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William Roberts: England at Play 20 January−18 March 2007 25th Anniversary of Pallant House Gallery Modern British Art: The First 100 Years Art for the Classroom: School Prints Bomberg and the Borough Group Event and Workshop Programme

£1.50 Number 10 January−March 2007 www.pallant.org.uk


By the Darling, Oil on board, 10 x 24 ins

Kasey Sealy New Year selection of recent Australian landscapes 16th January – 3rd February 2007

In an era when claims of all kinds have been made for art, one of it’s more vital functions has nevertheless been overlooked consistently. By drawing our attention to the physical beauty of our planet, an artist can help reassure us all that life continues to be worth living. 129 Portland Road London W11 4LW Tel: 0207 229 1099 Email: art@piano-nobile.com www.piano-nobile.com Works may be viewed in Sussex on request

Kasey Sealy lays out a satisfying visual repast before us and we are free to browse at our leisure. It is hard to do complete justice to the landscape of Australia but he regularly goes remarkably close. Giles Auty National Art Correspondent for The Australian


MESSUM’S www.messums.com

February afternoon. 2006 Mixed media on canvas 122 x 122 cms

Kurt Jackson

Kurt continues to explore the complexities of nature – this year in a progression of paintings inspired by the seasons within his own garden.

Exhibition Wednesday 17th January to Saturday 3rd February Catalogue (over 70 illustrations) £15 inc p&p Exhibition and prices on www.messums.com 8 CORK STREET, LONDON W1S 3LJ TEL: +44 (0)20 7437 5545 EMAIL: info@messums.com


2OYAL!CADEMY3CHOOLS )NTERIM%XHIBITION n&EBRUARY 3ELECTEDPAINTING SCULPTURE VIDEO ANDPHOTOGRAPHYBYSECONDYEAR POST GRADUATESTUDENTS


David Tindle RA Recent Paintings 20 January to 1 March 2007

Established 1923

20 Cork Street, London W1S 3HL tel 0044 (0) 20 7734 1732 art@redfern-gallery.com www.redfern-gallery.com


14 FEBRUARY - 8 MARCH 2007

GRAHAM RICH THE FINE ART SOCIET Y 148 New Bond Street • London W1S 2JT Telephone +44 (0)20 7629 5116 • Email tc@faslondon.com www.faslondon.com


Contents William Roberts 14 England at Play by Simon Martin 18 List of Works 20 A Day in the Sun by Timothy Wilcox

Art for the Classroom 24 An introduction to the School Prints by Ruth Artmonsky 26 The School Prints: A Recollection by Liz Walker

David Bomberg and the Borough Group 28 Notes on the Method of David Bomberg by Prof. Colin St. John Wilson

William Roberts, Goal (Detail), 1968, Oil on canvas Earl and Countess Harewood and the Trustees of the Harewood House Trust Š William Roberts Society L.S. Lowry, Punch and Judy (Detail), 1946, based on painting of 1943, Lithograph on paper David Bomberg, Tajo and Rocks, Ronda (The Last Landscape) (Detail), 1956-57, Oil on canvas, Wilson Loan, Š Sir Colin St John Wilson

Gallery News 10 The Success of 2006, the Challenge of 2007 30 Simon Sainsbury and Clive Evans Remembered 38 Excellence in Access 41 1/2 Price Thursday Evenings Regulars 90 Praise for Pallant 13 Current Exhibitions 32 New Acquisitions 34 Modern British Art: The First 100 Years 42 Bookshop 45 The Pallant Restaurant 46 A Letter from Lady Nicholas Gordon Lennox 51 Event and Workshop Programme 58 Diary 60 Pallant Photos 62 Forthcoming Exhibitions 7


you get is a relationship that feels like the

Supporter of the Collection

Supporter of the Gallery

each authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority. atures of the services offered by these two entities may differ.

Pallant House Gallery Magazine Issue 10, Winter 2007 EDITORIAL Editor Andrew Churchill, a.churchill@pallant.org.uk, 01243 770841 Sub Editor Harriet Wailling Gallery Editorial Frances Guy, Simon Martin, Marc Steene, Stefan van Raay Guest Editorial (with many thanks) Ruth Artmonsky, Peter Combes, Jillie Moss, Liz Walker, Timothy Wilcox, Prof Colin St. John Wilson, Alan Wood Art Direction, Design and Production David Wynn, d.wynn@pallant.org.uk, 01243 770840 Advertising Bookings and General Enquiries Kim Jenner +44 (0)207 3005658 Jane Grylls +44 (0)207 3005661 FRIENDS Events 01243 770816 Membership 01243 770815 Pallant House Gallery 9 North Pallant Chichester West Sussex PO19 1TJ Telephone +44(0)1243 774557 Email info@pallant.org.uk www.pallant.org.uk

The Priory and Poling Charitable Trusts, The Monument Trust, The Garfield Weston Foundation and other Trusts, Foundations and anonymous benefactors.

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The Success of 2006 The Challenge of 2007 Stefan van Raay, Director

2006 was an extraordinary year. The gallery re-opened to great acclaim in the general, art and architectural press and media. The building, the combination of the old and new, and the collections housed in it have been universally lauded. Most impressive and encouraging have been the reactions of the visitors; in general they have been bowled over by it. There have been days when, at the same time, a group of children are working in the Studio, a documentary is being shown in the Lecture Room, organised groups with the voluntary guides are undertaking tours of the collections, individual visitors are independently wandering through the gallery rooms, students are sketching works in a temporary exhibition and the garden is full of people having coffee or lunch. You will understand that such moments are precious; suddenly, everything has fallen into place and the hopes of nine years have become a reality. We welcome two supporters of the Gallery: Bonhams continues its sponsorship of the Gallery in 2007, in particular of the collections, and UBS Wealth Management, which recently opened an office in Brighton, is a new annual supporter of the Gallery. We are very pleased to be associated with these major players in their individual fields. Rather than resting on our laurels, however, we must now plan for the future. 2007 will be a special year marking the 25th anniversary of the Gallery, which opened in May 1982. At the same time it is the year in which we must consolidate the finances. The message is very simple; to ensure that the Gallery can remain open in perpetuity we have to secure a guaranteed income of around £600,000 per annum at current prices.

Most galleries of the stature of Pallant House Gallery can rely on subsidies from the government, local authorities or the Arts Council England amounting to 50 – 70% of their total budget. We receive only 20% of our budget from similar sources. Most of the income has hitherto come from individual donations by Friends of the Gallery whose generosity has been extraordinary. We must face the fact that we should not and cannot continue to rely in large part on these individual donors for a steady income stream. We have at the moment an endowment fund of £1.75m, which generates some £85,000 per annum. We need to raise a further £4.5m (making a total of £6.25m) which would generate some £310,000 additionally a year. In 2007 we aim to raise a £2m contribution to the endowment fund to celebrate the anniversary of the Gallery. In addition, we will ask the authorities and other donor organisations for a higher contribution towards the running costs, either annually or through a donation towards the endowment fund. The Gallery will continue to offer an exciting programme of exhibitions, workshops, lectures and events for everybody in the coming year, but at the same time we also ask for your contribution to make sure our children can continue to enjoy in the future what we enjoy now. A happy and healthy 2007!

Stefan van Raay, Photograph Anne-Katrin Purkiss © Pallant House Gallery Opposite Page Photograph © Peter Durant / arcblue.com

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Exhibiting a talent for understanding.

Make it new is the rule of art. Our rule is: make it individual. At UBS Wealth Management we create unique investment solutions designed to satisfy just one person: you. First we discuss your total financial picture. Then we offer the global expertise and resources of a world-leading wealth manager to make your investment vision reality. It’s personalised service raised to an art form. Supporter of Pallant House Gallery. For information about UBS in the south of England, please contact Ewen Emmerson on 01273 715300. Nile House Nile Street Brighton BN1 1HW www.ubs.com/uk

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UBS Wealth Management is a trading name of UBS AG, which is authorised and regulated by the Financial Services Authority. Š UBS 2006. All rights reserved.


Current Exhibitions and Visitor Information William Roberts: England at Play 20 January–18 March William Roberts created distinctive paintings that focused on the leisure pursuits of the English working class–in parks, cafes, cinemas, pubs, the races and the seaside. His work captured the English with humour and affection, providing a panorama of modern life.

Susie MacMurray: Shell Until May 2007 The artist has created an installation for the stairwell in Pallant House Gallery in response to the site and history of the building. 'Shell' is made of 20,000 mussel shells inlaid with velvet which covers the walls of the 18th century stairwell. Supported by Arts Council England and Abbey Harris Mural Fund Partners in Art/ Partnership of the Month exhibition Running successfully since 2001, 'Partners in Art' helps those, who due to disability, illness, injury or other reasons, have difficulty in accessing the arts themselves. 'Partnership of the Month', is an ongoing series of exhibitions that showcases the work of each partnership.

Art for the Classroom: School Prints 1946-49 9 January–25 March The School Prints were a remarkable series of colour lithographs, editioned in large numbers and sold at a low cost to schools throughout the UK. Includes L.S. Lowry, Henri Matisse, Henry Moore, John Nash, Pablo Picasso, Julian Trevelyan and John Tunnard. Bomberg and the Borough Group 27 January–1 April Coinciding with the 50th anniversary of David Bomberg’s death, this exhibition showcases a selection of his work from the Gallery’s holdings together with works by some of the artists Bomberg taught such as Frank Auerbach, Dennis Creffield and Leslie Marr.

Admission Prices Adults £6.50 Children (6−15) £2 Family (2 Adults 4 Children) £15 Students £3.50 Unemployed Free Cheap Tuesdays Half price Cheap Thursday Evenings (5-8pm) Half price Friends Free The Art Fund Members £3.50 (In-between temporary exhibitions) Free

Lizzie and Shirley, 9−26 January Sally and Gary, 6-23 February Roy and Nick, 6-23 March Modern British Art: The First 100 Years Ongoing throughout the year We continue to showcase a revolving selection of works from the permanent collections across 14 gallery rooms. Artists include Andrews, Auerbach, Blake, Bomberg, Caulfield, Freud, Hamilton, Kitaj, Moore, Nash, Picasso, Piper, Sickert, and Sutherland. See page 58/59 for a daily Exhibitions and Events Diary William Roberts, Jockeys (The Paddock) (Detail), 1928, Oil on canvas, Bradford Art Galleries and Museums

Opening Hours Mondays Tuesday-Saturday Thursday Sunday 12.30pm−5pm

Closed 10am−5pm 10am−8pm

Free Guided Tours (with admission) Saturday at 3pm and Thursday at 6pm For group bookings please contact the Gallery

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William Roberts: England at Play Simon Martin, Assistant Curator

William Roberts, Parson’s Pleasure, 1944, Oil on canvas Samantha Frank Opposite Page William Roberts, The Cinema, 1920, Oil on canvas, Tate – Purchased 1965

