Page 1


IN THIS ISSUE

FEATURE

4/ C AMPAIGN DONORS ARE MAKING HISTORY

3/ LETTER FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL 16/ BOARD OF TRUSTEES NEWS 18/ ON THE HILLTOP 22/ FALL AND WINTER ATHLETICS 30/ T HE DONOVAN CENTER FOR 32/ 34/ 36/ 38/ 40/ 42/

The Magazine of Canterbury School

LEARNING DEDICATION

THE DUFFY TRAVEL GRANT HOMECOMING AND PARENTS’ WEEKEND ATHLETICS HALL OF FAME CELEBRATION NEW FACULTY IN MEMORIAM STUDENT ART


PAGE 1.


BOARD OF TRUSTEES 2017—2018 Robert H. Steers ’71, P ’11 | President John A. Donovan ’59 | Vice President Michael R. Carretta ’71 | Secretary Rachel E. Stone | Head of School/Treasurer Dorothy L. Alpert ’78 Keith G. Angell ’75 James R. Briggs ’56, GP ’12, ’15 Carol Lovell Carmody P ’18 Karen B. Casey ’91

PA L LI U M OUR MISSION Founded in 1915 and guided by our Catholic heritage, Canterbury is a college preparatory, coeducational boarding and day school for students in grades 9-12. The School prides itself on creating a community based on its Five Values—Honesty, Respect, Compassion, Spirituality, and Self Reliance—in which students and faculty forge lasting bonds and every student experiences a broad and challenging program in a small-school setting. The School’s educational environment fosters academic rigor, athletic development, artistic enrichment, and spiritual growth and strives to ensure a superior experience that prepares students for leading colleges and universities and for life. With its rigorous and humane approach to students, both in and out of the classroom, Canterbury’s program inculcates vital intellectual and ethical habits of mind. The School sees all students as individuals, encourages them as necessary, challenges them as appropriate, and inspires them to become moral leaders in a complex, secular world.

Harold T. Clark III ’86 Jay Clarke ’84 Matthew P. Dwyer Jr. ’71 Douglas M. Famigletti ’90 Kevin Fee P ’18, ’19, ’21 Theodore C. Hollander IV ’82 Shawn Matthews P ’18, ’20 Thomas P. Morris ’85 Nancy B. Mulheren P ’03, ’13 H. Nicholas Ragland ’88 Nicole D’Amour Schneider ’93, P ’20 Peter J. Tucker ’78 Nell P. Williams ’81

TRUSTEE EMERITI

Director of Marketing and Communications Jessica Lewis Director of Advancement Carol Maxwell P '20 Associate Director of Advancement Jennifer Loprinzo Contributors Meredith Berry-Toon, Former Headmaster Tom Sheehy P ’92, ‘98, ‘04, Marc Vanasse ‘73, Paige Root Photo Contributors Marc Vanasse ‘73, Kelsh Wilson Design, S/L/A/M Collaborative Design Kelsh Wilson Design Canterbury School 101 Aspetuck Avenue New Milford, CT 06776 cbury.org

Daniel J. Altobello ’59

Front Cover: A S/L/A/M Collaborative rendering of the Campus Square Streetscape and Student Center

Hope Carter P ’86, ’87, ’88, ’91,’ 95, GP ’09, ’10, ’14

Back Cover: The sun setting over the Chapel of Our Lady, fall 2017

Denis P. Coleman Jr. ’63, P ’97 Donn C. Dolce ’63, P ’01 John P. Duffy ’59, P ’87, ’91 John D. O’Neill ’57, P ’89 L. Michael Sheehy ’56

PAGE 2.

NON-DISCRIMINATION Canterbury School does not discriminate on the basis of sex, race, color, religion, age, creed, national origin, age, sexual orientation, or disability in employment or admission to its programs and activities. ©Copyright 2018 Canterbury School. All rights reserved. No content from this publication may be reproduced or reprinted in any form without the express written consent of Canterbury School.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


GREETINGS FROM THE HILLTOP The past three months have been ones of great excitement, momentous planning, and a truly historic philanthropic gift to Canterbury. As Head of School, I speak for the entire Canterbury community in extending gratitude for a gift that is, by far, the largest in School history. The donors, who wish to remain anonymous, have made this extraordinary investment in a manner that they hope will inspire others to join them in fulfilling a vision for Canterbury that serves our students and transforms our hilltop campus. Not quite a year ago, on a warm May evening, I enjoyed one last gathering with a group of Sixth Form leaders who had spent many of their Tuesday evenings in conversation with me during their senior year. While we shared pizza at O’Connor House, we reminisced about the past year, imagined what was to come in college, and focused on the final days leading to graduation. One senior boy asked me about what would happen next at Canterbury. As I began to describe the plans and projects on the horizon, there was an eruption of joy and surprise: “You mean the ideas we shared with you and the trustees have turned into plans for an actual building?” Yes, I told them, that is exactly what I mean. RACHEL E. STONE HEAD OF SCHOOL

One of the greatest satisfactions in leading Canterbury is witnessing the tremendous commitment, devotion, and vision so many people share for this great School. They understand that we strive each day to fulfill both an educational and a moral mission. And they respond with determined planning and vigorous action.

FROM THE HEAD OF SCHOOL

This special edition of the Pallium is intended to share with the entire community the strategic planning completed by the Board; the challenge match that inspired us to raise our sights; and the new goals for Mission

and Momentum: The Campaign for Canterbury. I want to assure you that as we set our sights on transformative projects, we have not lost sight of what matters most: that essential mission and our commitment to students. It is impossible to put into words my excitement, optimism, and confidence in this next chapter of Canterbury’s history. With gratitude for these many gifts and hope for the future,

Rachel E. Stone Head of School

PAGE 3.


MISSION AND MOMENTUM

CAMPAIGN DONORS ARE MAKING HISTORY

PAGE 4.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


C A M PA I G N D O N O R S A R E M A K I N G H I S T O R Y

BUILDING ON SUCCESS

S

ince its inception in 2015, Canterbury’s Centennial Capital Campaign has generated extraordinary excitement and energy, and has become the largest and most aspirational fundraising effort in the School’s 102-year history. From all corners of the School community, 4,000 donors have participated in the comprehensive Campaign, with new gifts that have changed the impact of the Canterbury Annual Fund to major contributions that have substantially fueled the Endowment. To date, Canterbury has secured $54 million in resources already at work improving the experience of our students.

PAGE 5.


MISSION AND MOMENTUM AT A GLANCE

F

orged from this position of strength, the School’s Board of Trustees initiated an in-depth analysis of all dimensions of School life. In January 2017, a professional team from the S/L/A/M Collaborative spent time on campus studying, exploring, and engaging in conversations with students, faculty, and staff. Their charge was to take a deep dive into the School community, mission, and goals to develop a master plan for Canterbury’s next century. The assessment, both invigorating and informative, yielded a single, compelling vision: Canterbury is a school that places the student experience firmly at the center of its work—past, present and future. This reaffirmation became the driving force behind a strategic planning process and the launch of a second phase of the campaign. Mission and Momentum: The Campaign for Canterbury is a reignited endeavor to raise leadership, annual, and planned gifts and pledges together toward a final goal of $90 million.

TRANSFORMING THE HILLTOP Build a New Student Commons to Enhance Community Life

$15 Million

Define a Central Campus Square and Streetscape

$3 Million

Renovate Hume Hall Academic Building

$3 Million

PRESERVING CANTERBURY’S HISTORIC CAMPUS Invest in Academic, Athletic, and Residential Facility Improvements

LANDMARK GIFT AND C H A L L E N G E M AT C H Inspired by the core student-centric initiatives of the Campaign and ambitious plans to reimagine the Canterbury campus, an unprecedented landmark gift of $15 million has been pledged to the School by an anonymous donor, the single largest contribution to Canterbury of its kind. To help the School achieve the major milestone of Transforming the Hilltop, $5 million has been granted to the School, with an additional $10 million presented to the School community as a challenge match—to be awarded upon successfully raising $10 million in new gifts committed to three distinctive construction and renovation projects: the construction of a new Student Commons building; the creation of a Campus Square and Streetscape to define and unify campus; and renovations to Hume Hall, the central academic building at the heart of campus.

PAGE 6.

After a year of strategic planning and collaboration with the entire School community, the Board of Trustees has identified the following initiatives and priorities:

$5 Million

SECURING CANTERBURY’S FUTURE Grow the Endowment for Financial Aid and Faculty Support

$5 Million

DELIVERING EXCELLENCE Increase Support for Canterbury’s Annual Fund

$5 Million

Raised to Date

$54 Million

CAMPAIGN TOTAL GOAL

$90 Million

The Magazine of Canterbury School


C A M PA I G N D O N O R S A R E M A K I N G H I S T O R Y

“The Campaign for Canterbury is a comprehensive fundraising effort that is focused on both our present and our future. We are asking all members of the Canterbury family to take part, knowing that it is only with the broad and sustaining support of many that we will achieve our goals. In the strategic planning process, our work focused squarely on the student experience. Canterbury’s abiding belief in service and its mission of ‘inspiring students to become moral leaders in a complex secular world’ impacted my life and the lives of so many, and is worthy of your generous philanthropic support.” ROBERT H. STEERS ’71, P ’11

President, Canterbury Board of Trustees

PAGE 7.


TRANSFORMING THE HILLTOP A STUDENT COMMONS

T

his striking new building, to be set seamlessly into the hillside adjacent to the Chapel of Our Lady, will provide flexible, student-centered space for educational innovation and new technology as well as a welcoming and long-needed gathering place for the School community. The result of a design process that included extensive study and community-wide input, the Commons will connect the academic and extracurricular lives of students and faculty within a 20,000-square-foot student center, featuring flexible learning spaces to support new technology and innovative education, design-and-build spaces, and collaborative areas for students and teachers to work together. The new Commons will serve as the center of campus life where students and teachers interact daily. From a get-together with friends at the Commons CafĂŠ to a meeting with a teacher or advisor, from a small-group study session, to a dynamic space for guest speakers and campus events, the spaces within the Commons are intended to inspire meaningful connections and limitless opportunities for learning.

