was time to branch out on your own as a stylist? A year and a half ago I decided it was time. I always wanted to run my own shift. I felt it was the right time to make that leap and take the risks; I like to roll the dice. What are some of the advantages/ disadvantages of being an independent stylist? An advantage for me is that I get to work with all different clients across the board. When you work in-house for a magazine it’s harder to do so. Also, I am my own boss. The disadvantages would be that

it’s all on me and I have nothing to lean back on. But once again, it’s the risk and knowing that the future is always up in the air; my schedule is not nine-to-five; it changes every second of every day. Recall one of your most memorable jobs or experiences. I have a lot of great memories! Working with one of my old bosses on the MTV Video Music Awards, [for example]. The artist we were styling was up for awards and also performed, so it was a tremendous amount of work but the experience and energy the day of the show was so special and exciting. Also [memorable] are when I was living in Paris and working on the couture shows, doing my first celebrity shoots in Los Angeles and doing creative shooting with my


good friend Alex Valerio, where we have no rules or limits; we can just be free. And some crazy experiences you’d like to forget...?! The list of horror stories I have I am fortunately able to laugh at now. I have never liked going from airport to airport, sitting in Customs waiting for a piece of clothing to arrive and then it not even be the right look requested—or never come at all. Or waiting for DHL, praying that the look will show up in time to shoot it. I can’t stand the waiting, period! Any advice for a wanna-be stylist? Walk around Manhattan and get to know every garment and press building (for example: 530 7th Ave. or 450 W.

15th/[Milk Studios]), because you will be visiting them a lot, believe me. Also, make sure you own a pair of Converse sneakers to run around in, and that you love the hustle. What does the future hold? A lot of new ventures: my store that I plan to open in August 2012, creating my own private label and growing and building while maintaining bliss. Links and other self-promotion? Ashley@blksretail.com and I have just started Twitter @Ashley_Pruitt.

PHOTOS BY ALEX VALERIO

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STAR STYLIST

ALVIN STILLWELL: THE STYLIST BEHIND OUR GORGEOUS COVER (AND SO MUCH MORE). Interview by NICOLE BECHARD

SOPHIE PANGRAZZI

ALVIN NGUYEN

The basics: name, age and where you’re from? Alvin Stillwell. I am permanently in the age of now. I was born in the Philippine Islands and have lived in many places globally. Education credentials? A lifetime of digesting fashion magazines, and lots of sewing and design classes. You are quite the multi-tasker, with experience in both fashion and prop styling for editorial and advertising! Do you have a favorite or is each its own adventure? I enjoy doing both wardrobe and prop styling, each offering different challenges and rewards. 44

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Do you have a specific methodology or approach when it comes to your work as a stylist? When I am hired to style an advertising campaign or an editorial, I usually come up with a narrative. A clothing story that speaks to the product we are trying to sell or a concept that the editorial is based upon. I am always on the hunt for upcoming trends in fashion, interiors, music and pop culture, and I find that the world of design is interrelated. On average, how many jobs do you complete in a week? On average, I style one or two shoots a week. I don’t take it for granted that I am busy. I am represented by Celestine Agency and they have been

CHRISTINE HAHN

great with me. I also make it a point to always test with new photographers, because the things we are getting paid to do are sometimes not what we want in my portfolio. Plus, it’s just fun to creatively flex when we don’t have a client other than ourselves to please. What is the best gig you’ve ever done? Any favorites? My favorite jobs are when the creative/ art director, photographer and I are all on the same wavelength. When we have a well-seasoned producer on set, our talent is bringing it, my assistants are being smart and organized and [we have] a good craft service table! We had a great time styling our subject Jaimie Alexander for the current issue of Papercut Magazine!