A unique figure in the history of Modern British art, William Roberts was truly an artist of the twentieth century. His art reflects its time, not through the recording of the momentous events of the last century, but because for sixty years, following his pre-First World War involvement in Roger Fry’s Omega Workshop and the Vorticist Group, Roberts drew and painted the everyday life of the English people. Visiting local cafés, cinemas, parks, pubs, the races and occasionally the seaside, he captured the leisure activities of his fellow Londoners and portrayed the eccentricities and social interactions of those around him with respect, dignified humour and unerring affection. Roberts did not use a sketchbook but would make aides-mémoire on scraps of paper recording the incidents, types and gestures he would see on his walks. From these, he would work up finished and detailed drawings which in turn would be squared

up and transferred to a larger scale for painting. His paintings are often very elaborate, encompassing complex groupings of figures, yet he had the ability to strip the scene of all extraneous detail to focus on significant gestures and, using strong compositions, maintain a coherency and rhythm across the canvas. This was due in part to Roberts’s strong awareness of the importance of design, having worked for a commercial art firm before winning a scholarship to the Slade School of Art where he was one of a remarkable generation of students that included David Bomberg, Dora Carrington, Mark Gertler, Jacob Kramer, Paul Nash, C.R.W. Nevinson and Stanley Spencer. Seen together, Roberts’s paintings chart the way life in England changed dramatically during the twentieth century. The earliest painting in the exhibition, 'The Cinema' (1920), focuses on the audience of a silent cowboy movie, updating the views of music halls painted by Walter Sickert and the French Impressionists with a graphic pictorial 15


language strongly influenced by Cubism and Futurism. 'T.V.'(c. 1960), painted almost forty years later, captures the same sense of audience enthrallment in the moving images on screen, but in an intimate domestic setting as a family gathers around a television set to watch a boxing match. Such changes in technology and society are mirrored by the stylistic development of Roberts’s art as he gradually moved away from the dynamic Cubist impulse that had motivated his pre-war Vorticist work to achieve a classical monumentality in his paintings of modern life. In this respect his work should perhaps be considered in the context of the 'return to order' and the classicism of previously Cubist artists such as Georges Braque, Fernand Léger, and Pablo Picasso in the 1920s. Paintings such as 'Sunbathing' (1936), which depicts a family group relaxing on a sunny day in Regent’s Park, and 'Parson’s Pleasure' (1944), a witty depiction of the area beside the River Cherwell in Oxford that was reserved for nude male-bathing, 16

present modern-day classical Arcadias, while the composition of 'The Seaside' (1966) is suggestive of a classical frieze. Like Stanley Spencer, who also drew inspiration from urban life, Roberts’s work manages to imbue everyday scenes with both the monumentality and the tenderness of Giotto. Yet for an artist whose paintings seem to be so full of warmth and affection towards his fellow man, Roberts was surprisingly ungregarious. He limited his social encounters to only the most necessary contacts or those ordinary people going about their everyday tasks that he met during his daily perambulations around London, such as a Park Keeper in Regent’s Park or a waitress in a local teashop. According to the playwright Alan Bennett, the artist "was often to be seen in Camden Town in the seventies. An apple-cheeked man, he looked like a small rotund farmer but wasn’t at all amiable and if one got in his way on the pavement he would unleash a torrent of abuse." Bennett knew


William Roberts, Self-Portrait wearing a Cap, 1931, Oil on canvas, Tate – Purchased 1942 William Roberts, Rush Hour, 1971, Oil on canvas, Lord Marland of Odstock Opposite Page William Roberts, The Seaside, 1966, Oil on canvas, Arts Council Collection, Hayward Gallery, South Bank Centre, London

Roberts’s wife Sarah (the sister of the artist Jacob Kramer), and was once asked back to tea, but made to promise that should Roberts appear he was to show no interest in painting. Roberts was deeply suspicious of art-critics and the 'art world' in general, instead associating himself with the man in the street. Indeed, in his painting 'Self-Portrait Wearing a Cap' (1931) Roberts depicts himself wearing a shirt, braces, tie and a flat cap, and thus identifies himself as a 'working man.' An East-End lad who lived on a shoestring throughout his life, Roberts despised the class system but did not have an overt political agenda as such. However, his art can be considered truly democratic, reflecting his belief that art should be enjoyed by everyone. That much is clear from his warm account in a self-published book of 1964 of how he, "boarded a No.88 bus, this, the only one that passes the gallery, could truly be named 'The Tate Bus'. On the journey a number of

passengers asked for tickets to the Tate. But it seemed a little too much for the conductor when a couple of rather noisy charwomen, returning from their work in Whitehall, got on and also asked for the Tate; "what", he exclaimed, "are they giving something away there?" The loud-voiced Mrs. Mops laughingly replied: "yes they’re giving art away," adding, "you can learn a lot from art."' William Roberts: England at Play 20 January−18 March 2007 Simon Martin, Assistant Curator, will talk about the artist’s life and the works in the exhibition on Wednesday 7 February, 2pm and Thursday 15 February, 6pm. See the Events section to book tickets.

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William Roberts: England at Play List of Exhibits The Cinema 1920 Oil on canvas Tate – Purchased 1965 At the Hippodrome (The Gods) 1921 Oil on canvas Leicester City Museums Service Love Song in a Bar (The Love Song) 1922 Oil on canvas From the collection of the Late W.A. Evill The Dance Club (The Jazz Party) 1923 Oil on canvas Leeds Museums and Galleries (City Art Gallery) The Happy Family 1924 Oil on canvas Russell-Coates Art Gallery and Museum, Bournemouth Newspapers (The News) 1926 Oil on canvas From the collection of the Late W.A. Evill The Tea Shop (The Good Old Days) 1928 Oil on canvas Atkinson Art Gallery, Southport Jockeys (The Paddock) 1928 Oil on canvas Bradford Art Galleries and Museums

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The Restaurant (Discussion in a Café) 1929 Oil on canvas Private collection Bath Night (The Wash / Miner’s Toilet) c.1930 Oil on canvas Bolton Museums, Art Gallery and Aquarium, Bolton Metropolitan Borough Council Self-Portrait wearing a Cap 1931 Oil on canvas Tate – Purchased 1942 Going to Swim 1933 Oil on canvas Private collection

Parson’s Pleasure 1944 Oil on canvas Samantha Frank Cantering to the Post 1949 Oil on canvas Tate – Purchased 1951 T.V. Exhibited 1960 Oil on canvas Aberdeen Art Gallery and Museums Collection The Seaside 1966 Oil on canvas Arts Council Collection, Hayward Gallery, South Bank Centre, London

Playground (The Gutter) 1934-35 Oil on canvas Tate – Purchased 1979

Goal 1968 Oil on canvas Earl and Countess Harewood and the Trustees of the Harewood House Trust

Skipping (The Gutter) 1934-35 Oil on canvas Tate – Purchased 1979

Rush Hour 1971 Oil on canvas Lord Marland of Odstock

Sun-bathing 1936 Oil on canvas Lord Marland of Odstock

At the Local 1970 Oil on canvas Chris Ingram Collection

The Palms Foretell 1937 Oil on canvas Bristol City Museum and Art Gallery

Feeding the Seagulls 1974 Oil on canvas Reading Museum Service (Reading Borough Council

Punting on the Cherwell 1939 Oil on canvas The Jerwood Foundation Art Collection

All William Roberts images are © Estate of John David Roberts and are reproduced with the kind permission of the William Roberts Society.


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A Day in the Sun Timothy Wilcox Timothy Wilcox, author of 'A Day in the Sun: Outdoor Pursuits in Art in the 1930s' explores the artistic preoccupation with the subject in this enlightening extract from his book.


During the 1920s and 1930s, against a background of strikes, mass unemployment and threatening developments in Europe, the pursuit of leisure emerged as a major social and political issue in Britain. This went far beyond simple escapism, or a release from the harsh realities of daily life. A profound mental shift was taking place throughout the entire population, one in which work, flourishing industrial productivity and the world dominance of Empire could no longer be taken for granted as the basis of British identity. Prime Minister Stanley Baldwin signalled a reorientation of government policy and the weight of expectation associated with it in 1926 when he recognised the need to provide not only jobs, but also leisure: 'the greater the facilities for recreation, the better will be the health and happiness of the people and the closer will be the spirit of unity between all classes'. The promise was not only for physical health, but moral health as well. Among the many challenges of the post−war era, the constructive use of leisure came to have major significance. While the movies, gambling and after 1926, the radio, provided for the many, the numbers engaged in more active pursuits grew and grew. The wider availability of a greater range of sports to women, in particular, and to participants beyond the affluent middle classes were one of the defining characteristics of the age: leisure became the very image of modernity. In the fine arts, and specifically in painting, the interwar years have generally been seen as a period of retrenchment, succeeded by the gradual emergence in the 1930s of abstraction (and, to a lesser extent, of Surrealism). Paul Nash, writing in 1933, identified these as the two most powerful trends in contemporary art; the group he had recently assembled, Unit One, intended to unite both elements. 'A desire to find again some adventure in art seems more and more urgent to our sculptors and painters and, now, to our architects. This seems to suggest, as well as any explanation, the meaning of "the contemporary spirit". It is the adventure, the research, the pursuit in modern life …' Figurative art as a whole, but especially art based on the human figure, has, within the canons of mainstream modernism, often been seen as traditional by definition, and more or less excluded from serious examination. It is one up to now almost entirely overlooked, but which represents a small but resilient strand in the art of the 1930s: work which was not

so radically adventurous as Nash, perhaps, but still showed a commitment to subjects which were overtly modern in subject matter. Many of these paintings were first exhibited in the Royal Academy, then more than ever a bastion of traditional English values. The affinity between the contributions of these painters was recognised at the time to the extent that the pictures of sports, picnics and other open−air activities were often reproduced side by side in the annual Royal Academy Illustrated and seized on by critics and editors for the regular features in the illustrated press as representing literally 'a breath of fresh air' in the turgid atmosphere of what was still largely a late–Victorian salon. The clear−cut linearity of Bernard Fleetwood−Walker, Harold Williamson and Lancelot Glasson finds echoes in a parallel enthusiasm for the neo−classical style in the applied arts; the tempera painters, who really came of age in this decade, showed themselves to be concerned not only with technique and decoration, but with an uncluttered directness of expression. It is in the nature of the art of this period that most of these images were created by men; the works of the women artists included here, notably Laura Knight and Mary Adshead, who married Stephen Bone in 1929, are, however, often little different in content or style. Despite being presented in the predominantly middle−class arena of the Royal Academy, many of these paintings tackle subjects that were popular in a wider sense. Social commentators were well aware that not only did sport have mass appeal but it was an area in which divisions of class, and of race, were being repeatedly challenged during this decade. The inclusion in this book of travel posters and of a small selection of photographs from the Daily Herald reveals how painting participated in a wider community of images. While certain commentators, notably Clive Bell in his book Civilization, argued that culture must be exclusive, many of the works of art gathered here embrace their connections with publicity and photography and use this as a sign of their break with the past. Timothy Wilcox’s book is available from the Bookshop at £19.95. Telephone 01243 770813 The author will be giving a talk at the Gallery on Thursday 1 March, 6pm and will be signing copies afterwards. See the Events section to book tickets. 21


Graduate & Postgraduate Diplomas leading to MA Degree VISUAL AND APPLIED ARTS

Sculpture Tapestry Weaving Painting & Drawing Making Stringed Musical Instruments

CONSERVATION - RESTORATION Ceramics & related materials Antique Clocks, Antique Furniture Books & library materials, Fine Metalwork

For the Diploma prospectus contact: T +44(0)1243 818299 / 811301 E diplomas@westdean.org.uk West Dean College, Chichester, West Sussex, PO18 0QZ WWW.WESTDEAN.ORG.UK


Gallery Pangolin Modern and Contemporary SCULPTURE and SCULPTORS' DRAWINGS

Jackdaws on Chimney · Terence Coventry

Gallery Pangolin · Chalford · Gloucestershire · GL6 8NT · UK T: 00 44 (0)1453 886527 · E: gallery@pangolin-editions.com · www.gallery-pangolin.com


John Tunnard, Holiday, 1947, Lithograph on paper, © Peter Tunnard Henry Moore, Sculptural Objects, 1949, Lithograph on paper, © The Henry Moore Foundation

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Art for the Classroom An Introduction to the School Prints Ruth Artmonsky In 1945, at the end of World War II, a feisty young debutante called Brenda Rawnsley commissioned a number of British artists to produce prints which could be sold to schools. The aim was to bring 'good' art to pupils who might not have had access to a local art gallery, or, if one was available, lacked the courage to enter it. The idea of prints for schools had been that of Brenda’s young husband Derek (the grandson of Canon Rawnsley, one of the founders of the National Trust) who in 1935 had founded a picture lending library scheme. Derek unfortunately died in the war but Brenda decided to continue his work as a memorial to him, expanding the circulation scheme and publishing the School Prints. Brenda knew very little about art but, a quick learner, she gathered around her people who did, including Herbert Read the most influential art critic of the time. In her introductory letter to artists she wrote, "We are producing a series of auto-lithographs, four for each term, for use in schools, as a means of giving school children an understanding of contemporary art". By 1946 Brenda had 24 prints ready, commissioning the likes of Hans Feibusch, L.S. Lowry, John Nash, Felix Topolski and John Tunnard. The majority of these prints were lithographed directly by the artists and printed by the Baynard Press. They form part of the British 20th century 'democratising' of art by providing sets of prints for schools and for the general public. This tradition stretched from the posters of the Empire Marketing Board and the Post Office, along with John Piper’s Contemporary Lithographs which were brought out immediately before the start of the war, to the 1950s series of Lyons’ Lithographs commissioned by J. Lyons and Co. for their Corner Houses and the Coronation Prints, emanating from the Royal College of Art. Brenda, unaware of her place in this lithographic chain, began to look for targets beyond the wonderfully nostalgic yet rather parochial images of British artists, many of them producing similar images for the then remarkably popular Puffin Picture Books produced by Penguin.

