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Council urges no on marijuana Page 3

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Transitions 14

Pulse 15

Spectrum 16

Eating Out 28

Movies 30

Puzzles 65

NArts Art recalls two Sino-Japanese conicts

Page 25

NSports Stanford’s star linebacker returns

Page 32

NHome Up close with nature in Esther Clark Park

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Financing up to 100% of purchase price, plus tax, license and service contracts Terms up to 7 years Convenient online application

*YOUR ANNUAL PERCENTAGE RATE (APR) MAY BE HIGHER BASED ON CREDIT QUALIFICATION. THE RATE SHOWN INCLUDES A 0.25% RATE DISCOUNT WITH AUTOMATIC TRANSFER AND A 0.50% RATE DISCOUNT WITH DIRECT DEPOSIT. THE RANGE OF APRS FOR NEW AND USED AUTO LOANS IS 2.25% TO 7.25% AFTER DISCOUNTS. A SAMPLE PAYMENT ON AN 84-MONTH LOAN AT 2.25% APR IS $12.88 PER $1000. A $75 FEE WILL BE ASSESSED TO REFINANCE OR MODIFY A STAR ONE AUTO LOAN. RATES ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE.

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Upfront

,OCALNEWS INFORMATIONANDANALYSIS

Legal questions muddle Palo Alto’s pot debate !SCOURTSISSUECONFLICTINGRULINGSONMARIJUANA DISPENSARIES CITYOFFICIALSURGEVOTERSTOREJECT-EASURE# by Gennady Sheyner ITH #ALIFORNIAS MARIJUANA LAWSSTILLIMMERSEDINALE GALCLOUD AGROUPOF0ALO !LTOS ELECTED OFFICIALS IS URGING VOTERSTOSTRIKEDOWNIN.OVEMBER ACITIZENINITIATIVETHATWOULDALLOW UP TO THREE POT DISPENSARIES TO SET UPSHOPINTHECITY

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-EASURE#ENDEDUPONTHE.O VEMBER BALLOT AFTER MARIJUANA AD VOCATESSUBMITTEDMORETHAN  SIGNATURESTOTHE#ITY#LERKSOFFICE "UT EVEN IF THE VOTERS WERE TO AP PROVETHEMEASUREON%LECTION$AY THE LEGAL STATUS OF THE POT SHOPS WOULD REMAIN HAZY OBSCURED BY

CONTRADICTORY RULINGS FROM VARIOUS APPEALSCOURTSANDBYDISCREPANCIES BETWEENFEDERALANDSTATESTATUTES 0ROPONENTSOFMEDICALMARIJUANA POINT TO THE STATES #OMPASSIONATE 5SE !CT OF  WHICH PERMITS CULTIVATION OF MARIJUANA FOR MEDI CAL USE 4HEY CLAIM THAT THE ACT WHICHCAMEOUTOFAVOTERINITIATIVE EFFECTIVELYPROHIBITSCITIESFROMIM POSINGRESTRICTIONSONPOTDISPENSA RIES/PPONENTSPOINTTOTHEFEDERAL #ONTROLLED 3UBSTANCES !CT WHICH

PROHIBITS MARIJUANA AND ARGUE THAT INITIATIVES THAT PURPORT TO REGULATE MEDICALMARIJUANAINFACTPERMITIT )F VOTERS WERE TO APPROVE -EA SURE # THEY WOULD ROLL BACK THE CITYSHISTORICOPPOSITIONTOMEDICAL MARIJUANA !FTER #ALIFORNIA VOTERS PASSEDTHE#OMPASSIONATE5SE!CT THE #ITY #OUNCIL BECAME ONE OF MANYAROUNDTHESTATETOPASSALOCAL LAWPROHIBITINGDISPENSARIES .OW AGROUPOFFORMERANDCUR RENTELECTEDOFFICIALSISTRYINGTOCON

VINCE VOTERS TO REINFORCE THAT BAN -AYOR 9IAWAY 9EH 6ICE -AYOR 'REG3CHARFFAND#OUNCILMAN,AR RY+LEINHAVEPREPAREDACOLLEAGUES MEMO URGING VOTERS TO OPPOSE THE MEASURE CITINGTHELEGALCONTROVERSY ANDARGUINGTHATTHEPRESENCEOFPOT DISPENSARIES CAN hLEAD TO NEGATIVE @SECONDARYEFFECTSONOURNEIGHBOR HOODS SUCHASILLICITDRUGSALES LOI TERING ANDEVENCRIMINALACTIVITYv (continued on page 13)

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Palo Alto students narrow achievement gap (IGHERSCORESAMONG!FRICAN !MERICAN (ISPANIC STUDENTSCOMPAREDTO by Chris Kenrick ALO!LTOS!FRICAN !MERICAN AND(ISPANICELEMENTARYAND MIDDLESCHOOLSTUDENTSMADE SIGNIFICANT PROGRESS BETWEEN  AND  ACCORDING TO TEST DATA PRESENTEDTOTHE"OARDOF%DUCATION 4UESDAY 3EPT 3CORESWEREGENERALLYUPAMONG ALLSUBGROUPS BUTAPARTICULARFOCUS ON RAISING ACHIEVEMENT AMONG UN DERREPRESENTED MINORITIES APPEARS TOBEPAYINGOFF 4HE IMPROVEMENT WAS REFLECTED INANANALYSISOFSCORESONTHE#ALI FORNIA 3TANDARDS 34!2 4EST PER FORMEDBYDISTRICTSTATISTICIAN$IANA 7ILMOT h7HEN WE LOOK AT CLOSING THE ACHIEVEMENTGAPBETWEENTHEHIGHEST PERFORMINGANDTHELOWEST PERFORM ING STUDENTS IN %NGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS THE PERCENTAGE DIFFERENCE BE TWEEN!SIANAND!FRICAN !MERICAN STUDENTS IN  WAS  AND LAST YEARITWASPERCENTBETWEENTHE SAMEGROUPS v7ILMOTSAID h4HERES BEEN PROGRESS ACROSS 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY THAT MIRRORS THAT BUT IN SOME CASES WE HAD A WIDERGAPINANDWEVECLOSED ITATAFASTERANDGREATERRATEv 7ILMOTREPORTEDSIGNIFICANTGAINS FOR!FRICAN !MERICANAND(ISPANIC STUDENTSINBOTHMATHAND%NGLISH )N PERCENTOF!FRICAN !MERICANSTUDENTSANDPERCENT OF(ISPANICSTUDENTSWEREATGRADE LEVEL IN %NGLISH LANGUAGE ARTS BUT THAT FIGURE JUMPED TO  PERCENT OF!FRICAN !MERICANSANDPER CENTOF(ISPANICSTUDENTSTHISYEAR )N MATH GRADE LEVEL PROFICIENCY AMONG !FRICAN !MERICAN STUDENTS JUMPEDFROMPERCENTIN TOPERCENTIN&OR(ISPAN ICS IT WENT FROM  PERCENT FOUR YEARSAGOTOPERCENT 7ILMOTALSOPOINTEDTOSOMENAR ROWING OF THE hOPPORTUNITY GAPv

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Packard Children’s Hospital expansion breaks ground !FTERYEARSOFPLANS NEGOTIATIONSANDDESIGNWORK ,UCILE0ACKARD#HILDRENS(OSPITALOFFICIALS CELEBRATEDAMAJORMILESTONE4HURSDAYINTHEIREFFORTTOEXPANDANDUPGRADETHEHOSPITAL(OSPITAL OFFICIALSWEREJOINEDBY(0#%/-EG7HITMAN *OHN3OBRATO FOUNDEROF4HE3OBRATO/RGANIZATION ANDAHOSTOFDIGNITARIESATAGROUNDBREAKINGCEREMONYATTHEHOSPITAL4HEPROJECTWILLADD  SQUAREFEETOFSPACETOTHEHOSPITAL INCLUDINGSEVENOPERATINGROOMSANDNEWPATIENTROOMS OF WHICHWILLBEPRIVATE4HEPROJECT AMAJORCOMPONENTOF3TANFORD5NIVERSITY-EDICAL#ENTERSBILLION h0ROJECT2ENEWAL vEARNEDTHEAPPROVALOF#ITY#OUNCILIN*ULY4HE#HILDRENS(OSPITALADDITIONIS SLATEDTOOPENIN

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Stanford-Palo Alto trails proposal wins City Council’s backing #OUNCILLAUDSJOINTPLANTOSEEK-FORNEWBIKEBRIDGE TRAILSNEAR3TANFORD$ISH by Gennady Sheyner NTH HOURREQUESTFROM0ALO !LTOAND3TANFORD5NIVERSITY FORAGRANTTHATWOULDGREATLY ACCELERATETHECITYSAMBITIOUSBIKE PLAN AND CREATE AN EXPANSIVE TRAIL NETWORK AROUND THE 3TANFORD $ISH GLIDEDPASTTHE#ITY#OUNCIL4UES DAY NIGHT AND NOW HEADS TO THE 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY "OARD OF 3U PERVISORSFORPOSSIBLEAPPROVAL 4HEPROPOSAL WHICHTHECITYAND THEUNIVERSITYSCRAMBLEDTOPUTTO GETHEROVERTHEPASTMONTH AIMSTO

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TAPINTOAMILLIONPOOLTHATTHE COUNTYRECEIVEDFROM3TANFORDASA RESULT OF GRANTING THE UNIVERSITYS hGENERALUSEPERMITv)NITIALLY 3TANFORD HAD AGREED TO BUILD TWO TRAILSINEXCHANGEFORPERMISSIONTO CONSTRUCTUPTOMILLIONSQUAREFEET OFNEWDEVELOPMENTONCAMPUS"UT WHEN NEITHER 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY NOR 3AN -ATEO #OUNTY APPROVED OF WHERE THE NORTHERN TRAIL WOULD BEBUILT 3TANFORDOPTEDTOPROVIDE MONEYINSTEADTO3ANTA#LARA#OUN

TY WHICHNOWMUSTUSETHEFUNDSTO ENHANCERECREATIONOPPORTUNITIESFOR USERSOFTHE3TANFORDCAMPUS !S0ALO!LTO/NLINEREPORTED&RI DAY THE JOINT GRANT APPLICATION RE QUESTSFUNDSFORFIVEPROJECTSˆ MILLIONFORTHEPROPOSEDBIKEBRIDGE AT !DOBE #REEK  MILLION FOR NEWTRAILSBETWEEN%L#AMINO2EAL ANDTHE3TANFORD$ISHANDALONG*U NIPERO3ERRA TOCREATETHE (continued on page 6)

ˆ PERFORMANCE OF STUDENTS WHOSE PARENTSHAVEGRADUATEDEGREESCOM PARED TO THOSE WHOSE PARENTS JUST FINISHEDHIGHSCHOOL )N MATH PROFICIENCY FOR EXAMPLE THATGAPWASPERCENTIN BUT NARROWEDTOPERCENTTHISYEAR 3UPERINTENDENT+EVIN3KELLYSAID HEWAShEXTREMELYPLEASEDvWITHTHE DATA h4HESE RESULTS ARE GOOD BUT YOU STILLWANTTHEMTOBEBETTER vHESAID h)THINKWEAREDOINGBETTERCOL LABORATIVEWORK v3KELLYSAIDWHEN ASKEDWHATHETHINKSISBEHINDTHE IMPROVEMENT h7EHAVETEACHERSWHOAREFIRED UPONBEHALFOFALLSTUDENTS7EARE THINKINGMOREABOUTWHATOURSTU DENTSBRINGANDDONTBRINGINTOTHE CLASSROOMINTERMSOFTHEIRPARENTS AND TALENTS AND WE ARE BENEFITING FROMTHECONTINUALLYINCREASINGIN TERESTINEDUCATION vHESAID 0ARENT3USAN5SMAN A04!BOARD VICE PRESIDENT WHO TRACKS ACHIEVE MENTGAPISSUESFORTHEGROUP SAID h4HISISREALLYGREAT POSITIVEINFOR MATIONANDWEHAVENTSEENDATALIKE THISINALONGTIMEv +EN $AUBER A CANDIDATE FOR SCHOOL BOARD AND MEMBER OF THE PARENT GROUP 7E #AN $O "ETTER 0ALO!LTO APPLAUDEDTHERESULTS BUT QUESTIONEDSOMEOFTHENUMBERS $AUBERNOTEDTHATFEWER!FRICAN !MERICAN AND (ISPANIC STUDENTS WERE TESTED IN  SUGGESTING IT WASPOSSIBLETHATLOWACHIEVERSWERE OMITTEDFROMTHEAVERAGES 0ARENT 3ARA 7OODHAM *OHNSON ECHOEDTHOSECONCERNS NOTINGTHAT PERCENTFEWER!FRICAN !MERICAN STUDENTS WERE TESTED IN  THAN IN  3HE TOO APPLAUDED THE RESULTS BUT NOTED THAT  WAS A PARTICULARLYBADYEAR (continued on page 5)

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Upfront

PUBLISHER William S. Johnson

   

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EDITORIAL Jocelyn Dong, Editor Carol Blitzer, Associate Editor Keith Peters, Sports Editor Tyler Hanley, Express™ and Online Editor Rebecca Wallace, Arts & Entertainment Editor Rick Eymer, Assistant Sports Editor Tom Gibboney, Spectrum Editor Sue Dremann, Chris Kenrick, Gennady Sheyner, Staff Writers Eric Van Susteren, Editorial Assistant, Internship Coordinator Veronica Weber, Staff Photographer Colin Becht, Dale F. Bentson, Peter Canavese, Kit Davey, Iris Harrell, Sheila Himmel, Chad Jones, Karla Kane, Kevin Kirby, Jack McKinnon, Jeanie K. Smith, Susan Tavernetti, Contributors Maytal Mark, Dean McArdle, Editorial Interns DESIGN Shannon Corey, Design Director Linda Atilano, Diane Haas, Scott Peterson, Paul Llewellyn, Senior Designers Lili Cao, Rosanna Leung, Designer PRODUCTION Jennifer Lindberg, Production Manager Dorothy Hassett, Samantha Mejia, Blanca Yoc, Sales & Production Coordinators ADVERTISING Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Adam Carter, Elaine Clark, Janice Hoogner, Brent Triantos, Display Advertising Sales Neal Fine, Carolyn Oliver, Rosemary Lewkowitz, Real Estate Advertising Sales David Cirner, Irene Schwartz, Inside Advertising Sales Diane Martin, Real Estate Advertising Asst. Alicia Santillan, Classified Administrative Asst. Wendy Suzuki, Advertising Sales Intern EXPRESS, ONLINE AND VIDEO SERVICES Rachel Palmer, Online Operations Coordinator Rachel Hatch, Multimedia Product Manager BUSINESS Susie Ochoa, Payroll & Benefits Elena Dineva, Mary McDonald, Claire McGibeny, Cathy Stringari, Business Associates ADMINISTRATION Janice Covolo, Doris Taylor, Receptionists Ruben Espinoza, Courier EMBARCADERO MEDIA William S. Johnson, President Michael I. Naar, Vice President & CFO Tom Zahiralis, Vice President Sales & Advertising Frank A. Bravo, Director, Information Technology & Webmaster Connie Jo Cotton, Major Accounts Sales Manager Bob Lampkin, Director, Circulation & Mailing Services Alicia Santillan, Circulation Assistant Chris Planessi, Chip Poedjosoedarmo, Computer System Associates The Palo Alto Weekly (ISSN 0199-1159) is published every Friday by Embarcadero Media, 450 Cambridge Ave., Palo Alto, CA 94306, (650) 326-8210. Periodicals postage paid at Palo Alto, CA and additional mailing offices. Adjudicated a newspaper of general circulation for Santa Clara County. The Palo Alto Weekly is delivered free to homes in Palo Alto, Menlo Park, Atherton, Portola Valley, East Palo Alto, to faculty and staff households on the Stanford campus and to portions of Los Altos Hills. If you are not currently receiving the paper, you may request free delivery by calling 326-8210. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610, Palo Alto, CA 94302. Copyright Š2012 by Embarcadero Media. All rights reserved. Reproduction without permission is strictly prohibited. The Palo Alto Weekly is available on the Internet via Palo Alto Online at: www.PaloAltoOnline.com Our email addresses are: editor@paweekly.com, letters@paweekly.com, digitalads@paweekly.com. Missed delivery or start/stop your paper? Call 650 326-8210, or email circulation@paweekly. com. You may also subscribe online at www.PaloAltoOnline.com. Subscriptions are $60/yr.

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City/Zip: _______________________________ Mail to: Palo Alto Weekly, P.O. Box 1610. Palo Alto CA 94302

QUOTE OF THE WEEK

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450 CAMBRIDGE AVE, PALO ALTO, CA 94306 (650) 326-8210

Surrounding cities don’t allow them, so we’d be the magnet.

— Greg Scharff, Palo Alto vice mayor, on why Palo Altans should vote no on Measure C, which would allow medical pot dispensaries in town. See story on page 3.

Around Town HOW SWEDE IT IS ... The Swedish flag will fly high in Palo Alto on Monday night when the City Council celebrates its quarter-century-old relationship with the city of LinkĂśping. The two cities established their relationship in January of 1987 with the goal of fostering “friendship, appreciation, understanding, collaboration and citizen exchanges,â€? according to a special proclamation the council plans to pass Monday. The proclamation lauds LinkĂśping, which was founded in 1320, as an “economic, cultural and educational center in southern Swedenâ€? and states that the people of Palo Alto and its Swedish sibling have “forged a bond of friendship and appreciation for 25 years through many cultural and educational exchanges, the arts, music and collaboration in community affairs.â€? The council will also welcome LinkĂśping’s Mayor Ann-Cathrine Hjerdt and other officials representing the city and from the Neighbors Abroad program. The event will conclude with Palo Alto Mayor Yiaway Yeh proclaiming Sept. 10 through Sept. 14 as the “LinkĂśping, Sweden Week in Palo Alto.â€? PREPARING FOR THE BIG ONE ... Few things rattle the nerves of Palo Alto’s land-use watchdogs like “planned communityâ€? (PC) projects, which allow developers to far exceed the city’s zoning regulations in exchange for “public benefitsâ€? that are often negotiated in real time during council meetings. In recent months, major PC-zoned projects such as the College Terrace Centre on El Camino Real and College Avenue and, more recently, the Lytton Gateway development downtown, earned council approval after months of negotiations over these benefits. On Monday night, the council will get its first look at a highly anticipated PC project proposed by Jay Paul Company, a San Francisco-based commercial developer. Though no details about the project had been publicly released, city officials expect the proposal for 395 Page Mill Road (near AOL’s Silicon Valley headquarters) to be a dense office building. But what gets the city excited is one potential “public benefitâ€? — a new public-safety building. In June, City Manager James Keene mentioned that the tentative proposal includes a new underground garage at Park Boulevard and Olive Avenue. The city’s new police headquarters, which is one of its top infrastructure priorities, would stand on top of that garage. The council was so intrigued by this proposal that they

scheduled a special “prescreening meeting� to consider this proposal. They will not, however, be making any decisions on this proposal Monday night. GOING UNDER ... Palo Alto’s effort to take down its overhead electric lines and to bury them underground began nearly half a century ago and the end remains nowhere in sight. With about 46 percent of the city currently “undergrounded,� Utility Department officials expect that it will take about 70 years to extend the project to the entire city, according to a report that the Utilities Advisory Commission discussed Wednesday night. The city spends about 2 percent of its electric revenues on the undergrounding effort. But is the effort of removing dangling wires worth the cost? That’s the question the city is now trying to answer. According to the report by Senior Resource Planner Nicolas Procos and Engineering Manager Tom Ting, the impact is “primarily based on aesthetic values and is not a critical component of providing electric service to the residents and businesses in Palo Alto.� Thus, they write, changes to the program will be “based on individual considerations and value judgments.� Staff recommended reaching out to the public to determine how badly residents want their electric lines buried. “Due to the very high cost of the conversions, it is preferable to engage the community early in the discussions on policy formulation.� The commission agreed and voted unanimously on Wednesday night to recommend that the City Council appoint a new citizens advisory commission to consider the pros and cons of proceeding with the effort and to think about ways to pay for it. RIDING ALONG ... School commuters in Palo Alto now have a new tool at their disposal. The city this week launched a new online program, “Schoolpool,� which helps parents and students plan their trips, whether by car, bike or foot. The pilot program is sponsored by the city and by Ohlone Elementary School and is powered by the online service, Carpooltoschool.com. In announcing the program, the city touted as an “important option to the City’s Safe Routes to School program,� which encourages biking and walking to school. The city’s Chief Transportation Official Jaime Rodriguez called the new online program “another element of our alternative transportation toolkit.� N


Upfront #)49"5$'%4

Palo Alto trims managers’ benefits, eyes more reforms #ITY#OUNCILAPPROVESNEWCONTRACTWITHMANAGERSANDPROFESSIONALS WILLCONSIDEROTHERBENEFITCHANGESON3EPT by Gennady Sheyner WARDTHEENDOFTHEDISCUSSIONh)TS PAINFULFORTHECOUNCIL AND)REALLY APPRECIATE THE MANAGEMENT GROUP FOR MAKING THESE CHANGES SO THAT WE CAN BRING OURSELVES BACK INTO SUSTAINABILITYv -UCHOFTHECONVERSATIONCENTERED ONTHECITYSRESPONSETOARECENTRE PORT FROM THE 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY 'RAND *URY WHICH ANALYZED THE UNFUNDEDLIABILITIESOFEACHCITYIN

