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November 8-12, 2012


DALLAS

International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show

November 8- 12, 2012 2012 Show Catalogue


To our Most Welcomed Guests from Scott Diament and Robert Samuels the Organizers, It is our pleasure to welcome you to the DALLAS International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show at the Dallas Market Hall. We are proud to be able to host our show in the beautiful City of Dallas. As show organizers, we strive for excellence, traveling far and wide to the world’s finest art and antiques shows, in addition to attending the most important shows in the United States. As a result, it is our pleasure to be able to present you with a national and international array of unique and highly esteemed exhibitors in each category. A show of this magnitude presents challenges from its’ inception and requires a coordinated effort from a myriad of people. We would like to express our gratitude and congratulate everyone involved in making the DALLAS International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show a success. It is truly a team effort requiring seamless production and coordination from our hardworking office staff to our technical and creative personnel in order to bring this event to life. We are delighted to be able to honor the Texas Cultural Trust at our Opening Night Preview Party. The Texas Cultural Trust is a nonprofit organization that promotes the importance of the arts in educating children and in sustaining the vibrant Texas economy, through awareness, outreach, economic research, and the development of an art and digital literacy curriculum for public school students. We applaud TCT’s outstanding efforts and performance. Most importantly, we would like to give a special thanks to our exhibitors from around the world who traveled here so that the residents of the Dallas/Fort Worth Metroplex might enjoy spectacular works of art, rare antiques and timeless treasures. To each participant, we offer our deep felt appreciation and gratitude. To our visitors, we extend our warmest welcome, and invite you to take advantage of this cultural experience and the opportunity to meet many of the worlds most renowned and respected, fine art, antique and jewelry dealers who are eager to share their knowledge and treasures with you. We would also be pleased to welcome you to our other Palm Beach Show Group events: Los Angeles Art Show, January 23-27, 2013 Naples Art, Antique & Jewelry Show, February 7-11, 2013 Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show, February 15-19, 2013 Baltimore Summer Antiques Show, August 22-25, 2013 Los Angeles Jewelry & Antique Show, January 15-19, 2014 “It would take a lifetime of travel to see and experience all that the Palm Beach Show Group has to offer.” Please Enjoy the Show!

Scott Diament Show Organizers

Robert Samuels


DALLAS

International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show

Private Preview Party Thursday, November 8, 6pm - 10pm Honoring the Texas Cultural Trust

Show Hours Friday Saturday Saturday Monday

November 9 November 10 November 11 November 12

Designer Showcase John Bobbitt Joe Minton Marianna Riley Stephens

COVER Maurice Leloir (1853 - 1940). A Romantic Lunch. Oil on panel. 15 3/8 x 21 1/2 inches. Signed. Courtesy of Rehs Galleries BACK COVER Cartier 18K Yellow Gold, Platinum, Diamond, Coral & Cabochon Emerald Dragon Pin. Circa 1960s. Courtesy of Tenenbaum & Co.

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11am-7pm 11am-7pm 11am-7pm 11am-6pm


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November 2012

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Dear Friends, Welcome to the Dallas International Art, Antique and Jewelry Show! The Texas Cultural Trust and Texas Women for the Arts are proud to partner with this outstanding organization, and pleased to be the featured charitable organization for this year’s show. Established in 1995, the Texas Cultural Trust is a 501(c)(3) nonprofit organization that promotes the importance of the arts in educating our children and sustaining our vibrant Texas economy, through awareness, outreach, economic research, and the development of an art and digital literacy curriculum for public school students. The Texas Cultural Trust supports the programs of the Texas Commission on the Arts. Our keystone programs are Texas Women for the Arts and Texas Medal of Arts Awards, both of which benefit the Trust, and support our arts education initiatives economic research.

Karen Oswalt, Chair Austin Charles Matthews, Vice Chair Dallas Greg Davis, Treasurer Dallas Judy Robison, Secretary El Paso Wayne Fisher, Immediate Past Chair Houston Anita Arnold, Texarkana Ray Benson, Austin Kelli Blanton, Houston

Texas Women for the Arts is a giving program uniting the financial forces of Texas women to fund initiatives for the arts and arts education throughout the state. Its mission is to Awaken and Nurture the Artist in every Texas Child. Each year, Texas Women for the Arts members have the opportunity to choose the programs their dollars will support. Since its inception six years ago, Texas Women for the Arts has contributed $886,500 to 34 arts education programs across the state, benefitting more than half a million Texas children.

Leslie Blanton, Houston Marvin Blum, Fort Worth Michelle Brock, Midland Daniel H. Chapman, Dallas Patricia Hamilton Dewhurst, Houston Patsy Donosky, Dallas George Farish, Brownsville

The Texas Medal of Arts Awards is our biennial event that celebrates Texans who have achieved greatness through their creative talents, as well as those whose generosity has opened doors to artistic opportunity for Texans of all ages. Past recipients include Van Cliburn, Laura Bush, Walter Cronkite, Tommy Lee Jones, Lyle Lovett, Willie Nelson, Robert Rauschenberg, ZZ Top and more. The Texas Medal of Arts Awards highlights the power of the arts in education, the Texas economy, and the culture of the state. For more information on these and other programs, please visit www.txculturaltrust.org. Again, we are very excited to be a part of this weekend’s festivities and look forward to a successful show!

Linda Gibbons, Dallas Sandra Gilliland, Amarillo Anthony Hall, Houston Carol Haynes, Abilene Gayle Hunt, El Paso Alexis Hunter, Corpus Christi Gene Jones, Dallas Milla Perry Jones, Dallas Kathleen Kennedy, San Antonio Carole Krist, Kemah Linda LaMantia, Laredo Dawn Leatherwood, Tyler Nancy Loeffler, San Antonio

Sincerely,

Brian McCall, Austin Sharon McCullough, Dallas Debbie Montford, San Antonio

Karen Oswalt Chair, Texas Cultural Trust

Sandra Gilliland Donna Axum Whitworth Chair, Texas Women for the Arts Chair Emeritus, Texas Women for the Arts

Jesús Moroles, Rockport Guillermo Nicolas, San Antonio Kay Olson, Waco Laura Street, Amarillo Stephen Tipps, Houston

823 Congress, Suite 650 Austin, Texas 78701 512.478.5289 Toll Free 877.651.8282 Fax 512.478.5292 www.txculturaltrust.org The Texas Cultural Trust Council is a 501(c)3 non-profit organization.

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Leslie Ward, Austin Donna Axum Whitworth Fort Worth, Chair Emeritus, Texas Women for the Arts Pam Willeford, Austin Joci Straus, San Antonio Chair Emeritus, Texas Medal of Arts Awards


DALLAS

International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show Contents Show Hours & Preview Party

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Letters of Greeting

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Host Commitee

12

The Art of Seating by Brian J. Lang

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Costume Painting by Bill Rau, M.S. Rau Antiques

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Participating Exhibitors

34

Advertisements

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Index of Exhibitors

100

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THE PALM BEACH SHOW GROUP – Producer of the Palm Beach Jewelry, Art & Antique Show, the Baltimore Summer Antiques Show, the DALLAS International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show, the Naples Art, Antique & Jewelry Show, the LA Art Show, and the Los Angeles Jewelry & Antique Show

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DALLAS

International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show President, CEO ..................................................... Scott Diament, GG G.I.A. Vice President ...................................................... Rob Samuels, GG G.I.A. COMMUNICATIONS Executive Director of Communications...... Laurie Long Public Relations ................................................... Valerie Bell Art Director ........................................................... Hanna Isotalo EVENT MANAGEMENT Event Coordinator .............................................. Jaime Moses Event Coordinator .............................................. Kellie Ross ACCOUNTING Bookkeeper ........................................................... Lisa Solomon Weissman Assistant Bookkeeper ....................................... Ashley Wolfe OPERATIONS Director of Operations ...................................... Dale Chlumsky Floorplans, Layout & Lighting ........................ Robert Hann Administration ...................................................... Danielle Hamilton SHOW OFFICE 500 N. Dixie Highway, Lake Worth, FL 33460 tel: 561-822-5440 fax: 561-837-6651 Dallasfallshow.com | CollectorsNet.com

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DALLAS

International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show A SPECIAL THANK YOU TO OUR 2012 HOST COMMITTEE Tom Addis

Joyce Fox

Liz and Ralph Perry-Miller

Heather and Scott Asbury

Sarah Freeman

Terri Provencal

Marilyn Augur

Linda Gibbons

Melinda and William Rathke

George Ann and Bill Bahan

Nancy Gopez

Billie Leigh Rippey

Leigh Bailey

Randall Goss

Lillie and Philip Romano

Sue and Dan Bailey

Beth and Kevin Grace

Capera Ryan

Jan Baldwin

Jennifer and George Grubbs, III

Kit and Kemp Sawers

Blake Barker

Margaret and Barry Hancock

Carol Seay

Carrie and Tom Barron

Sherry Hayslip

Peggy and Carl Sewell, Jr.

