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Palo Alto

Vol. XXXVIII, Number 16

Q

January 20, 2017

California Ave. area eyes parking program Page 5

w w w. P a l o A l t o O n l i n e.c o m

shelters e c n le io v ic t Domes f room o t u o n u r e v ha Page 7

Donate to the HOLIDAY FUND

Page 12

Spectrum 14 Pulse 16 Movies 19 Puzzles 32 Q Arts ‘Crimes of the Heart’ puts comedy first Page 17 Q Home To attract feathered friends, feeders aren’t enough Page 21 Q Sports Eastside Prep grad returns to play at Stanford Page 34


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Page 2 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

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Upfront

Local news, information and analysis

City considers fewer lanes for north Middlefield Palo Alto council to review ‘road diet’ between Lytton Avenue and Menlo Park border by Gennady Sheyner

A

fter years of collisions, congestion and complaints, a bustling, three-block stretch of Middlefield Road near the Menlo Park border may soon be in for a dramatic redesign, including a reduction from four lanes to three. The proposal, which the Palo Alto City Council will consider Monday night, is the culmination

of dozens of car accidents and heavy lobbying from residents along Middlefield, who have long maintained that the deteriorating traffic conditions have created danger for their neighborhood. A group of residents has been meeting with city staff in recent months to discuss potential fixes. Most recently, the collaboration netted two alternatives, each of

which would include as its centerpiece what’s known as a “road diet.” One thing that everyone agrees on is that the status quo isn’t working. According to the city’s traffic study, the area is badly congested during commute hours, with all three Middlefield intersections in the area functioning at levels of service D, E or F (the three lowest grades) during the busy times. On Middlefield and Hawthorne Avenue, which has a level of service F, cars face delays of 126.9 seconds (more than

2 minutes) during the morning peak. Middlefield and Everett Avenue rates an F during the evening peak, with delays of 57.9 seconds. While crawling cars present one problem, speeding cars present another. During off-peak hours, cars on Middlefield — where the speed limit is 25 mph — typically drive between 31 and 34 mph (neighbors report seeing drivers traveling at 50 mph or higher). Collisions are common here given the high volume of cars (an estimated 18,000 on a

typical weekday) and the poor visibility for drivers turning at intersections. Palo Alto staff cited a California Highway Patrol database that showed about 33 reported collisions along these three blocks between 2009 and 2013. Residents believe the number is far higher because many minor accidents aren’t reported. According to city traffic staff, most collisions were “caused by right-of-way violations, and the prevailing crash type was angle (continued on page 10)

EDUCATION

District’s associate superintendent gone Superintendent: Further ‘significant restructuring’ is ahead for district office by Elena Kadvany

P Veronica Weber

Protesting at Palantir The Tech Workers Coalition, a group of technology employees and labor and community organizers, protested on Wednesday, Jan. 18, outside of the downtown Palo Alto headquarters of Palantir, a data-mining firm. They were highly critical of the tools Palantir uses to create databases of personal information that’s been collected by immigration and law-enforcement agencies, which they say could be used to create a registry of Muslim immigrants and visitors to the United States. Go to PaloAltoOnline.com to read the story.

TRANSPORTATION

Evergreen Park could get permit parking program Proposal calls for making 250 permits available to employees in the California Avenue area by Gennady Sheyner

F

or years, residents of Evergreen Park have been raising alarms about employees of California Avenue turning the neighborhood’s streets into parking lots, a problem that has worsened during the recent surge of development in the city’s “second downtown.” On Monday, the City Council may take a giant step toward alleviating those concerns when it

considers a new permit program that would significantly curtail the ability of employees to park in neighborhoods. Largely modeled on the permit program that went into effect downtown in September 2015, the new program around California Avenue would make permits available to every household. It would also make 250 permits available to area employees. For

everyone else, the streets would become a two-hour parking zone. Much like with the downtown program, which many have credited with easing parking congestion in the Professorville, University South and Downtown North neighborhoods, the annual employee permits would be sold for $149 ($50 for low-income (continued on page 9)

alo Alto Unified Associate Superintendent Markus Autrey, the district’s second-in-command who was hired just 18 months ago, left the district at the end of December, district officials confirmed to the Weekly Monday. Autrey was terminated under a provision in his contract that states the employment agreement may be terminated at any time by mutual consent of the parties, according to Scott Bowers, assistant superintendent for human resources. His last day was Dec. 31, Bowers said. No public announcement was made of his departure. Superintendent Max McGee described the decision as a costsaving measure made in response to the district’s ongoing budget deficit. McGee said he gave Autrey six month’s notice last summer, just after the district discovered it was facing a multimillion dollar budget shortfall and starting to search for places to save; however, McGee made no mention of it during numerous school board meetings to discuss the budget problems last summer and fall. Autrey, a former Los Gatos High School principal, was hired to replace Charles Young, who resigned in 2015. McGee said Autrey’s termination was an administrative decision that he informed the school board about but ultimately made himself. The district’s chief student

services officer, Holly Wade, and directors of elementary and secondary education, Barbara Harris and Sharon Ofek, respectively, along with McGee are absorbing Autrey’s responsibilities, the superintendent said. Eliminating the associate superintendent position midyear will result in savings this school year of about $100,000, McGee said. Autrey, with annual compensation totaling $216,000, including a $450 per month car allowance, was the third-highest paid administrator following McGee and Scott Bowers, associate superintendent for human resources. McGee said he does not intend to fill the position and, given the ongoing budget deficit, said “significant restructuring” of the district office is ahead. Autrey’s is the only district office position being eliminated midyear, McGee said, but he will be making recommendations to the board on further cuts this spring. A budget workshop scheduled for Feb. 14 will likely be moved up to Feb. 7 to discuss 2017-18 budget proposals. McGee said he also is eyeing a proposal to bring a consultant in to help the central office become “both more effective and more efficient.” “We’re not going to have as many district office positions next year as we have this year,” McGee said. Q Staff Writer Elena Kadvany can be reached at ekadvany@ paweekly.com.

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 5


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Page 6 â&#x20AC;¢ January 20, 2017 â&#x20AC;¢ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;¢ www.PaloAltoOnline.com

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505) EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Linda Taaffe (223-6511) Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6516) Arts & Entertainment Editor Karla Kane (223-6517) Home & Real Estate Editor Elizabeth Lorenz (223-6534) Assistant Sports Editor Glenn Reeves (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Renee Batti (223-6528) Express & Digital Editor Jamey Padojino (223-6524) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Elena Kadvany (223-6519), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Anna Medina (223-6515) Staff Photographer/Videographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Editorial Intern Patrick Condon Contributors Dale F. Bentson, Mike Berry, Carol Blitzer, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Trevor Felch, Chad Jones, Chris Kenrick, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Andrew Preimesberger, Daryl Savage, Jeanie K. Smith, Jay Thorwaldson ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Marketing Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Adam Carter (223-6573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), V.K. Moudgalya (223-6586) Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Lead Blanca Yoc (223-6596) Sales & Production Coordinator Diane Martin (223-6584) DESIGN Design & Production Manager Kristin Brown (223-6562) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Paul Llewellyn Designers Diane Haas, Rosanna Kuruppu, Doug Young EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Kevin Legarda (223-6597) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Zach Allen (223-6544) Business Associates Cherie Chen (223-6543), Elena Dineva (223-6542), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President & CFO Peter Beller (223-6545) Vice President Sales & Marketing Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Marketing & Creative Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Tatjana Pitts (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Charles Teet The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. ©2016 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

SUBSCRIBE! Support your local newspaper by becoming a paid subscriber. $60 per year. $100 for two years. Name: _________________________________ Address: ________________________________ City/Zip: ________________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto CA 94306

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAlto Online.com/news.

Neighbors challenge three home plans After securing approval from City Hall last year, a proposal to demolish three homes on North California Avenue and to construct three larger homes on the site may plunge back into uncertainty on Monday night, when the City Council considers an appeal from neighbors who say they havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t been adequately notified about the project. (Posted Jan. 18, 9:39 a.m.)

Local hospitals brace for Obamacare repeal With the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump on Friday, Jan. 20, congressional leaders are wasting no time delivering on one of his major campaign promises: the repeal of the Affordable Care Act. And while details are scant on what kind of replacement legislation will be offered, local county and hospital officials are voicing deep concerns that gutting parts of the landmark health care law could force millions of Americans to lose their health coverage. (Posted Jan. 18, 8:41 a.m.)

Bus depot closes for nine days The Palo Alto Transit Center bus depot temporarily closed beginning Tuesday, Jan. 17, for nine days due to a City of Palo Alto construction project, transit agency officials in Santa Clara and San Mateo counties said. Caltrain service will not be affected. The depot is set to reopen on Thursday, Jan. 26. (Posted Jan. 16, 12:08 p.m.)

Police nab boy, 13, driving stolen car Menlo Park Police are investigating whether a 13-year-old driver and his three passengers, whom officers detained on Saturday, Jan. 14, for driving a car reported stolen from East Palo Alto, are connected to a string of recent burglaries in and around Menlo Park. (Posted Jan. 15, 1:04 p.m.)

Court rejects aircraft noise petition Efforts aimed at reducing noise in the skies above Portola Valley, Ladera and Woodside as commercial aircraft head into San Francisco International Airport were dealt a setback recently by a three-judge panel in the U. S. Ninth Circuit Court of Appeals. A related development, however, may give cause for optimism. (Posted Jan. 14, 8:05 a.m.)

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week BOARD OF EDUCATION RETREAT ... The school board will convene for an all-day retreat to discuss goal review and revision and board governance. The meeting will run from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 23, at the district office, 25 Churchill Ave. CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to meet in a closed session for property negotiations with Palo Alto Housing over Plum Tree Apartments at 3020-3038 Emerson St. The council will then hear a presentation from the Santa Clara Valley Transportation Authority on its Next Network Initiative; consider a lane-reduction project on Middlefield Road, between downtown and the Menlo Park city line; and consider creating a new Residential Preferential Parking program in the Evergreen Park and Mayfield neighborhoods. The closed session will begin at 5 p.m. on Monday, Jan. 23. Regular meeting will immediately follow in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave. BOARD OF EDUCATION ... The school board will hear an informational update on the districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Local Control Accountability Plan (LCAP), discuss a college readiness block grant, a draft resolution agreement with the U.S. Department of Educationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office for Civil Rights, a status report on new mathematics curriculum adoption and vote on a board commitment to provide opportunity for public comment. The meeting will begin at 6:30 p.m. on Jan. 24 at the district office, 25 Churchill Ave. BOARD POLICY REVIEW COMMITTEE ... The school boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s policy review committee will meet at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Jan. 26, at the district office, 25 Churchill Ave., Room A. LIBRARY ADVISORY COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the Library Strategic Plan 2018-2021, have a follow-up discussion about the College Terrace Library and discuss the 2017 commission assignments. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 26, in the Community Meeting Room at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave.


Upfront

Photo by Veronica Weber

Maria De Lourdes Cordova Diaz stands in front of the entrance to the YWCA in San Jose, whose domestic violence shelter she once stayed in after fleeing from an abusive situation.

No place to go Domestic-violence shelters are turning away victims for lack of space by Sue Dremann

I

t doesn’t matter if they are rich or poor, longtime residents or new immigrants. Thousands of domestic-violence survivors in Santa Clara County are in the same boat: When they decide to leave their abusers, many find there is no shelter to take them in. In Santa Clara County, domestic-violence shelters can take in just 63 people at a time — and turn away nearly 2,500 requests annually, advocates say. But such shelters can mean the difference between victims rebuilding their lives and returning to their abusers. Emergency shelters for survivors of domestic violence offer critical services not found in homeless shelters, such as trauma counseling. And unlike homeless shelters, the addresses of domestic violence shelters are confidential to protect victims from their abusers. “It’s a sanctuary; it ensures that it is truly a respite for the individual,” said Tanis Crosby, chief executive officer of YWCA Silicon Valley, which runs an emergency shelter, crisis hotline, transitionalhousing program, advocacy and other support programs. For those who are lucky enough to find a bed in an emergency shelter, the stays are short. State funding allows up to a 30-day stay with the possibility of a 15-day extension for emergency shelters, a model that is designed for emergency situations. In that time victims are coping with their trauma, getting restraining orders, working on immigration issues and accessing public financial assistance. Many victims cycle from one shelter to another as they try to pull their lives together. The process can take years, even after finding transitional housing,

which also is difficult in Silicon Valley, advocates said. Most domestic-violence shelters and services are in south Santa Clara County. There are no such facilities in the county north of Sunnyvale to serve Palo Alto, Mountain View and Los Altos residents, according to advocates. Yet in Palo Alto, domestic violence is “very common,” said Katie Ritchey, founder of Palo Altobased Deborah’s Palm, a women’s resource center. Victims of domestic violence come to Deborah’s Palm “almost every day,” she said. “It is always there. They beat around the bush; they ask for other services, and 10 to 30 minutes later they tell you they are experiencing domestic violence,” she said. Silicon Valley’s stressful and expensive environment “works as a catalyst” for conflict within homes, Ritchey said. “What’s interesting about Palo Alto is that (abuse) is very well hidden, very well disguised. The woman is often fiscally more dependent. The domestic violence can be overt or covert; the victim can be verbally trapped. It is power over position, where the man is very controlling,” she said. Deborah’s Palm does not have a shelter, but it refers clients to shelters, she said. “It frustrates me that we don’t have the capacity of services we need in an affluent community,” Ritchey said. More problematic for Palo Alto area victims than being sheltered far from their homes is their sense of being misunderstood in the shelters. There’s an assumption that victims from wealthy areas are in less need — a presumption that seems bolstered when they

drive up in the Mercedes they have been living in or walk in wearing their expensive clothes, she said. But these victims can be as impoverished as their counterparts. Abusive partners often have the power, money and attorneys to hide assets and cut off access, said Ruth Patrick, executive director of WomenSV, a Los Altos advocacy organization. WomenSV helps victims of affluent abusers. When it comes to emergency housing, Patrick has searched far outside of the county for an open bed. “I have spent up to eight hours with survivors on the phone calling shelters. Every now and then I find a space, usually in Oakland,” she said. “It’s only slightly less impossible to find a space during the week than it is on the weekend,” she added. Patrick estimated that about 60 to 70 percent don’t have another place to stay — that have no relatives or friends with whom they would be safe. But giving people shelter so that they can then work on their problems is critical. Erin O., a client of Patrick’s, said she was fortunate to have friends and family who helped her. Even then, progress toward a stable life has been slow. She spent a year couch surfing. “I had just one suitcase of

clothes, and 2 1/2 years later, that’s still all I have,” she said. She was able to force the sale of her and her former partner’s house through civil court and now rents a room in a friend’s home. “That’s what saved me,” she said. Sandra Hernandez, the shelter coordinator for YWCA Silicon Valley, said that housing saves some victims’ lives. Because of the lack of housing and basic necessities for survival, victims can return to their abusers, some with fatal consequences. “Some women don’t make it; we never get to meet them,” Hernandez said. “It is very, very difficult to find a place in the county.” Maria De Lourdes Cordova Diaz’s journey emphasizes the difficulties posed by a lack of housing. Cordova has utilized every shelter in Santa Clara County. Cordova first received help from a local church when she was living in Ohio. She lived in a series of shelters there for nearly two years. To earn money for food, she cleaned houses with a woman she met at the shelter. In September 2014, two years after her ordeal began, she moved to the Bay Area to find relatives with the help of a plane ticket from the church. But three months later — and eight months pregnant — she again found herself in what she called a bad domestic situation. This

time, she contacted a crisis line. Community Overcoming Relationship Abuse (CORA) in San Mateo County did not have any available beds, but the staff put her up in a hotel and gave her food until a shelter bed became available through another agency. She arrived at the YWCA shelter on Dec. 29, 2014. “I was completely alone,” she said. CORA employees called the YWCA, who got Cordova into their shelter, where she received counseling and had her baby. And for the first time, she began to understand what had been happening to her since coming to the U.S. “I learned that I had experienced domestic violence. I know what that means now. I was thinking everything was my fault,” she said. Cordova said that Hernandez, who was a shelter advocate at that time, helped her even after Cordova had to move to other shelters. “She said, ‘You can do it. You are so smart. You have a lot of resources, so you don’t feel alone,’” Cordova recalled. A year ago Cordova moved into transitional housing through a “rapid re-housing” program that pays for her rent for up to two years. The program allows her to save money and build a stable economic base and career so she (continued on page 11)