Do you have any other hidden (or maybe not so hidden) talents or hobbies outside styling? I have a strong streak of wanderlust, so I travel as often as I can when I am not working. Any styling tip for our readers? Fit is paramount. You can make something inexpensive look great by choosing the right fit for your body type. And, also, choosing quality over quantity. We are all guilty of having too much stuff in our lives, and I think when we own things we truly love, we have less distractions in our wardrobe choices. What can we expect to see from you in the upcoming year? This year so far, I have editorial stories coming out from Vanity Fair, Wired,

Glamour and—of course—Papercut. I am also styling ad campaigns for Nintendo, Amazon, Eddie Bauer, Microsoft, Google and AT&T. Links and other self-promotion? I have started a Facebook fan page, and it’s updated frequently with current shoots I am working on: www.facebook.com/alvinstillwellstylist My website: www.alvinstillwell.com My agency portfolio: www.celestineagency.com/#p=artist/ stylists/alvin_stillwell

KATHRYNA HANCOCK

SOPHIE PANGRAZZI

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Trousers by GIVENCHY GAP; jacket by MR LIPOP; human hair necklace by TWO WEEKS

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dream

Photography by GEORGIE WILEMAN Retouching by ANA PAULA GRIMALDI & GEORGIE WILEMAN Hair by KENNY LEUNG Makeup by CRYSTABEL RILEY using SMASHBOX Styling by MARA PALENA Styling assistant SAMUELE MARFIA Model ALEX HAMMOND (SELECT)

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OPPOSITE Sweater by AP; trousers by MR LIPOP; head piece by CULIETTA THIS PAGE Jacket and shorts by THE ONLY SON; Head piece by LARA JENSEN

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE Jacket and trousers by THE ONLY SON; backpack by MR LIPOP

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OPPOSITE Jumpsuit by THE ONLY SON; Hood by AP THIS PAGE Printed cap and gloves by AGI & SAM; trousers by THE ONLY SON

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Sweater by AP; trousers by MR LIPOP; head piece by CULIETTA

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OPPOSITE Headpiece by LARA JENSEN; trousers by THE ONLY SON; belt by MR LIPOP THIS PAGE Dress by AP;

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Jewelled head band by JAMES HOCK; t-shirt by AP

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PARTY LIKE IT’S 19...88?

KIDS OF 88 IS THIS MONTH’S FEATURED MUSICAL ACT AND ARE NOT ONLY ORIGINAL BUT THEY HAVE SOME SERIOUS STYLE. Foreword and interview by arTisTech

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Kids of 88’s Jordan Arts and Sam McCarthy, photographed by Kyle Reinford (right); album artwork for their latest release Just a Little Bit (below).

As with all creative industries, it’s very hard to be original in music nowadays. No matter how cool you might think your sound is, or what new chord progressions you’re laying down, you can bet that someone, somewhere, has done something kind of like what you’re doing now. Lucky for our ears, this fact hasn’t discouraged all from the pursuit of originality. Which leads me to this month’s featured musical act, Kids of 88, a group with some serious style. Take their name for example, Kids of 88. It’s rather simple really. It represents the year when the duo’s two members, Jordan Arts and Sam McCarthy were born; a year that saw Robin Givens filing for divorce from Mike Tyson, the start of the Human Genome Project, CD’s outselling vinyl for the first time and Prozac being introduced as an antidepressant pill for all the people who were no doubt dealing with the fallout from Mike Tyson’s divorce. Oh the Agony! Then there’s the accent. Hailing from Auckland, New Zealand, Jordan and Sam get immediate cool points for being from outside the U.S. (chalk it up to the same reason we love U2, Coldplay and The Beatles). On a more serious (musical) note, the real style of Kids of 88 can be seen in their live shows and their music. The duo’s edgy electro-rhythms shine through their hit single, Just A Little Bit. And, while the band will be the first to tell you that their music plays nicely with today’s pop sentiments, they go to great lengths to experiment and infuse their music with new sounds, textures and genre references. An example of this can be heard in SQRL. The song begins with slow radiant vocals, a four-on-thefloor digital kickdrum, and synthy, belllike piano chords. As the song progresses,

a spacey arpeggio is introduced, guitar strums, a “zooming lazer” effect and your standard clap sound (in place of snare). It has a very organic feel and you can tell it was well thought out and deliberate. More importantly, it sets your ears up nicely for the finale, which oozes electro-progressiveness and introduces new, varying, yet sonically pleasing, layers.

mid-acid trip once. They were an absolute delight to dance with. It was magical.