Arundel Bell

Tres and Patrick Hodges

Betty Lou and Larry Sheerin

Valerie and Barron Bell

George Hunter

D’Andra Simmons

Betty Blake

Sue and Phil John

Ginger and Doug Simmons

John Bobbitt

Gene and Jerry Jones

Misty and Steven Smathers

Faye C. Briggs

Ramona Jones

Barbara and Shelly Stein

Pam and Dan Busbee

Olivia and Jeff Kearney

Marianna Riley Stephens

Meredith and David Camp

Joyce and Larry Lacerte

Molly Bowman Stephens

Connie and Denny Carreker

Susan and Lou Lebowitz

Anne and Steve Stodghill

Christie Carter

Lisa and George Longino

Jan and Dan Strimple

Minnie and Bill Caruth

Lynn and Allan McBee

Kirby Stuart

Laurie and Mark Connell

Kate Rose and T.J. Marquez

Jacquelin and Phillip Taylor

Gail and Dan Cook

Alan May

Lisa Taylor

Buddy Coronado

JoAnne and Michael McCullough

Maxine Trowbridge

Garry Cox

Patricia and Curtis Meadows

Rachel and Christopher Trowbridge

Mary Lee Cox

Peggy and Dan Meyer

Amy Turner

Kim and Glenn Darden

Jan Miller and Jeff Rich

Patty Jo and John Turner

Barbara and Don Daseke

Tincy and Vance Miller

Evy Kay and Dick Washburne

Debbie Denmon and Richard Greagor

Joe Minton

Kathy and Charles Webster

Gay and Brad Donnell

Dana and Lee Moore

Amy Wendt

Patsy Donosky

Karen Mordecai

Jocelyn White and Kim Seal

Emily Eisenhauer

Carole and Scott Murray

Kelly Wynne White

Tucker and Richard Enthoven

Patty and Bobby Nail

Beth and Richard Wilbins

Renee Querbes Farren

Angela and Doug Nash

Kendall and Derek Williams

Susan and John Farris

Jeanette and Lamar Norsworthy

Kimbell and Mitch Wynne

David Feld

Eric O’Keefe

Rebecca Young

Patti Flowers and Tom Swiley

Pam and Vin Perella

Cindy Zelazny

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Through December 30

In this celebratory exhibition honoring the Museum’s 40th anniversary, discover historic unpublished photographs and behind-the-scenes accounts of Kimbell milestones, including architectural achievements, pivotal art purchases, important exhibitions, and more.

3333 Camp Bowie Boulevard | Fort Worth, TX 76107 817.332.8451 | WWW.KIMBELLART.ORG

FREE admission Presenting sponsor

Promotional support is provided by Frederic Leighton, Portrait of May Sartoris (detail), c. 1860, oil on canvas, acquired in 1964

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The Dallas Symphony Orchestra is pleased to partner with the Dallas International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show. Week after week, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra presents the finest in classical and popular music in the architecturally-significant and acoustically-excellent Morton H. Meyerson Symphony Center in the heart of the Dallas Arts District in downtown Dallas. Now in his fifth season, Music Director Jaap van Zweden has elevated the orchestra’s performances to unprecedented levels of artistry and excitement with the Dallas Symphony’s exceptional musicians and with the world’s best-known and most-gifted musical soloists.

“ W H AT

VA N Z W E D E N H A S D O N E …

WITH THE DSO HAS TO BE

heard T O

— S C O T T C A N T R E L L , The Dallas Morning News

With an expanded donor base and significant and growing corporate and foundation support, the Dallas Symphony Orchestra has the assets in place to be recognized as one of the world’s great orchestras: a blazingly talented, internationally celebrated artistic leader in Maestro van Zweden; a fabulous concert hall in which he can burnish an already great ensemble; a vibrant, growing city with both a demonstrated love of the arts and an enviable depth of resources; and visionary leadership determined to grow the orchestra’s resources and reputation. The DSO performs more than 175 public concerts each year, including the 16-week Texas Instruments Classical Series and the 9-week DSO Pops series. The orchestra performs free Community Concert Series concerts in Dallas neighborhoods and parks. Launched in February, 2012, the DSO on the GO series takes the orchestra to concert halls in communities across North Texas, with 16 performances in 8 communities during the 2012-2013 concert year.

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B E B E L I E V E D.


2012–2013

Season Highlights SEPTEMBER 13-16

PINES OF ROME Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Joaquín Achúcarro, piano

SEPTEMBER 20-23

PICTURES AT AN EXHIBITION Jaap van Zweden, conductor Michael Guttman, violin | Wendy Sutter, cello

SEPTEMBER 27-30

OHLSSON PLAYS RACHMANINOFF Hans Graf, conductor | Garrick Ohlsson, piano

OCTOBER 18-21

DIVINE DVORÁK Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Narek Hakhnazaryan, cello

NOVEMBER 1-4

BEETHOVEN’S FIFTH Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Hilary Hahn, violin

NOVEMBER 8-10

BRITTEN’S WAR REQUIEM

A key part of its mission, the DSO’s award-winning youth education programs also enhance community ownership by building new and diverse audiences. Key programs include the Cecil and Ida Green Youth Concert Series at the Meyerson Symphony Center; the Young Strings program for African-American and Latino students in the city of Dallas;

Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Olga Guryakova, soprano Ian Bostridge, tenor | Dietrich Henschel, baritone Dallas Symphony Chorus Joshua Habermann, director Children’s Chorus of Greater Dallas Cynthia Nott, director | Paul Phillips, conductor II

JANUARY 10-13

BENEDETTI PLAYS TCHAIKOVSKY

Symphony YES! ensemble presentations in schools across North Texas; Open Rehearsals,

Pablo González, conductor | Nicola Benedetti, violin

and DSOKids.com/StudioDSO.com website resources for children and teenagers.

M O Z A RT F E S T I VA L JANUARY 17-19

Under Maestro van Zweden, the orchestra has released four CDs on its DSO Live label,

MOZART’S JUPITER Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Augustin Hadelich, violin

including the world premiere recording of Steven Stucky’s oratorio August 4, 1964;

JANUARY 24-27

Beethoven’s Fifth and Seventh Symphonies; and an on-going survey of Tchaikovsky’s

Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Yefim Bronfman, piano

greatest masterworks, including the Fourth Symphony and Suite No. 4, Mozartiana; Fifth Symphony and Capriccio italien. DSO Live recordings are distributed internationally and available as downloads through the Naxos, Amazon.com, iTunes and other stores and websites.

BRONFMAN PLAYS MOZART

FEBRUARY 14-17

ROMEO AND JULIET Julian Kuerti, conductor | Manuel Barrueco, guitar

FEBRUARY 21-24*

BEETHOVEN AND STRAUSS Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Anton Nel, piano

FEBRUARY 28 – MARCH 3

MAHLER’S MIGHTY SIXTH Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Erik Bosgraaf, recorder

APRIL 11-13

POETIC LISZT Marc Albrecht, conductor | Jean-Efflam Bavouzet, piano

APRIL 25-28

Share the excitement! We invite you to attend a performance by the Dallas Symphony Orchestra. Call 214.692.0203 or visit DallasSymphony.com

BACH AND BEYOND Ton Koopman, conductor and harpsichord Ryan Anthony, trumpet | Nathan Olson, violin | Christopher Adkins, cello | Jean Larson Garver, flute | Erin Hannigan, oboe Wilfred Roberts, bassoon

MAY 17, 19

DIE WALKÜRE Jaap van Zweden, conductor | | Heidi Melton, soprano Clifton Forbis, tenor | Eric Owens, bass

MAY 23-25

CARMINA BURANA Jaap van Zweden, conductor | Alexander Kerr, violin Sarah Joy Miller, soprano | John Osborn, tenor Michael Todd Simpson, baritone Dallas Symphony Chorus: Joshua Habermann, director Children’s Chorus of Greater Dallas: Cynthia Nott, director

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THE DALLAS INTERNATIONAL ART, ANTIQUE & JEWELRY SHOW

30th Anniversary salutes the

of the

A WRITER’S GARDEN SYMPOSIUM AND LUNCHEON

“Searching for Beauty” Wednesday, November 14, 2012 9:30 a.m. – 1:30 p.m. Rosine Hall at The Dallas Arboretum Contact: Jocelyn White at Joceink@aol.com or 214.912.2464.