ALO!LTOTOOKAGIANTSTEPON ITSROADTOWARDREDUCINGEM PLOYEE COSTS 4UESDAY NIGHT WHEN IT APPROVED A CONTRACT THAT FORCESABOUTMANAGERSTOCON TRIBUTE MORE TOWARD THEIR PENSION ANDHEALTHCAREEXPENSES "UTEVENASTHE#ITY#OUNCILAP PROVED THE AGREEMENT MEMBERS VOWED TO PURSUE IN THE COMING MONTHS FURTHER REFORMS GEARED AT CURTAILINGTHESPIKINGBENEFITCOSTS 4HE NEW CONTRACT WITH THE NON UNIONIZED GROUP OF MANAGERS AND PROFESSIONALS ACHIEVES CONCESSIONS SIMILAR TO THOSE THE CITY RECENTLY AGREED TO WITH ITS LARGEST POLICE UNION ITS FIREFIGHTERS UNIONS AND WITH THE 3ERVICE %MPLOYEES )NTER NATIONAL 5NION ,OCAL  WHICH REPRESENTS MORE THAN  WORKERS ABOUT HALF THE CITYS WORKFORCE )T WILL REQUIRE MANAGERS AND PROFES SIONALS TO CONTRIBUTE SIGNIFICANTLY MORETOWARDTHEIRPENSIONANDHEALTH CAREEXPENSESˆCOSTSTHATHAVETRA DITIONALLYBEENBORNEBYTHECITY /N PENSIONS THE MANAGEMENT GROUPWILLNOWBEREQUIREDTOPAY THE MAXIMUM hEMPLOYEE CON TRIBUTIONv TOWARD THE #ALIFORNIA %MPLOYMENT 2ETIREMENT 3YSTEM #AL0%23 THEGIANTFUNDTHATAD MINISTERSTHECITYSPENSIONBENEFITS 4HEEMPLOYEECONTRIBUTIONISEITHER PERCENTORPERCENTOFTHECITYS

TOTALPENSIONOBLIGATION DEPENDING ON EACH EMPLOYEES PENSION PLAN 4HISWOULDBEAMAJORINCREASEFROM THEPERCENTTHEYCURRENTLYPAY 4HE  MANAGERS AND PROFES SIONALS WILL ALSO HAVE TO PAY EXTRA FORMEDICALCAREUNDERTHENEWCON TRACT WHICHTHECOUNCILENTHUSIASTI CALLY APPROVED 4UESDAY NIGHT WITH AN   VOTE 3ID %SPINOSA WAS AB SENT 7HILETHECITYHASHISTORICALLY

FOOTED THE ENTIRE HEALTH CARE BILL MANAGERSANDPROFESSIONALSWILLNOW BEREQUIREDTOCONTRIBUTEPERCENT OFTHECOST4HISCHANGEISEXPECTED TOSAVETHECITYABOUT AN NUALLY ACCORDING TO A REPORT FROM 3ANDRA"LANCH ASSISTANTDIRECTOROF THE(UMAN3ERVICES$EPARTMENT )N EXCHANGE FOR THE CONCESSIONS THE CITY HAS AGREED TO GIVE THIS GROUP A  PERCENT SALARY INCREASE %VENWITHTHISPAYBUMP THEAVER AGEPAYCHECKWILLDROPBYPERCENT BECAUSE OF THE INCREASED CONTRIBU TIONS SAID +ATHRYN 3HEN DIRECTOR OF(UMAN3ERVICES h7EKNOWTHISISPAINFUL v#OUN CILWOMAN.ANCY3HEPHERDSAIDTO

THE COUNTY AND CONCLUDED THAT EX ISTINGOBLIGATIONSAREUNSUSTAINABLE 4HEREPORTRECOMMENDEDASERIESOF PENSIONREFORMS INCLUDINGASECOND PENSION TIER WITH A LESS GENEROUS PENSION FORMULA FOR NEW EMPLOY EES INCREASEDhEMPLOYEECONTRIBU TIONSvTOWARDPENSIONSANDINCREAS ING THE RETIREMENT AGE ˆ CHANGES THAT THE CITY HAS BEEN GRADUALLY ADOPTINGSINCE 4HECOUNCILGENERALLYAGREEDWITH THEREPORTSCONCLUSIONSANDRECOM MENDATIONS EVEN AS MEMBERS AC KNOWLEDGEDTHATTHEIRPOWERTOIM PLEMENTPENSIONREFORMSISLIMITED BY STATE LAW 3EVERAL MAJOR 'RAND *URYRECOMMENDATIONS INCLUDINGA

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CUT THAT WILL BE TRIGGERED SHOULD 'OV *ERRY "ROWNS .OVEMBER TAX INITIATIVEFAIL %VENSO BOARDMEMBERS4UESDAY VOTEDTOENDORSEBOTH"ROWNSMEA SURE 0ROPOSITION  AND ANOTHER SCHOOL REVENUE MEASURE 0ROPOSI TION  4HE TALLY WAS   WITH BOARD MEMBER "ARB -ITCHELL AB STAININGANDBOARDMEMBER-ELISSA "ATEN#ASWELLABSENTFORTHEVOTE -ITCHELLSAIDSHEWASABSTAINING BECAUSE THE BOARD hWONT CONTROL ANY FUTURE ACTION BY THE GOVERNOR ANDTHELEGISLATUREONHANDLINGTHESE FUNDS ANDWESIMPLYCANTASSUREIN MYVIEWTHATTHESEBALLOTMEASURES WILLENSURETHEHEALTHOF#ALIFORNIA PUBLICSCHOOLS h4HERESNOSIGNIFICANTSTRUCTURAL REFORM IN THESE TO SECURE LONG TERMFUNDINGFOR#ALIFORNIAPUBLIC SCHOOLS-YPOSITIONISNEITHERPOSI TIVE NOR NEGATIVE ) URGE VOTERS TO READ THESE INITIATIVES THEMSELVES v -ITCHELLSAID "UTABOARDMAJORITYSAIDITSIM PORTANTTOSTANDWITHOTHER#ALIFOR NIASCHOOLDISTRICTSWHOSTANDTOLOSE SUBSTANTIALFUNDINGIFNEITHERINITIA TIVEWERETOPASS h) DO HAVE CONCERNS ABOUT EACH PROPOSITION ˆ EACH HAS ASPECTS ) DISLIKEˆYET)MGOINGTOSUPPORT BOTH BECAUSE THE EFFECTS OF NEITHER PASSING WOULD BE FAR WORSE FOR EDUCATIONINOURSTATE vBOARD6ICE 0RESIDENT$ANA4OMSAID 4HE BOARD ALSO UNANIMOUSLY ENDORSED ITS TOP PRIORITY GOALS FOR   WITH PARTICULAR ATTENTION

English-language proficiency across Palo Alto student groups

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3KELLYLATERNOTEDTHAThOUR!FRI CAN !MERICAN POPULATION IS FALLING FAIRLYSTEADILY vBUT7ILMOTINDICATED SHEWOULDRE CHECKTHENUMBERS h7EVEMADEPROGRESS BUTTHEGAPS ARESTILLWAYTOOBIG v3KELLYSAID )N OTHER BUSINESS 4UESDAY SCHOOL BUDGETOFFICIAL#ATHY-AKSAIDBETTER THAN EXPECTED PROPERTY TAX REVENUE GROWTH FOR   ADDED   TOLASTYEARSBOTTOMLINE4HAT COM BINEDWITHBETTER THAN EXPECTEDEARLY PROPERTY TAXPROJECTIONSFOR  COULD MAKE A POSITIVE DIFFERENCE OF  MILLION FOR THE DISTRICTS  MILLIONOPERATINGBUDGET "UTSTEEPDECLINESINSTATEREVENUE OVER THE PAST FIVE YEARS MEANS THAT REVENUETOTHEDISTRICTISJUST  MORETHISYEARTHANFOURYEARSAGO #OMBINED WITH ENROLLMENT GROWTH THE RELATIVELY FLAT REVENUE SITUATION MEANS THAT REVENUE PER STUDENT ACTUALLY HAS DECLINED BY  PERCENT EXCLUDING LOCALLY RAISED FUNDSFROMTHE04!ANDTHEPARENT LEDINDEPENDENTFOUNDATION0ARTNERS IN%DUCATION0I%  h%VEN THOUGH OUR FINANCIAL PIC TUREHASIMPROVEDALITTLEBITITSVERY IMPORTANTTHATOURCOMMUNITYCON TINUE TO SUPPORT 0I% AND THE 04! ANDTHESCHOOLDISTRICTINTHECOMING YEARS v-AKSAID -AKSAIDHERCONSERVATIVEBUDGET ASSUMPTIONSALREADYHAVEACCOUNTED FORA PER STUDENTSTATEREVENUE

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SWITCHFROMhDEFINEDBENEFITvPLANS IN WHICH A RETIREE IS GUARANTEED CONSTANTANDPREDETERMINEDPENSION PAYMENTS TOhDEFINEDCONTRIBUTIONv PLANS IN WHICH PENSION PAYMENTS FLUCTUATEBASEDONPERFORMANCEOF #AL0%23 INVESTMENTS CANNOT BE LEGALLY IMPLEMENTED WITHOUT LEG ISLATIVE ASSISTANCE #OUNCILWOMAN +AREN(OLMANPOINTEDTOTHESELE GALBARRIERSASAMAJORREASONWHY THE CITY CANT MAKE THE TYPES OF SWEEPINGCHANGESRESIDENTSCALLFOR BUT SAID THE COUNCIL IS hDOING THE BESTWECANv 4HE COUNCIL APPROVED THE CON TRACTWITHTHEMANAGERSGROUPAFTER ALONG BROADANDEXTENSIVEDISCUS SION ABOUT THE 'RAND *URY REPORT ANDPENSIONREFORMINGENERAL4HE TOPICWILLRETURNTOTHESPOTLIGHTON 3EPT  WHEN MEMBERS CONSIDER FURTHER REFORMS 4HE MEETING WAS PROMPTED BY A COLLEAGUES MEMO FROM6ICE-AYOR'REG3CHARFFAND #OUNCILMEMBERS0AT"URT (OLMAN AND'REG3CHMID)NTHE*ULYMEMO THE COUNCIL QUARTET POINTED TO THE SWELLING EMPLOYEE BENEFITS WHICH COMPRISEDPERCENTOFSALARIESIN BUTINCREASEDTOPERCENTOF SALARIESIN 4HEMEMOURGED THECOUNCILTOhPROVIDEPOLICYDIREC TION REGARDING FUTURE REFORMS AND INNOVATION IN EMPLOYEE BENEFITS PENSIONS COMPENSATION AND OTHER

ELA proficiency

Ethnicity

English proficiency

2008

ASPECTSOFEMPLOYMENTv #OUNCILMAN ,ARRY +LEIN SAID 4UESDAYTHATAMONGTHEPOLICIESTHE CITYSHOULDCONSIDERATTHEHEARING ISWHETHERTHECITYSHOULDCONTINUE TOPROVIDEMEDICALCOVERAGETOEM PLOYEES FAMILIES (E NOTED THAT 0ALO!LTOISONEOFTHEFEWCITIESIN THEAREATHATHASSUCHAPOLICY /THER REFORMS THAT THE COUNCIL COULD CONSIDER IS MOVING TOWARD FIXED HEALTH BENEFIT CONTRIBUTIONS PROVIDING MORE EMPLOYEE CHOICE INHEALTHBENEFITSANDENCOURAGING CHANGESINSTATELAWTHATWOULDAL LOW0ALO!LTOTOESTABLISHAPENSION PLAN COMBINING DEFINED BENEFITS DEFINED CONTRIBUTIONS AND 3OCIAL 3ECURITY #HIEF&INANCIAL/FFICER,ALO0ER EZSAIDTHATWHILETHECITYCONTINUES TOFACEAMAJORCHALLENGEINCURBING THECOSTOFEMPLOYEEBENEFITS MUCH PROGRESSHASALREADYBEENMADE h) THINK WERE BEING PROGRESSIVE IN0ALO!LTO7EREBEINGLEADERS v 0EREZSAID 4HE CITY STILL FACES MAJOR CHAL LENGES WHEN IT COMES TO UNFUNDED LIABILITIES HESAID BUTITSNOTSTAND INGSTILL h7ERECOGNIZEITANDWERETAKING ACTION v0EREZSAIDN 3TAFF 7RITER 'ENNADY 3HEYNER CAN BE EMAILED AT GSHEYNER PAWEEKLYCOM

2012

Difference

Subgroup

Number on grade level/Total

Percent on grade level

Number on grade level/Total

Percent on grade level

Percent point change

African American

73/172

42.4%

81/130

62.3%

+19.9

Asian

1,199/1,281

93.6%

1,598/1,661

96.2%

+2.6

Hispanic

198/415

47.7%

318/502

63.3%

+15.6

White

2,143/2,369

90.5%

2,178/2,357

92.4%

+1.9

All others

180/230

78.2%

264/308

85.7%

+7.5

English only

2,686/3,065

87.6%

3,057/3,359

91.6%

+4.0

IFEP

461/508

90.7%

697/737

94.6%

+3.9

RFEP

514/619

83.0%

502/565

88.8%

+5.8

English learner

131/271

48.3%

175/309

56.6%

+8.3

ELA = English language arts IFEP = Initially fluent English proficient RFEP = Redesignated fluent English proficient

ONHOTLYDEBATEDEFFORTSTOIMPROVE HIGHSCHOOLCOUNSELINGPROGRAMS "OARD MEMBERS ASKED THAT AN IMPLEMENTATION DATE FOR REFORMS BE SPECIFIED RESULTING IN LANGUAGE CALLING FOR hCOMPARABLE AND HIGH QUALITY SERVICES AND OUTCOMES FOR THE SCHOOLYEARv

!MONGTHEOTHERGOALSWEREIMPLE MENTATIONOFTHEDISTRICTSNEWHOME WORKPOLICYANDRESULTSOFLASTYEARS %LEMENTARY -ATH 4ASK &ORCE AND CONTINUATIONOFTHEDISTRICTSEFFORTSTO hIMPROVE SOCIAL EMOTIONAL PHYSICAL HEALTHANDCONNECTEDNESSANDEXPAND USEOF$EVELOPMENTAL!SSETSv

4HE $EVELOPMENTAL !SSETS COM PRISE A WELLNESS FRAMEWORK DE VELOPED BY THE -INNESOTA BASED 3EARCH )NSTITUTE AND ADOPTED TWO YEARSAGOBYTHEDISTRICTN 3TAFF 7RITER #HRIS +ENRICK CAN BE EMAILED AT CKENRICK PAWEKLY COM

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Upfront

LEARN New Semester Starts September 8

For students who do not speak Mandarin at home Weekly at Jordan School (Wed or Sat), Fairmeadow School (Wed), Laurel School (Tues and Fri), Oak Knoll School (Thurs), Encinal School (Wed) Contact: Phyllis (650) 917-7907 for details

Hwa Shin Chinese School Established in 1995 750 N. California Ave., Palo Alto

www.hwashinschool.org

" b

Stanford University " b

280

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Arastradero Preserve (Palo Alto)

Caltrain Undercrossing

Page Mill Rd

Park Blvd Bike Blvd

El Camino Real

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Adobe Creek/ Hwy 101 overcrossing do

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Matadero Creek trail

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San Francisco Bay

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Stanford Research Park

Arastradero Road trail upgrades

£101

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Stanford Ave

INTERSTATE

City of East Palo Alto

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Arastradero Rd Charl

Baylands Preserve

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Stanford perimeter trail

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Unincorporated Santa Clara County

City of Palo Alto

San Fran cisco B ay Trail

City of ola Valley

Junipero S e rra Blvd

CITYS SECOND hBIKE BOULEVARDv ON 0ARK"OULEVARDMILLIONFORA NEWBIKE AND PEDESTRIANTRAILALONG -ATADERO#REEK WHICHWOULDLINK "RYANT3TREETAND'REER2OADAND   TO ENHANCE A TRAIL ALONG !RASTRADERO2OAD BETWEEN&OOTHILL %XPRESSWAYAND0URISSIMA2OADIN ,OS!LTOS(ILLS 4HE PROPOSAL WAS QUICKLY PUT TOGETHER BY CITY STAFF AND 3TANFORD OFFICIALS AFTER INITIAL DISAGREEMENTS ABOUT HOW THE FUNDS SHOULD BE SPENT #ITY PLANNERS ACKNOWLEDGED 4UESDAY THAT THEY HAVE MUCH WORK TO DO WHEN IT COMES TO PUBLIC OUT REACH "UT GIVEN THE TIGHT DEADLINE ˆTHEAPPLICATIONWASDUE4HURSDAY ˆTHEYURGEDTHECOUNCILTOSUPPORT THEAMBITIOUSPROPOSAL4WOOFTHE PROJECTSINTHEPROPOSALˆTHEBIKE BRIDGEAT!DOBE#REEKANDTHEhBIKE BOULEVARDvON0ARKˆAREKEYCOM PONENTSOFTHECITYSRECENTLYADOPTED "IKEAND0EDESTRIAN4RANSPORTATION 0LAN ADOCUMENTTHATAIMSTOTRANS FORM 0ALO !LTO INTO ONE OF THE NA

Proposed grant trail projects

Dish Rou te

(continued from page 3)

TIONSPREMIERBIKINGDESTINATIONS h7E THINK THIS IS A GREAT OPPOR TUNITYFORTHECITYTOHOPEFULLYKICK STARTOURNEWLYADOPTED"IKEAND0E DESTRIAN4RANSPORTATION0LANANDTO REALLYSIGNIFICANTLYFUNDTWOOFOUR MAJORPRIORITIES v0LANNING$IRECTOR #URTIS7ILLIAMSSAID4UESDAY 4HECOUNCILAGREEDANDVOTED  WITH#OUNCILMAN3ID%SPINOSAABSENT AND -AYOR 9IAWAY 9EH AND #OUN CILMAN ,ARRY +LEIN RECUSING THEM SELVES TOSUPPORTTHEAPPLICATION h)THINKTHATTHISISASTRONGGRANT APPLICATION v#OUNCILWOMAN.ANCY 3HEPHERDSAIDh)THINKITREALLYISA GREAT OPPORTUNITY FOR 0ALO !LTO TO SOLIDIFYOURDETERMINATIONTOGETOUR BICYCLEPATHSBUILTv (ER COLLEAGUES SHARED HER SENTI MENTS 6ICE -AYOR 'REG 3CHARFF SAIDHESVERYPLEASEDTHAT3TANFORD AND 0ALO !LTO WERE ABLE TO FORM A PARTNERSHIP #OUNCILWOMAN 'AIL 0RICEAGREED h) THINK AT THE END OF THE DAY A STRONG PARTNERSHIP AMONG ALL THE PARTIES IS VERY VERY IMPORTANT AND )THINKTHATWECANEACH INOUROWN WAY ACHIEVEOUTCOMESTHATWEJOINT LYWILLBEABLETOENJOY v0RICESAID

Map by Shannon Corey based on data from the City of Palo Alto

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4HEFIVEPROPOSEDTRAILPROJECTSWOULDCONNECTTOEXISTINGORPLANNEDPATHSAT3TANFORDORIN0ALO!LTO 4HEJOINTPROPOSALALSOEARNEDPLAU DITS FROM ANOTHER IMPORTANT STAKE HOLDER GROUP ˆ 3TANFORD CAMPUS RESIDENTS!LLYN4AYLOR VICEPRESIDENT OFTHE3TANFORD#AMPUS2ESIDENTIAL ,EASEHOLDERS SAIDHERGROUPWHICH IS ELECTED TO REPRESENT THE CAMPUS COMMUNITY FULLYBACKSTHEJOINTAP PLICATION4HEHOMEOWNERS SHESAID hARETHRILLEDTOBEWORKINGWITH0ALO !LTOvONTHEGRANTPROPOSAL h3TANFORD HOMEOWNERS ARE VERY MUCH IN SUPPORT OF THIS PROGRAM THATS BEEN OUTLINED TO YOU TODAY v 4AYLORTOLDTHECOUNCIL 4HE CAMPUS RESIDENTS HADNT AL WAYSSEENEYETOEYEWITHTHECITY ON THE RECREATION FUNDS 7HEN 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY 3UPERVISOR ,IZ+NISSPROPOSEDIN-AYTOUSE THE3TANFORDFUNDSTOPAYFOR0ALO !LTOS BIKE BRIDGE AND TO SPEND ANOTHER  MILLION EXTENDING THE $UMBARTONSECTIONOFTHE"AY4RAIL CAMPUSRESIDENTSPROTESTEDTHATTHE TWO PROJECTS ARE TOO DISTANT FROM THECAMPUS4HEYASKEDTHE"OARD OF3UPERVISORSTODELAYITSVOTEAND TOCONSIDEROTHERPROJECTS INCLUDING THE CAMPUS RESIDENTS PROPOSAL TO EXTENDTRAILSAROUNDTHE$ISH 5NIVERSITY OFFICIALS CONCURRED THATTHEPROCESSWASMOVINGTOOFAST ANDALSOASKEDTHECOUNTYSUPERVI SORS TO SET UP A MORE DELIBERATIVE PROCESSFOREVALUATINGVARIOUSGRANT REQUESTS4HE"OARDOF3UPERVISORS AGREEDANDISNOWSCHEDULEDTOHOLD

A PUBLIC HEARING ON THE GRANT PRO POSALSON/CT 4HECOUNTYISSUEDITSREQUESTFOR PROPOSALSIN!UGUST SAID*AIME2O DRIGUEZ 0ALO!LTOSCHIEFTRANSPOR TATIONOFFICIAL4HISLEFTTHECITYAND 3TANFORDWITHLESSTHANAMONTHTO PUTTOGETHERAGRANTAPPLICATION 4HE NEW PLAN DIFFERS MARKEDLY FROMTHEONE+NISSPITCHEDIN-AY 4HENEWGRANTPROPOSALINCLUDESA WIDER RANGE OF BIKE PROJECTS THAN THE PREVIOUS ONE )T ALSO INCLUDES THENETWORKOFTRAILSBYTHE$ISHFOR WHICH 3TANFORD CAMPUS RESIDENTS HAVELONGLOBBIED)TDOESNOT HOW EVER ASK FOR ANY FUNDS FOR THE  MILE$UMBARTONSECTIONINTHE3AN &RANCISCO "AY 4RAIL WHICH WOULD CONNECT2EDWOOD#ITYAND!LVISO 7ILLIAMS SAID THE CITY DECIDED NOT TO PURSUE THE $UMBARTON LINK BECAUSE THAT PROJECT WOULD LIE IN 3AN-ATEO#OUNTY WELLOUTSIDETHE CITYSJURISDICTION h4HE APPLICATION NEEDS TO COME FROM THE SPONSORING AGENCY AND WERE NOT THAT FOR THE "AY 4RAIL v 7ILLIAMS SAID h)TS NOT A PROJECT THATWEWOULDSPONSORANDBUILDv %VEN SO THE "AY 4RAIL PROJECT COULD COMPETE WITH THE ONES PRO POSED BY 0ALO !LTO AND 3TANFORD !DINA ,EVIN A MEMBER OF THE 3ILICON 6ALLEY "ICYCLE #OALITION SAIDTHE-IDPENINSULA/PEN3PACE $ISTRICTPLANSTOSUBMITITSOWNAP PLICATIONFORTHATPLAN4HEPROJECT

