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ANNUAL REPORT 1

TUESDAY, March 13, 2012

Al Bowman

ISU looking at blueprint for the future his year, Illinois State University students, faculty and staff members, along with local citizens, are participating in the university’s most important activity— the revision of our strategic plan, “Educating Illinois.” The document, first written in 2000, represents our belief in what Illinois State University stands for — its mission, vision, values and goals. “Educating Illinois” is the university’s blueprint for success and a guide that has helped transform Illinois State into a top-choice institution for motivated teachers, researchers and learners. One of the plan’s five core values is civic engagement. Illinois State’s aim is to preAl pare students to be Bowman informed and engaged citizens who will further the collective goals of society. We promote active learning experiences through which students will gain an awareness and understanding of civic engagement as a lifelong responsibility. We also encourage faculty and staff members to serve as civic leaders and role models promoting the quality of life for all citizens through collaborative and individual actions. A large body of evidence suggests that co-curricular and extracurricular experiences account for more than half of what students learn during their college careers. Students involved in out-of-class activities feel more positive about their college experiences and participation in those experiences are a good predictor of later success. Illinois State takes civic engagement seriously. In fact, ours is the only public university in the state that offers a civic engagement and responsibility minor, which combines new courses with redesigned existing courses and curriculum as well as out-of-class service learning. Illinois State was among the first universities in the country to join the American Democracy Project and its spin-off, the Political Engagement Project, which are nationwide engagement initiatives that are co-sponsored by the Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching, American Association of State Colleges and Universities and the New York Times. Last summer, Illinois State received a national honor as the only recipient of the 2011 New York Times Political Engagement Project Program of Excellence Award. The award recognizes the efforts of faculty and staff to provide opportunities for students in the classroom, on campus and in the community to develop skills related to political processes and leadership. Illinois State has been recognized as a model for campuses across the country and as an innovator in the field. As president of Illinois State, I hope our citizens locally, and throughout the region, recognize and appreciate the civic engagement of our students and their faculty and staff mentors. Last year, Illinois State students provided over 10,000 hours of community service. More than 325 students participated in alternative break programs, contributing more than 7,600 hours of service to communities across the U.S. and the western hemisphere. Our students, faculty and staff members lead local voter registration drives, sponsor health and wellness programs, spearhead Bloomington-Normal environmental sustainability efforts and support production of documentary films on social and political issues. Illinois State University is ranked fifth in the nation as a Peace Corps master’s international school. Local Peace Corps master’s international students serve both on campus as teaching and research assistants and with local organizations such as McLean County Community Compact and our Habitat for Humanity chapter. Along with our friends and colleagues from Illinois Wesleyan University, the ISU-IWU Habitat for Humanity chapter is one of the most successful in the country, having already built 17 homes. These are just a few of the hundreds of examples of the student, faculty and staff member engagement that occur in our community every day. During a time when most of the focus on higher education spotlights our very challenging economy, I offer this uplifting reminder that education, both in and out of the classroom, remains our highest priority and greatest passion.

T

Bowman is president of Illinois State University.

The Pantagraph/LORI ANN COOK-NEISLER

The Blaze mascot Scorch throws shirts to the crowd at the U.S. Cellular Coliseum on Feb. 12.

WHOLE NEW GAME New teams, owners and names hit the B-N scene By Mike Egenes megenes@pantagraph.com

BLOOMINGTON — The Twin Cities’ professional sports scene is rarely lacking for storylines outside the lines. In the six-year history of professional sports in Bloomington-Normal, that was never truer than in 2011. Ownership of teams changed hands. New nicknames and coaches were introduced. And in the case of the Central Illinois Drive, an entirely new professional sports franchise hit the scene, the fourth for the Twin Cities. Here is a recap of the changes: ◗ In hockey, the PrairieThunder met its demise and folded after five seasons. In its place came the Bloomington Blaze, now owned by Sandra Hunnewell of New Jersey, as a new entry in the Central Hockey League. Former National Hockey League veteran Paul Gardner took over as coach in September. ◗ In indoor football, Ed Brady sold the team to minority investor and Twin City businessman Jim Morris. Morris then changed the name from the Extreme to the Edge and brought Kenton Carr back to coach the team after Mike Murray left for a job at Illinois State University. ◗ In baseball, the CornBelters dispatched manager Hal Lanier after the Frontier League club failed to make the playoffs for a second straight season. The addition of basketball to the U.S. Cellular Coliseum lineup was perhaps the most surprising development. About a month before Morris took full ownership of the football franchise, he and partner Scott Henderson intro-

The Pantagraph/CARLOS T. MIRANDA

The Central Illinois Drive play against the St. Louis Phoenix Feb. 11 at U.S. Cellular Coliseum in Bloomington. duced the Drive and well-known coach A.J. Guyton, a native of Peoria and former All-American at Indiana University under Bob Knight. Morris is owner of Sonic America’s Drive-In in Normal, Roar Food Group LLC and four other Bloomington-Normal companies. He also played one season for the Green Bay Packers in the 1980s. “I’m a huge basketball fan,” said Morris. “I’m a businessman first and foremost, but I think there are enough basketball fans in Central Illinois to support this.” Through the first half of the season, the Drive was a rousing success on the

court as the team won its first 12 games. The Blaze did not enjoy a similar measure of early success. Slow to get off the ground with promotions and marketing, the team was equally as slow to assemble a competitive unit. Gardner had less than a month to fill out his roster and it resulted in a 12game losing streak early in the season. However, many feel Hunnewell, a pharmaceutical firm owner, is bestsuited among the revolving door of recent hockey team owners to have a successful run on and off the ice in future seasons. Hunnewell hired proven front SEE GAME / PAGE 2

Logan County escapes closure of prison — for now By Edith Brady-Lunny

idential and business growth. Among the priorities of the plan are finding ways to capitalize on Logan County’s centralized location and hopes to become a leader in wind energy. Lincoln also is looking forward to a major boost in the number of affordable housing units available in the community. A Chicago developer has announced plans to build 43 townhomes that will help with a shortage of homes in the $100,000 to $160,000 range, said Maniscalco.

eblunny@pantagraph.com

LINCOLN — When the 2011 economic scorecard is tallied for Logan County, what was not lost could be more important than what was gained. Lincoln and Logan County officials and residents breathed a sigh of relief in November after Gov. Pat Quinn ditched a plan to close seven state facilities, including the Logan Correctional Center with its 350 workers and 2,000 inmates. The community came together in September in a campaign to prevent what could have been a massive economic loss comparable only to the closing of the former Lincoln Developmental Center, said Michael Maniscalco, director of the Lincoln & Logan County Economic Development Partnership. But the economic development leader is urging residents to keep the T-shirts and yard signs from last year’s campaign to save the prison.

