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Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose Why monitor?

Monitoring blood glucose

Self-monitoring is the best way to tell if your diabetes is under control. If you have too much or too little glucose (sugar) in your blood, your doctor may need to change your meal plan, exercise plan or medicine(s).

To self-monitor, you will need a blood glucose meter, a lancing device (lancet) and a test strip. Check with your doctor or diabetes educator to find which meter is best for you and how to get these supplies. There are a number of self-monitoring kits on the market. When you get your kit, read the directions before you use it. Each kit is a little different. When you are ready to test, follow these basic steps:

When to monitor Some people only have to monitor their blood glucose once a day. Others need to test more often. It depends on the type of diabetes you have and how well you control it. Ask your doctor or diabetes educator how often you need to test.

1. Wash your hands well with soap and water. 2. Rub the finger you will be using a couple of times to increase the blood flow to it. 3. Prick the side of the finger tip with the lancet to get a drop of blood. Squeeze a drop large enough to cover the target area. (Use a new lancet each time you test.) 4. Carefully follow the instructions that came with your blood glucose meter. This will give you accurate results. 5. Read your result and record it on your blood glucose record, along with the date and time of day.

My target blood glucose range before meals is: ____to____ 2 hours after meals is: ____to____ at bedtime is: ____to____ Copyright Š 2001 Pritchett & Hull Associates, Inc. DO NOT DUPLICATE.

6. Make sure to dispose of your lancet safely. Check with your doctor or county health department to learn how to do this.

Pritchett & Hull Associates, Inc.

Atlanta, GA 800-241-4925 Providing Quality Health Education Materials Since 1973 ÂŽ

Product # 413


Self-Monitoring of Blood Glucose SAMPLE

Use the chart below to record the date, time(s) and reading(s) of your blood glucose each day. Also show the medicine you take (if any) and any comments you have.

DATE date: diabetes meds

MORNING

DATE date:

MORNING TIME

5-2

INSULIN

diabetes meds comments

MIDDAY

BLOOD GLUCOSE

8 am 118 N 20 Metformin OTHER

500

20 min . walk 5/1 PM

EVENING

BEDTIME

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

TIME

BLOOD GLUCOSE

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

INSULIN

OTHER

comments date: diabetes meds comments date: diabetes meds comments date: diabetes meds comments date: diabetes meds comments date: diabetes meds comments date: diabetes meds comments

Pritchett & Hull Associates, Inc.

Atlanta, GA 800-241-4925 Providing Quality Health Education Materials Since 1973

®

®

Copyright © 2001 Pritchett & Hull Associates, Inc. DO NOT DUPLICATE.


Self_Monitoring of Blood Glucose from P&H  

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