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YAMMAGAZINE.COM

STYLE ISSUE

A GULF ISLAND CLIFFHANGER COUTURE FASHION GOES WILD / LOFT LIVING ROAD TRIP, ANYONE? / FIND THE PERFECT CHAIR DYNAMIC DUOS OF STYLE / FINE ART OF FRIENDSHIP


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style issue

CONTENTS 70

40 CLIFFHANGER

Ambassadors of Style

With a palette of glass, pale concrete and white- and black-stained oak, this Quadra Island home blends with the sand, bleached driftwood and rock of the surrounding natural world.

These dynamic duos make Victoria a little more hip — and, by sharing their passions, allow us all to bring some flair into our own lives.

BY CAROLYN HEIMAN

BY ATHENA McKENZIE

54 The Great Cowichan Road Trip Enticed to the Cowichan Valley by the wine, farm bounty and artisan flavours, the YAM team spends a day in Vancouver Island’s Warm Land. BY CINDA CHAVICH

62 Take a Seat in Style YAM explores the chair, an often-overlooked lifestyle staple, with advice on how to find the perfect one for your personal style. BY MELISSA GIGNAC

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

78 The Friendship Factor Finding — and keeping — friends is a fine art. YAM sets out to discover how to nurture friendships in a city sometimes said to be cliquey. BY ALEX VAN TOL


IN EVERY ISSUE 8 EDITOR’S NOTE 11 YAM LOVE A Fashion Inferno recap, a Savour Cowichan ticket giveaway and the Vancouver Island Motor Gathering

15 TOP OF MIND Fall fashion finds, daringly designed furniture, luscious cosmetics and a Northern Quarter visit

34 IN PERSON Elate Clean Cosmetics creator Melodie Reynolds rejects stereotypical beauty marketing ideas By Danielle Pope

92 BOOKMARKS Fabulous fall reads By Carolyn Camilleri

Get Canada’s leading banks to compete for your mortgage. Jodie Kristian can help you get the best possible mortgage rate. It’s what she does best. Give her a call to find out how easy a professional mortgage broker can make your mortgage negotiations.

250-885-5738

94 LAST PAGE Sole searching By Athena McKenzie

90 FOOD + DRINK 22 GOOD EATS Happiness is an heirloom apple By Cinda Chavich

26 DIVINE DRINKS Why the Island is wild about whisky

26

By Adem Tepedelen

M

YA loves

jodie@modernmortgagegroup.ca www.jodiesmortgages.ca

HOME + GARDEN 32 LIVING SMART Lofty ambitions By Athena McKenzie

40 OUTSTANDING HOMES An architectural cliffhanger By Carolyn Heiman

FASHION 82 STYLE WATCH

DLC - Modern Mortgage Group 207-3531 Uptown Blvd. Victoria, BC V8Z 0B9

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

82

Between worlds By Janine Metcalfe

90 JOE DANDY Taking it to the streets By David Alexander


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W I S D O M + W E A LT H

EDITOR’S NOTE By Kerry Slavens

IT’S MY HAPPY COLOUR

I

bought the perfect little black dress last week. It was cut on the bias with just a hint of lace around the hemline. “But why do you need another black dress?” my husband asked me. “You must have 20 black dresses?” What can I possibly tell him to make him understand that one black dress is not like the other? That’s like saying all black cars are the same. And not all black dresses are even the same black. Some are smoky or charcoal, some are onyx or ebony. Perhaps a more relevant question is the one my mom used to ask me: “What is it about you and black clothes?” Even today I can still hear her chiding me, “You always look like you are going to a funeral.” I used to tell her what the poet Baudelaire said, “We’re all attending one funeral or another.” I think she worried that I was depressed or that I had a need similar to artist Georgia O’Keefe, who loved black because it allowed her to remain hidden. But I’ve never worn black because of inner sadness — NEIMAN MARCUS and I don’t want to be hidden away. I simply wear black because I feel authentic in it. It’s like this: Imagine if you gave a raven the garish plumage of an Amazonian parrot — the raven would just look wrong in so many ways. That’s exactly how I feel when someone tries to dress me in tropical colours or, God forbid, pastels. I remember one summer when I allowed myself to be colour-typed. The consultant told me I was a “spring” (which was wrong — I’m actually an “autumn”) and so I tried to wear pale blues, peaches and mint greens for a season. I felt like a superpower had been taken away from me. Here’s my oft-repeated mantra for why I love black so much: I love black because of its inky mystery, its subtlety, its rebellion contrasted with its chaste darkness, its timelessness. When I wear black, I feel energized, perhaps because this non-colour absorbs all light in the colour spectrum. It’s all there. And then there’s pure practicality. Black is easy. Christian Dior described it as the most convenient and elegant of all colours. “And I say colour on purpose,” he noted, “because black may be sometimes just as striking as a colour. You can wear black at any time. You can wear it at any age. You may wear it for almost any occasion.” Obviously, some people have trouble with that. A friend of mine once said, “Walking into your closet is like walking into a black hole.” It’s true. From black boots to black skirts and black T-shirts, it’s pretty dark in there. There’s also plenty of purple, because that’s my next favourite colour. No matter what colour or colours you love, it’s important that what you wear feels authentic to you. If it’s mustard yellow, don’t hold back. If it’s black, come sit by me. As the character of Wednesday Addams from The Addams Family famously said, “I’ll stop wearing black when they invent a darker colour. Vive la noire.