DOMESTIC VIOLENCE BY THE NUMBERS PALO ALTO (in 2016)

SANTA CLARA COUNTY

Kristin Brown

COVER STORY

50%

63

2,500

89

Emergency shelter beds

Victims turned away from shelters annually

Domesticviolence calls to police

Shelter residents who are children

Victims who are professionals/ retired

62

50%

Calls involving battery

Sources: Santa Clara County District Attorney’s Office; YWCA Silicon Valley; Santa Clara County Domestic Violence Death Review Team; Domestic Violence Advocacy Consortium Santa Clara County; Palo Alto Police Department; Santa Clara County Department of Public Health. www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 7


Upfront TRANSPORTATION

Managers worry parking program could harm business While some employees would not be affected, parking limits could add stress for others who work along California Avenue

O

utright surprise â&#x20AC;&#x201D; thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the overwhelming reaction of business owners and managers to Palo Altoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s possible implementation of permit parking along streets surrounding the California Avenue Business District. At more than a dozen businesses along California Avenue the Weekly visited to talk about the pending Residential Parking Permit program, all but two people were either unaware of it or largely unaware of its details. The pilot program, if approved by the City Council Monday, would expand the current two-hour parking restrictions from the business district to the adjacent Evergreen Park and Mayfield residential neighborhoods starting this April. To park for longer in one of the 1,000 street parking spots, one would need to buy a permit. Under the plan, only 250 permits would be sold to area employees, leaving a majority of

workers with few all-day parking options. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wow. I had no idea. ... Just wow,â&#x20AC;? said Steve Oberhauser, coowner of the family-owned The Cobblery on California Avenue. The shoe store, which has four owners and no other staff, has two designated parking spots behind the shop and will not be affected by the program, but Oberhauser said heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s still concerned about what the restrictions will mean for other businesses in the area. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What are restaurants going to do? They have huge staffs,â&#x20AC;? he said, shaking his head. Christian Iraheta, manager of Izzyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Bagels near the El Camino Real end of California Avenue, was also unaware of program, despite the fact that the city conducted community workshops, focus groups and surveys of residents and property owners. Iraheta said he fears the new program could â&#x20AC;&#x153;create a lot of chaosâ&#x20AC;? because now employees

wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t have any reason to park outside of the business district, which will mean more cars in an area thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already congested. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be a giant cluster,â&#x20AC;? he said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already bad as it is.â&#x20AC;? His workers have 8- to 10-hour shifts, so the two-hour parking limit is â&#x20AC;&#x153;pretty inconvenient,â&#x20AC;? as it is, he added. Michael Ekwall, manager of restaurant La Bodeguita Del Medio, participated in some of the city outreach meetings but conceded, â&#x20AC;&#x153;There isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t a satisfactory answer for everybody involved.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m totally compassionate with people that live in the neighborhoods, but this is really just kind of an issue that, in my opinion, the city has created. They were pushing for high-density development on California Avenue ... (It) goes back to over a decade ago when the city was encouraging high-density development in our neighborhood,â&#x20AC;? Ekwall said. Businesses on and near

Veronica Weber

by Anna Medina, Linda Taaffe and Patrick Condon

Cars line Oxford Avenue in the Evergreen Park neighborhood on Jan. 19. Two of the three blocks are typically 85 percent full of parked cars by mid-day, according to a city analysis. California Avenue are running out of options for their employees, he said, predicting that businesses would be threatened by an already difficult business environment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s hard to attract good employees as it is, with the cost,â&#x20AC;? Ekwall said. Ekwall said that he and others had lobbied the city for longer parking periods (four hours instead of two), a request that he said largely fell on deaf ears. He also said that they had lobbied for permits that could be transferred

between employees; the city staff report, however, states only that a transferable tag â&#x20AC;&#x153;mayâ&#x20AC;? be part of the program. Overall, Ekwall said he felt the wishes of residents probably have outweighed those of the business owners in the cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s eyes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When you have a small group of people and then you have an entire neighborhood of residents â&#x20AC;&#x201D; who are you going to listen to?â&#x20AC;? he said. Ekwall and Mollie Stoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s manager John Garcia were the only people the Weekly spoke

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Page 8 â&#x20AC;˘ January 20, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ www.PaloAltoOnline.com


Upfront

Parking (continued from page 5)

Veronica Weber

A parking enforcement officer drives down Park Boulevard in Palo Alto, where two-hour time limits are enforced. Just one block away, in the Evergreen Park residential neighborhood, people can park all day. That could change if a proposed permit-parking program is adopted. with who said they were aware of the city plan. (Of the 342 city surveys sent to businesses last fall, just 37 were returned). The new program won’t have much of an impact on the grocery store’s 30 or so employees, Garcia said. “It probably will cause them to park a couple of blocks farther away, but they’re already moving their cars every two hours now. They don’t have designated spots or permits ... A couple do take the train,” he said. Paola Campos, cashier at Palo Alto Baking Company, said many

of her co-workers take public transportation or are dropped off at work. She anticipated the new program would most impact part-time employees who already struggle to find parking and have to move their cars every couple of hours to avoid a parking ticket. “Parking is already a pain, and this might add stress and deter customers,” said Taqueria Azteca’s Fernando Miranda, who was taken aback when informed of the program. He said employees at the restaurant won’t be directly impacted, though, because the business has its own

designated parking. Raymond Luu of Performance Gains gym noted that most staff members park on Birch Street and College Avenue, where street parking currently is unrestricted. Like Garcia, he said employees would just have to park farther out. He’s more worried about how the new restrictions could impact business, particularly customers interested in staying in the area longer than two hours. If the council approves the program on Monday, residents and employers can expect it to go into effect as soon as April 1. Q

workers). Residents would get one free permit and an option to buy up to four more for $50 each. If the council approves the program Monday, enforcement of the one-year pilot program would begin on April 1. Under the proposal, the parking restrictions would be in effect from 8 a.m. to 6 p.m. Monday through Friday. One potential point of debate is boundaries. When residents petitioned the city in March to create the permit district, the area was bounded by Park Boulevard, the Caltrain rail corridor, Cambridge Avenue and El Camino Real. Since then, city staff decided to add the Mayfield neighborhood, thus stretching the district’s southern boundary to Page Mill Road. (A parking analysis conducted last year found that 13 blocks in Evergreen Park were more than 85 percent full of parked cars; eight blocks in Mayfield were parked to that level.) According to city surveys mailed to residents in November, 72 percent of the Evergreen Park respondents favor the new program, while only 60 percent do in Mayfield. Planning staff said the inclusion of Mayfield “is necessary to better distribute permitted

employee parking and prevent the relocation of unpermitted employee and long-term parking to the Mayfield area.” “This decision was reached after discussing various other scenarios with residents, employers and other stakeholders,” the report stated. The Planning and Transportation Commission, in its consideration of the proposal, was somewhat skeptical about including Mayfield and recommended the area be made “eligible” for entering the district on a blockby-block basis. The commission also recommended the permit district be assigned subzones, with the permits specifying the subzone in which the car can park. This way, employees’ cars would be dispersed throughout the area rather than concentrated along those blocks closest to California Avenue. At the commission’s Dec. 14 meeting, Terry Holzemer, who lives on California Avenue, asked for one modification to the program: fewer permits for area employees. Giving employees 250 parking spaces every year, he said, is effectively “allowing them to park in our neighborhood on a really permanent basis.” Q Editor’s note: The Palo Alto Weekly is headquartered on Cambridge Avenue, within the business district.

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Upfront

Middlefield

Middlefield Rd

Middlefield Rd

Everett Ave

Everett Ave

Source: City of Palo Alto

or broadside.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Several have resulted in injuries and/or have encroached onto the sidewalk area or private properties, creating safety and quality of life concerns for the residents that live and travel along Middlefield Road,â&#x20AC;? the report states. The cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s already attempted some changes: In 2015, it began prohibiting left turns onto Middlefield from Hawthorne and Everett. During peak hours, cars are also prohibited from going straight across Middlefield and must turn right. This, however, did not solve the problem: Lefthand turns during the evening rush hour at Middlefield and Hawthorne actually went up from 42 to 57 after the change, according to city staff. Now, the city is preparing to take road safety to the next level. Under the first of two alternatives â&#x20AC;&#x201D; known as 7A â&#x20AC;&#x201D; the section of Middlefield between Lytton and Palo Alto avenues would be redesigned so that instead of two lanes of traffic going in each direction, there would be one, along with a left-turn lane in the middle. In the southbound direction, the single lane would become two lanes between Everett and Lytton avenues, while the northbound direction would remain a single lane.

Concept 7B

Concept 7A

(continued from page 5)

Two alternatives for reconfiguring three blocks of Middlefield Road in Palo Alto, from Lytton Avenue to the border of Menlo Park, will be considered by the City Council Monday. In option 7A, there would be one northbound and two southbound lanes between Lytton and Everett Avenue and one northbound, one turning lane and one southbound lane from Everett to Palo Alto Avenue. The Lytton intersection would also have a left-turn lane going north. In option 7B, there would be one northbound, one turning lane and two southbound lanes from Lytton to Palo Alto Avenue. Medians installed at the Everett and Hawthorne intersections would ensure drivers could only turn right onto Middlefield. According to the Federal Highway Administration, such a â&#x20AC;&#x153;road dietâ&#x20AC;? results in 19 to 47 percent fewer crashes. It also lessens the difference between vehicle

We are currently recruiting for: Historic Resources Board 3 terms ending December 15, 2019 Parks and Recreation Commission 4 terms ending December 15, 2019 1 term ending December, 15, 2018 Planning and Transportation Commission 1 term ending December, 15, 2018 Deadline: January 27, 2017 at 4:30pm APPLICATIONS AVAILABLE ONLINE: http://bit.ly/bcapplications

Questions? Contact the *P[`*SLYRÂťZ6É&#x2030;JL H[ ÉŤVY David.Carnahan@CityofPaloAlto.org Page 10 â&#x20AC;˘ January 20, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ www.PaloAltoOnline.com

speeds and integrates the roadway â&#x20AC;&#x153;into surrounding uses that results in an enhanced quality of life,â&#x20AC;? according to a report from the Department of Planning and Community Environment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A key feature of a road diet is that it allows reclaimed space to be allocated for other uses, such as turn lanes, bus lanes, pedestrian refuge islands, bike lanes, sidewalks, bus shelters, parking or landscaping,â&#x20AC;? the report states. Under the second proposal, known as 7B, the number of lanes would be reduced from two

to one in the northbound direction. Southbound, however, the two-lane configuration would remain along the entire stretch. In between the southbound and northbound lanes, a left-turn lane would give local residents the ability to turn into their driveways. Unlike in 7A, this alternative does not include bike lanes. Both proposals include median barriers on Middlefield to prevent left turns from Everett and Hawthorne avenues. John Guislin, a Middlefield resident who has been leading the

charge for improvements, told the Weekly that for residents in his area, 7A is clearly the preferred choice â&#x20AC;&#x153;by a huge margin.â&#x20AC;? By creating a buffer zone between the sidewalk and the roadway, the design makes it easier for drivers turning onto Middlefield to see other cars. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Accidents can happen because people edge out to look if they can turn,â&#x20AC;? Guislin told the Weekly. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having the lanes that create a 5-foot-wide buffer zone each way improves the visibility.â&#x20AC;? Out of nine possible redesign alternatives, the group of neighbors gave option 7A a grade of A- and option 7B a D. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It only slows the northbound traffic but not the southbound,â&#x20AC;? Guislin said of 7B. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t improve driveway exits or access, and it doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t improve the sight lines.â&#x20AC;? In its report to the council, the group noted that the volume of traffic on Middlefield has almost doubled since 2013, when there were about 10,000 vehicles per day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This increase in traffic has brought increased accidents, increased average speed, increased congestion and significantly reduced quality of life,â&#x20AC;? the neighbors wrote. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People feel unsafe in their front yards and on the sidewalk.â&#x20AC;? The council will consider both configurations Monday and decide whether to approve one of them on a one-year pilot basis. If the council approves the $200,000 project, design will be completed in the spring and construction will begin shortly thereafter, according to staff. Q Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be reached at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.


Upfront

TAILGATE T AIL

Yo

Shelter (continued from page 7)

can take over the payments. She has gotten a work permit and has enrolled in San Jose City College, where she takes English as a Second Language classes. She is working on getting a U visa, which is granted victims of crimes who testify in court. She has a car and now makes more money as an Uber driver than she did as a janitor, her previous job. But she aspires to achieve much more. Cordova is slowly starting her own baby-clothing business. And she was the 2016 recipient of the YWCA Silicon Valley’s Empowerment Award for her bravery and advocacy. “My goal is to be a psychologist,” she said. Hernandez said the YWCA’s rapid re-housing program supports 21 domestic violence survivors through funding provided by the U.S. Office of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and local donors. Such programs are used by some agencies to help homeless persons to achieve stability more quickly and could be replicated if more funding was available, advocates said. Cordova said finding a landlord who would accept the rapid rehousing vouchers was difficult. She finally found a place by sharing a two-bedroom home with another woman in transitional housing. Hernandez said that in the current housing market, people who have Section 8 federal subsidies can’t find housing. Landlords don’t want to be locked into the rents while real estate is skyrocketing. The survivors must move far away from jobs and resources. “Some go to Fresno, Stockton, Manteca,” she said. Other organizations running shelters also have found it difficult to find shelter space and transitional housing for their clients. San Jose-based Asian Americans for Community Involvement (AACI) runs a 12-bed shelter, the Asian Women’s Home, which services 110 survivors a year, said Melissa Luke, domestic-violence program manager. The organization works largely with Asian immigrants who speak a number of languages and may face immigration issues, particularly when an abuser uses immigration status as a tool for abuse. Partners won’t tell victims if they have filed papers to make their status legal and may threaten them by saying they will be deported or jailed if they try to leave. On top of sky-high rents, many survivors also face a lack of affordable child care. County statistics state that about 50 percent of those housed in domestic violence shelters are children who come with a parent. While child care is an issue for everyone in the valley, those living in shelters have an especially difficult time. “It’s impossible as a single parent. How are they going to take care of their child while working on trying to find stable housing?” Luke said. There is a glimmer of hope. County voters approved Measure A on Nov. 8, a $950 million bond

designed to fund the acquisition or improvement of an estimated 5,000 affordable-housing units and give assistance to 1,000 first-time homebuyers. But how much of the funding would go specifically to house survivors of domestic abuse has not been determined, advocates said. Luke and Crosby said they are hopeful that the county can prioritize housing for persons fleeing domestic violence. “We know that this is a critical

public-safety issue,” Crosby said. She and Luke said while the housing supply is an immediate issue, there is also a greater need for early intervention, awareness programs in schools regarding abuse, batterer intervention and other “flexible support” programs. Such programs can help keep the family safe and ensure none have to move out of their homes. Q Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

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of Palo Alto government action this week

City Council

The council did not meet this week.