So, are you intrigued yet?

How do you feel about sites like YouTube, Twitter and Facebook? YouTube makes for a great end to a loose afternoon. Facebook is great for keeping in touch with the beloveds whilst abroad. I can’t say I’m an avid tweeter, however—I don’t usually have anything interesting for breakfast.

Answers From Sam McCarthy In three words or less, define your musical style? Acid. Dance. Pop. What music (aside from your own) are you currently listening to? Theophilus London, Pink Floyd, Teengirl Fantasy, Marvin Gaye. What is the music scene like in New Zealand? I can’t say there is a scene exactly, but it’s quite an individual sport down here, nutcases in home set-ups as opposed to bands on the road. What was it like opening for Ke$ha and Passion Pit? Quite contrasting audiences for one, but both [were] a privilege to perform for. How do you prepare for a live show? We all have our various warm-ups. I rely heavily on a smoky voice at the end of the headphones to talk me through some scales. No bottle of 1800 [tequila] just yet.

What do you like most about the ‘80s? What do you hate? I like the analog production and perfectly reverberous drum sounds. I hate how there wasn’t as much porn made then as there is now.

You currently tour with a guitarist and drummer. Any chance the duo might expand into a quartet? Jordan and I still continue to man the creative helm. The live aspect is such a different experience, we always feel like a foursome up there. Any upcoming shows? Links where people can check out the tunes? Forever upcoming, we’ll be back on the West Coast early May. People can find us on iTunes, Myspace, Spotify…and let’s be honest, probably most of the file-sharing sites (oops, now there’s a moral dilemma).

What’s the craziest thing that’s ever happened to you during a live set? We had someone clamber up on stage 61


MY GENERATION

HOW YOUNG PEOPLE INVADED FASHION (AND WHAT THEY COULD DO WITH IT IF WE LET THEM). Written by SAMANTHA TYLER

“I’m not trying to cause a big sensation, I’m just talking about my generation.” Those were the words used by English rock band The Who 46 years ago; nowadays, the right lyrics might be, “I’m trying to talk about my generation, ‘cause it is a big sensation...” Youth. These days, the term seems to be a real mantra in the industry. Fresh blood is becoming an obsession, and not just because vampires are trendy. But wait a minute—all the biggest actors of the present fashion world have been young at some point too, so why are we pushing the emphasis on a handful of beginners now? First, because our society is ageing, and so is the industry. At the head of the main houses of couture, labels, brands, groups and magazines, some figures seem to be ever-present and omnipotent (to such an extent that it can be irritating)—but their reigns can’t last forever. Second, because the newcomers storming in to take their place at the throne are not just a handful in number. Quite to the contrary, they are a genuine crowd and

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a myriad of talents of unique ideas and possibilities. As if it were raining genius. How can we explain this trend? ROOTS OF THE PHENOMENON It is a combination of different circumstances that have favoured this young, new guard. Modernity and the dedication of some enlightened spirits have allowed a fruitful harvest, stimulated by the growth of the Internet, and the unexpected aftermath of the financial crisis. But the most important reason has been brought by people themselves: the idea of a change came from the United States—after the election of Barack Obama—and took the world by storm. The young generation wants to take its destiny in hand and to shake this world. “There has been indeed a sudden interest for the young designers lately,” Agrees Yiqing Yin, who at 26 years old, is one of those watched designers. Based in Paris, Yin has a very sculptural approach to garments. Already in her career, she has been awarded by the French capital, has quickly launched