“Women who wear black live colourful lives.”

ANNETTE QUAN

VIOLA VAN DE RUYT

Viola Van de Ruyt FCSI, CIM, CPCA • INVESTMENT ADVISOR

250-657-2220 www.violavanderuyt.ca viola.vanderuyt@nbc.ca

Annette Quan FMA, FCSI • INVESTMENT ADVISOR

250-657-2222 annette.quan@nbc.ca

­­— Kerry Email me at kslavens@pageonepublishing.ca

National Bank Financial is an indirect wholly-owned subsidiary of National Bank of Canada. The National Bank of Canada is a public company listed on the Toronto Stock Exchange (NA: TSX).

8

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

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yam LIVING SMART

LIVING WELL

PUBLISHERS Lise Gyorkos, Georgina Camilleri EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kerry Slavens

DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY Jeffrey Bosdet

PRODUCTION MANAGER Jennifer Kühtz

EDITORIAL DESIGNER Janice Hildybrant

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Athena McKenzie

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Anneke Feuermann

PROOFREADER Vivian Sinclair CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Jo-Ann Loro CONTRIBUTING WRITERS David Alexander, Carolyn Camilleri, Cinda Chavich, Melissa Gignac, Carolyn Heiman, David Lennam, Danielle Pope, Adem Tepedelen, Alex Van Tol CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITOR Janine Metcalfe

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Jeffrey Bosdet, Simon DesRochers, Joshua Lawrence

CONTRIBUTING AGENCIES Living4Media p.10; Stocksy p.74; ThinkStock p.11, 25 ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Vicki Clark, Lory Couroux, Cynthia Hanischuk GENERAL INQUIRIES info@yammagazine.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR letters@yammagazine.com TO SUBSCRIBE TO YAM subscriptions@yammagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES sales@yammagazine.com ONLINE yammagazine.com FACEBOOK YAM magazine – Victoria TWITTER twitter.com/YAMmagazine INSTAGRAM @yam_magazine COVER This stunning Quadra Island home has been shortlisted for the Royal Institute of British Architects’ prestigious award.

Published by PAGE ONE PUBLISHING 580 Ardersier Road, Victoria, BC V8Z 1C7 T 250-595-7243 info@pageonepublishing.ca pageonepublishing.ca Printed in Canada by Transcontinental Printing. Ideas and opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of Page One Publishing Inc. or its affiliates; no official endorsement should be inferred. The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertisement and any and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertiser and not the publisher. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, in all or part, in any form — printed or electronic — without the express permission of the publisher. The publisher cannot be held responsible for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #41295544 ADVERTISE IN YAM MAGAZINE YAM magazine is Victoria’s leading home and lifestyle magazine. Established in 2009, YAM was created for people who want to live well, live smart and make the most of their lifestyle. For advertising info, please call us at 250-595-7243 or email sales@yammagazine.com.

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016


YAM LOVE

Fortify. Rejuvenate. Renew. Experience the power of berries.

SHOW CARS

> For more details, visit motorgathering.com.

VERONIQUE GAGNON

Who can resist a stylish ride? The Vancouver Island Motor Gathering showcases an exciting array of classic, unique, modern and custom cars and motorcycles. The fundraising event for the David Foster Foundation and the Cowichan District Hospital Foundation will be held on September 18 at its thrilling new venue, the Vancouver Island Motorsport Circuit, Canada’s first private motorsport resort.

