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Palo Alto

Vol. XXXVIII, Number 15

January 13, 2017

Committee recommends renaming schools Page 5

w w w. P a l o A l t o O n l i n e.c o m

On ChasinG

CriminalS,, CriminalS and being

Palo Alto’S

chief Dennis Burns reflects on 35-year career Page 7

Donate to the HOLIDAY FUND Page 8

Pulse 13

Movies 17

Puzzles 29

■ Arts New Stanford Live head feels at home on The Farm Page 16 ■ Home Palo Alto Hills: a rural, laid-back neighborhood

Page 20

■ Sports Stanford’s Dunning retires after 32 years

Page 31


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Page 4 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


Upfront

Local news, information and analysis

Board: Seek clarification but avoid pushback with feds School trustees discuss long-anticipated civil-rights agreement by Elena Kadvany

A

majority of the Palo Alto school board agreed Tuesday night that the best course of action forward on a proposed resolution agreement from the U.S. Department of Education’s Office for Civil Rights on sexual harassment cases at the district’s two high schools is to seek clari-

fication when needed but to avoid pushing back on requirements.   Primarily, the school board disagreed with a recommendation from Superintendent Max McGee to limit an independent investigation and review to only current students and teachers. In the draft resolution agreement,

provided in December, the Office for Civil Rights (OCR) directs the district to hire an independent investigator, to be approved by the federal agency, to conduct proper Title IX investigations into former Paly Principal Phil Winston’s alleged sexual harassment of students, former Paly teacher Kevin Sharp’s alleged consensual sexual relationship with a former student and reports of off-campus sexual violence between 2012 and 2014.   “This is the Office for Civil

Rights. They make suggestions to us, and my default is to accept those suggestions unless there is some compelling reason not to,” board member Jennifer DiBrienza said.   A majority of the board agreed that while the district can ask the Office for Civil Rights to clarify what an independent investigation might entail, there could be cases of sexual harassment or violence that they’re unaware of involving former students — students who may “have been harmed (and) to

whom we owe equitable relief,” board member Todd Collins said.   The independent investigation — the concept of which McGee does not object to and will comply with, he said — could shed light on how the district erred in the past so it can correct its practices for the future.   “This isn’t just about going and finding people that have been harmed,” said Vice President Ken Dauber, who served as the tempo(continued on page 10)

EDUCATION

Committee: Yes on renaming three school sites Minority report disagrees: to rename would ‘sever the connection with the past’ by Elena Kadvany

Veronica Weber

Putting a bird on it

A seagull perches on a wooden pillar at the Palo Alto Baylands duck pond as geese fly overhead at sunset on Jan. 11.

LAW ENFORCEMENT

Police to pilot psychiatric response team Officer and mental health professional will respond to mental health calls by Sue Dremann

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he Palo Alto Police Department will soon become the first in Santa Clara County to pair an officer and a mental health professional on the streets in an attempt to bring mental health services to persons in need and keep them out of jail. Pending state review and approval early this year, the trained team of a police officer and a county behavioral-health-services clinician would travel together to mental health crisis calls to evaluate the situations and coordinate services for the person in need, said Toni Tullys, director of Santa Clara County Behavioral Health Services. The new Psychological Emergency Response Team, or PERT, will ramp up for three months and then pilot its services for three months, she said. If successful, the program

could roll out to other law enforcement agencies throughout the county. The program has worked elsewhere in the state: Police and county behavioral-health professionals are hoping it will keep people from ending up in jail unnecessarily. Last year, police in Palo Alto put more people in 72-hour psychiatric holds than in any year of the past decade: 243 people, up from 239 in 2015. Between Jan. 1, 2006, and Dec. 27, 2015, officers placed 1,760 people in holds, an average of 176 people per year, according to department records. Although most Palo Alto police officers receive crisis-intervention training in addition to a statemandated course, mental health professionals say there’s a greater need for crisis teams that include a mental health professional.

Police respond to many calls involving mental health issues, beyond those that end in the 72-hour or so-called “5150” holds, police spokesman Lt. Zach Perron said. Many calls have a mental health aspect that isn’t discovered until after the officer arrives, he added. Some situations with mentally ill persons become deadly. On Dec. 25, 2015, officers fatally shot William Raff, a man with schizophrenia who charged at them carrying a table knife in downtown Palo Alto. The three officers involved were exonerated, but the tragedy highlighted the difficult situations that officers face. A trained clinician could help the situation by accessing the person’s history and assessing the situation, Tullys said. The mental (continued on page 6)

W

hat started as one father’s shock over his seventh-grade son’s book report on David Starr Jordan’s involvement in eugenics has culminated in a committee’s recommendation to rename that Palo Alto Unified school, as well as two others named for men who promoted eugenics. A majority of the school district’s Renaming Schools Advisory Committee, convened last year to study the issue of renaming, has recommended in a final report that David Starr Jordan Middle School, Lewis B. Terman Middle School and the Ellwood P. Cubberley Community Center be renamed (the latter only if it is reopened as a school) due to their namesakes’ leadership in the early 20th-century movement that promoted the reproduction of genetic traits of particular races over others. The 61-page report and 15 accompanying appendices reflect nine months of meetings, research, community outreach and often contentious discussion among committee members who vehemently disagreed on the value of renaming schools. In a minority report, four members who oppose renaming argue “the images these names evoke are not of an ugly racist ideology but of shared memories, community and growing up.” But the majority of the committee’s 13 members — which include the student who wrote the book report on Jordan and his father, other parents, alumni, one teacher and other

community members — believe that the schools’ names evoke reprehensible beliefs that are at direct odds with the values and mission of a public school district. “With everything we now know about the eugenics legacies of David Starr Jordan, Lewis Terman and Ellwood Cubberley, the majority of the committee believes that it is time to close the chapter on honoring these men and to create a sense of shared community and identity with new names — names we can all be proud of, namesakes who did not endeavor to disenfranchise and diminish students whose identities or learning differences didn’t live up to their preconceived ideals but also names that maintain the close relationship of the community with its schools,” the report states. The report presents an exhaustive argument for renaming, detailing the histories of Jordan, Terman and Cubberley — both their professional contributions to the community and their advocacy of forced sterilization, racial and ethnic segregation and other eugenics-driven beliefs. Jordan is best known as the founding president of Stanford University; Terman, as a psychologist and Stanford faculty member known for creating an IQ test, and Cubberley, as a professor and later dean of the Stanford Graduate School of Education. In response to the argument that it is unfair to judge Jordan, Terman and Cubberley by today’s standards, and that eugenics (continued on page 12)

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 5


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Palo Alto Unified School District Notice is hereby Given that proposals will be received by the Palo Alto Unified School District for bid package: Contract No. RFQW-17 DESCRIPTION OF THE WORK: The work includes, but is not limited to: a comprehensive wireless network infrastructure upgrade to address the existing and growing needs of high-speed, highdensity wireless connectivity for wireless devices used by staff and students. The proposed response to this RFP should provide a robust, scalable and easily managed solution that will meet the needs of the District’s staff and students for at least the next five years. Bidding documents contain the full description of the work. There will be a mandatory pre-bid conference and site visit at 2:00 p.m. on January 27, 2017 at the District Offices, 25 Churchill Avenue, Palo Alto, California Bid Submission: Proposals must be received at the District IT Office, by 2:00 p.m. on March 2, 2017. PREVAILING WAGE LAWS: The successful Bidder must comply with all prevailing wage laws applicable to the Project, and related requirements contained in the Contract Documents. Palo Alto Unified School District will maintain a Labor Compliance Program (LCP) for the duration of this project. In bidding this project, the contractor warrants he/she is aware and will follow the Public Works Chapter of the California Labor Code comprised of labor code sections 1720 – 1861. A copy of the Districts LCP is available for review at 25 Churchill Avenue, Building D, Palo Alto, CA 94306. 1. A pre-job conference shall be conducted with the contractor or subcontractors to discuss federal and state labor law requirements applicable to the contract. 2. Project contractors and subcontracts shall maintain and furnish to the District, at a designated time, a certified copy of each payroll with a statement of compliance signed under penalty of perjury. 3. The District shall review and, if appropriate, audit payroll records to verify compliance with the Public Works Chapter of the Labor Code. 4. The District shall withhold contract payments if payroll records are delinquent or inadequate. 5. The District shall withhold contract payments as described in the LCP, including applicable penalties when the District and Labor Commissioner establish that underpayment of other violations has occurred. Bidders may examine Bidding Documents online at https://goo. gl/4DkcRh All questions can be addressed to: Palo Alto Unified School District Technology Services 25 Churchill Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94306-1099 Attn: Derek Moore Email: dmoore@pausd.org

Page 6 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

450 Cambridge Ave, Palo Alto, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210 PUBLISHER William S. Johnson (223-6505) EDITORIAL Editor Jocelyn Dong (223-6514) Associate Editor Linda Taaffe (223-6511) Sports Editor Rick Eymer (223-6516) Arts & Entertainment Editor Karla Kane (223-6517) Home & Real Estate Editor Elizabeth Lorenz (223-6534) Assistant Sports Editor Glenn Reeves (223-6521) Spectrum Editor Renee Batti (223-6528) Staff Writers Sue Dremann (223-6518), Elena Kadvany (223-6519), Gennady Sheyner (223-6513) Editorial Assistant/Intern Coordinator Anna Medina (223-6515) Staff Photographer/Videographer Veronica Weber (223-6520) Editorial Intern Patrick Condon Contributors Dale F. Bentson, Mike Berry, Carol Blitzer, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Trevor Felch, Chad Jones, Chris Kenrick, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Andrew Preimesberger, Daryl Savage, Jeanie K. Smith, Jay Thorwaldson ADVERTISING Vice President Sales & Marketing Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Multimedia Advertising Sales Adam Carter (223-6573), Elaine Clark (223-6572), Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571), Janice Hoogner (223-6576), V.K. Moudgalya (223-6586) Real Estate Advertising Sales Neal Fine (223-6583), Carolyn Oliver (223-6581), Rosemary Lewkowitz (223-6585) Inside Advertising Sales Irene Schwartz (223-6580) Legal Advertising Alicia Santillan (223-6578) ADVERTISING SERVICES Advertising Services Lead Blanca Yoc (223-6596) Sales & Production Coordinator Diane Martin (223-6584) DESIGN Design & Production Manager Kristin Brown (223-6562) Senior Designers Linda Atilano, Paul Llewellyn Designers Diane Haas, Rosanna Kuruppu, Doug Young EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Online Operations Coordinator Sabrina Riddle (223-6508) BUSINESS Payroll & Benefits Zach Allen (223-6544) Business Associates Cherie Chen (223-6543), Elena Dineva (223-6542), Cathy Stringari (223-6541) ADMINISTRATION Receptionist Doris Taylor Courier Ruben Espinoza EMBARCADERO MEDIA President William S. Johnson (223-6505) Vice President Michael I. Naar (223-6540) Vice President & CFO Peter Beller (223-6545) Vice President Sales & Marketing Tom Zahiralis (223-6570) Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Frank A. Bravo (223-6551) Marketing & Creative Director Shannon Corey (223-6560) Major Accounts Sales Manager Connie Jo Cotton (223-6571) Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Tatjana Pitts (223-6557) Circulation Assistant Alicia Santillan Computer System Associates Chris Planessi, Charles Teet The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. ©2016 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com, ads@paweekly.com Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 223-6557, or email circulation@paweekly.com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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Psychiatric

(continued from page 5)

health professional can find out if the person has had treatment in the past or has run out of medication, which might be contributing to the crisis — information that police cannot access because officers cannot search medical records. The pilot program will not cost the department any money; it will be funded through California’s Proposition 63, the Mental Health Services Act. The project will focus on persons ages 18 to 25, but the team can also respond to calls involving people outside of that age bracket, he said. A similar PERT team in San Mateo County launched in March 2015. Jason Albertson, a licensed clinical social worker with San Mateo County’s Behavioral Health and Recovery Services, said last year that the program has prevented potential tragedies. He and San Mateo County Det. Jim Coffman comprise the team.

When they arrived at a home where a man was having a crisis, he said by way of example, they were able to remove realisticlooking toy guns from the home. “If an officer had come to that door and (the man) had displayed something that looks realistic, he could have been shot,” Albertson said. Tullys said the county was inspired by a successful PERT program in San Diego County, which launched in 1995. There, law enforcement has seen a steady rise in mental health calls for service. Between 2008 and 2014 San Diego County saw a 62.3 percent increase in dispatch calls for mental health-related cases, according to a San Diego County Board of Supervisors staff report. Without the teams, officers would be handling these cases in addition to their regular criminal case loads. San Diego now has PERT teams throughout the county. n Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be reached at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAlto Online.com/news.

County to allow Partial property tax payments

The Board of Supervisors in Santa Clara County has voted unanimously to allow residents to pay their property tax bills at least in part if they can’t pay immediately in full. (Posted Jan. 10, 5:03 p.m.)

Council delays commission appointments

Palo Alto officials on Monday night moved to delay the city’s process for appointing new members to three local commissions, opting instead to reopen the application process in hopes of attracting more candidates and giving new council members a greater say in the selection process. (Posted Jan. 10, 1:18 p.m.)

Palo Alto man arrested for prowling

Two Palo Alto residents were found by police allegedly prowling early Saturday morning in a Pleasanton neighborhood where several cars had been rummaged through. One — Daniel Vasquez, 25 — was arrested and booked into county jail. (Posted Jan. 9, 6:05 p.m.)

Storm downs treasured oak

The weekend storm that blew through Palo Alto led to the fall of a treasured live oak tree in the Barron Park neighborhood early Monday morning. (Posted Jan. 9, 4:12.m.)

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council has no meeting scheduled this week. ARCHITECTURAL REVIEW BOARD ... The board plans to consider a proposal to demolish two existing office and research-and-development buildings at 3223 Hanover St. and to construct a new two-story 110,000-square-foot building at the site. The board also will review a plan to demolish three office buildings on Porter Drive and build a new two-story 101,083-square-foot office building at 3181 Porter Drive; and discuss the proposed one-story replacement building at the Junior Museum and Zoo;. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Tuesday, Jan. 19, in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave. PUBLIC ART COMMISSION ... The commission plans to elect its chair and vice chair; consider a donation of artwork by Christine Gray; approve artwork by Joyce Hsu for the Palo Alto Golf Course; have an initial review for public art at 450 Bryant St.; hear a presentation on art at the Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital; and receive an update on proposed Code:ART art installations and urban interventions. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Jan. 19, in the Council Chambers at City Hall, 250 Hamilton Ave.


Upfront LAW ENFORCEMENT

On chasing criminals, race relations and being the chief Palo Alto Police Chief Dennis Burns reflects on 35-year career

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t takes Palo Alto Police Chief Dennis Burns about 15 minutes to walk from King Plaza to the conference room inside the Police Department — a remarkably sluggish pace for a guy who used to run track at San Jose State University and who made headlines just six years ago by chasing down a bike-riding purse-snatcher on University Avenue. But it’s not entirely his fault. First, he is approached by a man whose wife had been involved in a car accident, who wants to submit a police report and who only speaks Mandarin (Burns walks the man to the police station inside City Hall, where he is provided with a translator). He then says hello to a homeless man who regularly spends his days at City Hall, responds to a greeting from a stranger and then stops as a fellow with a mustache and a beanie approaches him on the plaza. “Going to take up fishing now?” the man asks. “No fishing and no golf.” After a brief chat about the past and the future, the man says, “Hope to see you again soon, under better circumstances.” “God bless you,” Burns replies. It’s no coincidence that just about everyone knows Burns, and vice versa. For the past 34 years, the Palo Alto Police Department has been his home away from home, and when it comes to police work, he’s pretty much done it all. After starting as a patrol officer in 1982, Burns held stints as detective, crime-prevention officer, defensive-tactics instructor, SWAT team member and assistant chief before getting the nod for the top position in 2009. On Dec. 29, his last day on the job before retirement, Burns sat down with the Weekly to look back on his years in the department and to offer his thoughts on fair and impartial policing, surveillance technology, asylum cities and the many joys and challenges of policing in Palo Alto. Q: Let’s start at the beginning, Chief. When did you first decide that you wanted to be a police officer? A: Growing up in the Sunset (neighborhood of San Francisco) you were probably going to be one of five things, and they all start with the letter “p.” You can be a plumber; you can work for PG&E; you can work for the phone company; or you’re gonna be a police officer or a priest. My mom wanted me to be a priest — that’s the special intention of every Irish mother: You want your boys to be priests. A lot of the guys in the neighborhood were police officers, and they were

good sorts. The job was interesting. So probably from the time I was 15, I knew I wanted to do it. Q: In football, they say when a team loses, the coach gets too much blame, and when it wins, the coach doesn’t get enough credit. Is that how it’s like with police chiefs? How much control does a new police chief really have over the department? A: Certain things happen to the community or the department well beyond the control of a police chief. What the police chief is really responsible for is how does a city or how does a police department respond to that. How do we react? Do we accept responsibility when we make a mistake or do we say, “It’s not our fault.” If we’re smart, we try to work together. Q: Do you remember the first arrest you made? A: My first arrest was a guy whom we stopped and he had some warrants and he gave me his brother’s name. Remember John Costa (a veteran officer who retired in 2009)? He went ahead and told me on the radio, “He uses his brother’s name from time to time.” He was like an early version of “Police Google” — he knew it all. He said, “Try his name. His brother’s name is X.” Sure enough, it turned out they weren’t serious warrants, but I remember being like, “Hey. This is the first time I arrested someone.” Q: When you got into detective investigating, did you like it more than patrolling? What part of the job is more appealing to you — the more strategic, solving-the-riddle type stuff or chasing down a guy on University Avenue to get a purse back? A: They are all satisfying. There’s different parts of the brain, and those stimulate different parts of the brain. For detective work — number one, you learn a lot. You work with judges and district attorneys; you get arrest warrants. A lot of times in patrol, your goal is to make an arrest, and it’s like you’re building a part of the car. In investigations, you’re building a lot of the car. You’re not just putting the hubcaps on, you’re getting the case ready to be filed, and not only filed, but you’re trying to find out — is this person responsible for other crimes that are so far not yet reported, can we prove those, can we find other victims and can we prove those? Q: One of the major cars you were charged with putting together was the Peninsula rapist.