her own couture house and is now working with many great names, such as Swarovski, and on her own perfume. She says, “I am aware that, at a time where institutional brands often become very safe, creatively ‘wise’, the fashion scene is fishing for fresh blood and for new proposals.” Across the Atlantic, the acknowledgement is the same. Saroya Norris is a proud New Yorker, blogger and owner of an online jewelry store, Rich&Rebellious: “The industry can’t only repeat itself, it has to evolve. If I can, I want to contribute to what’s next!” While their elders are more cautious with the market’s evolution and the whim of its clients, the young generation is taking advantage of its effrontery and candor: “It is definitely the age of entrepreneurial skills and self promotion,” Saroya maintains, “At a time when the job market was scarce, it seemed to be the best to make my own way. The timing was just right. There’s always a question on how your company will be perceived and if it will do well, but mine is built on the concept of fearlessness.” HARD TIMES AND SUCCESS Despite Saroya’s positive attitude, having the best intention is certainly not an “open-sesame” in a sector renowned for its harshness—and even cruelty— and all those fashion offshoots are not received on an equal footing. The

brothers Elicha for example, have easily launched their preppy rock label, The Kooples, in Europe; easily because their parents are the creators of the successful French brand, Le Comptoir des Cotonniers. When you are not “son of” or “daughter of,” it is another song. But it forces youngsters to push the limits. Sara Battaglia started creating bags at 16, and, at 25, she decided to create her own label in Milan, Italy: “In the beginning, it is difficult because people think

MODERNITY AND DEDICATION OF SOME ENLIGHTENED SPIRITS HAVE ALLOWED A FRUITFUL HARVEST, STIMULATED BY THE GROWTH OF THE INTERNET, AND THE UNEXPECTED AFTERMATH OF THE FINANCIAL CRISIS...THE YOUNG GENERATION WANTS TO TAKE ITS DESTINY IN HAND AND TO SHAKE THIS WORLD. famous brands are safer, they want to recognize a logo.” Indeed, young designers have to work harder to prove that their shoulders are strong enough to carry the pressure and to prove their reliability, rewarded only by their steadfastness and passion for their art. Now, Sara’s creations are often featured in popular magazines across Europe and United States, and have been seen on

the arm of celebrities. Others have more than one trick in their bag. The name of Nicola Formichetti was unknown to the public until it was placed next to a certain Lady Gaga. The pair decided to collaborate, and he became her official stylist and éminence grise. The rest is well known. If Gaga is one of the undeniable figures of fashion, she is also a genuine master key for Formichetti, who has since been appointed new creative director of Parisian fashion house Thierry Mugler and of Uniqlo, along with many other honors. A clever way to avoid years of internships and of hard labour, but we don’t always have an eccentric singer at hand. Difficulty goes up a notch when uprooting comes into play, as is the case of the majority of young workers in today’s world. The usual clash between small towns and big cities has been accentuated by the restriction of success in major locales. Victoria Rangayah is the head of rising label Z Mode, introduced at London Fashion Week in September of 2010. The Lithuanian-born young woman won her spurs in Johannesburg, South Africa before settling in England: “It took me some time to adjust to the UK fashion industry. It wasn’t an easy start for me as I had to build contacts and establish working relationships from scratch.” Material constraints are not the only fate of young owner/managers. David Benoliel, a 35-year-old Parisian settled in Miami, met another type

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: Portrait of designer Yiqing Yin, photographed by Laurence Laborie; a look from Yin’s F/W 11/12 collection; the Regiona Teodolinda bag from Sara Battaglia’s F/W 11/12 collection; a piece from the Rich&Rebellious jewelry collection; portrait of Rich&Rebellious designer Saroya Norris. OPPOSITE: portrait of designer Sara Battaglia.