Architectural Review Board (Jan. 19)

Zoo:The board reviewed the proposed design for the expansion of the Junior Museum and Zoo and requested that the building be redesigned and made more child-friendly and more respectful of the Rinconada Park context.Action: None

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www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 11


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Thank you for supporting the Holiday Fund Through January 13, 2017, 365 donors have contributed $345,200 to the Holiday Fund. 32 Anonymous ................ $108,759

Sally Hewlett .......................... 2,000

Madeline Wong .......................... 50

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Reed Content ........................... 275

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Jean Doble .................................... *

Page 12 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Nancy Peterson ........................... 75 David Thom .............................. 100 Ed & Linda Selden ..................... 225 Carroll Harrington ..................... 100 Barbara & Charles Stevens ............ * Karen Sipprell ........................... 250 George & Ruth Chippendale ......... * Charles & Jean Thompson ............. * Courtney & Kathy Bryant .............. * Ellmann Family ............................ 50 John & Lynn Wiese.................... 100 Paul & Maureen Roskoph .......... 100 Lodato Family ........................... 500 Harry & Susan Hartzell .............. 100


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Richard Morris ....................... 1,500

Dena Goldberg ......................... 500

The Braff Family ........................ 500

Michael Nelson ........................... 50

Sharon & Leif Erickson .............. 250

The Epstein Family .................... 200

Solon Finkelstein ....................... 150

Thomas Rindfleisch ....................... *

Chris Kenrick ......................... 1,000

Cathy Kroymann ....................... 250

Charles Williams ....................... 100

The Stauffer Family ................... 500

Havern Family ........................ 5,000

Gail Taylor ................................. 200

Nancy Steege ............................ 100

Nigel Jones ................................. 50

Nina & Norman Kulgein ............ 250

Pamela Mayfield ....................... 100

Deborah Baldwin & Lawrence Markosian .............. 200

Constance Crawford ..................... *

Hugh MacMillan ....................... 500

Linda & Steve Boxer ...................... *

Bjorn Liencres ........................ 1,000

Teresa Roberts........................ 2,000

Patti Yanklowitz & Mark Krasnow ....................... 150

Bill Johnson & Terri Lobdell ..... 1,000 Arden King ................................. 25

In Memory Of Edward & Elizabeth Buurma .......... *

Jacquie Rush ............................. 100

David Labaree ........................... 200

Tinney Family ............................ 250

Marilyn Sutorius ........................ 300

Dan & Chris Logan .................... 100

Joyce & Gerry Barker ................. 200

Bonnie Berg .............................. 300

Mary Festinger .............................. *

Don & Dee Price............................ *

Philip Gottheiner ........................... *

Hal & Iris Korol .............................. *

Ellen & Mike Turbow ................. 250

Lindsey Draper .......................... 200

Anna Messner........................... 250

John & Mary Schaefer ............... 100

Hal & Carol Louchheim ............. 400

Al Bernal ....................................... *

Patricia Levin ................................. *

Micki & Bob Cardelli ..................... *

Carol Bacchetti ......................... 200

Ludwig Tannenwald ...................... *

Stan & W Marie Scott ............... 100

Shirley Ely ................................. 500

Bruce Campbell ........................ 200

M. Cairns & A. Martin ............... 100

David & Diane Feldman .......... 1,000

Stan Shore ................................ 500

Mary Fran, Joe & Stephenn Scroggs ............... 100

Cindy & Dennis Dillon ............... 202

Sallie & Jay Whaley ....................... *

Roy & Carol Blitzer ........................ *

Tracy & Alan Herrick ...................... *

Howard Wolf ............................ 500

Veronica Tincher ....................... 125

Sally & Craig Nordlund .............. 500

Ryan ............................................. *

Stephanie Klein & Larry Baer ......... *

Al & Joanne Russell ................... 300

Tom & Ellen Ehrich .................... 300

Maria Serpa ................................ 30

Marlys Keoshian........................ 200

Lijun & Jia-Ning Xiang ............... 200

Eve & John Melton .................... 500

Bob Markevitch............................. *

Robert Gamburd ....................... 500

Margaret & Les Fisher ............... 100

Nancy & Joe Huber ................... 100

Carol Berkowitz ............................ *

Carolyn Williams & Mike Keeler .... * Amy Harris & Jopss Geiduschek. 100 Jeremy Platt & Sandra Murphy ...... * Hugh McDevitt ......................... 200 Hans & Judith Steiner ................ 100 Hoda Epstein ................................ * Sandra & Scott Pearson ............. 500 Sally O’Neil & Ken Bencala ........ 100 Fran Codispoti .......................... 500 Marvin & Kate Feinstein ............ 150 David & Virginia Pollard............. 150 David & Karen Backer ............... 500 Rosalie Shepherd ...................... 100 Lani Freeman & Stephen Monismith ................ 150 Herb & Alice Fischgrund ............ 175 Douglas & Leslie Murphy-Chutorian .............. 1,000

As a Gift For E G Lund Family ........................ 100 In Honor Of Kaye Kelley & Richard Van Dusen250 Ada’s Café, a tasty treasure ........... * Lucy Berman’s Clients............. 2,500 Lynn Radzilowski ........................... * Jill, Scott, Polly, Hayley, Jake & Garrett ..................... 1,200

Organizations Palo Alto Weekly Moonlight Run & Walk ...... 25,907 Sponsors of Moonlight Run: Palo Alto Medical Foundation ....................... 10,000 Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Foundation ............ 5,000 Stanford Federal Credit Union.................................. 5,000

Virginia Laibl ............................. 100

Karen & Steve Ross ....................... *

Betty Gerard ............................. 100

Tracy Herrick ............................. 500

Meri Gruber & James Tayler........... *

Gordon Chamberlain ................ 250

Robyn Crumly ............................... *

Bob Donald................................... *

Palantir ............................... 5,000

Ellen & Ron Krasnow................. 500

Norman & Nancy Rossen ........... 200

Peter Stern ................................ 250

Ando & Barbara MacDonell....... 250

DeLeon Realty ..................... 5,000

Jim & Nancy Baer .......................... *

Aaron O’Neill ................................ *

Lakin Spears........................ 2,000

Katharine Rogers King .................. *

Bank of the West ................ 1,000

Laure Woods ............................ 100

Mr. & Mrs. Robert Loarie ............... *

Xiaofan Lin ................................. 50

Fred & Deborah Kurland ........... 200

Drew McCalley & Marilyn Green ........................ 100

Marina Remmel ........................ 500

Elizabeth Salzer & Richard Baumgartner.................. *

Emmett Lorey ............................... *

Peery Foundation ................. 10,000

Mark Kreutzer........................... 100

Barbara Klein & Stan Schrier.......... *

Becky Schaefer.............................. *

Packard Foundation ............ 25,000

Bandy & Diane Sikic .................. 300

Judith Appleby .......................... 200

Ernest J. Moore ......................... 200

Hewlett Foundation ............. 25,000

Romola Georgia ............................ *

Robert Simoni ........................... 200

Caroline Zlotnick ........................... *

Jim Byrnes ................................ 100

Harrell Remodeling ....................... *

Colleen Anderson ..................... 250

Craig Jurney ............................. 100

Bobbie & Jerry Wagger.................. *

Betty Meltzer ................................ *

Bryan Wilson & Geri Martin Wilson ................. 100

Michael Kieschnick........................ *

Harry & Susan Hartzell .............. 200

Bob Wolbach .............................. 50

Alta Mesa Cemetery & Funeral Home .................. 1,800

John Wilkes .............................. 300

Diane Moore................................. *

Ted Linden ................................ 200

Helene Pier ................................... *

Joe & Rema Cotton ................... 100

Phil Hanawalt & Graciela Spivak ....................... 500

Leonard Ely, Jr. .......................... 250

Gwen Barry............................... 100

Georgie Gleim .......................... 500 Steve & Diane Ciesinski ............. 500 Merele McClure ........................ 500 Richard Ellson ........................... 100 Betsy & George Bechtel............. 100 The Gallo Family ....................... 500 Vic & Mary Ojakian ................... 200 Janice Bohman.......................... 250 Richard & Karen Olson .............. 200 The Dawes Family ..................... 250 Richard Zuanich .......................... 75 Cynthia Costell ......................... 100 Bonnie Packer and Robert Raymakers ............................. 100

Sally & Abdo Kadifa ............... 1,000 Robert & Barbara Simpson ............ * Debbie Nusinson ....................... 100 Joanne Koltnow ........................ 300 Michael & Jean Couch .............. 250 Susan Hyder................................ 20 Merrill & Lee Newman .................. * Brigid Barton & Rob Robinson ... 200 Laurie Jarrett ................................. * Bill & Barbara Busse .................. 200 Jody Maxmin ................................ * Tony & Judy Kramer ...................... * Beth & Peter Rosenthal ............. 300

Edward Kanazawa ........................ * Steve & Nancy Levy ................... 500 Eugene & Mabel Dong .............. 200 Roger Smith .............................. 300 Jim & Alma Phillips .................... 250 Donald & Adele Langendorf ...... 200 Ann & Don Rothblatt .................... * Bob & Edie Kirkwood .................... * George & Betsy Young .............. 100 Richard & Tish Fagin.................. 300 Brigid Barton............................. 500

Glen A. Lillington, MD .............. 200 Marie & Don Snow ................... 100 Nate Rosenberg ........................ 150 Willie Branch ................................ * August Lee King ........................... * Ruth & Chet Johnson .................... * Robert Lobdell .............................. * Y.C. and Er-Ying Yen ................. 250 Abe and Helene Klein ................... *

Attorney Susan Dondershine ..... 200 Good Bear and Co. Charitable Fund .................. 5,000 Bleibler Properties LLC............... 500 deLemos Properties ................... 300 Carl King/Mayfield Mortgage ........ * Palo Alto Business Park Judd Properties........................... * Reach 4U Coaching Lee Zulman ............................ 100 United Methodist Women of First United Methodist Church in Palo Alto ............................ 300

Mrs. Katina D. Higbee ............... 200 Helen Rubin .............................. 200 Dr. & Mrs. Irving Rubin .............. 200

Mitchell Rosen ............................ 50

Page & Ferrell Sanders............... 100

David Wynn .................................. *

Bill Reller ....................................... *

Lawrence Yang & Jennifer Kuan ...................... 1,000

Eric & Anne Kastner ............... 2,500

Roger & Joan Warnke ............... 275

Richard Johnsson ................... 7,000

Leo & Sylvia Breidenbach .............. *

Star Teachout ............................ 100

Catherine Dolton ...................... 200

Ted & Ginny Chu........................... *

Thomas & Louise Phinney.............. *

Joan & Robert Jack.................... 300

Lee Sendelbeck ......................... 500

John & Florine Galen ................. 100

Laddie Hughes .............................. *

Mehdi Alhassani ....................... 150

Ruth Rosenbaum .......................... *

Jan Thomson & Roy Levin.......... 250

Pam Grady ................................ 250

Weil Family .............................. 250

Tom & Patricia Sanders .................. *

Vince & Amanda Steckler ....... 1,000

Yoko Nonaka ................................ *

Max & Anna Blanker ................. 200

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 13


Editorial A new parking mess? Proposed parking program for California Avenue neighborhoods needs fine-tuning or it will fail

T

he debate over who should be entitled to park in residential neighborhoods adjacent to business districts will be renewed Monday night when the City Council is set to decide on whether to approve a new restrictive parking program for the neighborhoods north and south of the California Avenue business district. The arguments are mostly the same as those made when the controversial parking program was finally implemented in downtown but with a few twists that add complexities and potential problems that have gone unaddressed by the city staff. The primary goal, as it was downtown, is to reduce the number of employees of nearby businesses parking in the neighborhood and ensure that residents are able to park near their homes. We supported the creation of the downtown parking program as necessary to solve this problem and we support implementing a similar program for the California Avenue area (where the Palo Alto Weekly’s offices are located). But the plan recommended by the city staff is flawed and needs revision in several important respects. First, the recommendation that only 125 employee permits be issued for parking in the entire Evergreen Park neighborhood is apparently based on a false assumption that residents’ cars that are parked on the street do not leave during the day. A city survey found that there are 655 on-street parking spaces in the neighborhood, of which approximately 300, less than half the capacity, are utilized at night by residents, leaving 355 open. Limiting the number of employee permits issued to only 125 during a one-year trial period is too conservative and runs the unnecessary risk of pushing employee parking into the Old Palo Alto neighborhood, which lies at the eastern end of the California Avenue pedestrian tunnel, among other problems. Second, the staff recommendation makes no mention of the more restrictive College Terrace residential parking program, which currently prohibits all employee parking. Those rules long ago pushed employees of businesses located west of El Camino to parking in the Evergreen Park neighborhood. This raises a critical question of why College Terrace should be entitled to protection from all employee parking, effectively imposing it on another neighborhood. Some number of employee permits need to be available to those employees for parking in the close-in portions of the College Terrace neighborhood. Third, the staff acknowledges that an unknown number of cars parking in the neighborhoods surrounding California Avenue are Caltrain commuters but offers no solution for where they will go. With plentiful unregulated street parking available east of Alma Street, expect an immediate problem in that neighborhood and a request by residents there to restrict parking. Finally, the recommendation fails to include needed reforms to the current permit system for area’s city parking lots and garages intended to serve employees. The city reports it currently has a waiting list of 250 seeking parking permits for these lots, yet except for the lunch hour there are plenty of empty parking places in the two garages and the many parking lots. This would be a good time to experiment with having no cap on the number of permits issued for the garages and lots, doing away with the waiting list entirely. It would also benefit employers if the city issued transferable permits that can be passed from one employee to another. Currently, when employers attempt to obtain permits for new employees, especially low-wage, high-turnover service workers, by the time the employees get to the top of the waiting list they have left their job. There is much good to build on in the current proposed plan. The reduced price ($50) for an annual residential parking permit for low-income workers and the inclusion of the Mayfield neighborhood south of California Avenue (to Page Mill Road) are important elements. The generous availability of permits to residents, modeled after what has been successfully implemented downtown, gives needed flexibility for households with multiple cars, frequent overnight guests or service workers. We urge the council to double the number of employee permits to be issued during the trial year to 250 each in Evergreen Park and Mayfield and establish a goal of total usage of neighborhood parking places during the daytime to no more than 75 percent. It should also direct the staff to develop a smaller parallel employee permitting program for College Terrace and conduct an outreach effort to residents living to the east of the California Avenue tunnel so they are aware of the program and its possible consequences. We’ve learned a lot from what has happened downtown, and we should put that learning to good use as we implement a needed program for the California Avenue area. Q

Page 14 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Spectrum Editorials, letters and opinions

Guest Opinion Common goals, hopes should help us meet challenges by Patrick Burt

A

s we begin the year, three new members join the City Council and three of us exit. The new members have just come out of an exceptionally contentious and expensive campaign that focused on the types, amounts and impacts of development. They join three others who came on board only two years ago, making this the least experienced council in decades. They will face challenges out of the gate: the need to understand the complexities of our local government with its full set of utilities and many services, the difficulty of reconciling their campaign rhetoric with the reality of competing priorities, the costs and feasibility of implementing their ideas, and the need to work with their colleagues to develop initiatives that are supported by a majority of the council. However, as H.L. Mencken said, “For every complex problem there is a solution that is clear, simple and wrong.” That may be an overstatement, but local government solutions are often more complex than candidates claim. They must now do real problemsolving and govern effectively on behalf of a community with high expectations that are driven by how deeply our residents value where we live. When I joined the council nine years ago, the city faced different challenges centered on our financial problems. We had ever-growing structural deficits driven mostly by escalating employee-pension and benefit costs that jeopardized our ability to provide the services and physical environment we have long enjoyed. For decades, we had under-invested in our streets, facilities and other infrastructure, resulting in a $500 million backlog of needs with no financial solution in sight. We also badly needed greater funding for flood protections and emergency preparation. And while Palo Alto was at the global center of technology and innovation, our city government needed to become more efficient and innovative. We have made great strides since then. Improved efficiency along with employee-benefit reforms have helped us achieve budget surpluses each of the last five years, enabling huge investments in our streets, libraries, utilities, emergency preparedness, and now our expanded bike system, flood control, fire and public-safety buildings, revitalized parks and other projects. We will soon see a next wave of public/private partnerships in a rebuilt Avenidas senior center, Junior Museum and Zoo, and a city history museum. We also now have opportunities to take advantage of county Measures A and B from this November, which provide the biggest county funding ever for affordable housing and Caltrain. We have continued to build on Palo Alto’s legacy of environmental leadership. We are confronting the great environmental challenges of the era: how we respond to climate change and how can we pass on to future generations a community that retains our most valued qualities. We now have 100 percent carbonneutral electricity (at 30 percent below PG&E cost)

laying the foundation of our new Climate Action Plan. We are now adopting a new Sustainability Plan that guides energy, water, natural environment and transportation programs to make these resources sustainable. Both of these plans will integrate with our new Comprehensive Plan, which is the blueprint for our built environment for the coming decades. The new council faces big challenges, many centered on how we respond to the pressures of local and regional growth without degrading our quality of life and sustain that quality for future generations. Q How can we protect our valued local retail and services? Q We have now identified the actions needed to reduce our local transportation and parking problems, but how do we fund them? Q What is the relationship between office growth and our housing challenges? How much office growth do we want or need? Q How much and what types of housing should we plan for and what portion of that should be affordable for low- and moderate-income residents, shop and service workers, teachers, nurses, police and utility workers? How much should be for new tech workers? Q Given our housing pressures, do renters need greater protections? Q What next steps must we take to address our under-funded long-term employee-pension liabilities? Q How should we leverage the over $20 million in our fiber fund reserve to provide long-awaited broadband capabilities throughout the community? These are among the big challenges, but we have many opportunities as well. Palo Alto has long valued diversity, inclusiveness and civil discourse as core values. Can we reduce our recent divisions and come together as a community to tackle our challenges? If we want to provide a Palo Alto that sustains the enjoyable and vibrant community that we value, then we need to debate these issues thoughtfully and civilly, embracing the interests of all residents. We also have a community committed to sustainability, protecting our local environment and our planet. We see this same sense of obligation in our youth and we should harness their shared commitment. As we struggle with these challenges, we should not lose sight of what brings us to Palo Alto — our beautiful and safe city with great parks, expansive open space, exceptional services, a vibrant local economy that is a center of innovation and an engaged and educated citizenry of people who are deeply about their city and schools. This is why we choose to live here and why, despite our challenges, we value our city and are committed to it. It’s been a privilege to have served our great community for the last 18 years as a planning commissioner, City Council member and mayor. I now look forward to joining many of you as an active citizen working to retain the qualities that we value as we evolve and invest in our future. Q Patrick Burt was the mayor of Palo Alto in 2010 and 2016. He can be reached at patburt11@ gmail.com.