What was it like to work on that investigation? A: When this guy landed it was like aliens. He hit, like, six times within two weeks and then he was quiet for a while — had about three or four months off. Then he had an attempt. Tom Pohl, one of our officers, spotted the vehicle and that kind of led to a chain of events which ultimately resulted the apprehension of Romel Reid. ... I remember that day — Jan. 17, 1996 — where we ended up arresting the guy. Q: In the late 1990s, you got another new boss — Pat Dwyer. Did Dwyer change things or was he more into preserving continuity? A: He brought a different perspective. On community policing, he changed it so it’s less of a responsibility of one group. It’s a philosophy for the entire organization, not just, “Those people handle that.” The expectation is that we as police officers — we have police powers but also we can solve problems at a city level — be it bushes that are covering a sign or other nuisance that isn’t technically a police thing. Q: And he was succeeded by the department’s first female police chief — Lynne Johnson. Did she carry on her predecessor’s legacy? A: Lynne and Pat both were ahead of the game when it came to some of the stuff we see now. Pat made us one of the first agencies in the area that voluntarily collected demographic data on all of our stops. Lynne was also very interested in the accountability piece. She brought us our first version of the (vehicle) cameras. Those have raised the bar for our officers, and I think our community has a higher level of trust knowing that when the cops are out there, they have a camera strapped to the patrol car. Q: What was Lynne Johnson’s departure like? (She resigned in 2008 after making comments that many interpreted as an endorsement of racial profiling.) It must have been a painful chapter because, as you mention, the department is so based around transparency and community outreach. How hard was it dealing with the aftermath? A: It was hard. There was the issue, and then there’s the fact that it’s a public issue and people are concerned and questioning if we’re a legitimate entity or are we actually engaging in something. What’s interesting is that I don’t know anyone that’s done more to ensure that officers avoided it and stayed away

Veronica Weber

by Gennady Sheyner

Palo Alto Police Chief Dennis Burns, who has spent 35 years with the department, talks with a resident outside City Hall on his final day on the job, Dec. 29. from racial profiling than Lynne Johnson. It was totally ironic. Q: Are you fairly confident that racial profiling did not exist? A: I think Lynne did her best to ensure there was no racial profiling. We saw what we were doing, and we took some steps (after her departure) to make sure that we absolutely did not engage in it. We had kind of an enhanced concern about our own self-monitoring. If there is one officer or a couple of officers who are getting these kinds of complaints, can we talk to them during training and see if there is an explanation? The beauty is that we have cameras and the cameras do help tell the story. At the same time, people felt that perhaps there was (racial profiling). We needed to hear that and we needed to look at ourselves and say: “How can we get better?” It’s like in sports: “How can we get to the next level?” Q: I want to ask you about two issues that the council had discussed that your successor will likely be thinking about. One is sanctuary cities. What is the police department’s current policy for dealing with immigrationenforcement officials? A: We have a policy on dealing with immigration. Basically, we will respectfully decline participating in anything with ICE or INS — any type of sweep or anything like that. Q: But if it’s the current policy, does that mean the designation (as a sanctuary city) is unlikely to have an effect? A: The reality is, local police deal with state laws — vehicle code, the penal code, health and safety, welfare institution. ... We couldn’t care less about (immigration status). We want people to come to us, regardless of their immigration status. If they’re the victim of a crime, if they’re in a relationship where their child is getting beaten, if they are being extorted and what have you. In some countries the police are the enemy, and we don’t want to have any type of immigration concern that would hinder them or inhibit them from coming to speak with us. Q: The council has been talking about the idea of having a citywide policy that would govern surveillance technology. Are you comfortable with the

department’s current policies on surveillance equipment? A: The policies that we have that exist right now are very strong and they provide our folks with guidance, and they inform people that you can only use this technology for an official law-enforcement purpose. And if you go ahead and choose to use that technology in something beyond that, you’re looking at potential discipline, up to and including criminal charges. ... So, I think those things are there. But at the same time, I understand that the public and the council needs to be really smart. If they can provide kind of like a framework and guidance about what our core values are as a city as it applies to this, I think it will help. And it’s not just police. There’s a Public Works component and a Planning Department component. Q: What are you up to next? A: To be determined. We’ll see. I’m looking at a couple of things. I’ll certainly be working. I’m looking at maybe a community college thing, at least talking to someone about that. I think there will be opportunities that come up, and I’ll just have to sit down with my wife and see, does that work? Q: So you’re planning to be a track coach? Or are we still talking about Administration of Justice? A: It’ll probably be more about Administration of Justice, though I’d love to be a junior college track coach. n A community celebration for Chief Dennis Burns, and Assistant Chief Bob Beacom, will be held Wednesday, Jan. 25, 4-6:30 p.m. at the Palo Alto Elks Club, 4249 El Camino Real, Palo Alto. An RSVP is required: Barbara. teixeira@cityofpaloalto.org or 650-329-2556. Staff Writer Gennady Sheyner can be emailed at gsheyner@ paweekly.com.

READ & LISTEN ONLINE

PaloAltoOnline.com

The full Q&A between Chief Dennis Burns and Palo Alto Weekly reporter Gennady Sheyner, along with photos and a 8-minute audio podcast, is posted at paloaltoonline.atavist. com. In the extended interview, Burns discusses the 1990s cocaine epidemic, the case of the Peninsula rapist, Tasers, his fondness for strategy and what it’s like to rappel down tall buildings.

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 7


Support our Kids with a gift to the Holiday Fund

Last Year’s Grant Recipients 10 Books A Home � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $15,000 Ada’s Café � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Adolescent Counseling Services � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $10,000 Art in Action� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Art of Yoga Project � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Blossom Birth� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Beechwood School � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Building Futures Now � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 CASSY � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $10,000 Children’s Center of the Stanford Community � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Children’s Health Council � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $10,000 Common Ground � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Community Legal Services in East Palo Alto � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 Community Working Group � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Computers for Everyone � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 Deborah’s Palm � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Downtown Streets Team� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 DreamCatchers � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $10,000 East Palo Alto Children’s Day � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 East Palo Alto Kids Foundation � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 East Palo Alto Tennis & Tutoring � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 East Palo Alto Youth Court � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Environmental Volunteers � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Family Engagement Institute� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Friends of Palo Alto Junior Museum & Zoo � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Girls to Women � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Grace Lutheran Preschool � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Hagar Services Coalition� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Health Connected � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 InnVision Shelter Network � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 Jasper Ridge Farm � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 JLS Middle School � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,500 Jordan Middle School � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,500 Kara� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $10,000 The Learning Center � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Marine Science Institute � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Music in the Schools Foundation� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $10,000 New Voices for Youth � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $3,000 Nuestra Casa � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 One East Palo Alto � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Palo Alto Art Center Foundation � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Palo Alto Community Child Care � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Palo Alto Friends Nursery School � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $4,000 Palo Alto School District Music Department� � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 Palo Alto Housing Corporation � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Parents Nursery School � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $4,000 Peninsula Bridge � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Peninsula College Fund � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Peninsula HealthCare Connection � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Project WeHOPE� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $15,000 Quest Learning Center � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Ravenswood Education Foundation � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 RISE� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,000 Silicon Valley FACES � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $15,000 Terman Middle School � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $5,500 TheatreWorks� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 YMCA � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $7,500 Youth Community Service � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $10,000 Youth Speaks Out� � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � � $10,000

E

ach year the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund raises money to support programs serving families and children in the Palo Alto area. Since the Weekly and the Silicon Valley

Community Foundation cover all the administrative costs, every dollar raised goes directly to support community programs through grants to non-profit organizations. And with the generous support of matching grants from local foundations, including the Packard, Hewlett, Arrillaga & Peery foundations, your tax-deductible gift will be doubled in size. A donation of $100 turns into $200 with the foundation

Give to the Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund and your donation is doubled. You give to non-profit groups that work right here in our community. It’s a great way to ensure that your charitable donations are working at home.

matching gifts. Whether as an individual, a business or in honor of someone else, help us reach our goal of $350,000 by making a generous contribution to the Holiday Fund. With your generosity, we can give a major boost to the programs in our community helping kids and families.

CLICK AND GIVE

Donate online at siliconvalleycf.org/ paw-holiday-fund

Enclosed is a donation of $_______________ Name__________________________________________________________ Business Name __________________________________________________ Address ________________________________________________________ City/State/Zip ___________________________________________________ E-Mail __________________________________________________

Credit Card (MC, VISA, or AMEX)

All donors and their gift amounts will be published in the Palo Alto Weekly unless the boxes below are checked.

__________________________________________Expires _______/_______

❑ I wish to contribute anonymously.

Phone _________________________________________________________

❑ Please withhold the amount of my contribution. Signature ______________________________________________________ I wish to designate my contribution as follows: (select one)

Send coupon and check, if applicable, to:

❑ In my name as shown above ❑ In the name of business above OR:

❑ In honor of:

❑ In memory of:

❑ As a gift for:

_____________________________________________________________ (Name of person)

Non-profits: Grant application & guidelines at www.PaloAltoOnline.com/holiday_fund Application deadline: January 6, 2017

Page 8 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Please make checks payable to: Silicon Valley Community Foundation

Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund c/o Silicon Valley Community Foundation 2440 West El Camino Real, Suite 300 Mountain View, CA 94040 The Palo Alto Weekly Holiday Fund is a donor advised fund of Silicon Valley Community Foundation, a 501 (c) (3) charitable organization. A contribution to this fund allows your donation to be tax deductible to the fullest extent of the law.


Thank you donors As of January 6, 2017, 361 donors have donated $123,818; with match $247,636 has been raised for the Holiday Fund 31 Anonymous .................... $8,759 New Donors Judith Shulman......................... 200 Barbara Rieder .......................... 100 Irene Beardsley ........................... 50 Kingsley Jack ............................ 200 Ellen King ..................................... * Kay & Don Remsen....................... * Stuart & Carol Hansen .................. * Gerald Anderson & Betty Howell .......................... 100 Werner Graff ................................ * Claire & Ed Lauing .................... 250 Vic Befera ................................. 250 Sherry Brown ............................ 100 Ralph Wheeler .......................... 200 Sally Hewlett.......................... 2,000 Michael Chen & Cathy Lee ....... 300 Harriet & Gerald Berner ............ 150 John Boothroyd & Margaret Krebs ...................... 500 Bob & Jan Hermsen ...................... * Previously Published Carol & Mahlon Hubenthal .......... * Mary Beth Train ........................ 150 Daniel Cox ................................ 200 Nina & Mark Homnack ............. 500 Gil & Gail Woolley .................... 250 Ed & Linda DeMeo ................... 100 Charles Katz ............................. 500 Arthur Keller ................................. * Winyss Shepard ............................ * Sandy Jain ................................ 101 Jill Bicknell ................................ 100 Reed Content ........................... 275 Jean Doble.................................... * Madeline Wong.......................... 50 Alan Wachtel ............................ 250 Elgin & Elizabeth Lee ................ 250 A.C. & Kathryn Johnson ........... 100 Nancy Peterson........................... 75 John Muller .............................. 200 David Thom .............................. 100 Ed & Linda Selden..................... 225 Carroll Harrington .................... 100 Barbara & Charles Stevens ............ * Karen Sipprell ........................... 250 George & Ruth Chippendale ........ * Charles & Jean Thompson ............ * Courtney & Kathy Bryant .............. * Ellmann Family ........................... 50 John & Lynn Wiese ................... 100 Paul & Maureen Roskoph ......... 100 Lodato Family ........................... 500 Harry & Susan Hartzell .............. 100 John & Ruth De Vries ............. 2,500 Jonathan MacQuitty & Laurie Hunter .................. 1,000 Susan Osofsky ............................ 50 Carolyn Williams & Mike Keeler.... * Amy Harris & Jopss Geiduschek 100 Jeremy Platt & Sandra Murphy...... * Hugh McDevitt ......................... 200 Hans & Judith Steiner ............... 100 Hoda Epstein ................................ * Sandra & Scott Pearson ............ 500 Sally O’Neil & Ken Bencala........ 100 Fran Codispoti .......................... 500

Marvin & Kate Feinstein............ 150 David & Virginia Pollard ............ 150 David & Karen Backer ............... 500 Rosalie Shepherd ...................... 100 Lani Freeman & Stephen Monismith ............... 150 Herb & Alice Fischgrund ........... 175 Douglas & Leslie Murphy-Chutorian .............. 1,000 Dan & Chris Logan ................... 100 Hal & Iris Korol.............................. * Anna Messner .......................... 250 Patricia Levin................................. * Stan & W Marie Scott ............... 100 M. Cairns & A. Martin .............. 100 Cindy & Dennis Dillon ............... 202 Howard Wolf ............................ 500 Stephanie Klein & Larry Baer......... * Marlys Keoshian ....................... 200 Robert Gamburd ...................... 500 Virginia Laibl ............................. 100 Meri Gruber & James Tayler .......... * Ellen & Ron Krasnow ................ 500 Laure Woods ............................ 100 Xiaofan Lin ................................. 50 Drew McCalley & Marilyn Green ..100 Romola Georgia ........................... * Gwen Barry .............................. 100 Colleen Anderson ..................... 250 Bryan Wilson & Geri Martin Wilson ................ 100 Georgie Gleim .......................... 500 Steve & Diane Ciesinski............. 500 Merele McClure ........................ 500 Richard Ellson ........................... 100 Betsy & George Bechtel ............ 100 The Gallo Family ....................... 500 Vic & Mary Ojakian ................... 200 Janice Bohman ......................... 250 Richard & Karen Olson.............. 200 The Dawes Family ..................... 250 Richard Zuanich .......................... 75 Cynthia Costell ......................... 100 Bonnie Packer and Robert Raymakers .................. 100 Mitchell Rosen ............................ 50 David Wynn.................................. * Eric & Anne Kastner............... 2,500 Star Teachout ........................... 100 Joan & Robert Jack ................... 300 Mehdi Alhassani ....................... 150 Weil Family .............................. 250 Annette Glanckopf ....................... * Marion Lewenstein ................ 2,000 Jennifer DiBrienza ....................... 50 Barry Goldblatt ............................. * Nancy McGaraghan.................. 500 Carol Kersten............................ 300 Eileen Brennan ............................. * Jeffrey Ericson............................. 36 Mindy Williams Hollar............... 150 Cassius McEwen ....................... 200 The Braff Family ........................ 500 The Epstein Family .................... 200 Chris Kenrick ......................... 1,000 The Stauffer Family ................... 500 Nancy Steege ........................... 100 Nina & Norman Kulgein............ 250 Constance Crawford .................... * Bjorn Liencres ........................ 1,000 Patti Yanklowitz & Mark Krasnow ....................... 150 Jacquie Rush............................. 100

Joyce & Gerry Barker ................ 200 Don & Dee Price ........................... * John & Mary Schaefer .............. 100 Micki & Bob Cardelli ..................... * Shirley Ely ................................. 500 David & Diane Feldman ......... 1,000 Sallie & Jay Whaley ....................... * Veronica Tincher ....................... 125 Al & Joanne Russell................... 300 Lijun & Jia-Ning Xiang............... 200 Margaret & Les Fisher ............... 100 Karen & Steve Ross ....................... * Gordon Chamberlain................ 250 Norman & Nancy Rossen .......... 200 Mr. & Mrs. Robert Loarie .............. * Fred & Deborah Kurland ........... 200 Marina Remmel ........................ 500 Mark Kreutzer .......................... 100 Bandy & Diane Sikic .................. 300 Robert Simoni........................... 200 Craig Jurney ............................. 100 Michael Kieschnick ....................... * John Wilkes .............................. 300 Sally & Abdo Kadifa ............... 1,000 Robert & Barbara Simpson............ * Debbie Nusinson ...................... 100 Joanne Koltnow ....................... 300 Michael & Jean Couch .............. 250 Susan Hyder ............................... 20 Merrill & Lee Newman .................. * Brigid Barton & Rob Robinson .. 200 Laurie Jarrett................................. * Bill & Barbara Busse .................. 200 Jody Maxmin ................................ * Tony & Judy Kramer ...................... * Beth & Peter Rosenthal ............. 300 Page & Ferrell Sanders .............. 100 Bill Reller....................................... * Roger & Joan Warnke ............... 275 Catherine Dolton ...................... 200 Lee Sendelbeck......................... 500 Ruth Rosenbaum .......................... * Tom & Patricia Sanders ................. * Margaret & Marc Cohen .......... 250 Marcia & Michael Katz.............. 200 Susan & Doug Woodman ............. * Sue Kemp................................. 250 Jerry & Linda Elkind .................. 250 Diane Doolittle ............................. * Patrick & Emily Radtke ........... 2,000 Don & Bonnie Miller ................. 100 Ron Wolf .................................. 200 Richard Morris ....................... 1,500 Michael Nelson ........................... 50 Solon Finkelstein....................... 150 Cathy Kroymann ...................... 250 Havern Family ........................ 5,000 Nigel Jones ................................. 50 Pamela Mayfield ....................... 100 Hugh MacMillan ....................... 500 Teresa Roberts ....................... 2,000 Bill Johnson & Terri Lobdell .... 1,000 Arden King ................................. 25 David Labaree ........................... 200 Bonnie Berg.............................. 300 Ellen & Mike Turbow ................ 250 Hal & Carol Louchheim ............. 400 Carol Bacchetti ......................... 200 Bruce Campbell ........................ 200 Stan Shore ................................ 500 Roy & Carol Blitzer........................ * Sally & Craig Nordlund ............. 500