PAGE 8.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


C A M PA I G N D O N O R S A R E M A K I N G H I S T O R Y

“Our students sit squarely at the center of this Campaign. Your investment in Canterbury will provide the resources needed to make their educational experience even more meaningful and powerful as they prepare for lives of productive achievement and service.” RACHEL E. STON E, HEA D OF SCHOOL

The Commons

The structure’s stone exterior will create a complementary visual tie to the surrounding historic buildings. The expansive interior glass walls bring abundant natural light into the space, opening up dramatic views to the Housatonic Range beyond.

PAGE 9.


TRANSFORMING THE HILLTOP CAMPUS SQUARE AND STREETSCAPE

C

anterbury’s plans for a new Campus Square and Streetscape highlight one of the School’s greatest assets—the natural beauty of its campus—to create an architecturally defined and cohesive sense of place while providing essential pedestrian safety. The intersection of Aspetuck Avenue and Elkington Farm Road, at the center of the School, naturally unifies the two sides of Canterbury’s campus. A plaza with traditional stone columns, improved paving and curbing, outdoor lighting, and new pathways will welcome all to campus while framing the spectacular western views.

The reimagined crossroads of Aspetuck Avenue and Elkington Farm Road will emphasize the natural center of campus and serve as a welcome entrance for all students and families.

PAGE 10.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


C A M PA I G N D O N O R S A R E M A K I N G H I S T O R Y

A plaza with traditional stone columns, improved paving and curbing, new pathways, and outdoor lighting will create a welcoming point of arrival.

PAGE 11.


TRANSFORMING THE HILLTOP R E N O VAT I O N S T O H U M E H A L L

P

lans for Hume Hall—the center of science and math education at Canterbury—seek to improve both its function and aesthetic. Ten years ago, the School completed a large-scale renovation of classrooms and laboratories in Hume. The building now requires a new phase of upgrades to carry it into the next decade with the addition of a modern, light-filled art gallery, visible from Aspetuck Avenue, to showcase students’ creative work, as well as a stone façade to establish a new identity for Hume Hall, aligned with the other structures on campus.

NAMING OPPORTUNITIES Leave a Lasting Legacy THE STUDENT COMMONS The Commons Building Student Center and Atrium Outdoor Terrace and Overlook Entrance and Lobby Commons Café Design-and-Build Makerspace Digital Lab and Multi-Media Classroom School Store Classrooms (5)

$7,500,000 $2,000,000 $1,000,000 $500,000 $250,000 $250,000 $200,000 $100,000 $100,000 each

CAMPUS SQUARE & STREETSCAPE Campus Square Streetscape Terraced Lawn, Landscaping & Terraces The addition of a light-filled art gallery, visible from Aspetuck Avenue, will showcase students’ creative work. A new stone façade will enhance and unify the center of campus.

$500,000 $500,000 $500,000

HUME HALL Art Gallery Lobby Entrance

$1,000,000 $500,000

Naming Opportunities are eligible for the Challenge Match

PAGE 12.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


PRESERVE CANTERBURY’S HISTORIC CAMPUS

CAMPUS NEEDS

C

The list below includes several projects that the School has prioritized.

INFRASTRUCTURE

$2.5 Million

Modernize Energy and Utility Infrastructure

ACADEMIC

$1 Million

Renovate Maguire Auditorium

ATHLETIC Replace Field House Playing Surface

$1 Million

Replace Roof and Repair Siding at O’Neill Arena (Ice Rink) Resurface Tennis Courts

RESIDENTIAL Upgrade Interior and Exterior of Student Dormitories and Faculty Housing

$.5 Million

anterbury’s scenic campus and historic stone buildings are among the School’s greatest assets. Canterbury is committed to preserving the aesthetic and functional value of these structures to ensure their long-lasting service for future generations of students. As part of the School’s strategic planning process, the Board of Trustees engaged the Stone House Group to conduct a full Facilities Condition Assessment of Canterbury’s campus. The study revealed a significant inventory of needs. It also resulted in a 10-year road map to systematically address these needs. The Mission and Momentum Campaign affords opportunities for donors to invest in existing academic, athletic, and residential facility and infrastructure improvements, including renovations to O’Neill Arena and repairs to the Higgins Aquatic Center, resurfacing tennis courts, and refurbishing the interiors and exteriors of student dormitories and faculty housing. In December 2017, a $1 million gift provided the pivotal funding to begin renovations to Maguire Auditorium slated for early summer 2018. Maguire Auditorium serves as the gathering place for the allcommunity School Meeting as well as the center for the School’s theater arts program. It is also one of the first places prospective students visit with their families. The project reimagines this critical anchor space with new seating, flooring, and improved lighting and acoustic finishes, dramatically enhancing the look and function of the auditorium.

“Our campus is an extraordinary gift that must be stewarded for future generations—to live and learn in an environment that allows them to perform at their best.” TRU STEE N ICK RAG L A N D ’ 88

PAGE 13.


SECURING CANTERBURY’S FUTURE

ENDOWMENT PER STUDENT $300,000 $250,000

O

$200,000 $150,000

ne of the hallmarks of the Mission and Momentum Campaign is the commitment to continually strengthen the School’s Endowment. The annuity generated from the Endowment is vital to sustaining the School’s long-term goals, to building and safeguarding its financial security while providing flexibility to respond to new opportunities. Today, Canterbury’s Endowment stands at $33 million—with the most substantial growth realized over the past ten years. Investing in the Endowment—whether through outright gifts, bequests, or planned gifts—ensures support for the people and programs critical to Canterbury’s mission. Gifts to the Endowment may be unrestricted, or they may be established to support financial aid for students, enrichment for faculty, or specific academic or extracurricular programs.

$100,000 $500,00 0

T T Y E R D OK RY G IR TE EN IEL IN EN ER U K F SH INS RO RB WL H K NN F K B E A U R M SU ILL NT -P UT G BE ST Y M E SO CA NIT W I R T

CANTERBURY ENDOWMENT GROWTH 2017 $33 Million

Canterbury has a long history of providing financial assistance to deserving students, and today awards roughly $5 million annually. By increasing the percentage of aid funded by the Endowment, the School can guarantee that scholarship resources are permanently secure, and the opportunity of a Canterbury education remains within reach of students from all backgrounds.

2010 $16 Million 2005 $12 Million 2000 $10 Million 1995 $2.6 Million 1990 $1.4 Million

The faculty who mentor, teach, and coach our students are the heart of a Canterbury education. To attract and retain the best faculty members, Endowment dollars can ensure compensation remains competitively aligned with teachers’ significant responsibilities, and allows them to seek opportunities for professional growth and development and the tools they need to remain at the forefront of their disciplines. To help bring the Endowment into sharper focus, the Board of Trustees hired Verger Capital, a management firm with specific expertise in guiding Endowment investment decisions for higher educational institutions. Verger investments are directed by Jim Dunn P ’15, who serves as Chief Executive and Investment Officer and former Vice President and Chief Investment Officer at Wake Forest University.

PAGE 14.

“I consider it an honor and privilege to leave a legacy from which future generations of students can benefit.” JACK HEF F ERN A N ’58

The Magazine of Canterbury School


C A M PA I G N D O N O R S A R E M A K I N G H I S T O R Y

DELIVERING EXCELLENCE: THE CANTERBURY ANNUAL FUND

A

sk alumni what impacted them most when they were students at Canterbury, and they will tell you it was the people: the teachers who inspired and shaped them and the classmates who became their lifelong friends. The Canterbury Annual Fund supports the people of Canterbury—the students and teachers—who make this an exceptional School. The Annual Fund is the cornerstone of a healthy and vibrant fundraising effort, and should be the first priority a donor chooses when considering how to support the School. The School relies on the Canterbury Annual Fund to provide excellence in its academic, athletic, and extracurricular programs. In essence, recurring annual gifts support Canterbury’s present, just as gifts to the Endowment support its future. One of the critical goals of the Mission and Momentum Campaign is to elevate the fund from $1.5 million in annual gifts to $2 million by 2022 by increasing and sustaining loyal, year-over-year giving from alumni and current and past families. The Canterbury Annual Fund is the second largest revenue source for the School after tuition, generating approximately 10 percent of our annual operating budget. Through the vital unrestricted resources it provides, The Canterbury Annual Fund directly impacts the margin of excellence in all its programs. All gifts to The Canterbury Annual Fund are counted toward the $90 million Mission and Momentum Campaign goal.

“I wanted Canterbury to prepare my children for college. Canterbury ended up preparing them for life.” NA NCY M U L HER EN P ’ 03, ’13

SHAPING THE FUTURE

LEADERSHIP GIVING LEVELS VISIONARIES’ CIRCLE $25,000 AND ABOVE FOUNDERS’ CIRCLE $10,000–$24,999 LEADERSHIP CIRCLE $5,000–$9,999 HUME CIRCLE $2,500–$4,999

The initiatives and ambitious vision for Canterbury’s future are so much more than just a building or road map to a healthy and sustained Endowment. Mission and Momentum: The Campaign for Canterbury will enable the School to thoughtfully evolve and improve upon the promise we make to our families and secure our distinctive position among the finest boarding schools in New England. This campaign presents a unique opportunity for the community to partner with us on the exciting journey ahead and shape Canterbury’s future.

1915 SOCIETY $1,000–$2,499 SAINTS’ SOCIETY $500–$999 HILLTOP SOCIETY $250–$499 NAVY & COLUMBIA UP TO $250

canterbury

ANNUAL

FUND PAGE 15.


CANTERBURY WELCOMES NEW BOARD MEMBERS CAROL LOVELL CARMODY P ’18

Carol Carmody was appointed to Canterbury’s Board of Trustees in May 2017. Carol joined Boston University in 2008 as Associate Vice President for Financial Affairs and currently oversees the Debt and Treasury Management and the Risk Management Offices. Her teams manage the University’s existing debt and derivatives portfolios, new debt issuance, treasury activities and working capital cash portfolio, and risk management/insurance activities. Prior to joining Boston University, Carol was a Senior Vice President in Bank of America’s Healthcare and Higher Education unit, providing financing and banking services for local not-forprofit healthcare and higher education institution clients. Before entering the not-for-profit finance world, Carol worked in corporate finance, banking, and investment roles in Boston, New York, and overseas. Carol holds a bachelor's from Denison University, OH and an MBA from the Yale School of Management, CT. She also holds the Chartered Financial Analyst (CFA) designation. Carol serves as a class agent for her Yale class, is active in her church, and serves on several not-for-profit boards. Carol resides in Lincoln, MA with her daughter Nelle ’18 and the family’s two Labrador retrievers. When not working, she loves all things sporting and outdoors.