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TOMORROW HAS ARRIVED

F A S H I O N A B L Y E A R L Y.

Experience the all-new 2013 XTS with the obsessive service of Sewell Cadillac, your local authority on Cadillac sales and service.

Dallas / Grapevine / SewellCadillac.com 17


200 YEARS OF AMERICAN DESIGN BY BRIAN J. LANG

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Fig. 1: Grecian settee, design and manufacture attributed to John Finlay (active ca. 1799–1833) and Hugh Finlay (active ca. 1800–1837), Baltimore, Md., ca. 1825. Painted wood, freehand and stenciled gilt decoration, caning, reproduction silk upholstery. H. 30½, W. 76, D. 21 in. ©–Columbia Museum of Art. Photography by Jonathan Goley.

For millennia, humans have utilized seating furniture. The earliest surviving three-dimensional depiction of a chair is a clay model dating back to approximately 4750–4600 BCE; the oldest surviving chair belonged to the Egyptian princess Sitamun (Cairo Museum) and dates to approximately 1400 BCE. European immigrants to the New World in the seventeenth century brought chairs and other furnishings with them and began to produce chairs domestically shortly thereafter, adhering to the European prototypes. It was not until the early nineteenth century that Americans began to manufacture furnishings which, while they still borrowed classical and European motifs, had a decidedly American flavor. In the years following the Revolution, the Founding Fathers looked to the democratic ideals of ancient Greece and Rome for the basis of the fledgling political system. Artists, architects, and designers

also borrowed motifs from the classical past to reflect the moral and aesthetic values of the young Republic. Specialized seating furniture directly modeled on ancient prototypes—the klismos chair, the curule 19

seat, and Grecian benches—were to be found within elite households during the first quarter of the nineteenth century. As a burgeoning port city in the early nineteenth century, Baltimore attracted


Fig. 4: Side chair designed by Christian Herter (1839–1883); manufactured by Herter Brothers (1865–1905), New York, ca. 1880. Ebonized cherry, gilding, reproduction silk lampas upholstery of a documented fabric used on Herter seating furniture (original foundation). H. 34, W. 17½, D. 19½ in.

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Fig. 2: Rocking armchair designed and manufactured by a Shaker for a community member, New Lebanon, N.Y., ca. 1840. Maple, cloth tape. H. 45¼, W. 21¾, D. 26 in.

numerous foreign-trained craftsmen equipped to satisfy the desires of elite patrons for the latest fashions from abroad. John and Hugh Finlay, Irish-trained ornamental painters, became the leading craftsmen for “fancy” painted furniture in Baltimore, and established a vogue in the city that inspired other cabinetmakers to imitate their work. With its caned, platform seat, cylindrical arms and robust, turned legs, the painted Grecian settee (Fig. 1), clearly inspired by ancient Greek and Roman couches or beds, is a form unique to Baltimore. The overall design shows the cabinetmaker’s familiarity with popular pattern books of the day, specifically Thomas Hope’s Household Furniture and Interior Decoration (1807) and Charles Percier and Pierre Fontaine’s Recueil de Décorations Intérieures (1812). Attributed to the shop of the Finlay brothers, the circa-1825

Fig. 3: Slipper chair designed and manufactured by John Henry Belter (1804–1863), New York, N.Y., ca. 1855. Laminated and carved rosewood, brass casters, reproduction silk damask upholstery. H. 43¾, W. 18¼, D. 20¼ in.

settee bears close stylistic similarities to a pair of Grecian benches made in the Finlay shop, based on a design by Benjamin Henry Latrobe (1809) for the redecoration of the White House during the James Madison administration. The freehand and stenciled gilt motifs on the backrest—a stylized swan-and-lyre with alternating torch and crossed arrows set above a Greek key band—are adapted from designs in Thomas Sheraton’s The Cabinet-maker and Upholsterer’s Drawing-Book (1791), while the gilt floral motif on the front seat rail is adapted from classical and French sources and demonstrates the French taste much favored in Baltimore at the time. In contrast, the undecorated and restrained simplicity of the circa-1840 rocking armchair (Fig. 2) perfectly illustrates the functional design of domestic objects in the Shaker style. A 21

Protestant sect commonly referred to as “Shakers,” due to their demonstrative dancing during worship, the followers of founder “Mother” Ann Lee arrived in America from England in 1774 and settled the first of twenty-four communities at New Lebanon (later Mount Lebanon) in upstate Columbia County, New York. Members of the Shaker communities believed that work was a form of worship. Consequently, this focused tenet led to many pioneering Shaker inventions, including the clothespin, rotary harrow, circular saw, flat broom, wheel-driven washing machine and paper-packaged garden seeds. Shaker furniture is divided into two groups: that made for use within the Shaker community and that made for sale to “the world,” as Shakers referred to people outside the sect. While Shaker seating furniture made for both groups


incorporated the use of woven cloth tape on the seat bottom, the refined design details on this example—the gracefully scrolled armrests and tapered oval finials—indicate it was made by a New Lebanon community member and passed down within the sect. By the middle of the nineteenth century, classical influences had given way to a number of other revival styles. The reign of Napoleon III (reigned 1852–1870) in France revived interest in the Rococo style of the Ancien Régime of the earlier Valois and Bourbon dynasties, which quickly diffused to the United States. The concurrent Industrial Revolution in America saw the establishment of factories creating domestic goods en mass for a rapidly expanding middle class. These factories employed new technologies to produce steam-bent and laminated woods that were cut in fanciful patterns and embellished with rich stains and exotic veneers to heighten the visual effect. Nowhere are these technological innovations more evident than in the seating furniture produced in the New York City factory of German immigrant John Henry Belter (1804–1863). He patented several processes for the manufacture of his furniture, specifically a type of jigsaw that efficiently cut the elaborately pierced backs of chairs, as well as a method for bending crosslaminated wood into a continuous rail and stile, resulting in added strength and a pleasing aesthetic. His circa-1855 slipper chair (Fig. 3) perfectly illustrates Belter’s technological innovations and is a visual tour de force of the Rococo Revival aesthetic. The back of the chair, comprised of several layers of laminated and steam-bent rosewood, is pierced into a swirling mass of grape clusters, acorns, and both grape and oak leaves, all set within a frame of stylized grape tendrils that form the stiles. The undulating curves of the overall design draw the viewer’s eyes upward toward the crest rail, which contains a deeply carved floral and foliate bundle at its center. The bundle is further mirrored in the center of the front seat rail as well as on the knees of the cabriole legs. The chair could be interpreted as a three-dimensional manifestation of the paintings of the contemporaneous Severin Roesen (ca. 1815–ca. 1872), whose still-life

Fig. 5: Oxbow armchair designed by David Robertson Smith (dates not known); manufactured by Stickley Brothers (Albert and John George) (1891–ca. 1932), Grand Rapids, Mich., ca. 1903. Oak, original green leather upholstery, handwrought copper. H. 32¾, W. 23, D. 22 in.

paintings depicting bountiful tablescapes served as emblems of their owners’ prosperity and wellbeing. This era of national prosperity was interrupted by the Civil War and its devastating effects. However the Reconstruction years following the war gave rise to a second wave of industrialization, allowing for great fortunes to be amassed by a small populace made wealthy through banking, shipping, the railroad, and steel manufacturing. These individuals utilized the services of interior decorating firms to furnish “Gilded Age” homes

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in the latest fashion, heavily influenced by the exoticism of the Orient. Foremost among these firms was the New York City partnership of Herter Brothers (active 1864–1905). Its founder, Gustave Herter (1830–1898), the son of a master cabinetmaker, immigrated to America from Germany in 1848. With the arrival several years later of his well-traveled half brother, Christian Herter (1839–1883), the trajectory of the firm changed dramatically, offering bold and markedly un-European creations in a variety of traditional styles and embracing more avant-garde designs.