WIN

2

GIVEAW AY ALER T!

TICKETS TO

OCTOBERFEST AT SAVOUR COWICHAN! Held on a floating barge in scenic Mill Bay, Octoberfest is the new marquee event at the Savour Cowichan Festival! Taste selections from craft breweries, as well as local cidery and spirit producers, plus nosh on gourmet pub fare. This fundraising event on October 1 supports families living with autism in the Cowichan Valley through the Canucks Autism Network. For contest details, visit yammagazine.com. Entry deadline is September 22, 2016.

RS PHOTOS: SIMON DESROCHE

THE PERFECT SUMMER EVENING A fashion party like no other, Fashion Inferno saw models — and firefighters — strutting the runway in the latest looks from some of our favourite local boutiques. “It was the perfect night, and I can’t imagine a better, more unique space to hold a fashion show,” says Zoë Breen, manager of Bernstein & Gold, about the back lot of Capital Iron, which was transformed for the evening. “There was such great energy. It felt like something really special for Victoria.” Presented by Capital Iron and YAM magazine, the fundraising event benefitted the Victoria Firefighters Charitable Foundation. Bernstein & Gold opened the show with this floral gown by Leisure.

Love all things local? Like us at facebook.com /YAMmagazine

> To see our photo gallery from Fashion Inferno, visit yammagazine.com.

Join the conversation at twitter.com /YAMmagazine

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

11


LOCAL LOCALEXPERTISE, EXPERTISE,GLOBAL GLOBALCONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS

8697 West Coast Road, Victoria

$8,250,000

$5,988,800

$4,400,000

$3,188,000

2560 Queenswood Dr., Victoria

4563 Stonehaven Ave., North Vancouver

1600 Glen Ln., Mill Bay

7107 Deerlepe Rd., Victoria

Spectacular oceanfront hideaway. Custom 6,638 sq. ft. home of unsurpassed quality on 1.79 idyllic acres. Every room is framed by stunning mountain and ocean vistas.

This exquisite 4,300 sq.ft., 5 bedroom/ 5 bathroom home is situated on a spectacular waterfront property ideal for kayaking, swimming, boating and even a seaplane.

5,300 sq. ft. waterfront home surrounded by 80 acres of west coast woodland. 35 minutes north of Victoria, this home overlooks the Saanich Inlet and has 1,200 ft. of waterfront.

32+ Acres of prized natural Canadian West Coast real estate. 2,500+ ft. of private oceanfront oriented S to SW. Bring your architect and come visit, just 45 min from downtown.

Glynis MacLeod PREC

Katherine Gray

Andrew Maxwell

Neal Carmichael

250.661.7232

250.516.4563

250.213.2104

250.857.2067

RECENTLY PURCHASED

$1,550,000

$1,490,000

$1,299,000

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1777 Hollywood Cres., Victoria

150 Trueworthy Rd., Saturna Island

1830 Thrush Rd., Shawnigan Lake

2128 Neil St, Victoria

Exquisite oceanfront home with views of the Olympic mountains. South facing, private guest Gazebo and lap pool. Within walking distance of downtown and all amenities.

True West Coast style home situated on 1.7 acres of ocean front on Saturna Island. Custom finishing, exquisite design, vaulted ceilings, reclaimed timber.

Waterfront Home with 142ft of lake frontage. This 4,200 sq. ft. home is nestled perfectly on 1.46 acres of land & includes a guest cottage, private dock & pebble beach.

“Building Recognition Award” for its stunning transformation. This A. Willie Designed home received both an addition & extensive renovation. Beautifully landscaped.

Melissa Kurtz

Nancy Stratton

Sophia Briggs

Victoria Cao

250.508.5325

250.857.5482

NEW LISTING

250.418.5569

250.891.8578 NEW LISTING

NEW LISTING

$979,000

$950,000

$825,000

$624,000

1228 Howard Dr., Tofino

3512 Aloha Ave, Victoria

108-100 Saghalie Rd., Victoria

8697 West Coast Rd., Victoria

Revenue property in Chesterman Estates; only a 3 minute walk to Chesterman Beach. Live in one half and enjoy the revenue from rental suites. By appointment please.

Sweeping ocean and mountain views await you from this 3,452 sq. ft. immaculate open living space. Enjoy year-round entertainment on an expansive partially covered deck.

A luxury condo development that sets new standards of elegance and sophistication. This spacious 2 bedrooms, 2 bathrooms & den home features superb finishing throughout.