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of obstacle while working as a fashion photographer: “I had trouble imposing my style in Miami. There, photographers prefer the ‘beach and smiley’ pictures; mine were edgier and more modern. I had to work harder, and it took a little while for the other professionals to adapt their vision to my style. But now, I am working with the main agencies.” RECONSIDERING FASHION GEOGRAPHY At present, three capitals are claiming the title of Queen of the fashion world: New York, London and Paris. The United States is still considered a long-time favorite due to the seriousness granted to the fashion industry, and of course— its profits. One can’t help but notice the spotlight elsewhere of late, though. The States have given birth to some of the most interesting designers of the moment: Alexander Wang, Opening Ceremony and Rodarte have been quickly sent to the pantheon, but the avalanche of names stops here. Maybe it is due to “crisis of the creativity” noticed by Newsweek, or perhaps the giant was resting on its laurels for too long. It is quite striking that the new darling of New York is designer Joseph Altuzarra, who is, in fact, French. Last year, the British Fashion Council revealed that fashion was worth £21 billion to the British economy, and that the fashion industry was the largest employer of all the country’s creative industries with 816,000 employers. Each year the city of London disburses enormous sums to promote its designers, especially those just emerging on the scene. And it’s here that is located Central Saint Martins, the most renowned school of fashion in the world. Saint Martins attracts all talents and scatters its graduates around the world, in every house of couture. Students come from very far to have the privilege to be associated with Saint Martins, and many of the trendy designers of the British capital are foreigners: David Koma from Georgia, Mary Katrantzou from Greece and Michael Van Der Ham from Holland. Even Canadians Mark Fast and Erdem Moralioglu, neighbors of the United States, chose to migrate to London. Paris has lost a bit of its magnificence, but its engine is still humming pleasantly. It continues to be a great training center for foreign talent, due to its halo of prestige: “At the beginning, I [had] been advised to move to New York by some people, telling me that it is a more youth-friendly environment to FROM TOP: Z Mode dress, photographed by Natalie J. Watts; a photo by David Benoliel; a piece by painter Saul Zanolari.

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start a career.” recalls Yiqing Yin. “But I love my city and I think Paris is still the best window of the world when it comes to sophisticated products. But it doesn’t mean that I sell here. At the moment, I am also working on long distance projects with people in New York and Asia.” Other global capitals are claiming their piece of cake with the launch of their own Fashion Weeks, and influent fashion editors have started to do the rounds of Stockholm, Madrid, Amsterdam and Beijing. Asia in particular has been a focus these days, and many great brands are going after the Chinese public with special shows, exclusive collections and tributes. Notes Swiss contemporary painter Saul Zanolari, based in Shanghai: “I think that China and emerging countries are the best for the young generation now.” Where to start the climb to creative success sounds like a complex dilemma. But for Sara Battaglia, it is not: “I live between New York, Paris and Milan. The two first are very important in terms of success and creativity, but Milan is where I am happy.” Perhaps this is the trick of the youth: they let the world come to them... To be continued in Papercut’s July issue! SAMANTHA TYLER is a freelance writer and curates her blog The Column at http://samsensibility.blogspot.com whose goal is to decipher contemporary fashion everyday.