For their more elaborate chair commissions, the Herter Brothers utilized a basic frame design, which could be embellished in any number of stylistic variations. This formula is perfectly illustrated in their circa-1880 side chair (Fig. 4), which incorporates a variety of artistic styles drawn from the Romanesque, Anglo-Japanese, and Reform Gothic design vocabularies. Made of carved and ebonized cherry heightened through gilding, the seat back features a colonnade of Moorish or Romanesque-style arches surmounted by a wide crest carved with an elaborate Asianinspired plant motif. The silk lampas upholstery

on the seat, though not original to the chair, echoes the dense, stylized foliage carved on the crest and is copied from fragmentary pieces of an original silk show cover found on a Herter Brothers couch dating to the same period. The Arts and Crafts movement that swept America and Britain in the late nineteenth and early twentieth century (1880–1920) was a rejection of Victorian excess and of the factory goods mass-produced during the Industrial Revolution. While the movement was not a rejection of the use of all machinery in the making of goods, it celebrated the production of individually crafted objects made in

Fig. 6: Sling seat lounge chair designed by Warren McArthur (1885–1961); manufactured by Warren McArthur Corporation, Rome, N.Y., ca. 1935. Anodized aluminum, rubber upholstery. H. 31¾, W. 22, D. 31 in.

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studios or small workshops. Movement leaders Gustav Stickley (1858–1942) and his brothers, Albert (1851–1954) and John George (1871–1921), advocated for the creation of a distinctive American style that would integrate furnishings, architecture, handicrafts, and principles of harmonious living. Gustav promoted that well-designed furnishings could help “make life better and truer by its perfect simplicity.” Designed by David Robertson Smith, who joined Stickley Brothers in 1902, the circa-1903 oxbow armchair (Fig. 5) illustrates the clean lines, visible mortise-and-


Fig. 7: LCW (Lounge Chair Wood) designed by Charles Eames (1907–1978) and Ray Eames (1912–1988); manufactured by Evans Products Company for Herman Miller Furniture Company (est. 1923), Zeeland, Mich., ca. 1945. Molded birch plywood, rubber shock mounts. H. 26, W. 22, D. 24 in.

tenon joinery, and accentuated wood grain typical of the Craftsman design aesthetic. While its name calls to mind the American rural aesthetic, with the visual reference to an oxen’s yoke, the chair’s design also reflects a global influence. Through its yoke-shaped and steam-bent arms, shape of the splat, and the fumed oak finish imitative of Chinese huanghuali wood, the chair evokes parallels to quanyi (“horseshoe back”) chairs made during the Ming Dynasty. Smith diverged from traditional Chinese examples, however, most notably by reducing the number of legs from four to three, changing the stretchers from box-shaped to T-shaped, and by continuing the splat down to the stretcher rather than stopping it at the seat. Despite the tumult caused by two World Wars, the first half of the twentieth century continued to be an innovative time for designers, who began

to experiment with new materials and processes utilized during the war effort. In the years following the Great War (1914–1918), the full flowering of the modern design aesthetic was realized in the “International Style,” as promulgated by CharlesÉdouard Jeanneret (1887-1965)—commonly known as Le Corbusier—and members of the Bauhaus, the school of art, craft and design located in the Weimar Republic of Germany. Their agenda was utopian in focus, socialistic, relied on machine production, and sought to eliminate any nationalist identity or reference to historical antecedents in their designs. Seating furniture of the International Style reflected a machine aesthetic, and employed a reductive form of simple, continuous tubular metal framing. While recalling the linearity of the International Style, the designs of Warren McArthur (1885– 1961) actually predate many of his European counterparts, particularly those of Marcel Breuer 24

(1902–1981). In 1924, one year before Breuer designed his revolutionary “Wassily” chair, McArthur began experimenting with tubular metal to build furniture made of standardized parts and innovative fastening systems. His sling seat lounge chair (Fig. 6), circa 1935, is the full realization of McArthur’s experimentations. In it, he utilizes a dynamic system of standardized parts, assembled tectonically, employing an outer tube of brushed aluminum and an inner rod of steel; considerable strength is attained despite the use of minimal material as the outer tube is held in compression by the inner rod under tension. Possessing a streamlined, sculptural quality, its cold and stark surface caused by the use of bent tubular metal is echoed and softened by the halfround upholstery trimmed with black piping. Restrictions on the use of metals in the years preceding and during World War II led American manufacturers to experiment with plastics, fiberglass, and wood laminates in home and office furnishings. Following the war, suburban sprawl—fueled by a booming housing market due to returning GIs, combined with a rising automobile culture—prompted such American firms as Herman Miller, Knoll, and others, to mass-produce quality furnishings at affordable prices. These firms oftentimes engaged architects and industrial designers, such as the husband-and-wife team of Charles (1907–1978) and Ray (née Kaiser) Eames (1912–1988), to collaborate on designs. In the early 1940s, inspired by John Henry Belter’s long-expired 1858 patent for using heat and pressure to bend cross-grained wood laminate, Charles Eames and Eero Saarinen (1910–1961)—with assistance from Ray Kaiser (who later married Charles)—adapted Belter’s technology to mold plywood, entering their designs to two groundbreaking exhibitions at the Museum of Modern Art in 1940 and 1942. Charles and Ray Eames continued working with molded plywood through a commission to supply leg splints to the military during World War II. Further refinements in their technology resulted in their now legendary design, the LCW (Lounge Chair Wood ) (Fig. 7). The striking aesthetics of the chair—which appear almost zoomorphic—derive from the separation of the soft, organic shape of the backrest (head),


the seat (thorax), the spine (splat) and the quadruped legs. Praised for its compact and lightweight design—Time magazine proclaimed it the “Chair of the Century”—the LCW appealed to an expanding post-war middle-class of consumers and a subsequent Baby Boom generation, who were looking to outfit their homes and businesses with inexpensive, yet stylish, furnishings. So timeless is its design, the chair remains in production today by the Herman Miller Company. Coming full circle nearly two hundred years later, the 2010 Ionic Bench (Fig, 8) designed by Laurie Beckerman (b. 1953) harkens back to classical antiquity for inspiration. Interpreting the profile of a capital from an ionic column, the light and sinuous bench is designed to accommodate one person in its center, flanked on either side by two luxurious and oversized scrolls. Made from one-inch-thick Baltic birch plywood, the bench’s profile is cut out

eighteen times through the use of computer numerically controlled (CNC) technology. The slices are then laminated together, with their top surfaces finely sanded and coated with a high-grade Italian acrylic, resulting in a finish that is sensuous to the touch and a strong, curvaceous form. An architecture graduate of Pratt Institute, Beckerman envisioned the Ionic Bench for use in a hallway where boots and other footwear could be stored within its curves. More than forty exceptional examples of American chairs are on view in The Art of Seating: 200 Years of American Design, drawn from the Thomas H. and Diane DeMell Jacobsen Ph.D. Foundation, in collaboration with Andrew Van Styn, Director of Acquisitions, Conservation and Photography. Organized by the Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA), Jacksonville, where the exhibit opened in 2011, the show

Fig. 8: Ionic Bench designed by Laurie Beckerman (b. 1953); manufactured by Heritage Woodshop (est. 1995), Brooklyn, N.Y., 2010. Baltic birch plywood laminate. H. 21, W. 49, D. 18 in. Photography by Douglas J. Eng.

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is circulated by International Arts and Artists (IA&A), Washington, D.C. The exhibition next opens at the Academy Art Museum, Easton, Md. (November 24, 2012–February 10, 2013), before traveling to seven other venues, closing in 2015. For a complete list visit www.artsandartists.org. Brian J. Lang is chief curator and curator of contemporary art at the Arkansas Art Center, Little Rock, Arkansas. He authored this article when curator of decorative arts at the Columbia Museum of Art, Columbia, S.C. All photography credited to Michael Koryta and Andrew VanStyn, Director of Acquisitions, Conservation and Photography, Jacobsen Collection of American Chairs, unless otherwise noted.


“The following is an adaption of chapter seventeen, entitled “Costume Painting,” in author Bill Rau’s newest publication, NineteenthCentury European Painting from Barbizon to Belle Époque. The book, published by Antique Collector’s Club, is available now. For more information on this insightful new volume, including how to purchase a copy, please visit M.S. Rau Antiques’ booth, Number 308/409.”