Tom & Ellen Ehrich .................... 300 Eve & John Melton ................... 500 Nancy & Joe Huber ................... 100 Betty Gerard ............................. 100 Robyn Crumly............................... * Peter Stern ............................... 250 Jim & Nancy Baer.......................... * Elizabeth Salzer & Richard Baumgartner ............................. * Barbara Klein & Stan Schrier ......... * Judith Appleby ......................... 200 Caroline Zlotnick........................... * Bobbie & Jerry Wagger ................. * Harry & Susan Hartzell .............. 200 Diane Moore ................................ * Helene Pier ................................... * Phil Hanawalt & Graciela Spivak ...500 Edward Kanazawa ........................ * Steve & Nancy Levy................... 500 Eugene & Mabel Dong ............. 200 Roger Smith ............................. 300 Jim & Alma Phillips ................... 250 Donald & Adele Langendorf ..... 200 Ann & Don Rothblatt.................... * Bob & Edie Kirkwood ................... * George & Betsy Young ............. 100 Richard & Tish Fagin ................. 300 Brigid Barton ............................ 500 Lawrence Yang & Jennifer Kuan ....................... 1,000 Richard Johnsson ................... 7,000 Ted & Ginny Chu .......................... * John & Florine Galen ................ 100 Jan Thomson & Roy Levin ......... 250 Vince & Amanda Steckler ...... 1,000 Boyce & Peggy Nute ..................... * Jan & Freddy Gabus .................. 100 Kevin Mayer & Barbara Zimmer .... * Andrea Smith ........................... 100 Deborah Williams ..................... 250 Peter Beller ............................... 200 Elaine Hahn .............................. 500 John & Meg Monroe ................ 500 Jan Kilner.................................. 500 Dena Goldberg ......................... 500 Sharon & Leif Erickson .............. 250 Thomas Rindfleisch ....................... * Charles Williams ....................... 100 Gail Taylor................................. 200 Deborah Baldwin & Lawrence Markosian .............. 200 Linda & Steve Boxer ...................... * In Memory Of Edward & Elizabeth Buurma ......... * Tinney Family............................ 250 Mary Festinger.............................. * Lindsey Draper.......................... 200 Al Bernal....................................... * Ludwig Tannenwald ..................... * Mary Fran, Joe & Stephenn Scroggs .................. 100 Tracy & Alan Herrick ..................... * Ryan ............................................. * Maria Serpa ................................ 30 Bob Markevitch ............................ * Carol Berkowitz ............................ * Tracy Herrick ............................. 500 Bob Donald .................................. * Ando & Barbara MacDonell ...... 250 Aaron O’Neill ................................ * Katharine Rogers King .................. * Emmett Lorey ............................... * Becky Schaefer ............................. *

Ernest J. Moore ........................ 200 Jim Byrnes ................................ 100 Betty Meltzer ................................ * Bob Wolbach.............................. 50 Ted Linden ................................ 200 Joe & Rema Cotton .................. 100 Leonard Ely, Jr. .......................... 250 Glen A. Lillington, MD .............. 200 Marie & Don Snow ................... 100 Nate Rosenberg ........................ 150 Willie Branch ................................ * August Lee King ........................... * Ruth & Chet Johnson ................... * Robert Lobdell .............................. * Y.C. and Er-Ying Yen ................ 250 Abe and Helene Klein ................... * Mrs. Katina D. Higbee .............. 200 Helen Rubin.............................. 200 Dr. & Mrs. Irving Rubin ............. 200 Max & Anna Blanker ................ 200 Leo & Sylvia Breidenbach .............. * Thomas & Louise Phinney ............. * Laddie Hughes.............................. * Pam Grady ............................... 250 Yoko Nonaka ................................ * Our parents Albert & Beverly Pellizzari ..................... * Robert Spinrad ......................... 500 Boyd Paulson ................................ * Florence Kan Ho ........................... * Jack Sutorius............................. 300 Dr. Elliot W. Eisner ........................ * Mary Floyd.................................... * John Packard ............................ 100 As a Gift For E G Lund Family........................ 100 In Honor Of Kaye Kelley & Richard Van Dusen..250 Ada’s Café, a tasty treasure .......... * Lucy Berman’s Clients ............ 2,500 Lynn Radzilowski .......................... * Jill, Scott, Polly, Hayley, Jake & Garrett..................... 1,200 Marilyn Sutorius ....................... 300 Philip Gottheiner .......................... * Organizations Palo Alto Weekly Moonlight Run & Walk ..... 25,907 Sponsors of Moonlight Run: Palo Alto Medical Foundation ....................... 10,000 Wilson Sonsini Goodrich & Rosati Foundation ........... 5,000 Stanford Federal Credit Union ....................... 5,000 Palantir ............................... 5,000 DeLeon Realty .................... 5,000 Lakin Spears ....................... 2,000 Bank of the West................ 1,000 Harrell Remodeling ....................... * Alta Mesa Cemetery & Funeral Home.................. 1,800 Attorney Susan Dondershine .... 200 Good Bear and Co. Charitable Fund .................. 5,000 Bleibler Properties LLC .............. 500 deLemos Properties .................. 300 Carl King/Mayfield Mortgage ....... * Palo Alto Business Park - Judd Properties .................................. * Reach 4U Coaching - Lee Zulman..100 United Methodist Women of First United Methodist Church in Palo Alto ............................ 300

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 9


Upfront

Learn the Guitar this Winter Carol McComb’s “Starting to Play” workshop includes the FREE use of a Loaner Guitar for the duration of the classes. * Regular cost is just $180 for nine weeks of group lessons, and all music is included. * “Starting to Play” meets for one hour each Monday night for nine weeks beginning January 9th. For more information about this and Carol’s other classes at Gryphon, visit www.carolmccomb.com and click on “group classes.”

Stringed Instruments Since 1969

650 • 493 •2131

211 Lambert Avenue • Palo Alto

www.gryphonstrings.com

CITY OF PALO ALTO Notice of Funding Availability for Housing and Public Facilities Rehabilitation Projects Only Program Years 2017-18 & 2018-19 Community Development Block Grant Program Attendance at the Pre-Proposal Conference is MANDATORY for all applicants. Pre-Proposal Conference schedule: Thursday, January 19, 2017 at 1:30 p.m. APPLICATIONS DUE: by 12:00 p.m. on Friday, February 3, 2017 Applications are now available for the City of Palo Alto’s 2017-18 & 2018-19 Community Development Block Grant (CDBG) program years for Multi-Family Rehabilitation Projects and Public Facility Rehabilitation Projects only. The applications are for funding under the City’s two-year funding cycle that includes FY 2017-18 (July 1, 2017 to June 30, 2018) and FY 2018-19 (July 1, 2018 to June 30, 2019). The City expects to distribute locally an estimated $300,000 in funds for these two funding categories each fiscal year from the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) for the CDBG Program. The CDBG Program is directed toward expanding and maintaining the affordable housing supply; promoting housing opportunities and choices; maintaining and improving community facilities; increasing economic opportunities, accessibility, energy efficiency and sustainability; and providing supportive services specifically for persons of low and very low income. Targeted groups might include persons who are homeless, seniors, persons with disabilities, and other special needs groups. A Mandatory Pre-Proposal Conference is scheduled for 1:30 p.m. on Thursday, January 19, 2017 in the Planning Department Conference Room at the Civic Center, Fifth Floor, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California. ALL Proposers intending to submit a proposal are required to attend the Pre-Proposal Conference. If unable to attend, please contact Eloiza Murillo-Garcia at (650) 329-2561 or via e-mail at eloiza.murillogarcia@CityofPaloAlto.org. The application submittal package must be received by the CDBG Program Office by 12:00 p.m. on Friday, February 3, 2017, in order to be considered for funding during the period that includes FY 2017-18 & 2018-19. Applications are available at the City of Palo Alto Planning Division, City Hall, 5th Floor, 250 Hamilton Avenue, during regular office hours. Applications are also available on the City’s website: http:// www.cityofpaloalto.org/gov/depts/pln/cdbg.asp. To request an application or for more information please contact Eloiza MurilloGarcia, Senior Planner at 650.329.2561 or via email at eloiza. murillogarcia@CityofPaloAlto.org. Persons with disabilities who require auxiliary aids or services in using City facilities, services or programs, or who would like information on the City’s compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990, may contact: ADA Coordinator, City of Palo Alto, 650-329-2550 (Voice) ada@cityofpaloalto.org Page 10 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Civil rights

(continued from page 5)

rary president at Tuesday’s meeting in Terry Godfrey’s absence. “It’s also to understand what processes broke down, what decisions were made that shouldn’t have been made (and) what exactly was missing that we need to fix.   “If we don’t do those investigations, then we won’t know the answers to those questions.”   McGee argued that an independent investigation could have “diminishing returns and significant expenses” depending on its scope. For example, tracking down former students and staff could be costly. He took the same position on the resolution agreement’s directive to review all behavioral incident reports from Gunn and Palo Alto high schools from 2012 through 2016.   “We’re not disagreeing with the guiding principles” of those two requirements, “just how far back we should go,” McGee told the board. He later agreed to drop that recommendation at the board’s direction.   Melissa Baten Caswell — the only trustee who was on the board when the Office for Civil Rights first opened its investigations at Paly and Gunn — expressed concerns about the proposed agreement.   She said she was reluctant to agree to a resolution agreement without first receiving the agency’s official findings, which will identify where the district or the schools are legally out of compliance. The Office for Civil Rights has shared its findings verbally in meetings with McGee, Chief Student Services Officer Holly Wade and district attorneys but will not provide anything in writing until the resolution agreement has been signed.   Attorney Elizabeth Estes of the law firm Atkinson, Andelson, Loya, Ruud & Romo, who is working with the district on the resolution agreement, told the board via speakerphone that in her experience with voluntary resolution agreements, the Office for Civil Rights has issued its findings in writing after the agreement is finalized.   While the resolution agreement is subject to negotiation and could change, the findings are not, according to the agency’s procedures. The school district will have the option to appeal the findings within 60 days if it believes they are incomplete, incorrect and/or the appropriate legal standard was not applied, according to the Office for Civil Rights’ case-processing manual.   McGee said staff sent notes of their understanding of the agency’s findings from these meetings but has yet to receive confirmation from the Office for Civil Rights on what are findings and what might be “concerns.” Baten Caswell asked McGee to share those notes with the board members.   “I don’t think we should be signing a resolution if we don’t know what the findings are,” Baten Caswell said.   She also voiced concern about

the proposed minimum three-year monitoring period, which could involve requests for more information, site visits and interviews. While three years is “reasonable,” she said, “forever is probably impossible for us to support.”   Other board members noted that the monitoring period does have an end point — when the district is found to be in legal compliance, the resolution agreement states.   The trustees agreed with McGee that it’s reasonable to seek assurances from the Office for Civil Rights that it will respond to the district in a timely manner. District leadership has expressed frustration in the past that these investigations lasted for several years and that during those years, there was infrequent communication from the Office for Civil Rights.   McGee also proposed asking the federal agency to give 30-day notice before visiting the district to interview students and staff and that the notice include the specific purpose for the interviews, the specific students or staff to be interviewed and the expected length of the interviews. This proposal stems from the district’s past experience, he said, when the agency visited the district to interview staff who “felt extremely vulnerable and often discussed, ‘Should I get my own lawyer?’” McGee said.   Dauber called this position “unnecessarily defensive” and urged district leaders and staff to see the Office for Civil Rights’ involvement in the district as a positive, not a negative.   “I think it’s important and very positive ... to see the role of OCR here as supportive of our efforts

to provide a safe, educational environment for all of our students,” Dauber said. “To the extent that we haven’t done that in the past, which is what gave rise to the findings, we owe it to our students and to our obligations under federal and state law to correct that and to go forward and do better.”   McGee will bring the board’s input to his next meeting with the Office for Civil Rights on Jan. 19. The district’s new law firm is supporting the district in the process and has already started to work on policy revisions proposed in the resolution agreement, staff said Tuesday.   The district has also started work to develop an anonymous tip line for students and parents to report concerns about sexual harassment or sexual violence, McGee said.   The district intends “in large part” to fully comply and cooperate with the Office for Civil Rights, McGee said. He did not recommend any changes to the agency’s other reporting and investigatory requirements, which include to provide staff training on Title IX and investigations and to conduct a student and parent climate survey focused on sexual harassment and the district’s response and prevention efforts, among others.   “We all want to do what’s best to protect the safety and security of our students,” he said. “This is not adversarial.”   The district has until March 7 to respond to the draft resolution agreement, but McGee said he intends to return to the board for approval in February. n Staff Writer Elena Kadvany can be emailed at ekadvany@ paweekly.com.

CityView A round-up

of Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Jan. 9)

Swimming: The council approved a $143,000 contract with Team Sheeper for administration of the learn-to-swim program at Rinconada Pool. Yes: Unanimous Commissions: The council voted to extend the recruitment process for filling vacancies on the Parks and Recreation Commission and the Historic Resources Board. Yes: Fine, Kniss, Scharff, Tanaka, Wolbach No: DuBois, Filseth, Holman, Kou Planning: The council voted to open the recruitment process for the one unscheduled vacancy on the Planning and Transportation Commission. Yes: Unanimous

Board of Education (Jan. 10)

Resolution to support immigrant students: The school board approved a resolution affirming the district’s support of and protections for immigrant students.Yes: Baten Caswell, DiBrienza, Collins, Dauber Absent: Godfrey Elementary funding: The board approved $60 million to fund capital improvements at elementary-school campuses. Yes: Baten Caswell, DiBrienza, Collins, Dauber Absent: Godfrey Hoover design: The board approved a conceptual design for renovations at Hoover Elementary School. Yes: Baten Caswell, DiBrienza, Collins, Dauber Absent: Godfrey Wireless refresh: The board authorized staff to send out a bid for a wireless infrastructure refresh. Yes: Baten Caswell, DiBrienza, Collins Abstain: Dauber Absent: Godfrey

Planning and Transportation (Jan. 11)

Retail:The commission recommended adopting a permanent city-wide ordinance limiting conversion of ground-floor retail to other uses. Yes: Gardias, Lauing, Summa, Waldfogel No: Alcheck, Rosenblum Retail: The commission also recommended that the City Council direct it hold a future discussion about broader efforts to protect retail, with a greater focus on differentiating between various parts of the city. Yes: Alcheck, Gardias, Lauing, Rosenblum, Waldfogel No: Summa


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www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 11


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was popular in their time, the report provides examples of several people contemporary to the three men who spoke out against eugenics. The report also notes the growing number of school districts, colleges and universities that have been grappling with the same questions, with different outcomes. The renaming committee did agree that more education on eugenics is needed in Palo Alto Unified, recommending that the district incorporate the history of the California eugenics movement and Palo Alto’s role into secondary schools’ social-studies curriculum. The committee is also recommending that the school board add the values of “integrity, innovation and inclusion” to a policy on naming criteria. The group is not recommending

the district change the names of any other schools. The committee also researched the potential financial impact of renaming — the cost of changing everything from school signs and uniforms to business cards and letterheads. The committee estimates the price tag would be about $97,600 and about $45,600 at Jordan and Terman, respectively. Replacing the uniforms for after-school athletics teams at a single site would cost an additional $12,800, according to the committee. Several community groups have taken official stands in support of the recommendation to rename, including the Palo Alto Community Advisory Committee (CAC), which supports families of students with disabilities; Parent Advocates for Student Success (PASS), which supports minority students and families; and the Terman site council. In their “minority position” report, the four authors do not deny the three namesakes’ involvement

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Page 12 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

in what they describe as a “repugnant and non-inclusive” ideology. But to remove the three men’s names, they argue, would be to erase the symbolism and generations of memories tied to the schools. “As decades have passed, these names have been decreasingly associated with their namesakes and increasingly with the place,” the minority report states. “To change the name of this school will sever the connection with the past.” Three of the four minority-report supports are Palo Alto Unified alumni. The fourth is a current Jordan teacher. The minority report also notes that “there are many who feel that renaming institutions, however well intentioned, serves as a moral Band-Aid that glosses over deeper issues, such as the continuing presence of the achievement gap, and mutes the lessons of history.” The majority report argues that renaming is, in fact, doing the opposite as the “conscious, public act of facing the eugenics legacy.” The four minority members offer a compromise: to hold a public ceremony or ceremonies to formally remove the men’s full names from official school records and facilities but retain the generic names of Jordan, Terman and Cubberley for the sites. The members argue that removing the names completely, even with the addition of curriculum on eugenics, will mean future students will be less engaged in that history. “The controversial and emotional nature of this issue justifies a compromise, as the stakes are high for each side,” the report states. A different committee member, Ben Lenail, offers another “middle-of-the-road” compromise in his own report: to name Terman after Frederick Terman, Lewis’ son, and publicly reject any ties to the father’s legacy. Yet another committee member, Stan Hutchings, a staunch opponent of renaming, wrote his own piece. In it he argues, “A school environment has much more influence on belonging, acceptance, respect/values than a school name.” The district’s time, resources and attention, he added, would be better focused elsewhere. The question over whether to rename now lies in the hands of the school board, which will discuss it at a future meeting. If the board decides to rename Jordan, Terman and Cubberley, it is unclear through what process and when new names would be selected. The renaming committee suggests engaging in a “site-centric renaming approach that involves the students, staff and parents and helps to create a sense of name ownership and belonging.” The renaming committee’s final report and accompanying appendices are posted at pausd.org. n Staff Writer Elena Kadvany can be reached at ekadvany@ paweekly.com.