SHE SAID WOULD ADD VALUE TO THE 0ALO!LTOSECTIONSOFTHE"AY4RAIL BYMAKINGITPOSSIBLEFORPEOPLETO GETFROMTHECITYTO3AN-ATEOAND !LAMEDACOUNTIES "UTCOUNCILMEMBERSAGREEDTHAT THECITYWOULDHAVEABETTERSHOTAT GETTINGCOUNTYFUNDSWITHTHEPRO POSALOFFEREDBYSTAFFAND3TANFORD 2ODRIGUEZNOTEDTHATTHE$UMBAR TONTRAILISLOCATEDTOOFARFROMTHE OTHERELEMENTSINTHEPROPOSAL4HE ONES INCLUDED ON THE OTHER HAND ALL LINK TOGETHER IN ONE COHESIVE NETWORK4HEARGUMENTPROVEDCON VINCINGTOTHECOUNCIL h)THINKTHEMOSTIMPORTANTTHING ISPUTTINGOURBESTFOOTFORWARDAND MAKINGOURAPPLICATIONASSTRONGAS WECANMAKEIT v3CHARFFSAIDh4HE MOST IMPORTANT THING IS TO SECURE THEFUNDSTOMAKETHISAREALITYv 3OFAR THE$UMBARTONTRAILLINK ANDTHEBIKEBRIDGEARETHEONLYTWO PROJECTSTHATHAVEBEENEVALUATEDBY THECOUNTYSLEGALSTAFFANDDEEMED ACCEPTABLEUNDERTHECRITERIAOFTHE 'ENERAL5SE0ERMIT +NISSTOLDTHE 7EEKLY 4HURSDAY )T REMAINS TO BE SEEN SHE SAID WHETHER ALL THE PROJECTSINTHEJOINT0ALO!LTOAND 3TANFORD APPLICATION WILL LIKEWISE QUALIFYUNDERTHECONDITIONSOFTHE GENERAL USEPERMIT h7HEN ALL APPLICATIONS ARE IN STAFF WILL TAKE A LOOK AND DECIDE WHETHER OR NOT THEY WILL QUALIFY v +NISSSAIDN

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Tidal-gate repair in Baylands continues "AYLANDSHIKINGTRAILCLOSED&RIDAYWHILEWORKPROGRESSES by Sue Dremann POPULAR 0ALO !LTO "AYLANDS TRAIL WILL BE CLOSED &RIDAY 3EPT  WHILE CREWS CONTINUE TOREPAIRAHOLEBENEATHAFLOODGATE THATCAUSEDMOSQUITOESTOPROLIFERATE ASPOKESMANFORTHETHE3ANTA#LARA 6ALLEY7ATER$ISTRICTANNOUNCED #REWS WORKED ON 7EDNESDAY TO FILLTHEGAPINGHOLEWITHQUICK HARD ENINGCEMENTBUTCOULDNOTCOMPLETE THE WORK PRIOR TO HIGH TIDE DISTRICT SPOKESMAN-ARTY'RIMESSAID4HURS DAY-URKYWATERMADEESTIMATESOF THE DEPTH OF THE HOLE UNKNOWABLE BUT 7EDNESDAYS WORK SIGNIFICANTLY REDUCEDTHEFLOWOFTIDEWATER DISTRICT

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This space donated as Community Service by the Palo Alto Weekly

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OFFICIALSANNOUNCED 4HE TIDAL GATES IN THE 0ALO !LTO &LOOD "ASIN REGULATE WATER ALLOW ING HABITATS FOR WILDLIFE TO FLOUR ISH AND PROTECTING 0ALO !LTO FROM FLOODING BY THE -ATADERO !DOBE AND "ARRON CREEKS DURING HEAVY RAINSANDHIGH TIDEEVENTS 4IDES OVER TIME HAVE WASHED AWAY SAND AND SEDIMENT FROM BE NEATHTHEGATE CAUSINGABASKETBALL SIZED HOLE UNDERNEATH ACCORDING TOTHEDISTRICT0OOLINGWATERFROM TIDAL FLOWS ALLOWED DORMANT SALT MARSH MOSQUITO EGGS TO HATCH IN LARGENUMBERSANDCAUSEDASWELLOF

MOSQUITOBITESONLOCALRESIDENTS )F THE SEEPAGE WERE TO PERSIST IT COULDTHREATENTHETIDAL GATESCONCRETE FOUNDATION DISTRICTOFFICIALSSAID 7ATER DISTRICTCONTRACTORSPLANNED TOPUMPANADDITIONALCUBICYARDS OFFAST SETTINGCONCRETEINTOTHEHOLE DURINGLOWTIDEBETWEENAMAND PM&RIDAY)FTHATDOESNTFILLTHE HOLE WORKWILLCONTINUENEXTWEEK 'RIMESSAID !MOREPERMANENTFIXHASNOTYET BEEN DEVELOPED BUT IT IS PLANNED 4HE GATES WHICH WERE BUILT IN THE LATES ARENOTWEAKENEDINANY WAY OFFICIALSSAIDN


Upfront

Neighborhoods

!ROUNDUPOFNEIGHBORHOODNEWSEDITEDBY3UE$REMANN

AROUND THE BLOCK

CALIFORNIA AVENUE NEW AND IMPROVED ... The City of Palo Alto will hold a community meeting regarding the California Avenue Transit Hub Corridor Streetscape project on Thursday, Sept. 20, from 6:30 to 8 p.m. The city will show the latest concept plan and will solicit public input on the selection and placement of streetscape furniture, benches, bicycle parking, color palettes for sidewalk treatments and new planting material. The meeting will take place at the Palo Alto Unified School District, Conference Room A, 25 Churchill Ave. More information on this project is available at www.cityofpaloalto.org/calave; transportation@cityofpaloalto.org or by calling the Transportation Division at 329-2520. ICE CREAM SOCIAL ... Midtown, one of Palo Alto’s largest neighborhoods, will host its annual Midtown Ice Cream and Issues social, on Sunday, Sept. 16, from 1 to 4 p.m. at Hoover Park, 2901 Cowper St., Palo Alto. Festivities include ice cream scooped by Palo Alto City Council and Board of Education candidates, Palo Alto Firefighters chili, Palo Alto Fire Department engine, children’s activities, a book giveaway, and Palo Alto Police Lt. De Santigo and his canine police dog. Midtown neighborhood residents are invited and can email MidtownNews@att.net for more information. N

3END ANNOUNCEMENTS OF NEIGHBORHOOD EVENTS MEET INGSANDNEWSTO3UE$REMANN .EIGHBORHOODS EDITOR AT SDREMANN PAWEEKLYCOM /R TALK ABOUT YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD NEWS ON 4OWN 3QUARE AT WWW 0ALO!LTO/NLINECOM

Veronica Weber

BRING YOUR PIC-A-NIC BASKETS ... The College Terrace Residents’ Association (CTRA) is sponsoring its annual fall picnic on Saturday, Sept. 15, from 3 to 6 p.m., in Mayfield Park, next to the historic College Terrace Library on Wellesley Street. This year entertainer Daffy Dave will perform from 4 to 5 p.m. All residents of the College Terrace neighborhood are welcome and are asked to bring a dish to share as well as personal utensils, plates and cups. Hot dogs, veggie burgers and lemonade will be provided by the CTRA. More information is available by emailing board@ctra.org.

.EXTTOATHRIVINGMAGNOLIATREE THEONEONTHERIGHTWHICHHASLOSTITSLEAVES ISAMONGTHEPERCENTTHATCOULDBEREPLACEDSOON

#2%3#%.40!2+

Palo Alto’s majestic magnolias taking a beating !BOUTPERCENTOFTHE5NIVERSITY!VENUE TREESCOULDBEDYING by Sue Dremann BOUT  OF 5NIVERSITY !V ENUES STATELY MAGNOLIA TREES MIGHTHAVETOBEREMOVEDTHIS YEAR DUE TO DECLINING HEALTH 0ALO !LTO 5RBAN &ORESTER 7ALTER 0ASS MORESAIDTHISWEEK 4HEAVENUESMAGNOLIAS WHICH DISPLAYSTRIKING LEMON SCENTEDWHITE BLOOMS AGAINST DARK GREEN FOLIAGE ARE SHOWING SIGNS OF STRESS DUE TO CONSTANT NEARBYTRAFFICANDPOORSOIL CONDITIONS$RIVINGALONG5NIVERSITY PASSERSBYCANSEETREESWITHWITHER INGLEAVES3OMEAPPEARDEAD h4HE GOOD NEWS IS THERE IS NO CATASTROPHIC DISEASE STRIKING THE 5NIVERSITY!VENUEMAGNOLIATREES v 0ASSMORESAID (OWEVER h5NIVERSITY !VENUE IS AWELL USEDANDDEVELOPEDCORRIDOR WHERE TREES HAVE SIGNIFICANT CHAL LENGESTOTHRIVE4HEYCOMPETEWITH ROAD SIDEWALK UTILITIES LANDSCAPES

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ANDBUILDINGSFORSPACE vHESAID 0ASSMORESAIDTHE5NIVERSITY!V ENUETREESAREMOSTLYBETWEENTHREE ANDYEARSOLD WITHTHEAVERAGE AGE OF  TO  YEARS 4HEIR ROOTS HAVEOUTGROWNTHEIRSPACE ANDSOIL ISPOORINSOMEAREAS MAKINGITDIF FICULTFORROOTSTOABSORBWATERAND NUTRIENTS 4O ACCOMMODATE TRAFFIC SOMETREESREQUIREMOREFREQUENTOR MORE EXTENSIVE PRUNING 0ASSMORE SAID4HESTRESSWEAKENSTREESIM MUNE SYSTEMS MAKING THEM LESS ABLETODEFENDAGAINSTDECAYORGAN ISMS INSECTSANDDISEASES 7HAT COULD IMPROVE THEIR SITUA TION h-ORE VOLUME OF HIGH QUALITY SOIL COMBINED WITH COMPREHENSIVE MAINTENANCEWILLGROWBETTERTREES v 0ASSMORESAID #ITY STAFF IS CURRENTLY ASSESSING ALL THE TREES ALONG 5NIVERSITY !V

ENUE4HISWINTERWORKERSWILLSTART ONMAINTENANCE-OSTTREESWILLBE PRUNED BUTSOMEINPOORCONDITION WILL BE REMOVED .EW MAGNOLIAS WILLBEPLANTEDWHERESPACEISAVAIL ABLE HESAID 4HE TREES WILL BE ASSESSED ON A LIST OF FACTORS INCLUDING CONDITION RISK SIZE LOCATIONANDPOSSIBILITYTO REPLANT 0ASSMOREASSERTEDTHAT BASEDON PUBLIC INPUT WORKERS COULD TREAT TREES WITH QUESTIONABLE HEALTH OR DEFERTHEIRREMOVAL AFTERRISKSTOTHE PUBLICAREREDUCED4HETREESWOULD BETAKENOUTANDREPLACEDONEATA TIMERATHERTHANENMASSE HESAID (EPLANSTOREACHOUTTOTHECOM MUNITY ONCE ASSESSMENT IS COM PLETE #ATHERINE -ARTINEAU EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR OF #ANOPY WHICH IS DEDI CATEDTOPROTECTINGTHEURBANFOREST SAID THE ICONIC 5NIVERSITY !VENUE TREESAREONEOFTHEFEWSTANDSTHE CITYREPLACESWITHTHESAMESPECIES SHESAID h4HEY CREATE SUCH AN AMAZING

SENSE OF PLACE v -ARTINEAU OB SERVED 0ALO!LTOHASATOTALOF-AG NOLIA GRANDIFLORA TREES THROUGHOUT THECITY 4HE TREES ARE RUMORED TO HAVE BEEN PLANTED BECAUSE THE WIFE OF THE FIRST PUBLIC WORKS DIRECTOR WAS FROMTHE3OUTH WHICHCOULDEXPLAIN WHYTHEREARESOMANYPLANTED"UT -ARTINEAUSAIDSHEHASNEVERBEEN ABLETOVERIFYTHESTORY .ATIVETOTHESOUTHEASTERN5NITED 3TATESFROM6IRGINIATOCENTRAL&LOR IDA AND WEST TO EASTERN 4EXAS AND /KLAHOMA THE SO CALLED 3OUTHERN MAGNOLIA IS FOUND ON THE EDGES OF WATERWAYS AND SWAMPS IN MOIST BUTWELL DRAINEDSOILS)TCANGROW TOALARGETREE WITHSOMEMAGNIFI CENTSPECIMENSIN-ISSISSIPPIHAV ING REACHED  FEET IN HEIGHT AC CORDING TO THE 53 $EPARTMENT OF !GRICULTURE4HEREAREATLEAST CULTIVATEDVARIETIESN 3TAFF 7RITER 3UE $REMANN CAN BEEMAILEDATSDREMANN PAWEEK LYCOM

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A Neighbor’s Obligation to Pay for a Fence All too often disputes arise between owners directly adjacent to one another regarding the cost of replacing an old fence. Almost all fences are considered ďŹ xtures because they are attached to the ground, as opposed to resting on its surface. Since most fences are ďŹ xtures, they can’t necessarily be moved, added to, or dismantled by the owner anytime the owner wants to (because of building codes, recorded covenants, etc.). Not surprisingly, most disputes between adjoining landowners concerning fences do involve fences that are on the boundary. Civil Code 841, which regulates these so-called “division fences,â€? provides that “Coterminous owners are mutually bound equally to maintain: (1) the boundaries and monuments between them; (2) the

fences between them, unless one of them chooses to let his land lie without fencing; in which case, if he afterwards encloses it, he must refund to the other a just proportion of the value, at that time, of any division fence made by the latter.� Thus, neighbors have a mutual, equal duty to maintain fences that are located on the boundary between them, and neither one can alter or move the fence without the other’s permission Thus adjoining owners need to agree on how to maintain or to erect and maintain the common fence. This agreement is not required to be in writing. An oral agreement of this kind is binding upon the parties and such of their successors in title as have notice or when recognized and acted upon by the participating parties until repudiated.

If you have a real estate question or would like a free market analysis for your home, please call me at 650-384-5392, Alain Pinel Realtors, or email me at scullen@apr.com. For the latest news, follow my blog at www.samiacullen.com.

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OPERASJ.ORG 408.437.4450


Upfront %-%2'%.#902%0!2%$.%33

Focus of annual Quakeville shifts to Cubberley

COMMUNITY TALK: PROSTATE CANCER

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Stanford Cancer Center invites you to come learn more about prostate cancer, including: r

Prostate Cancer Screening and Watchful Waiting

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Update on Surgical Prostate Cancer Treatments

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New Treatments for Metastatic Prostate Cancer

Stanford’s prostate cancer experts will provide information and answer your questions.

SATURDAY, SEPTEMBER 8 t 9:30AM – 11:00AM Sheraton Palo Alto (Reception Room) 625 El Camino Real r Palo Alto, CA HOSPITALS

RSVP at: stanfordhospital.org/prostatehealth This event is free and open to the public. Breakfast will be served. Please register, seating is limited.

NATIONAL CANCER

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Upfront #/--5.)49

Palo Alto’s social calendar packed in September $OZENSOFCOMMUNITYEVENTSAREUNDERWAY

For a complete list of classes and class fees, lectures and health education resources, visit pamf.org/healtheducation.

Sept. 2012

Memory Loss, Dementia and Alzheimer’s Disease: The Basics Tuesday, Sept. 11, 7 to 8:30 p.m. Palo Alto Center 795 El Camino Real, Palo Alto

Presented by Edie Yau, M.A. Director of Diversity, Alzheimer’s Association 650-853-4873

Attendees will learn about the differences between normal aging and dementia, the basics of Alzheimer’s disease and related disorders, the diagnostic process, and management of the disease. Additional topics consist of community resources including the Alzheimer’s Association, planning for the future, and how family members and caregivers can help the person with dementia.

Understanding Hypertension Tuesday, Sept. 25, 12:45 to 1:45 p.m. Sunnyvale City Senior Center 550 E. Remington Drive, Sunnyvale

Presented by Aarti Srinivasan, M.D. PAMF Internal Medicine No registration needed, however, email can be sent to nhextell@ci.sunnyvale.ca.us

Hypertension is prevalent, affecting over 60% of older Americans. We’ll review the deďŹ nition of “hypertension,â€? lifestyle changes and modiďŹ cations that lower blood pressure, as well as common medications used to treat blood pressure. We’ll talk briey about other risk factors, such as diabetes, and cholesterol, that can exist along with blood pressure and increase one’s risk for heart disease.

Upcoming Lectures and Workshops October

November

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facebook.com/paloaltomedicalfoundation twitter.com/paloaltomedical pamfblog.org

Scan this code with your smartphone for more health education information. Get the free mobile scanner app at http://gettag.mobi.

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Upfront

News Digest

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Stanford appoints online-learning vice provost

Palo Alto teens arrested for arson 4WOTEENAGEBOYSWHOALLEGEDLYSETA FOOT HIGHORANGEPLASTICCON STRUCTIONFENCEANDA+RISPY+REMEDOUGHNUTBOXABLAZEAT*ORDAN-ID DLE3CHOOLWEREARRESTED3ATURDAY 3EPT FORARSON 0ALO!LTOPOLICE 3GT+ARA!PPLESAID !PASSERBYSAWTHEBOYS AGESAND NEARTHESMOKEANDFLAMES ATABOUTAMANDCALLEDPOLICE/FFICERSSTOPPEDTHETEENSABOUT ABLOCKAWAYFROMTHESITEANDLOCATEDLIGHTERSTHATPOLICEBELIEVEWERE USEDTOSTARTTHEFIRES !PPLESAID 4HEPLASTICFENCESURROUNDSALARGECONSTRUCTIONAREAINTHECENTEROF CAMPUS.OSTRUCTURESWEREDAMAGED BUTTHEFENCEWASMELTEDINPLACES SHESAID 4HETEENSAREDESCRIBEDONLYASLOCALYOUTH4HEYWERECITEDFORARSON AND WERE RELEASEDTO THEIRPARENTS 4HE YEAR OLD WASALSOCITED FOR POSSESSIONOFROLLINGPAPERS WHICHISILLEGALFORMINORS SHESAID3ANTA #LARA#OUNTY*UVENILE0ROBATION3ERVICESWILLREVIEWTHECASEN

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Laurene Powell Jobs joins Stanford trustees 0ALO!LTORESIDENTANDEDUCATIONREFORMLEADER,AURENE0OWELL*OBS HASBEENELECTEDTOTHE3TANFORD5NIVERSITY"OARDOF4RUSTEES THEUNI VERSITYANNOUNCED7EDNESDAY 3EPT 0OWELL*OBS WHOEARNEDA3TANFORD-"!IN WILLBEGINAFIVE YEAR3TANFORDBOARDTERM/CT4HEWIDOWOF!PPLECOFOUNDER3TEVE *OBS 0OWELL*OBSHASLONGBEENACTIVEINEDUCATIONREFORMANDSOCIAL JUSTICEISSUES h(ER FAMILIARITY WITH 3TANFORD COMBINED WITH EXTENSIVE EXPERIENCE WITHANDPOWERFULCOMMITMENTTOSUPPORTINGSOCIALENTREPRENEURSAND ORGANIZATIONS WORKING ON BEHALF OF UNDERSERVED STUDENTS WILL GREATLY STRENGTHENTHEBOARD v3TANFORDBOARDCHAIR3TEVEN!$ENNINGSAID 0OWELL*OBSISTHEFOUNDERANDCHAIROFTHE%MERSON#OLLECTIVE WHICH SUPPORTSSOCIALENTREPRENEURSANDORGANIZATIONSWORKINGINEDUCATION SOCIALJUSTICEANDCONSERVATION2ECENTLYTHEGROUPHASWORKEDTOHELP PASSTHE$REAM!CT FEDERALLEGISLATIONTOCREATEAPATHFORUNDOCUMENTED STUDENTSTOEARNCITIZENSHIP 3HEISALSOBOARDPRESIDENTOF#OLLEGE4RACK ANAFTER SCHOOLPROGRAM SHECOFOUNDEDINTOPREPAREUNDERSERVEDHIGHSCHOOLSTUDENTSFOR SUCCESSINCOLLEGE4HEPROGRAM WHICHBEGANIN%AST0ALO!LTO NOW SERVESSTUDENTSIN/AKLAND 3AN&RANCISCO .EW/RLEANS ,OS!NGELES AND!URORA #OLO 0OWELL*OBS AMEMBEROFTHE#OUNCILON&OREIGN2ELATIONS ALSOSERVES ONTHEBOARDSOF.EW3CHOOLS6ENTURE&UNDAND#ONSERVATION)NTERNA TIONAL3HEALSOHASSERVEDONTHEBOARDOF4EACHFOR!MERICAN

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ˆ%RIC6AN3USTEREN LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

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Upfront

High Holy Days 5773 with Keddem Congregation Everyone is welcome to attend our High Holy Day services at no charge, as space permits. Advance reservations required. Keddem is a community-led, Reconstructionist Jewish congregation, passionately committed to infusing tradition with new meaning. Elisheva Salamo, Rabbi

Main services in the Cultural Center (Theater) of the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center, 3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto.