Brenda had been brought up at the Egyptian court, was related to the likes of Anthony Eden, and had encountered hair-raising experiences in the W.A.A.F. across the Middle East and North Africa. Her sights were now set on expanding the School Prints across the Empire, if not the world. Using Henry Moore, a great friend of Herbert Read, as a guinea-pig for working with the new, easily transportable lithographic surface Plastocowell, Brenda set off in a hired plane with a small entourage to swipe the five best known French artists of the time for her scheme. The story of how in five days this young woman, socially sophisticated but art-ignorant, used her charm to persuade Georges Braque, Raoul Dufy, Fernand Léger, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso to produce work for her and 'pour les enfants du monde' is told elsewhere, but by 1949 she was able to hold a splendid launch party in Belgravia for her six 'European' prints. Publicity for this event was considerably aided by Sir Alfred Munning’s drunken Presidential address to the Royal Academy, which took place, by coincidence, the very same month. In his speech Munning declaimed that Churchill and he would kick Picasso if they should meet him in the street, and that the L.C.C. was scandalous for showing Matisse at the Tate. Lucky Brenda! The logistics of distributing and promoting the prints to 4,000 schools meant that in the end, the scheme did not accomplish its grand ambitions and yet it has been described as "one of the bravest experiments in the history of modern art in this country." Art for the Classroom: School Prints 1946-49 9 January - 25 March 2007 Ruth Artmonsky’s book 'The School Prints: A Romantic Project' is £12 from the Bookshop. She will be in conversation with Brenda Rawnsley on Thursday 8 February, 6pm. See Events. A selection of the School Prints will be available to purchase from the Bookshop. 01243 770813

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The School Prints: A Recollection Liz Walker

Julian Trevelyan, Harbour, 1946, Lithograph on paper

It was whilst visiting 'Magic Realities', the exhibition of the works by Mary Fedden and Julian Trevelyan held at Petworth House last Summer, that I found myself looking at a lithograph by Trevelyan titled 'Harbour'. It seemed strangely familiar, in the sense that it was a comfortable old friend, associated with childhood. And then I learned that it was a 'School Print', one of a number of lithographs that were available for schools to purchase in the immediate post-war period. I am ashamed to say that I was unaware of such a scheme – even though I was clearly a beneficiary. I simply know that for a limited time, at the beginning of each term – I suppose around 1947 – one of our art classes was devoted to looking at two or three such prints. Our teacher put them up on the board and then talked about each in turn. It was a delight: 26

it wasn’t a lecture, it wasn’t a lesson, it wasn’t a 'do as I say' situation. We were actually encouraged to voice our own views and then at the end, unbelievably in those days, we actually voted where we would like each picture hung. In a highly disciplined school, this faint whiff of democracy made almost as much of an impression as the prints themselves. So thank you, Brenda Rawnsley. Your original and exuberant idea introduced a lively, contemporary and quirky element to surroundings that were otherwise pretty drab and austere. And, at the same time, you stoked my developing enthusiasm to simply enjoy looking at paintings. Liz Walker is a Volunteer Guide and Friend of Pallant House Gallery


RICHARD AVEDON, PRINT FOR SALE.

Arden and Anstruther Photographic Gallery, 5 Lombard Street, Petworth. www.ardenandanstruther.com Telephone 01798 344411


Notes on the Method of David Bomberg Professor Colin St. John Wilson To coincide with the 50th anniversary of David Bomberg’s death in 1957 the Gallery is holding an exhibition showcasing an intriguing selection of works by Bomberg, together with works by some of the artists Bomberg taught whilst at the Borough Polytechnic in London, such as Frank Auerbach, Dennis Creffield and Leslie Marr. Here, Prof. Colin St. John Wilson examines Bomberg’s method.

Leslie Marr, Dartmoor-3, 2005, Wilson Loan © the artist David Bomberg, The South-East Corner, Jerusalem, 1926, Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, © Sir Colin St John Wilson

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"There "Thereare aretwo tworeasons reasonsfor forbelieving believingthat thatDavid David "Bomberg Bombergwas wasthe thefinest finestEnglish Englishpainter painterofofthis this "century: century:his hisearly earlywork workand andhis hislate latework." work." "David "DavidSylvester Sylvester But what of the middle? And why the total neglect for the last forty years of his life? These questions epitomise the bafflement that still haunts the reputation of the most misunderstood artist of our time. It is my belief that a study of his working method will lay the foundation for a more balanced overall view of his achievement. And some of the sequential studies exhibited in the display at Pallant House Gallery at least testify to some aspects of his deliberative procedures. In the first place neither the method nor the intentions have much in common with the works of his contemporaries in England. Not without arrogance he distanced himself from every established group – Vorticist, Bloomsbury, Circle, Euston Road, Surrealist, Romantic. He cast himself as the Outsider and was made to suffer for it with truly appalling neglect. What would have happened if he had gone to America at the same time as, for instance, Willem de Kooning or Hans Hoffmann? And when, posthumously, the late work achieved recognition, the assumption that it fell quite simply into the category of 'Central European Expressionism' was the more misleading for being so conveniently simple. What has to be understood is that the foremost word in his vocabulary was 'structure': and even in the case of the very last and 'freest' of paintings, there are examples of a preparatory oil study being made before the final work. I suggest that the clue to Bomberg’s work (and the grounds of his estrangement in England) lay in the seriousness of his commitment to Cézanne of whom he wrote that "Cézanne is father to me…Giotto stands to Cézanne as Cézanne will stand to posterity and I who am of the line and inherit the bloodstream should not be treated as a stranger in my Father’s House". We have evidence in the collection of a way of working very different from the expressionist in the 'The Monastery of St George, Wadi Kelt' (1924). Here, we have a line drawing in charcoal and a hatched drawing in coloured crayons. In these cases the studies are carried out as overlays on tracing paper – a

working method used with such mastery by Degas. Even more extraordinary is the method of using oil paint on successive tracing paper overlays in 'Petra North Façade' (1924) resulting at times in a transparent 'sandwich' of colour. The assurance with which paint is "pushed-around" (to use his own phrase) has no parallel among his contemporaries in England except perhaps Ben Nicholson who, symptomatically, pointed to its derivation in French practice – "la cuisine de la peinture". In the late paintings, we can see Bomberg coaxing three colours onto the brush at the same time in his 'Talmudist'(1953) Even in the Palestine paintings, the 'lost' middle period, the handling of fine impasto as in 'The South-East Corner of Jerusalem' (1926) is akin to the later work of Nicholas de Staël. A few of these paintings may have been 'pot-boilers' but most are deeply felt and original compositions. No one has more precisely registered the colour of desert sand. Their time will come… Among the artists of his own time it is more profitable to look for analogies in the work of Matisse than to any of Bomberg’s English contemporaries. In the work of both there is a tension between spontaneity and reflection, between the response to appearance and the assertion of structure. Furthermore there is the common procedural method of developing ideas in extended serial form. Finally, there is one consequence of Bomberg’s rejection during his lifetime that is particularly to be lamented: that is the absence of commissions for monumental wall-paintings. One has only to look at the tiny study 'Players Ghetto Theatre, no.1' (1919) to sense what could have been; the largeness of its architecture speaks for itself – in the words of David Sylvester once more "the bigness of form, the energy it encloses". This has nothing to do with Expressionism, nor with 'the Englishness of English art'. It does, however, have something to do with Giotto and Cézanne, who were Bomberg’s revered masters: and that it was not realised is our great loss. Bomberg and the Borough Group 27 January–1 April 2007 29


Simon Sainsbury 1930−2006 From the early beginnings of Pallant House Gallery in the late 1970s up until the reopening on 1 July 2006, Simon Sainsbury played a crucial role in the gallery’s development. Sainsbury’s Monument Trust contributed to the refurbishment of the historic house when it was converted from council offices into a gallery in the early 1980s, and every year thereafter either he or the trust would give Philip Stroud, the founder of the Friends of the gallery, a sum of money to be spent as he thought appropriate, be it on an acquisition or refurbishment. In October 1997 Sainsbury, with the other indispensable supporters of the gallery, Angus Hewat and David Hopkinson, bought the 1936 office building next door, and paved the way for the re-development of the gallery as it stands now. His contributions accelerated from then on, providing annual grants for the revenue budget and further capital donations to the building cost. Sainsbury was a very private and discreet man. He definitely did not like the glare of publicity which

inevitably followed the enormously successful flotation of Sainsburys in 1973, which he orchestrated. He and his partner for 40 years, Stewart Grimshaw, not only very quietly supported the arts, but also many other causes: research into HIV/Aids when no official support was available, the regeneration of council estates in the North of England, support for the gay and lesbian rights group 'Stonewall' in its infancy, and reform of the criminal justice and prison systems. Invariably, visiting Simon Sainsbury’s houses in London and West Sussex left me awestruck. One felt surrounded by the breath-taking beauty of architecture, paintings, objets d’art, interior and garden design. They reflected his quest for quality, his taste and his immaculate manners, which were combined with a dry sense of humour and a twinkle in his eye. When a staunch opponent of the Pallant House Gallery project wrote a bitter letter to The Times Letters’ Editor, reacting to Sainsbury’s obituary featured therein and describing him as 'a fancier of modernism', I could only smile. Sainsbury was a fancier of quality and beauty of every period and of every time. But he was more; he was generous with his advice and personal support, he was always there when the times were rough and he always sent me back on my mission uplifted and with regained confidence. I am so very happy that he saw the finished gallery at the benefactors’ lunch on 28 June 2006. Stefan van Raay

Clive Evans 1936−2006 The Honorary Treasurer of the Pallant House Gallery Trust and the Friends of Pallant House until 2001, Clive Evans, died at the age of 70 in August. He had served as Honorary Treasurer for five years from 1996 during a period of great change at the Gallery. Apart from dealing with all the day-to-day 30

finances of the gallery, he was also instrumental in the initial application to the Heritage Lottery Fund which entailed an enormous additional workload. Clive was meticulous in his accounting methods, always done in pencil rather than on the computer. It was always a delight when he was in the office and he continued to call in on a regular basis and attend many Friends’ events which kept him up to date with the latest developments. I am so pleased that he was here on the opening day of the new gallery and was able to see for himself the results of what he had worked so hard towards. Stefan van Raay


New Acquisitions and a Bit of British Postal History Frances Guy, Curator

Prof. Colin St. John Wilson, major donor of works to the Gallery, has just acquired a work by Leslie Marr from the exhibition at Piano Nobile (ill. pg 28). 'Dartmoor−3' is a recent oil painting by Marr, one of David Bomberg’s 'Borough Group', and is an important addition to Professor Wilson’s, and now the Gallery’s, collection of works representing this group of British painters. The painting will feature in an exhibition this spring looking at Bomberg’s role as a leading figure in Modern British art.

knowing that they had incurred an average loss of earnings of £150 over the period, a significant sum in those days, and that a lack of funds made it impossible to continue to make further hardship payments to those 30-40,000 workers who had no other income at all.