Pulse POLICE CALLS Palo Alto

Dec. 14-Jan. 10

Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Domestic/family violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Child/elder abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Robbery/armed . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Theft related Commercial/Residential burglaries . . . . . . 12 Forgery/misc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Shoplifting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Vehicle related Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Burglary attempt/auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Driving w/ suspended license . . . . . . . . . . 31 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Registration violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 83 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Vehicle accident/prop damage . . . . . . . . . 13 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Alcohol or drug related Drinking in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Driving under influence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Possession of paraphernalia . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Miscellaneous Arson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 B&P misc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Casualty/fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

(continued on page 14)

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Hildy (Hildegard) Wurzburg November 9, 1934-December 28, 2016

Wurzburg, Hildy (Hildegard) – It is with great sadness that our family has to announce that the matriarch of our family passed away on Dec. 28, 2016, after a brief illness. She was the first generation of her family to be born in the United States. Her parents were Frederick and Louisa Strothmann, both Stanford professors. She attended and met the love of her life, Willam (Bill) Wurzburg at Palo Alto High School. She graduated from Stanford with a Master’s degree in teaching. Her first teaching position was at Garland Elementary school at the age of 20. She and Bill purchased their first home in Menlo Park where they lived for several years. She and her husband, Bill and their daughter Michelle moved to Petaluma in 1963 when Bill got a job as the principal of Penngrove Elementary. Hildy taught for the bulk of her career within the Novato Unified School District, retiring after nearly 42 yrs. Hildy and Bill enjoyed traveling a great deal, often taking their daughters Michelle and Heidi with them on their adventures. For their 25th anniversary, they visited the islands of Hawaii and for their 50th, enjoyed a cruise through the Panama Canal. Hildy also took trips to the Baltic Sea region, Australia and New Zealand. She and her husband belonged to the 901 Elks camping group for many years as well as enjoyed dancing with the Cotillion group of Petaluma and with a local square dancing club. Hildy served on the Petaluma Parks and Recreation commission for eight years. She was active in the Petaluma’s Women’s and Garden clubs, the 901 Elks and the Danish club. Hildy leaves behind two daughters, Michelle (Mark Thomas) and Heidi (Marty Nygaard), three grandsons and a granddaughter, three great-grandsons and a great-granddaughter, three nephews and her niece. She is also survived by her twin sister, Sigrid. At her request, no funeral or memorial will be held. If desired, donations to St. Jude’s Hospital or Shriner’s Hospital are encouraged in lieu of flowers or other memorials.

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CITY OF PALO ALTO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council will hold a Public Hearing at the special meeting on Monday, January 23, 2017 at 6:00 p.m. or as near thereafter as possible, in the Council Chambers, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, to consider adoption of a Resolution for the creation of a new Residential Preferential Parking (RPP) Program in the Evergreen Park and Mayfield Neighborhoods bounded by Park Boulevard, Caltrain rail corridor, Oregon Expressway, Page Mill Road and El Camino Real and finding of exemption under the California Environmental Quality Act. BETH D. MINOR City Clerk

Patricia Nell Ferguson Weaver August 9, 1944 to September 16, 2016 Resident of Palo Alto

Patricia Nell Ferguson Weaver passed away peacefully in her sleep September 16, 2016, surrounded by her loving family. Born in Dallas, Texas, Patricia Nell Ferguson the daughter of Julia and Charles Ferguson, spent her elementary and junior high school years moving back and forth between Texas and California as her father’s jobs in the insurance industry changed. Graduating from John Muir High School in Pasadena, California, she attended Stanford University where she earned a BA in French and an MA in Education. While at Stanford, she met Richard Weaver whom she married in 1966 following a two-year courtship. Patricia and Richard settled in their “forever house� in Palo Alto, where they lived since 1974. Patricia’s professional path always involved teaching. Before interrupting that career to have children, she taught French, History, and Girl’s Physical Education at Hopkins Junior High and Irvington High in Fremont. When her children got older, she returned to teaching, as an SAT tutor, as a grader for Advanced Placement History and English classes, and occasionally as a classroom teacher, teaching English at Menlo-Atherton High School and Sacred Heart Prep as a long-term substitute or as a temporary replacement. However, her enthusiasm for helping people learn to think and write led her to fulfill her real passion which was to develop a tutoring and mentoring practice that she actively continued until just a few months before her death. In addition to working with students, Patricia helped to develop curriculum for local high school English departments while mentoring teachers, helping them to hone their skills. Always a committed Christian, Patricia loved the Lord. Her twenty-seven year battle with breast cancer energized her to share God’s love with all whom she came in contact. Instead of being embittered by her condition, she enthusiastically embraced each day as a gift from God that was to be lived with dignity and grace. Her ability to actively listen to others, empathize with their situations, and to provide thoughtful suggestions for solutions to their problems made her a much sought after friend, counselor, and companion. Although family and friends sorely miss her, they all rejoice in the certainty that she is in heaven, free from her earthly pain and suffering. Patricia leaves behind her husband of 50 years, Richard Weaver of Palo Alto, CA, her daughter and son-in-law Tricia and Charlie Moss of San Francisco, CA, her son and daughter-in-law David and Katelyn Weaver and her granddaughter Clara Anne Gravelle Weaver of Seattle, WA, and her stepmother Bobbie Mitchell Ferguson of Palm Desert, CA. We invite her friends to join us as we celebrate Patricia’s life at Stanford Memorial Church on Monday, January 30, 2017 at 2:00pm. In lieu of flowers, the family asks that contributions be sent to the women’s cancer help organization – Sense of Security California, 2636 Judah Street #133, San Francisco, CA 94122. http://www. senseofsecurityus.org PAID

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www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 13


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Frances and Charles Riley In Loving Memory

This past Spring our parents passed away 2 months apart. Our mother Frances L. Riley in March, then our father Charles W. Riley in May. They were married for 62 years. Our mother was born on June 20, 1929 to Mary and Everett Mann in New London, Connecticut. As the daughter of a U.S. Naval Officer she lived in a number of cities on both coasts of the U.S. She and Charles met through her brother Everett who was a classmate of Charles at the University of California, Los Angeles. Frances was a graduate of the University of California, Santa Barbara and was an artist and teacher. Among the places where Frances’ artwork has been displayed are Gallery House and the Pacific Art League in Palo Alto, and at the Menlo Park Civic Center. Frances and Charles were married on January 2, 1954 at her parents’ house in Millbrae, California. Charles was born on September 16, 1925 in Salt Lake City, Utah to Erma and Charles W. Riley, Sr. His family lived in Washington state and California, primarily in San Francisco and Los Angeles. His father was a pilot who had flown with John A. MacReady in the 1920s and Charles developed an interest in flying early in his childhood. While in college he obtained his pilot’s license. Charles graduated from UCLA with an Engineering degree and had a career as an Aerospace Engineer. Charles had been a member of the Acacia fraternity at UCLA and was a lifetime member of the Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers. When Lockheed Missiles and Space Corporation moved to Sunnyvale Frances and Charles moved from Santa Monica to Palo Alto in 1956 with their one-year-old first son Charles. Soon after their arrival in Palo Alto their second son Robin was born. Their daughters Mary and Frances were born in 1958. In 1963 they moved their family to Menlo Oaks near Peninsula School where Frances spent most of her teaching career. They lived in Menlo Oaks for the next 53 years. They donated their bodies to the Stanford University Medical School. After retirement Frances and Charles got great joy from their grandchildren and great grandchildren. They enjoyed activities at Avenidas, a non-profit agency which helps Seniors stay active and independent. They are survived by their children Charles, Robin, Mary and Frances, and by their seven grandchildren, four great grandchildren, and Frances’ brother Robert Mann. PAID

MEMORIAL

Page 14 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Ann Masik, a longtime resident of Palo Alto, was called home to the Lord on December 8, 2016 at the age of 95. Ann was born in Arnold, PA. She earned her RN degree in Pittsburgh, PA and served in the Navy Nurse Corps during WWII, where she met her husband James R. Masik. In 1950, they moved to Palo Alto when Jim accepted a job as Director of Recreation. It was here that they raised their six children. Ann worked as an office nurse for three different doctors as well as owned/operated Pleasant Manor Nursing Home in Palo Alto. Ann’s life was centered on her family and service to her church and community. As an active member of Saint Aloysius Catholic Church and later Saint Thomas Aquinas Church, Ann served as a lector, Eucharistic minister and helped on many church committees. She completed 15 years of hospital ministry at Stanford University Hospital. She always made the time to listen to others’ problems, to offer advice and to pray to the Lord for resolution. Ann was preceded in death by the love of her life Jim Masik, her parents Anthony and Anna, and her siblings Julia, Anthony and Andrew. She is survived by her children Janet Heekin (David); Robert Masik (Letitia); Don Masik (Nancy); Richard Masik; Monica Hofstetter (Craig); and Patrice Kaffun (Dave). She was the grandmother of Brian (Pam) Davis; Matt (Mimi) Davis; Bobby (Amanda) Masik; Kevin, Patrick, Carli and Scott Masik; Christopher and Doug Hofstetter; Kate and JJ Kaffun; great grandmother of Madison, Charlie, Owen and Sophia Davis; step grandmother of Molly Heekin (Joe Lee); Justin (Chrissy) Heekin; Brendon Wood; Shannon Hillier; step great grandmother of Carter and Katie Heekin; many nieces and nephews; and her caregivers Fifi Langi and Yvonne Sasano. Ann was beloved by family and friends and her spirit will remain strong to all who knew her. A rosary will be held at Saint Thomas Aquinas Catholic Church in Palo Alto at 7:00 pm on Friday, January 20. A memorial service to celebrate Ann’s life will be held at Saint Albert’s the Great Catholic Church in Palo Alto at 11:00 am on Saturday, January 21. A reception will follow in the church hall. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations to one of Ann’s favorite charities: Morgan Autism Center in San Jose, CA; American Red Cross; Saint Thomas Aquinas Church of Palo Alto, CA; or the charity of your choice. PAID

OBITUARY

Pulse

(continued from page 13) F&W disposal request . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Internet/misc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Misc penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Muni code/misc . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Outside investigation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Possession of stolen property . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Psych hold/subject . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 25 Sex crime/indecent exposure . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Sick and cared for . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . . . . 7 Unattended death . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 32

Menlo Park

Dec. 14-Jan. 10

Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Theft related Burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Defraud innkeeper . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Receive stolen property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Shoplifting . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Auto theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Bicycle recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Bicycle theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Driving w/ suspended license . . . . . . . . . . 29 Driving without license . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Expired/false registration . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 19 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 Vehicle accident/prop damage . . . . . . . . . . 4 Alcohol or drug related Driving under the influence . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 6 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Under influence of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Miscellaneous Annoying phone calls . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Coroner case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 5 CPS referral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 4 Dog bite . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Found property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Info. case . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Juvenile report . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 8 Medical call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Mental evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Property for destruction . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Psychiatric evaluation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 2 Returned missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Spousal abuse . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . . . . 3 Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Warrant arrest . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16


A CLASSICAL CELEBRATION AT BING CONCERT HALL

ST. LAWRENCE STRING QUARTET SUNDAY, JANUARY 22, 2:30PM

Bay Area favorites St. Lawrence String Quartet and Philharmonia Baroque Orchestra take the stage next week with programs featuring Beethoven, Mozart, Haydn, Adams, and more! live.stanford.edu 650.724.2464

SEASON MEDIA SPONSORS

PHILHARMONIA BAROQUE ORCHESTRA WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 7:30 PM

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 15


Arts & Entertainment A weekly guide to music, theater, art, culture, books and more, edited by Karla Kane

Courtesy Trevor Paglen Studio

W

A member of the Kronos Quartet performs, as seen by artist Trevor Paglen’s machine-vision software. So what exactly is “machine vision”? “A super-obvious example would be Optical Character Recognition,” with which computers are able to translate an image of printed text into machine-coded text, such as how red-light cameras read license plates, Paglen said. To Paglen, who’s worked extensively on the issue of privacy and mass surveillance, while the technology is wondrous, it’s also fairly ominous.

Courtesy Trevor Paglen Studio

hen you snap a picture on your smartphone, you may look at it for a few moments, perhaps share it with friends via social media, then forget about it. But it hasn’t forgotten about you. Even when the image is not being seen by human eyes, the computer programs inside your phone are still looking — and analyzing its data — forever. For artist Trevor Paglen, who’s been named Cantor Arts Center’s new artist-in-residence, understanding how computers “see,” and the implications of that vision, has become a major topic of interest. He explores this issue with his multisensory project “The Sight Machine,” which will be exhibited at a Stanford University-presented event in San Francisco on Jan. 14. The Cantor-commissioned performance piece, which lets Trevor Paglen viewers “see” a music performance (in this case, a concert by the renowned Kronos Quartet) the way machines do, will launch Paglen’s collaboration with the Stanford arts center. The winter-spring residency will likely culminate with an exhibition at the Cantor in May. Paglen said he plans to further explore the intersection of artificial intelligence, visual and performance art, and ethics, and that Stanford, with its wealth of expertise, is the natural place to do it. He and Cantor’s Chief Curator and Associate Director Alison Gass have worked together before, and when Paglen asked Gass if she might be able to connect him to Stanford, she jumped at the chance. “It’s a really exciting opportunity to think differently about what contemporary art at Stanford could be,” Gass said. “Our residencies can take all kinds of different forms. It’s really kind of experimental.” “The overarching project is looking at how the advent of computer vision is changing our relationship to images,” Paglen said. At Stanford, he’ll lead a crossdisciplinary examination involving the university’s Artificial Intelligence Vision Labs and the Center for the Internet and Society at Stanford Law School, giving some lectures and leading a symposium on the topic along the way (including, on Feb. 8, giving the annual Wilsey Distinguished Lecture at Bing Concert Hall). Paglen will be “looking specifically at different ‘techniques in seeing’ used in computer vision,” he said, “but also looking at a kind of history of machine vision at Stanford.”

Cantor artist Trevor Paglen’s ‘Sight explores AI vision by Karla Kane “We’re probably living in a moment now where computers look at images more than people do. What does that mean for culture, for society?” he said. “Computers always have agendas when they look at things.” Facial-recognition technology allows Facebook to suggest “tagging” photos of friends, for instance, but it also does much more. “When you put an image on Facebook or other social media, you’re feeding an array of immensely powerful artificial intelligence systems information about how to identify people and how to recognize places and objects, habits and preferences, race, class, and gender identifications, economic statuses, and much more,” Paglen wrote in a recent article for The New Inquiry. Part of his work involves comparing and contrasting the differences between animal (specifically, human) vision and that of machines. “Computer vision is obviously very formal,” he told the Weekly. A machine “looks for edges and lines and draws conclusions about what it’s seeing from that. For example, computers are better than humans at recognizing faces, but they’re limited by the fact that they don’t understand history, context, human emotions. It’s dramatically different.” To illustrate that contrast, Paglen chose to involve something he sees as essentially human: music. Watching and listening to live classical musicians perform is “extremely emotional, extremely human,” Gass explained.