Rosh Hashanah Sun, Sept 16, 7:30 pm Evening Service Mon, Sept 17, 9:30 am 1st Day Morning Service 9:45 am Junior Congregation; 10 am Young Children’s Celebration Tues, Sept 18, 9:30 am 2nd Day at Kehillah Jewish HS

Reserve online at www.Keddem.org

Veronica Weber

Yom Kippur

Tues, Sept 25, 7 pm Kol Nidrey (and food drive) Wed, Sept 26, 9:30 am Morning Service 650-494-6400 9:45 am Junior Congregation; 10 am Young Children’s Celebration hhd_reservations@Keddem.org 5 pm Mincha, Yizkor, Ne’ilah

A pooch with panache $ENICE3OUZA AGROOMERAT!LEXANDERS$OG'ROOMINGIN0ALO !LTO WORKSONTRIMMING,ULASCOATATTHESALONON!UG L U C I L E PA C K A R D

C H I L D R E N ’ S H O S P I TA L

PROVIDED BY LUCILE PACKARD CHILDREN’S HOSPITAL

Your Child’s Health University Lucile Packard Children’s Hospital offers classes and seminars designed to foster good health and enhance the lives of parents and children. CHILD CPR & FIRST AID Designed for parents and care-givers of children one year of age to adolescence, this class will cover cardio-pulmonary resuscitation techniques, choking and ďŹ rst aid for common childhood injuries. - Saturday, October 13: 9:00 am – 12:00 pm

GRANDPARENTS SEMINAR Designed for new and expectant grandparents, this class examines changes in labor and delivery practices, the latest recommendations for infant care and the unique role of grandparents in the life of their grandchild. - Sunday, October 21: 3:00 pm – 5:00 pm

MOTHERS OF SONS: THE JOYS AND CHALLENGES OF GUIDING YOUR SON THROUGH ADOLESCENCE Robert Lehman, MD, co-creator of the “Heart to Heart� program will host an evening just for mothers of adolescent sons. This seminar is a primer for mothers on the changes a boy experiences in adolescence and how mothers can help guide them. - Tuesday, October 23: 7:00 pm – 8:30 pm

PREPARING FOR MULTIPLES Are you expecting twins, or triplets or more? With the potential for early delivery, expectant parents of multiples are encouraged to learn everything there is to know about carrying and delivering multiple infants. - Sunday, October 28: 12:00 pm – 4:30 pm

Call (650) 724-4601 or visit calendar.lpch.org to register or obtain more information on the times, locations and fees for these and other courses.

Online This Week

These and other news stories were posted on Palo Alto Online throughout the week. For longer versions, go to www.PaloAltoOnline.com/news or click on “News� in the left, green column.

Police anticipate heavy traffic this weekend 4HE0ALO!LTO0OLICE$EPARTMENTHASISSUEDTWOTRAFFICADVISORIES FOR THIS WEEKEND 4HE 3TANFORD FOOTBALL GAME 3ATURDAY 3EPT  AT PMISEXPECTEDTOCAUSEHEAVYTRAFFICON%MBARCADERO2OAD %L #AMINO2EALAND3AND(ILL2OAD POLICESAID(Posted Sept. 6 at 2:41 p.m.)

Downed phone lines snarl traffic on Highway 101 4RAFFIC IN BOTH DIRECTIONS WAS DISRUPTED FOR ABOUT  MINUTES ON 53(IGHWAYIN2EDWOOD#ITYTHISMORNINGAFTERPHONELINESFELL ACROSSTHEROADWAY A#ALIFORNIA(IGHWAY0ATROLOFFICERSAID (Posted Sept. 6 at 12:18 p.m.)

U.S. Marshals, CHP arrest teen in East Palo Alto !TEENBOYBELIEVEDTOHAVEBEENONEOFTWOPEOPLEINACARTHAT RAMMEDANDSHOTATA#ALIFORNIA(IGHWAY0ATROLVEHICLEIN/AKLAND EARLIERTHISSUMMERWASARRESTEDIN%AST0ALO!LTO7EDNESDAY 3EPT  POLICESAID(Posted Sept. 6 at 8:19 a.m.)

Party crasher fires shots at Menlo Park house !3AN*OSEMANWASARRESTED3ATURDAYMORNING 3EPT ONSIXCOUNTS OF ATTEMPTED MURDER AFTER HE ALLEGEDLY FIRED SHOTS AT A HOUSE IN THE .ORTH&AIR/AKSAREAWHEREHEHADBEENKICKEDOUTOFAPARTY ACCORD INGTOTHE3AN-ATEO#OUNTY3HERIFFS/FFICE(Posted Sept. 4 at 11:22 a.m.)

Federal drug charges filed against Palo Alto man 0ERRY-OSDROMOS A0ALO!LTOMANWHOWASARRESTEDON*UNEFOR SELLING WORTHOFSTEROIDSANDPRESCRIPTIONMEDICATIONSTHROUGH HIS-ENLO0ARKBODYBUILDINGBUSINESS WASARRESTEDANDCHARGEDBY FEDERALAGENTSFORTHECRIMESON!UG(Posted Sept. 4 at 9:41 a.m.)

Fight leads to stabbing in East Palo Alto ! YEAR OLDBOYWASARRESTEDINCONNECTIONWITHASTABBINGTHAT SERIOUSLYINJUREDANUNIDENTIFIEDMANIN%AST0ALO!LTOEARLY-ONDAY MORNING 3EPT POLICESAID(Posted Sept. 3 at 11:10 a.m.)

Man killed in Middlefield Road crash identified !MANWHOWASKILLEDWHENHISCARDRIFTEDOFFOF-IDDLEFIELD2OAD IN 0ALO !LTO -ONDAY MORNING HAS BEEN IDENTIFIED THE 3ANTA #LARA #OUNTY#ORONERS/FFICESAIDON4UESDAY(Posted Sept. 3 at 11 a.m.)

Palo Alto electronics burglars face prosecution 4WO MEN ACCUSED OF STEALING HIGH END ELECTRONICS TO SELL ONLINE INCLUDINGFROM0ALO!LTOBUSINESSES WILLBEPROSECUTEDBYTHESTATE #ALIFORNIA!TTORNEY'ENERAL+AMALA(ARRISANNOUNCED&RIDAY !UG (Posted Sept. 3 at 11 a.m.)

Stanford, PAMF unit fined in administrative errors 3TANFORD5NIVERSITY(OSPITALAND-ENLO0ARK3URGICAL(OSPITAL A UNITOFTHE0ALO!LTO-EDICAL&OUNDATION WEREAMONG#ALIFORNIA HOSPITALSCITED4HURSDAY !UG AFTERTHE#ALIFORNIA$EPARTMENTOF 0UBLIC(EALTHFOUNDVIOLATIONSOFLICENSINGREQUIREMENTSTHAThCAUSED ORWERE LIKELYTOCAUSE SERIOUSINJURYORDEATHTOPATIENTSv (Posted VI S IT LP CH.ORG TO S IG N U P FOR CLAS S E S Page 12ĂŠUĂŠ-iÂŤĂŒi“LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

Aug. 31 at 9:56 a.m.)


Upfront

CityView A round-up of

Palo Alto government action this week

City Council (Sept. 4)

Trails: The council voted to submit a joint application with Stanford University seeking $10.4 million in Santa Clara County funds for a host of recreational improvements, including a new bike bridge over Highway 101 and a system of trails around the Stanford Dish. Yes: Burt, Holman, Price, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd Absent: Espinosa Recused: Klein, Yeh Contract: The council approved a new contract with the management and professionals group. The agreement includes greater employee contributions toward pension and health care and a 3 percent increase in base salary. Yes: Burt, Holman, Klein, Price, Scharff, Schmid, Shepherd, Yeh Absent: Espinosa

Board of Education (Sept. 4)

Ballot propositions: The board voted to endorse Propositions 30 and 38, both education-funding propositions on California’s November ballot. Yes: Klausner, Tom, Townsend Abstain: Mitchell Absent: Caswell 2012-13 priorities: The board voted on a list of district “focused goals� for 201213, including implementation of the district’s new homework policy and Elementary Math Task Force results and efforts toward student social-emotional health. Action: Unanimous Student achievement: The board heard a report on 2012 California Standards (STAR) Test results for elementary and middle school students, including an analysis on progress in narrowing the achievement gap among ethnic and socioeconomic subgroups. Action: None

Utilities Advisory Commission (Sept. 5)

Electric: The commission discussed recommending the City Council appoint a citizen-advisory committee to solicit community input about the city’s electric undergrounding policy. Yes: Eglash, Foster, Hall Absent: Chang, Cook, Melton Abstain: Waldfogel Power:The commission voted to recommend approving a power-purchase agreement with Brannon Solar, LLC, for up to 52,000 megawatt hours per year of energy over 25 years at a cost not to exceed $91 million. Yes: Eglash, Foster, Hall, Waldfogel Absent: Chang, Cook, Melton

Architectural Review Board (Sept. 6)

Stanford Shopping Center: The board discussed a request by Macy’s Inc., for a new three-story commercial development at the Bloomingdale’s site at Stanford Shopping Center. The board did not vote on the project but expressed concern about the height of the proposed building. Action: None

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at PaloAltoOnline.com

Public Agenda A preview of Palo Alto government meetings next week CITY COUNCIL ... The council plans to hold a joint meeting with the Parks and Recreation Commission; discuss a proposed planned-community project at 395 Page Mill Road and 3045 Park Boulevard that may involve a new public-safety building; and consider a colleagues’ memo from Mayor Yiaway Yeh, Vice Mayor Greg Scharff and Councilman Larry Klein urging opposition to Measure C. The joint session will begin at 6 p.m. on Monday, Sept. 10, in the Council Conference Room. Regular meeting will follow in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL POLICY AND SERVICES COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to hear the quarterly audit report from Office of the City Auditor; discuss the status of audit recommendations and discuss the city’s economic development policy. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Tuesday, Sept. 11, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). PLANNING AND TRANSPORTATION COMMISSION ... The commission plans to discuss the city’s capital-improvement program; the proposed Transportation Citywide Survey, which is designed to collect comprehensive data on travel and transportation patterns in the city; and the San Francisquito Creek Joint Powers Authority’s proposed initial flood-protection project. The meeting will begin at 6 p.m. on Wednesday, Sept. 12, in the Council Chambers at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). COUNCIL RAIL COMMITTEE ... The committee plans to hear an update on Caltrain’s grade crossing and track analysis, consider possible revisions to the Rail Committee’s guiding principles and discuss a press release updating the community on rail-related issues. The meeting will begin at 8:30 a.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.). HUMAN RELATIONS COMMISSION ... The commission plans to review the Consolidated Annual Performance and Evaluation Report, appoint mediators to the Palo Alto Mediation Program, and consider a resolution by Santa Clara County Move to Amend that corporations are not people and money is not speech. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. on Thursday, Sept. 13, in the Council Conference Room at City Hall (250 Hamilton Ave.).

Marijuana

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City of Palo Alto ENVIRONMENTAL IMPACT REPORT NOTICE OF PREPARATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto Department of Public Works intends to prepare an Environmental Impact Report under the California Environmental Quality Act for the project listed below. A Scoping Meeting will be held September 18, 2012 from 6:30 PM to 9:00 PM at Palo Verde Elementary School Multi-Purpose Room, 3450 Louis Road, Palo Alto, CA 94303. An Environmental Assessment under the National Environmental Policy Act will also be prepared. Scoping comments will be accepted beginning September 19, 2012 through October 18, 2012 at the following email pwecips@cityofpaloalto.org or by mail at the following address: c/o Elizabeth Ames, Palo Alto Department of Public Works, 250 Hamilton Avenue, Palo Alto, California 94301. Highway 101 Pedestrian/Bicycle Overcrossing PE-11011: is proposed by the City of Palo Alto and would build a year-round, grade-separated pedestrian and bicycle crossing of Highway 101 connecting south Palo Alto neighborhoods with the Baylands Nature Preserve and recreational and employment opportunities. The overcrossing is generally proposed as a 12-18’ wide pedestrian and bicycle bridge which would include a minimum 10’ wide travelway that would allow for a shared facility. Several alternative alignments will be proposed and considered. Potential environmental impacts could include changes to the visual landscape, biological impacts to surrounding wetlands and, temporary impacts during construction from noise, increased trafďŹ c and potential disruption to utilities. Curtis Williams, Director of Planning and Community Environment Persons with disabilities who require auxiliary aids or services in using City facilities, services or programs or who would like information on the City’s compliance with Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) of 1990 may contact (650) 329-2550. Sign language interpreters will be provided upon request with 72 hours advance notice. ĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°VÂœÂ“ĂŠUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠ-iÂŤĂŒi“LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 13


Wilford Walter Noeller Oct. 19, 1924-Aug. 22, 2012 Wilford W. (Bill) Noeller, 87, a 62-year resident of Palo Alto, died peacefully at home on Aug. 22. He was born Oct. 19, 1924, in Hughson, Calif., and grew up on the family ranch on the Tuolumne River. Bill served in the Navy as a Pharmacist’s Mate aboard ship and in Guadalcanal during World War II. He earned an A.A. degree in Agriculture at Modesto Junior College after the war, and received his private pilot’s license. In 1949 he married Betty Jane Reeves of Turlock, Calif. They moved to Palo Alto in 1950 when Bill began working as a Palo Alto Police Officer. In 1956 he went to work at Hewlett-Packard, retiring from HP after 31 years. Bill was an outdoorsman all his life, hiking the John Muir Trail, fishing in the Sierras and Carmel Valley, and rafting the Grand Canyon. After retirement he enjoyed walking at Rancho San Antonio and the Palo Alto Baylands. He remodeled his own and his daughter’s home, and built a cabin in Felton. Bill also went with his family on many road trips throughout the west, as well as to the East Coast and Alaska. Bill is survived by his daughter, Linda Dillon of Palo Alto; daughter and son-in-law, Jennie Noeller and George Paulsen of Los Altos; granddaughters, Janet Dillon Owen, Katie Dillon Pfenninger, Elizabeth Paulsen, Lindsay Dillon and Caroline Paulsen; grandson-in-law, Marc Pfenninger; great-grandsons, Cameron Owen, Cooper Owen and Max Pfenninger; and brother, Francis Noeller of Hughson. He was predeceased by his wife Betty Noeller and his brother Fritz Noeller. A memorial service will be held Sunday, Sept. 9, at 2 p.m. at St. Mark’s Episcopal Church, 600 Colorado Ave., Palo Alto. Memorial donations may be made to the Sempervirens Fund. Link: http://www.sempervirens.org/donate.php

Transitions Deaths

Carole Hansen Lusebrink After a prolonged illness, longtime Palo Alto resident Carole Hansen Lusebrink died Aug. 23 in Davis, Calif. She was born in Provo, Utah, on Dec. 2, 1929, and is the daughter of George H. and Afton Allred Hansen. After graduating from Lincoln High School and Brigham Young University, she taught Home Economics in Richland, Wash., where she met William Nels “Bill” Lusebrink of Walnut Creek, Calif. They were married in Provo on Jan. 26, 1953.

After living in Washington, they moved to California in 1958 and settled in Palo Alto in 1961, where Bill worked for Stanford University. They lived in the same Palo Alto home for 43 years. Preceding her in death were her two brothers, Don and Alan Hansen. She is survived by her sister, Helen Warnock; her husband, Bill; son, Karl, and daughter-in-law, Rita; son, Glen, and daughter-in-law, Jody; and three grandchildren. A memorial celebrating her life will be held Saturday, Sept. 8, at 3 p.m. in the auditorium at the University Retirement Community in Davis, Calif. Interment will be at East Lawn Memorial Hills in Provo, Utah, at a date to be announced. Charitable contributions in her honor can be made to the American Diabetes Association at www. diabetes.org.

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Richard Lyman A memorial service will be held for former Stanford President Richard Lyman on Tuesday, Oct. 2, at 3 p.m. at Stanford Memorial Church. A reception will follow from 4 to 6 p.m. at the Stanford Faculty Club. Lyman, whose tenure as provost and later president of Stanford University spanned a tumultuous period of student protest over the Vietnam War, weapons research and civil rights, died May 27 of congestive heart failure. He was 88.

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OBITUARY

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Philip Stein

Lasting Memories

March 16, 1932 – August 20, 2012 Dr. Philip M. Stein, Bay Area psychiatrist and psychoanalyst, fanatical tennis player, and loving husband, father, and grandfather, died on August 20, 2012, after contending with Parkinson’s disease for twenty-four years. Phil, known as “Big Phil” by family and friends, was born in Brooklyn in 1932, the youngest of seven children. As a kid, Phil inhabited the streets of East New York, playing stickball, handball, and sandlot baseball (he pitched). His father, Jacob, passed when Phil was seventeen, and Phil went to work to take care of his mother, Rebecca. He attended City College of New York and Brooklyn College at night, and was graduated Magna Cum Laude and Phi Beta Kappa. Phil met Bonnie Miller, of Forest Hills, New York, in 1954, and they were married two years later. Phil attended medical school at Albert Einstein College of Medicine in the Bronx and was a member of its third graduating class in 1961. His residency at Stanford University Medical School took him and Bonnie to Palo Alto in 1962. Phil’s oldest child, Andrew, later graduated from Einstein, making them the first pair of father-son alums in Einstein’s history. While Phil was on a surgery rotation during medical school, a nurse prophetically joked that he had “the hands of a psychiatrist.” Phil had the mind, the empathy, the wisdom, the ear,

Memorial Services

and the compassion of a great psychiatrist, as well as a deep grasp of, and scholarly devotion to, psychoanalytic theory. Combining clinical skill and a capacious love of people, Phil had a busy private practice in San Jose and, later, Palo Alto until he retired in 2004. He also became a training analyst at the San Francisco Psychoanalytic Institute, and taught courses in psychiatry and psychotherapy at Stanford University Medical School and the Pacific Graduate School of Psychology (PGSP) in Menlo Park. Phil is survived by Bonnie, his wife of 56 years, and by their four children: Dr. Andrew Stein and his wife, Karen, of Danville; Julie Bolanos and her husband, Ray, of Redwood City; Paul Stein and his wife, Sarah Smith, of San Francisco; and Laura Santora and her husband, Francis, of Menlo Park. Phil had seven grandchildren: Jordan, Becky, Hanna, Matthew, Harriet, Walter, and Jessie. Phil is also survived by his big brother, Alvin Stein of Barrington, Rhode Island. A memorial service for Phil will be held at Congregation Etz Chayim, 4161 Alma Street (between Charleston and San Antonio), Palo Alto, on September 30, 2012, at 3 p.m. The family invites you to contribute, in lieu of flowers, to the American Parkinson Disease Association (www.apdaparkinson.org). PA I D

OBITUARY

An online directory of obituaries and remembrances. Search obituaries, submit a memorial, share a photo. Go to: www.PaloAltoOnline.com/obituaries

Harry James Conner April 14, 1943 – Aug 30, 2012 It is with great sadness that we share the news of the loss of Harry James Conner on Aug. 30, 2012. Also known as “Harry the Hat,” Harry and his wife Molly Morris Conner have resided in Oregon since 1995. Born April 14, 1943, in Booneville, Ind., to Pierre William Conner and Signa Viola Felt Conner, they moved to California when he was still a baby. Until moving to Oregon, Harry lived and worked in the Palo Alto area of California. He went to Cubberley High School in Palo Alto, Calif., and then joined the Navy. After discharge, Harry met Marilyn Badgley and she soon became his wife. They had two children, Deborah and Todd. They divorced in 1985 and Harry met Molly Morris, bringing yet another beautiful, wonderful woman into the Conner family. Harry is survived by his wife, Molly; his children, Deborah and Todd; five grandchildren, Austin Billy Conner, Signa Maxine Mascot, William Philip Mascot, Colman James Conner and Riley Thomas Conner. He is also survived by his father, Pierre Conner; and siblings, Karen Conner, Rickey Conner, Leslie Spencer and Susan Nance; and a host of other family and friends who were important to Harry throughout his lifetime. Memorial services are pending. PA I D

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OBITUARY


Pulse

A weekly compendium of vital statistics

POLICE CALLS

Atherton

Palo Alto

Violence related Assault and battery. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Misc. traffic violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Suspicious vehicle . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .20 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .2 Vehicle code violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Fire call . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Hazard . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Outside assistance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .2 Suspicious person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2

Aug. 29 - Sept. 4 Violence related Arson . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Assault w/a deadly weapon . . . . . . . . . .1 Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Family violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Robbery/car jack . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Sexual assault. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Attempted burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Commercial burglary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Identity theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Vehicle related Abandoned auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .8 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Misc. traffic . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12 Theft from auto . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .7 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .8 Vehicle impound . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 10 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Alcohol or drug related Drunk in public . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 13 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Miscellaneous Animal call. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Casualty/fall . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Found property. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .7 Misc. penal code violation . . . . . . . . . . .2 Missing person . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of stolen property . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Stalking. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .9 Town ordinance violation . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Warrant/other agency . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 12

Menlo Park Aug. 29 - Sept. 4 Violence related Battery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Domestic violence . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Robbery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Theft related Attempted burglary. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Fraud . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Grand theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Petty theft . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .4 Residential burglaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .6 Vehicle related Auto recovery . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Driving w/suspended license . . . . . . . . .4 Hit and run . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Vehicle accident/minor injury . . . . . . . . .8 Vehicle accident/property damage. . . . .7 Vehicle tampering . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Vehicle tow . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Alcohol or drug related Drug activity . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Drunk driving . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Possession of drugs . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Miscellaneous CPS referral . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Disturbance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .3 Lost property . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Probation violation . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Property destruction. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Suspicious circumstances . . . . . . . . . . .1 Threats . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Shots fired . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Vandalism . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Violation of court order . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .5 Medical aid . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Other/misc. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Pedestrian . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .1 Psychiatric hold . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .2 Warrant arrest. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .8

Compost to Create Naturally Beautiful Garderns

Aug. 29 - Sept. 4

VIOLENT CRIMES Palo Alto 00 block University Avenue, 8/29, 12:16 a.m.; assault with a deadly weapon. Unlisted block Dake Avenue, 8/29, 7:20 p.m.; family violence. Unlisted block El Camino Real, 8/29, 12:13 p.m.; sexual assault. 300 block University Avenue, 8/30, 12:34 p.m.; robbery/car jack. Unlisted block N. California Avenue, 9/1, 10:58 a.m.; arson. Unlisted block Guinda Street, 9/3, 9:51 a.m.; battery.

Backyard composting conserves energy and reduces pollution and waste. Discover how easy it is to use composting techniques to create a vibrant, healthy and beautiful garden. Learn how to turn your food and yard waste into a wonderful soil amendment or mulch that will help your garden thrive by surpressing weeds, protecting the soil, improving soil structure and conserving water.