PAGE 16.

“It is an honor and my privilege to be invited to join Canterbury’s Board of Trustees. When I first met my husband Christopher (“Kit”) Carmody (Class of 1957) 30 years ago, it was immediately clear that Canterbury came with the deal, given both the Carmody family’s long affiliation with the School and Kit’s own personal devotion to it. Canterbury activities were many for us, and I came to know a number of Kit’s classmates, other alumni and the Sheehy family well. As I engaged with the school over time, I, shall we say, 'drank the Kool-Aid' myself, seeing the balance of academic rigor, spiritual tradition, and athletic activities at Canterbury as a very special environment for formation of young adults. Kit and I were ultimately thrilled that our youngest daughter Nelle chose Canterbury and is now a Sixth Former. I look forward to bringing a family and parent perspective, as well as a professional higher-education perspective to working with Canterbury’s Board, especially at such an exciting time of leadership transition and new energy and momentum at the School.”

HAROLD T. CLARK III ’86

Harold “Tom” Clarke III ’86 was appointed to Canterbury’s Board of Trustees in September 2017. At Canterbury, Tom was a member of the Boys’ Varsity Hockey team. Following his graduation, he earned his bachelor’s degree in business public management from SUNY Polytechnic Institute. Tom currently serves on the McDonald’s Corporation Philadelphia Region Second Generation Owner Operator Team as the owner and operator of several McDonald's in the central New York region. Tom has been integral to the small business community in the Mohawk Valley and is currently a member of the Central New York/Northern Pennsylvania Advertising Co-op.

Tom serves as the board President for the Camp Ronald McDonald for Special Children of the Mohawk Valley, and on the board of Root Farm Equestrian Center. He has volunteered as a coach of youth soccer, hockey, and baseball, and was President of the New Hartford Youth Hockey Executive Board for six years.

“The Board of Trustees is an opportunity for me to work alongside many talented and committed individuals who strive to make Canterbury an even better place for today and for the future.”

SHAWN MATTHEWS P ’18, ’20

Tom lives with his wife and son in Utica, NY. The couple have two additional, grown children.

KEVIN FEE P ’18, ’19, ’21

Shawn Matthews was appointed to Canterbury’s Board of Trustees in September 2017.

Kevin Fee was appointed to Canterbury’s Board of Trustees in May 2017. Kevin is Co-Founder and Managing Director of Castlerock Asset Management, a premier Nashvillebased real estate development, hospitality, and management firm. Kevin received his bachelor’s degree in economics from SUNY Cortland where he was a member of the Men’s Varsity Basketball team. He began his career on the trading floor of the New York Stock Exchange for the firm Adler Coleman & Company. He soon thereafter became a member of the New York Stock Exchange, and in 2001 was appointed Co-Head of Floor Trading. In 2006, Kevin transitioned into real estate and established the New York office of the Dublin-based Menolly Group before coforming Castlerock in 2013. In addition to his current professional work, Kevin is involved with several philanthropic organizations in both Tennessee and New York. Kevin splits his time between his New York and Tennessee homes. His primary residence is in Montauk, NY, with his wife and four boys, Kevin ‘18, Ciaran ‘19, Ryan ‘21, and Dylan.

The Magazine of Canterbury School

Shawn has served as the Chief Executive Officer of Cantor Fitzgerald & Co. since 2009, and previously held several senior management roles at the firm. He is currently in the process of starting a Global Macro Hedge Fund, Hondius Capital Management. Shawn started his career at Wertheim Schroder & Co. in 1990, and has spent the past 25 years in a senior management role, having run both desks and departments at several firms. He has also been the Managing Member of West Side Capital, a brokerdealer, as well as the Managing Partner of Alchemist Capital Management, a hedge fund. Shawn is a member of Board of Directors of Autism Speaks and was formerly on the Board of the Securities Industry and Finance Markets Association. He holds a bachelor’s degree in finance from Fairfield University, CT and an MBA from Hofstra University, NY. Shawn resides in Fairfield, CT with his wife Monica and children, Shawn ‘18, Ryan, Maura ‘20, and Erin.


PETER J. TUCKER ’78

JOHN D. O’NEILL ’57 P ’89

Peter J. Tucker ’78 was appointed to Canterbury’s Board of Trustees in January 2018. Following his graduation from Canterbury School, where he served as a proctor and a member of the drama club, Boys’ Varsity Lacrosse, and Boys’ Varsity Soccer, Peter matriculated to Georgetown University, D.C. He received his bachelor’s degree in history and began his career at Chubb in 1983, working in Property & Marine in the New York City office. He then advanced to become the European Zone Marketing Manager in 1994. Following Chubb’s merger with ACE Ltd. in 2012, Peter became the Regional Chief Operating Officer of New York. As of October 2017, he is the Regional Executive Officer, where he is responsible for overseeing all of Chubb’s business in New York, New Jersey, and Vermont, Chubb’s largest region in North America. Peter is past Chair of the Northeast Division of the Insurance Industry Charitable Foundation. As the President of the Canterbury School Society of Alumni, established in 2014 as the first organized alumni association, Peter has brought extraordinary leadership and vision to the School’s engagement with its alumni. His grandfather, Carleton J.H. Hayes, was a personal friend of founding Headmaster Dr. Nelson Hume and served as a trustee from 1939 to 1949. Peter’s mother, Mary Elizabeth Tucker, is among the first female trustees in School history, serving from 1979 to 1986. Peter has four other siblings who all attended Canterbury: Duane ’66, Paul ’68, Carlton ‘73, and Elizabeth ‘76. Peter currently lives in Westport, CT, with his wife, Sara. “Canterbury changed my life, allowing me to leave the small town I grew up in, gain independence and a better education, and build relationships for life. The invitation to serve on the Board of Trustees is truly special, as I now represent the third generation in our family to serve on the board, and more importantly, it allows me to give back to the school, which has given so much to our family!”

Following thirty-one years of dedicated service, John O’Neill retired from the Board of Trustees in May 2017 and was honored with the designation of Trustee Emeritus. As the longest tenured Board member in Canterbury’s history, John has made an eternal, tangible impact to the life of every Canterbury student of the last generation. His commitment to the School is a testament to his belief in the positive effect of a Canterbury education, and we are deeply grateful for his continual devotion to our School’s mission. A graduate of the Class of 1957, John entered Canterbury as a one-year Sixth Former. Undaunted by his short time here, he immediately made his mark as a School leader. John was an editor of the School’s newspaper, The Tabard, and played Varsity Basketball, Track and Field, and JV Football. Following Canterbury, John matriculated to Princeton University, NJ, and received his bachelor’s degree in political science. He was the President and CEO of Clark-O’Neill, Inc., one of the most trusted direct marketing firms in the healthcare industry, and led the company for over a decade. John successfully retired in 1987 after the company’s sale to IMS International. John’s tenure on the Board of Trustees followed the same undeterred path as his time as a student at Canterbury. He was quick to lead and promptly made his mark on the Executive, Development, Compensation, and Trustee Committees after being appointed in 1986. He provided extraordinary leadership for the School during his fifteen years as Vice President (1992-2007), and has been a visionary force behind the strength of the School today. John received the Canterbury Medal in 2009 and was the 2013 Commencement Speaker. He and his wife, Julie, have been instrumental in organizing Canterbury’s advancement efforts in Florida, and have brought alumni, parents, and friends even closer to our School community. As noted by the late Bill O’Connor '57, John’s Canterbury and Princeton roommate, “John’s enthusiasm has motivated all of us, and his candor, intelligence, and sense of humor have made working with him a pleasure.” The couple’s extraordinary generosity extends well beyond Canterbury. John helped form the Montclair, NJ Hockey Association, which has served over 900 children since its inception, and has been heavily involved in the wider philanthropic community of Montclair Township. In the spirit of enormous appreciation, Canterbury formally dedicated its ice hockey rink as the O’Neill Arena on Saturday, May 12, 2018.

CANTERBURY WELCOMES NEW DIRECTOR OF ADVANCEMENT CAROL MAXWELL P ‘20 In March 2018, Carol joined Canterbury as the Director of Advancement from Rumsey Hall School, where she served as the Director of Development since 2009, leading the advancement and major gift efforts for the enhancement of facilities and programs, the growth of the Endowment, the School’s annual giving and special fundraising projects. Carol has organized regional events throughout the US and abroad; oncampus community events, most notably the Annual Benefit Auction; and directed the School’s Communications and Alumni efforts. Prior to joining Rumsey, Carol developed a twenty-year career cultivating expertise in branding, communications, design, and marketing for Lehman, Gartner Group, and Citibank, and was a top real estate sales producer with Sotheby’s International. Carol holds a bachelor’s degree in English/Communications from Fairleigh Dickinson University, NJ. Carol is parent to four children. Her son John ’20 is currently a Fourth Former student at Canterbury.

PAGE 17.


ON THE HILLTOP FALL HAPPENINGS 1

2

3

4

1. IV Form students “Walk-a-Mile” for their Annual Retreat, an event hosted by New Milford Social Services which included grocery shopping at Big Y and a mile walk back to Social Services to drop off the food for their pantry. Pictured from left to right: Retreat leader Jess Stolfi ‘18 (Sacristan), Maura Matthews ‘20, Tori Congdon ‘20, Kayla Jendras ‘20, Joyce Gao ‘20, and Jiwon Lee ‘20. 2. Author of Outcasts United Warren St. John speaks to the Canterbury community on a panel about the global refugee crisis. His book about the soccer team of refugees in Clarkston, GA, was the All-School Summer Read. 3. Cross Country Captain Anna Oeser ‘18 races to victory during the Canterbury Invitational. She won the Invitational four years in a row and has set a personal record with each race. Anna holds the course records in competitions against Berkshire School, Cheshire Academy, The Gunnery School, Suffield Academy, Williston Northampton School, and Kimball Union Academy. 4. Eli Taylor ‘19, Finn Brown ‘19, and Will McArdle ‘18 spoke with college representatives at College Night.

5

5. During the III Form Retreat, Sacristans, students, and faculty advisors hiked at Lover’s Leap State Park and journaled at stations throughout the woods.