Page 16 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

“To humans, music is a very effective form of communication. It immediately connects with you emotionally, it resonates; it’s not reducible to something that’s quantified,” Paglen said. Seeing such a quintessentially human experience through a machine’s eye, so to speak, “creates a really nice contrast that hopefully underlines that schism” between human and computer visual interpretation, he said. For the Jan. 14 performance, Paglen curated the planned one-hour program with the Kronos Quartet, which will include a variety of music styles, from classical to contemporary minimalist to African folk music and American blues. Multiple cameras will create a live feed of the performance, processed through different AI surMachine’ veillance algorithms, and the resulting images will be projected onto a screen above the quartet, giving audiences a look at how different computers might “see” the show. The performance will be held at historic Pier 70 in San Francisco’s Dogpatch district, a fitting setting for “The Sight Machine,” Gass said, due to the location’s rich history as a place where warships were once built. Its ties to the darker side of U.S. history connect nicely with Paglen’s interest in governmental surveillance and privacy issues. “It is a Stanford project, but Pier 70 felt like the right place to do this,” she explained, the gritty pier adding “an element of discomfort” that would be missing from a concert hall or auditorium on campus. Paglen, Glass and Stanford Center for Internet and Society Director of Civil Liberties Jennifer Granick will also present a panel discussion on AI and ethics earlier that day, at the FOG Design+Art fair, also in San Francisco. Paglen’s work has opened Gass’ eyes (no pun intended) to how prevalent AI vision has become in modern life. “Once you spend a little time talking to Trevor, you start to understand that machine vision is everywhere,” Gass said. “Our faces can be recognized very easily; the privacy we think we have isn’t really there.”n For more information, go to museum.stanford.edu/ news_room/Paglen. Arts & Entertainment Editor Karla Kane can be emailed at kkane@paweekly.com


CALL FOR NOMINATIONS for the 38th Annual

All’s quiet on the Eastern front Martin Scorsese tests faith in ‘Silence’

MMM (Century 20 & Palo Alto Square)

From a young age, director Martin Scorsese was marked by Catholicism. It bubbles up in many of his films, most obviously in “The Last Temptation of Christ” and, now, “Silence.” Though he also made a film on Tibetan Buddhism (“Kundun”), Scorsese has been perhaps not so much a religious seeker as a seeker of the meaning of religion, its relative harms and usefulness. Like anyone who has paid attention to history, Scorsese has seen religion feed the soul and destroy souls, seen it abused terribly (by Spanish inquisitors, say), embraced sincerely for demonstrable good (by the likes of social justice true believer Dorothy Day), and everything in between. “Silence” engages in the contradictions of religion and of faith, and he has identified the source material, Japanese author Shūsaku Endō’s acclaimed 1966 novel, about “the painful, paradoxical passage ... from certainty to doubt to loneliness to communion.” This journey is undertaken by Sebastian Rodrigues (Andrew Garfield), one of two Portuguese Jesuit priests in 1633 who travel to Japan on an urgent mission (the other priest is played, in a keen tone of austere blinkeredness, by Adam Driver of “Paterson”). With reluctant allowance from their superior (Ciarán Hinds), the missionaries go in search of their mentor Father Ferreira (Liam Neeson), who appears to have renounced the Jesuit faith in Japan, where Christians have been persecuted and driven underground in fear of torture or death. What follows suggests a variation on Joseph Conrad’s “Heart of Darkness,” a dark journey with an even darker destination, fated to transform a naïve hero. It is, to be sure, slow going, with its run time of two hours and 41 minutes devoted to longeurs of fearful, tortured thought and bursts of physical torture. “Silence” feels heavy with the burden of martyrdom and the weight of that “painful, paradoxical” struggle between faith and doubt. But “Silence” also represents consummate filmmaking, with Scorsese surrounded by ace collaborators: his co-screenwriter Jay Cocks (“Gangs of New York,” “The Age of Innocence”), his loyal editor Thelma Schoonmaker (a three-time Oscar winner), cinematographer Rodrigo Prieto (“The Wolf of Wall Street”), and regular designer Dante Ferretti (“Shutter Island”), among others. Though the acting is uniformly excellent, Scorsese has an ace in the hole, as

well: Issei Ogata as the sly, canny inquisitor who burrows through the Jesuits’ sense of certainty. “Silence” riffs on the roles of Jesus and Judas, the mystery of faith and the frailty of humanity (“Man’s nature,” as one character puts it, “cannot be moved”). It is a story of what Scorsese calls “the questioning faithful,” full of toils

and snares and competing notions of freedom as earthly or eternal. For those outside of the Catholic experience, “Silence” will not resonate so deeply but more likely test their patience even more than Scorsese intends (for “Silence” is a deliberately trying film). (continued on next page)

Health. Tech. Education. Innovation starts here. Join us for three new programs on local innovation.

The Historic Roth Building. From the Palo Alto Medical Clinic to the Palo Alto History Museum

Friday, January 13, 5pm-7pm Hearst Conference Room, PAMF Jamplis Bldg, 3rd Floor (795 El Camino Real) In 1930, forming a physician group with a specialist in obstetrics and surgery - let alone a female doctor was innovative. And it happened here. Explore the story of the visionary Palo Alto Medical Clinic with Drs. Tony Marzoni and Ben Maser, then see how PAMF’s birthplace will become our first history museum, opening in 2018. This free program is

Tall Tree Awards Nominations are due Friday, January 20, 2017 in the following categories:

Outstanding Business Outstanding Nonprofit Outstanding Citizen Volunteer Outstanding Professional Business Person The Nomination Form is available at www.paloaltochamber.com

SAVE THE DATE Tall Tree Awards May 16, 2017 sponsored by

Questions? Call 650-324-3121 or info@paloaltochamber.com

presented in conjunction with the Palo Alto Medical Foundation. Refreshments. Space is limited. NEXT UP: February: The Garage: From Humble Beginnings to Global Impact March: Lesson Plan: the Story of the Third Wave - a Daring Social Experiment in Palo Alto

YOUR SUPPORT IS BUILDING THE NEW MUSEUM, AND PROGRAMS LIKE THESE. THANK YOU!

PaloAltoHistoryMuseum.org

Harmony and healing

Discover how you can experience them in your life Josh Niles is a practitioner and teacher of Christian Science healing and a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship.

“The law of harmony and Christian Science healing” Saturday, Jan. 21, 2017, 1:30pm Menlo-Atherton Performing Arts Ctr. 555 Middlefield Rd., Menlo Park, CA 94025 For more info: (650) 322-5600

Joshua Cohen

FACULTY, APPLE UNIVERSITY

January 19|5–7:30PM

Through presentation and small-group Paul Brest Hall, Stanford discussion, Joshua Cohen will lead audience members to explore the ambitious purpose Limited free tickets available and obsessive execution in Central Park’s ethicsinsociety.stanford.edu democratic design and renovation. 7+( (7+,&6 (7+ 2)

'(0 &5$&< &

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 17


TheatreWorks S I L I C O N V A L L E Y

A CLASSIC AMERICAN COMEDY

Crimes of the Heart

By Pulitzer Prize Winner Beth Henley “Overflows with infectious high spirits.” The New York Times

Now thru Feb 5

Mountain View Center for the Performing Arts

theatreworks.org 650.463.1960

Movies

‘Silence’ (continued from previous page)

And yet, for all its Catholic insularity, “Silence” cultivates

enough ambiguity — skewing to skepticism — to allow the outsider’s perspective on the arrogance of the European missionary, the cruelty of religious persecution, and, most disturbing to the

faithful, God’s silence in the face of suffering. Rated R for some disturbing violent content. Two hours, 41 minutes. — Peter Canavese

MOVIES NOW SHOWING A Monster Calls (PG-13) HHH1/2 Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Arrival (PG-13) HHHH Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Assassin’s Creed (PG-13) HH Century 20: Fri. - Sun. The Bye Bye Man (PG-13) Century 20: Sat. & Sun. Casablanca (1942) (Not Rated) Stanford Theatre: 5:35, 9:20 p.m. Fri.-Mon. Disney Junior At The Movies With Mickey! (G) Century 16: Saturday Century 20: Saturday The Eagle Huntress (G) HH Aquarius Theatre: Fri. - Sun. Fences (PG-13) HHHH Aquarius Theatre: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Hidden Figures (PG) HH1/2 Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Jackie (R) HHH Century 16: Fri. - Sun. La La Land (PG-13) Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Lion (PG-13) Palo Alto Square: Fri. - Sun. Live by Night (R) Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Sat. & Sun. Manchester by the Sea (R) HHH1/2 Guild Theatre: Fri. - Sun. Moana (G) HHH1/2 Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun.

Monster Trucks (PG) Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Moonlight (R) Aquarius Theatre: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Ok Jaanu (Not Rated) Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Passengers (PG-13) HH Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Patriot’s Day (R) HH Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (PG-13) HHH1/2 Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Silence (R) HHH Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Palo Alto Square: Fri. - Sun. Sing (PG) HH1/2 Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Singin’ in the Rain (65th anniversary) (PG) Century 20: Sunday Sleepless (R) Century 20: Fri. - Sun. To Be or Not to Be (1942) (Not Rated) HHHH Stanford Theatre: 3:45 p.m.Sat.& Sun. 7:30 p.m., Sat.-Mon. Underworld: Blood Wars (R) Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. - Sun. Why Him? (R) HH Century 16: Fri. - Sun. Century 20: Fri. & Sat.

★ Skip it ★★ Some redeeming qualities ★★★ A good bet ★★★★ Outstanding

Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (For recorded listings: 327-3241) tinyurl.com Aquariuspa Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View tinyurl.com/Century16 Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City tinyurl.com/Century20 SARAH MOSER, THERESE PLAEHN, & LIZZIE O’HARA / PHOTO KEVIN BERNE

CineArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (For information: 493-0128) tinyurl.com/Pasquare Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (For recorded listings: 266-9260) tinyurl.com/Guildmp Stanford Theatre: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (For recorded listings: 324-3700) Stanfordtheatre.org

Find trailers, star ratings and reviews on the web at PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

NOW PLAYING AT SELECT THEATRES

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AVENIDAS

CHECK LOCAL LISTINGS FOR THEATRES & SHOWTIMES

Palo Alto Weekly (San Jose)

BLOCK PARTY #7

FRIDAY 01/13 2 COL. (3.87”) X 2” ALL.JCK.0113.PAW

TM

“BUILDING FOR THE FUTURE!” Join the fun and help us kick-off this exciting community project!

SATURDAY, JAN. 14TH 11AM - 2PM AT AVENIDAS (450 BRYANT STREET) DOWNTOWN PALO ALTO Live music! Hands-on activities! Art display! Presentations by city officials! Food trucks!

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Family fun!

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FREE ALL AGES WELCOME! G

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650.289.5400 avenidas.org

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SUMMER 2017

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING of the City of Palo Alto Historic Resources Board 8:30 A.M., Thursday January 26, 2017, Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Plans may be reviewed at the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue or online at: http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/ planningprojects; contact Robin Ellner for additional information during business hours at 650-329-2603. Public Hearings: CONTINUED BUSINESS None NEW BUSINESS Recommend HRB Bylaws Modification and 2015-2016 Certified Local Government (CLG) Annual Report and Discuss Topics for Upcoming 2017 HRB Retreat Study Session: 1451 Middlefield Road [16PLN-00217]: Request for Preliminary Review of a 14,790 sf replacement building for an expanded Children's Museum and Zoo and reconfiguration of the adjacent parking lots. Environmental Assessment: A Draft Initial Study/ Mitigated Negative Declaration is being prepared. Zoning District: Public Facilities (PF) Amy French Chief Planning Official The City of Palo Alto does not discriminate against individuals with disabilities. To request an accommodation for this meeting or an alternative format for any related printed materials, please contact the City’s ADA Coordinator at 650.329.2550 (voice) or by e-mailing ada@cityofpaloalto.org.

Camp Connection

Attention Camp Directors!

Reserve your space in the only camp magazine delivered to homes from Woodside to Mountain View

Camp Connection is a costeffective, multimedia solution to reach Midpeninsula families • Full color ad in Camp Connection magazine • Print directory listing for 12 weeks in The Almanac, Palo Alto Weekly, Mountain View Voice • Online directory listing for 12 weeks on fogster.com

Deadline to advertise is January 19, 2017

Call your Sales Rep today

(650) 223-6570

THE ART OF

RIGHT SIZING Wednesday, January 25, 2017 | 2pm Please be our guest for an informative presentation with Cindy Hofen, Founder and President of Managing Moves and More. Cindy is a Certified Senior Move Manager and public speaker that has helped hundreds of families to “right size” easily and with little stress. Her focus for this presentation is to discuss “right sizing” and what to do with all your “stuff.” Cindy will share with you everything you need to know: from “right sizing” to making a smooth transition when moving into your senior living community. You won’t want to miss this! Light refreshments and appetizers will be served, with raffle prizes galore. Even if you are not ready to move, this is a great way to spend an hour or so to gather very helpful information!

To RSVP, please call 855.885.6984

1174 Los Altos Avenue, Los Altos, CA 94022 | License # 435200989 BLA Right Sizing ad 10 x 6.375 Palo Alto Weekly.indd 1

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 PageAM 19 1/4/17 • 11:44


Home&Real Estate

OPEN HOME GUIDE 26 Also online at PaloAltoOnline.com

A weekly guide to home, garden and real estate news, edited by Elizabeth Lorenz

Home Front

NEIGHBORHOOD SNAPSHOT

WATER-EFFICIENT PERMITS LAW... The City of Palo Alto Development Services Department has begun requiring an Outdoor Water Efficient Landscape Permit to be issued separately from building permits. The new requirement went into effect on Jan. 1. This new process will enforce the Model Water Efficient Landscape Ordinance (MWELO) while streamlining the landscape submittal process. The permit allows building owners to complete critical activities associated with finalizing a building permit separate from the landscape work. To support the new permit process, the Development Services Outdoor Water Efficiency Compliance webpage contains several resources including the Outdoor Water Efficiency Landscape Trigger Permit Worksheet, MWELO Submittals and Guidelines, and a MWELO Compliance Video training. SAVE THE DATE ... The Gamble Garden Spring Tour dates are Friday and Saturday, April 28 and 29. Look for more information and ticket sales closer to the date at gamblegardens.org. JAPANESE MAPLE CLASS ... The De Anza Chapter of the American Rhododendron Society will offer a program on pruning Japanese maples at 7 p.m., Wednesday, Jan. 18. The talk will be in Room 12 of the Hillview Community Center, 97 Hillview Ave., Los Altos. Arnie Cornez, a longtime volunteer at the Hakone Japanese Gardens in Saratoga, will share his expertise on the selection, care, and pruning of maples. For additional information on the program, please go to www.deanza-ars.com. DREAMING OF REPLACING YOUR LAWN? ... Gamble Gardens might boost your plan with a class on Saturday, Feb. 25 from 9:30 a.m. to 11:30 a.m. The class, called “Replace Your Front Lawn with an Eye-Catching Garden,” will teach participants how to replace or shrink their front lawns with flowering and edible plants that provide seasonal interest and drought tolerance. After class, the course teacher, Kim Raftery, will offer a tour of two gardens she designed. Fees for the class are $25 for members of Gamble Gardens and $35 for nonmembers. Go to gamblegardens. org to register. Send notices of news and events related to real estate, interior design, home improvement and gardening to Home Front, Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302, or email elorenz@ paweekly.com. Deadline is one week before publication.

Susan and Jay Weber enjoy growing olive trees and curing the olives themselves.

Hills

Palo Alto

Rural neighborhood a stone’s throw from Silicon Valley by Rachel Van Gelder | photos by Veronica Weber

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he drive to Palo Alto Hills is unlike the drive home most Palo Alto residents experience. Winding rural roads with glimpses of rolling golden hills through the foliage and very few cars make for an enjoyable commute for residents of this neighborhood. and it’s easy to forget it’s only a stone’s throw from Silicon Valley. The Palo Alto Hills neighborhood is an oasis for those looking for a serene setting to live in. With large lots featuring sizable homes with breathtaking views of the Bay Area, it is an ideal place to get away. Palo Alto Hills residents moved to the neighborhood for many of the same reasons, to get away from the busy Silicon Valley life and relax in a place with friendly neighbors and spectacular views. Palo Alto Hills resident Mark

Nadim has lived in the neighborhood for 30 years and still says his favorite thing about his home is its natural, relaxing qualities. “It’s nice to have the fresh air and wildlife,” Nadim said. “It really makes it a serene place to live.” Other Palo Alto Hills residents like Jay Weber are very appreciative of the neighborhood’s tranquility. Weber was particularly taken by the laid-back, private atmosphere when he moved in seven years ago. “The partly rural feel of the neighborhood is nice. It is quiet, but not deathly quiet. It is quiet enough that you can take a deep breath and take it all in,” Weber said. “It is also a nice drive when you are coming back from work and driving through the trees. You feel like you’re going to a different space.” In order to have larger lot sizes,

A home in the Palo Alto Hills neighborhood.