Figure 1: Eugène Delacroix, Study of Armor, 1823 Oil on Paper Laid on Canvas 8” high by 12” wide Fine Art Collection of M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans

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Figure 2: Jean-Louis Ernest Meissonier, A Painter in His Studio (Les Amateurs de Peinture), 1843 Oil on Panel 11 1/4” high by 8 1/4” wide Private Collection/ © Christie’s Images, Ltd.

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Figure 3: Adolphe-Alexandre Lesrel, The Chess Game, 1877 Oil on Canvas · 47 1/2” high by 65 3/8” wide Private Collection/Fine Art Collection of M.S. Rau Antiques, New Orleans

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Invest in the Arts. The Arts Perform. The Texas Cultural Trust provides leadership to promote and highlight

To inspire, integrate, & illuminate the arts in Texas

the importance of the arts in educating our children and sustaining our vibrant Texas economy. Supporting the arts ensures Texas’ cultural and economic advantage for the future. Programs of the Texas Cultural Trust include the biennial Texas Medal of Arts Awards, the Young Masters Program, Create Texas, the children’s book Adventures in the ARTS, Texas Women for the Arts, Founders for the Arts, Art of Economic Development, and an Art & Digital Literacy Curriculum.

For more information on the Texas Cultural Trust, its programs or events, visit www.txculturaltrust.org or call 512-478-5289. 30


Texas Medal of Arts Awards The Texas Medal of Arts Awards, the signature event of the Texas Cultural Trust, spotlights and celebrates the creative excellence, exemplary talents and outstanding contributions of Texans in selected categories, ultimately featuring the best in Texas. The 2013 Texas Medal of Arts Awards, co-chaired by Kelli Blanton and Marita Fairbanks, will honor legendary artists, entertainers and arts patrons in Austin on March 4-5, 2013.

Texas Women for the Arts Awaken and nurture the artist in every Texas child. Texas Women for the Arts is a giving program uniting the ďŹ nancial forces of Texas women in funding initiatives for the arts and arts education throughout the state. Each year, Texas Women for the Arts’ members select the programs their funds support. Texas Women for the Arts has contributed $886,500 to 34 arts education programs statewide.

Thank you to our Sponsors 31


LA ART SHOW 2013 HISTORIC | MODERN | CONTEMPORARY

JANUARY 23-27

LA CONVENTION CENTER / SOUTH HALL LAARTSHOW.COM InformatIon 561.822.5440 • 310.822.9145 THE 18TH ANNUAL LA ART SHOW IS PRESENTED BY THE

PALM BEACH SHOW GROUP FROM REMBRANDT TO RUSCHA AND BEYOND. PAINTING, SCULPTURE, WORKS ON PAPER, PHOTOGRAPHY, VIDEO THE MOST DIVERSE ART SHOW IN THE WORLD. OVER 100 PROMINENT GALLERIES FROM AROUND THE GLOBE. IN TANDEM WITH THE 28TH ANNUAL IFPDA LOS ANGELES PRINT FAIR

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Willow Gallery

Charles L. Washburne Antiques

The Chicago Gallery

Jewels By VIGGI

Palm Beach Show Group Presents

Art Link International Only Authentics

2 n D A N N UA L

Stephen Kalms Antiques Guarisco Gallery

Naples Art, Antique & Jewelry Show SAVE THE DATE FEBRUARY 7-11, 2013 A PRESTIGIOUS EVENT WITH OVER 75 INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITORS AT THE NAPLES EXHIBITION CENTER

Vendome William Cook

ANTIQUE & estate jewelry • silver • watches americana • porcelain • objets D’art ceramics & pottery • clocks • furniture textiles • sculpture • bronzes • art glass paintings • asian art & antiques • oriental carpets other antiquities & 20th century Design

McColl Fine Art

Yafa Signed Jewels

Danish Silver

Naplesshow.com The Englishman

TOJ Gallery

Lion Heart Autographs

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MS Rau Antiques

Rehs Galleries


A.B. Levy 211 Worth Avenue, Palm Beach, FL 33480 tel: 561-835-9139 fax: 561-832-5625 email: ablevy@me.com internet: www.ablevypb.com

Pair monumental patinated bronze and medics torchieres. Circa 1880 Height 8’3” - SC:6316

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Alexander gallery Important 18th and 19th Century American Paintings and Historical Items, 15th Through 19th Century European Paintings and oriental works of art 115 East 72nd Street Suite 1B New York, NY 10021 tel: 212-472-1636 fax: 212-249-2306  internet: www.alexandergallery.com

Bernardino Nocchi The Four Evangelists: Designs for Four Lunettes, presentation pieces for the artist’s work in the chapel of the palazzo Vidoni - Caffarelli in Rome (1773-74) Oil on Canvas 9⅛ x 18¼ inches

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ARADER GALLERIES THE FINEST SELECTION OF RARE MAPS & ATLASES, COLOR-PLATE BOOKS, AUDUBON PRINTS, NATURAL HISTORY ENGRAVINGS, AND WATERCOLORS Michael Foley michaelfoley@aradergalleries.com Katie Jernigan katiejernigan@aradergalleries.com Alison Petretti alisonpetretti@gmail.com 5015 Westheimer, Suite 2303, Houston, TX 77056 tel: 713-621-7151  internet: www.aradergalleries.com

John James Audubon Plate I Great American Cock from The Birds of America, London: 1827-38

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Art Link international Fine Art Paintings & Glass contact: Howard Brassner & Barbara Womelsdorf 809 Lucerne Ave, Lake Worth, FL tel: 561-493-1162 fax: 561-493-2931 email: barbara@artlinkinternational.com internet: www.artlinkinternational.com

William Merrit Chase 17½” x 27¼” Oil on Canvas Painted in 1897 Shinnecock Hills from Canoe Place, Long Island

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ASIANTIQUES Chinese, Japanese, and Korean Art P.O. Box 1707, Winter Park, FL tel: 407-362-1025 fax: 407-358-5161 email: questions@asiantiques.com internet: www.asiantiques.com

A group of Chinese snuff bottles, Qing Dynasty (1644-1911)

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bauman rare books antiquarian books and autographs 535 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10022 tel: 212-751-0011 fax: 215-546-9064 email: brb@baumanrarebooks.com internet: www.baumanrarebooks.com

“Incomparably the most important work in the English language” William Shakespeare. Comedies, Histories, and Tragedies. London, 1685. Rare 1685 Fourth Folio of Shakespeare’s complete plays, first issue, with the engraved frontispiece portrait of Shakespeare. Because of their incalculable impact on the language, thought and literature of our world, the Shakespeare folios are “incomparably the most important work in the English language” (William A. Jackson), and rank among the most desirable of all English language books, the prizes of any collection. $225,000.

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BENCHMARK OF PALM BEACH 678 East Main Street, Blue Ridge, GA 30513 tel: 706-258-3553 fax: 706-258-3788 email: benchmarkofpalmbeach@hotmail.com internet: www.benchmarkofpalmbeach.com

Classic David Webb 18K Yellow Gold and White Enamel Bracelet

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BRENNER VALDEZ ANTIQUES & INTERIOR DESIGN contact: Richard Brenner or Robert Valdez 3109 West Barcelona Street, Tampa, FL 33629 tel: (Richard) 813-244-7120 / (Robert) 813-245-4708

Brenner Valdez Antiques is Central Florida’s premier source for fine 18th to 19th Century Antiques. Conveniently located close to Bayshore Boulevard in Palma Ceia, we are Florida’s most diverse resource for antiques and unique accessories. Our antiques have been hand selected in Europe and the U.S..

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CHARLES EDWIN PUCKETT MEDIEVAL AND RENAISSANCE ILLUMINATED MANUSCRIPTS, ANTIQUE MAPS, CLASSICAL ANTIQUITIES contact: Charles or Teresa Puckett 3867 West Market St. #253, Akron, OH 44333 tel: 330-668-0032 fax: 330-668-0037 email: charles@cepuckett.com internet: www.cepuckett.com

Book of Hours and Calendar, c. 1526. France (Paris) - Use of Rome. Printed text with 44 large and 34 small hand-painted miniatures. 19th century green morocco binding.