Compost Workshop

Saturday September 22 10 AM - 12 PM Master Gardener’s Palo Alto Demonstration Garden 852 Center Drive This free workshop is sponsored by Zero Waste Palo Alto and taught by UCCE Master Garderners www.zerowastepaloalto.org zerowaste@cityofpaloalto.org (650) 496-5910

Menlo Park Unlisted block Pierce Road, 8/29, 9:38 a.m.; battery. 1300 block Willow Road, 8/30, 9:02 p.m.; spousal abuse. Unlisted block Ringwood Avenue, 8/31, 5:06 p.m.; robbery. 1300 block Henderson Avenue, 9/3, 1:57 p.m.; spousal abuse. 1300 block Willow Road, 9/2, 5:43 p.m.; domestic violence.

ATTENTION ADVERTISERS

Atherton 500 block Middlefield Road, 8/29, 10:10 a.m.; assault and battery.

Sept. 28

FALL HOME & GARDEN DESIGN IS COMING

ANNOUNCING OUR 2012 FALL HOME & GARDEN DESIGN SPECIAL PUBLICATION AN ALMANAC, MOUNTAIN VIEW VOICE AND PALO ALTO WEEKLY PUBLICATIO N

PUBLICATIO N ALTO WEEKLY VOICE AND PALO MOUNTAIN VIEW AN ALMANAC,

HOME+GARDEN

HOME+GARDEN

Register online at PaloAltoOnline.com

Your program will deliver your message in print and online to our local community, looking for home and garden improvement products and services. Publication Dates: October 3 & 5, 2012 Space Reservation & Copy Due: September 7, 2012

AN ALMA NAC,

WINTER 2012

CREATING ROOMS WITH VIE WS IN

SPRING 2012

East meets West in Portola Valley

PAGE 4

A three-week kitchen in Palo Alto

PAGE 10

PORTOLA VALLEY | PAGE 12

Updating a Mountain View bungalow

PAGE 18

MOU NTAI

N VIEW VOIC E

HOME+G

AND PALO ALTO WEEK LY

PUBLI CATIO

ARDEN

SUMMER

N

2011

FROM ‘7 COTTAGE0s TO MODER N IN MENL

O PARK

PAGE 10

ALL GROWN UP

IN LOS ALTOS HILLS 25 PAGE

OLD MOUNTAIN VIEW COTTAGE GOES MODERN LIGHTENING UP | PAGE 4 WITH A BARREL CEILING | PAGE 8

AN EYE FOR DETA IL IN PALO THE ULTIM ALTO | ATE MOU PAGE 4 NTAIN VIEW HONORIN DO-IT-YO G AN OLD URSELF ER HOM PROJECT E IN PALO | PAGE ALTO | 16 PAGE 22

To reserve your advertising space today, contact your advertising rep or call Tom Zahiralis, Vice President, Sales & Marketing at 650.223.6570 or e-mail: tzahiralis@embarcaderopublishing.com

Good for Business. Good for You. Good for the Community. ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ-i«Ìi“LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 15


Editorial

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Spectrum %DITORIALS LETTERSANDOPINIONS

Renaming buildings %DITOR

7HILE ON THE SUBJECT OF NAM ING OR RENAMING BUILDINGS LIKE THEMAINLIBRARY ISTHEREAREASON WHYTHE#ULTURAL#ENTER WHENIT WASRENAMEDAFEWYEARSAGO WAS CALLED THE 0ALO !LTO !RT #ENTER RATHER THAN THE 0ALO !LTO !RTS #ENTER 4HERE IS AN AUDITORIUM WHICH WHENAVAILABLE ISUSEDBY MUSICIANSFORCONCERTSANDRECIT ALS 7HY NOT ACKNOWLEDGE THEIR PRESENCE TOO BY THE ADDITION OF THELETTERhSv 3HAILA3ADROZINSKI #HURCHILL!VENUE

Thanks, drivers %DITOR

) AM WRITING TO PRAISE THE AWARENESSOFANDPATIENCETOWARD YOUNG BICYCLISTS THAT ) HAVE SEEN SHOWNBY0ALO!LTODRIVERS 'ETTINGMY YEAR OLDTWINSOFF THE SAFE TRAILS AT 3HORELINE AND ONTO REGULAR 0ALO !LTO STREETS AS WE BIKED TO CAMP THIS SUMMER WASTHESCARIESTTHING)HAVEEVER DONE "ECAUSE OF COURSE DESPITE ALL OUR DISCUSSIONS ABOUT TRAFFIC RULESANDSAFETYISSUES ITHASNOT BEEN WITHOUT INCIDENT )VE HAD CHILDRENMISTAKENLYGOTHEWRONG WAY ACROSS TRAFFIC WHEN CROSS ING AN INTERSECTION AND AT TIMES THECOMMANDTOhWAITvWASMIS INTERPRETEDAShGOv /UR WORST MIX UP WAS THE DAY THEYTANGLEDTHEIRTRAININGWHEELS WHILE CROSSING ,OMA 6ERDE AT -IDDLEFIELD ANDBOTHWENTDOWN IN A HEAP 7ITH A TODDLER ON THE BACK OF MY OWN BIKE ) COULDNT EASILYGETOFFTOHELP YETTHEDRIV ERS ˆ EASILY MORE THAN  CARS WEREINVOLVEDˆWAITEDPATIENTLY THROUGH A COMPLETE TRAFFIC LIGHT CYCLE WHILE EVERYONE GOT BACK ONTHEIRFEETANDACROSSTHESTREET SAFELY NO DRIVER HONKED AND NO VEHICLETRIEDTOhSNEAKBYvUS ) AM GRATEFUL FOR THE TOLERANCE SHOWNBYLOCALDRIVERS WHICHHAS MADEITSAFEFORUSTOGETTHROUGH THATCRUCIALEARLY LEARNINGPERIOD -YCHILDRENARENOWMUCHMORE COMPETENT AND WE HAPPILY BIKE TO SCHOOL DAILY 4HEIR BODIES ARE GETTING STRONGER OUR STREETS ARE LESS CONGESTED AND OUR ENVIRON MENTISCLEANER $ORI-OSS 4ORREYA#OURT

Why so few candidates %DITOR

4HE 7EEKLY NOTED THAT FEW CANDIDATES HAVE FILED FOR #ITY #OUNCILAND3CHOOL"OARDRACES 0UBLIC SERVICE IS IMPORTANT AND REWARDING BUT THERE ARE SERIOUS OBSTACLESTORUNNING,ETMESUG GESTREASONSANDASIMPLEANDUSE FULSOLUTION )T IS WELL UNDERSTOOD ˆ ESPE CIALLY BY THOSE WHO HAVE BEEN ACTIVE IN CIVIC AFFAIRS ˆ THAT

TIME AND SCHEDULE DEMANDS CAN BE DAUNTING %LECTED OFFICIALS MUST PREPARE FOR MEETINGS AT TEND SEVERAL WEEKLY MEETINGS TALK WITH COMMUNITY MEMBERS AND STAFF RESPOND TO EMAILS AND PHONECALLS SERVEASALIAISONTO LOCAL BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS SERVEONREGIONALBOARDS ANDAT TEND COMMUNITY EVENTS &INALLY THEELECTEDSALSONEEDTOTAKETHE TIME TO REFLECT ON ISSUES BEFORE THEM /NLY SOME ARE WILLING OR ABLETOMAKETHISCOMMITMENT /THERS MAY NOT BE ABLE )NDI VIDUALS WITH LIMITED MEANS LESS F LEXIBLE EMPLOYMENT REQUIRE MENTS ANDOR PERSONAL AND FAM ILY TIME DEMANDS CANNOT SERVE -ANY PEOPLE DECIDE THAT THESE CIRCUMSTANCESANDOBLIGATIONSARE NOTEASYTOBALANCE/THERSMAKE ITWORK 3INCEFEWOBSTACLESARELIKELYTO CHANGE LETMESUGGESTONETHING THAT COULD MAKE THESE JOBS MORE ATTRACTIVE SHORTENING THE LENGTH OF OUR MEETINGS (AVING SERVED FOR OVER  YEARS ON THE 3CHOOL "OARDAND#ITY#OUNCIL )BELIEVE THAT NO USEFUL DISCUSSION OC CURS IN THE MIDDLE OF THE NIGHT

/THER CITIES AND REGIONAL BOARDS DOMUCHBETTER4IGHTERAGENDAS BREVITYBYTHEELECTEDSANDSOME VOLUNTARYRESTRAINTFROMTHECOM MUNITYMAYALLHELPTOENCOURAGE MOREPEOPLETORUNFOROFFICE 'AIL!0RICE 0ALO!LTO#ITY#OUNCIL

Blinded by the light %DITOR

2ESIDENTIALSTREETLIGHTSˆBRIL LIANTFINANCIALDECISIONORJUSTTOO BRIGHT !NYONE ELSE DISLIKE THE NEWLY INSTALLED ,%$ NEIGHBORHOOD STREETLIGHTS)FEELLIKE)NOWRE SIDE IN A SHOPPING MALL PARKING LOT -ARILYN-AYO /XFORD!VENUE

LET’S DISCUSS: Read the latest local news headlines and talk about the issues at Town Square at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

WHAT DO YOU THINK? The Palo Alto Weekly encourages comments on our coverage or on issues of local interest.

?

7HATDOYOUTHINKOFNEWPLANSFOR TRAILSANDABIKEBRIDGE

Submit letters to the editor of up to 250 words to letters@paweekly.com. Submit guest opinions of 1,000 words to editor@paweekly.com. Include your name, address and daytime phone number so we can reach you. We reserve the right to edit contributions for length, objectionable content, libel and factual errors known to us. Anonymous letters will generally not be accepted. Submitting a letter to the editor or guest opinion constitutes a granting of permission to the Palo Alto Weekly and Embarcadero Media to also publish it online, including in our online archives and as a post on Town Square. For more information contact Editor Jocelyn Dong or Editorial Assistant Eric Van Susteren at editor@paweekly.com or 650-326-8210.


Check out Town Square! (UNDREDS OF LOCAL TOPICS ARE BEING DISCUSSED BY LOCAL RESIDENTS ON 4OWN 3QUARE A READER FORUM SPONSORED BY THE 7EEKLY ON OUR COM MUNITYWEBSITEATWWW0ALO!LTO/NLINECOM0OSTYOUROWNCOMMENTS ASKQUESTIONS READTHE%DITORSBLOGORJUSTSTAYUPONWHATPEOPLEARE TALKINGABOUTAROUNDTOWN

On Deadline

My sister’s greatest gift — advice to a teenager that lasted a lifetime by Jay Thorwaldson NCEUPONATIMEåMORETHANAHALFCENTURY AGO ˆ MY OLDER SISTER -ARILYN GAVEMEAGIFTWHEN) WAS A YOUNG TEENAGER IN,OS'ATOS (ERGIFTWASASIMPLE CONCEPT EXPRESSED IN JUSTAFEWSENTENCES 9ETTODAYITOCCURSTO ME THAT IT MAY BE REL EVANTTOYOUNGPERSONS IN 0ALO !LTO n AND IN ANYCOMMUNITYWHERE PEOPLE MAY BE JUDGED BY THEIR PERFORMANCE ANDWHAT!TTITUDE0RESENCE )NMYCASE )CANTRECALLWHY)HADGONEINTO A SEVERE BLUENESS ˆ hDEPRESSIONv WAS NOT A COMMONTERM)TMAYHAVEBEENAMISSEDDEAD LINEFORASCHOOLASSIGNMENT )NSTEADOFGETTINGUPTOGOTOSCHOOL)STAYED INBED PLEADINGILLNESS &ORASOLIDWEEK)TMIGHTHAVEBEENJUSTSAD NESSTHATSEEMSTOAFFLICTSOMEYOUNGPERSONS FROMTIMETOTIME -YNONPLUSSEDMOTHERFINALLYMENTIONEDMY SURLYSECLUSIONTO-ARILYN YEARSMYSENIOR ANDMARRIEDWITHYOUNGKIDSOFHEROWN-ARI LYNSOONDROPPEDBYANDSATONTHEFOOTOFMY BEDAS)LAYGRUMPILYFACINGTHEWALL (EREWASHERGIFT %VERYONE SHESAID IMPACTSOTHERPEOPLEˆ EVERYONETHEYMEET INFACT0EOPLEWHOPRESENT ASOUR RUDE ANGRYORCRITICALFACEANDATTITUDE LEAVEBEHINDATRAILOFPEOPLEWHOSEDAYHAS JUSTBEENMADEABITLESSPLEASANT ORDOWNRIGHT UNPLEASANTINEXTREMECASES "UTTHOSEWHOPRESENTAPLEASANTFACE FRIEND LYATTITUDE PERHAPSASMILEORSIMPLEGREETING

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Streetwise

After last week’s game, what do you foresee for Stanford’s football season? Asked on Cambridge Avenue in Palo Alto. Interviews and photographs by Dean McArdle.

John Mitchell

Retired teacher Barron Park “It’s gonna be great, I always have faith.”

Susan McOmber

Property manager Old Palo Alto “I’ve heard they are supposed to be awesome, and I’m not put out by them not winning by much last week.”

Jack Smith

Grad student Escondido Village “It’s a good team, so I hope well.”

Sheralee Inglehart

Reading specialist, substitute teacher Stanford “Touch and Go. “

Liza Taft

Retired nurse South of Midtown “They will have to pull themselves together, but at least they won.”

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Cover Story

Coming

rescue Good Samaritans take risk to help strangers in distress by Sue Dremann photos by Veronica Weber

T

“I did a tour in Iraq. It’s more normal to fight in a war than to have what happened to her happen at home. It is just so far out there.” Page 20ÊUÊ-i«Ìi“LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“

he day before Halloween in 2007, Sunnyvale resident Fred Burgener got the fright of his life. As he pulled up to a stoplight on Fair Oaks Boulevard in Sunnyvale, a grisly spectacle came running toward him: a terrified young girl, her face covered in blood, he said. “I saw her running down the street. She was bleeding from her mouth and really shaken up,” he said, recalling that she also had a black eye. Jolted by what he saw, Burgener quickly stepped out of his car and made eye contact with her. He pointed to the vehicle, asking her if she wanted to get in. She did. Once she was inside, he tried to discern what had occurred. “She just kept saying, ‘Go fast, go fast,’” he said. Burgener had happened upon the victim of a brutal sexual assault, beating and kidnapping that originated in Palo Alto. He is one of hundreds of Bay Area residents who have come across acts of violence, accidents or lost and wandering persons and who stopped to help. These Good Samaritans could have turned away and not gotten involved — many times people do, said Cindy Hendrickson, Santa Clara County supervising deputy district attorney, who has prosecuted violent-crime cases in which people refused to aid victims and witnesses would not testify. But people who have become rescuers instead stepped out of their comfort zones, in some cases risked their own lives in the process. The 17-year-old Gunn High School student that Burgener helped had been kidnapped from


Cover Story

her apartment-building garage. Her assailant — Todd David Burpee, a 2006 Palo Alto High School graduate — smashed her head on the pavement until she passed out, then dragged her into his gold, four-door, 1993 Oldsmobile Cutlass and drove away. Beaten and sexually assaulted, she only escaped after he had parked his car and entered his Sunnyvale apartment. He assumed he had killed her during the attack, according to court papers. He was later convicted of the crimes and received 43 years to life in prison. Burgener testified at the trial. The day the girl ran toward him in many ways changed his life, he said. A self-described “ordinary guy with an ordinary life,” he suddenly wound up in the media spotlight. There were microphones and cameras and a press conference with then-Palo Alto police Chief Lynne Johnson. Googling his name, Burgener said it was surreal to find it connected with the words “attempted murder” and “rape” in articles about the crime. He also paid a significant price for his good deed. On the day of the incident, he lost his job as a Union Pacific Railroad engineer because he was distracted by the events. He was not paying attention to safety procedures, he said. It took 18 months — including a second tour of duty in Iraq — before the union successfully got his job back.

T

hough random events suddenly pulled Burgener and other Good Samaritans into strange and traumatic, life-changing scenarios, many rescuers said helping someone during a crisis was the right thing to do. Their actions left them with a mix of emotions ranging from lingering regret and sadness to deep satisfaction, but faced with a similar situation, they would help again, they said. Burgener recalled that once in his car, the girl slipped in and out of consciousness. He had trouble understanding her story because she was distraught and English was not her primary language, he said. As he heeded her warning to drive away from the scene, he called 9-1-1, he said. He was also scared for himself, he said. He was a middle-aged man with a bleeding teenage girl in his car, and he didn’t want police to think he committed the crime. He also feared the girl’s attacker might assault him, he said. “I thought that somebody was pretty mean to do this. Someone who hurts a kid like that

Gagni said he did not consider the consequences: He was responsible for doing his job, but he considered his greater duty to call the police and catch the criminal, he said. must be crazy — they are so small. I was terrified. “I did a tour in Iraq. It’s more normal to fight in a war than to have what happened to her happen at home. It is just so far out there,” Burgener, a father of three, said. Because of rush-hour traffic, Burgener went to his mother-in-law’s house a few blocks away instead of to a hospital. “The whole ordeal took just a few minutes, but it seemed like it took forever,” he said. Later, some family members admonished him for getting involved. His mother was also worried that Burpee would come after him, he said. But Burgener said he would want someone to help his daughters if they were in a similar situation. He shrugged off fears that he could have been sued if something went wrong. “For the average person, the chances of getting sued are small. The fears are minimal. But you are going to get your horror stories here or there,” he said. As Burgener entered a Santa Clara County

Superior Court elevator after his testimony, he came face to face with the victim for the first time since the incident. But he did not attempt to talk to the girl. As she had throughout the trial, she had covered her face with her long hair and was still visibly traumatized. But he introduced himself to a victim’s advocate who had supported the girl while she testified. The woman embraced Burgener, he recalled. “I’ve had a pretty boring life,” he said on a recent afternoon in Palo Alto. “Here I was having a press conference. Everyone I knew in the Army says I should get the Soldier’s Medal for civilian heroic deeds. “I got the glamour, and she got to pay the price,” he said ruefully.

H

endrickson said prosecutors are frustrated when people won’t help them prosecute crimes. Recently, “the sole eyewitness to a domestic violence (case) absolutely refused to testify. We had a long talk about following through,” she said.

“I have seen cases where people turned victims away,” she added. At a 7-11 in Sunnyvale last year, the clerk refused to help a distraught sexual-assault victim, she said. “The person said, ‘Get out of my store.’ He thought she was crazy,” Hendrickson recalled. But she praised Ferrolo Gagni, another convenience-store clerk, who did not turn away. Working the graveyard shift at a 7-11 on Old Middlefield Way in Mountain View on Jan. 26, 2011, Gagni had plenty of reasons not to get involved with strangers. He has been the victim of three separate violent crimes in his 22 years working at 7-11 stores, he said. Assailants pointed guns at him during two robberies. In the third, the thief pointed a 12inch knife at his back. “It was so long, I thought that if he stabs me here, I can see the knife if it goes through my stomach,” he said. But his life experiences have also given him reasons for compassion, he said. When a hysterical woman in her 20s entered the store at 2:30 a.m. that January day, Gagni might have been forgiven for throwing her out. She was wearing only an oversized T-shirt and holding her shoes, he remembered. Instead, he listened to what she said. “Someone is trying to kill me,” he recalled she said. Gagni, 65, looked outside to make sure no one was following the woman. The car she had driven to get there had lost a tire, and she had been driving on the rim, he said. He called 9-1-1. “I had no doubt at all. It didn’t enter my mind to push her out of the store,” he said. Gagni said he did not consider the consequences: He was responsible for doing his job, but he considered his greater duty to call the police and catch the criminal, he said. A friendly, personable man, Gagni said he is never rough with customers. His is an occupation filled with late-night characters and people who get peeved when they can’t buy beer after 2 a.m., he said. “If you are behind the counter, you have to be polite and friendly and courteous — even if they are rude to you. It is not good to make an enemy of your customer,” he said. Police later arrested 36-year-old Walter Ray Slone for rape, kidnapping, sexual penetration, oral copulation and threats to commit (continued on next page)

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Cover Story

“There is a level of life that happens to me because I do extend myself. It’s a generosity of life that is a full circle.� —Bonnie Berg

Rescuers

(continued from page 21)

a crime resulting in death or great bodily injury against the 23-yearold mother of three. It was a date that had gone terribly wrong. Slone assaulted her repeatedly in his girlfriend’s car in a Milpitas apartment-complex garage. The victim escaped by taking the car and speeding away when he got out. She ran over his foot as she drove off, according to a police report. Gagni was entirely accommodating when asked to testify in court, Hendrickson said. He was the first person on the witness stand. From his seat at the defense table Slone tried to intimidate him throughout his testimony, Gagni recalled. “The guy looked at me and stared at me, and I stared at him, too. I still remember his face. I will never forget his face,� he said. Slone was convicted on all counts last Sept. 23. He was

sentenced to 325 years to life in prison, with terms to be served consecutively, according to court documents. Gagni said he can’t imagine not helping someone in need. But he had some advice for people when confronted with a crisis: It is important to remain calm. Even if the scope of the problem seems beyond one’s capabilities, one should give the impression of being capable of offering aid. Then call 9-1-1, he said. “Make a quick decision so that she or he knows when they approach you that you can give them help. They don’t have to feel afraid anymore if you give that kind of assurance,� he said.

T

o a dying 9-year-old boy, assurances were the only gift Palo Alto resident Bonnie Berg could offer, she said. Four years ago she and her husband, David, came upon the tragic accident. “It was the most dramatic and intense experience of my life,� she said last week.

She and David were leaving Visalia after helping his mother pack up her house to move. Just moments after they said goodbye, a young driver who was talking on his cell phone had run a light, causing a truck to swerve to avoid him. The truck, which contained three children and their father, flipped over. No one in the truck had been wearing a seatbelt. One of the passengers, a 9-year-old boy named Tanner, was thrown from the vehicle, which flipped on top of him, pinning him under the roof, Berg said. “I immediately ran to the truck and knelt down into the cab. There was glass everywhere,� she said. Tanner’s older sister was screaming his name. His older brother was in shock with a huge gash in his leg. Berg, a registered nurse, elevated the older boy’s legs. She tried to attend to Tanner. With only inches between them, she spoke soothingly to the little boy, trying to offer some comfort, even though she could not see any part of him except for his legs, she said.