PAGE 18.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


6

7

9

8

10

6. Students and faculty children during the Color Run. 7. Nikki DeCola ‘20 makes a shot during the Pink Out Volleyball Game. Canterbury competed against Cheshire Academy during the annual event in which all the proceeds from attendance and the bake sale were donated to Susan G. Komen for the Cure. 8. Canterbury students get into the spirit duing the Annual Pink Out Volleyball Game. 9. Bella Cotier ‘20 (right) with her host sister and friend while on the Mallorca, Spain Exchange. Six Canterbury students (including Olivia Allen ‘20, Griffin Duffy ‘20, Grace LaVigne ‘20, Abby Omaña ‘20, and Erin Sudbey ‘20) went on the six-week trip, during which they lived with a host family on the island and attended high school Spanish classes. 10. Visiting artist Meg Marden explains her paintings to Steven Luo ‘19 during an art opening at The Edward J. Duffy Family Gallery. 11. Margaret Melich ‘19 and Connor Cherry ‘19 perform in the fall musical production, Much Ado About Nothing.

11

PAGE 19.


ON THE HILLTOP WINTER HAPPENINGS 1

3

1. DeVaughan Montgomery ‘03, a teacher at the Bishop John T. Walker School for Boys in Washington, DC, speaks to theology students on Martin Luther King Jr. Day in the Brodie Room. 2. Jina Lee '18 and Gigi Schullery ‘18 during the Sixth Form Retreat, a time of reflection and looking ahead for the Class of 2018.

4

3. Students race across the pool at the Higgins Aquatic Center in handcrafted cardboard boats created in faculty member Michael Kennedy’s engineering fundamentals class. 4. Finn Brown ‘19, Sammy Tscheppe ‘21, and Steven Luo ‘19 perform in the Jazz Combo during the All Band Christmas Concert. 5. Raheem Logan '12, Squash Coordinator for City Squash Brooklyn, NY, speaks with Fifth Form students during their Fifth Form Retreat about living a life of service.

5

PAGE 20.

The Magazine of Canterbury School

2


6

7

8

6. Megan LeBlanc ‘20 and Shannon Kennedy ‘20 during the three-legged race at the Annual Battle of the Forms. 7. Red-clad Jacob Finkel-Hozer ‘19 and Christopher Roberti ‘19 beat out Cameron Plants ‘20 and Jeff Lumia ‘20 during the three-legged race at Battle of the Forms. 8. Students in Chorale lead the Canterbury community in song during the Annual Lessons and Carols event that takes place in the Chapel of Our Lady. 9. Hartford, CT based visiting artist Matthew Best discusses his work in the Edward J. Duffy Family Gallery.

9

PAGE 21.


SAINTS // FALL TEAMS

ATHLETICS BOYS’ CROSS COUNTRY The Boys’ Cross Country team had a successful season, led by captains Nick Toth ‘18, Riley Burns ‘18, and Henry Morgan ‘18. With nearly 30 boys on the roster, the team brought robust competition to each invitational and placed competitively among Class A and B league opponents. The Saints raced exceptionally well at both the Cheshire and Berkshire Invitationals, placing first and second, respectively. At the 2017 NEPSTA Division III Cross Country Championships, the team placed seventh overall among 22 teams. The team’s Sixth Formers included Riley Burns, Nick Toth, Diego Hagemann Barroso, Arthur Lange, Henry Morgan, and Rex Rohde. Jack McCluskey ’20 received the MVP Award, and Greg McKenna ’19 was presented with the Coach’s Award. Boys’ Cross Country races off during the afternoon event at the Canterbury Invitational.

GIRLS’ CROSS COUNTRY Led by captains Anna Oeser ’18, Megan Tracy ’18, and Ali Goracy ’18, the Girls’ Cross Country team had a competitive season, challenging Class B and Class C opponents at invitationals across the region. Notably, Anna Oeser ’18 placed first in every race of the season and won the Canterbury Invitational for the fourth year in a row. As a whole, the team placed first at the Cheshire Invitational, second at the Suffield Invitational, and third at the Berkshire Invitational. At the 2017 NEPSTA Division III Cross Country Championships, the team placed sixth overall to end the season on a successful note. Sixth Formers included Ali Goracy, Clara Tomann, Megan Tracy, Anna Oeser, and Avery Rikhoff. The MVP Award was presented to Anna Oeser ’18, and the Coach’s Award was given to Avery Rikhoff ’18. Megan Tracy ‘18 nears the finish line during the Canterbury Invitational for the Girls’ Cross Country team.

PAGE 22.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


SAINTS // FALL TEAMS

SAINTS BOYS’ SOCCER While early injuries hurt several of the team’s starting players, the Saints did not let this initial setback hinder their early season successes. The Saints battled Kingswood Oxford School, Kent School, and Millbrook School back-to-back and began the season with a strong, threegame winning streak. The 4-1 final score against Class A competitor Kent was a highlight of the season, according to Coach Shawn Ganow. While the team graduates nine members of the Class of 2018, the remaining underformers continue to be a strong group of students who will take the reins. The Sixth Formers on the team included Connor Amsley, Rafael Baquerizo, Dakota Casey, Victor Costa Gonzalez, Reilly Curtis, Alejandro Navarro Ramos, Seidu Shamsudeen, Steven Sigillito, and Quentin Silverio. The MVP Award was presented to Connor Amsley ‘18, and the C.T. Fisher ’72 Soccer Award, presented to the soccer player who has made the greatest contribution to the program, was awarded to Steven Sigillito ‘18 and Alex Navarro ‘18. Jacob-Finkel Hozier '19 dribbles the ball during a game against Cheshire Academy.

GIRLS’ SOCCER With a freshly invigorated roster, including six new III Formers, the Girls’ Varsity Soccer team was positioned for success this season. The Saints battled many of the top teams in Canterbury’s league (Class C) and were fierce competitors for larger Class B programs. Notably, the Saints defeated Class B competitor Berkshire School 3-1 and Class A competitor Kent School 2-1. On Gunnery Day, the girls helped lead Canterbury to victory over the Highlanders with a 1-0 win. The team’s sole Sixth Former was Gabby Vitelli. Peyton DeRouen ‘21 was awarded the MVP Award, and Rachael DeLong ‘19 received the Coach’s Award. Jade Brinker ‘20 passes to her teammate during the Girls' Varsity Soccer game against Ethel Walker School.

PAGE 23.


SAINTS // FALL TEAMS

SAINTS FIELD HOCKEY

Following the success of being named the Class C 2016 Champions, Girls’ Varsity Field Hockey had another great season, ending with a 10-1-7 record. The team, led by captains Ellyn Fritz ‘18, Gigi Schullery ‘18, Vic Body ‘18, and Liz Hawley ‘18, earned their place at the NEPSAC tournament for the fourth straight year, and advanced to the semifinals before being defeated by the eventual champion Holderness School. Season highlights included the Saints' 2-1 win against Rye Country Day School, 5-0 win against Millbrook School, and 1-0 win against New Hampton School. The team’s Sixth Formers included Ellyn Fritz, Gigi Schullery, Vic Body, Liz Hawley, and Megan Francis. Goalie Jami Procanik ‘19 received the MVP Award and Ellyn Fritz ‘18 and Gigi Schullery ‘18 were presented with the Coach’s

Award. Maddy Hackett ‘19 hits a reverse sweep during the Varsity Field Hockey game against Taft School.

FOOTBALL The Canterbury Football team concluded its 2017 campaign with a 41-19 victory over Albany Academy. This final season game proved to be the team's best all-around effort of the season as they executed at a high level across the field. The Saints finished with a 4-4 record with other wins over Wilbraham & Monson Academy, Westminster School, and Wyoming Seminary. The highlight of the season came against a strong Wyoming Seminary team when the Saints got off to a fast start moving the ball up and down the field and putting points on the board. After five Canterbury players went down to injuries in the second quarter, many reserves had to step up for the Saints. The game ended with Canterbury prevailing 21-19 after a back-and-forth during the second half—a great victory and a turning point in the season for Canterbury. Coach Stone presented the team‘s MVP award to Jake Roper ‘18 and the John Confort ‘70 Award for outstanding effort, team play, and contribution to the team to Liam Sutherland ‘19 and Cam Williamson ‘18. Canterbury quarterback Jake Roper ‘18 makes a pass for Saints Varsity Football during their game against Wyoming Seminary.

PAGE 24.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


SAINTS // FALL TEAMS

WATER POLO Led by captains Spencer McLean ‘19 and Gordon Bradshaw ‘19, the Water Polo team had an impressive season against many tough Class B competitors. The Saints’ battle against Choate Rosemary Hall was a highlight of the season—Canterbury won 11-10, a first ever in the School’s history competing against the Wild Boars. Additional season highlights include the Saints‘ 14-10 win against Williston Northampton School, 10-2 win against Hotchkiss School, and an invitation to the Hopkins Tournament. Spencer McLean ‘19 received the MVP Award and Gordon Bradshaw ‘19 was presented with the Coach’s Award from Coach McLean. Boys’ and Girls’ Varsity Water Polo scores a goal against Williston Northampton School.

VOLLEYBALL Saints Volleyball boasted an impressive roster of 20 students this season, led by captains Lilly Hoeniger ‘18 and Coco Booth ‘19. Notably, the team defeated Wilbraham & Monson Academy and Miss Hall’s School in four rounds and Berkshire School in three rounds. One of the traditional highlights of the season was the Annual Pink Out where students, dressed head-to-toe in pink, packed Pigott Arena to cheer on the Saints. The team collected donations for Susan G. Komen for the Cure and raised $1,400. The team’s Sixth Formers included Thanh Vi Dang, Lilly Hoeniger, Erin Kincade, Chamonix McAdam, Stephanie Proteau, and Skylar Stepankiw. The MVP Award was awarded to Coco Booth ‘19 and the Coach’s Award was presented to Lilly Hoeniger ‘18. Steph Proteau ‘18 strikes the ball for Girls’ Varsity Volleyball during their match against Sacred Heart Academy.

PAGE 25.