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Charles L. Washburne Antiques victoriaN majolica specialist P.O. Box 486, Solebury, PA 18963 tel: 215.794.7584 internet: www.majolica.net

George Jones Majolica Pineapple Teapot Circa 1870, England

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colm rowan Fine Art the masterworks of ken hamilton contact: Colm Rowan 1711 Spruce Street, Suite 4R, Philadelphia PA 19103 tel: 610-256-3256 email: rowan.colm@gmail.com internet: www.kenhamiltonmasterworks.com

Ken Hamilton (Irish, 1956- ) “Laura” Oil on board 10” x 8” Monogrammed lower left

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Earle Vandekar of KnightsbridgE contact: Paul Vandekar P.O. Box 55, Maryknoll, NY 10545 tel: 212-308-2022 email: info@vandekar.com internet: www.vandekar.com

A Pair of Large Chinese Export Porcelain Mandarin Vases. Circa 1775-85. The pair of vases are very well painted in the mandarin palette with Chinese domestic scenes in panels to the top and bottom of the front and reverse with large similarly decorated panels beneath the handles. The gilt and iron-red handles are in the form of a stylized dragon. The covers are surmounted with kylins. Height: 18 inches (45.72 cm)

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FRENCH COUNTRY LIVING ANTIQUES 18TH & 19TH CENTURY FRENCH ITALIAN AND SWEDISH ORIGINAL PAINTED FURNITURE AND GARDEN ANTIQUES contact: Douglas Hill 7C Penywern Road, London S-W-59TT tel: 011 33 613 237 084 email: jeananddoughill21@gmail.com internet: www.frenchcountrylivingantiques.com

A French nineteenth century sculpture of a horse called “Amazon” in plaster, mounted on iron stand. Circa 1880

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gallery afrodit Antique & Decorative Carpets, Kilim & Central Asian Textiles contact: Mustafa Bulguroglu Acin Cad No: 15/1, GOP-Ankara, Turkey 06670 tel: 90 312 4362129 fax: 90 312 4475948 cell (USA): 917-855-1355 email: afrodit@ada.net.tr internet: www.galleryafrodit.com

Antique Persian Serapi rug 9’5”x10’5” Perfect condition.

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GIOIA New & Antique/Vintage Jewelry By appointment only 595 Madison Avenue, New York City, NY tel: 212-223-3146 fax: 212-223-0294 email: Gioiainc@gmail.com

Rosecut Sapphires and Moonstones Cuff Bracelet.

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Guarisco Gallery 1120 22nd Street NW, Washington, DC 20037 tel: 800-426-3747 email: guariscogallery@guariscogallery.com internet: www.guariscogallery.com

Émile Munier (French, 1840-1895) L’Armistice (A Truce) Signed lower left Oil on canvas 54-1/4” x 41-5/8”

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Haynes Fine Art of broadway 19th – 21st Century British & European Paintings contact: Mark Shaw Picton House 42 High Street, Broadway, Worcestershire WRIZ 7DT, England tel: 011 44 1386 852649 fax: 011 44 1386 858187 email: email@haynesfineart.com internet: www.haynesfineart.com

John Atkinson Grimshaw (British 1836-1893) “Liverpool Docks” Oil on canvas, 12” x 18”

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imperial fine books Specializing in leatherbound sets, fine bindings, children’s, Illustrated, Sporting, Color Plate, Travel, First and Rare Editions 790 Madison Avenune, New York, NY 10065 tel: 212-861-6620 fax: 212-249-0333 email: imperialfinebook@aol.com internet: www.imperialfinebooks.com

A Splendid Collection of William Shakespeare Plays

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imperial oriental art Specializing in Chinese Ceramics and Works of Art from the Ming to Qing Dynasties: Blue and White, Celadon, Famille Verte, Famille Rose, Monochromes, Peking Glass, Jade 790 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10065 tel: 212-717-5383 fax: 212-249-0333 email: imperial200@aol.com internet: www.imperialorientalart.com

A Pair Chinese Jardiniere.

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j.s. fearnley Fine antique and estate jewelry including Victorian, Edwardian, Art Deco and signed jewelry contact: Steven Fearnley or David McKeone 87 West Paces Ferry Road, Atlanta, GA 30305 tel: 404-812-6464 fax: 404-812-6463 email: steven@jsfearnley.com / david@jsfearnley.com internet: www.jsfearnley.com

18k yellow gold Buccellati cuff bangle with three rubies of very good color and clarity weighing 8.00 carats and with 108 round diamonds weighing 1.50 carats. 64.2 grams.

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jacob’s diamond and estate jewelery 607 S. Hill St., Suite 304 Los Angeles, CA tel: 213-627-0072 email: jacobsjewelry@sbcglobal.net internet: www.jacobsestatejewelry.com

Provenance: Jacqueline Kennedy An Art Deco sapphire, diamond and rock crystal brooch, mounted in platinum, accompanied by a red leather box signed A La Vielle Russie.

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Jesse Davis Antiques contact: Jesse Davis 10 Mina Road, London SW19 3AU, United Kingdom tel: 44 7831 496 516 email: jessedavis@talk21.com internet: www.jessedavis-antiques.co.uk

A magnificent and extremely rare pair of large Staffordshire lion and lamb figures, commemorating the visit of the famous Kentucky lion tamer, Isaac van Ambourg to Great Britain in the first half of the 19th century. English, circa 1860.

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jewels by viggi Diamond jewelry, pearls & precious gems Great Neck, NY 11021 / Greenwich, CT 06830 tel: 516-829-6161 / 203-622-2900 email: info@viggi.com internet: www.viggi.com

1. Hoop Earrings: Inside and out, set with 9.74 carats of round diamonds. 2. Eternity Band: Set with 7.65 carats of emerald cut diamonds. 3. Pink Diamond Engagement Ring: Please inquire

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Joyce Groussman Estate & Fine Jewelry Antiques & Fine Jewelry contact: Joyce & Steve Groussman 7201 East Camelback Road Suite 285 Scottsdale, AZ 85251 tel: 610-331-3279 fax: 480-699-5199 email: Joycegroussman@gmail.com internet: www.jgmainline.com

Coral Collections

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Kendall Fine Art contact: Matt Kendall 4460 Garmon Rd NW, Atlanta, GA 30327 tel: 404-538-9035 email: info@kendallfineart.com internet: www.kendallfineart.com

Lucien Adrion (1889-1953) La croisette ĂĄ Cannes Oil on canvas 30.5 x 45 inches

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King Art contact: Katherine King 2063 N Cambridge Avenue, Milwaukee, WI 53202 tel: 414-276-6779 email: kking15259@aol.com internet: www.trocadero.com/kingart

Honore Daumier, French, 1808-1879. This rare oil on panel is the famous artist at his best: displaying a keen sense of humor about daily French life. It is 20.5cm by 26.8cm, in excellent condition, and signed lower right in the beautiful original frame. His paintings are in many major museums.

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LR Antiques 2230 Bissonnet Street, Houston, TX 77005 tel: 713-524-3272 email: lrantiques@lrantiques.com internet: www.lrantiques.com

Top left to bottom right Tiffany Diamond Necklace Jacob Petit Evers Daum Nancy Vase Art Deco Broach

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made in russia contact: Dennis Easter P.O. Box 3075, Palm Beach, FL 33480 tel: 561-723-3131 email: djeaster@bellsouth.net internet: www.russianstore.com

An exceptional matching pair of Russian Orthodox icons in gilded silver, cloisonnĂŠ enamel, and pearl cover by maker Pavel Ovchinnikov. Ca. 1900, Moscow.

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Marilyn garrow fine textile art Suffolk, England tel: 44 (0)1728 648671 mob: 44 (0)7774 842074 email: marilyn@marilyngarrow.com internet: www.marilyngarrow.com

A close up of an exquisite 18th century Italian hand embroidered panel. The embroidery hand worked in polychrome silks and silver thread on a silk ground.

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Marlene Alvarado Antique & Estate Jewelry Exquisite antique and estate jewelry contact: Marlene Alvarado 3636 So. Alameda, Ste. B-131, Corpus Christi, TX 77027 tel: 361.855.4250 fax: 361.855.4401 Email: mlalvarado@stx.rr.com

Jadeite & Tsavorite Diamond 18K Ring. Designed by Lydia Courteille.

