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Giving Your Child Oral Medicine You need to give your child medicine by mouth. Some medicine comes in several forms. It may come as a liquid, tablet or capsule. Follow the doctor’s advice closely. Use these steps to give your child an accurate dose.

Liquid medicines ●

Check the medicine label 3 times before giving it to your child. This helps to avoid mistakes. Check it for the right: name ❍

amount

strength

Shake it well.

Be sure your child takes the whole dose.

For babies: ●

You may give the medicines through a nipple and let him suck it out. You may use a syringe or dropper to give the medicine. If you do: Place the syringe or dropper at the side of his or her mouth and let your child suck the medicine. ❍

Or, slowly and gently squirt the medicine into his mouth. Do not squirt it too fast, it may cause him to throw up.

Caution! If you use a syringe, take off the end cap first. Throw it away. A baby can easily choke of this if swallowed.

©2006-12 P&H Assoc., Inc This handout is for information only and is not meant to replace your doctors advice or treatment.

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Giving Your Child Oral Medicine

For older children: ●

Measure the dose using a syringe or pediatric measuring device. You can buy one at a food or drug store. Do not use a kitchen spoon to measure a dose – it is not accurate.

Tablets and capsules ●

Do not crush, chew or open enteric coated or time release tables or capsules. Before mixing any medicine with food, check with your child’s doctor or pharmacist. Some medicines will not work when mixed with foods. If you are able to mix it with food, use small amounts of food so that your child is sure to get the full dose of medicine. Foods like applesauce, juice, jelly, pudding, and ice cream work well. Always tell your child when you put the medicine in his food. Let your child choose the food or drink to use to mix the medicine in. If your doctor or pharmacist says the tablet is OK to crush, you can do it between two spoons or a spoon and a piece of wax paper. To make sure you get the right dose for your child, only split tablets in half that have grooves.

©2006-12 P&H Assoc., Inc This handout is for information only and is not meant to replace your doctors advice or treatment.

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Giving Your Child Oral Medicines