A few feet from the ocean’s shore lays this special architecturally designed “Beach Box”. This cottage style home will bring you & yours memories for life.

John Fraser

Brad Maclaren PREC

Logan Wilson

Rebecca Barritt

Andy Stephenson Stephenson

VICTORIA VICTORIA 250.380.3933 250.380.3933

250.726.8456

Andrew Andrew Maxwell Maxwell

NEW NEW YORK YORK

BradBrad Maclaren Maclaren

250.727.5448

Constantin D’Arcy PopaHarris

SALT SALT SPRING SPRING 250.537.1778 250.537.1778

250.857.0609

D’Arcy Dean Dean Donald Donald Mark Mark HarrisBoorman BoormanSt. Germain St. Germain ImhoffImhoff

HONG HONG KONG KONG

VANCOUVER VANCOUVER 604.632.3300 604.632.3300

MOSCOW MOSCOW

Glynis Glynis MacLeod MacLeod

CALGARY CALGARY 403.254.5315 403.254.5315

John John Fraser Fraser

VENICE VENICE

250.514.9024

Katherine Katherine Gray Gray

TORONTO TORONTO 416.960.9995 416.960.9995

Sotheby’s Sotheby’s International International Realty Realty Canada, Canada, Independently Independently Owned Owned andand Operated. Operated. E.&O.E.: E.&O.E.: ThisThis information information is from is from sources sources which which we we deem deem reliable, reliable, butbut must must be verified be verified by prospective by prospective Purchasers Purchasers andand maymay be subject be subject to change to change or withdrawal. or withdrawal.


1.877.530.3933 1.877.530.3933sothebysrealty.ca sothebysrealty.ca

3530 Richmond Road, Victoria

NEW LISTING

$2,995,000

$2,189,900

$2,599,000

$2,276,000

1946 Crescent Rd., Victoria

1239 Lavinia Lane., Victoria, BC

2904 Mt. Baker View Rd., Saanich

657 Ardmore Drive, Saanich

Breathtaking sea to sky views define this West Coast gem. Natural light spills throughout the dazzling 5,200 sq. ft. highlighted by rich detailing and plush amenities.

This 4 bedroom, 3 bathroom custom built family beach front house is nestled into the mountain side. It features an open concept layout with a view of Mt. Baker.

Stunning Ten Mile Point waterfront executive home with 4,500 sq.ft. of wonderful living space. Situated on a private 30,000 sq.ft. lot with sweeping ocean views.

Spectacular gated waterfront home on a beautiful 1.24 acre property with southern exposure & many recent updates & high-end renovations, a private & immaculate oasis.

Andy Stephenson

Mark Imhoff PREC

Scott & Mike Garman

Lisa Williams

250.532.0888

250.883.1995

250.896.7099

250.514.1966

RECENTLY PURCHASED

$1,075,000

$1,050,000

$1,025,000

$980,000

1659 Strathcona Heights Rd., Mill Bay

800 Rainbow Cres., Victoria

1120 Timber View, Victoria

3530 Richmond Rd., Victoria

Custom built home on 9.68 acres with panoramic views of ocean, valley, mountains and lake. High-end features include a fabulous granite and maple kitchen & master bath/spa.

On southwest slope of Christmas Hill is this spacious 7 bedroom, 4 full bath, 3,900 sq .ft. home. A bright and open living plan, generous in finishing and function.

From the moment you enter the grand foyer, it is evident that no expense was spared in giving this 4,816 sq. ft. home a truly elegant, airy and modern feel. A must see.

Extensively renovated 2,500 sq. ft. home to the highest of standards, with an amazing terraced and lit backyard. Park-like setting with wonderful westerly city views.

Andrew Maxwell

Dean Boorman

Brad Maclaren PREC

Scott & Mike Garman

250.213.2104

NEW LISTING

250.882.0234

250.727.5448

250.896.7099

RECENTLY PURCHASED

NEW LISTING

$569,000

$538,000

$489,000

$299,900

111-845 Dunsmuir Rd., Victoria

1161 McGillvary Ave, Gabriola Island

2931 Carol Ann Pl., Colwood

103 - 439 Cook St., Victoria

Gorgeous waterfront living with scenic walks from the front door. An expansive 1,352 sq. ft. one bedroom with sumptuous finishing, this suite offers unparalleled value.