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MAYFAIR INTERIORS 18TH & 19TH CENTURY CONTINENTAL FURNITURE AND MID-CENTURY MODERN 3601 W. Barcelona St., Tampa, FL 6910 S. Dixie Hwy, West Palm Beach, FL Tampa: 813-254-6111 Palm Beach: 561-588-5868 email: crhanlon@hotmail.com internet: www.mayfairantiquedealers.com www.palmbeachantiquesanddesigncenter.com

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Only authentics Fine luxury accessories, specializing in vintage, runway, limited edition, hermÉs, chanel, and louis vuitton New York, NY tel: 917-685-6115 email: charlesvirgil@gmail.com internet: www.onlyauthentics.com

Hermes Birkin Bag Size: 40cm Color: Chartreuse Material: Togo Leather

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PAST ERA ANTIQUE JEWELRY FINE ANTIQUE JEWELRY 3433 West Alabama, Houston, TX 77027 tel: 713-621-3433 internet: www.PastEra.com

Retro white gold scrollwork bangle bracelet with diamonds and synthetic sapphires, circa 1940

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provident jewelry West Palm Beach tel: 561-833-7755 Jupiter tel: 561-747-4449 Boca Raton tel: 561-488-7737 Naples tel: 239-649-7737 Naples II tel: 239-649-7200 Fort Myers tel: 239-274-7777 internet: www.providentjewelry.com

LEFT: One of a kind Art Deco Platinum Cuff with 50 carats of Diamonds, accented with cabochon emeralds. RIGHT: Art Deco 18 kt white gold diamond bracelet with 10 carats of diamonds.

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R & A INTERNATIONAL contact: Rosaria Varra 36 NE 1st Street #365, Miami, FL 33132 tel: 305-532-1210 fax: 305-924-0122 email: rnaintldesign@yahoo.com

Exquisite Brooch by Seaman Schepps, featuring three carved coral fishes, with turquoise, diamonds and Akoya pearls, set in 18k Yellow gold.

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M.S. Rau Antiques Fine Antiques including 18th and 19th century furniture, Georgian Silver, Rare Music Boxes, Walking Sticks, & Clocks; Jewelry and Fine Art 630 Royal Street, New Orleans, LA 70130 tel: 800-544-9440 email: info@rauantiques.com internet: www.rauantiques.com

Pierre-Auguste Renoir 1841-1919 French Paysage de Bretagne 1892 Stamp signed “Renoir” (lower right) Oil on canvas Canvas: 13 1/8” high x 14 1/8” wide Frame: 24 1/2” high x 25 1/2” wide

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Rehs Galleries, INC. Important Paintings From the 19th, 20th & 21st centuries contact: Howard L. Rehs 5 East 57th Street, New York, NY 10022 tel: 212-355-5710 fax: 212-355-5742 email: howard@rehs.com internet: www.rehs.com

Daniel Ridgway Knight (1839 - 1924) On the Path at Dusk, Rolleboise Oil on canvas 22 x 18 1/4 inches Signed

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ROBERT E. ALKER FINE ART ART DECO FURNITURE PIECES AMERICAN & EUROPEAN PAINTINGS FROM THE 17TH - 20TH CENTURY contact: Robert E. Alker 2311 Westheimer, Houston, Texas 77098 tel: 713-962-9040 email: conosseur@aol.com

Art Deco sideboard. This well shaped sideboard having three keyed doors and decorated with chromed deco ornamentation. Rests on sloped base.

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roberto freitas American Antiques & Decorative Arts Period 18th and 19th century American Antiques and Fine Art. Selected Marine Art, Folk Art and Decorative Arts. contact: Roberto Freitas 156 Water Street, Stonington, Connecticut tel: 860-535-1797 fax: 860-535-1798 email: info@robertofreitas.com internet: www.robertofreitas.com

Thomas Kirby Van Zandt (1814 – 1886) Gentleman’s Ride, Outside Albany signed “Van Zandt” and dated “1858” Oil on Canvas, 39” x 55½”

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roger d. winter contact: Roger Winter P. O. Box 65 tel: 215-794-5926 cell: 267-614-0056 email: rdwantiques@hotmail.com

A fine George III Hepplewhite sideboard of small size in Mahogany inlaid with Satinwood. C. 1790 England.

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rosenberg diamonds Rare and Important white & natural fancy color diamonds and high jewels contact: David Rosenberg 233 South Federal Highway, Suite 107, Boca Raton, FL 33432 tel: 561-477-5444 fax: 561-477-5222 email: info@rosenbergdiamonds.com internet: www.rosenbergdiamonds.com

Shown is a selection of GIA certified diamond rings ranging in size from 14ct to 45ct, color from D to H and clarity from Flawless to VS2. Matching necklace and earrings have a combined total weight of approximately 127ct and are of collection quality.

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rumi antiques & fine art 17th, 18th, 19th & 20th century period furniture, fine art & decorative accessories contact: Richard Rumi 55 Woodlawn Avenue Mississauga, Ontario L5G 3K7 tel: 905-274-3616 email: richardrumi@gmail.com internet: www.rumiantiques.com

A Magnificent and Highly Sophisticated German Mahogany Architect’s Desk in the school of Roentgen (David Roentgen (1743-1807)

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santos-london Chinese Porcelain 16th to 19th Centuries contact: Alberto Santos 21 Old Court House, London W84PD, UK tel: +44 207 937 6000 fax: +44 207937 3351 email: santos@santoslondon.com internet: www.santoslondon.com

Fine Chinese export porcelain ovoid vase decorated with iron-red and gilt carps on an under glaze cobalt “powder blue” ground, c. 1720, Kangxi reign, Qing dynasty. Height: 25 cm, 10 in.

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SHERRY’S contact: Sherry Fehr and Gail Fehr 21090 Saint Andrews Blvd., Boca Raton, FL tel: 561-338-9100 email: ijtman@aol.com

18k gold, diamonds, and green tourmaline necklace.

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tenenbaum & co. The finest in unique, rare, and collectible estate jewelry antique, vintage and contemporary 1801 Post Oak Blvd., Houston, TX 77056 tel: 713.629.7444 email: sales@tenenbaumandco.com internet: www.tenenbaumandco.com

David Webb 18K Yellow Gold, Platinum, Black Enamel, Diamond and Ruby Unicorn Pin.

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The Englishman Fine Art & Antiques 1190 3rd Street South, Naples, FL 34102 239-649-8088 email: naples@theenglishmanusa.com internet: www.theenglishmanusa.com

Clockwise from top right 1. “Rapture” by Martin Eichinger (b. 1949) 2. “Family Love” by Bernard Pothast (1882-1966) 3. “Chateau Gaillard” by Sir Claude Francis Barry (1883-1970) 4. “Clipper at Full Sail” by Patrick von Kalckreuth (1892–1970)

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tomlinson antiques Sarasota, Florida tel: 941.904.1111 fax: 941.906.1112 email: tomlinsonantiques@yahoo.com

Rare Kholmogory Russia bone & walrus ivory carved box. 10” wide x 7” high x 7” deep. Dated 1828.

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traum safe world’s finest luxury home safes 946 Madison Avenue, New York, NY 10021 tel: 212-452-2565 email: clients@traumsafe.com internet: www.traumsafe.com

Elegant and stunning, the double door LEGACY SAFE from Traum. High security safe with custom interior.

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ZANE MOSS ANTIQUES 10 East End Ave, New York City N.Y 10075 tel: 212-628-7130 email: mrzanemoss@aol.com internet: www.zanemossantiques.com

A Fine Black Forest Carving Of A St Bernard At Rest. Circa 1890.


THE INTERNATIONAL ART MAGAZINE Painting | Sculpture | Decorative Arts | Architecture

Published monthly, Apollo offers you the greatest diversity of any art magazine – covering everything from antiquities to contemporary art.

SEPTEMBER 2012 £5.95

THE INTERNATIONAL ART MAGAZINE

PARIS BIENNALE PREVIEW

International in scope, every edition brings you authoritative guidance on collecting, reviews and previews of exhibitions worldwide, plus interviews with major collectors and important personalities from the art world. Whatever your passion, it’s reflected in Apollo.