New hospital opens The Pantagraph/STEVE SMEDLEY

Audience members chant “Save Logan,” prior to the start of the State Facility Closure Act Hearing on Oct. 26 at Lincoln Christian University. “We do have that fear that it could happen again,” said Maniscalco, as the state continues to struggle with huge deficits. Loss of the Lincoln prison could have drained $21.7 million in lost worker income and $73 million in total economic losses to the area, according to an eco-

nomic impact study. Maniscalco took over as director of the economic development agency several weeks before the prison closure debate began. Since the prison crisis ended in November,he has focused on a countywide master plan for res-

One of the major boosts to the Logan County area came with the March opening of the new Abraham Lincoln Memorial Hospital on Stahlnut Drive,a $50 million facility that replaced a facility built in 1954 in the middle of town. The new hospital reflects a shift from inpatient care to a greater emphasis on outpatient services. The 116,000-square SEE LOGAN / PAGE 2


2 • ANNUAL REPORT 1 • Tuesday, March 13, 2012

www.pantagraph.com

Ken Natzke

OSF Healthcare embraces vision O SF HealthCare has a new system-wide vision: “Embracing God’s great gift of life, we are one OSF ministry transforming health care to improve the lives of those we serve.” This vision reflects the past year and the year ahead at OSF St. Joseph Medical Center. We are revitalizing what health care is all about – our patients. Most recently, OSF HealthCare announced its hospitals, physiKen cians, adNatzke vanced care practitioners, home care services and pharmacies in Central Illinois have been selected to participate as a Medicare Pioneer Accountable Care Organization by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services Innovation Center. OSF is one of 32 organizations in the U.S. participating in this new program during the next three years based on its demonstrated capabilities to offer high quality, coordinated care. The Pioneer ACO is a group of doctors, hospitals and health care providers working together with CMS to give our Medicare patients better service, better quality and better care at a lower cost. The goal of the Pioneer ACO is for the Medicare patients’ health care providers to better coordinate the care of their patients in order to better meet unique individual needs and preferences of the patients we serve. In August, we enhanced our commitment to God’s gift of life when we opened the doors to our new stateof-the-art Birthing Center. OSF St. Joseph Medical Center was the first to offer a new delivery of care model, designed for family-centered care, with Labor/Delivery/Recovery/Postpartum rooms. Moms and dads enjoy staying in one spacious suite for their birthing experience, making them feel at home. Our quality of service has always been excellent, and our environment now matches it. We also embarked on a

LOGAN FROM PAGE 1

new initiative, with other community partners, to ensure the safety of our patients by promoting the campaign, “Healthy Babies are Worth the Wait.” The campaign is designed to educate the community on the importance of waiting for elective delivery until at least 39 weeks and the overall benefit of waiting for labor to begin on its own. Also in August, the OSF Weight Management Center began offering the LAPBAND adjustable gastric banding system. OSF St. Joseph Medical Center helped to transform health care in Bloomington-Normal by being the first health care facility to perform the surgery in McLean County, providing more convenient weight loss options for patients. We are proud to report all of our patients, who have undergone the surgery, have experienced no complications and are on a road to successful weight loss. Throughout the entire patient experience, our goal at OSF St. Joseph Medical Center is to meet and exceed high patient expectations for quality and service. In 2011, our patients selected us for the HealthGrades Outstanding Patient Experience Award for the second consecutive year. HealthGrades determined our hospital ranked in the top 10 percent for patient experience. We are one of 13 recipients in Illinois and the only Bloomington-Normal area hospital to receive the designation. HealthGrades is an independent source of hospital information and quality outcomes. Patients can connect to hospitals and physicians in their area, based on the quality rating given by HealthGrades. Our services have grown in 2011 and we look forward to a bright future in 2012. We express our sincerest gratitude to the community for your continued dedication over the years. With your support, year after year, OSF St. Joseph Medical Center continues to serve every patient, every time, with the greatest care and love.

Natzke is president and CEO of OSF St. Joseph Medical Center in Bloomington.

The Pantagraph/LORI ANN COOK-NEISLER

Dr. Shermian Woodhouse, with the Community Cancer Center, shows a scan of the breast after a tumor had been removed. The outpatient center is looking at expansion as the number of patients has increased.

Medical centers eye expansions By Paul Swiech pswiech@pantagraph.com

NORMAL — As the Community Cancer Center and Community Health Care Clinic plan for expansions, a proposed clinic for people on Medicaid remains under development.

Community Cancer Center The outpatient center at 407 E. Vernon Ave., Normal, needs to expand as the number of patients has increased, said Executive Director Barb Nathan. About 220 patients receive services at the cancer center each day and Nathan projects that number will increase 7 percent each year as the population ages and as treatments improve survivor rates. The cancer center board wants the 27,000-squarefoot building to expand to the south by 35,000 square feet while renovating some existing space. The twostory addition would include more space for medical oncology, radiation oncology, lab and patient consultation. The estimated price tag is $10 million. The board will not commit to an expansion until it determines how much money it can raise. A capital campaign began several months ago. While the campaign remains at an early phase, more than $2 million has been raised, campaign co-chairman Dave Magers said.

ALMH puts the facility among the top employers in the county and serves as an incentive for potential new residents, said Maniscalco. “This is one of those things you show off to new people. When you’re looking for a place to live, it’s all about the schools and the hospital,” for some people, he said.

foot medical center takes care of 160 outpatients a day. The community financial support — almost $5.5 million—is a reflection of how important the hospital is to residents, said hospital spokeswoman Legal expense looms Amy Denney. The contributions “speak volumes Logan County taxpayers face a pofor how people feel about their com- tential mountain of legal bills associmunity hospital,” said Denney. ated with the trials of two brothers The 290-person workforce at accused of killing five members of a

GAME FROM PAGE 1

office veteran David Holt as general manager and continues to seek local investors. “What we were hoping to achieve was stability and bringing strong ownership to the table in regard to all

The Pantagraph/DAVID PROEBER

The Community Health Care Clinic, 902 N. Franklin, hopes to expand to provide more space for patient services. This summer, the advancement phase will end, the communitywide capital campaign will begin and the board will determine the size of the expansion.

Community Health Care Clinic McLean County’s medical clinic for low-income residents who are uninsured or underinsured is considering growing at its location at 902 N. Franklin Ave., Normal, or moving. The clinic is planning for a 30 percent increase in patients by 2014 — a reversal from a year ago when clinic leaders anticipated a decline in patients because of health reform. Clinic leaders reversed course a few months ago after concluding that the shortage of primary care doctors who see Medicaid pa-

Beason family in 2010. The Logan County Board has earmarked about $1 million in estimated revenue the county could receive from wind farms expected to locate in the area for the pending cases against Christopher and Jason Harris. The repeal of the death penalty in Illinois ended state funding for defense costs in capital murder cases. The responsibility of paying the legal bills for those accused of slaying Rick and Ruth Gee and three of their children now rests with Logan County.

three pro teams,” said John Butler, president of Central Illinois Arena Management, which runs the downtown Bloomington arena. “The important thing about minor-league sports is having the ownership group understand the business model and capitalize the team properly. I think that has happened now.”

tients means the need for the clinic will grow as health reform unfolds. A committee should have an expansion plan ready by July, said Executive Director Angie McLaughlin. A capital campaign may follow. Meanwhile, the number of clinic patients continues to grow beyond 3,000. Thirty-six patients were added in January alone. The clinic has nine full-time employees and one part-timer and relies on physician, nurse and other volunteers to serve patients.