NUCLEAR FUTURE NUCLEAR POWER: FRIEND OR FOE? Written by STEVEN READ

“Now, I am become Death, the destroyer of worlds.” These were the words of J. Robert Oppenheimer, scientific director of the Manhattan Project, upon realizing the destructive power of the atomic bomb. The Manhattan Project’s work went on to end World War II in a spectacular fashion, through destruction of the Japanese cities of Nagasaki and Hiroshima. Atomic weapons have been a frightening specter ever since then, with the nuclear arms race between the United States and the Soviet Union during the Cold War bringing the world close to the brink of destruction. The risks of nuclear energy should not be discounted. However, since the days of the Cold War, scientists have done much to tame the enormous raw, destructive power derived from splitting the atom. Nuclear physics has proven its ability to transform a force that many see as uniformly dangerous into applications ranging from power to medicine that are immensely beneficial to humankind. The most obvious and relevant example of this is the production of energy. Public perception of nuclear power is extremely negative—in much part due to incidents like Three Mile Island, Chernobyl, and the current situation with the Fukushima plant in Japan. It is worth mentioning, though, that as of January 19th, 2011, according to the European Nuclear Society, there are currently 442 operational nuclear power plants in the world, accounting for about sixteen percent of the globe’s power output. The vast majority of nuclear power generation has been clean, effective and safe, and this alternative energy source has proven large-scale reliability and efficiency in comparison to fledgling technologies like solar cells, wind farms and hydropower. Obviously, nuclear power isn’t a panacea that can solve all the world’s problems, but it can help mitigate many. The risks of nuclear disaster seem all the more terrifying due to the invisible nature of radiation—people fear what they can’t see more than anything. There will need to be a significant element of oversight and regulation if nuclear power generation is to continue to expand. Chernobyl and Three Mile Island showed the importance of needing vigilant safety systems and training. In Japan, 51 of 52 plants survived a once-in-a-century earthquake and tsunami and, through knowledge and training, scientists and engineers are doing their best to contain and control the Fukushima incident. Unfortunately, media overreaction to the Fukushima incident poses a significant threat to our energy future. The recent catastrophic oil spill in the Gulf of Mexico certainly hasn’t had any lasting impact to oil companies expanding and drilling, and although recently declassified reports show that more than 26,000 people died in China due to a hydroelectric dam’s failure, there hasn’t been a media outcry for the end of hydroelectric power. Either newspapers and other media organizations are tremendously incompetent, or they are gleefully engaging in fear-mongering to sell papers and capture viewers. Most nuclear nations are democracies, and it is difficult to develop political will to introduce nuclear energy as a prominent energy policy when most of the public is ill-informed of the benefits and actual risks. The lure of turning atomic power into a bogeyman is too strong for the media.

At the time of this writing, Germany—a landlocked nation located in one of the most tectonically stable regions of the earth—moved to dramatically curtail its nuclear power generation in reaction to the Japan disaster. The monetary value of energy lost is estimated to be between 1 and 2.3 billion Euros. That amount of energy will have to now come from an increased dependence on fossil fuels. If more nations choose to follow Germany’s path it will increase the pain and costs we face with coal, oil and natural gas dwindling in supply. Nuclear power plants cannot be easily started on a whim, and delaying the building of more modern facilities risks worsening the energy gap between dependence on fossil fuels and relying on alternative sources. Nuclear power buys us time to develop even cleaner and more efficient power sources. Society as a whole needs to overcome its fears of nuclear power—even if they are rational. It is naive to expect a generation that has grown up under the specter of nuclear war and the catastrophe of Chernobyl to embrace nuclear power without reservations. To do this there needs to be trust in nuclear power, which means that the nuclear industry should make greater efforts to educate and increase awareness in people. Japan has shown us that it takes two natural disasters of the largest scale to impact just one plant out of fifty-two—it seems laughable to call this a success for nuclear power, but in some ways it is. Unfortunately, media perception has done much to skew public perception in another direction. Of course raising awareness is an uphill struggle when nuclear power’s most visible ambassador for the past two decades has been Homer Simpson.

IMAGE COURTESY OF U.S. GOVERNMENT

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SOME THING WICKED THIS WAY COMES Photography and retouching by LARA JADE Hair by ALEXANDER TOME Makeup by DEBORAH ALTIZIO Styling by LAUREN ARMES Model YULIANA (IMG)

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Dress by H FREDRIKSSON; paper hat is stylist’s own

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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE Dress by GESTUZ; stockings by FALKE; paper hat is stylist’s own

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THIS PAGE Skirt by WACKERHAUS; bodysuit by RICKYS; veil by JOHNNY LOVES ROSIE GOLD; choker is vintage OPPOSITE Dress by WACKERHAUS; ribbon by VV ROULEAUX; yarn (worn 71 around head) by PURL SOHO


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THIS PAGE AND OPPOSITE Dress by H FREDRIKSSON; paper hat is stylist’s own

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THIS PAGE Headband (worn round neck) is stylists own OPPOSITE Dress by COS; headband by JENNIFER OUELLETTE; veil is vintage