  

  

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Cover Story Tanner’s father stood away from the truck, too stunned to approach the horrific scene, Berg said. She called him over to be with his son, but he couldn’t bear to stay amid the shrieks of his daughter and the sight of the crushed boy, she said. Berg realized there was nothing she could medically do to help Tanner. “My purpose was simply to be there with him in his last moments. I stayed with Tanner and asked that, if he could hear me, to move his legs — the only part of his body that was visible — and he did. Three times I made contact with him this way,” she said. Soon afterward, the children’s mother arrived at the scene. Berg recalled the mother’s cries when she saw her son pinned under the truck.

“It was actually good to see his face, though hard. ... This experience deeply affected me, and I was emotionally disturbed for weeks afterward, going over the incident, wondering if I could have done anything more to help Tanner. “I finally talked with a psychologist friend who suggested I do a ritual to have closure with it. And I did,” she said. Berg climbed a hill in Foothills Park, which is one of her favorite hiking spots. She came upon a flowering bush along a trail and picked a blossom for each person in the accident. She meditated, “talking” to each person, giving them encouragement, she said. “I included everyone: the driver of the other car, the dad who neglected to have his kids buckle up, Tanner’s siblings and then, his

scrapes of her brothers and their friends as they raced down the hill in their go-carts, she said. She still feels infused with the same feelings whenever she helps someone in need, she said. “I have a very, very deep sense of purpose and a sense of satisfaction that I was able to make a difference in that moment. I have that sense that I have been able to do something meaningful for that person,” she said. Berg said she never worries about consequences. “I just do what is needed in that moment. If I have any fallout from a situation, I’ll deal with it as it comes up,” she said. “If I saw somebody in need and I didn’t help them, my inner life would feel very disturbed. I want to feel good about the choices I did not

Their actions left them with a mix of emotions ranging from lingering regret and sadness to deep satisfaction, but faced with a similar situation, they would help again, they said. “Her deep wailing is unforgettable,” Berg said. When the police finally arrived, they told Berg to move. “My only regret is that I did not tell them I had been in communication with Tanner. I think he actually died shortly afterward,” she said. The following week Berg and her husband returned to Visalia. As they rounded the corner of the scene of the accident, there were teddy bears and flowers and memorabilia in honor of Tanner. Berg gazed at a photo of Tanner in his soccer uniform.

mother, who arrived on the scene minutes after the accident and learned that her baby was dead.” “Prayer is a form of energy. I wanted to release as much guilt as I could to lighten their load. I do feel like I’m really still connected to that little boy,” she said. Berg said she couldn’t remember a time when she didn’t have the urge to ease suffering. The eldest of seven siblings, she had looked after her younger brothers and sisters. As a 7-year-old, she would rush out with a washcloth and disinfectant, attending to the

make,” she said. Lending a hand is an act of generosity, she added. “I feel like I’m the luckiest person in the world. It’s just the way I live my life. I give out, and it comes back to me. I don’t give it out for that reason, but it’s just what happens to me. There is a level of life that happens to me because I do extend myself. It’s a generosity of life that is a full circle.” N Staff Writer Sue Dremann can be emailed at sdremann@ paweekly.com.

Palo Alto Unified School District

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Tuesday, September 18, 2012, at 6:30 p.m. BOARD OF EDUCATION MEETING Palo Alto Unified School District Office 25 Churchill Avenue, Palo Alto, CA 94306

In accordance with Education Code §60119, the PAUSD Board of Education will receive input from the public relative to certification that students in the Palo Alto Unified School District have sufficient textbooks or instructional materials, or both, for the 2012-2013 school year.

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***************************************** THIS IS A SUMMARY OF COUNCIL AGENDA ITEMS. THE AGENDA WITH COMPLETE TITLES INCLUDING LEGAL DOCUMENTATION CAN BE VIEWED AT THE BELOW WEBPAGE:

http://www.cityofpaloalto.org/knowzone/agendas/council.asp (TENTATIVE) AGENDA–SPECIAL MEETINGCOUNCIL CONFERENCE ROOM September 10, 2012 - 6:00 PM ROLL CALL 1. Joint Meeting with the Park & Recreation Commission 7:00 PM OR AS SOON AS POSSIBLE THEREAFTER-CHAMBERS SPECIAL ORDERS OF THE DAY 2. Proclamation and flag ceremony for the Sister City of Linkoping 3. Resolution Expressing Appreciation to Marilyn Keller Upon the Completion of Her Term as a Utilities Advisory Commissioner STUDY SESSION 4. Prescreening of 395 Page Mill and 3045 Park Blvd. (Jay Paul) Planned Community Project CONSENT CALENDAR 5. Adoption of Budget Amendment Ordinance Amending Fiscal Year 2012 Budget to Provide Additional Appropriations of $XX to Fund the Implementation of the Development Center Blueprint and Approve Contract with (Company Name) to Install Furniture and Equipment at 285 Hamilton Avenue 6. Approval of Amendment Number 1 to Contract #C10131396 in the Amount of $1,299,122 with CDM Smith, Inc. to Provide Additional Services Associated with the Reservoir, Pump Station and Well at El Camino Park and Mayfield Pump Station Augmentation Project WS-08002 7. Approval of contract amendment in the amount of $______ for Moscone, Emblige & Sater/Otis & Iricki for legal services related to public works construction matters. 8. Request City Council Approval of a New Contract With the Independent Police Auditor OIR, Office of Independent Review, for up to Three Years in an Amount Not to Exceed $27,500 Per Year 9. Approval of Amendment No. 1 to Contract with Project Sentinel for Mediation Services 10. Approval of City Response to the Adopted Regional Housing Needs Allocation (RHNA) for the 2014-2022 Cycle (Continued from 9/4/12). 11. Approval of Response to Grand Jury Report on Pension and Other PostEmployment Benefits 12. Adoption of an Amendment to Resolution of Intent No. 9245 of the Council of the City of Palo Alto to Set December 10, 2012 as the New Public Hearing Date for the Establishment of Underground Utility District Number 47 (Portions Of Homer, Cowper, Addison, Middlefield, Channing And Webster) ACTION ITEMS 13. Policy & Services Recommendation regarding Council Priority Setting Process (Staff Requests be moved to 9/24/2012) 14. Colleague’s memo from Vice Mayor Scharff, Council Member Klein and Mayor Yeh regarding opposition to Measure C STANDING COMMITTEE MEETINGS The Policy & Services Committee meeting will be held on September 11, 2012 at 6:00 PM regarding; 1) Status of Audit Recommendations, 2) Auditor’s Office Quarterly Report, 3) Economic Development Policy Plan The Rail Committee meeting will be held on September 13, 2012 at 8:30 AM The Cubberley Policy Action Committee meeting will be held on September 13, 2012 at 10:30 AM

Additional information available through Educational Services Office @ 650-329-3709. ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ-i«Ìi“LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 23


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Palo Alto


Arts & Entertainment

A weekly guide to music, theater, art, movies and more, edited by Rebecca Wallace

In the 1895 woodblock print “Private Onoguchi Destroying the Gate of Chinchou Fortress,” artist Kiyochika Kobayashi gives a Japanese soldier a heroic stance.

by Rebecca Wallace

Patriotic, dramatic and sometimes violent, prints and paintings recall the two Sino-Japanese conflicts Men rush to aid victims and put out fires in “Bombing,” a 1944 inkand-color painting by Chinese artist Zhang Wenyuan.

wo sides, two wars face each other from opposite museum walls. Years of troubled history are remembered in woodblock prints and ink on paper: explosions, a warship sinking, the wounded carried away in blankets. Even in a small gallery corner, battles can be fierce. In the new exhibition “Divided Visions: Reportage from the Sino-Japanese Wars,” Stanford’s Cantor Arts Center has placed Japanese prints from the First Sino-Japanese War (1894-1895) across from Chinese ink paintings from the Second Sino-Japanese

War (1937-1945), which was fought during World War II. Despite their differences in tone and style, both the prints by Kiyochika Kobayashi and the paintings by Zhang Wenyuan are powerful portraits of the patriotism, violence and heightened — and often easily manipulated — emotions of wartime art. Also included are a few photos shot in China by German-born American journalist John Gutmann, who worked for an American propaganda unit in southwestern China during World War II. (continued on next page)

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Arts & Entertainment NOTICE OF VACANCIES ON THE THREE PALO ALTO BOARDS AND COMMISSIONS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Palo Alto City Council is seeking applications for volunteers on the following Boards and Commissions: ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠUĂŠĂŠĂŠˆLĂ€>ÀÞÊ`Ă›ÂˆĂƒÂœĂ€ĂžĂŠ ÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜ ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠUĂŠĂŠ*Ă•LÂ?ˆVĂŠĂ€ĂŒĂŠ ÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜ ĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠĂŠUĂŠĂŠ*>Ă€ÂŽĂƒĂŠ>˜`ĂŠ,iVĂ€i>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠ ÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜ Â?Â?ĂŠ ÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠi“LiĂ€ĂƒĂŠĂƒiÀÛiĂŠĂœÂˆĂŒÂ…ÂœĂ•ĂŒĂŠÂŤ>ÞÊ>˜`ĂŠ>Ă€iĂŠ>ÂŤÂŤÂœÂˆÂ˜ĂŒi`ĂŠ LÞÊ ĂŒÂ…iĂŠ ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ ÂœĂ•Â˜VˆÂ?°Ê Ă?ÂŤiĂ€Âˆi˜Vi]ĂŠ `Ă•ĂŒÂˆiĂƒ]ĂŠ ĂŒÂˆÂ“iĂŠ VÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂŒÂ“iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒ]ĂŠ >˜`ĂŠĂ€iĂƒÂˆ`i˜VÞÊÀiÂľĂ•ÂˆĂ€i“iÂ˜ĂŒĂƒĂŠĂ›>ÀÞʍiÀÊ ÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜Â°ĂŠÂœĂ€ĂŠ`iĂŒ>ˆÂ?i`ĂŠ ˆ˜vÂœĂ€Â“>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜]ĂŠÂŤÂ?i>ĂƒiĂŠĂ›ÂˆĂƒÂˆĂŒĂŠĂŒÂ…iĂŠ ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠÂœvĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iLĂƒÂˆĂŒiĂŠ>ĂŒĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ° VÂˆĂŒĂžÂœvÂŤ>Â?Âœ>Â?ĂŒÂœÂ°ÂœĂ€}ÉVÂ?iÀŽ]ĂŠ ÂœĂ€ĂŠ V>Â?Â?ĂŠ ĂŒÂ…iĂŠ ÂˆĂŒĂžĂŠ Â?iĂ€ÂŽÂ˝ĂƒĂŠ "vwViĂŠ >ĂŒ Ăˆxä‡Îә‡ÓxÇ£° ÂŤÂŤÂ?ˆV>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂƒĂŠ>Ă€iĂŠ`Ă•iĂŠLÞÊx\ĂŽĂ¤ĂŠÂŤÂ“ĂŠÂœÂ˜ĂŠ"VĂŒÂœLiÀÊ££]ÊÓä£Ó°ÊvĂŠÂœÂ˜iĂŠ *>Ă€ÂŽĂƒĂŠ >˜`ĂŠ ,iVĂ€i>ĂŒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠ ÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜iÀÊ `ÂœiĂƒĂŠ Â˜ÂœĂŒĂŠ Ă€i>ÂŤÂŤÂ?Ăž]ĂŠ ĂŒÂ…iĂŠ `i>`Â?ˆ˜iĂŠvÂœĂ€ĂŠĂŒÂ…>ĂŒĂŠ ÂœÂ“Â“ÂˆĂƒĂƒÂˆÂœÂ˜ĂŠĂœÂˆÂ?Â?ĂŠiĂ?ĂŒi˜`ĂŠĂŒÂœĂŠ"VĂŒÂœLiĂ€ĂŠÂŁĂˆ]ÊÓä£ÓÊ >ĂŒĂŠx\Îäʍ“° ĂŠ

" Ê°Ê, ,]Ê

City Clerk

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING of the City of Palo Alto Architectural Review Board (ARB) 8:30 A.M., Thursday, September 20, 2012 Palo Alto Council Chambers, 1st Floor, Civic Center, 250 Hamilton Avenue. Go to the Development Center at 285 Hamilton Avenue to review ďŹ led documents; contact Diana Tamale for information regarding business hours at 650.329.2144. 1701 Page Mill Road [12PLN-00283]: Request by Jim Inglis of Stanford Real Estate on behalf of The Board of Trustees of the Leland Stanford Junior University for Major Architectural Review Board review for the demolition of 67,000 square feet of existing commercial development oor area and construction of 116,000square feet of new oor area for a two story research and development building on a 8.5 acre site located at 1701 Page Mill Road. The project includes a Design Enhancement Exception for an encroachment into the 35 foot maximum height limit. Environmental Assessment: an Initial Study and Mitigated Negative Declaration have been prepared. Zone District: Service Commercial (RP). 1313 Newell Road [12PLN-00300]: Request by City of Palo Alto Art Center for Architectural Review of new signage requiring sign exceptions for height, size, and type for the existing the Art Center. The new signs include four directional, one free-standing, and four removable banner signs. Zone: PF. Environmental Assessment: Exempt from the provisions of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) per CEQA Guidelines Section 15311. 135 Hamilton Avenue [12PLN-00463]: Request by Keenan Lovewell Ventures, on behalf of Hamilton and High LLC, for Architectural Review and Variance request for a new four-story 27,149 square foot mixed-use building on an existing vacant lot (approximately 20,000 square feet of commercial area, two residential units, and below grade garage). The Variance request is for a ďŹ ve-foot ten-inch encroachment into the 7’ Special Setback on Hamilton Avenue for a length of approximately 84 feet. Zone: CD-C(P). Environmental Assessment: A draft Negative Declaration has been prepared for the project in accordance with the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA). Amy French Chief Planning OfďŹ cial

Page 26ĂŠUĂŠ-iÂŤĂŒi“LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“

A strong-profiled officer stands stalwart in Kiyochika Kobayashi’s 1894 woodblock print “The Great Victory of Our Forces in the Yellow Sea.� from the 1940s, the artist incorporates rhymes by the general Feng Yuxiang, every one concluding with an entreaty to resist the Japanese. “Contribute effort and money to the War of Resistance, defeat little Japan, so that everyone may live peaceful years,� one reads. Underneath is a calm depiction of everyday life in a teahouse, the ink complemented by peaceful paleblue pigment on the men’s clothing. The piece does not seem like it would be out of place hanging in a family room. Indeed, these forms of wartime art found homes far outside the art gallery. They were meant for mass audiences, to drum up popular support for repeated wars, and the patriotism of the war effort helped them find their audiences. Wenyuan created many of his drawings and cartoons while part of the National Salvation Propaganda Manua (Cartoon) Corps in Shanghai, and Kiyochika found widespread popularity for his prints when his art turned political at the start of the First Sino-Japanese War in 1894, according to the exhibit. In finding these audiences, the creations also succeeded in widely disseminating new forms of art, such as photography or new types of printing. The print became not just a form of fine art but a type of In Zhang Wenyuan’s 1944 ink-and-color painting “Hurry Up and mass media. Scatter to the Countryside, Prevent Meaningless Sacrifice,� villagers do When artwork was as violent just that. and dramatic as Kobayashi’s, that chooses to depict the loss of the might have helped broaden its apZhiyuan as an almost quiet mo- peal when emotions and tensions (continued from previous page) ment. While the fighting continues were high. to rage above in explosions of red, And other artists were watching. Art is indeed a tool here, building the focus of the print is the warship According to the exhibit, the popuand swaying emotions. Kobayashi’s slipping beneath the waves, the tiny larity of the print during the First prints depicted the Japanese soldier “Chinese sailors abandoning ship, Sino-Japanese War led to another as a stalwart-faced hero: the noble, depicted as though they are float- surge in printmaking during the strong-profiled officer standing on ing like insubstantial bubbles,� an Russo-Japanese War in 1904-05. the edge of a battered ship in the exhibit card reads. The growing art of photography 1894 print “The Great Victory of Across the gallery, Wenyuan’s played a role, too, an exhibit card Our Forces in the Yellow Sea,� for paintings from the following Si- reads: “Printmakers attempted to example, or the wise scout gazing no-Japanese war are more subtle approximate the realistic effects down from a hilltop in “Our Scout and monochromatic. In the 1944 of black-and-white photography Reconnoiters the Enemy Encamp- drawing “Bombing,� men rush to and expanded to more impressive ment near the Yalu River,� from the aid victims and put out fires. All panoramic views to appeal to audisame year. is bustle and determination, almost ences.� N In contrast, Kobayashi deperson- reassuring in its activity. The artist alizes the Chinese enemy, making commonly pictured wartime havoc Info: “Divided Visions� is on display its troops weak and faceless, almost “in a dispassionate manner, select- through Jan. 13, Wednesday through insignificant. In his sweeping 1894 ing scenes of rebuilding efforts, Sunday from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. and print “Sinking of a Chinese Ship,� free trucks organized to transport Thursdays until 8 p.m., at the Cantor he depicts the sinking of the Chi- refugees, and other attempts to re- Arts Center, Lomita Drive at Museum nese warship Zhiyuan after a five- gain normalcy,� according to an Way, Stanford University. Admission hour sea battle. The subject matter exhibit card. is free. Call 650-723-4177 or go to is terribly violent, yet Kobayashi In another series of paintings museum.stanford.edu.

The art of war


Arts & Entertainment

Worth a Look Theater ‘The Cherry Orchard’

Chekhov’s last play, “The Cherry Orchard,” might hit too close to home for some people in this foreclosure-riddled economy, but a classic is a classic. And the latest production does have a shiny-new translation. Presented by the Pear Avenue Theatre, this translation of the play was done by Stanford University lecturer Marina Brodskaya. The

‘The Little Dog Laughed’

Julia Belanoff and Robert Sean Campbell play Anya and Trofimov in a new translation of Chekhov’s “The Cherry Orchard” at the Pear Avenue Theatre.

In addition to Chekhov, a decidedly more modern tale is being offered up on the stage over in downtown Palo Alto. Dragon Productions is presenting “The Little Dog Laughed,” by favorite Dragon playwright Douglas Carter Beane (“As Bees in Honey Drown,” “The

can Life,” Tough has long written and reported on poverty and education. In his new book, he looks at connections between stress in children and their later success, while paying tribute to the tremendous effects that strength of character can have in overcoming obstacles. He also offers thoughts and ideas on helping poverty-stricken young people. Tough’s talk is scheduled for 3 p.m. Sept. 15 at Kepler’s Books, 1010 El Camino Real, Menlo Park. Audience members must buy the event book or a $10 gift card to admit two; members get in free. Go to keplers.com or call 650-324-4321.

Art

‘Memories from Syria’

Books Paul Tough

How can growing up in poverty affect the minds of children — and how can teachers and doctors help kids overcome those challenges? Journalist Paul Tough, an editor at the New York Times Magazine, delves deeply into these Journalist and questions in his new author Paul book, “How Children Tough speaks at Succeed: Grit, Curiosity, Kepler’s Books and the Hidden Power of on Sept. 15. Character.” A New Yorker who has also been a writer and producer for public radio’s “This Ameri-

City of Palo Alto Presents the 28th annual

Mary McIlvaine

Pear bills it as an interpretation that takes a fresh and unsentimental approach, delivering “Chekhov’s humor and pathos for a modern audience while retaining his lyricism.” Pathos is plentiful in this tale of Madame Ranevskaya (played by Palo Alto resident and Pear artistic director Diane Tasca), who comes home from Paris to learn that her treasured cherry orchard may need to be auctioned off. As a wealthy merchant offers his help, friends and relatives swirl around, and the comedy and tragedy of life goes on. Palo Altan Jeanie K. Smith, a Weekly theater critic, directs. The play previews on Sept. 20 at 8 p.m., and then runs Sept. 21 through Oct. 14, Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m. The theater is at 1220 Pear Ave. in Mountain View, and tickets are $10-$30. Go to thepear.org or call 650-254-1148.

Country Club,” the book for the musicals “Xanadu” and “Sister Act”). The play centers on Mitchell Green, a sexually perplexed actor who could be a big star if he could only stay in the closet, or so his agent sees it. When the play opened in the Big Apple in 2006, the New York Times’ Ben Brantley called it “the tastiest homegrown comedy of manners to hit New York since, well, Mr. Beane’s “As Bees in Honey Drown.” Directed by theater veteran Dale Albright, the show has a pay-what-you-can preview on Sept. 13 and then runs Sept. 14 through Oct. 7 at 535 Alma St. in downtown Palo Alto. Show times are Thursday through Saturday at 8 p.m. and Sundays at 2 p.m.; admission is $20-$30 on opening night, Sept. 14; and $16-$25 at other performances. Go to dragonproductions. net or call 650-493-2006.

Family dinners, prayers, weddings and holidays, all rendered in colorful oil paint on antique wood. These are the artistic memory pieces painted by Avraham Shemi-Shoham as he recollects his childhood in the town of Halab (also known as Aleppo), Syria. The artist, who now lives in Israel, is exhibiting his series “Memories from Syria” this fall at the Oshman Family Jewish Community Center in Palo Alto. He is also a graphic designer and illustrator who explores various themes of Judaica in his art and the ketubahs (Jewish wedding contracts) he creates. An artist’s reception will be held for the JCC exhibition on Sunday, Sept. 9, from 6:30 to 8:30 p.m. in the Schultz Cultural Arts Hall. The show is up through Nov. 7. To RSVP for the free reception, email Simcha Moyal at sim@clay-artisan.com. To schedule a viewing of the exhibition, call 650-223-8699 or email boxoffice@paloaltojcc.org. The JCC is at 3921 Fabian Way; go to paloaltojcc.org.