Immanuel Health Center Community volunteers — led by Dr. Trina Scott, a family physician — are renovating part of the Marian Wing of the old St. Joseph Hospital building, 502 S. Morris Ave., Bloomington, to develop a doctor’s office that offers spiritual support. The target population for Immanuel Health Center is children and adults who are on Medicaid and in need. Renovation work should be done this spring. Scott hopes to open the clinic later this year.

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ANNUAL REPORT 1 • Tuesday, March 13 2012 • 3

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Colleen Kannaday

Advocate changing for better t is truly an exciting time to be in health care and an even more exciting time to be at Advocate BroMenn Medical Center and Advocate Eureka Hospital. As most of you know, there is a significant amount of discussion nationally about health care reform and many questions about it being reColleen pealed Kannaday with the upcoming elections. The truth is that health care reform is happening right now and it is being driven by a collaborative effort among hospitals, physicians and payors (insurance companies and government). Back in March 2010 when Congress passed health care reform legislation, a new and different type of dialogue started among hospitals, physicians and payors. The exciting part is that this dialogue focused on ways we could partner together and align our incentives to focus on keeping patients healthy, rather than just treating them when they get sick. One could argue this should have been the role of health care from the beginning, but the reality is that our health care system was never designed this way, so it is truly a fundamental shift. So, what are these changes and how do they impact patients? At Advocate Health Care, one example is that we have formed new partnerships with our physicians to clinically integrate the care of the patient and assist our physicians in keeping patients healthy. We have expanded office hours in many locations to make sure patients can get same day appointments with their doctor rather than going to the emergency department. Locally, Advocate Medical Group has expanded urgent care services and now offers this at both our College at Towanda Avenue location as well as on the BroMenn campus in our AMG primary care office. We have also worked with many of our physicians to proactively reach out to patients to make sure they are receiving annual preventive screenings. Again, the focus is on the patient and making sure we provide care to the patient “at the right time and in the right setting.” In reality, these are important changes that will benefit our patients and our community, regardless of health care reform. As I mentioned earlier, exciting things are happening at BroMenn this year. In June, we will open our new, state-of the-art building on our hospital campus which will house our new obstetrics unit, our new intensive care unit and our new high acuity unit. We are grateful for the generous $10 million in charitable gifts from our patients, physicians, associates and the community to support this wonderful project and allow us to expand our health care ministry. Later this summer, we will also open our new outpatient center on Illinois 9 in Bloomington, across from the Central Illinois Regional Airport. This facility will expand primary care, specialty care and outpatient services in a convenient location for our patients. Finally, I would be remiss if I didn’t mention the very best part of our ministry – our dedicated physicians, associates and volunteers. I am inspired every day by their talent, their passion for what they do and their unwavering commitment to our patients.

I

Kannaday is president, Advocate BroMenn Medical Center and Advocate Eureka Hospital.

The Pantagraph/STEVE SMEDLEY

Salvation Army volunteer Emily Lesher, left, helps Bloomington resident Maricela Silva shop for her three children, during the 2011 McLean County Toys For Tots toy distribution on Dec. 21.The distribution took place at The Salvation Army, 611 W.Washington St., Bloomington.

Community helps social agencies meet goals Salvation Army and United Way fund drives hit targets By Bill Flick flick@pantagraph.com

Although it could be said the economy was still “in the tank” over much of the past year — mired in the lingering effects of a recession — the good news is, it was in other places than tanks. Like, kettles. And, community chests. Even in tough times, the Salvation Army of McLean County’s 2011 Red Kettle Campaign, as an example, surpassed its goal by more than $14,000. Spokesman Steve Schroeder said $229,126.90 was collected. Its original goal was $215,000. The agency’s mail appeal campaign also had a good year and, together, its two campaigns collected a total of $445,479, exceeding its combined goal of $425,000. Meanwhile, as the United Way of McLean County 2011 effort neared its end, State Farm Insurance Cos. made a last minute additional gift of $99,000, bringing the total from the company and its employees, to $1.9 million. That enabled the United Way to eke past its goal of $4.3 million by $200. “We were pleasantly surprised with the response from the community, especially with the economic headwinds we knew we would be facing,” said United Way 2011 Campaign Chairman Aaron Quick. “One of our goals — to help offset some of those headwinds — was to get some new businesses signed up to run campaigns and we accomplished that goal. This community always seems to step up.” At other social service agencies, like Mid Central Community Action in Bloomington, an agency whose services include Countering Domestic Violence-Neville House, home weatherization and Mayor’s Manor supportive housing for formerly homeless people, the economy and its effects brought on continued efforts to restructure amid tightening federal and state funding. In November, Rockie Ziegler, 58, of Bloomington, who for the last 22 years had been president of Original Smith Printing Co., Bloomington, became new executive director of Mid Central Community Action. Meanwhile, officials of the American Red Cross of the Heartland announced the speaker for its April 26 “Evening of Stars” extravaganza — an event that has netted $1.4 million for Red Cross services in 18 years —

The Pantagraph/STEVE SMEDLEY

Gina Mandros, director of investor relations for United Way of McLean County, The Pantagraph/LORI ANN COOK-NEISLER presents Aaron Quick, Community Action's Todd Goodman, home ownership counselor, assists Deja Griffin, 5, Monay outgoing 2011 United Way of Duvendack, 5, Soriya Moore, 7, and Donnell Moore, 5, as they participate in the Neighborhood McLean County campaign Works Week by planting pots on June 8 at the Boys and Girls Club where they are members. chairman with a plaque following the announcement of the United Way of McLean County's annual fundraising campaign raising $4,300,220. would be Joe Buck. Buck is a six-time Emmy Award winner who has called 14 World Series, 16 league championship series, 13 All-Star games and three Super Bowls. He is the son of Jack Buck, the late, great, legendary St. Louis Cardinals announcer.

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4 • Annual Report 1 • Tuesday, March 13, 2012

www.pantagraph.com

Honor Roll

of area businesses

ESTABLISHED

1837

Early 1800s

Evergreen Memorial Cemetery

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1837

1855

First Christian Church

For Youth Development • For Healthy Living For Social Responsibility

Trinity Lutheran Church & School Lutheran Church Missouri Synod

Prayer: A Lifelong Journey

(Disciples of Christ)

www.trinluth.org

www.blmfcc.com

302 E. Miller St. Bloomington, IL 61701

301 W. Washington St. Bloomington, IL

1062606

1059729

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1884

1062224

1890

BLOOMINGTON TENT & AWNING COMMERCIAL & RESIDENTIAL AWNINGS & TENT RENTALS

Antique Clock & Jewelry Repair

217-935-4583 600 West Side Square - Clinton

1058562

1059730

828-3411

1 Brickyard Dr. Bloomington

309-827-0428 www.McHistory.org

501 E. Stewart St. • Bloomington, IL 61701 Scrap 828-6084 • Steel 829-0655 www.morristick.com 1058559

1062053

ESTABLISHED

Member FDIC “A Full Service Bank Where Friendliness Prevails”

Men’s Clothing

1014 W. Washington Bloomington

314 Crittendon, Chenoa 815-945-7871

www.sbofgray.com

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1061549

1920

1061535

(309) 828-4823

First State Bank of Forrest Member FDIC “A strong friend for your family” 133 E. Krack St., Forrest, IL (815) 657-8248

Box 47, Graymont 815-743-5951

1100 W. Howard, Pontiac 815-844-4433

1916

603 W. Oak Street, Fairbury, IL (815) 692-4321 115 N. Chestnut, Onarga, IL (815) 268-7351

Costigan & Wollrab, P.C.