With an exquisitely unique form and views to the ocean this home will give you a tranquil & inviting space. Domespace is a true work of art for a unique individual

Great for a family or first time buyer. A well maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom. Suite potential or students. Close to parks, schools, shopping and transit.

Within five minute walk to Cook Street Village, this 1,100 sq. ft 2 bedrooms, 2 bathroom ground floor condo has been extensively renovated from top to bottom. 439cook.com

Andy Stephenson

D’Arcy Harris

Tammy Gray

Donald St. Germain PREC

Lisa Lisa Williams Williams

WHITE WHITE ROCK ROCK 604.385.1840 604.385.1840

250.532.0888

Logan Logan Wilson Wilson

LONDON LONDON

Mike Mike Garman Garman

Melissa Melissa KurtzKurtz

WHISTLER WHISTLER 604.932.3388 604.932.3388

250.686.2375

250.857.4729

Nancy Nancy Neal Neal Rebecca Stratton Stratton Carmichael CarmichaelBarritt

PARIS PARIS

SUN SUN PEAKS PEAKS 250.578.7773 250.578.7773

Sophia Rebecca BarrittBriggs

TOKYO TOKYO

Scott Sophia Garman Briggs

KELOWNA KELOWNA 250.469.9547 250.469.9547

250.744.7136

Tammy Scott Gray Garman

SYDNEY SYDNEY

Victoria Tammy Cao Gray

MONTREAL MONTREAL 514.933.4777 514.933.4777

Sotheby’s Sotheby’s International International Realty Realty Canada, Canada, Independently Independently Owned Owned andand Operated. Operated. E.&O.E.: E.&O.E.: ThisThis information information is from is from sources sources which which we we deem deem reliable, reliable, butbut must must be verified be verified by prospective by prospective Purchasers Purchasers andand maymay be subject be subject to change to change or withdrawal. or withdrawal.


HAVE YOU SEEN US LATELY?

d.g.bremner & co.


T O P O F M IN D

16

ON OUR RADAR

18

CITY CULTURE

22

GOOD EATS

26

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

DIVINE DRINKS

SOPHISTICATION + STRUCTURE The Trestle bar stool was inspired by the Kinsol Trestle near the Shawnigan Lake studio of 2point54. The majestic and historic train trestle is the largest, highest surviving timber trestle in the world. Echoing the trestle’s structure, the stool’s steel legs weave together, creating a strong dynamic that contrasts with the soft sweep of walnut veneer and poplar ply seat with its fog-coloured faux leather cushion. Trained at Parsons School of Design in New York, 2point54’s owners and designers, Christine Sheu and Kevin Helm, are guided by the natural beauty of their materials, creating furnishings that stand on their own as works of art. // 2point54.com

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

15


T OP O F M I ND

ON OUR RADAR

A collection of our favourite things

DESIGN + DARING

1

Bold lines and sharp angles create a modern yet functional feel that will make your home style-central. 1 The Lumen Center Italia Grus floor light combines a balancing framework with a classic lamp fixture (themodernshop.ca, $3,845) 2 Use the Spike Sphere sculpture to add a pop of interest to a table or shelf (Parc Modern, $89) 3 Metalwrapped and hand-hammered, the Brass Clad buffet is a strikingly modern storage solution (westelm.com, $1,299) 4 Taking inspiration from origami, these AKMD Origami Bowls can be used as jewelry dishes, key holders or simply as objets d’art (providehome.com, $350) 5 The A&A Residential chaise unites casual comfort with refined elegance and a dash of high fashion (Gabriel Ross, $4,451)

2 3 4

5 STYLE IN TYPE INSPIRATION FROM TIMELESS TRENDSETTERS

Grace: 30 Years of Fashion at Vogue showcases fashion stylist Grace Coddington’s legendary fashion shoots, and is chock-full of visual treats and stories to stimulate your artistic ideas. (Chapters, $200). Written by three generations of the iconic Eames family, EAMES Beautiful Details is a must-have book that celebrates the groundbreaking, iconic designs of Charles and Ray Eames. (eamesoffice.com, $70).

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

BEAUTYCOUNTER YOUR BEAUTY, YOUR HEALTH Beautycounter, the California cosmetic and skincare sensation, refuses to use any of the 1,400 ingredients banned or restricted in the EU. The result? Luscious serums and cosmetics that do no harm and really perform. The line was introduced to Vancouver Island by Tulipe Noire’s Kari McLay.

beautycounter.com


1

2

It’s Style Season Transition seamlessly from summer patio affairs to crisp fall outings.