Briefly mentioned in the last Magazine was the donation of seven envelopes by Mr and Mrs Lumley featuring stamps designed by British artists for the 'Culture Carrier' campaign. The artists are Derek Boshier, David Hockney, Allen Jones, Eduardo Paolozzi, Ralph Steadman and the poet Christopher Logue who took part in the initiative to issue a set of stamps in support of the Postal Workers Union during the 1971 Postal Strike.

The strike did not have the quite the crippling effect on the postal service that Jackson had envisaged. Some post offices opened for a few hours each week to allow pensions and other benefits to be paid, and the Post Office was able to grant temporary licenses to those wishing to operate a postal service. These licenses enabled private organisations to deliver mail and issue stamps, now the source of a mass of collectable material for philatelists. Also of interest is that decimal currency was introduced on 15 February, meaning that when postal services resumed, the rate for a first-class stamp was set at 3p, the equivalent to 7.2d compared to 5d prior to the strike.

The Postal Strike was the first in a series of industrial actions in a decade characterised by trade disputes, culminating in the 'Winter of Discontent' of 1978−79 that effectively ended the Labour leader James Callaghan’s political career and saw Margaret Thatcher become Prime Minister. The Postal Workers Union submitted a claim for a pay rise of 15-20% at the end of 1970, representing a cost of £50million to the Post Office. In the New Year, management made an offer of 8%, which was rejected, and 200,000 workers walked out on 20 January at the beginning of the first national postal strike. Seven weeks into the walk-out however, a deal was struck. An award of wage increases following an enquiry into the efficiency of Post Office staff and management, was promised by the hard-line Conservative government and reluctantly accepted by the workers. Tom Jackson, the Union’s general secretary, urged the strikers to vote for the package

The full set of 'Culture Carrier' stamps also includes a stamp by Joe Tilson, postcards by Christo and Richard Hamilton and four proof stamps by Hamilton which were never produced. The stamps were issued in an edition of 250 by the publisher Edizioni O, each initialled by the artist and mounted on a 'Culture Carrier' envelope addressed to the buyer. The art project was organised by Anthony Haden-Guest, the journalist, cartoonist and author, who gathered artists and poets together to start an ad hoc postal service intended to raise money for the postal workers through the sale of artwork with a postal theme. One of the Jones stamps, 'Stamp Out Art', inspired subsequent exhibitions of the artwork in Milan and Paris. The sales of the stamps, all characteristic of each artist’s style, were greatly enhanced by the artists’ signatures and initials on the stamps themselves and several thousand pounds were raised for the Union.

Culture Carrier Campaign Stamps, various artists Montage by David Wynn

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Modern British Art: The First 100 Years Ongoing throughout the year

Christopher Wood, Lemons in a Blue Basket, 1922, Hussey Bequest, Chichester District Council (1985) © Pallant House Gallery, Chichester Opposite Page John Tunnard, Abstraction at Noon, c.1941, Kearley Bequest, through The Art Fund (1989), © Peter Tunnard

Rooms 1 and 2 An Introduction to Pallant House Gallery The 16th century Heroines of Antiquity look down on you as you enter the first room in the Gallery, leading to the Entrance Hall of Pallant House with its carved oak staircase. Susie MacMurray’s installation 'Shell', comprising 20,000 mussel shells, each individually stuffed with velvet, lines the walls of the stairwell. Room 3 The Historic Collections This room highlights work from the Gallery’s Historic Collections: landscapes and still-life paintings by the Smith brothers of Chichester; 'The Rawson Conversation Piece' by Gawen Hamilton; portraits by George Romney; and William Hogarth’s 'The Beggar’s Opera'.

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Room 4 Britain and Post-Impressionism 1860−1925 The story of Modern British art begins with Walter Sickert and his paintings and etchings of urban landscapes. The room explores the cross-channel influence of the European Post-Impressionist artists on the British avant-garde and includes Aristide Maillol and Gino Severini alongside Mark Gertler, Duncan Grant and Matthew Smith. Room 5 Landscape and Still Life Painting Between the Wars Much of British art in the inter-war period is characterised by a return to traditional subjects and a mood of nostalgia, illustrated here by John and Paul Nash, Henry Lamb and Christopher Wood. The landing of the House features a group of portraits by Glyn Philpot.


Room 6 Surrealism in Britain This room, with its imposing four-poster bed, explores Surrealist dream-worlds and fantastical visual imagery from the unconscious mind, featuring the work of British and European Surrealists such as John Armstrong, Edward Burra, Salvador Dalì, Paul Delvaux, Merlyn Evans and John Tunnard. Room 7 The Impact of World War II Artists commissioned as part of the war-artists scheme of World War II are represented here including John Piper and Graham Sutherland. Henry Moore’s drawings of Londoners made in the Underground shelters and his small sculpture ‘Helmet Head’ are also on show here.

Room 8 Church Patronage in Post-War Britain This room tells the story of Bishop Bell and Dean Hussey, patrons of contemporary church art. Bell supported Jewish émigré Hans Feibusch from whom he commissioned the 'Baptism of Christ' for Chichester Cathedral. Works commissioned by Hussey include Graham Sutherland’s 'Christ Appearing to Mary Magdalen' and John Piper’s tapestry. This room also features a sculpture by Eric Gill, inspired by the Romanesque reliefs in Chichester Cathedral. Room 9 Britain and International Modernism This room explores the connections between British artists and the work of European modernists including Fernand Léger, Georg Muche and Pablo Picasso. The display features Ben Nicholson’s '1946 (still life – cerulean)', Barbara Hepworth’s 'Single Form (Nocturne)' and a selection of Studio Ceramics featuring Hans Coper and Lucie Rie. 35


Colin Self, Waiting Women and Two Nuclear Bombers (Handley Page Victors), 1962-63, Oil on board, Wilson Gift through The Art Fund

Room 10 British Pop Art The Wilson Gift features iconic works by the new generation of artists that emerged fresh from art school in the late 1950s and early 1960s to make a lasting impact on the British art scene. The display includes work by artists such as Michael Andrews, Peter Blake, Patrick Caulfield, Richard Hamilton, R.B. Kitaj, Eduardo Paolozzi, Colin Self and Joe Tilson.

Rooms 12-14 William Roberts: England at Play Temporary exhibition – see article for more information.

Room 11 The Reserve Collection This room is densely hung and functions as an open store as well as the Gallery’s Lecture Room. The works on display change each quarter as exhibitions and displays in the rest of the Gallery go up and come down, but the work of many well-known artists can be seen such as Patrick Caulfield and Ivon Hitchens. The room also houses the two model modern art galleries, featuring original miniature artworks by a range of artists, and ceramics and sculpture from the collection.

Room 17 Contemporary Art in the Gallery Contemporary artworks on loan from The Wonderful Fund collection (last quarter’s exhibition) are on display in Room 17. Other contemporary works can be seen around the Gallery, such as Andy Goldsworthy’s 'Hearth Stone' in Room 2 of Pallant House; Langlands & Bell’s 'The Ministry (Health and Education)' on the main staircase of the new wing; a light-box by Jo Ganter; and Joy Gregory’s photographic series 'Heroines of Antiquity' on the landing of the new wing.

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Rooms 15 and 16 Bomberg and the Borough Group Temporary exhibition – see article for more information.


THE SOCIETY An Appreciation Society dedicated to

William Roberts RA 1895-1980 Founded in 1998, the Society aims to circulate two newsletters per year plus updates, and to organise various events and outings including an annual Public Lecture. The Society administers the copyright of the John Roberts estate which includes the works of William Roberts and his brother-in-law, Jacob Kramer. It is a focal point for research with an important archive, including a photographic catalogue of works by Roberts. This archive has made possible several important publications, including Andrew Gibbon Williams’ definitive biography, William Roberts: an English Cubist: published by Lund Humphries 2004, and its own lavishly illustrated and informative website. Annual subscription: £8 (£12 for couples) New Members welcome William Roberts Society Lexden House, St Julian Street, Tenby, Pembrokeshire, SA70 7BJ Registered charity No.1090538

William Roberts, Cantering to the Post, 1949, Oil on canvas, Tate

Telephone: 01834 843295 Email: williamrobertssociety@hotmail.com Website: www.users.waitrose.com/~wrs Search Engine: William Roberts Society

'tiny mother and child' 2006 silver plated bronze limited edition of 19 4 1/2 inches long

Tel: 01603663775 vanessapooley@onetel.com

New and improved website www.vanessapooley.com


Gallery Wins Award for 'Excellence in Access' Marc Steene, Education and Outreach Officer Pallant House Gallery has won the 'Excellence in Access Award' from the Access for Disabled people to Arts Premises Today (ADAPT) Trust. The accolade recognises arts venues that demonstrate good practice in providing access for disabled people. The ADAPT Trust Access Awards, which are annually rewarded for excellence in accessibility, demonstrate that good design can automatically include good access facilities for people of all abilities. Pallant House Gallery’s redevelopment by architects Long and Kentish in association with Professor Sir Colin St John Wilson, which re-opened to the public on July 1st 2006, now provides those with access difficulties a much improved visitor experience. The new, streetlevel entrance ensures access for all into the Gallery; lifts provide access to all levels of the new galleries as well as the old House which was not previously accessible for wheelchair users and there are excellent toilets for those with disabilities .

Gallery Director Stefan van Raay said "we are delighted to have won this prestigious award. The new building now permits access to the whole of the Gallery and it is wonderful that such things are rewarded. The ADAPT award, not only identifies the Gallery’s accessibility, but also recognises all the hard work, energy and goodwill put in by everybody involved in a project such as this, including the architects, staff, focus groups and volunteers." Ben Hockliffe, a participant of the Disability and Access Focus Group for the project, explained how working with the Group was a very positive experience. "It was great to work on a project where consideration of access was given as the building was being built, rather than afterwards, which is usually the case. This demonstrates a genuine commitment on the part of Pallant House Gallery for inclusivity for everyone in the community. The Focus Group was asked to make recommendations on a whole range of issues relating to access for people with disabilities, from lighting to ramps, the lift and signage, as well as engaging people with disabilities with the work of the Gallery itself. This has been a great opportunity, and it has really worked."

Partnership of the Month Exhibitions Partners in Art aims to help people to access the arts who have difficulties in accessing it themselves due to disability, illness, injury or other reasons. They are placed in partnership with a trained volunteer and meet up regularly to make art together, take part in art events both in the Gallery and in the community and visit exhibitions.

Much of this work has taken place quietly and un-noticed during the building of the new Gallery but with the reopening the people involved in Partners in Art can now tell their stories. Lizzie and Shirley, 9−26 January Sally and Gary, 6-23 February Roy and Nick, 6-23 March

Each partnership is entitled to an exhibition in the Studio at Pallant House Gallery. The exhibitions gives the opportunity to show what the partnerships have been up to and to show their journal that records their meetings and creative journey.

Disability and Access Focus Group Photograph by Anne-Katrin Purkiss © Pallant House Gallery

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NeilLAWSON Lawson Baker NEIL BAKER Painter and and SCULPTOR Sculptor PAINTER

GRAINGERS STUDIO, WEST ASHLING.. CHICHESTER. NeilNeil welcomes visitors welcomes visitorstotohis hisstudio studioby by appointment appointment. It 10 is only 10 minutes away Pallant from Pallant House. It is only minutes away from House Gallery TELEPHONE 0044(0)1243576082 Or visit the website andStudio, leaveWest a message Graingers Ashling,www.neillawsonbaker.com Chichester Telephone +44 (0)1243 576082 or visit the website and leave a message www.neillawsonbaker.com


1/2 Price Thursday Evenings Free Guided Tours Thursday evenings at Pallant House Gallery offer the perfect opportunity to unwind after work, wander around the Gallery, perhaps take in a tour and enjoy drinks and Tapas in The Pallant Restaurant. The Bookshop also remains open throughout the evening. Entrance is half-price (just £3.25 for adults) from 5pm until the Gallery closes at 8pm. The Gallery is offering a free (with admission ticket) monthly programme of five themed tours exploring different aspects of the Pallant House Gallery collection. After the tour there is the opportunity to continue conversations on the subject over a glass of wine and Tapas in the restaurant (not included in the price). Participants should meet at reception at 6pm. Portraits: Image and Identity 8 February / 15 March / 19 April Pallant House Gallery’s permanent collection includes many portraits from the 16th century to the present day. This tour explores developments in the art of portraiture through aspects of pose, dress, personality, experimentation and self-representation from 18th century 'conversation pieces' and grand portraits by the likes of George Romney to 20th century portraits influenced by art movements such as Cubism and expressionism; as well as self-portraits and contemporary photographs.