Check out Town Square! Hundreds of local topics are being discussed by local residents on Town Square, a reader forum sponsored by the Weekly at PaloAltoOnline.com/square. Post your own comments, ask questions or just stay up on what people are talking about around town!

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Denying permits for new building projects (GLWRU This otherwise complete description of the traffic mess ´6WXFNLQWUDIILFµ'HF GRHV not mention the obvious elephant in the room! The problem is caused by all of our local governments granting permits for huge QHZ EXLOGLQJ SURMHFWV ZLWK QR demands for any mitigation of VXEVWDQFH 2IFRXUVHWKHPRVWHJUHJLRXVLV WKHH[SDQVLRQRI)DFHERRNLQHDVW 0HQOR 3DUN &RXOG QRW RXU ORFDO SROLWLFLDQVGHQ\DSHUPLWVRWKDW WKH\FRXOGJREXLOGLQ1HEUDVNDRU ,RZDSODFHVWKDWZRXOGDSSUHFLDWH QHZHPSOR\PHQW"$WWKHVDODULHV WKH\SD\WKH\FRXOGHDVLO\DWWUDFW HPSOR\HHV 5RGQH\'HUE\VKLUH 0HQOR2DNV'ULYH0HQOR3DUN

Making rent affordable (GLWRU The editorial in the Palo Alto

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GLVDVWHUWKHVHSHRSOHZLOOVLPSO\ not be available to help our comPXQLW\7HDFKHUVQHHGWREHSDUW RIWKHFRPPXQLW\WKH\VHUYH Microunits meeting the above requirements could help attract KLJKO\ TXDOLILHG WHDFKHUV ILUH ILJKWHUVDQGSROLFHWR3DOR$OWR 5HQWFDQQRWEHVXEMHFWWRPDUNHWIRUFHVRWKHUZLVHRQO\KLJKO\ paid tech employees will inhabit WKHVH XQLWV 7KHUHIRUH W\LQJ WKH UHQW WR WKH UHQWHU·V VDODU\ LV D QHFHVVLW\ Since the city owns the current SDUNLQJORWODQGLWVKRXOGEHSUDFtical to build microunits that meet the above requirements in addition to a multilevel parking facilLW\&RXQFLOKDVJLYHQOLSVHUYLFH WRWKLVSUREOHPIRU\HDUV1RZLV the time to act to make affordable housing available to those that VHUYHRXUFRPPXQLW\ 5LFK6WLHEHO 7DOLVPDQ'ULYH3DOR$OWR

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³:KDWVRQJVUHPDLQZKDWDUHWKHLUO\ULFVDQGZK\DUHWKH\DSSURSULDWH"µ 7KHODWHVW´YLRODWLRQVµIRFXVRQWZRLQFLGHQWV7KHDOOHJHGDOFRKROYLRODWLRQUHODWHG to a few of-age band members sharing a SLWFKHU RI EHHU DW D IULHQG·V IDUHZHOO GLQQHUEHIRUHDWWHQGLQJUHKHDUVDO7KHDOOHJHG violation of the travel ban involved some students going to a house in Tahoe that was reserved for the band before the travel EDQZDVH[WHQGHGZKHUHWKHSD\PHQWIRU the house was no longer refundable and a Student Affairs representative had given SHUPLVVLRQ1HLWKHURIWKHVHLQFLGHQWVLQGLFDWHVD´V\VWHPLFFXOWXUDOSUREOHPµ , GRQ·W ZLVK WR DQWDJRQL]H DQ\RQH EXW DVVRPHRQHZKRKDVVSHQW\HDUVLQWKH ILQDQFLDOLQGXVWU\,PXVWVD\ZKDWLVEHLQJ required of the band is almost stricter than ZKDWWKH6HFXULWLHV ([FKDQJH&RPPLVVLRQ UHTXLUHV RI KHGJH IXQGV 7KH GLIIHUHQFHLVKHGJHIXQGVKDYHWKHUHVRXUFHVWR KLUH ODZ\HUV WR GHDO H[FOXVLYHO\ ZLWK GHmands for additional reporting and regulaWLRQ+HUHDEXQFKRIVWXGHQWVZLWKWR XQLW FRXUVH ORDGV LQ HQJLQHHULQJ DQG FRPSXWHU VFLHQFH DPRQJ RWKHU PDMRUV  KDYH EHHQ GURZQHG LQ SDSHUZRUN MXVW VR WKH\FDQ´EULQJIXQNWRWKHIXQNOHVVµ My sincere hope is that the administration will not continue to deprive the entire 6WDQIRUG FRPPXQLW\ VWXGHQWV LQFOXGLQJ PXVLFLDQVDQGDWKOHWHVIDQVDQGHYHQQRQ IDQV  RI DQ HVVHQWLDO 6WDQIRUG H[SHULHQFH <RX FDQ·W VWRS WKH PXVLF <RX VKRXOGQ·W VWRSWKHPXVLF$VWKH6WDQIRUGPRWWRVD\V ´'LH/XIWGHU)UHLKHLWZHKWµ³´7KHZLQG RIIUHHGRPEORZVµQ Sanjay Arora is an alumnus, a parent of students at Stanford and a longtime volunteer for the alumni association. He can be reached at sanjayhawaii@ gmail.com.

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DQDGGLWLRQDOFKDUJHLVULGLFXORXV I subtracted it from my credit card FKDUJHDQGZKDWWRP\ZRQGHULQJ H\HVGLG,ILQGEXWWKHUHVWDXUDQW SXWLWEDFNRQWRP\FKDUJHVHYHQ though I did not sign to include it! ,VWLOOILJXUHGWKHSHUFHQWWLS, ZRXOGQRUPDOO\DGGRQWRWKHELOO I have also found articles online indicating that when the fees colOHFWHGH[FHHGWKHHPSOR\HU·VFRVW IRU PHGLFDO FRYHUDJH WKH\ MXVW SRFNHWWKHGLIIHUHQFH1RWH7KHUH is nothing on any of the menus indicating that this â&#x20AC;&#x153;employer manGDWHGIHHµZLOOEHDGGHGWR\RXU ELOO Carol Gilbert %\URQ6WUHHW3DOR$OWR

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest. Submit letters to the editor of up to 300 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Anna Medina at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.

www.PaloAltoOnline.com â&#x20AC;¢ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;¢ January 20, 2017 â&#x20AC;¢ Page 15


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City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board Regular Meeting 250 Hamilton Avenue, Council Chambers February 2, 2017 at 8:30am Action Items PUBLIC HEARING / QUASI-JUDICIAL. 567 Maybell [15PLN00248]:Consideration of a Major Architectural Review to Allow the Demolition of four single-family residences and the construction of 16 two-story single-family residences with basements. Environmental Assessment: Consistent with Previously adopted Mitigated Negative Declaration for the project. Zoning Districts: R-2 and RM-15. For more information, contact the project planner Sheldon S. Ah Sing at sahsing@mgroup.us. The Architectural Review Board is live streamed online at http:// midpenmedia.org/category/government/city-of-paloalto and available on via cablecast on government access channel 26. The complete agenda with accompanying reports is available online at http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/ boards/ptc/default.asp. For Additional Information Contact Alicia Spotwood at alicia.spotwood@cityofpaloalto.org or at 650.617.3168.

CITY OF PALO ALTO ENVIRONMENTAL ASSESSMENT

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January 11 - 17 Violence related Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Family violence/threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft related Commercial burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Shoplifting. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vehicle related Burglary attempt/auto. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . 4 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . 4 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Alcohol or drug related Drinking in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Driving under influence . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Drunk in public/juvenile. . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Possession of paraphernalia . . . . . . . . 1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Miscellaneous Elder abuse/neglect . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . 2 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6

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Page 16 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a Draft Mitigated Negative Declaration has been prepared by the Palo Alto Department of Planning and Community Environment for the project listed below. In accordance with CEQA Guideline Section 15073, this document will be available online for review during a 30-day circulation period beginning January 19, 2017 through February 18, 2016 at http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/ news/displaynews.asp?NewsID=3645. If you need assistance, please visit the City’s Development Center during the hours of 9:00 A.M. and 4:00 P.M. M-F at 285 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. Written comments on the Mitigated Negative Declaration will be accepted until 5:00 PM on February 21, 2017 in the Planning and Community EnvironTLU[+LWHY[TLU[VɉJLZVU[OLÄM[OÅVVYVM*P[`/HSS or comments may be e-mailed to Claire Hodgkins at claire.hodgkins@cityofpaloalto.org. [16PLN-00288 and 16PLN-0089]: Request by Mary Ricks, on behalf of Bowman School and Steven Pierce, for Architectural Review, Conditional Use Permit and Variance to allow day care facilities for up to 60 children and additional enrichment classes for existing students at Bowman’s Terman site. A Variance is required for the proposed below grade learning circle in the R-1 (10,000) Zoning District. In addition, the applicant has requested a Preliminary Parcel Map with Exceptions to allow the merger of two existing lots to create one lot with an area of approximately 54,894 square feet for the development of the school facilities. Project Planner: Claire Hodgkins. Hillary Gitelman, Director of Planning and Community Environment

January 11 - 17 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Stolen property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft undefined. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Driving with suspended license . . . . . . 3 Exhibition of speed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vehicle accident/no injury. . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Possession of paraphernalia . . . . . . . . 1 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Miscellaneous Brandishing. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 CPS referral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 False identification . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Gang validations . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Information . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Located missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Mental evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 Missing juvenile. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Registrant . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto

South California Avenue, 1/11, 4:35 p.m.; family violence/threats. Olive Avenue, 1/13, 11:09 p.m.; domestic violence/battery.

Today’s news, sports & hot picks Sign up today at www.PaloAltoOnline.com


A weekly guide to music, theater, art, culture, books and more, edited by Karla Kane

by Kevin Kirby

T

he Magrath sisters are having a bad day. In Beth Henley’s Pulitzer Prize-winning “Crimes of the Heart,” now on offer at TheatreWorks, these three siblings from smalltown Mississippi suffer a series of setbacks, losses and indignities that make the lives of their Chekhovian counterparts seem rosy by comparison. Eldest sister Lenny is turning 30, though her birthday brings only a re-gifted box of chocolates and the news that her beloved horse, Billy Boy, has been killed by lightning. Middle sister Meg returns from California, where her dream of a singing career has turned into a job at a dog-food company, only to discover that her old flame, Doc Porter, has just moved back with a Yankee wife and two halfYankee kids. Meanwhile, Babe, the youngest of the Magrath girls, has just been released on bail after shooting her husband (a state senator and the town’s most powerful lawyer) for reasons that she cannot reveal without inviting even more scandal for herself and her family. Add to this the lingering shadow of their mother’s suicide two decades earlier plus the hospitalization of the grandfather who raised the girls after their mother’s death and you have the makings of a very bad day indeed. But despite the parade of woes that Henley heaps on her heroines, “Crimes of the Heart” is a comedy — a decidedly black one, certainly, but a comedy nonetheless — and TheatreWorks’s production,

directed by Giovanna Sardelli, charges hard for the laughs. Therese Plaehn hits all the right notes as Lenny: dutiful, frustrated, frazzled and chronically unsure of herself. Hers is the show’s strongest performance, and the one that knits the others together. From the moment, early on, when a nearhysterical Lenny, alone in the kitchen, makes wishes on a single birthday candle that she lights and relights for herself, we know we’re in good hands. Sarah Moser’s Meg is a bit aloof — fitting for the middle sister who left town to chase Hollywood dreams — with frequent flashes of a rebellious nature that has yet to be beaten down by her professional failure. Lizzie O’Hara is unfailingly funny as would-be murderer Babe, deadpanning her initial explanation for the shooting: “I didn’t like his looks.” On the other hand, her matter-of-fact callousness and lack of evident vulnerability keep the audience at arm’s length, preventing us from fully sympathizing with Babe’s past trauma or her current plight. All three of these actresses bring tremendous energy to their roles, whether flying across the room in fits of panic or inspiration, or devolving into demented laughter when one last tragedy pushes them beyond the limits of conventional grief. Sardelli has given them plenty of movement to keep the scenes from growing stale, and designer Andrea Bechert has created a spacious and interactive (not to mention drop-dead gorgeous) set — large

Sisters Lenny (Therese Plaehn) Babe (Lizzie O’Hara), and Meg (Sarah Moser) bond in the dark comedy “Crimes of the Heart.” kitchen, entry hall with stairs, and partial back porch — in which to play. The three leads are joined by Laura Jane Bailey as the Magraths’ cousin Chick, Timothy Redmond as Doc Porter, and Joshua Marx as Barnette Lloyd, the very green lawyer hired to defend Babe. In addition to being a whirlwind of energy herself, Bailey serves as a one-woman Greek chorus, giving full voice to all of the whispered gossip and disapproval of the small-town South. Redmond plays it close to the vest with Doc’s motivations, making his interaction with Lenny all the more intriguing. Marx is clearly a talented actor, more than capable of matching the energy of O’Hara and the others. His portrayal of Babe’s lawyer/ new love interest, though, goes astray from the beginning. Marx seems so intent on landing laughs that his Barnette Lloyd becomes almost a caricature: excitable verging on manic, over-confident and inexplicably nerdy. Because we are unable to relate to him as a real person, his sacrifice in the second half of the show fails to move either us or, apparently, Babe, turning it into a cheap deus ex machina instead. Ultimately, Marx’s performance is emblematic of the underlying tonal problem with Sardelli’s approach to the play, an approach that favors laughs over more complex emotional reactions. Yes, most of our heroines’ problems have been resolved favorably by the end of the show, and yes, that is the classical definition of a comedy. But while “Crimes of the

Kevin Berne

TheatreWorks production earns laughs but lacks depth

Kevin Berne

‘Crimes of the Heart’ puts comedy first

Sarah Moser and Therese Plaehn deliver strong performances in “Crimes of the Heart.” Heart” is undeniably a comedy, it is not just a comedy. The humor in Henley’s script is not the result of tragedy being avoided or overcome. Nor is it humor meant to divert or distract us from the ugliness of life. Rather, it is humor as a direct reaction to tragedy, humor that would make no sense without a simultaneous acknowledgment of sorrow. This duality is present early in the TheatreWorks production but by the end of the show, the purely comic impulse has won out, leaving us with a feelgood portrait of perseverance and sisterly love. This is all well and good, but the production misses an opportunity to impart a more nuanced denouement and a more

lasting impression. Tonal issues aside, though, this “Crimes of the Heart” is still a success — a showcase for flawless production values and exceptional comic acting.Q Freelance writer Kevin Kirby can be emailed at penlyon@ peak.org. What: “Crimes of the Heart” Where: Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts, 500 Castro St., Mountain View When: Through Feb. 5 (performance times vary; see online for schedule) Cost: $19-$80 Info: Go to theatreworks.org

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 17


Arts & Entertainment

Joyce Goldschmid

In Palo Alto Players’ latest production, The Marx Brothers are reimagined by Mohamed Ismail as “Carlo,” Patty Reinhart as “Gino” and Andrew Ceglio as “Samovar.”

READ MORE ONLINE These and other arts stories were posted on Palo Alto Online. For longer versions, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/arts.

In the mood for Marx Classic vaudeville and film comedians Groucho, Harpo and Chico Marx (or rather, their renamed facsimiles) are the shining stars of Palo Alto Players’ “A Day in Hollywood/A Night in the Ukraine,” a twoact production set to open this week. (Posted Jan. 19, 8:55 a.m.)