307 E. Grove St., Bloomington

309.662.2886

www.ClayDooley.com

(309) 828-4310

• Expert Auto Service • Expert Advice • ASE Certified Technicians

2030 Ireland Grove Rd, Bloomington

309-663-4391 View all our inventory at

www.shopbarker.com

1059175

1061538

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1922

Look for our New Showroom in July to better serve our customers! Complete line of Pre-owned vehicles too!

1507 E. Vernon, Normal

Bloomington, IL 61701

www.cwlawoffice.com

Your Easy to get to Buick & GMC Store!

309.828.5037

308 E. Washington Street

1931

1060561

1917

1917

Attorneys at Law

(309) 664-1800 ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1062626

STATE BANK OF GRAYMONT

(Featuring Big & Tall), Work Boots, Carhartt - Dickies Women’s & Children’s Carhartt

Business, Personal Life & Health

200 N. Main St., Bloomington

1059601

ESTABLISHED

191 19 9 100

1906

www.bloomingtontent-awning.com

• Back Lit Awnings • Custom Made • Retractable Fabric Products Awnings • Pool & Boat Covers • Canopies • Tent Sales

Bloomington, IL 61701 Ph. (309) 663-0355

ESTABLISHED

Morris Tick Company Recycling • Aluminum Cans • Scrap Metal & Iron Tick Steel Fabrication • Steel Sales • Custom Fabrication • On Site Welding

Since 1890

Bloomington (309) 829-7513 1062220

1898

1892

“Always a Shade Better”

812 I.A.A. Dr.,

School: 1102 W. Hamilton Rd.

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1890

www.chenoail.org

Bloomington (309) 828-6265

Bloomington-Normal YMCA 602 S. Main St. Bloomington, IL 61701 309-827-6233 www.bnymca.org

1058561

www.evergreen-cemetery.com

401 W. Jefferson Bloomington 829-9327

1061539

(309) 827-6950

Church: 801 S. Madison

Sunday Worship: 8:30 & 11 a.m.

1061941

ESTABLISHED



1940

1940

EMMETT-SCHARF 81 Great Years

309-664-1111 Mon.-Fri. 8 am - 4:30 pm

“Woodford County’s Only Independent Locally Owned Bank!” 1061058

Visit us on the Web... www.emmett-scharfelectric.com

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

(across from College Hills Meat Shop)

Bloomington - Ph. 309-828-2741 Chenoa - Ph. 815-945-2141 Pontiac - Ph. 815-842-1627 Fax: 815-945-7066

1059735

1811 Eastland Drive Bloomington | 661.1166 www.midillinicu.com facebook.com/midillinicu

ESTABLISHED

1946

309-451-4312 www.beltone.com 1062120

1062121

1061529

ESTABLISHED

1944

1942

“SOUND OF ILLINOIS CHORUS”

1520 E. College Ave. Normal

Residential • Commercial Fully Insured Illinois State License #1

CO ELECTRIC CO.

1062477

201 S. Eureka St., Goodfield, IL Ph. 309-965-2221 1805 S. Main St., Eureka, IL Ph. 309-467-2747

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1946

1947

1947

Warrick’s (309) 826•4066•2100 Bunn St•Bloomington

1208 N. TOWANDA IN TOWANDA PLAZA Celebrating our

70th Anniversary Barbershop Chorus Meets Every Tuesday Night 7:00 - 9:30 PM www.soundofillinois.com

309-827-8541

(309) 846-7123

Hours: M-F 7-5 p.m., Sat. 8-4 p.m.

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1059362

1947

1058800

FISH FRYS the 1st & 3rd Fridays of Each Month with COUNTRY BAND ENTERTAINMENT OPEN TO THE PUBLIC ALL WELCOME Book your Parties, Banquets and Receptions with us! Fishing Memberships Available Check us out on Facebook

452-2030

Pontiac • Odell • Dwight www.bankofpontiac.com

“A Family Tradition Since 1946”

Member FDIC Member Pontiac Bancorp

www.bloomingtonha.com

1061530

ESTABLISHED

1954

1953

104 E. Wood St. Bloomington

309-829-3360

1060619

ESTABLISHED

Providing quality affordable housing and self-sufficiency opportunities to low and moderate income citizens of McLean County.

“Together We’re Better”

300 Pine Street Normal, IL 61761

1059741

ESTABLISHED

1951

Shoe Repair Service

ESTABLISHED

1955

1956

Tarvin’s

Frame-Mart Inc. We frame for less.

309-454-4406 Hours: Mon.-Wed. 9:30-5:30 Thurs: 9:30-3 • Fri. 9:30-5:30 Sat. 9:30-3 1062396

WRIGHT’S

808 IAA Dr. Bloomington, IL 800-676-2541 www.iaacu.org 1058563

www.sunkelplumbing.com

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1961

1960

1957

WWW.THECOPYSHOPONLINE.COM

1061533

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1059734

309-829-1001 800-792-4222 1208 Towanda, Bloomington 1059441

ESTABLISHED

1963

1540 E. College Ave. Normal 309-452-7436 www.themusicshoppe.com

(309) 828-3337 Nationwide Warranty at over 800 Locations!

Call 309-663-5892 or 815-939-2935

1061544

ESTABLISHED

1059731

ESTABLISHED

1963

1971 1

HeritageOfCare.com 1062450

ESTABLISHED

1971

WINKS SHELL

AA NN DD T TOO WW I I N N G

®

Gas • Towing • Maintenance • Service

1902 Market St. • Bloomington

Celebrating 48 years of serving Central Illinois!

Life • Home • Car • Farm • Business • Asphalt Paving • Ready Mix Concrete • Complete Maintenance • Landscape Materials 1059708

FOR PERSONAL SERVICE, SEEK SHELTER TODAY.

Serving seniors & their families since 1963.

1059796

ESTABLISHED

1971

1964

BRIAN THOENNES

1062567

(309) 663-4400

Jim Brosseau Custom Roofing & Roofing Repair, Inc.

Specializing in all roof repairs, including wind damage

1062112

Seek Shelter Today!

Look for us on Facebook!

1963

www.aamco.com 321 S. Main, Bloomington

ESTABLISHED

1964

2010 Fox Creek Road Bloomington, IL 309.828.4580 www.niepagens.com

309-829-5320

#8 Gilmore Dr. Bloomington

TRANSMISSIONS

Flowers for every occasion ...