1 WEEK FOR PRE-R LEFT EGISTRATIO N

5K walk, 5K & 10K run A benefit event for local non-profits supporting kids and families

Friday

Sept. 28 7pm

Corporate Sponsors

Event Sponsors

Community Sponsors

REGISTER ONLINE: PaloAltoOnline.com/moonlight_run ÜÜÜ°*>œÌœ"˜ˆ˜i°Vœ“ÊUÊ*>œÊÌœÊ7iiŽÞÊUÊ-i«Ìi“LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊU Page 27


Eating Out FOOD FEATURE

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BEST OF PALO ALTO 2012 For a full list of the 2012 Best Of Palo Alto winners, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/best_of SERVICE

BEST AUTO CARE

Dave’s Auto Repair 830 East Charleston Rd., Palo Alto BEST DRY CLEANER

AJ’s Green Cleaners 395 California Ave., Palo Alto

AJ’s Quick Clean

BEST HOTEL

BEST EYEWEAR

Garden Court Hotel

Lux Eyewear

520 Cowper St., Palo Alto

1805 El Camino Real, Palo Alto

BEST ORTHODONTISTS

Midpeninsula Orthodontics – Dr. Stacey Quo 965 High St., Palo Alto

3175 Middlefield Rd., Palo Alto

BEST PERSONAL TRAINERS

BEST FITNESS CLASSES

2741 Middlefield Rd. #102, Palo Alto

FOOD & DRINK

BEST BAGELS

House of Bagels 526 University Ave., Palo Alto

NoXcuses Fitness BEST BAKERY/DESSERTS

Prolific Oven

Uforia Studios 819 Ramona St., Palo Alto

BEST PLUMBERS

550 Waverley St., Palo Alto

BEST FRAME SHOP

Palo Alto Plumbing Heating and Air/Dahl Plumbing

University Art

716 San Antonio Rd. # F, Palo Alto

BEST MEAL UNDER $20

267 Hamilton Ave. BEST SKIN CARE BEST GYM

Destino Spa

Oshman Family JCC

4335 El Camino Real, Palo Alto

3921 Fabian Way, Palo Alto BEST HAIR SALON

Hair International 232 Stanford Shopping Center, Palo Alto BEST MEN’S HAIRCUT HALL OF FAME:

Hair International

BEST BOUTIQUE, BEST GIFT/NOVELTY SHOP AND BEST JEWELRY STORE

BEST AMBIANCE AND BEST BAR/LOUNGE, BEST LATIN AMERICAN RESTAURANT, BEST ROMANTIC RESTAURANT

La Bodeguita del Medio 463 South California Ave., Palo Alto BEST NEW RESTAURANT

AND BEST SALAD

Sprout Cafe 168 University Ave., Palo Alto

LYFE Kitchen 167 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto BEST OUTDOOR DINING

CafĂŠ Riace 200 Sheridan Ave., Palo Alto

BEST PIZZA R E TA I L

R E S TA U R A N T S

Patxi’s Chicago Pizza 441 Emerson St., Palo Alto

BEST SPORTS BAR HALL OF FAME:

The Old Pro 541 Ramona St., Palo Alto

BEST YOGURT

BEST VEGETARIAN RESTAURANT

Shady Lane

Fraiche

Calafia Cafe and Market A Go Go

441 University Ave., Palo Alto

200 Hamilton Ave., Palo Alto

855 El Camino Real # 130, Palo Alto

Page 28ĂŠUĂŠ-iÂŤĂŒi“LiÀÊÇ]ÊÓä£ÓÊUĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠ7iiÂŽÂ?ÞÊUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°*>Â?ÂœÂ?ĂŒÂœ"˜Â?ˆ˜i°Vœ“


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What school is meant to be.

Open Houses: Upper School Oct. 28, Dec. 2 Middle School Oct. 7, Nov. 4

www.menloschool.org/admissions PENINSULA

Bumble Los Altos,145 First St., Los Altos; 650-383-5340; www. bumblelosaltos.com Hours: Daily 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Playroom: 9 a.m.-8 p.m.

ON THE WEB: Hundreds of restaurant reviews at www.PaloAltoOnline.com

Inspirations a guide to the spiritual community FIRST CONGREGATIONAL CHURCH, UCC £™nxĂŠÂœĂ•ÂˆĂƒĂŠ,Âœ>`]ĂŠ*>Â?ÂœĂŠÂ?ĂŒÂœĂŠUĂŠÂ­ĂˆxäŽÊnxĂˆÂ‡ĂˆĂˆĂˆĂ“ĂŠUĂŠĂœĂœĂœÂ°vVVÂŤ>Â°ÂœĂ€}ĂŠ -Ă•Â˜`>ÞÊ7ÂœĂ€ĂƒÂ…ÂˆÂŤĂŠEĂŠ Â…Ă•Ă€VÂ…ĂŠ-V…œœÂ?ĂŠ>ĂŒĂŠÂŁĂ¤\ääÊ>°“°

Homecoming Sunday: Listening with Fingers in Our Ears Rev. David Howell Preaching

An Open and Affirming Congregation of the United Church of Christ

Discover the best places to eat this week! AMERICAN

CHINESE

Armadillo Willy’s

Chef Chu’s

941-2922 1031 N. San Antonio Road, Los Altos www.armadillowillys.com

948-2696 1067 N. San Antonio Road www.chefchu.com

Cheese Steak Shop

Ming’s

326-1628 2305-B El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.cheesesteakpaloalto.com

856-7700 1700 Embarcadero East, Palo Alto www.mings.com

The Old Pro

New Tung Kee Noodle House

326-1446 541 Ramona Street, Palo Alto www.oldpropa.com

947-8888 520 Showers Drive, Mountain View www.shopmountainview.com/luunoodlemv

STEAKHOUSE

INDIAN

Sundance the Steakhouse

Janta Indian Restaurant

321-6798 1921 El Camino Real, Palo Alto www.sundancethesteakhouse.com

462-5903 369 Lytton Ave. www.jantaindianrestaurant.com

Read and post reviews, explore restaurant menus, get hours and directions and more at ShopPaloAlto, ShopMenloPark and ShopMountainView

Inspirations is a resource for ongoing religious services and special events. To inquire about or to reserve space in Inspirations, please contact Blanca Yoc at 223-6596 or email byoc@paweekly.com

Thaiphoon 323-7700 543 Emerson Ave, Palo Alto www.ThaiphoonRestaurant.com

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Movies

MOVIE TIMES

All showtimes are for Friday through Sunday only unless otherwise noted. For other times, as well as reviews and trailers, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies. 2016: Obama’s America (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:35 a.m.; 2:10, 4:25, 6:50 & 9:05 p.m. Century 20: Noon, 2:30, 4:55, 7:20 & 9:40 p.m. Beasts of the Southern Wild (PG-13) (((( Guild Theatre: 1, 3:30, 6 & 8:30 p.m.

Lawless (R) ((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:35, 4:10, 7 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 12:45, 2, 3:20, 4:35, 5:55, 7:15, 8:40 & 10:10 p.m. Marvel’s The Avengers (PG-13) (((( Century 16: 6:20 & 9:30 p.m. Century 20: 6:40 & 9:50 p.m. The Odd Life of Timothy Green (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:10 a.m.; 1:40, 4:10, 6:40 & 9:10 p.m. Century 20: 12:15, 2:50, 5:20, 7:50 & 10:20 p.m. ParaNorman (PG) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 4:05 & 9 p.m.; In 3D at 1:40 & 6:30 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m. & 4 p.m.; In 3D at 1:35, 6:55 & 9:15 p.m.

The Bourne Legacy (PG-13) (( Century 16: Noon, 3, 7 & 10:05 p.m. Century 20: 1, 4, 7 & 10 p.m. Brave (PG) (((1/2 Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:30 & 3:55 p.m. Century 20: 11:15 a.m.; 1:40 & 4:10 p.m.

The Possession (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:40 a.m.; 2:05, 4:30, 7:20 & 9:35 p.m. Century 20: 12:30, 1:45, 2:55, 4:15, 5:40, 6:55, 8, 9:15 & 10:20 p.m.

The Campaign (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 11:15 a.m.; 4:40 & 9:50 p.m. Century 20: 12:30, 3, 5:30, 7:55 & 10:20 p.m.

Premium Rush (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:50 a.m.; 2:25, 5, 7:40 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:40 a.m.; 2:15, 4:35, 7:05 & 9:25 p.m.

Celeste and Jesse Forever (R) ((1/2 Century 16: 2:20 & 7:25 p.m.

Robot & Frank (PG-13) ((( Century 20: 11:50 a.m.; 2:20, 4:45, 7:10 & 9:30 p.m. Palo Alto Square: 2, 5 & 7:25 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:45 p.m.

Chinatown (1974) (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: Thu. at 2 & 7 p.m. Century 20: Thu. at 2 & 7 p.m. The Cold Light of Day (PG-13) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:25 a.m.; 2, 4:35, 7:30 & 10:10 p.m. Century 20: 12:10, 2:30, 5, 7:30 & 10 p.m. Compliance (R) ((( Century 16: Noon, 2:40, 5, 8 & 10:20 p.m. The Dark Knight Rises (PG-13) (((( Century 16: 11 a.m.; 2:30, 6:10 & 9:40 p.m. Century 20: 12:55, 4:40 & 8:30 p.m.

Ruby Sparks (R) (((1/2 Palo Alto Square: 1:45, 4:30 & 7:15 p.m.; Fri. & Sat. also at 9:50 p.m. Sleepwalk with Me (Not Rated) ((1/2 Aquarius Theatre: 2:15, 4:30, 7 & 9:15 p.m. The Words (PG-13) (( Century 16: 11:15 a.m.; 1:45, 4:30, 7:30 & 10:15 p.m. Century 20: 11:25 a.m.; 1:55, 4:20, 7 & 9:30 p.m.

Diary of a Wimpy Kid: Dog Days (PG) (( Century 20: 11:30 a.m.; 1:50, 4:15, 6:45 & 9:10 p.m.

( Skip it (( Some redeeming qualities ((( A good bet (((( Outstanding

The Expendables 2 (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11 a.m.; 1:30, 4, 7:10 & 9:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:55 a.m.; 2:30, 5, 7:30 & 10 p.m.

Aquarius: 430 Emerson St., Palo Alto (266-9260) Century Cinema 16: 1500 N. Shoreline Blvd., Mountain View (800-326-3264) Century 20 Downtown: 825 Middlefield Road, Redwood City (800-326-3264) CinĂŠArts at Palo Alto Square: 3000 El Camino Real, Palo Alto (493-3456) Guild: 949 El Camino Real, Menlo Park (266-9260) Stanford: 221 University Ave., Palo Alto (324-3700) Internet address: For show times, plot synopses, trailers and more information about films playing, go to PaloAltoOnline.com/movies

For a Good Time, Call... (R) (Not Reviewed) Century 16: 11:30 a.m.; 2:15, 4:50, 7:50 & 10:20 p.m. Hope Springs (PG-13) ((( Century 16: 11:20 a.m.; 1:55, 4:20, 7 & 9:25 p.m. Century 20: 11:20 a.m.; 1:45, 4:10, 6:50 & 9:20 p.m. Ice Age: Continental Drift (PG) (Not Reviewed) Century 20: 11:35 a.m. & 4:25 p.m.; In 3D at 1:55, 7 & 9:20 p.m. The Intouchables (R) (( Aquarius Theatre: 3:15, 6 & 8:45 p.m. Century 20: 11:35 a.m.; 2:15, 4:55, 7:35 & 10:15 p.m.

      



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OPENINGS Compliance ---

(Century 16) Fair warning: “Compliance� will make you squirm. This psychodrama of illadvised behavior may well leave you feeling dirty as well, for what you’ve watched helplessly and perhaps for what you’ve countenanced as an American citizen. Set in the American heartland (namely Ohio), as well as Ameri-

can heart-attack land (namely a takeout joint named ChickWich), the film uses those trappings to remind us of our national character. Even as writer-director Craig Zobel tells a seemingly specific story inspired by true-crime events, the film’s reach seems to broaden as it goes, and by the end, we’re sickened by the confirmation of our fears. On the face of it, “Compliance� dramatizes an incident of sanctioned abuse. It’s a hectic night

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at ChickWich, made worse when manager Sandra (Ann Dowd) gets a call from a man (Pat Healy) claiming to be a police officer named Daniels. Daniels explains that a theft has been reported by a customer, and as the conversation progresses, he quickly pins the crime on a low-level employee Sandra agreeably identifies as Becky (Dreama Walker). Claiming to be tied up with a search of Becky’s home, Daniels enlists Sandra to serve as an unofficial deputy at the scene of the crime: She will have to search Becky, he explains, and hold her until he can arrive. Since the young and pretty Becky earlier slighted the middle-aged, dowdy Sandra, the older woman harbors personal feelings of jealousy and resentment that she only too willingly channels — under the guise of professional duty — into her suddenly heightened position of power. Daniels consistently tests Sandra’s limits, which seem to know no bounds. She agrees to stripsearch Becky, and this first in a series of violations emboldens Daniels to sexually tempt men (including Sandra’s fiancĂŠ, and one of Becky’s co-workers) to do his bidding, amounting to phone sex at its most perverse. Dowd expertly captures her character’s officiousness and moral weakness, which falls somewhere between self-satisfied and selfloathing, and Bill Camp heartbreakingly plays similar notes as the fiancĂŠ worn down by Daniels and drink. These crimes of obedience (“I did as I was told to do,â€? one character offers lamely) may at first seem as incredible as they are outrageous, but it doesn’t take much digging to recall historical precedents, from Nazi Germany to the infamous Milgram Experiment. Without ever making the subtext text, Zobel lays out a story dramatizing how willingly humans abdicate personal responsibility, enjoy power over others, embrace “confirmation biasâ€? in all its forms, and implicitly — through apathy, inertia and inaction — endorse crimes committed in our names as American citizens, from the deaths of innocent civilians to the civil-rights violations of American prisoners. With this in mind, the policies and uniforms of a fast-food franchise begin to appear as a twisted parody of capitalist corporatism (at best?), the military mindset (at worse?), and fascism (at worst), our institutions a hair-thin, scarily permeable membrane between civilization and savagery. Or one can simply take “Complianceâ€? at face value, as a seedy true-crime story, made all the more unsettling by the subtle cues of a crack cast of character


Movies actors. That view has led many to reject the controversial film as mere exploitation, but Zobel’s narrative control shows restraint, betraying none of the characters’ concealed pleasure or willful moral denial. Rated R for language and sexual content/nudity. One hour, 30 minutes. — Peter Canavese

The Words --

(Century 16, Century 20) Identity theft gets a fresh spin in “The Words,” an ensemble drama exploring moral crimes in the literary sphere. While I wouldn’t blame you for leaping to the likes of James Frey and non-fiction bestsellers built on juicy lies, “The Words” concerns a wholesale act of plagiarism, the purloined novel in question having taken inspiration from its true author’s life. Or maybe none of this ever happened. Maybe it just makes for a good story, or a good metaphor for untrustworthy character. And to go one “meta,” we actually know it never happened: It’s only a movie we’re watching. Wow. Deep. The film’s framing device finds bestselling author Clay Hammond (Dennis Quaid) conducting an extensive public reading from his latest novel before offering private spoilers to an audience of one: hot literary groupie Daniella (Olivia Wilde). Hammond’s story, which forms most of the film, tells of Rory Jansen (Bradley Cooper), whose dreams of artistic and popular success as a novelist have been repeatedly stymied. Told he’s talented but unpublishable, Rory settles into a mailroom job at a publishing firm so he can marry his sweetheart, Dora (Zoe Saldana). But when they honeymoon in Paris, Rory accidentally gets his hands on a long-lost unpublished manuscript, a soulful novel that shames Rory in its brilliance: first because he could never write something that elegant, and then because Dora reads it and professes deeper love due to her husband’s unexpected depths. Of course, Rory cannot bring himself to confess the novel’s origin. Instead, he offers the book to his boss for a second opinion. Suddenly, Rory finds a lucrative contract under his nose, and he makes a Faustian bargain with himself, seizing his dreams by selling someone else’s soul.

Century Theatres at Palo Alto Square Fri -Sat 9/7-9/8 Robot & Frank - 2:00, 5:00, 7:25, 9:45 Ruby Sparks - 1:45, 4:30, 7:15, 9:50 Sun thru Thurs 9/9-9/13 Robot & Frank - 2:00, 5:00, 7:25 Ruby Sparks - 1:45, 4:30, 7:15

Tickets and Showtimes available at cinemark.com

That’s all well and good until an old man (Jeremy Irons) shows up to claim authorship of the now widely acclaimed bestseller. The old man has his own story to tell, of his younger self (Ben Barnes), the novel’s origins in tragedy, and how the book was lost in the first place. Despite the Russian-nestingdoll structure, “The Words” is a fairly straightforward yarn with bluntly articulated themes of Regret, Guilt, Misplaced Trust and the Vagaries of Fate. The direction by Brian Klugman and Lee Sternthal (also the screenwriters) is sturdy enough, as are the per-

Avenidas presents the 9th Annual formances by Irons (at his canniest) and Cooper (resonant in his moral rottenness). But while Marcelo Zarvos’ Philip Glass-lite score tries to convince us we’re watching “The Hours,” it’s hard to care about much of anything in this work of fiction about a work of fiction that’s either a couched confession or an artful “lie that tells the truth.” Rated PG-13 for brief strong language and smoking. One hour, 36 minutes. — Peter Canavese

Family Caregiver Conference Saturday, September 15, 9 am - 3 pm Mountain View, CA Topics will include: Š Forgiving yourself Š Long-term care costs Š Safe medication use Š Dementia care challenges Š Avoiding burnout Š Help for hoarding Free tours of Avenidas Rose Kleiner Center at 3 pm! Register at Avenidas.org or call (650) 289-5435.

Resources and programs for positive aging

Palo Alto Unified School District REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATION OF BIDDERS PQ-12

DUVENECK ELEMENTARY SCHOOL MODERNIZATIONS & NEW CONSTRUCTION The Palo Alto Unified School District is inviting qualification information from General Contractors to provide Construction Services for an upcoming construction project. Duveneck Elementary School: Construction of a new two story classroom building, two single story classroom buildings & modernization to multiple existing buildings. Construction estimate is $8M. There will be a MANDATORY prequalification conference on Wednesday, September 19, 2012 at 10:00 AM at 25 Churchill Avenue, Building “D”, Palo Alto, CA. The project and the Prequalification package will be discussed.

SAVE THE DATE FOR THESE SPECIAL UPCOMING EVENTS!

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 13

Movie Screening at the Aquarius Theatre: “Who Does She Think She Is?” SATURDAY, OCTOBER 20

Divorce Recovery Seminar

september highlights NEW FOR THIS MONTH: — Job Strategy Groups — Journaling and Poetry — Assertive Woman Workshops — Uncover Your Joy & LifeStory — Goal Setting Workshop — Women & Sleep Workshop For further details, visit our website: deborahspalm.org 555 Lytton Avenue, Palo Alto 650/473-0664

debor ah’s palm

All responses to this RFQ must be received no later than 01:00 PM Tuesday, October 2, 2012. Interested firms shall submit Qualifications as described in the Prequalification Package to: Palo Alto Unified School District Facilities Department 25 Churchill Avenue, Building “D” Palo Alto, CA 94306 Attn: Lori Larson Direct questions regarding this Request for Qualification (RFQ) to Lori Alvarez Larson – lalvarez@pausd.org These are not requests for bids or offers by the District to contract with any party responding to this RFQ. The District reserves the right to reject any and all responses. All materials submitted to the District in response to this RFQ shall remain property of the District and may be considered a part of public record.

5K walk, 5K & 10K run

Moonlight RUN&WALK

Sept. 28

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Sports Shorts

STANFORD FOOTBALL

Finally, the wait is over

ON GRIDIRON . . . The Palo Alto Knights’ Jr. Midgets’ football team will have this weekend off, a deserved break after opening the season with a pair of victories. The latest came Sunday in a 36-0 triumph over the Oakland Dynamites at Oakland Tech High. The Knights (2-0) wasted little time, scoring on a 64-yard run on the second play from scrimmage. It was the first of two long touchdown runs by running back Jordan Schilling, who also scored on a 57-yard run in the second quarter. He led all rushers with 136 yards. Sione Latu, the Knights’ largest player at 155 pounds, moved from tackle to fullback and gained 12 yards on his first-ever carry. He followed with a 52-yard touchdown run for his first touchdown and finished with 64 yards on just two carries. Ethan Stern ran for 74 yards and a touchdown to round out the Knights’ rushing attack. Quarterback Jake Rittman threw a 46-yard touchdown pass to Josh Brigel, the Knights’ only pass attempt, to round out the scoring. The Knights’ defense was stellar as it did not allow Oakland a first down while giving up just 43 yards of total offense. The defense was led by ends Ty Wilcox and Ben Cleasby plus linebackers Schilling, Stern, Jamie Cullen, Alifeleti Malupo and defensive line Latu and Jackson Chryst. The Knights’ other four teams suffered their second losses.