Still Life: The Language of Objects 18 January / 22 February / 29 March This tour explores how artists have used the still life as a means of expression and experimentation. The tour includes historic still life paintings and considers the symbolism and significance of particular objects, memento mori and the way that the still life has been used as a vehicle for artistic innovation in the 20th century. It encompasses Cubists, Surrealists, Abstract and Pop artists such as Andre Derain, Henri Hayden, Paul Nash, Fernand Leger, Ben Nicholson, Patrick Caulfield and Julian Opie.

Fernand Léger, L’Engrenage Rouge ( Nature morte en rouge et bleu), 1939, Oil on canvas, Kearley Bequest, through The Art Fund (1989) Peter Blake, Roxy Roxy, 1965-83, Acrylic emulsion and collage on hardboard, Wilson Loan

Pop Art and the Swinging Sixties 25 January / 1 March/ 5 April The tour explores Pop Art and the culture of the 'Swinging Sixties' including the work of artists such as Peter Blake, Patrick Caulfield, Richard Hamilton, Eduardo Paolozzi, R.B. Kitaj and Colin Self. It explores the Pop artists’ interests such as celebrity and popular culture, new art materials and political protest. George Romney, Portrait of Sir Henry Gough, Baron Calthorpe, 1779, Oil on canvas, On loan from a private collection, © Pallant House Gallery Eric Ravilious, New Bungalow (verso The Back Garden at Bardfield), c.1930, Watercolour and pencil on paper, Hussey Bequest, Chichester District Council (1985)

Landscapes and Modernity 11 January / 15 February / 22 March / 26 April A tour looking at the changing way landscape has been depicted in art from the 18th century pastorals by the Smith brothers to the urban townscapes of Whistler, Sickert and Gore. The talk covers landscapes between the wars by Eric Ravilious, Paul Nash, David Bomberg, Matthew Smith to abstracts by Ivon Hitchens and Barbara Hepworth. Figurative expressionist landscapes by Bomberg and Auerbach to contemporary landscape art by Andy Goldsworthy are also included.

Collectors and Collecting 1 February / 8 March / 12 April Pallant House Gallery is a 'collection of collections', which have been donated, bequeathed or loaned by important private collectors. For this reason it reflects 20th century tastes in art. This tour explores the different collections and the personalities behind them: Walter Hussey the church 'patron of art', Charles Kearley, a businessman and builder of modernist architecture, Prof Sir Colin St John Wilson the architect, academic and close friend of many of the artists in his collection. It explores how these people have amassed such extraordinary collections and what drives people to collect. Saturday Highlights Tour Free Highlights Tours are offered by the Gallery every Saturday at 3pm. Please note a British Sign Interpreter will accompany the last Tour in the month

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Bookshop Sickert: Paintings and Drawings Wendy Baron Walter Richard Sickert was an artist of prodigious creativity and a writer of inimitable wit and insight. For sixty years, in his several roles as painter, teacher and polemicist, he was a source of inspiration and influence to successive generations of British painters. This catalogue is divided into two parts: the essay chapters describe Sickert’s chronology in terms of his stylistic and technical development; there is then a catalogue of more than 2800 entries. Of the several thousand drawings and 1500 paintings that survive, 1000 (many of which have never been published before) are illustrated. £55, Hardback Eric Ravilious: Imagined Realities Alan Powers The English artist Eric Ravilious was a painter of watercolours and murals, a book illustrator in wood engraving and lithography, and a designer of transfer-ware, pottery and porcelain. From 1939 till his death he was an Official War Artist. This book presents a full retrospective of all aspects of his work, culminating in the final phase of his war artist work. A major retrospective of this important British artist, this publication accompanied the recent exhibition of his work at the Imperial War Museum in London. £24.95, Paperback

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Peter Blake Natalie Rudd Peter Blake is one of the most influential and original artists working in Britain today, with a career that spans six decades. His fascination with the heroes of popular music, sport and film made him a vital contributor to the mergence of Pop art in Britain. He continues to produce work in a diverse media, including painting, collage, sculpture, assemblage, printmaking and illustration. Writer and curator Natalie Rudd provides a comprehensive account of Blake’s life and art, with new interviews with the artist. £14.99, Paperback The Art Book for Children Phaidon Editors A perfect introduction to art for children everywhere, The Art Book: Children’s Edition brings the clarity and innovation of Phaidon’s bestselling Art Book to our youngest readers ever. An A to Z guide of 30 great artists and their most famous works, it is designed for both parent and child to enjoy together. The book encourages the children to look and use their imagination to understand why artists choose to create the work they do and in the way that they do it. £12.95, Hardback

Modern British Art at Pallant House Gallery Stefan van Raay, Frances Guy, Simon Martin and Andrew Churchill This beautifully designed and illustrated book is far more than a book on a collection. It follows themes in twentieth-century British art history, with over 100 colour illustrated examples from this extraordinary collection, resulting in a scholarly and immensely enjoyable appraisal of this period in British art. The history and development of the Gallery from its inception in 1982 to the launch of the new Gallery is outlined in an introduction by the Director, Stefan van Raay £12.95, Paperback £25, Hardback


Shell Susie MacMurray A unique, hand assembled book to accompany the year long installation on the staircase of Pallant House. The book is in a concertina format, with stunning large format images of the installation, which features 20,000 mussel shells lined with velvet, on one side, and an essay by Dr. Catherine Harper on the reverse. The hand-printed covers evoke the mussel shell form and add to a celebration of a much-loved installation. £6, Hardback

William Roberts: An English Cubist Andrew Gibbon Williams This book looks for the first time at the whole range of Roberts’ work and asserts his true status as a major contributor to the art of the twentieth century. William Roberts’ life was one of artistic and practical struggle not helped by an intransigent and latterly hermetic personality. Widely illustrated with reproductions of his work, William Roberts: An English Cubist offers a fuller understanding of the life and work of this major British artist. £35, Hardback William Roberts: Retrospective Hatton Gallery This catalogue accompanied a major retrospective exhibition held in 2004. The 150 page catalogue is in full colour and illustrates works from national and regional galleries, as well as private collections, including works from his entire career. £20, Paperback

The School Prints: A Romantic Project Ruth Artmonsky To accompany the exhibition in the Prints Room, this book explores the genesis of this remarkable series of prints, commissioned from many of the best British and continental artists of the day for exhibition in school classrooms. For the first time this fascinating group of works has been given a thorough, and deserved, investigation. £12, Paperback Author book-signing, Thursday 8 February Prints and Multiples Pallant House Gallery has commissioned editions by leading contemporary artists, including the iconic Peter Blake, Official War Artists and Turner Prize nominees Langlands & Bell, leading printmaker Paul Catherall and Susie MacMurray whose 'Shell' installation currently resides in the Gallery. Pallant Paul Catherall 4 Colour lino print, signed and numbered from an editiion of 250 £65 Pop Art Peter Blake 4 Enamel badges, signed and numbered from an edition of 2000 £25 Frozen Sky Langlands & Bell Wristwatch, signed and numbered from an edition of 1000 £50 Shell Susie MacMurray Silver-plated mussel shell lined with velvet, signed and numbered from an edition of 250 £75

Montage by Andrew Churchill Photograph / Photo-editing by David Wynn

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Royal

The CLUB WITH AN INTERNATIONAL DIMENSION

Royal Over-Seas League

Special membership rates for readers of the Pallant House Gallery magazine

The Royal Over-Seas League (ROSL) has a long history of welcoming members from the UK and overseas to its London and Edinburgh clubhouses and providing a network of reciprocal clubs, branches or honorary representatives around the world. The London clubhouse, comprising two period houses, is in a prime location bordering Green Park and near the Ritz Hotel. Over-Seas House has a private garden, al fresco dining, restaurant, buttery for light meals, bar, drawing room, 80 bedrooms and seven conference and private dining rooms. The Edinburgh clubhouse is centrally situated at 100 Princes Street.

Over-Seas Benefits of membership include economical central London pricing*, varied events programmes, quarterly journal, discounts on certain cruises and tours, in-house art exhibitions and concerts, evening speakers and short term access to over 70 other clubs around the world in Canada, Australia, New Zealand, Singapore, Hong Kong, Malaysia, India, Pakistan, South Africa, Kenya, Gibraltar, Spain, USA and elsewhere.

Specially discounted joining fees for readers of the Pallant House Gallery Magazine range from £26 (resident overseas) to £59 (resident within 50 miles of Charing Cross, London). 2007 annual subscriptions range from £74 to £228. The joining fee is waived for those aged 17-25.

League For further information please contact the Membership Department, remembering to quote PALLANT HOUSE GALLERY.

Over-Seas House, Park Place, St James’s Street, London SW1A 1LR Tel: 020 7408 0214 Fax: 020 7499 6738

(Enquiries: 9.00am-5.00pm Monday-Friday - exts. 216 and 315) Website: www.rosl.org.uk E-mail: info@rosl.org.uk

*London clubhouse: gin & tonic £2.95; pint of beer £2.50; house wine £2.95; three course meal with coffee £26.50; evening events from £4.00; bedrooms £80 - £160; complimentary e-mail and computer facilities in Central Lounge, broadband internet connection in bedrooms. Prices correct at time of design, November 2006.


The Pallant Restaurant Peter Combes

Photograph by Jason Hedges © Pallant House Gallery

Here we are six months from opening, and how delighted we are! Of course there have been teething problems but, apart from some work to be done in January, held over from July to allow us to open in-line with the Gallery, we seem to be over these and the restaurant is running smoothly. Currently the restaurant is open daily from 10am–5pm. Plans are well in hand for evening opening and the aim is to start this in March on a Thursday, Friday and Saturday evening. We have had a number of party bookings − as I write there are 20 Kemp Town ladies enjoying lunch – and December looks particularly busy. I very much hope this will develop as it seems to me that the groups we have had have all enjoyed their visit to the Gallery and Restaurant.

Although it is 'winter time' the greatest boon to the restaurant is the courtyard garden. Through July to early October this proved a popular place for coffee, lunch and tea and on Thursday evenings when the Gallery is open until 8pm, Tapas and wine were served. Currently there is seating for twenty-four but we hope to increase this in time for late Spring. We all look forward to seeing you during your visit to the Gallery and very much hope you enjoy yourselves. Lindsey and her team are here, ready, willing and able! Telephone +44 (0)1243 784701 www.thepallantrestaurant.com The Restaurant will be closed for 1 week in January. Please call to confirm.

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Letter to the Friends Lady Nicholas Gordon Lennox Chairman of the Friends

Photograph by Alex von Koettlitz

A very happy New Year to you all and a warm welcome to our new Friends who have joined us since the new gallery opened. 2007 will be a special year for Pallant House Gallery as it is the 25th anniversary of its opening and of the foundation of the Friends and we will be celebrating this with many exciting events and exhibitions and, of course, fundraising efforts. I would urge you to pay special attention to the Director’s article on page 10 in which he explains very fully the financial situation of the gallery. The Friends of Pallant House have been the most generous and supportive band since their foundation – Pallant House Gallery has relied very heavily on their financial support and will continue to do so in the future. Since the opening of the new extension in July, we have made 900 new Friends – our aim for our anniversary year is to introduce a further 1,000 Friends. To achieve this, we partly rely on the existing Friends to pass the word and encourage everybody they know to join. Please do all you can.