ESTABLISHED

STRONG

AAMCO

Auto Service

(309) 662-5542 1805 Morrissey Dr. • Blm

3 GENERATIONS

1963 19963

Erickson’s

Solving Your Car Care Puzzle

Water Conditioning

Quality Furniture, Flooring & Appliances The “Wright” Store For You 115 E. Madison, Pontiac (815) 844-7177

1059390

1520 E. College Ave Suite P • Normal

302 E. Washington, Bloomington (309) 827-5466

See Brian Thoennes 410 N. Clinton • Blm. • Ph. 829-8451

827-4811

1061548

2027 Ireland Grove, Rd Bloomington,IL 309-662-1648 www.chucksharley-dav.com Bring A Friend - Make A Friend 1062159

2 LOCATIONS: Maroa Ph: (217) 794-2292 East Peoria Ph: (309) 699-6231

(309) 828-7812 “Bloomington-Normal’s LAST Full Service Station”

1059736 1061546 1062318


Annual Report 1 • Tuesday, March 13, 2012 • 5

www.pantagraph.com

Honor Roll

of area businesses

ESTABLISHED

1971

ESTABLISHED

1971

GENE’S

Dairy Delight Spring Is Here

ESTABLISHED

1972

ESTABLISHED

1972

McLean Countyʼs Choice Since 1971

1974

HORINE’S

KURTʼS

PIANOS PLUS

Save on gas and ride the bus!

417 North Main Bloomington, IL 61701 (309) 829-7529

YOUR FINER PIANO SHOW ROOM

1061545

ESTABLISHED

7717A North University Peoria, IL 61614 (309) 692-1277

662-5823 kurtsautobody.com 2205 Ireland Grove Rd., Bloomington 1060418 888463

www.bnpts.com

www.imusicenter.com

Mike Manahan

I-55 & Rt. 116 • Pontiac (815) 842-3344 Websites: www.lynnchevroletbuick.com www.lynnchevroletbuick.net Email: lynncvbu@mchsi.com

See Mike For All Your New Construction And Real Estate Needs!

and our Bloomington location opened in December of 2001

(309) 275-0215

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

BLOOMINGTON MEATS

Carl’s Ice Cream

• Retirement Living Apartments • The Willows Duplexes • Licensed Assisted Living • Martin Health Center

www.westminstervillageinc.com

1062219

Locally Owned & Operated!

www.haaqg.tripod.com/ Our office is open 7 days a week

Over 1000 apartments in more than 30 great locations!

OPEN FOR THE SEASON!

(309) 828-9731 “Best meat on Bunn”

www.carlsicecream.com

309-827-8576 www.apartment-mart.com

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1983

1983

Join us for Quilt Spectrum 2012, Sentimental Journey, which will be held on April 14th from 9am to 5pm and 15th from 10am to 4pm at Illinois Wesleyan University’s Shirk Center.

1058556

1061671

1059742

Established 1982

1980

601 W. Locust Bloomington (309) 828-7732

Mon.: 9 – 6 • Tues. – Fri.: 9 – 5 Saturday: 9 – 3 www.solidgoldjewelers.net

1059740

1062045

2025 E. Lincoln St., Bloomington (309) 663-6474

2401 S. Bunn St. Bloomington, IL

309.452.1612

ESTABLISHED

1979

1979

1062218

1062294

In The Heart of Normal

www.bloomingtoncarpets.com

www.DocsDrugs.com

1062060

North Street & Broadway

At South Main & Woodrig Road

Our Family Serving Your Family For Over 30 Years

Mike@C21AperRealty.com

402 N. Main Ph. (309) 827-5522

1061543

A Complete Continuing Care Retirement Community

DWIGHT.......815-584-2140 EL PASO......309-527-3627 FAIRBURY...815-692-2132 LE ROY........309-962-3627 PONTIAC.....815-842-6774

Broker, Realtor® Over 35 Years of Experience!

1978

BLOOMINGTON CARPETS 829-1442

Rx PHARMACY

127 E. Beaufort Ph. (309) 454-1713

ESTABLISHED

1978

®

Celebrating 34 years in our Normal location.

1061499

ESTABLISHED

1977

BILL’S KEY & LOCK SHOP

“Where Service Makes Friends”

1058560

ESTABLISHED

1976

802 S. Eldorado Rd., Blm 309-661-1116 www.kiddermusic.com

1062295

1061779

ESTABLISHED

1976

Route Information 828-9833

Supporting Music today and tomorrow

• Instrument Rental & Repair • Sheet Music & Accessories • Yamaha Digital Pianos • Private Lessons

1336 E. Empire, Bloomington (309) 663-PLUS 888-231-8430 www.horines.net

KURT ZIMMER, OWNER

1019 S. Main, Bloomington

1974

BLOOMINGTON NORMAL

Autobody Repair Shop, Inc.

Now Open!

ESTABLISHED

1059493

ESTABLISHED



1059739

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1984

1983

1985

Bloomington-Normal

DRISCOLL

Electrolysis Heating • A/C • Geothermal 72 Locations.

taxaccountingplus.com 501 N. Clinton Bloomington

1210 Fort Jesse Road, Normal, Illinois

On-Campus College Living & Off-Campus Residential. 138 East Beaufort Street, Suite A

1062221

ESTABLISHED

1986

Normal, IL 309-888-4444

1059431

1061541

(309) 827-4010

1030 W. Reynolds, Pontiac (815) 842-1143 or (800) 851-7605 www.driscollmotors.com

309.454.1611

AUTO SALES 106 N. East (Rt. 24 East) Eureka

(309) 467-2677

P.R.O.U.D. Pontiac Redeveloping Our United Downtown

1061067

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

MIDWEST EXCHANGE

THANK YOU FOR A GREAT 20+ YEARS!

Established 1992

(309) 828-8080

1061528

ESTABLISHED

Established 1992

ESTABLISHED

1992

1992

1060560

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

For better grades call Sylvan today!

Bob Brady

1991

309.275.0836

Reading Math/Algebra Writing Study Skills ACT Test Prep

FAMILY RESTAURANT 1412 E. Empire, Blm.

Home of Quick Cash

663-6013

1991

1990

superfastcash.com

Complimentary Consultation

1061684

309-662-7296

1062341

“Experience Counts”

Creating smiles, one by one!

512 IAA Drive Empire Plaza

120 W. Howard Street P.O. Box 622 Pontiac, IL 61764 815-844-6692 pontiacproud@route24.net On the web: PontiacProud.org

312 N. Main St. Bloomington, IL 61701

1062505

1990

DOUBET’S

Licensed Electrologist

www.BecksFamilyFlorist.com

www.BratcherComfort.com

www.FirstSiteApartments.com

Judy Barnes,

309-828-3632

• 22 Years of Knowledge & Experience in the Home Building & Real Estate Business • Specializing in Real Estate Brokerage, New Construction, & Remodeling • We will make the experience as stress free as possible! • From our Home to yours……..

Bloomington 662-8537 Peoria 683-3601 1061536

1062403

WE ARE PROFESSIONAL GRADE

1059417

Our Tax Professionals have 8-25 Years Experience!

ESTABLISHED

Established 1994

1994

• Vehicles from $3,000 to

$50,000.

1217 S. Adelaide St. Normal, IL 61761 Lic. #058107624

Custom Built Cabinets & Furniture

CNAs, NAs & Companions/Homemakers

www.acaringtouch.info Bloomington • 309.828.1516 Pontiac • 815.844.2400

1059675

309-661-1726 ESTABLISHED

1996

1995

1996

Over 17 Years of Experience! New Construction, Land, Commercial and firtst Time Home Buyers.