Making Waves

The Louvre’s new galleries for Islamic art

Plus . Palais de Tokyo . Polychrome Sculpture . Titian’s Metamorphoses

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Namur

Art & Antiques Fair

10-18 nov Week-end from 11 am to 7 pm Week from 2 to 7 pm

Photo - foto : Collection/Collectie Parfumerie Fragonard, Grasse

Ladies’ Day Tuesday 13 November, free entry for ladies

Save 30% on your ticket on

www.antica.be Exhibition sponsored by

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INTERIOR DESIGN

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1410 Slocum Street Dallas, TX 75207 214.744.3111 www.mintonantiques.com

2623 White Settlement Road Fort Worth, TX 76107 817.332.3111 www.josephminton.com 85


Jimmy Choo

Chanel

Escada

Lela Rose

St. John

Carolina Herrera

Stella McCartney

Akris

Ralph Lauren

our stores & r estaur ants include : Akris . Anne Fontaine . Anthropologie . Beretta Gallery Carolina Herrer a . Chanel . Christian Louboutin . DVF . Hadleigh’s . Harry Winston Her mès . Lela Rose . Loro Piana . Pockets Menswear . R alph Laur en . Scoop NYC St. John . Stella McCartney . Tory Burch . Vince . Saint Laur ent Paris (coming soon) gi ft c a r ds ava i l a bl e com pl i m e n ta ry va l et pa r k i ng 86

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214.4 43.9898


to see As Artists see American Art from The Phillips Collection

on view through January 6, 2013

This landmark show features more than 100 paintings by some of the greatest names in American art—Richard Diebenkorn, Arthur Dove, Winslow Homer, Edward Hopper, Georgia O’Keeffe, Jackson Pollock, and Mark Rothko. Admission is free! Richard Diebenkorn (1922–1993), Girl with Plant (detail), 1960, oil on canvas, © The Richard Diebenkorn Foundation, The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C., acquired 1961 This exhibition has been organized by The Phillips Collection, Washington, D.C. Local support is made possible by the Ann L. & Carol Green Rhodes Charitable Trust, Bank of America, Trustee, and FTS International.

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Visit AFAMAG.COM to Register for a FREE 2-YEAR Online SUBSCRIPTION

Visit AFANEWS.COM for Breaking News, Events & Articles on the Art Market 88


F O R C O L L E C TO R S O F T H E F I N E A N D D E C O R AT I V E A RT S

ON NATIONAL NEWSSTANDS NOW! S U B S C R I B E O N L I N E AT 89a r t a n d a n t i q u e s m a g . c o m


March 23, 2013 Hilton Anatole

For more information and to purchase tickets: 214.748.8580 n dallas@diffa.org

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Empowering and transforming women and their families

DALLAS INTERNATIONAL ART, ANTIQUE AND JEWELRY SHOW Salutes

Nexus Recovery Center is proud to partner with Dallas International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show. Nexus empowers women and their families to break the cycle of addition. Our mission is to serve as a link to sobriety, independence, and dignity for low income women and their families affected by addiction. We inspire hope, offer respect and honor the unique differences of female addicts. In November 2012, we will open our new Adolescent Dormitory that can accommodate 30 more beds, to serve adolescent girls living with addiction, ages 13-17. We are very grateful to our Board, Capital Campaign Cabinet, sponsors, individual donors and friends that made it all possible through their support to raise $1.8 million towards our goal of $5 million for campus improvements. There are naming opportunities available, call Abi Erickson at 214.321.3096 ext. 2104 for more information.

8733 La Prada Drive, Dallas, TX 75228 | Office: 214.321.0156 ext. 2104 | Fax: 214.321.3096 | www.nexusrecovery.org 92


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On the Silk Road and the High Seas chinese ceramics, culture, and commerce September 1, 2012–January 27, 2013 Organized by the Norton Museum of Art

ABOVE:

Peacock blue fish vase with ormolu mount. Qing dynasty, Jiaqing reign (1796–1820), gilt bronze mounts in Louis XV style, 19th century. Porcelain, overglaze enamel or enamel-on-biscuit decoration. Norton Museum of Art, Gift of The Leo and Doris Hodroff Collection, 2003.181.2a-b. ©Norton Museum of Art.

Dallas Arts District | 2010 Flora Street | crowcollection.org 94


BOWMAN & RILEY

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We’re supporting the performing arts in North Texas with

ONE MILLION

D O L L A R S I N G R A N T S F O R T H E F I F T H Y E A R R U N N I NG.

Earlier this year, 41 dynamic and diverse performing arts organizations that serve our community with theater, music, dance, and opera received grants from TACA. This is the fifth consecutive year that TACA has contributed $1,000,000 to the North Texas performing arts community. TACA is pleased to have been the inaugural partner in the Dallas International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show.

To become involved with TACA, please visit taca-arts.org.

2011 Cedar Lake Contemporary Ballet

presented by TITAS, in association with the AT&T Performing Arts Center. Photo by Sharen Bradford.

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Embrace Artful Living

From Cowboy to Contemporary, Western Art & Architecture celebrates America's love affair with visual arts and architecture.

APRIL | MAY

FEBRUA

From

Cowb

RY | MA

Cont oy to

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Tim Solliday: Physics and Poetry The Evolution of Western Art Sculptor Mic hael Naranj o’s True Vision Perspective: Gustave Bau mann

From Co wboy to Contemp

re tic Natu Authen Man rd miel: An Len Ch vides is the Bi t’s Real Sa g Wha in Stefan t fin l: Rede Stewar Ed Mel ive: LeConte ct Perspe

plus:

Wanderings: Santa Barbara, California L.A.’s Marmol Radziner In the Studio with Richard Parrish

plus: s: Fort Worth, Tex

as ng ects tteucci Wanderi pe Archit hard Ma Heliotro and Ric Seattle’s : Nedra Art th wi Living

The Best Auctions || The Hidden Destinations The Most Compelling Personalities || The Quintessential Collector’s Lifestyle

Find us on

twitter.com/WesternArtArch facebook.com/WesternArtandArchitecture pinterest.com/WesternArtArch

Subscribe online at:

WesternArtandArchitecture.com 97

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c o u t ur e r en ta l s

Showroom open at 315 Cole Street Dallas Texas 75207 972 818 3200 office info@poshcouturerentals.com

w w w. p o s h c o u t u r e r e n ta l s . c o m

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Second Sundays

11:00 am

The award-winning local home and garden show focusing on

“Upscale Living with a Down-Home Heart.” Segment hosts include Gary Riggs, Linda Cooper, Gene Freeman and Susie McAuley, The Real Susie Homemaker! Airing the second Sunday of each month at 11:00 am on WFAA-TV Channel 8. Sponsored by GrandLuxe Magazine, Complete Landsculpture, Gary Riggs Home and Briggs-Freeman Sotheby’s. Learn more at www.designingdfw.tv

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Alphabetical List of Exhibitors

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Alphabetical List of Exhibitors

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Jeffrey Tillou Galleries

Rosenberg Diamonds & Co.

Katherine Houston Porcelain

Rehs Galleries

Palm Beach Show Group presents

Dean Borghi Fine Art Asiantiques

33rD ANNUAL

Ophir Gallery Santos

Baltimore Summer Antiques Show

Camilla Dietz Bergeron

Fine Art • Antiques • Jewelry

SAVE THE DATE

Vallin Galleries

THE WEEKEND PRIOR TO LABOR DAY

AUGUST 22-25, 2013 Drucker Antiques

featuring over 575 INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITORS AT THE BALTIMORE CONVENTION CENTER

John Atzbach

Visit Baltimoresummershow.com Antique American Wicker Guarisco Gallery

Heller Washam Antiques

William Cook

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J.S. Fearnley

Jeff R Bridgman American Antiques


Presenting the INAUGURAL

Los Angeles Jewelry & Antique Show JANUARY 15-19, 2014 BY THE

PALM BEACH SHOW GROUP

APPLICATIONS NOW BEING ACCEPTED For more information call 561.822.5440

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Art Link International

J.S. Fearnley

Past Era Antique Jewelry

Tenenbaum & Co.

Alexander Gallery

Rehs Galleries Only Authentics

Palm Beach Show Group presents 4TH ANNUAL

Imperial Fine Books

Santos

DALLAS International Art, Antique & Jewelry Show

Guarisco Gallery

SAVE THE DATE NOVEMBER 7-11, 2013 Zane Moss Antiques

featuring over 60 INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITORS at the Dallas market hall

For more information visit Dallasfallshow.com MS Rau Antiques

Charles Edwin Puckett

Earle D. Vandekar of Knightsbridge

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Made In Russia

Rosenberg Diamonds & Co.

Bauman Rare Books Arader Galleries


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Dallas Catalogue 2012