SAINTS // WINTER TEAMS

SAINTS BOYS’ HOCKEY

Captains Quentin Silverio ‘18, Connor Snowdy ‘18, and Connor Amsley ‘18 led the Saints Boys’ Varsity Hockey team for the 2017—2018 winter season. The team clutched early season wins against Millbrook School, Berkshire School, and Lawrenceville School, and had a strong showing at the tournaments at Lawrenceville and Cushing Academy in December. With their tough schedule—the Saints played several of the top teams in the nation—and early successes, the team headed into late February with the opportunity to advance to the NEPSAC Small School Tournament. The last seven games for the Saints were played against playoff-bound teams, but the boys secured their spot in the tournament to face off against The Gunnery during the quarterfinal round. While the Boys’ season ended after the quarterfinals, the team played a hard-fought game. Jericho Petkovich ‘18 was voted to the All-NEPSAC West team. Sixth Formers included the three captains along with Shawn Bedard, Anthony Cusano, Steven Mullally, Jordan Perez, Jericho Petkovich, Christian Schopfer, and Dongyoon Shin. Coach McCarthy presented the MVP Boys’ Hockey Award to Connor Amsley ‘18 and the Coach’s Award to Anthony Cusano ‘18. Connor Amsley ‘18 carries the puck during the Boys’ Varsity Hockey game against Hotchkiss School.

GIRLS’ HOCKEY Led by captains Gabby Vitelli ‘18, Ariella Haas ‘18, and Rachael DeLong ‘19, the Girls’ Varsity Hockey team hit the ice ready to go this season. With a nine-game winning streak against teams that included Greenwich Academy, Proctor Academy, and Portsmouth Abbey School, the Saints hit their groove early. The girls advanced to the NEPSAC Small School Tournament and qualified to play in the quarterfinals against Rivers School. While the Saints‘ season ended after the quarterfinal game, the team played hard and held Rivers, the #1 seed, at three goals for a final score of 3-2. In addition to the two Sixth Form captains, the team’s graduating class included Vic Body, Ellyn Fritz, Meghan Francis, Stephanie Proteau, and Clara Tomann. Coach Mandigo presented the MVP Girls’ Hockey Award to Ariella Haas ‘18 and the Coach’s Award to Gabby Vitelli ‘18. Rachael DeLong ‘19 races down the ice during the Girls’ Varsity Hockey game against Rye Country Day School.

PAGE 26.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


SAINTS // WINTER TEAMS

GIRLS’ BASKETBALL Led by captains Anna Oeser ‘18 and Jacalyn Pugliese ‘19, the Girls’ Varsity Basketball team played a tough schedule this season. Season highlights include the team’s two wins against The Gunnery, their win against Millbrook School, and their win against Westminster School. The Saints battled Berkshire School twice and, as Coach EJ Soifersmith noted, played strong in their second game, closing the score gap by more than half what it was in their first game. Sixth Formers on the team included Patsy Buckley, Thanh Vi Dang, Sophia Poli, and captain Anna Oeser. Coach Soifersmith presented the MVP Girls’ Basketball Award to Anna Oeser ‘18 and the Don K. Gowan Basketball Award for the player who best embodies what Don Gowan expected of all his players representing Canterbury Basketball—integrity, respect, and sportsmanship—to Jacalyn Pugliese ‘19. CC Poli ‘20 guards the ball during the Girls’ Varsity Basketball game against King School.

BOYS’ BASKETBALL With a new head coach and a handful of new Saints on the roster, the Boys’ Varsity Basketball team worked hard in the first weeks of their season to position themselves for success. Team highlights included two nail-biter games against Taft School—both ending in victory for the Saints by only single digits, the one- point win over South Kent, and several large-margin victories against Trinity-Pawling School, Avon Old Farms School, and Kent School. The team won the Tri-State League by two games and went 19-5 in the regular season. The Saints advanced to the NEPSAC Class B tournament, seeded #3, and beat Hamden Hall Country Day School during the quarterfinals to advance to the semifinals at Rivers School, where their season ended after a good run. Sixth Formers Manny Ansong, Kevin Fee, Sean Maher, Shawn Matthews, Logan O’Donnell, Kieffer Punter, and Michael Speight rounded out the team’s graduating class. Coach Baudinet presented the MVP Boys’ Basketball Award to Mike Speight ‘18 and the Don K. Gowan Basketball Award for the player who best embodies what Don Gowan expected of all his players representing Canterbury Basketball—integrity, respect, and sportsmanship—to Kevin Fee ‘18. Manny Ansong ‘18 dunks the ball for Boys’ Varsity Basketball during their game against Trinity-Pawling School.

PAGE 27.


SAINTS // WINTER TEAMS

SAINTS GIRLS’ SQUASH

The Girls’ Varsity Squash team ended the season by competing at the NEISA tournament hosted by Millbrook School. Bella Cotier ‘19 placed fifth in her flight and Ella Olcese ‘21 placed third in her flight. While without official captains, the two Sixth Formers, Lily Li and Aaliyah Biondo, led the team by example throughout the season. Lily challenged her way from the JV team to earn a place on the varsity practice squad. While Aaliyah Biondo ‘18, new to the sport last year, was a valuable varsity player who played well under pressure, especially when she was asked to unexpectedly play up a spot during a match. Season highlights included the Saints‘ performance against Suffield Academy and Millbrook School. Coach Omaña presented the MVP Girls’ Squash Award to Ella Olcese ‘21 and the Coach’s Award to Bella Cotier ‘19. Lia Ma ‘19 competes for Girls’ Varsity Squash during their match against Westover School.

BOYS’ SQUASH Led by captains Will Dowler ‘18, Alex Lytle ‘18, and Henry Amory ‘18, the Boys’ Varsity Squash team boasted a reinvigorated roster with 11 strong players for the 2017—2018 season. Coach Nikhil Seth, new to Canterbury’s coaching staff, brought collegiate-level training to the team’s weekly routine. In addition to a rigorous practice schedule, the players spent time inside the classroom, watching films, discussing their technique, and speaking about mental toughness. Season highlights included wins against TrinityPawling School, Salisbury School, and Kingswood Oxford School—each a full team effort. The team finished the season at the NEISA Class B tournament hosted at Moses Brown School, which was the first time the Boys’ team competed at the Class B level. Henry Amory ‘18 took eighth in his flight and the rest of the team played well against tough competitors. The team’s Sixth Form players included the three captains as well as Seidu Shamsudeen, Alejandro Navarro Ramos, Reilly Curtis, Victor Costa Gonzalez, and Conor Cassidy. Zachary Booth ‘19 and Pablo De Saro ‘19 managed the team, and Coach Seth looks forward to working with them next year, along with the returning players and a new crop of first-year students. Coach Seth presented the MVP Boys’ Squash Award to Henry Amory ‘18 and the Coach’s Award to Alex Lytle ‘18. Willem Steiner ‘19 challenges competitor from Rye Country Day School for Boys’ Varsity Squash. PAGE 28.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


SAINTS // WINTER TEAMS

SWIMMING Looking to defend their NEPSAC Class C Champion title for the third year in a row, the Boys’ Varsity Swim team jumped into the season with meets against Greenwich Academy, Brunswick School, and Kingswood-Oxford School, all before the end-of-the-semester break. Led by captains Will Ondrey ‘19 and Spencer McLean ‘19, the boys’ won against Westminster School and Cheshire Academy and hit personal records at each meet. Notably, the Boys’ team won their third consecutive New England Class C title. Coach Irving presented the MVP Boys’ Swimming Award to Spencer McLean ‘19 and the Coach’s Award to Matt Martin ‘19. Boys’ Class of 2018 swimmers and divers included Alejandro Bonnet ‘18 and Nicholas Pizzano ‘18. Ali Goracy ‘18 and Gianna Terracino ‘19 captained the girls’ team as the Saints sought to advance to the NEPSAC Class C tournament. Season highlights included the girls’ win against Kingswood Oxford School, Westminster School, and Kent School. Girls’ Class of 2018 swimmers and divers included Isabella Jimenez, Wyn Maloney, Mila Piacsek, Jessica Stolfi, Megan Tracy, and captain Ali Goracy. Coach Irving presented the MVP Girls’ Swimming Award to Gianna Terracino ‘19 and the Coach’s Award to Megan Tracy ‘18. Alejandro Bonnet ‘18 swims the butterfly during a meet against Hotchkiss School and Christian Heritage School.

WRESTLING Wrestling, led by captains Henry Morgan ‘18 and Adrian deCola ‘19, had a strong winter season. Highlights of the team’s schedule included the two home matches—against Taft School and a joint match against Marvelwood School and Avon Old Farms School—and an early season win against Williston Northampton School. The team brought four wrestlers to the Western New England tournament where Thomas Cho ‘21 and Bryce Leckey ‘19 took home sixth while Adrian deCola ‘19 and Jason Xing ‘20 placed fourth, and each athlete advanced to the New England Championship hosted at Tabor Academy. The team’s Sixth Formers included Draquan Jones and Henry Morgan. Coach Conroy presented the MVP Wrestling Award to Adrian deCola ‘19 and the Guiseppe “Joe” Leto ‘97 Wrestling Award for the greatest contribution to team effort to Henry Morgan ‘18. Draquan Jones ‘18 competes for Saints Wrestling versus Taft School.

PAGE 29.


THE DONOVAN CENTER FOR LEARNING DEDICATION

A GIFT FROM JOHN ’59 AND DANA DONOVAN TRANSFORMS A LIBRARY SPACE INTO A HUB OF COLLABORATION

Always an active hub of student activity, the David C. Copley ’70 Library is now additionally well-equipped to serve the evolving needs of Canterbury students thanks to the newly dedicated Donovan Center for Learning. The Center provides a much-needed space for student-faculty collaboration, and offers services for students to find assistance with a homework question, receive standardized test prep, or build strategies to enhance their overall academic performance.

PAGE 30.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


1. Sixth Form participants in the 2017 Montana Leadership Program with John ‘59 and Dana Donovan. From left to right, back row: John Donovan, Riley Burns, Will Dowler, Jeaneville Quaye, Nick Toth, Ali Goracy, Seidu Shamsudeen; front row: Dana Donovan, Gabby Vitelli, Steven Sigillito, Quentin Silverio

“EVERYTHING THAT A STUDENT NEEDS TO BE ACADEMICALLY SUCCESSFUL IS LOCATED HERE.”