Available. Rates Starting at 1.9%

532-1616

Hours: 9 a.m. to 7 p.m. M-Fri. 9 a.m. - 5 p.m. Saturday.

(309) 454-4440

customwoodcraftillinois.com

208 Landmark Drive, Normal www.dennisonauto.com

Established 1996

ESTABLISHED

1061751

1061542

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

815-692-4566

Realtor®, Broker, ABR, Developer

• National and Local Financing

201 S. Crystal Lane P.O. Box 254 Fairbury, IL 61739

1702 W. College Ave., Ste A-3 Normal, IL

Cindy Eckols

• 100 Point Inspections.

CREATION’S DOG TRAINING CENTER

www.CindyEckols.com

1061944

(309) 452-4848

• Free CARFAX on Every Vehicle.

1062449

Celebrating our 20th Anniversary

At-Home Care For Your Loved Ones!

©2011 Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities. An independently owned and operated broker member of Prudential Real Estate Affiliates, Inc., a Prudential Financial company. Prudential, the Prudential logo and the Rock symbol are service marks of Prudential Financial, Inc. and its related entities, registered in many jurisdictions worldwide. Used under license. Equal Housing Opportunity.

ESTABLISHED

1997

1997

$

• Puppies • All Levels Of Obedience • Puppy, Tea Cup & Big Dog Agility • Treibball

1058565

ESTABLISHED

Normal, IL

www.pedcorhomesapartments.com

www.briarwood-apartments.com Normal, IL

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

1997

1997

309-888-9478

1998

1059416

701 Fox Hill Circle Bloomington, IL

309-451-5625 creationsdtc@frontier.com www.cdtcnormal.com ESTABLISHED

1999

1060192

102 West Washington (309) 828-0142

309-828-2888 1059357

YOUR SPORTS HEADQUARTERS

309-242-6455

great shops, great food, great times! 1059356

20 Units 1 Month Free No Deposit Free Locks Large Units www.millerstorageunits.com

ESTABLISHED

1999

Check out F1RST FR1DAYS! downtownbloomington.org 1062024

Established

1999

Dr. Mary Dellorto Licensed Clinical Psychologist

422 North Main Street Bloomington

309.829.1521

On the Square in Historic Downtown Bloomington

Prom Tuxedo Rentals

2012 Season May 12 - Oct 27

Ph. 309-829-3655

Every Saturday, 7:30 - Noon 1061890

Call us at 1206 Towanda Ave. Bloomington

1062029

2412 E. Washington St., Suite 3 • Bloomington 309-664-6952 www.drdellorto.com 1061080

Family-owned Celebrating a Decade of Excellence

502 N. Prospect #24 Bloomington Eastland Square Ph. 664-6655 www.artfuldesignsonline.com “Cheaper than Therapy” 1058700

309-827-4905 or

309-824-4505 Email us at martindale@martindalecleaning.com

martindalecleaning.com

1059655

Providing individual, couple and family therapy and psychological evaluation to adults, adolescents and children.

1062319


6 • ANNUAL REPORT 1 • Tuesday, March 13, 2012

www.pantagraph.com

ISU and IWU see campus changes By Dan Craft dcraft@pantagraph.com

The past year at Illinois State University and Illinois Wesleyan University was one of goals being met and new ones arising through various gifts and grants. At ISU, the year began with the January 2011 opening of the $50 million, 170,000-square-foot Student Fitness Center, which also included the renovation of McCormick Hall. More than 25,000 visitors were logged in its first week of operation. In addition,$1.8 million in support from the State Farm Insurance Companies Foundation, announced in May, resulted in “numerous” academic, cultural and scholarship programs at the school. By August, ISU was welcoming its largest enrollment since 1992, with a historic high of 85.1 percent for the freshman-to-sophomore retention rate. Come September, the Mennonite College of Nursing formally opened its new $2 million nursing simulation laboratory, which offers students real-world nursing situations. Also arriving through the fall was more grant and contract activity, including awards of $1.5 million from the U.S. Department of Education, $450,000 from the National Science Foundation,$450,000 from the Department of Children and Family Services, $400,000 from the National Institute of Justice and $330,000 from the McCormick Foundation. Other highlights of the past year: ISU’s College of Business ranked by Businessweek magazine among the nation’s top 100 undergraduate business schools; ISU’s ranking as fifth in the nation as a Peace Corps Master’s international school; and the school receiving the 2011 New York Times Political Engagement Program of Excellence Award, the highest honor for leadership in developing politically engaged stu-

For The Pantagraph

Architect's view of new classroom building at Illinois Wesleyan University dents. At Illinois Wesleyan University, meanwhile, the big news was that the third year of the “Transforming Lives” fundraising campaign, begun in 2009, reached $93 million of its $125 million goal. The campaign is the largest of its kind in the school’s 162-year history, and continues through 2014. In addition, support from alumni and others permitted construction to begin on a $16 million, 48,700square-foot new main classroom building anchoring the north end of Eckley Quad. It will house the business administration and economics departments, as well as classrooms, study

areas and research space. Another major gift, from Class of 1943 alumni Flo Armstrong and her late husband Vic, provided funding for a glass sculpture by Arizona artist Lyle London that hangs in the new rotunda entry of the Ames School of Art. A gift from Class of 1966 alumnus Byron Tucci funded the resurfacing of the historic Wilder Field with artificial turf and resulted in The Pantagraph/LORI ANN COOK-NEISLER the renaming of IWU’s football stadium as Tucci Stadi- Grand opening ceremonies for Illinois State University's new Student Fitness Center were held Jan. 9, 2011.Tours of the facility and the largest game of tag at ISU were the highlights of the um. Also part of the past year opening. at IWU was the school’s ranking on Kiplinger’s list of the 100 best values in private higher education, a ranking based on measures of quality and affordability.

14TH ANNUAL

Women’s Health Night Sponsored by the Illinois Heart and Lung Foundation

Tuesday, March 20, 2012 3:00 p.m.- 7:30 p.m. ISU Bone Student Center

101062278-01

An evening of health education, booths, health screenings, fitness demonstrations, and informative presentations.

101060970-01 American Red Cross Blood Drive: 3:00 - 7:00 P.M. CPR Certification 6-7:30 P.M. provided by: Advocate BroMenn Medical Center Registration needed: Call 268-5207

Free Parking! Learn more at: www.IHLF.org Sponsored by: State Farm; Advocate BroMenn Medical Center; St. Joseph Medical Center; Frontier Communications; Commerce Bank; ISU Bone Student Center; Radio Bloomington; Jack Lewis Jewelers; The Pantagraph; The CW-4 Peoria-Bloomington; ABC- HOI-19

1060970

1062278



Honor Roll

of area businesses

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

2000

ESTABLISHED

2004

2003



ESTABLISHED

2004

ESTABLISHED

2006

2005

LEXINGTON , IL

Closer than you think Better than you’d expect! ONLY 10 MINUTES North of Menards on I-55

Student & Residential Listings

ESTABLISHED

2007

2007

M&S SECURITY SERVICES, LLC

www.shopbarker.com

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

A Subsidiary of First State Bank Member FDIC

YOUR INTEREST IS OUR PRIORITY! Call us today to refinance or purchase a home at 664-9100

1206 Towanda Ave. #1 Bloomington

1059090

1062122

ESTABLISHED

1062339

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

2009

Vera Bradley Summer Launch Coming Soon ... Call for details!