Page 20 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

residents must live further apart and do not see each other as frequently as they might if they lived in another Palo Alto neighborhood. For Weber this was a big adjustment for him and his wife when they moved from Menlo Park. While they do not see people as often as they did in their previous neighborhood, Weber says they do see a few neighbors when they go on walks or runs. There is still a strong sense of community in the neighborhood. “We do not always see our nextdoor neighbors,” Nadim said. “We may not be close by but I know that if I need help, it is only a phone call or an email away.” Within Palo Alto Hills, residents have easy access to a few activities including the Palo Alto Hills Golf Course and Country Club and Foothills Park. Access to Foothills Park is particularly exciting for Weber and his wife since they lived in Menlo Park prior to moving to Palo Alto Hills and the park only allows Palo Alto residents to visit. “Foothills Park is a real gem and a real plus to the neighborhood,” Weber said. “When we were looking at this house, we were Menlo Park residents so they wouldn’t let us into the park and we wanted to see it. We saw it on the map but we didn’t know what a gem it really was until we actually moved here.” While residents do have easy access to a variety of outdoor activities and live in a very peaceful, secluded place, simple things like going downtown or doing grocery shopping are more time-consuming than they are for most Palo Alto residents. Most attractions within Palo Alto and surrounding cities are at least a 20-minute drive away. Nadim says this can make it more difficult to stay connected to the Palo Alto community.

To maintain connections within the neighborhood, Nadim, who also happens to be the president of the neighborhood association, organizes an annual holiday party at the country club. The event brings neighbors together to celebrate the holidays as well as address neighborhood business. It is very popular among residents and is a favorite neighborhood event of Weber’s. Although it is more remote than any other neighborhood in Palo Alto, residents still find their location ideal because they are close to outdoor areas that most locals do not get to visit on a daily basis. “Every morning when I run up to Vista Hill, I get to see the whole Bay Area laid out in front of me,” Weber said. “I get that same view three times a week but that is still the highlight of living here for me.”n

FACTS

Fire Station: No. 8 Foothills Park, 3000 Page Mill Road (during summer); No.5 600 Arastradero Road Library: Mitchell Park branch, 3700 Middlefield Road Location: Off Page Mill Road: Alexis Drive, Country Club Court, Bandera Drive and Laurel Glen Drive Neighborhood association: Mark Nadim, president, 650-9495672, paloaltohillsna@gmail.com Park: Foothills Park, 3300 Page Mill Road Post office: Cambridge, 265 Cambridge Ave. Public schools: Nixon Elementary School, Terman Middle School, Gunn High School Shopping: El Camino Real, Downtown Los Altos, California Avenue


Work with the innovator! List your home with

DeLeon Realty

DeLeon Realty will cover all of the following at no additional charge: Staging* | Property Inspection | Pest Inspection *Includes: Design, Installation, 1 Month of Furniture Rental and Removal Our clients love the personal attention they receive from Michael Repka, from beginning to end. Additionally you will receive a suite of free services from the DeLeon Team, including interior design, construction consulting, handyman work, and dedicated marketing to local and foreign buyers.

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www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 21


ColdwellBankerHomes.com

Woodside

Price Upon Request

Country estate built in 2012 to LEED Silver standards. Aprx 3+ stunning ac in Central WDS. 5 BR 5 full + 2 half BA Erika Demma CalBRE #01230766 650.851.2666

Woodside

155 Kings Mountain Rd Stunning estate in Central Woodside. Renovated and expanded on 5 flat sunny acres. 5 BR 4 full + 2 half BA Erika Demma CalBRE #01230766 650.851.2666

618 Manzanita Wy Beautifully remodeled home, equestrian facilities + pvt pool & spa, on 2.6+ landscaped ac. 4 BR 4.5 BA Erika Demma CalBRE #01230766 650.851.2666

Woodside

Sun 1:30 - 4:30

$8,695,000

Menlo Park

Sat/Sun 1:00-4:00

$4,295,000

Atherton

Los Altos

Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30

$2,495,000

Los Altos Hills

Sat/Sun 1 - 4

$1,075,000

San Carlos

1760 Holly Ave. Remodeled home in move-in condition. Grand LR, 2 FR’s & huge open DR. Prvt yard & patios. 5 BR 4 BA Sam Anagnostou CalBRE #00798217 650.851.2666

701 Meadow Lane 4 BD/2 BA home located on expansive lot just over 11,000 sq ft. 4 BR 2 BA Katie Hammer Riggs CalBRE #01783432 650.324.4456

Redwood City

431 Vera Ave Charming remodeled home on XL lot! Walking distance to downtown Redwood City! Don’t miss! 3 BR 2 BA Tom Huff CalBRE #00922877 650.325.6161

Sun 1:30 - 4:30

$14,995,000

Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30

$3,195,000

Menlo Park

Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4

$2,598,000

Sun 1:30 - 4:30

$2,100,000

Menlo Park

Sat/Sun 1 - 4

$1,199,000

$889,000

Menlo Park

Sat/Sun 2 - 4

$858,000

41 Maple Ave Charming Atherton Cottage w/ MP Schools. Country chic appeal in a tranquil garden setting. 4 BR 4 BA Tim Kerns CalBRE #01800770 650.324.4456

844 Partridge Ave Spacious & inviting w/dramatic 20” ceilings. 1180 sf Basement/garage w/custom built-ins. 3 BR 3 BA Wendi Selig-aimonetti CalBRE #01001476 650.324.4456

14486 Liddicoat Cir Gorgeous Views! Spacious home with high ceilings, pool, & guest house. Palo Alto schools! 5 BR 3 BA DiPali Shah CalBRE #01249165 650.851.2666

Sun 1 - 4

461 Burgess Dr Charming updated condo across from Burgess Park. Spacious living area and private balcony. 2 BR 2 BA Bob Johnston CalBRE #01228365 650.324.4456

416 Portofino Dr 206 Cozy and Updated Condo in San Carlos! Must see! 2 BR 2.5 BA David Thomas CalBRE #01946017 650.324.4456

2140 Santa Cruz Ave A305 Sought after penthouse at Menlo Commons. Complex includes pool, spa, exercise rm. 2 BR 2 BA Beth Leathers CalBRE #01131116 650.324.4456

THIS IS HOME This is where snow ball fights take place, the great outdoors are enjoyed and warm and cozy jackets are a must.

Coldwell Banker. Where Home Begins. San Carlos

Sat/Sun 1:30 - 4:30

$848,000

#ThisIsHome

941 Holly St Original hardwood floors, cozy fireplace, and lovely French doors. 2 BR 1 BA Gordon Ferguson CalBRE #01038260 650.325.6161

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©2017 Coldwell Banker. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker® is a registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company and Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. This information was supplied by Seller and/or other sources. Broker has not and will not verify this information and assumes no legal responsibility for its accuracy. Buyers should investigate these issues to their own satisfaction. Real Estate Licensees affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are Independent Contractor Sales Associates and are not employees of NRT LLC., Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC or

©2013 Coldwell Real Banker Estate LLC. RightsLLC. Reserved. Coldwell Banker® isColdwell a registered trademark to Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. An Equal Opportunity Company. Equal Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary of NRT LLC. BRE License #01908304. ©2016Banker Coldwell RealAllEstate All Rights Reserved. Banker® is alicensed registered trademark licensed to Coldwell Banker RealCalBRE Estate LLC. #01908304. An Equal Opportunity Company. EqualBanker Housing Opportunity. Each Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage Office is Owned by a Subsidiary Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. License

of NRT LLC. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC, Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage or NRT LLC. CalBRE License #01908304.

Page 22 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com


Warm words on a cold evening, a full moon on a dark night, and the road downhill all the way to your door. Since 1973 Ann Griffiths was a vice president at Cornish and Carey and a top agent at Coldwell Banker. She is now the number one referral agent to the most successful brokers in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Portola Valley and Woodside. For successful results in purchasing or listing your home you can email Ann at annmgriffiths@hotmail.com or call her at 650.561.3291.

40 years in residential Real Estate selling properties in Atherton, Menlo Park, Palo Alto, Portola Valley and Woodside Million $ Club Menlo-Atherton Board of Realtors Vice President Cornish & Carey Top Salesperson Coldwell Banker

Ann Griffiths 650-561-3291 650-752-0722

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 23


A Luxury Collection By Intero Real Estate Services 

5 Betty Lane, Atherton

200 Alamos Road, Portola Valley

11627 Dawson Drive, Los Altos Hills

$26,800,000

$22,880,000

$13,888,000

Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas Lic.#01878208

Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas, Lic.#01878208

Listing Provided by: David Kelsey, Tom Dallas, Lic.#01242399, 00709019

291 Atherton Avenue, Atherton

26880 Elena Road, Los Altos Hills

10440 Albertsworth Lane, Los Altos Hills

$10,988,888

$14,688,000 Listing Provided by: Nancy Gehrels, Lic.#01952964

27466 Sunrise Farm Rd, Los Altos Hills

Listing Provided by: Dan Kroner, Lic.#01790340

1100 Mountain Home Rd.,Woodside

$11,488,000 Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas & John Reece, Lic.#01878208 & 00838479

1250 Miramontes Street, Half Moon Bay

$9,500,000

$5,850,000

$2,800,000

Listing Provided by: Greg Goumas, Lic.#01878208

Listing by: David Kelsey, Tom Dallas, Lic.#01242399, 00709019

Listing Provided by: Dana Cappiello, Lic.#01343305

See our entire luxury collection at www.InteroPrestigio.com ©2017 Intero Real Estate Services Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate and a wholly owned subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc. All rights reserved.

Page 24 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you are listed with another broker.


INNOVATION meets

INFLUENCE Silicon Valley’s fastest growing real estate brokerage has put down roots in San Francisco. We’re combining our pioneering industry approach with our association with one of the most respected brands in the world, HomeServices of America Inc, a Berkshire Hathaway Affiliate, to bring our agents, clients and communities the best experience imaginable.

INTERO REAL ESTATE SERVICES - SAN FRANCISCO 1902 Van Ness Avenue

Come see our new home.

www.InteroRealEstate.com ©2017 Intero Real Estate Services Inc., a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate and a wholly owned subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc. All rights reserved. www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 25 All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you are listed with another broker.


Prime Los Altos Hills lots for sale

THIS WEEKEND OPEN HOMES UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED, ALL TIMES ARE 1:30-4:30 PM

ATHERTON

PALO ALTO

4 Bedrooms 41 Maple Av Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$3,195,000 324-4456

FREMONT 5 Bedrooms 38452 Mission Blvd Sat/Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

$1,250,000 325-6161

LOS ALTOS 701 Meadow Ln Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

$2,495,000 324-4456

5 Bedrooms 14486 Liddicoat Cir Sun Coldwell Banker

$2,100,000 851-2666

MENLO PARK 2 Bedrooms 1701 Stone Pine Ln Sat/Sun Alain Pinel Realtors

$1,850,000 462-1111

2 Bedrooms - Condominium 461 Burgess Dr #10 Sat/Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

$1,199,000 324-4456

2140 Santa Cruz Av #A305 Sat/Sun 2-4 Coldwell Banker

$858,000 324-4456

Ted O’Hanlon

3 Bedrooms

Explore Real Estate 650.813.1077

4 Bedrooms

844 Partridge Ave Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker

#01868277

iexplorerealestate.com Information contained herein is deemed reliable but cannot be guaranteed as to its accuracy.  Any information of special interest should be obtained through independent verification.

$3,498,000 520-3407

3719 Starr King Cir Sat/Sun Keller Williams

$2,298,000 520-3407

REDWOOD CITY 3 Bedrooms $1,075,000 325-6161

SAN CARLOS 2 Bedrooms - Condominium

LOS ALTO HILLS

Lot 2: 26026 Westwind Way, Los Altos Hills Lot 3: APN 175-45-060 Lot 4: 13177 La Paloma Road, Los Altos Hills

3239 Maddux Dr Sat/Sun Keller Williams

431 Vera Av Sat/Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

4 Bedrooms

Lot 2: $4,280,000 Lot 3: $5,280,000 Lot 4: $4,280,000

4 Bedrooms

$2,598,000 324-4456

416 Portofino Dr #206 Sat/Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

2 Bedrooms 941 Holly St Sat/Sun Coldwell Banker 961 Cherry St Sat/Sun Alain Pinel Realtors

$995,000 462-1111

SUNNYVALE 3 Bedrooms 585 Old San Francisco Rd Sat/Sun 1-5 Deleon Realty

$998,000 543-8500

WOODSIDE 4 Bedrooms 618 Manzanita Way Sun Coldwell Banker

5 Bedrooms

5 Bedrooms $4,295,000 323-7751

$848,000 325-6161

3 Bedrooms

1980 Santa Cruz Av $2,890,000 Sat/Sun Dreyfus Sotheby’s Intl. Realty 847-1141 1760 Holly Av Sat/Sun 1-4 Coldwell Banker

$889,000 324-4456

155 Kings Mountain Rd Sun Coldwell Banker

$8,695,000 851-2666 $14,995,000 851-2666

®

The DeLeon Difference® 650.543.8500 www.deleonrealty.com

5647 Wylderidge Drive, Murphys, CA This 3 bedroom, 3 bath, single-story luxury home is located in the Heart of the Sierra Foothills in California’s scenic Gold Rush Country. The xeriscaped grounds offer a handsome, rustic appeal. Large native trees flank the curved pathway that extends from the front of the large three-car garage to the covered front patio and welcoming entryway. The 1600 sq. ft. stamped concrete deck make this the ideal space to entertain any time of year. The large den could be 4th bedroom. Enjoy your favorite music through the integrated sound system or simply enjoy some solitude in this inviting and beautiful living area.

Offered At: $1,500,000

650.543.8500 | www.deleonrealty.com | DeLeon Realty CalBRE #01903224

A variety of home financing solutions to meet your needs Let’s get started today. Vicki Svendsgaard

Mortgage Loan Officer, SVP NMLS ID: 633619 650-400-6668 Mobile vicki.svendsgaard@bankofamerica.com mortgage.bankofamerica.com/vickisvendsgaard

www.5647WylderidgeDrive.com

Darlene Brinkerhoff, REALTOR®

408.410.9478

dbrinkerhoff@interorealestate.com www.darlenebrinkerhoff.com Lic. #01435047

©2017 Intero Real Estate Services, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate and a wholly owned subsidiary of HomeServices of America, Inc. All rights reserved. All information deemed reliable but not guaranteed. This is not intended as a solicitation if you are listed with another broker.

Page 26 • January 13, 2017 • Palo Alto Weekly • www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Bank of America, N.A. and the other business/organization mentioned in this advertisement are not affiliated; each company is independently responsible for the products and services it offers. Bank of America may compensate select real estate companies and builders for marketing its home loan products and services. Bank of America, N.A., Member FDIC. Equal Housing Lender. ©2014 Bank of America Corporation. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. ARK69DJ5 HL-113-AD 09-2014


585 Old San Francisco Road, #5, Sunnyvale Offered at $998,000 Extraordinary New Townhome A fantastic location is just one of many highlights offered by this newly built 3 bedroom, 2.5 bath townhome of over 1,900 sq. ft. (per plan). Quickly reach local attractions from this stylishly finished home that enjoys an open layout, an attached two-car garage, and a host of energy-efficient features. An island kitchen with a breakfast bar centers the home, while an extravagant master suite showcases his-and-her closets and a luxurious bath. Also included are an upper-level laundry center and two outdoor lounges. Easily stroll to popular shopping and dining, spacious Braly Park, and Ellis Elementary, and live within moments of top downtown ®

venues (buyer to verify eligibility).

OPEN HOUSE Saturday & Sunday, 1-5 pm Complimentary Lunch

For video tour & more photos, please visit:

www.585OldSanFranciscoUnit5.com 6 5 0 . 4 8 8 . 7 3 2 5 | i n f o @ d e l e o n r e a l t y. c o m | w w w. d e l e o n r e a l t y. c o m | C a l B R E # 0 1 9 0 3 2 2 4

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 27


Marketplace PLACE AN AD ONLINE

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INDEX

■BULLETIN

BOARD

100-155 ■FOR SALE 200-270 ■KIDS STUFF 330-390 ■MIND & BODY 400-499 ■J  OBS 500-560 ■B  USINESS SERVICES 600-699 ■H  OME SERVICES 700-799 ■FOR RENT/ FOR SALE REAL ESTATE 801-899 ■P  UBLIC/LEGAL NOTICES 995-997

The publisher waives any and all claims or consequential damages due to errors Embarcadero Media cannot assume responsibility for the claims or performance of its advertisers. Embarcadero Media right to refuse, edit or reclassify any ad solely at its discretion without prior notice.

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fogster.com is a unique web site offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly, The Almanac and the Mountain View Voice.

Bulletin Board

202 Vehicles Wanted DONATE YOUR CAR - 888-433-6199 FAST FREE TOWING -24hr Response - Maximum Tax Deduction - UNITED BREAST CANCER FDN: Providing Breast Cancer Information and Support Programs (Cal-SCAN)

115 Announcements PREGNANT? Considering adoption? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877-362-2401 Pregnant? Considering adoption? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 1-877-879-4709 (Cal-SCAN) Christian Science Lecture

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT to Heritage for the Blind. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 800-731-5042 (Cal-SCAN) GET CASH FOR CARS/TRUCKS!!! All Makes/Models 2000-2016! Top $$$ Paid! Any Condition! Used or wrecked. Running or Not. Free Towing! Call For Offer: 1-888-417-9150. (Cal-SCAN) Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1-800-743-1482 (Cal-SCAN)

210 Garage/Estate Sales

Dixieland Dance Party FREE BOOK GIVEAWAY

Palo Alto, 4000 Middlefield, Jan. 14 & 15, 9:30-4

History talk at Kepler’s, 1/17 HUGE USED BOOK/CD/DVD SALE John Rothmann on “Also-Rans” - FREE WISH LIST FRIENDS PA LIBRARY

Star Wars Style C Movie Poster - $15.00

WRITE A CHILDREN’S PICTURE BOOK Are you from a rural area? Can you capture the sounds and traditions in a story written in poetic prose?