Catching up with Chris Lorway The Stanford Live and Bing Concert Hall executive director chats about his time at Stanford thus far, his hopes for the future and why there’s no such thing as “an audience.” (Posted Jan. 18, 9:53 a.m.)

Planned Parenthood benefit at Dragon Playwright Lauren Gunderson has invited artists to stage free Inauguration Night readings of her feminist play, “The Taming,” as fundraisers. Redwood City’s Dragon Theatre, among others, has taken Gunderson up on her offer and will donate any proceeds from the evening to Planned Parenthood. (Posted Jan. 18, 9:22 a.m.)

For the love of dolls Dozens of Raggedy Ann and Andy dolls are currently on exhibit at the Los Altos History Museum through February. (Posted Jan. 12, 11:31 a.m.)

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OPENINGS

Courtesy of A24

Annette Bening (left), Greta Gerwig (center) and Elle Fanning (right) play three generations of feminists in “20th Century Women.”

It takes a village A mom crowdsources child-rearing in ‘20th Century Women’ 0000 (Palo Alto Square) At one point in “20th Century Women,” writer-director Mike Mills’ semiautobiographical comedy-drama, one character asks another, “How did you get to be this person that you are?” It’s that loving curiosity that emblematizes Mills’ work, which is both empathetic and self-searching. With his previous film,

“Beginners,” Mills memorialized his father in a story of late-in-life coming out (Ewan McGregor and Christopher Plummer played the surrogates for Mills and his dad). Now, Mills turns his attention to his formative years and the women in his life, especially his mother. The story takes place “at a turning point in our history,” as

Jimmy Carter puts it in his “malaise” or “crisis of confidence” speech. In 1979, Mills was becoming a man not long after America, too, lost its innocence, post-Vietnam, post-Watergate, and about to welcome Reagan as the man with the answers for the gogo ‘80s. Annette Bening plays single mother Dorothea Fields. “Don’t worry about her,” her 14-year-old son, Jamie (newcomer Lucas Jade Zumann), clarifies. “She’s from the Depression.” Though partly Jamie’s coming-of-age story, “20th Century Women” primarily celebrates three generations of feminists in Dorothea and the family friends — free-spirited boarder Abbie (Greta Gerwig) and teen neighbor Julie (Elle Fanning) — that Dorothea enlists to help raise her son. Along the way, Mills recalls the cultural tides that brought in punk rock to answer conservative, corporate authority, crucially integrating pop culture and pop philosophy as inextricable from character: Humphrey Bogart and Talking Heads, M. Scott Peck and Judy Blume. At its margins, “20th Century Women” also evinces an experimental flair typical of Mills’ art-world sensibility: a unique aesthetic of character collage and historical montage that sometimes erupts into fast-mo or druggy “trails.” Mostly, though, “20th Century Women” is a highly witty, deeply humane look at people who may be too conscious for their own good, people who think and feel (continued on next page)

MOVIES NOW SHOWING 20th Century Women (R) ++++ Palo Alto Square: Fri. - Sun. Arrival (PG-13) ++++

Monster Trucks (PG) Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Bolshoi Ballet: The Sleeping Beauty (Not Rated) Century 20: Sunday The Bye Bye Man (PG-13)

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Casablanca (1942) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: 5:35 & 9:20 p.m., Friday The Eagle Huntress (G) ++

Aquarius Theatre: Fri. - Sun.

Fences (PG-13) ++++ Aquarius Theatre: Fri. - Sun. The Founder (PG-13) +++1/2

Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Hidden Figures (PG) ++1/2 Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. La La Land (PG-13) Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Lion (PG-13)

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Palo Alto Square: Fri. - Sun.

Live by Night (R) Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Madame DuBarry (1919) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: 3 p.m., Sunday Manchester by the Sea (R) +++1/2 Guild Theatre: Fri. - Sun.

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Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Moonlight (R) Aquarius Theatre: Fri. - Sun.

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Passengers (PG-13) ++ Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Patriot’s Day (R) ++ Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

The Resurrection of Gavin Stone (PG) Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) +++1/2 Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Silence (R) +++ Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Sing (PG) ++1/2 Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Sleepless (R)

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Split (PG-13) Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

The Student Prince in Old Heidelberg (1927) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Saturday To Be or Not to Be (1942) (Not Rated) ++++ Stanford Theatre: 7:30 p.m., Friday

Met Opera: Romeo et Juliette (Not Rated) Century 16: Saturday Century 20: Saturday Palo Alto Square: Saturday

Underworld: Blood Wars (R) Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Moana (G) +++1/2 Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

xXx:The Return of Xander Cage (PG-13) Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

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Century 16: Fri. - Sun.

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Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (For recorded listings: 327-3241) tinyurl.com Aquariuspa Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View tinyurl.com/Century16 Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City tinyurl.com/Century20

CineArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (For information: 493-0128) tinyurl.com/Pasquare Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (For recorded listings: 266-9260) tinyurl.com/Guildmp Stanford Theatre: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (For recorded listings: 324-3700) Stanfordtheatre.org

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27 University U i it Ave., A Downtown Palo Alto

650.321.9990 • www.macpark.com www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 19


PALO ALTO CITY COUNCIL CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE BROADCAST LIVE ON KZSU, FM 90.1 CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ***************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/agendas/default.asp AGENDAâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;SPECIAL MEETINGâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;COUNCIL CHAMBERS January 23, 2017, 5:00 PM Closed Session 1. CONFERENCE WITH REAL PROPERTY NEGOTIATORS Authority: Government Code Section 54956.8 Property: Plum Tree Apartments, 3020-3038 Emerson Street, Palo Alto, CA, Under Negotiation: Option to Purchase â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Price, (Ń&#x153;VYKHIPSP[`9LZ[YPJ[PVUZHUK;LYTZVM7H`TLU[ Study Session  7YLZLU[H[PVU I` [OL :HU[H *SHYH =HSSL` ;YHUZWVY[H[PVU (\[OVYP[`=;(9LNHYKPUN[OL5L_[5L[^VYR0UP[PH[P]LHUK its Impacts on Bus Service in Palo Alto Special Orders of the Day  7YVJSHTH[PVU,_WYLZZPUN(WWYLJPH[PVU[V(UUPL-VSNLYMVY 6\[Z[HUKPUN7\ISPJ:LY]PJLVUOLY9L[PYLTLU[ Consent Calendar  (\[OVYPaH[PVU[V,Z[HISPZOH:\WWSLTLU[HS7LUZPVU;Y\Z[ >P[O [OL 7\ISPJ (NLUJ` 9L[PYLTLU[ :LY]PJL 7(9: HUK Approve Budget Amendments in the General Fund and [OL.LULYHS)LULĂ&#x201E;[Z-\UK 6. Approval of a Contract With Altec Industries Inc., in the Amount of $335,213 for the Purchase of an Altec Hydraulic Telescoping Crane and Approval of a Budget (TLUKTLU[PU=HYPV\Z-\UKZ  (WWYV]HSVM(TLUKTLU[5\TILY;^V[V*VU[YHJ[5\TILY C14153485 With Canopy, for an Additional Amount of  MVY H ;V[HS (TV\U[ 5V[[VL_JLLK  to Administer a Crowdsourced Tree Data Platform to (K]HUJL 7YVNYHTTH[PJ 0UP[PH[P]LZ PU [OL <YIHU -VYLZ[ Master Plan, and Continue Basic Contract Services ;OYV\NOH;OYLLTVU[O,_[LUZPVU[V1\UL 8. Approval of a Contract With Altec Industries Inc., in the Amount of $496,278 for the Purchase of Three 40 Foot (S[LJ(LYPHS;Y\JRZHUK(WWYV]HSVM)\KNL[(WWYVWYPH[PVU (TLUKTLU[ZPU[OL,SLJ[YPJ<[PSP[`-\UKHUK[OL=LOPJSL Replacement and Maintenance Fund 9. Adoption of a Resolution of the Council of the City of Palo (S[V,_WYLZZPUN(WWYLJPH[PVU[V+LUUPZ)\YUZ<WVU/PZ Retirement 10. Adoption of a Resolution of the Council of the City of Palo (S[V ,_WYLZZPUN (WWYLJPH[PVU [V )VI )LHJVT <WVU /PZ Retirement 11. 900 N. California Avenue [15PLN-00155]: Denial of the Appeal of the Planning and Community Environment Director's Architectural Review Approval of Three new Single-Family Homes, one With a Second Unit. ,U]PYVUTLU[HS 9L]PL^! *H[LNVYPJHSS` ,_LTW[ WLY *HSPMVYUPH ,U]PYVUTLU[HS 8\HSP[` (J[ *,8( .\PKLSPULZ :LJ[PVU H 5L^ *VUZ[Y\J[PVU VY *VU]LYZPVU VM :THSS :[Y\J[\YLZ AVUPUN +PZ[YPJ[! 9 *VU[PU\LK -YVT 1HU\HY`  Action Items  +  PZJ\ZZPVU HUK +PYLJ[PVU [V :[HŃ&#x153; [V 0TWSLTLU[ H 6UL `LHY ;YHŃ?J :HML[` 7PSV[ 7YVQLJ[ (SVUN 4PKKSLĂ&#x201E;LSK 9VHK )L[^LLU[OL4LUSV7HYR*P[`3PTP[ZHUK-VYLZ[(]LU\L -PUK[OL7YVQLJ[,_LTW[-YVT[OL*HSPMVYUPH,U]PYVUTLU[HS 8\HSP[`(J[*,8(HUK(WWYV]LH)\KNL[(TLUKTLU[PU the General Fund 13. PUBLIC HEARING: Adoption of a Resolution for the *YLH[PVU VM H UL^ 9LZPKLU[PHS 7YLMLYLU[PHS 7HYRPUN 977 7YVNYHT PU [OL ,]LYNYLLU 7HYR HUK 4H`Ă&#x201E;LSK 5LPNOIVYOVVKZ )V\UKLK I` 7HYR )V\SL]HYK *HS[YHPU 9HPS *VYYPKVY 6YLNVU ,_WYLZZ^H` 7HNL 4PSS 9VHK HUK ,S *HTPUV 9LHS HUK -PUKPUN VM ,_LTW[PVU <UKLY [OL *HSPMVYUPH,U]PYVUTLU[HS8\HSP[`(J[*,8(

Page 20 â&#x20AC;˘ January 20, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ www.PaloAltoOnline.com

TheatreWorks S I L I C O N V A L L E Y

A CLASSIC AMERICAN COMEDY

Crimes of the Heart

By Pulitzer Prize Winner Beth Henley

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Delectable! Superb comedy!â&#x20AC;? SF Chronicle

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theatreworks.org 650.463.1960

SARAH MOSER, THERESE PLAEHN, & LIZZIE Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;HARA / PHOTO KEVIN BERNE

Movies

Women (continued from previous page)

too much to ever be truly happy. Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a film crammed with true observations about lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s contradictions and frustrations and fleeting joys, about the cruelties of even the most loving relationships and the deep need to understand and protect the people we love. Above all, Bening pumps the blood of the film with yet another flawless performance. Just to watch her listen, fully present and with amazing focus, amounts to a master class in acting. And all the actors in the film are as good as theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve ever been (Billy Crudup plays a lovably fumbling romantic in orbit around the Fields home). Millsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; thoughtful, mature filmmaking and this beautifully humane, searching story of differing generational perspectives in conflict and mutual support give the actors an ideal circumstance to ply their wares. For all of lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s disappointments, the wistful â&#x20AC;&#x153;20th Century Womenâ&#x20AC;? feels like a smile and a hug. Mills invites us to relate to good people making mistakes, rolling with the punches, and sometimes getting it right. Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s how, one hopes, you get to be the person that you are. Rated PG-13 for brief strong language. One hour, 59 minutes. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Peter Canavese


Home&Real Estate

OPEN HOME GUIDE 28 Also online at PaloAltoOnline.com

A weekly guide to home, garden and real estate news, edited by Elizabeth Lorenz

Home Front

Feed the birds

PLANTING CAMELLIAS ... On Sunday, Feb. 26 from 1:30 to 4:30 p.m., you can learn about including camellias in your garden plan. The class will cover the different camellias you can add to your garden and why choose one over another for a given location. Following the presentation, speaker Barbara Tuffli will lead a walk through Gamble Garden, which is on the Camellia Trail. Afterwards there will be a tea reception in the Library. Tuffli inherited her parent’s camellia garden, which she was asked to document for the Smithsonian Institution’s Archives of American Gardens. The class is $40 for members and $50 for non-members. Go to gamblegarden.org

EMERGENCY PREPAREDNESS ... It’s always good to think through what you or your family members should do in an emergency. The Palo Alto Fire Department offers these simple things to think about before you call 9-1-1. First, know where you are: Could you tell 9-1-1 exactly where to find you? Second, stay calm and ready to listen: The call taker is there to help. One of the first things you’ll be asked for is the location of the emergency. Provide cross streets and identifiable buildings. When using your cell phone: The current 9-1-1 system is designed for VOICE communications only. Texting 9-1-1 is not an option in most locales.

Birds like this white-crowned sparrow are attracted to suet-dough feeders, but also forage on the ground.

I

t’s winter and most backyard plants are dormant or not blooming. How do you attract birds to your yard now, let alone when spring comes?

Palo Alto Adult School Birding instructor Larry Spivak says besides feeders, a source of water and shelter will bring the birds. “Feeders alone will not attract birds. Feeders properly placed in the yard will bring them in,” he said. “A fountain with water helps, but it must be cleaned every week to prohibit virus transmission from bird to bird.” Besides a feeder filled with homemade nectar, other sources of nectar in flowers will also help keep hummingbirds around. The most important thing is to have shelter near a feeder or a water source such as trees where the birds can hide. In the wintertime, Spivak said, people often worry about preventing bird migration because there is a source of food handy in this area. “Do not worry,” he said. “Nectar to a hummingbird is a source of energy, not food. Their main source of food is insects. The seed eaters have many sources of food. Depending on a single source would be fatal. When their overall diet begins to fail, both natural and manmade, they will leave.” Palo Alto resident Candace Simpson, a master gardener with the UC Extension program, prefers to feed birds by “having plants they can use, rather than feeders.” “Salvias are my go-to plant for this purpose, though I also see (hummingbirds) in the citrus

and sasanqua camellia blossoms. For seed eaters, I let flowers like cosmos, grasses, and occasionally veggies like lettuce go to seed.” Simpson’s colleague, Sue Van Stee, who is also a master gardener, emphasizes the importance of water. In her front yard near two ponds and a very small stream between the ponds, she has suet dough feeders. “The crowned sparrows that are here in the fall and winter particularly love the suet dough, but a diversity of birds visits throughout the year, and all of these birds forage on the ground so they are finding food there in addition to the suet dough.” If you opt for a bird feeder, follow Spivak’s suggestions. There are four basic backyard

The last kind of feeder is “suet” or fat. These attract woodpeckers and many other birds. The basic feeder is a wire cage that encloses the hunk of suet and hangs from a tree. Most feed can be store-bought, although it’s easy to make nectar at home, using 1/3 cup granulated sugar for every 1 cup of water. Spivak says Niger, seeds and suet should be purchased at a retail store with the following caveats: Don’t buy mixed birdseed, only sunflower seeds. The majority of mixed seeds, Spivak said, are “junk” that birds do not eat in this area. The suet should be infused with hot pepper, which birds love but squirrels hate. Squirrels are the biggest problem backyard feeders have, even with a simple nectar feeder, Spivak said. They are very clever at getting to feeders and can leap great distances from nearby trees. “If there are many squirrels in the neighborhood, I would avoid the sock Niger feeder. They do not seem to be able to access the steel mesh feeders.” Once birds stop coming to the feeder, wait one or two weeks, empty it, clean it and wait for spring. It’s important to remember that birdseed is perishable. Store any open product in a cool, dry place away from direct sunlight to prevent the seed from drying out and bugs from finding it. Q

feeders, based on the type of food and the birds that are attracted to it. The first one, nectar, is a basic hummingbird feeder. The most efficient are the ones that have a dish-like platform with flowers on the dish. The others are easily raided and emptied by squirrels or orioles. The second type of food is Niger seed, a very small black seed that attracts goldfinches and a few other small birds. There are two types of feeders for this kind of food: one looks like a stocking and one is a mesh columnar tube. The third type of feeder are straight seed feeders. Basically, the most important seed is a sunflower seed — unsalted in the shell. They attract a large number of birds, mostly finches and chickadees, but are also the most troubled by squirrels. There is a large assortment of these available at retailers and the customer should have a discussion with a retailer about their particular habitat and desires for these feeders.