2010

2011

114 North Street (Uptown Normal)

Normal | 452-7999

Vijeyta Bhatia, D.D.S. Adult & Children General Dentistry

ESTABLISHED

2011

Williamsburg Place 109 N. Williamsburg Dr. Bloomington, IL 61704 309-662-3123

309.824.5196 www.SerenityCreekDesign.com 1062293

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

2012

2011

TWIN CITY Homebrewing

Infinite Heart Studios

903 W. Wood St. Bloomington 309-828-5588

Art Classes for Kids, Teens and Adults www.iheartclass.com 309-212-1738

1060143

Sunrise Breakfast

1062382

Call now for your Spring projects!

1061873

ERICʼS RESTAURANT

Open at 5:30 a.m.

1059392

2009

2009

Or apply online at

www.mortgageservices3.com

Elevating child development to a new level through the C.A.R.E. approach

ESTABLISHED

ESTABLISHED

Located in First State Bank — Corner of Hershey Rd. and Eastland Dr., Bloomington

309-820-1008 10-8outfitters.com

www.ForSaleChoice.com 1061943

2007101062320-012009

Mortgage Services III, LLC

1602 Glenbridge Rd. Bloomington 309-663-5800 www.katieskids.net

It’s Like Getting a Bedroom And Bath For Free! At $695 (plus utilities) our 3br/2bth row home Perfect for couples, families and roommate sharing. Come by and see why. Certain income restrictions apply. 309.451.5555 info@summertree.biz 711 W. Orlando, Normal, IL. 61761 Weekdays 9 to 5 Sat. 10 to 2 Sun. Closed

WHY RENT FROM THE SAME OLD COMPANIES!

3302 Gerig Drive, Bloomington

A local family-owned shop specializing in beer brewing and wine making supplies and equipment.

309-808-2125

604 Dale St. Suite A1 • Normal (309)862-0700

www.core3pm.com

1062016

tchomebrewing.com

1062286

ESTABLISHED

www.pedcorhomesapartments.com

Michelle Hodge

Realtor®, Broker Specializing in move up sellers and sellers with little or no equity MichelleHodge@live.com Call or text me at

309-531-4588

309-365-2161 View our complete inventory of new and used vehicles at

1061940

www.classactrealty.com Normal, Illinois

19 Basil Way Bloomington IL

1059358

1059384

309-454-2960

1059733

Mickey Little, Owner 1012 S. Main St., Bloomington Ph. (309) 829-9800

Home of the Guaranteed Credit Approval

309-829-5631

803 Morrissey, Bloomington (309) 829-0936

1058664

Daily Breakfast & Lunch Specials

1062320


ANNUAL REPORT 1 • Tuesday, March 13, 2012 • 7

www.pantagraph.com

The Pantagraph/DAVID PROEBER

The Pantagraph/DAVID PROEBER

The Pantagraph/CARLOS T. MIRANDA

Left: Max Seibert, 3, and Matt Krause, 30, of Deer Creek-Mackinaw High School hold up their IHSA super sectional basketball trophy after defeating Chrisman at Redbird Arena in Normal, on March 8, 2011. Center: Rachel Durchholz (10) and Whitney Nichols (20) of Mount Pulaski High School carry away their IHSA 1A volleyball runnerup trophy Nov. 12 at Redbird Arena in Normal. Mount Pulaski lost to Dakota High School, in the championship game, 25-16 and 25-20. Right: Prairie Central's Andy Hoselton celebrates his win with coach Joe Cliffe after defeating Peotone's

Alex Young in the championship match of the IHSA Class 1A 160-pound class last year at Assembly Hall in Champaign.

2011 high school teams delivered excitement Pantagraph-area high school teams made several deep runs at state titles By Randy Sharer rsharer@pantagraph.com

When the topic of 2011 Pantagraph area high school sports comes up at future class reunions, stories will fly. Doing what hadn’t been done in school history is a sure conversation starter and one Normal Community’s basketball team can claim that after advancing to the state tourney. The 27-8 Ironmen’s fourth-place finish in Class 4A was a shocker, especially after trailing by 14 in the regional semifinal. Among those saving the day then and later was Illinois State-recruit Anthony Beane. Deer Creek-Mackinaw’s basketball team, which had never won a sectional, placed fourth in Class 1A. The 25-7 Chiefs were easy to cheer for because of their reputation for academic success and community involvement. Pantagraph Area Athlete of the Year Matt Krause set the tone, graduating as a three-sport all-stater before leaving on a mission trip to Africa. No area basketball team matched the 32-1 record of the Central Catholic girls, who took second in 2A after winning the year before. Central was led by the Pantagraph Area Female Athlete of the Year Jess Reinhart, who shared the Area Basketball Player of the Year Award with teammate Allie Norton. The area’s only team state champion was University High’s girls in Class A golf. The Pioneers’ one-shot win over Nashville came after Katherine Hepler sank a 15-foot putt on the final hole. Hepler won individually by six strokes. Helping the area sweep the small-school golf titles was Tri-Valley’s Austin Sproles, who won in a playoff. Mount Pulaski advanced to the 1A volleyball final for the ninth time in Donna Dulle’s 31 years as coach. The senior-less Lady Toppers (26-16) finished second for the seventh time. Five area teams placed third in the state, but only one did so in a singleclass sport and that was the boys swim team of U High (enrollment 610), which trailed New Trier (4,167) and Naperville Central (2,921). U High won its third trophy of 2011 when its

The Pantagraph/LORI ANN COOK-NEISLER

The Central Catholic High School girls basketball team celebrate winning the IHSA Girls Class 2A Supersectional over Litchfield High School at Millikin University in Decatur last year. boys cross country team ran third in 2A. The battle for third in 1A dual team wrestling was an all-area affair as LeRoy (21-2) topped Prairie Central (22-5). Sending Prairie Central coach Joe Cliffe into retirement in style was Area Wrestler of the Year Andy Hoselton, the 46-0 state champ at 160 pounds. The 27-7 Ridgeview girls basketball team finished third in 1A, matching its 2009 finish. The Eureka girls’ thirdplace state track effort was their fifth trophy, tying the most in 1A history. Leading the way was twotime state 400-meter dash champ Kalla Gold, who keyed the winning 1,600 relay. Area pole vaulters won 12 state medals led by champions Emily Grove of Pontiac in 2A and Taylor Kirby of Normal Community West in 3A. Grove’s best was an all-time Illinois record 13 feet, 5 inches. The area’s lone double state champion was Sydni

STARK EXCAVATING, INC.

BLOOMINGTON • CHAMPAIGN • PEORIA • TONICA 101062068-01

Excavation • Site Utilities Site Concrete Paving • Building Concrete

For The Pantagraph/DARYL WILSON

Anthony Beane of NCHS gets the rebound from a Warren High School player at the Class 4A state tournament semifinal at Peoria.