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BEAUTIFUL, CHARMING AND SHE KNOWS HOW TO HANDLE A SWORD (WATCH OUT, BOYS). VISIT THE ALL-NEW PAPERCUTMAG.COM FOR A FULL INTERVIEW AND BEHIND-THE-SCENES COVERAGE. Photography by ALVIN NGUYEN Hair by CHRISTI CAGLE for RENE FURTERER Makeup by ERIN SKIPLEY for NARS Styling by ALVIN STILLWELL for CELESTINE AGENCY Styling assistant KELLY KERSEY Model ACTRESS JAIMIE ALEXANDER Special thanks to PINNACLE PR & MELROSE LIGHTSPACE All clothing provided by Neiman Marcus except for Koch, Meghan and Pendleton 76

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Top by MEGHAN; Touche du Boise necklace by N.OOR

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THIS PAGE Leather jacket by Rebecca Taylor; blouse by Theory; skirt by DVF; ring by TACORI; rose gold and diamond headband by N.OOR PREVIOUS Maxi dress and leather jacket by Phillip Lim; chain vest by FLEET; diamond pave and ebony bracelets and ring by N.OOR

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THIS PAGE Blouse by Phillip Lim; leather skirt by Alice + Olivia; gold bracelets by TACORI OPPOSITE Feather vest and shorts by Alice + Olivia; peasant blouse by Rebecca Taylor; shoes by Report Signature; ring by TACORI; silk 80 flower by BAN.DO MAY 2011 www.papercutmag.com


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THIS PAGE AND NEXT: Dress and muffler by PENDLETON PORTLAND COLLECTION

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Linen dress and vest by KOCH; belt by Neiman Marcus; ebony and diamond bracelets by N.OOR

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THIS PAGE Blouse by Phillip Lim; leather skirt by Alice + Olivia; trench coat by PENDLETON PORTLAND COLLECTION; ring by KIMBERLY BAKER OPPOSITE Dress and muffler by PENDLETON PORTLAND COLLECTION; ebony and 86 diamond bracelets by N.OOR MAY 2011 www.papercutmag.com


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THE REMARKABLE EZRA SANTOS COUTURE NEVER LOOKED SO GOOD.

Foreword and interview by NICOLE BECHARD

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My jaw dropped, the first time I saw the work of Ezra Santos hit the catwalk. Our Fashion Editor and I were in attendance at his Couture Fashion Week show last fall, and it was like a scene from a movie. Seated in the front row, you could feel the electricity in the air. Ezra doesn’t just put on a runway show; he creates a seductive fantasy world that commands your attention and leaves you breathless. But what better way than to hear it from the designer himself? Read on as Ezra talks inspiration, artistry and immortality. You have said that you knew you wanted to be a fashion designer since the age of seven. What influenced you to arrive at that conclusion at such a young age? My life in fashion started at a very young age. I was fond of watching the black and white movies. The couture dresses of the 90

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‘40s and ‘50s always fascinated me, and from then my love for fashion started. Who/what were some of your biggest influences growing up that really shaped you as a designer? My parents—especially my mom—who just gave me the freedom to be who I am. I always watched [my mom] dress up, and I guess the movies, television and magazines influenced me as well. We first encountered your “Afrique de OR” collection last September at Couture Fashion Week in 2010; what an amazing show it was! And this was also your U.S. debut. What was that like for you? It was a wonderful experience. It was overwhelming, and the most important part was [that people] found my fashion unique and something different. I am so grateful that I got a lot