Kim Loisel

Send notices of news and events related to real estate, interior design, home improvement and gardening to Home Front, Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302, or email elorenz@ paweekly.com. Deadline is one week before publication.

by Elizabeth Lorenz

Kim Loisel

GARDEN PHOTOGRAPHY ... Gamble Gardens will also hold a class on “iPhone Garden Photography” on Sunday, March 19 from 1:30 to 3:30 p.m. at Gamble Gardens, 1431 Waverley St. in Palo Alto. This hands-on class taught by commercial photographer Tom Upton, is an introduction to the art of iPhone photography in the garden using basic techniques and key features of the camera. After a brief orientation session in the Carriage House on the mechanics of the iPhone camera and some simple rules of composition, Upton will lead the class outside to take pictures in Gamble Garden. Class size is limited so that each person can have personal attention. The class is open to members only until Feb. 1 and then will open to non-members. Cost is $40 for members and $50 for nonmembers.

If you want to attract feathered friends, be a friend to them

Lesser goldfinches like these as well as other birds love fountains. It’s important to have a shelter near a water source, and also to clean the fountain weekly to prevent viruses from spreading among birds.

READ MORE ONLINE

PaloAltoOnline.com

There are more real estate features online. Go to PaloAltoOnline.com/ real_estate.

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 21


//

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HOME STARTS HERE PA L O A LTO $ 7 , 6 8 8 , 0 0 0

WO O D S I D E $ 5 , 4 9 8 , 0 0 0

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1465 Edgewood Drive | 5bd/4ba J. Forsyth James/C. Miller | 650.323.1111 BY APPOINTMENT

22 Starwood Drive | 5bd/6ba S. Hayes/K. Bird | 650.529.1111 BY APPOINTMENT

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P O RTO L A VA L L EY $ 2 , 3 9 5 , 0 0 0

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1300 Oak Avenue | 5bd/2ba Yvette Stout | 650.941.1111 BY APPOINTMENT

142 Plymouth Avenue | 3bd/2.5ba Judy Citron | 650.462.1111 BY APPOINTMENT

1701 Stone Pine Lane | 2bd/2.5ba Monica Corman | 650.462.1111 BY APPOINTMENT

M O U N TA I N V I EW $ 1 , 6 4 9 , 0 0 0

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1165 Elena Privada | 3bd/2.5ba Kathy Bridgman | 650.941.1111 BY APPOINTMENT

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P O RTO L A VA L L EY $ 9 9 5 , 0 0 0

SA N C A R L O S $ 9 9 5 , 0 0 0

L O S A LTO S $ 9 2 5 , 0 0 0

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251 Vista Verde | Land Wayne Rivas | 650.529.1111 BY APPOINTMENT

961 Cherry Street | 3bd/1ba Susan Soden | 650.462.1111 BY APPOINTMENT

460 Lassen Street, Unit 8 | 2bd/1ba Shilpa Merchant | 650.941.1111 OPEN SAT & SUN 1:30-4:30

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Page 22 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


Thank you for a great

2016 TRUSTED . REAL ESTATE . PROFESSIONAL KATHLEEN WILSON Mobile: 650.207.2017 kwilson@apr.com License# 00902501

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 23


880 AMES COURT, PALO ALTO

  







• Close to parks, YMCA, coffee shops, • 3 bedrooms restaurants, shopping, transportation and • 2 bathrooms much more • Spacious courtyard entry • Private backyard with mature landscaping • Excellent Palo Alto schools including Gunn High • Large family room with vaulted ceilings • 1,615 sq. ft. of living space, approx. • Attached two car garage • 7,539 sq. ft. lot, approx. • Situated on a small, quiet cul-de-sac • Ideally located just steps away from Palo Verde Elementary School

OFFERED AT $2,375,000

      

Listing Agent: Tim Foy • 2775 Middlefield Road • Phone: 650.321.1596 • www.Midtownpaloalto.com



Page 24 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


Work with the innovator! List your home with

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www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 25


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Page 26 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


2215 Liberata Drive, Morgan Hill, California | $10,889,888 | Listing Provided by: Joe Velasco, Lic. #01309200

www.2215Liberata.com Customized to the unique style of each luxury property, Prestigio will expose your home through the most influential mediums reaching the greatest number of qualified buyers wherever they may be in the world. For more information about listing your home with the Intero Prestigio International program, call your local Intero Real Estate Services office. Woodside 1590 Cañada Lane Woodside, CA 94062 650.206.6200

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www.InteroRealEstate.com www.InteroOpenHomes.com 2016 Intero Real Estate Services Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate and a wholly owned subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc. All rights reserved. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you arewww.PaloAltoOnline.com listed with another broker. • Palo

Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 27


THIS WEEKEND OPEN HOMES ®

EXPLORE OUR MAPS, HOMES FOR SALE, OPEN HOMES, VIRTUAL TOURS, PHOTOS, PRIOR SALE INFO, NEIGHBORHOOD GUIDES ON www.PaloAltoOnline.com/real_estate UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ALL TIMES ARE 1:30-4:30 PM

ATHERTON

FEATURED

4 Bedrooms 41 Maple Av Sun Coldwell Banker

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$3,195,000 324-4456

BELMONT 3 Bedrooms 2303 Cipriani Bl Sat/Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

$1,549,000 324-4456

FREMONT 5 Bedrooms

Are you staying current with the changing real estate market conditions? :HRσHUWKHRQHRQOLQHGHVWLQDWLRQWKDWOHWV\RXIXOO\H[SORUH ÷,QWHUDFWLYHPDSV ÷+RPHVIRUVDOH ÷2SHQKRXVHGDWHVDQGWLPHV ÷9LUWXDOWRXUVDQGSKRWRV

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Explore area real estate through your favorite local website: TheAlmanacOnline.com MountainViewOnline.com PaloAltoOnline.com And click on “real estate” in the navigation bar.

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$1,250,000 325-6161

MENLO PARK 3 Bedrooms 844 Partridge Ave Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

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5 Bedrooms 1109 Valparaiso Ave $5,195,000 Sun 1-4 Cowperthwaite & Company 851-8030

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MOUNTAIN VIEW 2 Bedrooms - Townhouse 1350 Montecito Av #B Sat 2-4 Coldwell Banker

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PORTOLA VALLEY 4 Bedrooms

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3 Bedrooms 880 Ames Ct Sat Midtown Realty

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4 Bedrooms 3239 Maddux Dr Sun Keller Williams

$3,498,000 520-3407

3719 Starr King Cir Sat/Sun Keller Williams

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Open Sat & Sun 1:30-4:30 FIND YOUR NEW HOME PaloAltoOnline.com/real_estate

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SAN JOSE 3 Bedrooms 256 Heilen Ct Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

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4 Bedrooms 1300 Kipling Ct Sat/Sun 1-5 Deleon Realty

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EXPLORE OUR WEB SITE • Interactive maps • Homes for sale • Open homes

• Virtual tours • Prior sale info and more

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Today’s news, sports & hot picks

253 Fernando Avenue, Palo Alto Beds: 3 | Baths: 1

PRICE: $1,998,000

T

his 3 bedroom, 1 bath home has so much potential. Move-in ready or remodel or build ]SYVHVIEQLSQI6I½RMWLIHLEVH[SSH¾SSVWXLVSYKLSYXXLIQEMRPMZMRKEVIEERH FIHVSSQWTPYWXLIVIMWEWITEVEXIHMRMRKEVIEMREHHMXMSRXSXLIIEXMROMXGLIRERHJSVQEP PMZMRKVSSQ[MXL½VITPEGI 8LIPEVKIVPSX WUJXTIV%WWIWWSV LEWQER]QEXYVIJVYMXXVIIWMRGPYHMRKPIQSR Santa Rosa plum, peach, Asian pear, persimmon, and Fuji apple. The separate 2-car detached KEVEKILEW[EWLIV HV]IVLSSOYTWERHYXMPMX]WMROEPSRK[MXLEWQEPPIV[SVOWLSTEVIE EXXEGLIHXSXLIFEGOSJXLIKEVEKI[MXLMXWS[RWITEVEXIIRXVERGI

Fresh news delivered daily

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TERRIE MASUDA 650.917.7969 terrie@terriemasuda.com www.terriemasuda.com CalBRE #00951976

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Page 28 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Mike Costa 408.436.3660

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Warm words on a cold evening, a full moon on a dark night, and the road downhill all the way to your door. /DI>@II#MDÍ»OCNR<N<QD>@KM@ND?@IO<OJMIDNC<I?<M@T<I?< OJK<B@IO<OJG?R@GG<IF@M/C@DNIJROC@IPH=@MJI@M@A@MM<G<B@IOOJ OC@HJNONP>>@NNAPG=MJF@MNDI,<GJGOJ )@IGJ,<MF ,JMOJG<2<GG@T<I? 3JJ?ND?@"JMNP>>@NNAPGM@NPGONDIKPM>C<NDIBJMGDNODIBTJPMCJH@TJP><I @H<DGII<O<IIHBMDÍ»OCNÎ&#x2020;CJOH<DG>JHJM><GGC@M<O 40 years in residential Real Estate selling properties in Atherton, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Portola Valley and Woodside Million $ Club Menlo-Atherton Board of Realtors Vice President Cornish & Carey Top Salesperson Coldwell Banker

Ann Griffiths

Denis Morrissey 650-245-2448

650-561-3291 650-752-0722

www.PaloAltoOnline.com â&#x20AC;¢ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;¢ January 20, 2017 â&#x20AC;¢ Page 29


E. S U30 P.M O H -4: 0 3 : EN N1 U P OAT & S S

987 LUNDY LANE, LOS ALTOS Build New or Remodel Opportunity in the Coveted Country Club Area! Nestled in the highly regarded Country Club area, this cottage-style 2 bedroom and 1 bath home is located close WRWRSUDWHG/RV$OWRVVFKRROV7KHEHDXWLIXOODUJHDQGñDW lot (8360 +/- sf) cradles the home with amazing opportunity. You’ll love the privacy on the right side of Lundy & that no one is directly behind the lot too! There is plenty of room to either build a new custom home or add on and redesign the existing home. You can live in the cottage until your plans are complete! Conveniently located to both the 280 and 85 freeways and close to the top Los Altos schools, shopping, Los Altos Country Club and all of the commutes! Lots of potential in one of the best areas of Los Altos! Highly rated schools: Loyola Elementary, Blach Middle School & Mountain View High!

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LYNNORTH N Lic. #01490039

(650) 209-1562 (650) 703-6437

If you are considering selling your home, please call Lynn for a complimentary marketing analysis! Every home is sold in 9 days ^P[OT\S[PWSLVɈLYZ

lnorth@apr.com

www.LynnNorth.com Page 30 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE fogster.com

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HONE P650.326.8216 Now you can log on to fogster.com, day or night and get your ad started immediately online. Most listings are free and include a one-line free print ad in our Peninsula newspapers with the option of photos and additional lines. Exempt are employment ads, which include a web listing charge. Home Services and Mind & Body Services require contact with a Customer Sales Representative. So, the next time you have an item to sell, barter, give away or buy, get the perfect combination: print ads in your local newspapers, reaching more than 150,000 readers, and unlimited free web postings reaching hundreds of thousands additional people!!

INDEX

The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEB SITE Combining the reach of the Web with print ads reaching over 150,000 readers!

fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice. 425 Health Services

Bulletin Board

For Sale

115 Announcements PREGNANT? Considering adoption? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 1-877-879-4709 (Cal-SCAN)

201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts JAGUAR 2000 xj8 L Sedan 4-Door, $ 2630, 4-WD, Cassette Player, CD Player, Leather Seats, Sunroof. Call me: 209-425-2754

PREGNANT? Considering adoption? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401

jaguar 2000 xj8 L Sedan 4-Door, 4-WD, Cassette Player, CD Player, Leather Seats, Sunroof. Call me: 213.986.6703

Dixieland Dance Party

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT to Heritage for the Blind. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 800-731-5042 (Cal-SCAN)

FREE BOOK GIVEAWAY HUGE USED BOOK/CD/DVD SALE WISH LIST FRIENDS PA LIBRARY

202 Vehicles Wanted

GET CASH FOR CARS/TRUCKS!!! All Makes/Models 2000-2016! Top $$$ Paid! Any Condition! Used or wrecked. Running or Not. Free Towing! Call For Offer: 1-888-417-9150. (Cal-SCAN)

133 Music Lessons Christina Conti Piano Private lessons for all levels, all ages. Also Music Theory. In your home or mine. SJSU Bachelor of Music. 650-493-6950

Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1-800-743-1482 (Cal-SCAN)

Hope Street Music Studios Now on Old Middefield Way, MV. Most instruments, voice. All ages and levels 650-961-2192 www. HopeStreetMusicStudios.com

210 Garage/Estate Sales

Paul Price Music Lessons In your home. Piano, violin, viola, theory, history. Customized. BA music, choral accompanist, arranger, early pop and jazz. 800-647-0305

Switch to DIRECTV. Lock in 2-Year Price Guarantee ($50/ month) w/AT&T Wireless. Over 145 Channels PLUS Popular Movie Networks for Three Months, No Cost! Call 1-800-385-9017 (Cal-SCAN)

240 Furnishings/ Household items

140 Lost & Found DID YOU KNOW 7 IN 10 Americans or 158 million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

Loveseat for sale - $150.00

245 Miscellaneous DISH TV - BEST DEAL EVER! Only $39.99/mo. Plus $14.99/mo. Internet (where avail.) FREE Streaming. FREE Install (up to 6 rooms.) FREE HD-DVR. Call 1-800-357-0810 (Cal-SCAN)

QBULLETIN

BOARD 100-155 QFOR SALE 200-270 QKIDS STUFF 330-390 QMIND & BODY 400-499 QJ  OBS 500-560 QB  USINESS SERVICES 600-699 QH  OME SERVICES 700-799 QFOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 801-899 QP  UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997

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HOME BREAK-INS take less than 60 SECONDS. Don’t wait! Protect your family, your home, your assets NOW for as little as 70¢ a day! Call 855-404-7601 (Cal-SCAN) REWARD FOR MISSING DOG Currently offering a reward for my lost dog Snoopy. He escaped January 7,2017 and has been missing since. He is a small white chihuahua mix with a brown head and tail as well as brown spots on his back. He is not microchipped and was unfortunately not wearing his collar at time of escape. Last seen on the corner of Villa and Higdon Ave in Shoreline West neighborhood. if any info or if found please contact me at 650-8338933. Would just like to find my little guy and bring him home.

145 Non-Profits Needs DONATE BOOKS/HELP PA LIBRARY

150 Volunteers ASSIST IN FRIENDS BOOKSTORE ASST SECTION MGRS FOR FOPAL FRIENDS OF THE PALO ALTO LIBRARY JOIN OUR ONLINE STOREFRONT TEAM Stanford Museum Volunteer

Classified Deadlines:

NOON, WEDNESDAY

Protect your home with fully customizable security and 24/7 monitoring right from your smartphone. Receive up to $1500 in equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1-800-918-4119 (Cal-SCAN) Safe Step Walk-In Tub! Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch StepIn. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN) SAWMILLS From only $4397.00- MAKE and SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills. com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (Cal-SCAN)

Mind & Body 417 Groups DID YOU KNOW 144 million U.S. Adults read a Newspaper print copy each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-703-9774. (Cal-SCAN) Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a pain-relieving brace — little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1-800-796-5091 (Cal-SCAN) MAKE THE CALL to Start Getting Clean Today. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol and drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN) OXYGEN - Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The AllNew Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844-359-3976. (Cal-SCAN)

440 Massage Therapy EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release - the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916-288-6011 or http://prmediarelease.com/california (Cal-SCAN)

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Sales Representative California Trade Association located in Sacramento is seeking someone with strong knowledge for Advertising, print, digital and social media solutions, great with detail, an amazing attitude, and a passion for selling content and integrated partnerships. 3-5 years experience a plus. We offer a competitive base salary, commission and bonus plan, along with great benefit package. Email Resume and Salary History to jobs@cnpa.com. EOE (Cal-SCAN) Engineer: Software Involved with software design and development. BS or equiv. degree in Comp Sci, Info Tech, Comp. Eng, EE, Eng or equiv. field. 5 yrs exp. as Software Engineer, Software Developer, Engineer or equiv. 5 yrs concurrent exp. with: Programming languages such as C#, Java and Python; Programming language SQL required to query large databases; Financial mathematics and quantitative models; Data analytics and statistical modelling using R and Matlab; Data visualization techniques & using tools such as Qlikview; Product design techniques using design tools such as Microsoft Visio, Adobe Photoshop and Balsamiq; and Managing technology projects using agile methodologies and scrum tools. Jobsite: Palo Alto, CA. Mail resume to: Position NK012017 Integral Development Corporation 3400 Hillview Ave. Building 4, Palo Alto CA 94304 Hardware Eng. Plumbing Showroom Sales Assoc. SOFTWARE Pure Storage, Inc. has following job opps. in Mountain View, CA: Member of Technical Staff (Software Engineer) [Req. #SSR28]. Dsgn, dvlp and test system SW for high-end enterprise flash memory storage devices. Manufacturing Test Developer [Req. #MTD61]. Dsgn and dvlp manufacturing SW and scripts for test’g storage appliances. Systems Engineer [Req. #SYS79]. Prfrm full cycle app. dvlpmt for systms level storage SW.  Mail resumes refrnc’g Req. # to: G. Vega, 650 Castro St, Ste 400, Mountain View, CA 94041.