2. John and Dana Donovan address the community during the Donovan Center for Learning dedication.

ALISON BAILEY, DIRECTOR OF THE DONOVAN CENTER FOR LEARNING

“Everything that a student needs to be academically successful is located here,” explains Alison Bailey, the Director of the Center. “That includes tutors for writing, math, and standardized testing prep; academic counselors; and the latest in-classroom technology, such as JTouch touchscreens. We also provide food and refreshments to help students stay focused!” The Donovan Center for Learning occupies space along the back width of the Library, separated from the main reading area by a glass wall. It also includes a new classroom at the front of the Library, featuring a large conference table and the most advanced classroom technology. The Center is already a part of the daily routine for many students, and, as noted by Head of School Rachel Stone, “an integral and central part of the day-to-day pattern of community life.” The Center accommodates students who drop in during unscheduled blocks to receive help on a homework assignment as well as those who make arrangements to visit a tutor in advance. “One of the goals of the Donovan Center for Learning is to work with students to teach them how to learn,” says Sue Roberts, Associate Head for Academics. “The dedicated space allows students to work closely with tutors and receive the organizational support they need to become self-reliant learners and selfadvocates in their next academic venture.” Bob Steers ’71, P ’11, President of the Board of Trustees, noted in his dedication remarks, “The deliberate choice of the word ‘learning’ as an active and ongoing aspect of our student work typifies the Donovan spirit.” The formal dedication of the Center took place on September 29, 2017, honoring benefactors John ’59 and Dana Donovan. The Donovans have

been active supporters of Canterbury students in both their academic and extracurricular pursuits, encouraging students to explore the world and learn through experience. In 2005, the couple spearheaded the Montana Leadership Trip, a two-week summer program for rising Sixth Formers. John, a member of the Board of Trustees since 2002 and Vice President since 2007, matriculated to Harvard College, MA upon his graduation from Canterbury, and soon after attended Fordham Law School, NY. He practiced corporate litigation, both in New York and Los Angeles, ultimately becoming head of the West Coast Litigation practice of Skadden, Arps, Slate, Meagher & Flom. During the dedication, Head of School Rachel Stone noted that the commitment and love John and Dana exhibit toward the School is truly special: “It is a win for the entire community.”

PAGE 31.


THE DUFFY TRAVEL GRANT LANGUAGE TEACHER PAIGE ROOT DISCOVERS THE ISLAND NATION AND SHARES HER INSIGHTS WITH STUDENTS

F

or many Americans, including myself, Cuba has been enshrouded in mystery. The island nation lies only about one hundred miles from Florida. However, in my mind, Cuba seemed a world away. My fascination with the island country of around 11.5 million people began during my undergraduate years at the University of New Hampshire, where I studied Spanish, French, and education.

By Paige Root

CUBA REVEALED

During my postgraduate years, I pursued my interest in Latin American politics and culture by traveling through the region and completing a master’s degree through Middlebury College in Argentina. My professors and friends would speak of their hero Che Guevara, the threat of neoliberalism, and the importance of Latin American solidarity, and I would listen, wondering why I had no memory of learning about Latin America during my public school education. Of course, there were no memories from the start.

The Duffy Travel Grant Allows Paige Root to Discover the Island Nation and Share Her Insights with Students

By Paige Root

1

PAGE 32.

The Magazine of Canterbury School

Even as I began my career at Canterbury in the fall of 2016, these questions continued to surface in my thoughts. The death of Fidel Castro in November 2016 and the end of the “wet foot dry foot” policy in January 2017 landed Cuba in the headlines. Naturally, students became curious, and I quickly realized these issues required a more comprehensive understanding of Cuban affairs, something that is best achieved firsthand. Fortunately, thanks to the enormous generosity of the Duffy family, I spent 27 captivating days in Cuba the summer of 2017 through the partial support of the Duffy Travel Grant. My voyage began with an eight-day seminar entitled “Contemporary


Cuban Transformations: Social Inequalities and Social Policies” with the Council on International Educational Exchange. The seminar, which was designed for college professors, took place in Havana at the Centro de Estudios Martianos. As the only participant who was not a college professor, I was surrounded by experts in fields such as social psychology, economics, and organizational leadership. Each day contained a different agenda, some of which included lectures by Cuban academics on a variety of topics. I was able to supplement lectures on education, race, gender, the economy, Cuban history, healthcare, and U.S.-Cuba relations with compelling talks with the highly educated members of my cohort. The program also visited a health clinic, cooperative restaurant, Old Havana, a self-sustaining eco-village, the Museum of the Revolution, and La Casa de Africa. After the seminar I embarked on a 19-day solo journey around the western half of the island. This portion of the trip introduced me to Cuba’s system of “casas particulares,” essentially homestays, in which Cuban homeowners rent a room or several rooms in their house to tourists. Raul Castro’s economic reforms during the past decade allowed for development of the private sector, encouraging the emergence of the casa particular system. My hosts made me feel like a part of their family. They invited me to share Sunday lunch with them, took me to visit relatives, shared coveted black market ice cream, and accompanied me to museums. The best moments of my trip were spent sitting in rocking chairs or on stoops watching the world go by and chatting with my hosts. My itinerary included Viñales, an idyllic green valley famous for coffee and tobacco production. I spent a few days in the lush countryside hiking between the mogotes and learning from farmers about the cultivation of tobacco and the cigar-making process.

1. Paige Root poses in a plaza in La Habana Vieja (Old Havana).

2

2. Photo of La Plaza de la Revolución, one of the largest city centers in the world. The plaza was the site of many political rallies and speeches during the revolution. The steel text next to the sculpture of Che Guevara reads “Hasta la victoria siempre,” famous lyrics by Cuban composer Carlos Puebla in farewell to Guevara when he left Cuba. 3. Fishermen end their workday off the Atlantic coast.

3

Next, I traveled to the Bahía de los Cochinos (Bay of Pigs), where I toured the invasion museum, accompanied by my host, Silvio. Silvio’s father had served as a medic during the event, and he spoke of his country with enormous pride. Later that day we went scuba diving together off the coastline where the soldiers disembarked. Bobbing in the water, staring back at the perfect white sandy beach, we reflected on how surreal it was for us to be there: a Cuban and an American scuba diving together in the very place where our two countries had waged war. My trip continued in Cienfuegos, a sleepy seaside city known as the “pearl of the South.” I spent my time simply enjoying the tranquility of the small city and conversing with my host on the front stoop. Over the course of six breezy evenings, we discussed everything from the Special Period to the Balseros Crisis to the recent rise of the private sector. My favorite quote of his is “I am a socialist in the street, but I am a capitalist in my house,” which seemed to be the motto of many Cubans I encountered. I then ventured to Trinidad, a colorful colonial and cobblestoned UNESCO World Heritage site. I visited a nearby resort area and wondered why tourists would ever spend a night in a generic state-run hotel when homestay options were so abundant. I finished my journey in Santa Clara, where Che Guevara and Camilo Cienfuegos won the last battle of the Revolution. Back on U.S. soil, I am now faced with the complicated task of designing a unit on Cuba for my classes that doesn’t serve to further biases or misconceptions. However, now that the veil of mystery surrounding Cuba has been lifted for me, it will not be difficult to share the beauty and wonder of the island of Cuba!

PAGE 33.


HOMECOMING AND PARENTS’ WEEKEND

1

SOMETHING NEW—CANTERBURY CELEBRATES JOINT HOMECOMING AND PARENTS’ WEEKEND

Parents, alumni, and friends joined the Canterbury community for a joint weekend of celebration in honor of Homecoming and Parents’ Weekend. In a new tradition, parents had the opportunity to attend class with their students and experience what “life on the hilltop” is like. Each class met for a mini-session during which parents participated in lessons or were taught by their own children. Algebra I and geometry teacher Kelli Darrin led parents and students through an activity about inverse equations. In Spanish I with faculty Julio Omaña, students taught their parents new vocabulary about their classroom surroundings. This was the first Parents’ Weekend at Canterbury that brought parents together with their students in the classroom. Following classes, parent-faculty conferences, and two days of the “hilltop” experience, families socialized and celebrated Canterbury at the Annual Benefit Auction. Items varied from on-campus favorites such as the “Dean for a Day,” where students play the role of Dean of Students Jake Dellorco (setting the dress code, deciding the dining hall menu, and organizing school meeting), to a holiday vacation in Paris, France.

2

3

The entire weekend of activities brought families together to celebrate the Canterbury community and experience our remarkable hilltop.

HOMECOMING

4

1. Alumni Elaine Mullen Peer ’77, Joanna Martiska Woodworth ’77, P '11, '13, Alec Woodworth ’11, and Julie Schwerzmann Gilbane ’74 returned to campus for the fall Homecoming games. 2. Kara Schiebel Kacmarcik ‘95 poses with her daughter during face-painting activities. 3. Sisters Nicole Duff DeSantis ’91, P '20 and Renee Duff ’86 watch Canterbury Varsity Football Team compete against Berkshire School. 4. Classmates Neil Boylan ’79 and Michael Burke ’78 with Liz Spitler. 5. Joe Viau ’79 stands with his parents, Helene and the late former faculty member Jules Viau, outside of the Homecoming Tent.

5

PAGE 34.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


6

7

8

PARENTS’ WEEKEND 6. Head of School Rachel Stone welcomes parents and families in the Chapel of Our Lady. 7. Lauren and Mark Booth attend class with daughter Coco Booth ‘19 (left) and Carter Finnen ‘19. 8. Alison Chace looks over the weekend schedule with son Finn Brown ’19. 10

9

9. Parents make their way to class to meet their students. 10. Dean of Students Jake Dellorco speaks with John and Joanne Lee, parents of William ’19, during Parents’ Weekend Registration.

AUCTION

11

11. Auction Co-Chair Nancy Hawley, parent of Elizabeth ’18 and Katie ’21, Louis Sproviero, and Auction volunteer Patty Morasco, parent of Gianna Terracino ’19, pose together during the event.

12

12. Trustee Carol Lovell Carmody, parent of Nelle ’18, motions excitedly over a winning live auction bid. 13. Janice Graham, parent of Nicolas ’21, enjoys a round of the game Heads and Tails. 14. Rachel Stone pictured with Trustee Nicole D’Amour Schneider ’93 and Todd Schneider, parents of Justin ’20. 15. Kristen and Stephen Stolfi, parents of Jessica ’18 and Caroline ’15, look over the selection of silent auction items.

13

14

15

PAGE 35.