as it caresses and shapes fabrics and cuts, and it gives them a breath of fresh modernity. How about your future collections? Can you divulge any details? Yes, I’m [in the] planning stage of my new collection. It will be more unique and different this time, and I am aiming to [tackle] the U.S. Market. What about a menswear line? Yes, I would love to… What factors led you to leave your home in the Philippines and ultimately reside and start your business in Dubai? Would you ever return home to work? Dubai has given me the opportunity to have my own atelier. I do love the different cultures and traditions [there], and I am inspired by the Emirati women to love fashion more because of their passionate and unique being. What are the biggest advantages you have found working in the UAE that other markets may not have? The UAE is undeniably the world’s melting pot. It is where you come across and meet people of different nationalities and cultures—so ordinarily—in your daily life. Working here is indeed a privilege, and an experience of a lifetime.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: The press goes wild for Ezra and his collection at Couture Fashion Week; creative director Nicole Bechard and fashion editor Nicole Herzog with the designer after his show; a look from the “Afrique de OR” collection on the catwalk.

of proposals right away. It was such a great privilege to represent Dubai in New York, showing how fashionable Dubai is.

OUR INTRICATE BEADWORK MAKES MY DESIGN DIFFERENT FROM THE REST. EACH AND EVERY COMPONENT IS ATTACHED BY HAND. I AM LUCKY TO HAVE BEAD WORKERS FROM INDIA—THEY ARE THE BEST IN INTRICATE EMBROIDERY. We were enthralled by the intricate detail of every piece! Our intricate beadwork makes my design different from the rest. Each and every component is attached by hand. I am lucky to have bead workers from India— they are the best in intricate embroidery.

Can you tell us a little more about the collection? Who or what was it inspired by? Many cultures have been influenced by Africa, in provocative fashion statements to great cultural movements; from the great artistry of Modigliani, Matisse and Picasso in their color palettes, to [Africa’s] rhythmic sounds that so captivate the international music scene. I chose nature as a catalyst for a collection that embraces the nuances of white and black and gold, accentuated with modern African ornamentations and crystallizations. It is a reinterpretation that is depleted of the vibrant palette of colors and yet rich in elaborate symmetry and tapestry, with a profusion of painstaking embroidery and jewelry in the form of gold and semi-precious stones, to complete a tableau worthy of fashion immorality. [The collection] redefines classic looks

Can we expect to see you in the New York market anytime soon? Yes! This is definitely my main objective! To bring my fashion to the stores of New York! [I’m hoping] to start a prêt-a-porter line of wedding dresses/RTW brand for [sale in] NYC. Do you have exciting plans or news in the near future that you’d like to share with our readers? We are planning a big show in Dubai. I hope you can come to see it, probably in November. Do you have any advice or tips for emerging designers? To all the budding designers, fashion is a continuous study and you need to be always updated on what’s happening outside the fashion world. You have to be yourself and create something that would surely be remarkable in the fashion industry. And to top it all, you need to have passion for fashion. For more, visit Ezra Santos on the web at www.ezrafashiondesign.com.

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WITH THE TIP OF YOUR HAT

THE EMBELLISHED LIFE’S JESSICA KELLY SHARES HER AFFINITY FOR HEADWEAR. Posted by JESSICA KELLY Photographed by TRUC NGUYEN

Walking around New York, the Spring weather has finally kicked in, and I love seeing the flowers blooming, the people emerging from hibernation and one very small thing that tops them all… Hats! Since the days of dress up in my mother’s closet, I have had an affinity for headwear and this season I am embracing it full force. Here is a broad array of the stylish and oh-so-irresistible options for you. For more check out JESSICA KELLY’S blog The Embellished Life at http://livingembellished.blogspot.com/

“Fedoras are always my go to accessory for insta-cool, they match everything.”

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“Scarves are so amazing because they can give you so many different looks! I concocted this side braided version after playing around with one to see what it could do…it’s quickly becoming my signature style.”


“Turbans can be sold as hats or easily made from a large square scarf, either way they add a little exotic spice to your style.”

“Hippie headbands are back and so much fun! This one by GLA.MAR.OUS is super hip since it’s a zipper that can be styled many ways. It’s also made local here in NYC which I love!”

“Big floppy hats are fun since they play with proportion…and keep the sun out of your eyes.”

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May 2011 "one-year anniversary" issue