Staff Sftw Engr (Code: SSE-PTM) in Mountain View, CA: Dsgn and dvlp sftw modules on MobileIron’s cutting edge MDM platform. MS + 2 yrs rltd exp/BS+5 yrs rltd exp. Mail resume to MobileIron, Attn: Piper Galt, 415 E. Middlefield Rd, Mt. View, CA 94043. Must ref title and code.

Business Services 604 Adult Care Offered A PLACE FOR MOM The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/ no obligation. CALL 1-800-550-4822. (Cal-SCAN)

624 Financial Do You Owe Over $10K to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Call now 855-993-5796 (Cal-SCAN) SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY benefits. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-966-1904 to start your application today! (Cal-SCAN)

636 Insurance Health and Dental Insurance Lowest Prices. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888-989-4807. (Cal-SCAN)

640 Legal Services DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s hostile business climate? Gain the edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the FREE One-Month Trial Smart Search Feature. For more information call Cecelia @ (916) 2886011 or www.capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN) Xarelto users have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don’t have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1-800-425-4701. (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services 715 Cleaning Services Isabel and Elbi’s Housecleaning Apartments and homes. Excellent references. Great rates. 650-670-7287 or 650-771-8281

LANDA’S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maint. *New Lawns. *Clean Ups *Irrigation timer programming. 20 yrs exp. Ramon, 650-576-6242 landaramon@yahoo.com

751 General Contracting A NOTICE TO READERS: It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

754 Gutter Cleaning Rain Gutter Cleaning Call Dennis (650) 566-1393 Fully Licensed and Insured. 20 Yrs experience. Free Est. Roofs, Gutters, Downspouts cleaning. Work guar. 30 years exp. Insured. Veteran Owned. Jim Thomas Maintenance, 408-595-2759.

757 Handyman/ Repairs Alex Peralta Handyman Kit. and bath remodel, int/ext. paint, tile, plumb, fence/deck repairs, foam roofs/repairs. Power wash. Alex, 650-465-1821 Handyman Services Lic. 249558. Plumb, electrical, masonry, carpentry, landscape. 40+ years exp. Pete Rumore, 650-823-0736; 650-851-3078.

759 Hauling J & G HAULING SERVICE Misc. junk, office, gar., furn., green waste, more. Local, 20 yrs exp. Lic./ ins. Free est. 650/743-8852

771 Painting/ Wallpaper Glen Hodges Painting Call me first! Senior discount. 45 yrs. #351738. 650-322-8325, phone calls ONLY. Learn How to Paint your own home. What tools and materials to use to prep and paint. 40 years exp. 650-380-4335 STYLE PAINTING Full service interior/ext. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650-388-8577

775 Asphalt/ Concrete Roe General Engineering Asphalt, concrete, pavers, tiles, sealing, artificial turf. 36 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703. 650-814-5572

Real Estate

Silvia’s Cleaning We don’t cut corners, we clean them! Bonded, insured, 22 yrs. exp., service guaranteed, excel. refs., free est. 415-860-6988

748 Gardening/ Landscaping J. Garcia Garden Maintenance Service Free est. 25 years exp. 650-366-4301 or 650-346-6781

801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Palo Alto, 1 BR/1 BA - $2895/mont Atherton, Studio - $1975/mont Palo Alto Downtown, 2 BR/2 BA - 3700

go to fogster.com to respond to ads without phone numbers www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 31


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Palo Alto, 2 BR/2 BA - $3895/mont Sunnyvale, 2 BR/1.5 BA - 2695/month

805 Homes for Rent Palo Alto, 3 BR/2 BA - $8500/mont

809 Shared Housing/ Rooms Los Altos, 1 BR/2 BA - $1100

850 Acreage/Lots/ Storage N. Arizona Wilderness Ranch $236 MONTH - Quiet and secluded 37 acre off the grid self-sufficiency ranch bordering 640 wooded acres of State Trust lands at cool clear 6,200 elevation. Minutes from historic pioneer town and fishing lake. True wilderness with free roaming wildlife, no urban noise and dark sky nights. Blend of evergreen woodlands & grassy meadows with sweeping views across surrounding uninhabited wilderness mountains and valleys. Abundant groundwater, rich loam garden soil and maintained road access. Camping and RV use ok. $27,500, $2,750 dn. with no qualifying seller financing. FREE BROCHURE with additional property descriptions, prices, photos, topo map, weather chart, area info. 1st United Realty 800.966.6690. (Cal-SCAN)

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM

855 Real Estate Services DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s highly competitive market? Gain an edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the Smart Search Feature. For more information call Cecelia @ (916) 288-6011 or www.capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN)

Fogster.com is a unique website offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly.

News, sports and local hot picks Receive information on what’s happening in your community by email every day. Sign up today at PaloAltoWeekly.com

“Arise!”–get up to the challenge. Matt Jones

This week’s SUDOKU

Answers on page 33.

Answers on page 33.

www.sudoku.name

27 “I ___ robot, beep boop beep” (unusually common impersonation of a robot)

Across

42 Muhammad of the ring

Down

1 Body of beliefs

43 The Jetsons’ youngest

1 “Unbelievable” band of 1991

6 Zipped past

45 Creator of “Community” and co-creator of “Rick and Morty”

2 Wrestler-turned-B-movie-actor Johnson

48 Quenches

3 Yes, in Yokohama

50 Most dangerous, as winter roads

4 How files were often stored, before the cloud

51 ___ en place (professional kitchen setup)

5 Bangalore wrap

37 Like a clogged dryer vent

6 Part of the NRA

41 “Go forward! Move ahead!” song

7 Crossword puzzler’s dir.

44 Couturier Cassini

8 Places where one may tip for getting tips

46 Cleopatra’s undoer

11 Heathcliff, for one 14 2016 Disney title character voiced by Auli’i Cravalho 15 Statement of empathy (or sarcasm, depending on tone) 16 He shared a phone booth with Bill and Ted 17 Sides at the monastery diner? 19 Commingle 20 Rotary phone feature 21 “Forbidden dance” popularized in the late 1980s 23 “Daily Show” correspondent ___ Lydic 26 Kombucha brewing need 28 Pitchblende and hornblende, e.g. 29 Is here

53 “King ___” (Jackson moniker) 55 “Ring Around the Rosie” flower 56 Paper crane art 58 Makes a knot 60 B-movie piece 61 Team of nine that doesn’t draw, dance, or play an instrument? 66 Beehive State college athlete 67 “___ Joy” 68 Home of the Burj Khalifa

31 “Thank you,” in Honolulu

69 “WKRP” character Nessman

33 “Just don’t look nervous”

70 Tissue masses

35 Pivotal

71 Rating system basis, often

38 “Read Across America” gp.

9 It’s visible on cold days 10 “O.K.” from Tom Sawyer 11 Special appearance by a Chevrolet muscle car?

30 Tucker who sang “Delta Dawn” 32 Company with a duck mascot 34 Vague 36 At ___ (puzzled)

47 Removes, as an opponent’s spine in “Mortal Kombat”

51 Business bigwig 52 Mad as hell

13 State with the most counties

54 Others, in Spanish

18 Gives confirmation

57 Author unknown, for short

22 New Mexico’s official neckwear

59 Comes to a close

23 American Revolutionary patriot Silas

62 Got into a stew?

25 Places to buy Indian string instruments?

63 “___ Action: It’s FANtastic” (old slogan) 64 Musical ability 65 “___ the season ...”

39 Smoking alternative, once 40 Hogwarts letter carrier

Page 32 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

The Peninsula’s FREE Classifieds Website

49 ___ dragon (world’s largest lizard)

12 Emulate The Dude

24 Shine

A BOLD NEW APPROACH TO CLASSIFIEDS FOR THE MIDPENINSULA

©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com)

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Legal Notices 995 Fictitious Name Statement PERFECT FIT CABINET SHOP FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 624434 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Perfect Fit Cabinet Shop, located at 276 Martin Avenue, Santa Clara, CA 95050, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A General Partnership. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): ELVIR OMEROVIC 276 Martin Avenue Santa Clara, CA 95050 BRANKO MARIN 276 Martin Avenue Santa Clara, CA 95050 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 10/07/2016. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 16, 2016. (PAW Dec. 30, 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 20, 2017) RK LIMOUSINE SERVICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 624713 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: RK Limousine Service, located at 2625 Middlefield Rd. #335, Palo Alto, CA 94306, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): SAVTANTAR KUMAR 2625 Middlefield Rd. #335 Palo Alto, CA 94306 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 23, 2016. (PAW Dec. 30, 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 20, 2017) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 624685 The following person(s)/ registrant(s) has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s).

The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the County Clerk-Recorder’s Office. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): HOCK & COMPANY 15305 Watsonville Road Morgan Hill, CA 95037 FILED IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY ON: 05/12/2014 UNDER FILE NO.: 591871 REGISTRANT’S NAME(S): GREGORY O HOCK 15305 Watsonville Road Morgan Hill, CA 95037 THIS BUSINESS WAS CONDUCTED BY: An Individual. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 22, 2016. (PAW Dec. 30, 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 20, 2017) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. FBN624903 The following person(s)/ registrant(s) has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the County Clerk-Recorder’s Office. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): SILICON VALLEY PENINSULA ROTARACT 250 Stratford Place Los Altos, CA 94022 FILED IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY ON: 12/07/2015 UNDER FILE NO.: FBN611774 REGISTRANT’S NAME(S): JUSTIN TAIT 250 Stratford Place Los Altos, CA 94022 MICHAEL CONDON 250 Stratford Place Los Altos, CA 94022 THIS BUSINESS WAS CONDUCTED BY: An Unincorporated Association Other Than a Partnership. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 30, 2016 (PAW Jan. 13, 20, 27; Feb. 3, 2017) HOCK COMPANY LLP HOCK COMPANY HOCK AND COMPANY HOCK & COMPANY FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: FBN625004 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: 1.) Hock Company LLP, 2.) Hock Company, 3.) Hock and Company, 4.) Hock & Company, located at 711 Colorado Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: Limited

Liability Partnership. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): GREGORY O. HOCK 15305 Watsonville Road Morgan Hill, CA 95037 KEVIN BRATCHER 711 Colorado Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94303 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 4, 2017. (PAW Jan. 13, 20, 27; Feb. 3, 2017) MI RANCHO SUPERMARKET FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: FBN625258 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Mi Rancho Supermarket, located at 3840 Monterey Hwy., San Jose, CA 95111, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): MI RANCHO SUPERMARKET, (SAN JOSE 2) INC. 137 Roosevelt Ave. Redwood City, CA 94061 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 01/12/2017. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 12, 2017. (PAW Jan. 20, 27; Feb. 3, 10, 2017) EDUNATION FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: FBN625227 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Edunation, located at 3181 Louis Road, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): ANDREW DONG 3181 Louis Road Palo Alto, CA 94303 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 11, 2017. (PAW Jan. 20, 27; Feb. 3, 10, 2017) RUNTIME INC. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: FBN625272 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as:

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Runtime Inc., located at 2560 Mission College Boulevard, Suite 130, Santa Clara California 95054, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): RUNTIME DESIGN AUTOMATION 2560 Mission College Boulevard, Suite 130 Santa Clara California 95054 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 12, 2017. (PAW Jan. 20, 27; Feb. 3, 10, 2017) ENVIRON INVESTIGATIONAL SERVICES FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: FBN625226 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Environ Investigational Services, located at 531 Lasuen Mall #20223 Stanford, CA 94305, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): AUNDREA L. COUTS 531 Lasuen Mall #20223 Stanford, CA 94305 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 01/11/2017. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 11, 2017. (PAW Jan. 20, 27; Feb. 3, 10, 2017)

997 All Other Legals Public Notice In the Superior Court of the State of California in and for the County of Santa Clara In the Matter of the Petition of David Price to Have the Standing of The Daily Post Adjudicated as a Newspaper of General Circulation for the City of Palo Alto and County of Santa Clara.

petitioner intends to apply for an order declaring the newspaper known as The Daily Post to be a newspaper of general circulation for the City of Palo Alto and County of Santa Clara, California. Dated: Jan. 11, 2017. Petitioner, David Price, appearing pro se, alleges: 1. Petitioner is the Editor and Co-publisher of the newspaper known as The Daily Post, hereafter referred to as the “Newspaper.” 2. The Newspaper is a newspaper of general circulation published for the dissemination of local and telegraphic news and intelligence of a general character in the City of Palo Alto and County of Santa Clara. The Newspaper’s business address is 385 Forest Ave., in the City of Palo Alto and the County of Santa Clara. 3. The Newspaper has a bona fide subscription list of paying subscribers in the City of Palo Alto and the County of Santa Clara. 4. For more than a year preceding the filing of this petition, the Newspaper has been established under the name The Daily Post, and has been so established and published, that is, issued and sold or distributed regularly every day except Sunday in the City of Palo Alto and County of Santa Clara. WHEREFORE, petitioner prays for a judgment ascertaining and establishing The Daily Post as a newspaper of general circulation as defined in Sections 6000 and 6020 of the Government Code, for the City of Palo Alto and County of Santa Clara, California. Dated: Jan. 11, 2017. /s/ David Price, Petitioner David Price, Editor and Co-Publisher of The Daily Post. (PAW Jan. 20, 2017) SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA, FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA CLARA

IN THE MATTER OF The Donald M. and Laddie W. Hughes Trust Agreement Dated May 9, 1979 LADDIE W. HUGHES aka GLADYS WILMA HUGHES, decedent Case No.: 16-PR-179983 NOTICE TO CREDITORS Probate Code Section 19052, et Seq. Notice is hereby given to the creditors and contingent creditors of the above-named decedent, that all persons having claims against the decedent are required to file their claims with the Superior Court of California for Santa Clara County at Probate Filing Clerk, 191 North First Street, San Jose, CA 95110, and mail or deliver a copy to DONALD M. HUGHES, Trustee of The Donald M. and Laddie W. Hughes Trust Agreement (and wherein the decedent was the settlor) at 620 Sand Hill Road #215-D, Palo Alto, CA 94304, within the later of four months after the date of the first publication of Notice to Creditors or, if Notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this Notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Section 19103 of the Probate Code. A claim form may be obtained from the court clerk. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Jacob M. Glickman, Attorney at Law 60-29th Street, Box 127 San Francisco, CA 94110 (PAW Jan. 20, 27; Feb. 3, 2017)

Answers to this week’s puzzles, which can be found on page 32.

No. 16CV305056, VERIFIED PETITION TO ASCERTAIN AND ESTABLISH STANDING AS A NEWSPAPER OF GENERAL CIRCULATION [Gov. C §§ 6000, 6020] NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on Feb. 23, 2017, at 9 a.m. or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard in Department 9 of this Court, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, California,

We handle all your Legal publishing needs • The Palo Alto Weekly is adjudicated to publish in the County of Santa Clara. • Our adjudication includes the Mid-Peninsula communities of Palo Alto, Stanford, Los Altos, and Mountain View • The Palo Alto Weekly publishes every Friday.