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Initials

£20 for 3 years

Postcode£37.50

Patrons

Name

Surname

DOB

M

Y And annually on the same date in each succeeding year the sum of £

Account Number Account Number

Postcode Postcode

Date Date This cancels any previous Standing Order to the Friends of Pallant House This cancels any previous Standing Order to the Friends of Pallant House

Signature Signature

And annually on the same date in each succeeding year the sum of £

Please pay NatWest Chichester 60-05-24 for the credit of Friendspay ofNatWest Pallant House Account no. 96217952 on theoffirst day of Please Chichester 60-05-24 for the credit Friends of Pallant House Account no. 96217952 on the first day of M Y M annually on Y the same date in each succeeding year the sum of £ And

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I would like you to treatPostcode as Gift Aid donations this and all future subscriptions an Postcode

Name/s and DOB in full of children under 16 (Family Membership or Young Friend) Name Surname DOB Gift Aid Name Surname DOB 1st Postcode Use Gift Aid and you can make your membership worth more. For every £1 you 1st give us we get an extra 28p* from HM Revenue & Customs. All you need to do is sign 2nd Name of account holder the declaration. The only condition is that you must be paying enough income tax to 2nd 3rd cover the amount that we reclaim. (* at time of going to press) Bank sort code Account Number 3rd 4th I would like you to treat as Gift Aid donations this and all future subscriptions an 4th donations to The Friends of Pallant House until I notify you otherwise. Please pay NatWest Chichester 60-05-24 for the credit of Friends of Pallant House Account no. 96217952 on the first day of Signature Date

Name/s and DOB for in full children under 16 (Family or Young Friend) r Details (or recipient giftofmembership) Please write inMembership capital letters

£1000 minimum

subscription could go even further: Telephone could go even further: Family £37.50 subscription tanding Order keeps down our costs and Email (please write16) clearly) venient for you. tanding Order keeps down our costs and Young Friend (Under £10 venient for you. Student I would like to receive a monthly email bulletin £10 ax, please sign the Gift Aid Declaration. We currently get Include a Aid copy of student card)currently £20 for 3 years v students. ax, please sign the Gift We get e(Full-time Government for every £1Declaration. ofyour your subscription. eGallery Government for /every £1 (Double/Family of your subscription. Name of Spouse Partner Membership) Club £300 minimum

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M Y Gift Aid annually on the same in each succeeding yearFor the sum £1 of you £ Gift Aid And Use Gift Aid and you can make yourdate membership worth more. every give us we extra Revenue & Customs. you need£1toyou do is sign Use Gift Aidget andanyou can28p* makefrom yourHM membership worth more.All For every the The only28p* condition that you must be payingAll enough income taxis to givedeclaration. us we get an extra from isHM Revenue & Customs. you need to do sign Signature Date cover the amount that wecondition reclaim. is(*that at time going press) the declaration. The only you of must be to paying enough income tax to cover the amount that we reclaim. (* at time of going to press) I would like you to treat as Gift Aid donations this and all future subscriptions an donations toyou ThetoFriends ofGift Pallant until I notify you otherwise. I would treat as Aid House donations andFriends all future subscriptions Thislike cancels any previous Standing Order this to the of Pallant House an donations to The Friends of Pallant House until I notify you otherwise. Signature Date Signature Date

PaymentBank sort code Account Number Payment I enclose a completed Standing Order Form I enclose a completed Standing Order Form I enclose cheque made payable to the Friends offor Pallant Houseof Pleaseapay NatWest Chichester 60-05-24 the credit Friends of Pallant no. 96217952 the first day of I enclose a cheque madeHouse payableAccount to the Friends of Pallant on House

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Your Details write in capital letters Title (or recipient for gift membership) PleaseForename/s Your Details (or recipient for gift membership) Please write in capital letters Standing Order Form Title Forename/s SurnameGift Aid Title Forename/s Standing Order Form SurnameAddressUse Gift Aid and you can make your membership worth more. For every £1 you To the Manager (your bank) give us we get an extra 28p* from HM Revenue & Customs. All you need to do is To signthe Manager (your bank) Surname Address of Bank Address the declaration. The only condition is that you must be paying enough income tax to Address Address of Bank cover the amount that we reclaim. (* at time of going to press)

(Full-time students. Include a copy of your student card) £20 for 3 years 3rd Club Payment Gallery £300 minimum Gallery Club £300 minimum 4th Patrons £1000 minimum I enclose a completed Standing Order Form Patrons £1000 minimum I enclose a cheque made Giver’s Details (Gift Membership only)payable to the Friends of Pallant House

donations to The FriendsPostcode of Pallant House until I notify you otherwise. £1,000 minimum £300 minimum Telephone Telephone £1,000 minimum Telephone ion toPatrons benefits of the Gallery Club, £1000 minimum mber Date Email (please clearly) Email write (please write clearly) Signature Date ion to benefits of the Gallery Club,GA Email (please write clearly) mber SO I would like to receive monthly email bulletin I would like to areceive a monthly email bulletin receive: receive: No Till ReceiptPlease No write in capital letters Your Details (or recipient for gift membership) v I would like to receive a monthly email bulletin tion to the Director's Annual Dinner vName ofPayment ountTitle Initials Forename/s SpouseStanding / PartnerOrder (Double/Family Membership) Form (For Official Use Only) No. tion to the Director's Annual Dinner Name of Spouse / Partner (Double/Family Membership) distinguished guest speaker Surname To theaManager (your bank) Order Form I enclose completed Standing distinguished guest speaker Address of Bankmade payable to the Friends of Pallant House mbership I enclose a cheque ionAddress in Options the list of Patrons of the Year Name/s and DOB in full of children under 16 (Family Membership or Young Friend) ion the list of Patrons of the Year Singlein Membership £24

(Full-time students. Include a copy of your student card)

involved with the Gallery embership Application Form Membership Options Club £300 minimum Single Membership £24 Club £300 minimum ion to Friends' benefits, you will receive: asedcomplete this form and hand it towill the receive: reception£37.50 desk or send ion toJoint Friends' benefits, you o: Honorary Membership Secretary, Friends of Pallant House, Family £37.50 tions to private views llant House Gallery, 9 views North tions to private Young Friend (Under 16) Pallant, Chichester, PO19 £101TJ tion to reception with Director and Curators Student £10 ase writeto in capital letters tion reception with Director and Curators

Amount

want to Gift getAidmore use paywho tax, please sign the Declaration. We currently get se who want to get from the Government for every £1more of your subscription. involved with the Gallery

Join the Friends Adult membership from £24

Surname nvitations to private views Please write in capital letters younger arts enthusiast Friend (under 16) £10 Please write in capital letters Address Friend 16) £10 nvitation to reception with Director and Curators For Official Use only receive:(under receive: For Official Use only Number Date Postcode entry to the collection and Number Date tron £1,000 minimum Number GA Membership Application Form Telephone Giver’s Details (Gift Membership SO only) entry to the collection and al exhibitions Number SO GA Till No Email (please Till Receipt No addition to benefits of the Gallery Club, write clearly) Title Forename/s al exhibitions Till No Till Receipt No Amount Initials Please complete this form and hand it to the reception desk or send I would like to receive a monthly email bulletin Surname Pack uctivities will receive: Initials ctivities Pack Membership Secretary, Friends of Pallant House, Amount v Address it to: Honorary gnvitation Friend's activity sheet and events to the Director's Annual Dinner Pallant House Gallery, 9 North Pallant, Chichester, PO19 1TJ NameOptions of Spouse / Partner (Double/Family Membership) Membership gamme Friend's activity sheet events 3 times a year ith distinguished guest and speaker Membership Options Single Membership £24 Please write in capital a letters amme 3 times year Single Membership £24 Postcode £37.50 Joint d ty booking nclusion in for the workshops list of Patrons of the Year £37.50 Joint d Family Name/sTelephone and DOB in full of children under 16 (Family Membership or Young Friend) For Official Usefor only workshops ty booking £37.50 Family £37.50 tion to seasonal event exclusive Name Surname DOB Number Date Email (please write clearly) Young Friend (Under 16) £10 your to subscription go even further: tion seasonalcould event exclusive Young 16)like to receive a monthly email bulletin £10 1st Friend (Under Number SO GA ung Friends I would Student £10 ing by Standing Order keeps down our costs and ung Friends Student £10 2nd students. Include a copy of your student card) Till No Till Receipt No (Full-time £20 for 3 years ore convenient for you.

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Above Berthold Lubetkin, Highpoint One and Highpoint Two Photograph courtesy of Simon Martin Right Erno Goldfinger, 2 Willow Road, Hampstead ŠNTPL/Dennis Gilbert

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Visit to 2 Willow Road, Hampstead and Highpoint Apartments, Highgate Alan Wood

The Friends’ visit to London last August provided an excellent follow-up to the Modernism exhibition seen at the V&A earlier in the year. In the morning we visited the home of the Hungarian-born architect and designer, Erno Goldfinger in Hampstead, North London. Goldfinger, who studied in Paris, mixing with avant-garde architects during the 1920’s, relocated to London in 1931 before marrying Ursula Blackwell in 1933 and moving into one of the Highpoint apartments. His dream, however, was to design and build a house that would incorporate ideas about modern living, and the availability of a site in Willow Road, close to Hampstead Heath, provided the perfect opportunity. In Willow Road, Goldfinger designed a terrace of three houses, Number 2 being the largest. A concrete frame construction allowed the first floor to be designed as a flexible space, with moveable partitions and folding doors a key feature. Wide window openings provided a much greater level of daylight than is usual in terrace houses while the street elevation was designed to respect the scale and proportions of the many eighteenth century houses in the immediate neighbourhood, without imitating their Georgian forms. The development was completed about three months prior to the outbreak of war and it was only after 1945 that the Goldfinger residence functioned as intended, at one time providing accommodation for four generations. The National Trust has been responsible for the property since 1994, ensuring that this important example of Modernist architecture is maintained for the future.

In the afternoon we visited the two sets of apartments known as Highpoint One and Highpoint Two in Highgate. The former was commissioned by Sigmund Gestetner in 1935 as accommodation for the employees of his office-equipment company. The architect was Russian-born Berthold Lubetkin, a partner in the architectural practice Tecton. We were welcomed into the large entrance hall by one of the residents who gave a fascinating account of this seven-storey development. The chosen plan, inspired by Le Corbusier, was a double-cruciform providing 64 apartments with either two or three bedrooms. The living rooms are orientated so as to receive direct sunlight, while the bedrooms are positioned on the shadier sides of the building away from the service and circulation areas. Folding windows, that slide to one side of the openings, maximise the supply of fresh air, healthy living being an important tenet of Modernism. To protect the adjoining land from unsympathetic development, the architect persuaded Gestetner to build Highpoint Two. This was completed in 1938 with larger apartments and aimed at the more affluent residents. There is also a penthouse, occupied originally by Lubetkin himself. The day ended in relaxed manner in the apartment of our guide, where we enjoyed refreshments and stunning views. Visiting 2 Willow Road Opens March 2007, Thursday-Saturday 12 noon-5pm. Open first Thursday in month (Apr to Oct, evening only) 5-9pm. Nov 1-25, 12noon-5pm Sats Only Telephone 01494 755570 (Infoline) www.nationaltrust.org.uk

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Events Gallery Talks The School Prints: A Gallery Talk and Book Launch Ruth Artmonsky and Brenda Rawnsley Thursday 8 February The School Prints, published in the 1940s, were a series of colour lithographs editioned in large numbers and sold at a low cost to schools in the UK. The prints enabled school children to encounter original works of art, by leading British and European artists, in their own classrooms. The artists included L.S. Lowry, Henry Moore, Julian Trevelyan, and the continental artists Georges Braque, Henri Matisse and Pablo Picasso. Art historian Ruth Artmonsky will be in conversation with Assistant Curator, Simon Martin, and will be introducing the story behind the prints. The original publisher, Brenda Rawnsley, will also be speaking to give her account of their creation. After the talk, Ruth Artmonsky will sign copies of her new book 'The School Prints: A Romantic Project' in the bookshop. £5 to include a glass of wine; £2.50 for students; 6pm