1805 W. WASHINGTON STREET • BLOOMINGTON, IL 61701 • 309.828.5034 220 WILBUR AVENUE • CHAMPAIGN, IL 61822 • 217.355.5054 96 SANGER STREET • PEORIA, IL 61602 • 309-673-3400 502 N. 21ST ROAD • TONICA, IL 61370 • 815.442.3400 www.starkcompanies.com • 877.699.5034

Meunier of GCMS in the 1A 800 and 1,600. Rounding out area champs was Bloomington long jumper Torre Harrell in 2A.

1062068

Downtown Bloomington is the place to be on the First Friday of every month from 5 - 8 p.m. Browse the unique shops, grab a bite to eat and enjoy a cocktail and maybe catch show at the BCPA or the Coliseum.

To subscribe, call 827-7323 or 800-747-7323, ext. 358.

Keep Warm with a new apartment

Mark your calendars for the next First Friday on May 4.

Affordable Apartments in a Senior Living Community

101062316-01

• On Site Management and Maintenance • Rides to Grocery and Discount Stores • Security Cameras at entry doors • Affordable Rent • Cats and small dogs allowed 101058764-01

VISIT US IN HISTORIC DOWNTOWN BLOOMINGTON Great Food Specials! s! s! Great Drink Specials! Great Sports!

Pay No More Than 30% of your income in rent *** Rents from $30 to $330 *** Could Be LESS Than You Pay Now!

Every Seat is the Best Seat in the House!!

21 HD

Televisions

Model Apartment Open Wed.’s from 2-4pm

Wood Hill Towers

102 W. Washington, Bloomington 309-828-0142

1060919

1058764

For more info call 309-829-3360 or stop by our office to pick up an application at 104 E. Wood Street, Bloomington

“Like” us on

1060904 106090 10609 06090 0 6090 090 9 4

1062316


• Annual Report 1 • Tuesday, March 13, 2012

www.pantagraph.com

BROUGHT TO YOU BY HELLER FORD IN EL PASO 2012 FORD F-150

Bold, efficient and powerful T

he Ford F-150 breaks new ground with its available EcoBoost engine, delivering a combination of fuel economy, performance and towing that beats all other trucks. The Ford F-150’s official EPA ratings are 22 mpg on the highway and 16 mpg in the city. No other truck with comparable horsepower can match the F-150 EcoBoost in highway or city fuel economy. The one-two punch of Ford Motor Company’s EcoBoost technology — fuel economy and high performance — has opened a new era for truck customers. “The 3.5-liter EcoBoost truck engine is a shining example of the uncompromising nature of Ford’s EcoBoost technology: more power and better fuel economy,” said Doug Scott, Ford Truck Group Marketing Manager. “What’s important for truck customers is that this all-new engine delivers best-in-class capability where it matters most: towing and hauling. Now they’re getting great fuel economy, too.” The 3.5-liter EcoBoost truck engine produces bestin-class 420 lb.-ft. of torque, helping enable best-in-class maximum towing of 11,300 pounds and maximum payload of 3,060 pounds, all with unsurpassed fuel economy.

SAVING FUEL The 3.5-liter EcoBoost is the final piece of the most

engineers have enhanced EcoBoost’s technology capabilities by adding variable valve timing and precisely controlling all aspects of the engine. Ford has at least 125 patents on its EcoBoost technology.

DIESEL-LIKE PERFORMANCE

The use of EcoBoost technology makes the Ford F-150 an efficient, capable and refined pickup truck. extensive powertrain makeover in the 63-year history of Ford F-Series. Introduced last year were a new 3.7-liter V6, a 5.0-liter V8 and a 6.2-liter V8. Each of these engines also offered best-in-class or unsurpassed fuel economy, power and capability. Meanwhile, each engine is mated to a fuel-saving six-speed automatic transmission — making Ford the only manufacturer to equip its entire full-size pickup lineup with standard sixspeed automatic gearboxes. All F-150s, except those

equipped with the optional 6.2-liter V8, feature EPAS, or electric power-assisted steering, a segment first. EPAS contributes about a 4 percent fuel-economy benefit compared with conventional hydraulic systems. This versatile powertrain lineup enables F-150 customers to choose the engine that best suits their needs.

TECHNOLOGY The 3.5-liter EcoBoost truck engine for the Ford F150 means this award-winning technology is available

in the best-selling vehicle in America. In 2010, 528,349 Ford FSeries trucks were sold, making it not only the bestselling truck in America for the 34th straight year, but also the best-selling vehicle, car or truck, for the 29th consecutive year. No other car, truck, SUV or CUV reached the 400,000 unit sales level in 2010. By 2013, Ford plans to offer an EcoBoost engine in up to 90 percent of its North American nameplates, supporting global sales of 1.5 million EcoBoost-powered

vehicles per year. EcoBoost is fundamental to Ford’s strategy to provide technologically advanced, high-output, smaller-displacement powertrains that deliver uncompromised performance and fuel economy. Ford EcoBoost engines deliver fuel-economy gains of up to 20 percent and reduction of CO2 emissions of up to 15 percent, compared with larger, less-efficient engines. In addition to turbocharging with direct injection, Ford powertrain

The key technologies built into every EcoBoost engine, including turbocharging and direct fuel injection, are particularly relevant to truck customers. This combination of turbocharging and direct fuel injection delivers a wealth of low-end torque and maintains it across a broad rpm range, which is key in towing applications. The 3.5-liter EcoBoost truck engine delivers 420 lb.-ft. of torque and 365 horsepower to enable bestin-class towing of 11,300 pounds – more than enough to tow a fully loaded threehorse trailer or 30-foot boat, for example. Plus the EcoBoost truck engine does it all on regular fuel and with outstanding fuel economy. “Truck customers should think of the EcoBoost truck engine as a gas-powered engine with diesel-type capability and characteristics,” said Jim Mazuchowski, V6 engines program manager. “The twin turbochargers and direct injection give it the broad, flat torque curve that makes towing with a diesel so effortless.”

WORTH THE DRIVE CHECK OUT THESE OTHER NEW VEHICLES IN THE FORD LINEUP! NEW 2012

FORD EDGE #1200406

SALE PRICE

+

$

25,962

NEW 2012 F-250 XLT REGULAR CAB 4X4

NEW 2011 F-250 XLT SUPER CAB 4X4

6.7LL Diesell 66.7L #11009233 #1100923

#12000666

NEW 2011

FORD F-150 XLT #1100991

SALE PRICE SALE PRICE

$

$

+

32,462

NEW 2012

SALE PRICE

30,962

+

NEW 2012

FORD ESCAPE

5

38,962

FORD FIESTA #1200345 #1200411

AVAILABLE ABLE

SALE PRICE

$

+

20,962

YOUR CHOICE

+

NEW 2012

FORD FOCUS #1200481

$

$

16,862

CHOOSE FROM 3

$

17,162

866.644.2507 • I-39 & Route 24 • EL PASO Hours: M-Th 8-8; Fri. 8-5:30; Sat. 8-4 www.HellerStores.com *All factory and finance rebates applied; plus tax, title and license. +Includes Ford Motor Credit Cash and Trade Assistance. Actual vehicles may differ from vehicles pictured.

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Annual Report 1