HALL OF FAME CELEBRATION

2017—2018 HALL OF FAME INDUCTEES Coach Donald Robert (1967-84) The 1970 Wrestling Team Lawrence Lessing Jr. ’28

THIRD ANNUAL INDUCTION CEREMONY

Thomas Haire Sr. ’30 Terence McBride ’66 Robert Gilbane ’67 Edward Wallace ’67 Robert Steele ’72

The Canterbury community joined together to celebrate its history and acclaimed alumni at the Third Annual Athletics Hall of Fame celebration on October 21, 2017. Many alumni, some of whom had not returned to campus for over thirty years, attended the event to support their former teammates and Canterbury friends.

Michael Bourdeau ’73 John Sargeant ’75 Debra O’Connor Cully ’78 Sandra Foster Swindler ’82 Peter Lappin ’84

This year’s class of inductees included Coach Donald Robert (wrestling, football, baseball, and lacrosse, 1967-84), the 1970 Wrestling team, and 13 individual athletes: Lawrence Lessing Jr. ’28 (five-sport athlete), Thomas Haire Sr. ’30 (football, hockey), Terence McBride ’66 (football, hockey, golf), Robert Gilbane ’67 (football, hockey, track & field), Edward Wallace ’67 (swimming), Robert Steele ’72 (basketball, golf), Michael Bourdeau ’73 (soccer, basketball, baseball), John Sargeant ’75 (football, basketball, lacrosse), Debra O’Connor Cully ’78 (soccer, basketball, track & field), Sandra Foster Swindler ’82 (swimming), and Peter Lappin ’84 (football, hockey, golf). Head of School Rachel Stone opened the evening welcoming all guests. Board of Trustees President Bob Steers ’71, P ’11 shared this thought: “Athletics at Canterbury are central to so many of our experiences, memories, and the lessons that we learned at Canterbury. Athletics at this School have always been about more than winning: It is where many of us first learned about real discipline, the power of teamwork, and about leadership by example.”

1

The event was a heartwarming experience as alumni cheered on their former classmates with the same vigor they once showed on the sidelines. When Coach Robert received his award, several dozen athletes whom he had coached rose in applause for his formative role in their growth, shouting “Coach, Coach.” Attendees applauded their Canterbury memories and their honored classmates. The Third Annual Athletics Hall of Fame event was a true celebration of Canterbury past, present, and future.

2

PAGE 36.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


3

4

5

6

7

8

9

10

1. Left to right: Board President Bob Steers ’71, P’11, Pamela Falk, inductees Bob Gilbane ’67 and Ed Wallace ’67, and Rachel Stone. 2. Left to right: Inductee Coach Don Robert with his children, Fran Robert ’83, Don Robert Jr., and Steve Robert ’84. 3. Steve Lessing, son of posthumous inductee Lawrence Lessing Jr. ’28. 4. Left to right: Nicole Pettingell, Christine Bourdeau, Inductee Mickey Bourdeau ’73, Mike Steele ’75, and Paul Bourdeau. 5. Children of posthumous inductee Thomas Haire Sr. ’30: Virginia Ann Haire (left) and Brett Haire ’67 (right) with his wife Judy (center). 11

6. Siblings of posthumous inductee Bob Steele ’72: Anne Linden Steele (left) and Ed Steele (right) with his wife Brenda (center). 7. Rachel Stone with Mike McBride ’71, brother of posthumous inductee Terry McBride ’66. 8. Inductee John Sargeant ’75 with Trustee Keith Angell ’75 and David Sullivan ‘77. 9. 2016 inductee Coach Walter Burke (left) with Harmon Moats ‘75 (right). 10. Inductee Debra O’Connor Cully ’78 being congratulated by Trustee and classmate Dorothy Alpert ‘78. 11. Peter O’Donnell ’70 at the podium delivering acceptance remarks on behalf of fellow inductees on the 1970 Wrestling team: Mike Seaman ’72, Paul Haire ’73, Tony Hume ’71, Bob Spagnola ’73, Steve Coleman ’71, Chappy LeBlond ’70, and Coach Don Robert. 12. Trustee Emeritus John O’Neill ‘57 stands up during the recognition of his service to the Board and in anticipation of the dedication of the O’Neill Arena.

12

PAGE 37.


CANTERBURY WELCOMES

NEW FACULTY MEMBERS

Canterbury's newest faculty join our community with a wide-range of backgrounds and interests. From the Mathematics Department to the Admission Office, these community members bring a unique perspective to their individual roles and a shared passion for boarding school life. Canterbury is excited to welcome our new faculty as they make their home on our remarkable hilltop.

BRIAN BAUDINET ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ADMISSION; HEAD COACH OF BOYS’ VARSITY BASKETBALL

Brian Baudinet joins Canterbury as the new head coach of Boys’ Varsity Basketball and Assistant Director of Admission. Prior to Canterbury, he coached at Trinity College, CT, American International College, MA, and Duquesne University, PA. He also served as a D League Assistant with the Oklahoma City Thunder Association and as an assistant coach with the Tulsa 66ers. Brian received his bachelor’s degree at UMass Amherst, MA where he remains one of the most acclaimed baseball players in the school’s history. He attended Taft School, CT and completed a PG year at Blair Academy, NJ. He lives on campus and is a dorm parent in Carmody House.

PAGE 38.

CAITLIN CATALDO

KELLI DARRIN

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF ADMISSION; HEAD COACH OF VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY, ASSISTANT COACH OF GIRLS’ VARSITY HOCKEY AND LACROSSE

MATHEMATICS FACULTY AND TUTOR IN THE DONOVAN CENTER FOR LEARNING; ASSISTANT COACH OF GIRLS’ VARSITY VOLLEYBALL AND BASKETBALL

Prior to joining the Canterbury community, Caitlin Cataldo worked for Tenacity, an organization in Massachusetts that works to close the opportunity and achievement gap for Boston Public School students through after-school enrichment. A decorated athlete herself, Caitlin was the goalie on the Connecticut College Women’s Lacrosse team. She brings extensive coaching experience, having previously worked as assistant coach for the Varsity Women’s Lacrosse team at Endicott College, MA, and a field hockey and lacrosse coach at Milton Academy, MA. Caitlin graduated from Hotchkiss School, CT in 2010 and matriculated to Connecticut College, CT where she received her bachelor’s degree with a major in American studies and a minor in psychology. In addition to serving Canterbury as an Assistant Director of Admission, she is on the coaching staff of Varsity Field Hockey, Girls’ Varsity Hockey, and Girls’ Varsity Lacrosse. Caitlin is also a dorm parent in South House, where she enjoys spending time in the common room with her many advisees.

Well-versed in what life at a boarding school is like, Kelli Darrin joins the Canterbury community following many years as an educator (English and mathematics) and III Form Dean at South Kent School, CT. At Canterbury, Kelli teaches Algebra I and geometry, and works with our students as a math tutor in the Donovan Center for Learning. In addition to South Kent, she previously taught at Greenwich School, CT. Kelli continues to live at South Kent with her husband and four children. Kaelyn (9), Kacie (8), Tarquin (6), and Tobias (2) have all equally enjoyed spending time on campus getting to know the students on Kelli’s teams: Girls’ Varsity Volleyball and Girls’ Varsity Basketball.

The Magazine of Canterbury School

JAKE DELLORCO DEAN OF STUDENTS; MATHEMATICS FACULTY; ASSISTANT COACH OF VARSITY FOOTBALL

Dean of Students Jake Dellorco joins Canterbury following nearly ten years in independent school teaching. As the advisor to the Sixth Form Council, dorm head of Carmody House, coach of Varsity Football, and math teacher, Jake has already fully embraced his student and community-oriented role. Early in the year, he received a “Saints Shoutout” at School Meeting for his pivotal role as a math teacher. He joins the Canterbury community following two years at Choate Rosemary Hall, CT, where he served as the Director of their Prefect Program and a faculty member in the Math Department. Jake earned his bachelor’s in mathematics from Tufts University, MA and his master’s at Columbia’s Graduate School of Education, NY. He lives with his wife, Meredith, in Carmody House.


MIKE NIU LATIN FACULTY; ASSISTANT COACH OF VARSITY WATER POLO

If you pass Michael Nui’s classroom in Old Schoolhouse, you can see his visible enthusiasm about material he is teaching—and how he is inspiring the same excitement from his students. Michael has a background in classical studies and earned his bachelor’s degree in the subject from Dickinson College, PA. He brings a historical perspective to his classroom, leading his students through the history of ancient Rome in addition to translating classical texts. Inspired by his mother and sister, both educators at independent schools, Michael began to consider teaching following his experience as a teaching assistant during his undergraduate career. He was drawn to Canterbury in particular because he felt he could simultaneously be involved in the academic, athletic, and residential life of the School. As a new faculty member, he has enjoyed getting to know his students through out-of-the-classroom conversations in the dorm and in the aquatics center as the assistant coach of Varsity Water Polo. Michael lives in Carmody House, where he also serves as a dorm parent.

KATIE MANDIGO ASSISTANT DIRECTOR OF COLLEGE COUNSELING; HEAD COACH OF GIRLS’ VARSITY HOCKEY AND ASSISTANT COACH OF GIRLS’ VARSITY LACROSSE

As Assistant Director of College Counseling, dorm parent in South House, and head coach of Girls’ Varsity Hockey, Katie Mandigo has already had ample opportunity to work closely with our upperform students. She, alongside Director Sarah Ferland, works closely with all Fifth and Sixth Formers on their college search, application, and enrollment process. While she has enjoyed working with students in that regard, she is equally excited when out on the ice with her team. A two-season college athlete, Mandingo captained the Varsity Hockey team her senior year at Middlebury College, VT where she received her bachelor’s degree in psychology. Katie was also the starting goalie on Middlebury’s NCAA Championship-winning Varsity Lacrosse team and won MVP of the NCAA Tournament in 2016. Katie is familiar with the boarding school environment as a 2012 alumna of Loomis Chaffee School, CT and as a former Assistant Director of Admission at Holderness School, NH.

SEAN MILANO

NIKHIL SETH

MATHEMATICS FACULTY; ASSISTANT COACH OF VARSITY FOOTBALL, WRESTLING, AND VARSITY BASEBALL

MATHEMATICS AND HISTORY FACULTY; HEAD COACH OF BOYS’ VARSITY SQUASH AND GIRLS’ VARSITY TENNIS

A familiar face for many Canterbury community members, Sean Milano returns as a faculty member in the Mathematics Department following two years at nearby Salisbury School, CT. Prior to his work at both schools, Sean received his bachelor’s degree in psychology from Williams College, MA where he played football for four years. While at Williams, Sean was inspired by a fellow alumnus and independent school educator to return to work in a college prep school setting. Since this decision, Sean says that when he wakes up in the morning, he never feels like he’s going to work. He enjoys every aspect of the multifaceted boarding school life—“to me, this is a lifestyle.” Sean coaches Varsity Football, Wrestling, and Varsity Baseball. He lives with his wife, Amy, their dog, Barley, and their cat, Oscar, in Duffy House, where he serves as a dorm parent.