David Bomberg: Spirit in the Mass Richard Cork Thursday 8 March To mark the 50th anniversary of David Bomberg’s death in 1957, Richard Cork, the leading authority on Bomberg’s work, will give a talk on the artist’s life and work and his continued legacy. Richard Cork is an art critic, historian, lecturer and curator. A frequent broadcaster, he regularly reviews art exhibitions on Radio 4, Radio 3 and Radio 2 and is the author of the much-acclaimed monograph on Bomberg (1986). Following the lecture Richard Cork will sign copies of his various publications on modern art, available from the bookshop. £10 to include a glass of wine; £5 for students; 6pm

Richard Cork

Hans Feibusch School Print

A Day in the Sun: Outdoor Pursuits in Art in the 1930s Timothy Wilcox Thursday 1 March The pursuit of leisure was one of the most remarkable social phenomena of the 1930s. A drab and uncertain time politically, the period was enlivened by the discovery of the English countryside, and the development of English seaside holidays and modernist lidos. This lecture considers the depiction of leisure pursuits in the work of British artists such as Laura Knight, William Roberts, Stanley Spencer and Harold Williamson and how their paintings relate to the Shell posters, contemporary photography, and guidebooks of the 1930s. Timothy Wilcox is an independent curator and author of ‘A Day in the Sun: Outdoor Pursuits in Art in the 1930s’ (2006). Following the lecture Timothy Wilcox will sign copies of his book in the bookshop. £7 to include a glass of wine; £3.50 for students; 6pm

Maxwell Armfield, At the Seaside, 1932, Tempera on board Private Collection ©The Artist’s Estate/ Bridgeman Art Library

FREE Antique Valuations Specialists from Bonhams Monday 19 March Antique valuations with specialists from Bonhams including Eric Knowles. Bring along any items that you wish to discuss with the specialists or have valued. No pre-booking required. Free; 3−5pm A Guide to the World of Collecting Antiques and Auctioneering Eric Knowles Monday 19 March The well-known TV presenter and antiques expert, will kick off the series of Bonhams events with a talk guiding us through the interesting world of collecting antiques and auctioneering. £8 to include a glass of wine; 6pm

Eric Knowles

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Guided Tours

Visits

'William Roberts: England at Play' Exhibition Tour Simon Martin, Assistant Curator Thursday 15 February, 6pm / Wednesday 14 March, 2pm Throughout his career William Roberts created distinctive paintings that focused on the leisure pursuits of the English working class, providing a panorama of modern life in England. Simon Martin, Assistant Curator, will lead a tour of the exhibition exploring the development of Roberts’s art, from his Vorticist origins to the monumental figures of his mature work. £5 to include coffee; £2.50 for students

William Roberts, The Dance Club (The Jazz Party), 1923, Oil on canvas Leeds Museums and Galleries (City Art Gallery)

A Visit to Spitalfields Tuesday 20 March Spitalfields, which is where the City of London meets the East End, was once the home of 18th century silk merchants. Located beside the historic Old Spitalfields Market, Spitalfields is now home to many contemporary artists and is a fascinating area. We begin the visit with Nicholas Hawksmoor’s famous Christ Church, built in 1729, which has been newly restored to its former Baroque splendour. Hawksmoor was a pupil of Christopher Wren and his London churches are considered to be minor masterpieces. We will then have an extraordinary tour of the Dennis Severs’ House. The restored house, built in 1724, was owned by the American born artist Dennis Severs. He lived in the house much as the original occupants would have done, and the rooms are set out as a series of 'tableaux vivants'. He called it a 'still-life drama' and to say any more would spoil the experience. There will be time after this visit to enjoy the local atmosphere with supper at one of the many eateries nearby. We will provide a list of suggestions. 12.30pm−10.30pm approx; £33; A limited number of tickets are available at £18 to those who wish to join this visit in London; Tea and supper are not included in the ticket price.

David Bomberg and his Artistic Legacy Friday 16 March, 2pm / Wednesday 21 March, 10am To mark the 50th anniversary of David Bomberg’s death in 1957 a special tour has been developed focussing on some of the 25 Bombergs in the permanent collection. The tour, led by Pallant House Gallery guides, will consider Bomberg’s artistic development in the wider context of 20th century art, from his early work inspired by Cubism and Futurism o his Palestinian landscapes of the 1920s and paintings of the Spanish town of Ronda, culminating with his later expressive paintings, such as his moving Last Self Portrait and Tajo and Rocks (The Last Landscape). The tour also considers Bomberg’s enormous influence of on pupils such as Dennis Creffield, Leslie Marr and Frank Auerbach, who described Bomberg as "probably the most original, stubborn, radical intelligence that was to be found in art schools". £4 to include coffee/tea; £2 for students

Denis Severs’ House

David Bomberg, Tajo and Rocks, Ronda (The Last Landscape), 1956-57, Oil on canvas, Wilson Loan © Sir Colin St John Wilson

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Discover Kew Palace Thursday 19 April The newly transformed Kew Palace, which has re-opened after a ten year conservation project, was once home to George III, Queen Charlotte and their children. This intimate little palace, originally known as the 'Dutch House' is situated in the Royal Botanic gardens and was built by a wealthy Flemish merchant in 1631. The tour of the house reveals the story of the Royal occupation from 1801–18 and some of the rooms have been restored to how they would have looked at that time. The renovation has also uncovered a series of rooms previously not open to public view and many have been untouched for nearly two hundred years. There will be time before and after the tour to wander in the gardens and have lunch in one of the cafés. 9am−6pm approx; £35 (£31 for concessions); Lunch not included in the ticket price

Kew Palace

Friends’ Coffee Mornings Wednesday 17 January / Wednesday 7 March Please join us in the lecture Room for an informal coffee morning and to meet a member of staff who will give a short talk about their work at the gallery.Marc Steene, Education and Outreach Officer, will talk in January and Simon Martin, Assistant Curator, in March. £2; 10.30−12pm

Office Use

Number of Tickets

Cost

BOOKING FORM Friends Priority Booking Until 24 January 2007 Gallery Talks The School Prints Thursday 8 February, £5/£2.50 stu.

A Day in the Sun Thursday 1 March, £7/£3.50 stu.

David Bomberg Thursday 8 March, £10/£5 stu.

Eric Knowles Monday 19 March, £8

GUIDED Tours William Roberts Thursday 15 February, £5/£2.50 stu. Wednesday 14 March, £5/£2.50 stu.

David Bomberg Friday 16 March £4/£2 stu. Wednesday 21 March £4/£2 stu.

Visits A Visit to Spitalfields Tuesday 20 March £33/£18 joining in London

Discover Kew Palace Thursday 19 April £35 /£31 conc.

Friends Coffee Mornings Wednesday 17 January, £2 Wednesday 7 March, £2

Total Cost

Please see over for payment details The coach departure point for both visits will be from Oaklands Way, Chichester.

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Your Details Mr / Mrs / Miss / Ms First Name Surname

Pallant House Gallery is available to hire for conferences, seminars and evening receptions

Address

Please contact Helen Ward 01243 770838 h.ward@pallant.org.uk Postcode Daytime Telephone Friends Membership Number Email Address A duplicate booking form will be enclosed with your tickets, in case you wish to book more events in the future.

Payment method

You can pay by cheque or credit/debit card (all major cards accepted except American Express) Cheques: Please make cheques payable to Friends of Pallant House, leaving the amount open in case we are not able to provide all the tickets you request. For security, you can limit the cheque by writing "Not above £‌" at the bottom of the cheque. Credit/Debit Card Payment Please write card number below Start Date Expiry Date Issue No Please write your 3 digit security number from the signature strip on the back of your credit card number

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PAYMENT DETAILS

Please cut the completed form from the magazine and send with a stamped, addressed, DL size envelope to: Friends Office (Events) Pallant House Gallery 9 North Pallant Chichester PO19 1TJ 54

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Children’s Workshops Masked Saturday 13 January Masks and Collage Artist: Jane Moran £4.50; 10am−12pm; 5−8 year olds; Max 14 children Storms, Rainbows and Rivers Saturday 27 January Get dirty with natural materials to explore the landscape paintings in the collections Artist: Johanna Berger £4.50; 10am−12pm; 9−12 year olds; Max 20 children Making Marks Saturday 10 February Wander through the landscapes at the Gallery and print your own Artist: Dinah Kelly £4.50; 10am−12pm; 13−16 year olds Max 20 children Cosmic Painting Saturday 3 March Based on Alan Davie’s ‘Setting for the Cosmic Dance’ Create your own cosmic painting Artist: Jaita Patel £4.50; 10am−12pm; 5−8 year olds; Max 15 children

In the Frame Saturday 10 March A painting workshop looking at people looking at paintings Artist: Jenny King £4.50; 10am−12pm; 9−12 year olds; Max 20 children

Free Holiday Workshops No booking required but places are limited Who is it?? Is it us?? Wednesday 21 February Explore some of the characters in the William Roberts exhibition in a dynamic and interactive way Artist: Andy Brereton 10am−12pm also 1pm−3pm 5−16 year olds; Max 20 children

Badge it! Saturday 31 March Easter badge making workshop Artist: Louise Bristow 10am−12pm also 1pm−3pm 5−16 year olds; Max 20 children Soft Boiled Eggs Saturday 07 April Make felt Easter eggs to take home Artist: Jane Moran 10am−12pm also 1pm−3pm 5−16 year olds; Max 20 children Spring Flowers Saturday 14 April Spring colour monoprinting Artist: Jane Chitty 10am−12pm also 1pm−3pm 5−16 year olds; Max 20 children

Alan Davie, Setting for the Cosmic Dance, c.2000, Oil on canvas, Presented by the Artist 2006 William Roberts, The Tea Shop (The Good Old Days), 1928, Oil on canvas, Atkinson Art Gallery, Southport

What’s that Sound? Saturday 17 March Can you paint sound? Look at the musically inspired works in the collection and find out Please bring a small musical instrument Artist: Irina Brzeski £4.50; 10am−12pm; 13−16 year olds; Max 20 children

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Adult and Student Workshops Adult Art Masterclasses A programme of three hour workshops based on the collections and led by artists experienced in traditional art techniques. For Artists with some experience of the subject. £6.50 plus a model charge Please bring your own art materials Book early as places are limited. Watercolour Masterclass Sunday 14 January Artist: Jenny Tyson 1pm−4pm; Max 12 people

Life Drawing Masterclass Sunday 28 January Artist: Pippa Blake 1pm−4pm; Max 12 people Drawing Masterclass Sunday 11 February Artist: Irina Brzeski 1pm−4pm; Max 14 Oil Painting Masterclass Sunday 4 March Artist: Jenny Tyson 1pm−4pm; Max 14

Artwork of the Month Workshops Artwork in Focus talks are free with admission to the Gallery Participants to bring own art materials. Book early as places are limited. Ben Nicholson’s '1946 (still life - cerulean)' Wednesday 31 January Free 20 minute Artwork in Focus drop-in talk with volunteer guide Jock Johnston Free; 11am Using block printmaking to explore colour and contrast Artist: Suzie Darcel £4.50; 12pm−2pm; Max 20 people

David Bomberg’s 'Last Self-Portrait' Wednesday 28 February Free 20 mintue Artowork in Focus drop-in talk with volunteer guide Jillie Moss Free; 11am Using self-portraiture, paint your state of mind and spirit Artist: Teresa Mason 12pm−2pm; Max 15 people

Life Drawing Masterclass Sunday 11 March Artist: Jenny King 1pm−4pm; Max 14 Landscape Masterclass Sunday 18 March Artist: Jenny King 1pm−4pm; Max 14

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Gino Severini’s 'Danseuse No.5 (Dancer No. 5)' Wednesday 28 March Free 20 mintue Artowork in Focus drop-in talk with volunteer guide Judy Addison-Smith Free; 11am Make a Cubist card and collage sculpture construction Artist: Louise Bristow 12pm−2pm; Max 15 people Alan Davie, OM No.10, 1972, Gouache and watercolour on paper, Kearley Bequest, through The Art Fund (1989), © Alan Davie Ivon Hitchens, Curved Barn, 1922, Oil on canvas, Presented by the Artist (1979), © Estate of Artist Ben Nicholson, 1946 (still life - cerulean), Oil on canvas over board, Kearley Bequest, through The Art Fund (1989), © Angela Verren Taunt David Bomberg, Last Self Portrait, 1956, Oil on canvas, Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, © Sir Colin St John Wilson Opposite Page Michael Andrews, The Estuary, Thames Painting, 1994 - 5, Oil and mixed media on canvas, Wilson Gift through The Art Fund, © June Andrews