Call Alicia Santillan 650-223-6578 asantillan@paweekly.com

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Free. Fun. Only about Palo Alto. C R O S S W O R D S www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 20, 2017 • Page 33


Sports Shorts

PREP ROUNDUP

M-A basketball teams hope to continue success

TAKE THE FIELD . . . The Spring 2017 girls’ recreational softball league is accepting registration for girls ages 5-15 from Palo Alto, Menlo Park and the surrounding communities. The league is focused on fun and skill building, so if your daughter likes softball please sign her up. No travel, no pressure -everyone plays to win, but the focus is on fun and getting better. Register and learn more at http://www. paloaltogirlssoftball.org. Registration closes on January 31, 2017; Season starts in March.

Paly, Menlo, SHP, Priory and Pinewood all have teams in first place by Rick Eymer

M

SPLASH HIT . . . Stanford sophomore driver Madison Berggren was named Mountain Pacific Sports Federation Player of the Week. She led the Cardinal with six goals in two games at the LouStrong Memorial and No. 1 Stanford began its season with a 17-1 win over No. 14 San Jose State and a 21-2 victory against No. 17 UC Davis. ON COURSE . . . Stanford grad Andrew Yun ranks third on the Web. com power rankings heading into this week’s Bahamas Great Abaco Classic at The Abaco Club. The Web.com Tour season opened two weeks ago at The Bahamas Great Exuma Classic at Sandals Emerald Bay, one of three new tournaments on the schedule. Yun birdied his final two holes of the Great Exuma Classic to get him into a tie for second at the season opener. Yun’s paycheck of $52,800 exceeded the $43,161 he earned in 21 tournaments last year.

ON THE AIR Sunday College women’s basketball: Arizona State at Stanford, 3 p.m., Pac-12 Networks

Thursday College men’s volleyball: USC at Stanford, 7 p.m., Pac-12 Networks

READ MORE ONLINE

www.PASportsOnline.com For expanded daily coverage of college and prep sports, visit www.PASportsOnline.com

Don Feria

IT’S THE WATER . . . The Los Angeles Sports Council has named U.S. Olympic women’s water polo coach Adam Krikorian as its firstever recipient of the “Extraordinary Achievement in Olympic Sport” Award. Krikorian, a Mountain View native, will be honored during the 12th Annual LA Sports Awards on Monday, February 27 at The Beverly Hilton Hotel. As head coach of the women’s national team during last summer’s Rio Games, for the second straight Olympics Krikorian coached Team USA to an undefeated record and the gold medal. He was inducted last year into UCLA’s Athletics Hall of Fame in recognition of the 15 national championships won by his teams at UCLA: 11 as a head coach, three as an assistant coach and one as a player.

Destiny Graham helped Eastside Prep reach the state championship game in 2015 and is now a starter for the Arizona women’s basketball team.

Eastside Prep grad looking forward to a homecoming Destiny Graham returns to the area as a starter for the Wildcats by Glenn Reeves hen Arizona takes on the Stanford women’s basketball team Friday night, the distinction of most psyched-up Wildcat will, without a doubt, go to starting power forward Destiny Graham, a sophomore from Eastside Prep. “I’m really excited to come back and play,’’ Graham said in a phone interview Wednesday. “I’m looking forward to seeing my family, friends, even my teachers, and my high school coach.’’ She has remained in contact with Eastside coach Donovan Blythe and followed the team last season when it won the state Division V championship. The previous year in Graham’s senior season the Panthers fell short of that objective, advancing to the state title game but losing a tight game to La Jolla Country Day. “I was very happy and excited for them,’’ Graham said. “A lot of people were counting them out. I’m glad they proved them wrong.’’ This will be Graham’s second trip to Stanford as a member of the Arizona women’s basketball team, but her first as a starter. She came off the bench as a freshman, but has started every game this season as a sophomore. Her stats are a relatively modest 4.9 points and 4.1 rebounds per game. But those numbers don’t begin to convey

W

Page 34 • January 20, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

her importance to the team. “Destiny has been a wonderful surprise with her ability to play both the 4 and the 3,’’ Arizona assistant coach Kelly Rae Finley said. “A lot of things she does you don’t see on the stat sheet, but coaches value very much.’’ At 6-foot-3, Graham has prototype postplayer size. But with her quick feet and athleticism, Arizona coaches have begun employing her as a defensive stopper against high-scoring wing forwards. When the Wildcats played Washington they had Graham guard Kelsey Plum, the Pac-12’s leading scorer. “We like her versatility, her size and tremendous motor,’’ Finley said. “She’s very coachable, a very smart basketball player. When she defended Plum she really showed her great length and foot speed.’’ Graham began developing perimeter skills and comfort on the perimeter at Eastside. While the majority of 6-3 players are used exclusively underneath the basket at the high school level, Blythe frequently deployed Graham on the perimeter to prepare her for college. “When I was in high school we probably had three post plays,’’ Graham said. “The rest of the time I was outside.’’ Graham says she has adapted well to (continued on next page)

enlo-Atherton High has something special in athletics going this school year. On the heels of a highly successful fall season, the winter sports seem to be picking up the mantle of distinction. Both the girls and boys basketball teams, and the girls’ soccer team, are undefeated in Peninsula Athletic League play and bring extended winning streaks into play Friday. In basketball, the M-A boys (4-0, 12-3) remained undefeated after beating Aragon, 78-46, on Wednesday. The Bears are tied with Sequoia for the league lead in the South Division and bring a nine-game winning streak to Woodside on Friday. The M-A girls (4-0, 15-1) knocked Aragon out of a share of first place in the South, beating the Dons, 60-15, on Wednesday. The Bears are tied with Hillsdale for the league lead and bring a 15-game winning streak to Woodside on Friday. In soccer, the M-A girls (4-0, 4-3-1) won their fourth straight, beating Burlingame, 5-0, earlier in the week as Katie Guenin scored four times. The Bears play at Capuchino on Tuesday. The M-A boys (2-1, 5-3-3) took their first soccer loss on Wednesday and went into Thursday’s game at South San Francisco in second place. The Palo Alto winter teams are in a similar situation. The PA girls’ basketball and soccer teams are undefeated and in first place in the SCVAL De Anza Division while the boys’ basketball team is tied, with Wilcox for the league lead. Palo Alto (3-1, 11-3) hosts Cupertino at 7:45 p.m. Friday in boys basketball and the girls’ team (4-0, 11-3) hosts Homestead at 6:15 p.m. Friday. In girls soccer, the Vikings (2-0-2, 8-0-2) hosted Los Gatos on Thursday. The Gunn girls’ soccer team brought a 4-0, 6-5-1 mark into their Thursday match at Homestead. In West Bay Athletic League boys’ basketball, Menlo School (5-0, 7-4) holds a two-game edge over co-second place Eastside Prep, Priory and Sacred Heart Prep. The Knights go to Harker, Sacred Heart Prep (3-2, 6-8) hosts Eastside, Priory (3-2, 11-3) hosts Crystal Springs Uplands and Pinewood hosts The King’s Academy at 6:30 p.m. Friday. Pinewood (3-0, 14-2) tops the WBAL Foothill Division in girls basketball and hosts Priory (2-1, 10-5) at 6:30 p.m. Friday while Eastside Prep (2-1, 11-5) plays at Sacred Heart Prep (1-2, 10-6). Menlo (3-0-1 WBAL) and host Sacred Heart Prep (3-0) meet Friday at 2:45 p.m. to settle first place in boys soccer for the time being. In girls soccer, Sacred Heart Prep (3-0) visited Menlo (1-1-1) on Thursday. Priory (4-0, 6-1) lerads the Skyline Division and was scheduled to meet Castilleja at El Camino Park on Thursday. No girls basketball team has made a steeper vertical climb this season than Priory. The Portola Valley private school has made the move from the West Bay Athletic Leagueís Skyline Division up to the much more competitive Foothill Division. And with a 2-0 divisional record (11-4 overall) heading into Wednesdayís game with Eastside Prep, the Panthers were even knocking on the top of the standings door. Reality check. Eastside, the defending Division V state champion, let Priory know there are a few more steps to take before being part of the upper echelon. Diminutive sophomore guard Zion Gabriel knocked down eight first-half 3-pointers and finished with 31 points as a much quicker Eastside team rocked and rolled its way to a 70-55 victory at Priory. Klara Astrom recorded a double-double with 22 points and 10 rebounds and Pinewood took care of host Notre Dame-Belmont. Q


PALO ALTO PLANNING & TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION CIVIC CENTER, 250 HAMILTON AVENUE CABLECAST LIVE ON GOVERNMENT ACCESS CHANNEL 26 ******************************************************* This is a summary of THE Agenda items. The Agenda with complete titles including legal documentation can be viewed at the below webpage: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/boards/ptc/default.asp

Don Feria

Destiny Graham (4) and Chacitty Cunningham celebrate a good play in 2015.

Destiny Graham (continued from previous page)

life in Arizona, that she likes the warm weather and is doing very well in school as a psychology major. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I want to graduate my junior year and get my masters in four years,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; she said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At Eastside, I took a lot of classes for college credit. I have 72 units as a sophomore. A typical sophomore would have 36.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; So sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s ahead of schedule as a student and coming on strong on the court. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her teammates were asked in a radio interview who was the most

improved player on the team,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; Finley said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Destiny had significant support, and thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s something which the coaching staff would most definitely agree. We expect, over the next two years, for her to have continued tremendous growth â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;â&#x20AC;&#x2122; No. 10 Stanford (15-3, 5-1) goes for its 15th straight win against the Wildcats (11-6, 2-4) in Maples on Friday at 7 p.m. Arizonaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s last win in Maples came Jan. 6, 2001 (68-65). Since then, Stanford has outscored Arizona by an average of 22 points (78.3-56.3), outshot the Wildcats by more than 11 percent (.475.361) and outrebounded Arizona by nearly 10 per game (41.6-31.9). Q

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Katie Guenin

Andy Maltz

MENLO-ATHERTON SOCCER

GUNN WRESTLING

The senior forward scored six goals in a pair of M-A victories last week. She scored four in a 5-0 win over Burlingame. She currently leads the Bears with 10 goals on the season.

The senior heavyweight was named Outstanding Wrestler of the upper weights on Saturday in winning his division at the San Ramon Valley Invitational, pinning all three of his opponents.

Honorable mention Skylar Burris Palo Alto basketball

Cameron Gordon Sacred Heart Prep soccer

Akayla Hackson Pinewood basketball

Greer Hoyem* Menlo-Atherton basketball

Lindsey Johnson Sacred Heart Prep soccer

Ila Lane* Priory basketball

Thomas Brown Menlo basketball

Eric DeBrine Sacrted Heart Prep basketball

Max Dorward Palo Alto basketball

Daniel Hausen Menlo soccer

Peter Love Sacred Heart Prep soccer

Tevin Panchal Sacred Heart Prep basketball * Previous winners

CITY OF PALO ALTO PUBLIC HEARING, NOTICE OF EIR PREPARATION, CASTILLEJA SCHOOL APPLICATION The Planning and Transportation Commission will hold a Public Scoping Meeting on February 8, 2016 at 6 PM in the Council Chambers at 250 Hamilton Avenue, regarding the Project: Castilleja School Application for Conditional Use Permit (CUP) Amendment, Master Plan, Parcel Map with Exception and Variance to allow the pedestrian access and vehicle ramp into the subterranean garage to encroach into the Embarcadero Road special setback and the Emerson Street side setback, and some subterranean parking to encroach into the Embarcadero Road and side setbacks (collectively â&#x20AC;&#x153;Projectâ&#x20AC;?), at 1310 Bryant Street, 1235 and 1263 Emerson Street [File 16PLN-00238]. The City will prepare an Environmental Impact Report (EIR). The City of Palo Alto requests comments and concerns from organizations and interested parties regarding the LU]PYVUTLU[HSLŃ&#x153;LJ[ZHZZVJPH[LK^P[OJVUZ[Y\J[PVUHUKVWLYH[PVUVM[OL7YVQLJ[(U0UP[PHS:[\K`OHZ been prepared for the Project. For more information, visit the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s webpage for the project: http:// www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/topics/castilleja_school.asp Or Contact Amy French at amy.french@ cityofpaloalto.org PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Castilleja School is an all-girls private school in Palo Alto that has been operating since 1907. Currently, the school serves grades 6 through 12. The schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s facilities at 1310 Bryant Street include an administrative building, a maintenance facility, a chapel [OLH[LY JSHZZYVVTZ H N`TUHZP\T WVVS HIV]L NYV\UK WHYRPUN HYLHZ H[OSL[PJ Ă&#x201E;LSKZ HUK H dining hall. The Project proposal is to demolish two homes on adjacent Castilleja-owned parcels (at 1235 and 1263 Bryant) and merge the two parcels into the Castilleja campus parcel via Parcel Map with Exception, and demolish four existing buildings and replace them with a single building. The redevelopment of the campus is proposed to occur in three construction phases: *VUZ[Y\J[HILSV^NYHKLWHYRPUNZ[Y\J[\YL[VHJJVTTVKH[L]LOPJSLZYLYV\[LKYVWVŃ&#x153; and pick-up through the garage, and increase enrollment to a maximum of 490 students; (2) Relocate the existing pool, complete bikeway station on Bryant Street Bicycle Boulevard, and increase enrollment to a maximum of 520 students; and (3) Relocate deliveries and waste pickups further from the street and below grade, reduce number of food service deliveries by 10%, implement sustainability plan, and increase enrollment to a maximum of 540 students. Eventual construction (future phase) of new campus buildings would result in an increase in the total building square footage within the campus by 26,700 square feet, all of which would be below grade -above grade the square footage would remain the same. The applicant also proposes to PUJYLHZL[OLU\TILYVMVŃ&#x153;Z[YLL[WHYRPUNZWHJLZMYVT[V6M[OLZL^V\SKILILSV^ ground and 40 of which would be in surface parking lots. This would reduce the number of above ground spaces by 33 spaces. The amount of open space would also increase by 6,182 square MLL[-PUHSS`[OL7YVQLJ[WYVWVZHSPUJS\KLZH;YHUZWVY[H[PVU+LTHUK4HUHNLTLU[7SHU[VVŃ&#x153;ZL[ transportation impacts and a proposal for no net new automobile trips, as well as a Sustainability Program. POTENTIAL ENVIRONMENTAL EFFECTS: As documented in the Initial Study prepared in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), the following areas of WV[LU[PHSS`ZPNUPĂ&#x201E;JHU[LU]PYVUTLU[HSPTWHJ[^PSSILHUHS`aLKPU[OL+YHM[,09!(PY8\HSP[`WYVQLJ[ construction only), Biological Resources (trees and migratory birds), Cultural Resources, Geology HUK:VPSZ.YLLUOV\ZL.HZ,TPZZPVUZ3HUK<ZLHUK7SHUUPUN5VPZL;YHŃ?JHUK;YPIHS*\S[\YHS Resources. Potential cumulative impacts and potential for growth inducement will be addressed; alternatives, including the No Project Alternative, will be evaluated. The Notice of Preparation (NOP) and Initial Study as well as future CEQA documents for this project will be available on January 23, 2017 for review at the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s website for this project: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/ gov/topics/castilleja_school.asp PUBLIC REVIEW PERIOD: The Notice of Preparation is available for public review and comment pursuant to California Code of Regulations, Title 14, Section 15082(b), for 30 days. The comment period for the Notice of Preparation begins January 23, 2017 and ends on February 22, 2017. Due to the limits mandated by state law, your response must be sent at the earliest possible date but not later than 30 days after January 23, 2017. Responses should be emailed to amy. MYLUJO'JP[`VMWHSVHS[VVYNVYTHPSLK[V(T`-YLUJO*OPLM7SHUUPUN6Ń?JPHS*P[`VM7HSV(S[V7*, Department, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301. Questions. For any questions regarding the above items, please contact the Planning Department H[ ;OLĂ&#x201E;SLZYLSH[PUN[V[OLZLP[LTZHYLH]HPSHISLMVYPUZWLJ[PVU^LLRKH`ZIL[^LLU the hours of 8:00 AM to 5:00 PM. This public meeting is televised live on Government Access Channel 26. AMERICANS WITH DISABILITY ACT (ADA) Persons with disabilities who require auxiliary aids or services in using City facilities, services or programs or who would like information on the Cityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, may contact (650) 329-2368 (Voice) 24 hours in advance. *** Hillary Gitelman, Director of Planning and Community Environment

Watch video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to PASportsOnline.com

www.PaloAltoOnline.com â&#x20AC;˘ Palo Alto Weekly â&#x20AC;˘ January 20, 2017 â&#x20AC;˘ Page 35


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Palo Alto Weekly January 20, 2017  
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