ON THE AIR Saturday College football: Duke at Stanford, 7:30 p.m., Pac-12 Networks; KNBR (1050 AM); KZSU (90.1 FM)

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son as the Knights’ head coach. “My top four are really, really solid and we’re really working hard on our doubles.” While Menlo is the winningest CCS team in history with seven section titles, Monta Vista is the defending CCS champ and has been the dominant team recently with five section crowns since 2003. The Matadors have eliminated Menlo from the past two section tournaments in the semifinals. “Monta Vista didn’t graduate anybody and they got a really good freshman,” said Shine. “It seems like they haven’t graduated anyone the past couple of years. Monta Vis-

by Rick Eymer tanford senior Shayne Skov has been on the sidelines for nearly a year. To say he’s ready for some football would be an understatement. Come Saturday, he’ll be running around the field like a wild man. Come to think of it, that would be business as usual for the All-American inside linebacker candidate. “It’s a long time coming,” Skov said of his anticipation. “Twelve months of not being able to play the game you love is definitely different. I’m itching to get back out there and it will show by the emotion I play with.” The team’s leader in tackles (84, including 7 1/2 sacks) as a sophomore, Skov was forced to miss No. 25 Stanford’s season-opening 20-17 win over visiting San Jose State last week. He was suspended for the game following a DUI arrest during the offseason. That came on the heels of a season-ending injury last season. With Duke, which also won its opener, coming to town for a 7:30 p.m. kickoff, there’s nothing to hold Skov back from doing what he loves most, and that’s making a shambles of the opposing offense. His appearance is sure to light a fire under the rest of his defensive teammates, too. He’s the unquestioned leader on the defensive side of the ball. He’s animated, talkative and holds himself to a high standard. Watching his teammates while on crutches is one thing. Having to watch the Cardinal from his couch was an entirely different experience. “The second half, I started getting pretty frustrated,” he said. “I love football, and the way I play I think resonates that. So to not be able to play it for 12 months has been tough, but it has also been an incredibly humbling experience.” Thus, Skov is excited to be back. How excited? Skov recalled missing two games because of injury in 2010 and being so amped upon his return, he walloped the Wake Forest quarterback a full two seconds late. “Hopefully, I’ll be more in control of my emotions when I play this time,” he said. “But I’m certainly excited.” Skov recorded 11 tackles and was credited 1 1/2 sacks in last year’s game against the Blue Devils. Even if he can’t match that this week, he’ll be a welcome addition. “I’m hoping by midseason that he gets back to his true form,” Cardinal coach David Shaw said. “The bottom line is that he’s still fast, he’s still physical. We’ve had a tough

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(continued on page 34)

S

Keith Peters

ON THE COURT . . . Two local seniors who will be closing out their college volleyball careers this season earned some time in the spotlight during tournament action over the weekend. Harvard senior Taylor Docter from Castilleja was named to the Hokie Invitational All-Tournament team after getting 17 kills and 13 digs in a loss to host Virginia Teach and 11 kills plus seven digs in a 3-0 setback to Towson on Saturday. In a five-set loss to Middle Tennessee State to open the tourney, Docter produced 14 kills, 11 digs and four blocks. Gunn grad Teresa Skelly had six blocks against Middle Tennessee in addition to hitting .545 wityh seven kills in the Towson match. Docter has 31 kills and 24 digs as the Crimson has gotten off to an 0-3 start, heading into their own Harvard Invitational this weekend. UC Davis senior Allison Whitson, from Palo Alto High, also saw her team swept last weekend during the Aggie Invitational. UC Davis fell to Utah, North Carolina and Santa Clara. Whitson, however, had 32 kills during the three matches to bring her career total to 1,240. That moved her from sixth to No. 3 all-time in the Aggies’ history book, trailing only Candy Leach (1,888 from 1989-92) and Kally Gaudino (1,337 from 2000-03).

After missing nearly a year, Shayne Skov ready to face Duke

Menlo School sophomore Liz Yao posted a straight-set victory at No. 1 singles on Wednesday to help the Knights remain unbeaten with a 7-0 nonleague victory over 2011 CCS runner-up Saratoga in Atherton.

Menlo School girls’ tennis is hoping to end its CCS frustration this season by Keith Peters enior Giannina Ong is sporting a new hair color these days — red instead of her normal brown. Junior Paulina Golikova has added streaks of green to her blonde locks. And, the Menlo School girls’ tennis team has added to its wardrobe new T-shirts enscribed: “I Bust Mine So I Can Kick Yours.” Clearly, the Knights are out to change things up this season. Perhaps they’re looking for additional inspiration to end six years of frustration. Despite winning 188 straight league dual matches and being undefeated in league play since the start of the 1994 season — 18 years and counting — Menlo has suffered

S

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through a drought in the Central Coast Section playoffs. The Knights last appeared in the section title match in 2006 — losing to Monta Vista — and last won a CCS team championship in 2005. Menlo, however, returns 14 players who were on the roster at the end of the 2011 season that ended 20-5 with a loss to Monta Vista in the semifinals. The Knights are a year older and more experienced. Moreover, they are best-suited to make a run at the Matadors this season — certainly in better shape to reach the CCS finals and qualify for NorCals. “Everybody is a year older and I’ve got all my singles players back,” said Bill Shine, now in his 17th sea-


Sports

Palo Alto hopes to move up on all-time football leaders Vikings will take 617 career victories, ranked No. 6 in state history, into their 2012 season opener on Friday night at San Benito by Rick Eymer

P

alo Alto will have the opportunity to maintain its position as one of the winningest football programs in California history when the Vikings open their 2012 season on Friday at San Benito. Kickoff is 7:30 p.m. Palo Alto begins the season with 617 victories from 1897-2011. That includes a record of 87-46 in rugby from 1907-1919, which was played as an alternative for 11-man football during those years. According to the Cal-Hi Sports state football record book, Paly will begin its season ranked No. 6 all-time for most victories. Bakersfield, which is 2-0 this season, is No. 1 with 729 and Long Beach Poly (1-0 this season) is second with 710. Berkeley (0-1) ranks No. 3 with 639 while Santa Monica (1-0) and Loyola-Los Angeles (2-0) are tied for fourth with 620. Palo Alto is next, six wins ahead of Dos Palos (611). Those are the only teams in state history with 600 or more victories. Paly has made a big move over the past nine years, going 91-23-2. That included a 14-0 record and CIF Division I state championship in 2010 for veteran coach Earl Hansen, who begins his 24th season at Paly with a 175-86-3 record. The Vikings were 10-3 a year ago but lost a ton of offensive talent in B.J. Boyd (25 touchdowns), Dre Hill, Austin Braff, Morris Gates-Mouton plus lineman Tory Prati that helped produce 36.5 points a game. While Palo Alto heads to Hollister on Friday, Gunn (1-0) will be at home against Carlmont (1-0) at 7:30 p.m. Sacred Heart Prep (1-0) will visit Mountain View (0-0) at 3:15 p.m., Pinewood (0-0) will host Anderson Valley (0-1) at 4 p.m., and MenloAtherton (1-0) will visit Los Gatos (0-1) at 7:30 p.m. On Saturday, Priory will open its eight-man season by hosting Rincon Valley Christian at 1 p.m., and Menlo School (1-0) will take on Mission (0-0) at San Francisco’s Kezar Stadium at 2 p.m. Here’s a look at last week’s openers:

Menlo 66, Santa Cruz 14 Menlo senior running back Heru Peacock has played the violin longer than he’s played football and he’s pretty good at football. He started winning awards for his violin virtuosity in middle school. These days he’s just as happy scoring touchdowns. Peacock needed eight carries to rush for 82 yards and a pair of touchdowns in the Knights’ thrashing of visiting Santa Cruz on Friday. “We showed we had good depth,� Peacock said. “The juniors stepped up and kept the momentum going.� Peacock hopes to get a chance to participate in college, both football and the violin. He also plays the electric guitar and is a member of the Menlo jazz band. Peacock’s football lineage is pretty impressive too. His father, Walter Peacock, is the career rushing leader (3,204 yards) at the University of Louisville. Peacock took his hand offs from

two different quarterbacks in the game, junior starter Jack Heneghan and senior Matt Bradley. The two signal callers combined to throw for 140 yards on 11-of-18 passing. Heneghan added 67 rushing yards. He passed for a touchdown and ran for two more. Last year Menlo beat Santa Cruz on the final play of the game. This year, against a junior-dominated team, the Knights had a 9-0 lead before they ran a play from scrimmage. Max Parker raced 91 yards with the opening kickoff for a 7-0 edge and a bad snap into the end zone gave Menlo another two points. The Knights turned the game into a romp after that, building a 30-0 advantage and 66-7 lead. Menlo-Atherton 26, El Camino 0 Royce Branning completed seven of 13 passes for 171 yards and two touchdowns to spark the Bears to

a season-opening victory over El Camino at South San Francisco High on Friday night. Branning hooked up with Evan Perkins on an 85-yard TD and fired another to Talaisi Teu, who also rushed for a score. Teu finished with 90 yards on 13 carries while Isiah Nash led the rushing attack with 13 carries for 129 yards. The Bears ground out 251 rushing yards on 35 carries. Perkins finished with three catches for 118 yards. Brian Keare added 32 yards on two catches. Sacred Heart Prep 31, Branham 6 Ryan Gaertner got his senior season under way in a big way as he scored a pair of touchdowns to lead the Gators to a nonleague triumph over host Branham on Friday night in San Jose. SHP quarterback Kevin Donahoe got his team rolling when he hit Rex Shannon on a 60-yard scoring play.

Gaertner provided the winning points on TD runs of 10 and four yards while Chris Lee contributed an eight-yard scoring run and Brendan Spillane kicked a 20-yard field goal. Gunn 14, San Mateo 6 With the exception of poor tackling on one play, the Gunn defense was the key in a 14-6 win at San Mateo in the opening game for both teams. Gunn QB Andre Guzman connected on two passes to Kevin Sharp. The

first gained 62 yards and then, four plays later, Guzman hit Sharp from five yards out for the score with 16 seconds to go in the half. Ben Sampson converted the extra point to put the Titans up, 7-6. With 4:25 to go in the third, Gunn faced fourth-and-5 from San Mateo’s 33 and eschewed the pass as Guzman handed off to Sean Lydster, who rambled over the right side for the touchdown. Sampson’s extra point gave Gunn a 14-6 lead. N

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Sports

Shayne Skov

STANFORD ROUNDUP

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by Rick Eymer uke is looking to earn its first road victory over a ranked team since 1971. That was when the Blue Devils won, 9-3, at Stanford in a Rose Bowl season. Saturday will mark Duke’s first return to Stanford Stadium since that game. “Defensively, they’re going to be aggressive,” said Stanford coach David Shaw. “They have some long, rangy guys on the defensive

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Cardinal women’s soccer is still missing Ubogagu Sophomore standout playing for US U20 team in Germany by Rick Eymer Stanford record of 0.45. he Stanford women’s soccer team will be playing for the Men’s soccer Stanford Nike Invitational Stanford (1-2) travels to No.11 UC this weekend. Cardinal sophomore Irvine (3-0) for a match Friday at Chioma Ubogagu will be playing 7 p.m., looking to end a two-match for the United States in the FIFA slide. Under-20 World Cup final against Stanford dropped two matches at Germany. last week’s Charleston tournament, Fifth-ranked Stanford (2-1-1), 2-1 in overtime to the host school which hosts the Inviand 2-0 to No. 22 Furtational, meets Boston man. University (3-2-1) at 7 UC Irvine won 16 p.m. Friday in its first games last year, reachmatch. The Cardinal ing the second round and No. 23 Georgeof the NCAA Tournatown (6-0) play Sunment. The Anteaters day at noon. have played in three Santa Clara and of the last four NCAA Georgetown meet at Tournaments, includ4:30 p.m. on Friday, ing in 2009 when they while Boston Univeralso faced Stanford in sity will play at Santa the second round. Clara at 1 p.m. SunThe Cardinal is led day. in scoring by Adam The Stanford womJahn who has a goal en’s athletic program and an assist in the will also be presented early going. Aaron Chioma Ubogagu with its Capital One Kovar has Stanford’s Trophy during Friday’s match with other goal, a game winner at USF. Boston. Drew Hutchins has played all 273 Ubogagu scored the winning goal minutes of the season in goal, allowin overtime to beat North Korea in ing four goals, although two were on the quarterfinal round and played in penalty kicks. the second half of the Americans’ 2-0 semifinal victory over Nigeria. Women’s volleyball The U.S. is seeking its third chamThe top-rated freshmen recruitpionship in the biennial tournament ing class has certainly made an that began in 2002. immediate impact for Germany defeated No. 8 Stanford, which the U.S. during pool hosts the Stanford Inplay. vitational beginning Ubogagu, last year’s Friday. Pac-12 Freshman of All five freshmen — the Year, is Stanfordís Inky Ajanaku, Madi leading returning Bugg, Jordan Burgess, scorer with 10 goals. Brittany Howard and She is expected to be Megan McGehee — available next† Friday have started at least when Stanford faces one match already. San Diego State at the Burgess (50) and Santa Clara Classic. Howard (46) are the While Stanford had top two kill leaders its 51-match home for the Cardinal (3-2). winning streak ended Junior Carly Wopat is in last week’s 1-1 draw third with 42 kills and Jordan Burgess with Boston College, leads the team with 24 the Cardinal still owns a 56-match total blocks. unbeaten streak at home. Stanford, which lost to Jiangsu Junior Natalie Griffen, in the of China in an exhibition match starting lineup for the first time, Wednesday night, plays Santa Clara leads Stanford with three goals, al- at 7 p.m. Friday night, Loyola on ready more than she scored in the Saturday at 10 a.m. and Pacific on previous two years combined. Saturday at 6 p.m. Stanford has trailed in three of its first four matches, equaling last Women’s field hockey year’s total. Stanford recovered to No. 16 Stanford hosts No. 10 Iowa win all three in 2011 and two of the at 2:30 p.m. Friday in a nonconferthree this year. Also, Stanford’s five ence match to be televised nationgoals allowed is more than half of ally on the Pac-12 Networks. last seasonís total of nine allowed. unior goalkeeper Emily Oliver, Men’s golf who did not play in the first four No 10 Stanford opened a week matches because of injury, has a ca- in Scotland on Thursday for worldreer goals-against average of 0.27. class golf and cultural immersion in She has allowed only 11 goals in 44 the United Kingdom. Made possible career matches. Her GAA, if main- by an endowed foreign travel fund, tained, would rank No. 1 in Stanford the team will take an “life-changcareer history. U.S. national team ing trip every four years,” Stanford member Nicole Barnhart has the coach Conrad Ray said. N

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Jim Shorin/stanfordphoto.com

time blocking him all training camp.” That’s music to any defensive coordinators’ ears. Stanford cornerback Usua Amanam, the former running back, knows what to expect from Skov. “Shayne has always been a step ahead of everyone in terms of what he has in his head, the physical ability and his instincts,” Amanam said. “He’s a fighter, and there’s not much more to say.” A year ago, Skov figured to be preparing for his first NFL game right now. That was before he suffered his season-ending knee injury during the second quarter in Tucson last year. He was trying to tackle Arizona’s Juron Criner, who is preparing for his first NFL game with the Oakland Raiders, when a major collision between the two players occurred, leaving Skov with torn ligaments in his left knee. “It was nasty,” Skov said. “I remember seeing it up on the Jumbotron at Arizona while I was lying down. But you just have to move on. If you play football worrying about getting hurt or wondering about ‘What ifs,’ you’re going to miss out on the opportunities you have right in front of you.” Skov also learned a lesson during the offseason when he was charged with DUI in a campus incident. He was barred from participating in any spring drills and suspended for the season opener. Skov said the entire experience has changed him, beyond football. “A greater level of maturity,” Skov said. “In regard to the injury, any time you lose something, you come back with a greater appreciation for what you have, and also, a greater development in terms of my work ethic. “In terms of being able to come back and play this year, it was going to take a lot. I learned that what I did before was enough then, but if I want to get back to where I was and improve upon that, it’s going to take more. Hopefully, once I’m back to where I was, with the new work ethic I’ve gained, I’ve only improved. “In regards to what happened

After missing nearly a year following an injury and a one-game suspension, standout linebacker Shayne Skov is set to face Duke on Saturday. before, with the suspension and whatnot, just the level of responsibility and the gravity of one’s actions. I’m ready to move past that. I haven’t forgotten about that and I won’t ever forget about that, but I just have to be more mature in how I carry myself and move on in life.” Once he steps onto the field Saturday, the past 12 months will dissipate into the wind and Cardinal fans can look forward to an improved defense that showed some weaknesses — especially in the secondary — against San Jose State. On the plus side, Skov watched teammates Jarek Lancaster and A.J. Tarpley develop into top-notch line-

side, and they try to make it as difficult on you as possible, based on their alignments.” _______________________ Fullback Ryan Hewitt, a key member in Stanford’s offense, sat out the season opener with an ankle injury and is questionable against Duke. “I’m leaning toward not playing him,” Shaw said, “he’s leaning toward playing.” _______________________

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backers and became their de facto coach with advice during game films and elsewhere. Stanford’s linebacker crew is the team’s strength and the addition of Skov will only serve to emphasize that. In addition to Lancaster and Tarpley, Palo Alto grad Kevin Anderson and fifth-year senior Alex Debniak are also in the mix. Debniak earned more playing time after he forced a third-quarter fumble that set up Jordan Williamson’s winning field goal. Debniak will likely see more playing time in any given situation based on his success against San Jose State and his effort during training camp. N

Freshman running back Barry J. Sanders, the son of the Detroit Lions’ Hall of Famer, did not play against San Jose State and is “most likely” going to redshirt this season, Shaw said. _______________________ Asked to pinpoint Stanford’s struggles against San Jose State in a game the Cardinal was expected to win handily, Shaw said the answer wasn’t so simple. “It’s hard to point and say, There’s the problem,” Shaw said. “It was the combination of a lot of little tiny things that makes you feel, just `blah.’ Outside the first two drives, it was just `blah.’” However, “A month from now, people are going to be saying Stanford beat a pretty good San Jose State team,” Shaw said. N


Sports (continued from page 32)

ta is clearly the team to beat.” Menlo, of course, is among the challengers along with Mitty and 2011 runner-up Saratoga, which captured section titles in 2009 and ‘10. The Falcons, however, aren’t as strong this season and Menlo proved that with a big 7-0 nonleague victory on Wednesday in Atherton. The Knights (2-0) swept the singles with only one match going to three sets — Ong pulling out a 2-6, 7-6 (7-2), 6-3 victory at No. 3 singles. Ong is the only senior in Menlo’s singles’ lineup. Sophomore Liz Yao won at No. 1, junior Kristy Jorgensen prevailed at No. 2 and junior Christine Eliazo swept at No. 4. Shine, meanwhile, picked up his 375th career triumph at Menlo (against 65 losses). He was most impressed with his team’s play in doubles, which will be a crucial aspect to Menlo’s success this season. “We can’t count on our No. 1 singles player winning every match,” said Shine. “The doubles have to come through.” Senior Laura Gradiska teamed with sophomore Helena Ong to win, 6-1, 6-2, at No. 1 while senior Sam Hoag and sophomore Sadie Bronk posted a 6-2, 6-1 triumph at No. 2. Golikova and junior Sarah Schinasi swept at No. 3 doubles. Menlo next will compete in the California Classic in Fresno this weekend, where Dana Hills is the No. 1 seed and Monta Vista is No. 2. The Knights also will host Monta Vista on Sept. 19 in what could be a preview of the CCS finals. Elsewhere Wednesday: Sacred Heart Prep opened its season with a tough 4-3 loss to host Los Altos. The Gators managed only one singles victory, by Caroline Nordman at No. 1, but had a chance in doubles. The No. 2 tandem of Caroline Parsons and Maddy Jones put SHP in position to win after a 6-4 opening set, but the Gators’ duo then dropped the next two sets. Girls’ golf The first-ever Gunn girls’ golf team make its debut a successful one by handing visiting Sacred Heart Prep a nonleague defeat on Wednesday, 235-251, at Palo Alto Municipal. Gunn sophomore Anna Zhou led the Titans (1-0) with a 1-under-par 36 as she registered eight pars and one birdie. Teammate Jayshree Sarathy added a 40, notching six pars. Tiffany Yang (47), Sandra Herchen (56) and Somina Lee (56) wrapped up the Titans’ first-ever dual-match effort. Sophomore Jessica Koenig shot 45 to lead the Gators (1-1) with teammate Maddy Ellison a stroke behind her. On Tuesday, Koenig, a former Sacred Heart Prep water polo player, made the most of her transition to the golf team leading the Gators over Mercy-Burlingame, 249-319, in the first match of the 2012 West Bay Athletic League (Foothill Division) season. Koenig shot a 42 to earn medalist honors while Ellison contributed a 48 for the Gators on the par-36 Sharon Heights Country Club course.

Girls’ volleyball Menlo School used some precise serving to register a three-set victory over visiting Aragon in a nonleague match Wednesday. The Knights (4-2), coming off a sixth-place finish at Spikefest I last weekend, beat the Dons, 25-13, 25-12, 25-19. Menlo junior Maddy Frappier notched eight kills and senior Emma Thygesen collected seven. Junior Abbey Schmitt (19 assists) and senior Alexandra Ko (nine assists) distributed well for the Knights, who hit .266 for the match. “I think the key to us dominating the match was tough accurate serving,” Menlo coach Atlee Hubbard said. “We struggled a little with serving in the Spikefest tournament and worked on it this week in practice. Tonight was exactly what our serving should be.” In San Mateo, first-year coach Dustin Moore got his first victory of the season as Priory registered a 2523, 25-23, 23-25, 25-17 nonleague victory over host San Mateo on Wednesday. The Panthers improved to 1-1, bouncing back from a seasonopening loss to Harker last week.

On Tuesday, Sacred Heart Prep improved to 6-1 with a 25-19, 2521, 25-23 nonleague win over visiting Menlo-Atherton. Ellie Shannon produced 13 kills and four blocks to pace the Gators, who won the Silver Division of the Spikefest I on Saturday. Against the Bears, the Gators got nine kills and 10 digs from Sonia Abuel-Saud, seven kills and six blocks from Payton Smith, 10 digs from Helen Gannon and 26 assists from Cammie Merten. The Bears (0-1) were missing last year’s MVP in the PAL Bay Division, Ali Spindt, while Pauli King was limited to libero duties while coming back from injury. Also Tuesday, senior Shelby Knowles contributed 14 kills and 10 digs as two-time defending CIF Division I state champion Palo Alto opened its season with a 25-20, 2523, 25-20 nonleague victory over visiting Notre Dame-Belmont. The victory was the 22nd straight for the Vikings, who capped the 2011 season with a 21-match win streak. Sophia Bono, who is the only other senior on the team and one of two co-captains, added 35 assists in her

lengthiest playing stint while junior Becca Raffel finished with 11 kills. Keri Gee added 15 digs to lead the Vikings in that department. Paly is now 78-4 since the start of the 2010 season. Girls’ water polo Menlo-Atherton got its 2012 season off to a good start with a 10-7 nonleague victory over visiting Presentation on Wednesday evening. The teams traded scoring for three periods with neither team leading by more than a goal. But, in the final minute of the third period, the Bears ramped up their attack. A goal from junior Jessica Heilman broke a 6-6 tie to give the Bears a one-goal lead going into the final period. The fourth quarter was all Bears with senior Jenna Swartz scoring two goals late to help secure the win. Junior goalie Sierra Sheeper had 10 saves and some key denials. The Bears had four players find the net — Heilman notching five goals with junior Sophia Caryotakis and Swartz scoring twice. Nicole Zanolli added a second- period goal. N

Keith Peters

Prep roundup

Giannina Ong’s T-shirt could be Menlo’s rallying cry this year.

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Palo Alto Weekly 09.07.2012 - Section 1