Nikhil received his bachelor’s degree from Princeton University, NJ and master’s degree from St. Lawrence University, NY where he also served as the assistant coach of the Varsity Squash team. He joins the Canterbury community as a joint math and history faculty member, teaching Algebra II and AP macroeconomics. Nikhil understands boarding school life as an alumnus of Tabor Academy, MA. He serves as the head coach of Boys’ Varsity Squash and Girls’ Varsity Tennis. Nikhil is a dorm parent in Sheehan House, where he lives with his wife, Elizabeth. Nikhil is one of the dorm’s reigning ping-pong and pool champions, and anyone is welcome to challenge him during his Friday night duty responsibilities.

PAGE 39.


REMEMBERING WILLIAM B. O’CONNOR ’57 A Giant Among Saints TRUSTEE, BOARD PRESIDENT, TRUSTEE EMERITUS

By Marc Vanasse ’73 William “Bill” B. O’Connor ’57, whose close association with Canterbury spanned more than half a century, died Monday, November 6, 2017. Bill became a member of Canterbury’s Board of Trustees in 1996, succeeding Hope E. Carter as President two years later and continuing in that role until 2007, remaining on the Board until 2014. The Board voted him a Trustee Emeritus in 2012 and he received the Canterbury Medal and spoke at graduation in 2007. “Bill devoted all of his passion, love, and energy to Canterbury in every way you can imagine,” said Trustee Emeritus John O’Neill ’57, Bill’s Canterbury and Princeton lifelong friend, and Board Vice President through Bill’s tenure. “As Board President, he was a spectacular leader.” Bill and John roomed together for one year at Canterbury and were roommates while at Princeton. Head of School Rachel Stone remarked, “I had the honor of meeting Bill almost exactly one year ago at his home in Port Washington, NY, and the privilege of welcoming him back to campus May 2017 to celebrate John O’Neill’s retirement from the Board. Kind, resilient, and generous of heart and spirit, Bill embodied the true meaning of our School and the Canterbury family. We will all miss him.” A loyal and faithful alumnus, Bill was a wise mentor and leader. He generously funded the restoration of the Chapel of Our Lady’s west window, the “porch” of the chapel, and many additional projects. The sacristy is dedicated to him. In June 2016, the Head of School’s House was named O’Connor House in his honor. Canterbury is an infinitely better school because of his diligent, generous, and farsighted leadership. Not only did Bill fund capital projects, but he also created and supported numerous endowment funds earmarked for faculty study and student financial aid. Among the funds to which he contributed are The Roderick Clarke ’46 Endowment Fund for Faculty Advanced Study, The Thomas J. and

PAGE 40.

Betsy Sheehy Endowment Fund for Faculty Support, The Pat Hiro Scholarship Fund, The William B. O’Connor ’57 Scholarship Fund, and The Algis StankusSaulaitis Library Fund. He also contributed generously to the Annual Fund, including challenge matches and in honor of the Class of 1957 on reunion years. Hailing from Roslyn Estates, NY, Bill arrived at Canterbury in the fall of 1954. He played JV football, ran track, and was a member of the Mimers Drama Club, Debating Club, and Carillon, the School art and literary magazine. As a Sixth Former, he was Managing Editor of the Cantuarian, the Canterbury yearbook, a member of the student council, and a Sacristan. He went on to graduate from Princeton University, NJ. Bill believed that the secret to life was “living small.” This he taught his children. He lived in a modest home, drove modest cars, and never boasted, preferring to change the world without too much fanfare, if he could. Whenever the School honored him, one might have gotten the impression that he was embarrassed by being in the spotlight. Through and through, Bill was the quintessential Christian gentleman and humble to a fault, a true giant among Saints. A memorial service was held for Bill in the Chapel of Our Lady in May 2018.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


RICHARD E. DILLON ’51 A Friend for All Seasons TRUSTEE By Former Headmaster Thomas J. Sheehy III P ’92, ’98, ’04 On Thursday, August 17, 2017, Canterbury lost a great alumnus, a former trustee, and Canterbury Medal recipient Richard E. Dillon ’51. A beloved husband, father, grandfather, great grandfather, and friend, Dick spent his last days surrounded by his family. He died the way he lived, always in control and managing the situation. Betsy and I first met Dick and Phyllis in NYC at a reception and dinner recognizing John Duffy’s final year as President of Canterbury’s Board of Trustees. Following the dinner, Dick invited us to visit them in Vero Beach, FL where they had recently moved, having left Newport Beach, CA after his many years as CEO of Mendoza and Dillon. In late January 1992, we arrived at 2310 Ocean Drive, Vero Beach, where Dick and Phyllis greeted us like long-lost family. They had a full schedule for us, including golf (a game I had just started playing), dinner at their favorite restaurants, and days full of conversation. Dick was constantly asking questions, delving into our views, including those on education at Canterbury. It was during that first visit that Dick and Phyllis thought it would be a good idea to have some alumni and families connected with Canterbury for dinner. And so in 1992 Dick and Phyllis began a tradition, “The Canterbury Vero Dinner,” which continued unbroken until 2016 when Dick announced that he was passing the torch on to others. At that first dinner there were about ten of us, but over the years that number grew to 28 as couples came year after year to hear about Canterbury and enjoy an evening of lively conversation, drink, and food fit for royalty. During one of our many visits to Vero, a second great tradition got its start, the Dillon Super Bowl Party, which continues to this year with friends and alumni gathering to cheer on their chosen team amidst chili, chicken wings, good wine, and conversation. I am not sure Dick’s team ever won, as I remember taking money from him almost every year. As our friendship grew over the years, Dick became more involved with Canterbury, rejoining the Board for a term in the 90s and eventually including Canterbury in his estate planning.

For his dedication and loyalty to Canterbury over the years, Dick was awarded the Canterbury Medal at a dinner at the Union League Club in 2011. It was an evening of joy and celebration as almost 200 alumni, family, and friends, including several of his classmates from the Class of 1951, assembled to honor Dick. His daughter, Patty, captured her dad with the following statement: “I credit Canterbury and later Princeton with teaching my dad the kind of rigorous thinking that has rendered him one of those rare people who can think for himself and has the courage to formulate a new direction, a new way of doing things, a new way of looking at things. In other words, he has vision.” And in 2014, Dick gave Canterbury’s graduation speech, reflecting on the lessons learned from his many failures that ultimately led him to the successful life he and Phyllis had together. Never one to quit, he persevered, battling his ailments with determination and humor, all the while indulging in his new passion, bridge. As with everything in his life, he never undertook anything half-heartedly. When not playing bridge, he would be found devouring biographies on Churchill or some other historical character, or reading the latest opinion piece by Charles Krauthammer. As the summer months moved along, it became apparent that Dick was failing, in spite of his upbeat attitude. We soon learned that hospice had been called in and Dick was facing his final show. When the time came, Dick passed peacefully in Phyllis’s arms, and his life was celebrated with an Irish wake and funeral service, just as Dick would have wanted. Canterbury has lost a devoted and dear alumnus who positively impacted all who knew him. He will be missed, but memories of our time together will stay with us. On February 4, 2018, we raised a glass at his home as we watched the Super Bowl and celebrated a friend for all seasons.

PAGE 41.


STUDENT ART

THE EDWARD J. DUFFY FAMILY GALLERY

1

2

3

4

5

1. David Radcliffe ’18 / 2. Michaela Stowell ’19 / 3. Ariella Haas ’18 / 4. Zack McGrew ’20 / 5. Mike Shi ’21 / 6. Brigida Caruso ’20 / 7. Sara Stone ’19 / 8. Lilly Hoeniger ’18 / 9. Jami Procanik ’19 / 10. Jade Brinker ’20 / 11. Nova Chen ’19 / 12. Jami Procanik ’19

PAGE 42.

6

The Magazine of Canterbury School


7

8

9

10

11

12

PAGE 43.


FOR DETAILS AND TO REGISTER, VISIT CBURY.ORG/ALUMNIWEEKEND

ALUMNI WEEKEND CANTERBURY

JUNE 8 -10, 2018

ALL ARE WELCOME! ALUMNI FROM ALL CLASS YEARS ARE INVITED TO ALUMNI WEEKEND. CLASSES ENDING IN 3S OR 8S...IT'S STILL YOUR YEAR. WE LOOK FORWARD TO CELEBRATING WITH OUR MILESTONE REUNION CLASSES!

PAGE 44.

The Magazine of Canterbury School


V I S I T S H O P. C B U R Y. O R G TO P U R C H A S E YO U R C A N T E R B U R Y S P I R I T W E A R A N D G I F T S O N L I N E .

R

YO U

All School Store items

50% off!

(excluding Johnnie-O Pop-Up Shop). *Prices as marked

S

W O H

S PRI D

E

S

NT I A

(L-R in photo) Champion adult hoodie $25.50, Champion 1/4 zip pullover in navy $24.50, Champion field house sweat pants in black with straight hemmed bottom $15, Champion heathered gray crew neck sweatshirt $22.50

17 oz. Copper Vacuum Insulated Bottle $10

Canterbury School Navy Cap $9

Canvas Boat Tote $12.50

Swiss Army Computer Backpack $50

JOHNNIE-O POP-UP SHOP

East Coast prep meets West Coast casual with Canterbury’s Johnnie-O Pop-Up Shop! Canterbury-branded Johnnie-O apparel for men and women will be available for purchase through July 30, 2018. Don’t miss this opportunity to refresh your Canterbury gear for spring and summer!

Men’s Lammie Pullover $98

Women’s Lido Pullover $98

Men’s Birdie Polo $75

Women’s Tori Polo $75


NONPROFIT ORG U.S. POSTAGE

Canterbury School 101 Aspetuck Avenue, New Milford, Connecticut 06776-2825

PAI D

PERMIT NO. XXX CANTERBURY

Pallium Magazine Fall/Winter 2018  
Pallium Magazine Fall/Winter 2018