130 Classes & Instruction

Two Fabulous Beatles Posers - $15.00 Ea.

220 Computers/ Electronics Apple Cinema 30-inch HD Flat-Pa - $499

AIRLINE CAREERS begin here - Get started by training as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 800-725-1563 (AAN CAN)

133 Music Lessons

240 Furnishings/ Household items Teak Entertainment Unit Large Teak Entertainment Unit. Great Condition.

245 Miscellaneous

HOME BREAK-INS take less than 60 SECONDS. Don’t wait! Protect your family, your home, your assets NOW for as little as 70¢ a day! Call 855-404-7601 (Cal-SCAN)

Hope Street Music Studios Now on Old Middefield Way, MV. Most instruments, voice. All ages and levels 650-961-2192 www. HopeStreetMusicStudios.com  Paul Price Music Lessons In your home. Piano, violin, viola, theory, history. Customized. BA music, choral accompanist, arranger, early pop and jazz. 800/647-0305

145 Non-Profits Needs DONATE BOOKS/HELP PA LIBRARY

Protect your home with fully customizable security and 24/7 monitoring right from your smartphone. Receive up to $1500 in equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1-800-918-4119 (Cal-SCAN) SAWMILLS From only $4397. MAKE & SAVE MONEY with your own bandmill- Cut lumber any dimension. In stock ready to ship! FREE Info/DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills.com 1-800-578-1363 Ext.300N (Cal-SCAN) Switch to DIRECTV. Lock in 2-Year Price Guarantee ($50/ month) w/AT&T Wireless. Over 145 Channels PLUS Popular Movie Networks for Three Months, No Cost! Call 1-800-385-9017 (Cal-SCAN)

150 Volunteers ASSIST IN FRIENDS BOOKSTORE ASST SECTION MGRS FOR FOPAL  FRIENDS OF THE PALO ALTO LIBRARY

Kid’s Stuff

JOIN OUR ONLINE STOREFRONT TEAM

For Sale JAGUAR 2000 xj8 L Sedan 4-Door,$ 2630,4-WD,Cassette Player,CD Player,Leather Seats,Sunroof. Call me: 2094252754

Classified Deadlines:

NOON, WEDNESDAY

Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a pain-relieving brace -little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1-800-796-5091 (Cal-SCAN) MAKE THE CALL to start getting clean today. Free 24/7 Helpline for alcohol and drug addiction treatment. Get help! It is time to take your life back! Call Now: 855-732-4139 (AAN CAN)

Safe Step Walk-In Tub! Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch StepIn. Wide Door. Anti-Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800-799-4811 for $750 Off. (Cal-SCAN)

470 Psychics

Jobs 500 Help Wanted Sales Representative California Trade Association located in Sacramento is seeking someone with strong knowledge for Advertising, print, digital and social media solutions, great with detail, an amazing attitude, and a passion for selling content and integrated partnerships. 3-5 years experience a plus. We offer a competitive base salary, commission and bonus plan, along with great benefit package. Email Resume and Salary History to jobs@cnpa.com. EOE (Cal-SCAN) BUSINESS Box, Inc. has the following position available in Redwood City, CA: Software Engineer (GS-CA) - Design, develop, and test cloud content management software. Send your resume (must reference job title and job code GS-CA) to Attn: People Operations, Box, Inc., 900 Jefferson Ave, Redwood City, CA 94063.

Fogster.com is a

345 Tutoring/ Lessons

201 Autos/Trucks/ Parts

ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844-703-9774. (Cal-SCAN)

DID YOU KNOW 144 million U.S. Adults read a Newspaper print copy each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916-288-6011 or email cecelia@cnpa.com (Cal-SCAN)

DISH TV - BEST DEAL EVER! Only $39.99/mo. Plus $14.99/mo. Internet (where avail.) FREE Streaming. FREE Install (up to 6 rooms.) FREE HD-DVR. Call 1-800-357-0810 (Cal-SCAN)

Christina Conti Piano Private lessons for all levels, all ages. Also Music Theory. In your home or mine. SJSU Bachelor of Music. 650-493-6950

425 Health Services

OXYGEN - Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All-New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844-359-3976. (Cal-SCAN)

215 Collectibles & Antiques

Jazz & Poetry this Saturday - FREE

Mind & Body

EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release - the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916-288-6011 or http://prmediarelease.com/california (Cal-SCAN)

fogster.com

TM

unique website offering FREE postings from communities throughout the Bay Area and an opportunity for your ad to appear in the Palo Alto Weekly.

Engineer: Software Involved with software design and development. BS or equiv. degree in Comp Sci, Comp. Eng., Elec. Eng., Info Tech, Math, Eng. or equiv. field. 5 yrs exp. as Software Engineer, Software Dev Engineer, Engineer or equiv. 5 yrs concurrent exp. with: Programming languages including Java (core and enterprise), as well as programming concepts like object oriented programming; Build tools like Ant and Maven; Building low latency, application integration middleware using XML/JSON as data exchange format; Patterns of integration and asynchronous processing using technology like JMS and Apache ActiveMQ; Web services (SOAP based and REST) and API design and creation; Tomcat server, Web technology (Servlets and JSP) and web protocols like HTTP and HTTPS; Unix and scripting languages (bash). Jobsite: Palo Alto, CA. Mail resume to: Position RB012017 Integral Development Corporation 3400 Hillview Ave. Building 4, Palo Alto CA 94304 Hardware Eng. Hardware Eng. Barefoot Networks, Inc. seeks Hardware Eng. @ 2185 Park Blvd, Palo Alto, CA 94306. Job Duties: 1) Responsible for the architecture and implementation of design verification plans based on various design specifications. 2) Design and develop all test environment components as well as write various functional tests to confirm the functionality of the targeted design is behaving as detailed in the design specification. 3) Work with designers in debugging, tracking, and closing of test failures and ensure full verification coverage of the designs. 4) Develop Unit Level test benches using UVM, System Verilog, DPI, and CIC++. 5) Develop full chip test benches. 6) Develop test plans, test cases and debug tests. 7) Develop Perl Scripts for building RTL, Testbench code, tests, gates, and test regressions. 8) Participate in Emulation & Silicon Bring up in the lab. 9) Maintain and develop test databases for regressions. 10) Interact & debug with IT and Tool Vendors for ASIC tool problems. Minimum Requirements: Master’s degree in Computer Engineering, Electrical Engineering, or related field (or foreign equivalent), plus 5 years of experience in the job offered or ASIC Engineer. Special Requirements: Experience must include: a) 1 year with UVM; b) 5 years with SystemVerilog; c) 5 years with DPI; d) 5 years with C; e) 5 years with C++; f) 2 years with Assembly Level Language; g) 1 year with Verilog and Perl; h) 5 years with Design Verification; and i) 2 years with Post Silicon Validation. To apply, send resume to jobs-hr@ barefootnetworks.com and reference job title.

MULTIPLE POSITIONS Pure Storage, Inc. has following job opps. in Mountain View, CA: Member of Technical Staff (Software Engineer) [Req. #RHY47]. Dsgn # dvlp SW for storage arrays to connect to cloud srvces for monitoring. Software Engineer [Req. #YMK91]. Dsgn and dvlp SW for highly scalable storage systems. Sr. Financial Analyst [Req. #FNA77]. Assist w/build’s scalable and efficient reporting processes of financl and op. prfrmnce drivers and participate in rltd FP&A initiatives. Mail resumes refernc’s Req. # to: G. Vega, 650 Castro St, Ste 400, Mountain View, CA 94041 SW Engineer Pluribus Netwks seeks Principal SW Engr for Palo Alto, CA jobsite to dev netwkng SW. Reqs Masters+4 yrs exp. Send resume: jobs@pluribusnetworks.com. Must ref Job #978. Technical Informatica LLC is accepting resumes for the following position in Redwood City, CA: Senior QA Engineer (RP-CA): Develop, and execute software test plans, designs and automated test cases. Submit resume by mail to: Informatica LLC, Attn: Global Mobility, 2100 Seaport Blvd., Redwood City, CA 94063. Must reference job title and job code (RP-CA).

540 Domestic Help Wanted Engineer: Software Involved with software design and development. BS or equiv. degree in Comp Sci, Info Tech, Comp. Eng, EE, Eng or equiv. field. 5 yrs exp. as Software Engineer, Software Developer, Engineer or equiv. 5 yrs concurrent exp. with: Programming languages such as C#, Java and Python; Programming language SQL required to query large databases; Financial mathematics and quantitative models; Data analytics and statistical modelling using R and Matlab; Data visualization techniques & using tools such as Qlikview; Product design techniques using design tools such as Microsoft Visio, Adobe Photoshop and Balsamiq; and Managing technology projects using agile methodologies and scrum tools. Jobsite: Palo Alto, CA. Mail resume to: Position NK012017 Integral Development Corporation 3400 Hillview Ave. Building 4, Palo Alto CA 94304

560 Employment Information Drivers: Local Drivers Wanted Be your own boss. Flexible hours. Unlimited earning potential. Must be 21 with valid U.S. driver’s license, insurance and reliable vehicle. 866-329-2672 (AAN CAN) PAID IN ADVANCE! Make $1000 A Week Mailing Brochures From Home! No Experience Required. Helping home workers since 2001! Genuine Opportunity. Start Immediately! www.IncomeStation.net (AAN CAN)

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Business Services 604 Adult Care Offered A PLACE FOR MOM The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/ no obligation. CALL 1-800-550-4822. (Cal-SCAN) Adult Caregiver Available 2pm to 9pm, Mon-Fri. Exp., prefer P/T. Call 408-585-8471

624 Financial Do You Owe Over $10K to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Call now 855-993-5796 (Cal-SCAN) SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY benefits. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1-800-966-1904 to start your application today! (Cal-SCAN)

628 Graphics/ Webdesign

751 General Contracting A NOTICE TO READERS: It is illegal for an unlicensed person to perform contracting work on any project valued at $500.00 or more in labor and materials. State law also requires that contractors include their license numbers on all advertising. Check your contractor’s status at www.cslb.ca.gov or 800-321-CSLB (2752). Unlicensed persons taking jobs that total less than $500.00 must state in their advertisements that they are not licensed by the Contractors State License Board.

754 Gutter Cleaning Roofs, Gutters, Downspouts cleaning. Work guar. 30 years exp. Insured. Veteran Owned. Jim Thomas Maintenance, 408-595-2759.

757 Handyman/ Repairs Alex Peralta Handyman Kit. and bath remodel, int/ext. paint, tile, plumb, fence/deck repairs, foam roofs/repairs. Power wash. Alex, 650-465-1821 Handyman Services Lic. 249558. Plumb, electrical, masonry, carpentry, landscape. 40+ years exp. Pete Rumore, 650-823-0736; 650-8513078. 

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759 Hauling

636 Insurance

771 Painting/ Wallpaper

Health and Dental Insurance Lowest Prices. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888-989-4807. (Cal-SCAN)

640 Legal Services DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s hostile business climate? Gain the edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the FREE One-Month Trial Smart Search Feature. For more information call Cecelia @ (916) 288-6011 or www.capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN) Xarelto users Have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don’t have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1-800-425-4701. (Cal-SCAN)

Home Services 715 Cleaning Services Isabel and Elbi’s Housecleaning Apartments and homes. Excellent references. Great rates. 650-670-7287 or 650-771-8281 Silvia’s Cleaning We don’t cut corners, we clean them! Bonded, insured, 22 yrs. exp., service guaranteed, excel. refs., free est. 415-860-6988 

748 Gardening/ Landscaping J. Garcia Garden Maintenance Service Free est. 25 years exp. 650-366-4301 or 650-346-6781 LANDA’S GARDENING & LANDSCAPING *Yard Maint. *New Lawns. *Clean Ups *Irrigation timer programming. 20 yrs exp. Ramon, 650-576-6242 landaramon@yahoo.com

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Glen Hodges Painting Call me first! Senior discount. 45 yrs. #351738. 650/322-8325, phone calls ONLY.  Learn How to Paint your own home. What tools and materials to use to prep and paint. 40 years exp. 650/380-4335 STYLE PAINTING Full service interior/ext. Insured. Lic. 903303. 650-388-8577

775 Asphalt/Concrete Roe General Engineering Asphalt, concrete, pavers, tiles, sealing, artificial turf. 36 yrs exp. No job too small. Lic #663703. 650-814-5572

Real Estate 801 Apartments/ Condos/Studios Palo Alto Downtown, 2 BR/2 BA - 3700

805 Homes for Rent Redwood City (emerald Hills), 2 BR/2.5 BA - $3650

815 Rentals Wanted ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN) S’vale: BR + Private BA. in private home, Sunnyvale to MP. N/S, N/P. $1,000-$1,200 mo. Call 408-585-8471 

825 Homes/Condos for Sale Rancho Mirage: 3BR/3BA “Come and Warm Up”. The Springs Country Club, 25 Dartmouth. Completely furn. $495,000.00 Call Pete Hammond 760-656-8920 or 650-906-3165 petehammz@gmail.com

855 Real Estate Services DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s highly competitive market? Gain an edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the Smart Search Feature. For more information call Cecelia @ (916) 288-6011 or www.capublicnotice.com (Cal-SCAN)

Across 1 Put in stitches 5 Andreas opener 8 Cogitates, with “over” 13 Antioxidant berry in fruit juices 14 Nervous twinge 15 Like a game’s tutorial levels 16 Considered only in terms of money 19 Science Fiction and Fantasy Writers of America bestowals 20 Bird that runs 35 mph 22 Dating site datum 23 1986-to-2001 orbiter 24 Hi-___ graphics 26 Like “The Polar Express” 28 “Ain’t happenin’” 30 “Friends” friend 31 Filet mignon cut 35 Foul, as weather 36 Number sometimes decoded as “Z” 39 Friedlander of “30 Rock” 42 Amish, e.g. 43 “Buy It Now” site

47 ___ of troubles 49 Ashley and Mary-Kate, for two 51 Christmas tree choice 52 Fall back, tidewise

5 Uphill battle 6 Supermarket section 7 March Madness gp. 8 Cheese companion

54 Quirky comic Philips 55 Unagi, at sushi bars

10 Retired hockey great Eric 11 “Dig in, everyone!” 12 High-class group, for short? 15 Hubble after whom a space telescope was named

56 It’s provided by guild members 60 Advice that the four long entries with circles failed to follow 63 Baby garment with snaps 64 Word heard by Marge a lot, I imagine 65 Extreme aversion 66 ___ Martin (007’s car) 67 Part of MS-DOS (abbr.) 68 Fairy tale preposition Down 1 Trump tweet ender, often 2 Prefix before friendly or terrorism 3 Brownie ingredients, sometimes 4 Khartoum’s river

9 Exploitative type

17 “I’ve got ___ feeling about this!” 18 “Born on the Fourth of July” locale, briefly 20 “To ___ is human” 21 “Little Red Book” chairman 25 James Bond, for example 27 “Como ___?” (“How are you?” in Spanish) 29 Horns that are really winds 32 Iron-___ (T-shirt transfer patterns) 33 London or Brooklyn ending 34 Home of Times Sq. and Columbus Cir. 37 Brings by cart, perhaps

www.sudoku.name

38 Bovine quartet 39 Peanut butter brand for “choosy moms” 40 Instances of agreement 41 Hackers’ hangout that’s tough to find via search engines 44 Keg attachment 45 “I’d like to buy ___” (request to Pat Sajak) 46 Armani competitor, initially 48 “I’ll have ___ Christmas without you” (Elvis lyric) 50 “Rio ___” (John Wayne flick) 53 Ask for a doggie treat, perhaps 54 Judy Jetson’s brother 57 “Make ___!” (Captain Picard’s order) 58 Some PTA members 59 Aloha Stadium locale 60 Morgue acronym 61 Judge Lance played by Kenneth Choi on “American Crime Story” 62 First number shouted before a ball drop, often ©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com)