Office Use

Cost

Number of Tickets

Community Art Club BOOKING FORM FREE art workshops for Partners in Art and other community groups and individuals that require extra support. Please contact the Education and Outreach officer on 01243 770835 to find out eligibility and to book a place. By the River Thursday 11, 18, 25 January Create a 3D Collage using recycled materials based on Michael Andrews 'Study for Thames Painting: The Estuary' Artist: Nadine Mahoney Free; 2.30pm–4.30pm

children’s Workshops

Masked Saturday 13 January £4.50

Storms, Rainbows and Rivers Saturday 27 January £4.50

Marking Marks Saturday 10 February £4.50

Cosmic Painting Saturday 3 March £4.50

In the Frame Saturday 10 March £4.50

What’s that Sound? Saturday 17 March £4.50

Watercolour Masterclass Sunday 14 January, £6.50

Life Drawing Masterclass Sunday 28 January, £6.50

Drawing Masterclass Sunday 11 February £6.50

Oil Painting Masterclass Sunday 4 March £6.50

Life Drawing Masterclass Sunday 11 March £6.50

Landscape Masterclass Sunday 18 March £6.50

Ben Nicholson Wednesday 31 January £4.50

David Bomberg Wednesday 28 February £4.50

Gino Severini Wednesday 28 March £4.50

adult art masterclasses

Looking in the Mirror Thursday 1, 8, 15 February Making a self portrait exploring a range of techniques Artist: Rachel Johnston Free; 2.30pm–4.30pm Hidden Stories Thursday 1, 8, 15 March Painting workshop exploring the hidden stories in the Gallery’s collections Artist: Kate Horbury & Marc Steene Free; 2.30pm–4.30pm Sculpture Workshop Thursday 22, 29 March / 5 April Explore materials and texture, create an exciting assemblage Artist: Suzie Darcel Free; 2.30pm–4.30pm An Introduction to Art and the Gallery Thursday 18, 25 January / Thursday 1, 8, 15 February / 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 March A ten week course organised by the W.E.A and Pallant House Gallery. The course will focus on two areas, firstly inspired by the William Roberts: England at Play exhibition at Pallant House Gallery you will create art works based on your interests, hobbies or favourite objects and secondly choose your favourite paintings from the collections and explore what makes you like it, the colour, the subject, the style or how the painting makes you feel! This is a free course for people with disabilities, or those who have additional needs and require support, and members of Partners in Art. To book a place please contact Anne Hollis on 01243 551683 or contact the Gallery to find out more. Free; 10am–12pm

ARTWORK OF THE MONTH

Total Cost

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PAYMENT DETAILS

CHEQUE PAYMENTS Cheques should be made payable to Pallant House Gallery. Please leave the actual amount open in case we are not able to provide all the tickets you request. For security “Not above £.........” can be written in the lower left-hand corner and we will advise you of the amount for your cheque. Please cut off the completed form from the Pallant House Gallery Magazine and send, with a stamped addressed envelope and payment to: Education Pallant House Gallery 9 North Pallant Chichester PO19 1TJ

Your Details Mr / Mrs / Miss / Ms First Name Surname Address

Postcode Daytime Telephone Friends Membership Number Email Address

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Diary • • • • •

Talk Tour Friends Event Adult Workshop Children’s Workshop

Monday 8 January Closed Tuesday 9 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Wednesday 10 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Thursday 11 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Landscapes and Modernity Friday 12 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Saturday 13 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Highlights of the Collection Masked Sunday 14 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Watercolour Masterclass Monday 15 January Closed Tuesday 16 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Wednesday 17 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Coffee Morning Thursday 18 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Still Life Friday 19 January Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Saturday 20 January William Roberts Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Highlights of the Collection Sunday 21 January William Roberts Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Monday 22 January Closed Tuesday 23 January William Roberts Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art

• • •

• • • •

Wednesday 24 January William Roberts Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Thursday 25 January William Roberts Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Pop Art Friday 26 January William Roberts Modern British Art Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Saturday 27 January William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Storms, Rainbows and ... Highlights of the Collection (BSL Interpreted) Sunday 28 January William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Life Drawing Masterclass Monday 29 January Closed Tuesday 30 January William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Wednesday 31 January William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Artwork of the Month Artwork of the Month Thursday 1 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Collectors and Collecting Friday 2 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Saturday 3 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Highlights of the Collection Sunday 4 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Monday 5 February Closed Tuesday 6 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Wednesday 7 February William Roberts Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art

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Thursday 8 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Portraits The School Prints Friday 9 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Saturday 10 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Highlights of the Collection Making Marks Sunday 11 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Drawing Masterclass Monday 12 February Closed Tuesday 13 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Wednesday 14 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Thursday 15 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art William Roberts tour Landscapes and Modernity Friday 16 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Saturday 17 February William Roberts Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Highlights of the Collection Sunday 18 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Monday 19 February Closed Tuesday 20 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art

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A Visit to Spitalfields Wednesday 21 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Who is it?? Is it us?? Thursday 22 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Still Life A Chapel/Two Churches Friday 23 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Saturday 24 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Highlights of the Collection (BSL Interpreted) Sunday 25 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Monday 26 February Closed Tuesday 27 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Wednesday 28 February William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Artwork of the Month Artwork of the Month Thursday 1 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom A Day in the Sun Pop Art Friday 2 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Saturday 3 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Highlights of the Collection Cosmic Painting Sunday 4 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Oil Painting Masterclass Monday 5 March

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Closed

Tuesday 6 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Wednesday 7 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Coffee Morning Thursday 8 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Bomberg/Richard Cork Collectors and Collecting Friday 9 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Saturday 10 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Highlights of the Collection In the Frame Sunday 11 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Life Drawing Masterclass Monday 12 March Closed Tuesday 13 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Wednesday 14 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art William Roberts tour Thursday 15 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Portraits Friday 16 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Tour of Bomberg/ Borough Group

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Saturday 17 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Highlights of the Collection What’s that Sound? Sunday 18 March William Roberts Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Landscape Masterclass Monday 19 March Exhibitions Closed 3-5pm Bonhams Valuations Eric Knowles Tuesday 20 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Wednesday 21 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Tour of Bomberg/ Borough Group Thursday 22 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Landscapes and Modernity Friday 23 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Partners in Art Saturday 24 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Highlights of the Collection Sunday 25 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Art for the Classroom Monday 26 March Closed Tuesday 27 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Wednesday 28 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Artwork of the Month Artwork of the Month Thursday 29 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Still Life Friday 30 March Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Saturday 31 March Poets in the Landscape Modern British Art Bomberg/Borough Group Highlights of the Collection: (BSL interpreted) Badge it!

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Royal Opening by HRH Princess Alexandra

HRH Princess Alexandra opening Pallant House Gallery / She is also seen here with: Stefan van Raay, Prof. Sir Colin St. John Wilson, collector and architect and MJ Long, architect / The. Hon George and Mrs Plumptre, Bonhams, co-sponsors of the launch / William Richards, Bonhams, supporter of the collection and Alan Sharp, UBS Wealth Management, supporter of the Gallery / Derek Groves and Peter Neuner, Partners in Art / Ian Robertson, Chief Executive of Rolls-Royce Motor Cars Ltd, co-sponsors of the launch.

The Wonderful Fund Private View

Stefan van Raay and Vanessa Branson, co-curator of The Wonderful Fund / Prue O’Day, co-curator of The Wonderful Fund and Howell James, Permanent Secretary, Government Communications / David Ogilvy, musician / The Rt. Hon. Lord Irvine of Lairg / David Gilmour, musician / Anita Sen, architect, Peter Arnold and Angie O’Rourke, Wonderful Fund member / Stefan van Raay, Director and Alan Yentob, BBC Director of Drama and Entertainment

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DĂ­a de los Muertos Party

Jessica, Corona Extra / Lady Nicholas Gordon Lennox, Manuel Velazquez de la Cadena, Chairman of the British Mexican Society, Countess and Count de Liederkerke / Clare Kirkman / Author Kate Mosse and artist Felix de Rooy / Manuel Velazquez de la Cadena and James Kirkman, artist / Paul and Toni Arden, gallerists / Manuel Diaz-Cebrian, Director of MĂŠxico Tourism Board UK, Eduardo Gomez, Corona Extra Promotions and Jose Luis Jauregui, Corona Extra, Manager UK, Marketing and Promotions.

Excellence in Access Awards, V&A, London

Matthew Weekes, Corporate Services Manager, Rolfe Kentish, Long & Kentish architects, Frances Guy, Curator, Sir Donald Sinden, actor, Marc Steene, Education and Outreach Officer, Stefan van Raay, Director, at the Excellence in Access Awards, held at the V&A, London.

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Forthcoming Exhibitions Poets in the Landscape: The Romantic Spirit in British Art 31 March−10 June 2007 'Poets in the Landscape' explores the creative links between poetry, the pastoral vision and British art in the work of Romantic artists of the 18th and 19th centuries, and the ‘Neo-Romantic’ artists of the mid-20th century. Taking as its starting point William Blake’s visionary period in Sussex, when he was working for the Chichester poet William Hayley, the exhibition features the poetically inspired art of Blake and his Romantic contemporaries and followers, including Edward Calvert, John Flaxman, Samuel Palmer, George Romney and Joseph Wright of Derby. It considers Blake and Palmer’s influence on the 'Neo-Romantic' artists and poets whose work embodied a search for a 'Paradise Lost', including Michael Ayrton, Cecil Collins, John Craxton, David Gasgoyne, Geoffrey Grigson, John Minton, Ceri Richards, Graham Sutherland, Dylan Thomas and Keith Vaughan.

John Minton, Landscape with a Harvester Resting, c.1945, Pen, ink, wash and chalk on paper, Promised as a future gift from a private collections (Dr John Birch Collection), © Royal College of ArtPeter Snowdon, Barbara Hepworth, St Ives, 1964, Photograph, © Peter Snowdon

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Eye-Music: Klee, Kandinsky and all that jazz 30 June−16 September 2007 Searching for a new visual language at the beginning of the 20th century, many artists were inspired by musical forms and ideas in their early experiments in abstract art: Paul Klee took the fugues of Bach as the model for his multi-layered paintings; Wassily Kandinsky’s friendship with the avant-garde composer Schönberg encouraged the development of his free, expressive style; and later in the century, jazz became a model for artistic improvisation in the work of Piet Mondrian, Alan Davie and others. This exhibition and the accompanying programme of events explores these relationships and other ideas, including the phenomenon of synaesthesia and the ability to 'hear' colours, the spectacle of sound and light performances, and early prototypes of abstract film.

Snowdon’s Private View: The Artist through the Lens 29 September 2007−13 January 2008 Snowdon’s photographs of the art world including pictures of Frank Auerbach, Peter Blake, Sir William Coldstream, Salvador Dalì, Lucian Freud, Richard Hamilton, Barbara Hepworth, L.S Lowry, Henry Moore, Grayson Perry, John Piper, Briget Riley, Graham Sutherland, Joe Tilson and others.


MODERN WORKS ON PAPER with

1–4 February 2007

Opening evening 31 January in aid of CLIC Sargent

The Royal Academy of Arts

6 Burlington Gardens London W1S 3EX

Ground Floor 20th Century and Contemporary prints, photographs, watercolours and drawings First Floor Watercolours and drawings from the 17th Century to the present All works for sale, fully vetted for authenticity 07000 785 613 info@worksonpaperfair.co.uk www.worksonpaperfair.co.uk By arrangement with the Royal Academy of Arts, Burlington Gardens


Pallant House Gallery Magazine 10