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Legal Notices 995 Fictitious Name Statement MORGAN HILL REAL ESTATE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 624415 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Morgan Hill Real Estate, located at 1240 Lions Peak Lane, San Martin, CA 95046, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A Corporation. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): DIRESTA CONSULTING GROUP INC. 1240 Lions Peak Lane San Martin, CA 95046 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 08/28/2008. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 15, 2016. (PAW Dec. 23, 30, 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 2017) PERFECT FIT CABINET SHOP FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 624434 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: Perfect Fit Cabinet Shop, located at 276 Martin Avenue, Santa Clara, CA 95050, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: A General Partnership. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): ELVIR OMEROVIC 276 Martin Avenue Santa Clara, CA 95050 BRANKO MARIN 276 Martin Avenue Santa Clara, CA 95050 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on 10/07/2016. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 16, 2016. (PAW Dec. 30, 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 20, 2017) RK LIMOUSINE SERVICE FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: 624713 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: RK Limousine Service, located at 2625 Middlefield Rd. #335, Palo Alto, CA 94306, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: An Individual. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): SAVTANTAR KUMAR 2625 Middlefield Rd. #335 Palo Alto, CA 94306 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 23, 2016. (PAW Dec. 30, 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 20, 2017) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. 624685 The following person(s)/ registrant(s) has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it

appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the County Clerk-Recorder’s Office. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): HOCK & COMPANY 15305 Watsonville Road Morgan Hill, CA 95037 FILED IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY ON: 05/12/2014 UNDER FILE NO.: 591871 REGISTRANT’S NAME(S): GREGORY O HOCK 15305 Watsonville Road Morgan Hill, CA 95037 THIS BUSINESS WAS CONDUCTED BY: An Individual. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 22, 2016. (PAW Dec. 30, 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 20, 2017) STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME File No. FBN624903 The following person(s)/ registrant(s) has/have abandoned the use of the fictitious business name(s). The information given below is as it appeared on the fictitious business statement that was filed at the County Clerk-Recorder’s Office. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME(S): SILICON VALLEY PENINSULA ROTARACT 250 Stratford Place Los Altos, CA 94022 FILED IN SANTA CLARA COUNTY ON: 12/07/2015 UNDER FILE NO.: FBN611774 REGISTRANT’S NAME(S): JUSTIN TAIT 250 Stratford Place Los Altos, CA 94022 MICHAEL CONDON 250 Stratford Place Los Altos, CA 94022 THIS BUSINESS WAS CONDUCTED BY: An Unincorporated Association Other Than a Partnership. This statement was filed with the County Clerk Recorder of Santa Clara County on December 30, 2016 (PAW Jan. 13, 20, 27; Feb. 3, 2017) HOCK COMPANY LLP HOCK COMPANY HOCK AND COMPANY HOCK & COMPANY FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT File No.: FBN625004 The following person (persons) is (are) doing business as: 1.) Hock Company LLP, 2.) Hock Company, 3.) Hock and Company, 4.) Hock & Company, located at 711 Colorado Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94303, Santa Clara County. This business is owned by: Limited Liability Partnership. The name and residence address of the registrant(s) is(are): GREGORY O. HOCK 15305 Watsonville Road Morgan Hill, CA 95037 KEVIN BRATCHER 711 Colorado Avenue Palo Alto, CA 94303 Registrant began transacting business under the fictitious business name(s) listed above on N/A. This statement was filed with the County Clerk-Recorder of Santa Clara County on January 4, 2017. (PAW Jan. 13, 20, 27; Feb. 3, 2017)

997 All Other Legals NOTICE OF TRUSTEE’S SALE TS No. CA-16-734587-BF Order No.: 5917923 NOTE: THERE IS A SUMMARY OF THE INFORMATION IN THIS DOCUMENT ATTACHED TO THE COPY PROVI DED TO THE MORTGAGOR OR TRUSTOR

(Pursuant to Cal. Civ. Code 2923.3) YOU ARE IN DEFAULT UNDER A DEED OF TRUST DATED 4/3/2007. UNLESS YOU TAKE ACTION TO PROTECT YOUR PROPERTY, IT MAY BE SOLD AT A PUBLIC SALE. IF YOU NEED AN EXPLANATION OF THE NATURE OF THE PROCEEDING AGAINST YOU, YOU SHOULD CONTACT A LAWYER. A public auction sale to the highest bidder for cash, cashier’s check drawn on a state or national bank, check drawn by state or federal credit union, or a check drawn by a state or federal savings and loan association, or savings association, or savings bank specified in Section 5102 to the Financial C ode and authorized to do business in this state, will be held by duly appointed trustee. The sale will be made, but without covenant or warranty, expressed or implied, regarding title, possession, or encumbrances, to pay the remaining principal sum of the note(s) secured by the Deed of Trust, with interest and late charges thereon, as provided in the note(s), advances, under the terms of the Deed of Trust, interest thereon, fees, charges and expenses of the Trustee for the total amount (at the time of the initial publication of the Notice of Sale) reasonably estimated to be set forth below. The amount may be greater on the day of sale. BENEFICIARY MAY ELECT TO BID LESS THAN THE TOTAL AMOUNT DUE. Trustor(s): JOHN H WHARTON, AN UNMARRIED MAN Recorded: 4/11/2007 as Instrument No. 19378233 of Official Records in the office of the Recorder of SANTA CLARA County, California; Date of Sale: 1/20/2017 at 10:00 AM Place of Sale: At the Gated North Market Street entrance of the Superior Courthouse, 191 N. First Street, San Jose, CA 95113 Amount of unpaid balance and other charges: $714,653.83 The purported property address is: 3419 CORK OAK WAY, PALO ALTO, CA 94303 Assessor’s Parcel No.: 127-48-023 NOTICE TO POTENTIAL BIDDERS: If you are considering bidding on this property lien, you should understand that there are risks involved in bidding at a trustee auction. You will be bidding on a lien, not on the property itself. Placing the highest bid at a trustee auction does not automatically entitle you to free and clear ownership of the property. You should also be aware that the lien being auctioned off may be a junior lien. If you are the highest bidder at the auction, you are or may be responsible for paying off all liens senior to the lien being auctioned off, before you can receive clear title to the property. You are encouraged to investigate the existence, priority, and size of outstanding liens that may exist on this property by contacting the county recorder’s office or a title insurance company, either of which may charge you a fee for this information. If you consult either of these resources, you should be aware that the same lender may hold more than one mortgage or deed of trust on the property. NOTICE TO PROPERTY OWNER: The sale date shown on this notice of sale may be postponed one or more times by the mortgagee, beneficiary, trustee, or a court, pursuant to Section 2924g of the California Civil Code. The law requires that information about trustee sale postponements be made available to you and to the public, as a courtesy to those not present at the sale. If you wish to learn whether your sa le date has been postponed, and, if applicable, the rescheduled time and date for the sale of this property, you may call 916939-0772 for information regarding the

THE PENINSULA’S FREE CLASSIFIEDS WEBSITE TO RESPOND TO ADS WITHOUT PHONE NUMBERS GO TO WWW.FOGSTER.COM trustee’s sale or visit this Internet Web site http://www.qualityloan.com , using the file number assigned to this foreclosure by the Trustee: CA-16-734587-BF. Information about postponements that are very short in duration or that occur close in time to the scheduled sale may not immediately be reflected in the telephone information or on the Internet Web site. The best way to verify postponement information is to attend the scheduled sale. The undersigned Trustee disclaims any liability for any incorrectness of the property address or other common designation, if any, shown herein. If no street address or other common designation is shown, directions to the location of the property may be obtained by sending a written request to the beneficiary within 10 days of the date of first publication of this Notice of Sale. If the sale is set aside for any reason, including if the Trustee is unable to convey title, the Purchaser at the sale shall be entitled only to a return o f the monies paid to the Trustee. This shall be the Purchaser’s sole and exclusive remedy. The purchaser shall have no further recourse against the Trustor, the Trustee, the Beneficiary, the Beneficiary’s Agent, or the Beneficiary’s Attorney. If you have previously been discharged through bankruptcy, you may have been released of personal liability for this loan in which case this letter is intended to exercise the note holders right’s against the real property only. QUALITY MAY BE CONSIDERED A DEBT COLLECTOR ATTEMPTING TO COLLECT A DEBT AND ANY INFORMATION OBTAINED WILL BE USED FOR THAT PURPOSE. Date: Quality Loan Service Corporation 411 Ivy Street San Diego, CA 92101 619-645-7711 For NON SALE information only Sale Line: 916-939-0772 Or Login to: http://www. qualityloan.com Reinstatement Line: (866) 645-7711 Ext 5318 Quality Loan Service Corp. TS No.: CA-16-734587-BF IDSPub #0120194 12/30/2016 1/6/2017 1/13/2017 NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOAN LENORE WINSOR, aka JOAN L. WINSOR, aka JOAN WINSOR Case No.: 16PR180045 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both, of JOAN LENORE WINSOR, aka JOAN L. WINSOR, aka JOAN WINSOR. A Petition for Probate has been filed by: RICHARD WINSOR AND JANICE WINSOR in the Superior Court of California, County of SANTA CLARA. The Petition for Probate requests that: RICHARD WINSOR AND JANICE WINSOR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. The petition requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held on February 17, 2017 at 9:00

a.m. in Dept.: 10 of the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Clara, located at 191 N. First St., San Jose, CA, 95113. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE-154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Tisa M. Pedersen, Esq. Thoits Law, A Professional Corporation, 400 Main St., Ste. 250 Los Altos, CA 94022 (650)327-4200 (PAW Dec. 30, 2016; Jan. 6, 13, 2017) NOTICE TO CREDITORS OF BULK SALE (SECS. 6104, 6105 U.C.C.) Notice is hereby given to the Creditors of: Sam’s Chowder House Palo Alto, LLC,

Seller(s), whose business address(es) is: 185 University Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301, that a bulk transfer is about to be made to: OneTeam Restaurant PA, LP, Buyer(s), whose business(es) address is: 185 University Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301. The property to be transferred is located at: 185 University Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301. Said property is described in general as: All stock in trade, fixtures, equipment, goodwill and other property of that Restaurant business known as SAM’S CHOWDER HOUSE, and located at: 185 University Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94301. The bulk sale is intended to be consummated at the office of: FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, 405 Primrose Road, Burlingame, CA 94010. The bulk transfer will be consummated on or after the 1st day of February, 2017. This bulk transfer is subject to Section 6106.2 of the California Commercial Code. If Section 6106.2 applies, claims may be filed at FIDELITY NATIONAL TITLE COMPANY, Escrow Division, Escrow No. FSSE-0101600999-LC, 405 Primrose Road, Burlingame, CA 94010. Phone: (415)359-2540, Fax: (415)520-6641. This bulk transfer includes a liquor license transfer. All claims must be received prior to the date on which the Notice of Transfer of the liquor license is received by Escrow Agent from the Department of Alcoholic Beverage Control. So far as known to the Buyer(s), all business names and addresses used by the Seller(s) for the three (3) years last past, if different from the above, are: NONE. IN WITNESS WHEREOF, the undersigned have executed this document on the date(s) set forth below. By: Fidelity National Title Company as Escrow Agent for the herein Buyer January 3, 2017 Tyler Miller, Escrow Assistant 1/13/17 CNS-2962761# PALO ALTO WEEKLY

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C R O S S W O R D S


david@gonzales.com

and raced to join in. it needed a spark. Don Shaw, who “We just beat the No. 1 team,” led the Cardinal to its first national Richards said. “I can’t believe it. title in 1992 and then won three We’re on a high and we’re going more, took a leave of absence folto keep going. Nothing lowing the 1999 season. will stop us.” Denise Corlett, one “We’ve always beof the greatest assistant lieved in ourselves coaches of all time, and our practices have took over the program been competitive,” said on an interim basis. Nnamani, who finished She didn’t have fourwith a career high 37 time Olympian and Allkills. “We always feel American Logan Tom prepared and now our around when the season confidence has sky started. Tom was at the rocketed.” 2000 Olympics. And Dunning’s reac- John Dunning’s Corlett did well tion? “We’re heading first-year at enough to continue in the right direction.” Stanford led Stanford’s record of That direction led to to the 2001 success in the NCAA Stanford’s previous na- championship. though. And Tom retional title. turned for the Pac-10 After NCAA victories, Dun- season on 10-10-00. Shaw returned to campus but as ning deferred to his players when asked for an opening comment. the men’s volleyball coach. Enter Dunning, After defeats he’d take whose first act was to the lead. retain Corlett as top asThe first time I saw sistant and eventually this happen was to associate head coach. Robyn Lewis, a senior Dunning directed setter. He shoved a miStanford to three nacrophone in front of her tional championships and a surprised Lewis (2001, 2004, 2016) and gathered herself and eight conference titles spoke eloquently about during his 16-year tenteam play. ure on The Farm. He During one preboasts five national tiseason press confer- The 2004 NCAA tles overall and was inence, I was interview- championship ducted into the Ameriing Anna Robinson trophy. can Volleyball Coaches one-on-one and all of a sudden she broke out laughing. Association Hall of Fame in 2011. Dunning finishes his career Dunning was making faces bewith an 888-185 overall record hind my back. Dunning came to Stanford when (.828). n

Don Feria/isiphotos.com

John Dunning won three national titles in 16 years at Stanford. His overall coaching record is 888-185. His Cardinal teams never lost more than two matches in a row.

Dunning never lost his sense of playfulness

by Rick Eymer

C

Courtesy of Stanford Athletics

retirement, after 32 years at the overing a John Dunning- college level, I realized he’s the coached team as a report- same person who took over the er is unlike covering any program at Fremont. The biggest other sport at any other level. I al- difference from my perspective is ways had the sense I was in an in- he allowed himself to have a little teractive classroom with a patient more fun. teacher explaining the basics. The same attributes that made Dunning cared enough about him a championship coach in high his players and his sport to spend school are the same attributes he time promoting them in a way that displayed in leading a young Stanwas more about being supportive ford team, led by a fifth-year sethan being a salesman. nior, to an unlikely national chamBefore he became a Hall of pionship on December 17, 2016. Fame college volleyball coach, Dunning’s first NCAA title arJohn Dunning, now 66 years rived December 22, 1985, when of age, was a high school math the Tigers beat Stanford in four teacher at Fremont-Sunnyvale. sets at Western Michigan. Before he won The blurb in his first national Pacific’s media championship at guide says it all: Pacific, he was “A new era began winning Central for Pacific volleyCoast Section ball as first-year titles at Fremont. head coach John He earned his Dunning led a collegiate repugroup of looseytation at Pacific, goosey freshmen but coaching at and seasoned vetStanford meant erans to Pacific’s coming home. first ever National Women’s volChampionship.” leyball had a cult Dunning called following in the his freshmen mid-80s, when group this year John Dunning poses with I was covering “crazy” as in the 2016 NCAA teams like Frecrazy in the way championship trophy. mont, Los Altos, they enjoy playSt. Francis and Sacred Heart Prep. ing with other. The Cardinal was years away Stanford has had its share of from winning its first national heart-pounding, come-from-betitle and my stories, for the Times hind victories over the years, inTribune, never made it above the cluding a five-set win over Califold. fornia on November 23, 2007. The That never stopped coaches, Cardinal was down, 14-9, in the like Dunning, from taking their final set and rallied to win, 16-14. jobs seriously. They worked as But perhaps none compares to hard as any football coach to the magnitude of Stanford’s 28teach, cajole and motivate the best 30, 11-30, 30-27, 34-32, 20-18 win out of each athlete. The last player over then No. 1 and undefeated on the freshman team was just as Washington on November 18, important as the college-bound 2004; a match that took place in scholarship player. Burnham Pavilion as Maples was When Dunning announced his being refurbished.

The Huskies were clearly the dominant team and the second set was absolutely devastating. The Cardinal looked as though they were ready to pack it in and give up on the season. Ogonna Nnamani, Stanford’s all-time kills leader, had eight kills after two sets and reporters were scrambling to find out if she’d ever been held to single digits. Dunning was furious. He went into the intermission with a face that could have melted the Ford Center. Ten minutes later a different team took the court. Stanford never led nor trailed by more than three points in the third set. The Cardinal trailed, 24-21, before Nnamani recorded five kills and Leahi Hall’s service ace gave Stanford the win. Washington led, 25-19, at one point in the fourth set. Bryn Kehoe served five straight points and the Cardinal tied the match. The Huskies were on the verge of victory at 29-26, but Stanford never packed it in. The Huskies still held the advantage at 32-31 but kills from Nnamani, Kristin Richards and Kehoe evened the match. Imagine how much emotion and energy had been spent by both sides. There was no way they could keep this up through another set. But they did. Once again Washington was on the verge of winning at 14-11. And once again Stanford rallied to take a 15-14 advantage. A service error gave the Cardinal a 19-18 edge when Jennifer Hucke stepped up and served herself into Stanford folklore. Hucke looked dazed as she slumped to the floor following her ace. In a matter of moments she was surrounded by happy teammates. Even the student radio crew abandoned their stations

david@gonzales.com

The joy of coaching

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Lauren Koyama

Joe Foley

PALO ALTO BASKETBALL

MENLO BASKETBALL

The senior averaged 19.3 points a game in three wins last week, including a pair of SCVAL De Anza Division victories. She scored 22 in a league victory over Gunn.

The junior forward scored 40 points in the Knights’ West Bay Athletic League Foothill Division victory over Eastside College Prep, the most by a local player this season.

Honorable mention Sam Erisman* Menlo basketball

Katie Guernin Menlo-Atherton soccer

Natalie Hill Gunn soccer

Hannah Jump Pinewood basketball

Stella Kailahi Menlo-Atherton basketball

Carly Leong Palo Alto basketball

Max Dorward Palo Alto basketball

Seth Goyal* Palo Alto wrestling

Ben Quinn Gunn soccer

Marc Velten Menlo soccer

Andrew Wang Palo Alto wrestling

Kai Winterling Menlo-Atherton basketball * Previous winners

Watch video interviews of the Athletes of the Week, go to PASportsOnline.com

www.PaloAltoOnline.com • Palo Alto Weekly • January 13, 2017 • Page 31


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Palo Alto Weekly January 13, 2017