3 4

1 The subtle shades of this Luisa Cerano overcoat put you stylishly into fall fashion (Bagheera Boutique, price upon request) 2 With its mixed teals, mochas and dreamy whites, the Lanai link necklace is the ideal officeto-evening statement piece (oliveandpiper.com, $56) ) 3 Shimmer in style in these 14K gold moonstone earrings. (leahalexandra.com, $170) 4 The Mini Cosima bag is your communication central with builtin Bluetooth speakers, in-bag light and phone charger (Mezzi, line available at Patryka Designs)

SHOP YOUR WAY. HERE. #LoveLifeBayCentre thebaycentre.ca

BREAKING THE RULES That textile designer’s eye for pattern and colour is evident in the works of Salt Spring artist Michela Sorrentino, who worked as a textile designer in France and Italy for many years before returning to Canada. Today, Sorrentino focuses on visual arts, breaking with convention by combining cold wax, oil, acrylic, graphite, ink, gouache and charcoal in her work

michelasorrentino.com ROUTE 7, 48" x 48," cold wax and oil on panel

BCBGMAXAZRIA • CLUB MONACO L’OCCITANE • MELANIE LYNE MIGRATION • LE CHATEAU

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

bayc_9327_Yam Ad.indd 1

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2016-03-08 9:18 AM


CITY CULTURE

By David Lennam

TRUE NORTH Northern Quarter reignites pub culture

With a locally sourced menu, live gigs featuring the likes of Old Man Luedecke and West My Friend, and a hip (but not selfconsciously so) vibe, Northern Quarter is a modern take on a public house.

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

A

s far as quizzes go, I figured I was on a bit of a roll. I got bovine (as in “what cows are”). I got the capital of Pakistan (Islamabad). And I got three countries in the Northern Hemisphere that begin with B (Burma, Bangladesh, Belarus). But then the math question. Always the math. Our table of five was to calculate the square root of 5,776, and not one of us could recall how to get there, although I’m sure that was beaten into me at school. And I’m sure it had something to do with this symbol: √ What, exactly, remains elusive. I was flummoxed and was out of the running for the evening’s $100 prize, which, along with pride and bragging rights, is up for grabs Wednesday nights at Benji’s Pub Quiz at Northern Quarter, the newish bar/restaurant/gathering spot across from the Victoria Public Market on Douglas.


< Learning from traditional pubs in Yorkshire, co-owner of Northern Quarter Benji Coey creates new quizzes for trivia night each week that are both devilish and hilarious.

Now in its ninth year, it’s the city’s most popular ongoing pub quiz despite shifting venues several times. When Benji Coey opened Northern Quarter a year ago in the Hudson District, with business partners Torin Egan and Carlos Marticorena, the quiz settled in for what continues to be a sold-out run. Coey wears his loathing of trivia like a medal. So his pub quiz is more real knowledge than minutiae, technicalities and trumperies. And he creates it fresh each week, giving himself seven hours every Wednesday to come up with devilish and hilarious questions.

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THE RIGHT ANSWER? WHO CARES? Growing up in Yorkshire, Coey got tutelage on proper quiz protocol with every pint. “Usually it was Jim the barman, at the top of his voice, shouting out questions,” he says. “There was no pomp and show. It was just what you did on an off night of the week. John would make up the questions and you’d get six free pints if you won. If you lost, who cares?” That’s the attitude he brings to quiz nights at Northern Quarter. The idea was to get people comfortable and communicating and not feeling right or wrong. And not looking at TV screens or at their phones. “It’s not an intelligence test. If you know it, you know it. If not, it doesn’t bloody matter. Oh, well done, you know the third queen of Belgium,” Coey jokes. “It doesn’t mean anything ...” Delphine Pugh runs her own pub quiz in Prince George, but didn’t want to miss out on Benji’s when she was down for a visit. For her, the appeal is more than the brain teasing; it’s the quizmaster himself, YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

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dashing around, doing his brand of stand-up, riffing sound effects with every right and wrong — like a TV game show. “His stage presence has advanced into the realm of full-blown artistic genius,” gushes Pugh. “To attend his quiz is a completely hypnotic experience because he brings such theatricality to it. He’s definitely nailed the performance aspect.” Must be that suave and quirky British charm. Coey giggles. Yeah, sure. But the man has pedigree. England’s pub and quiz culture is

integrated, and much of the population lives in pubs (c’mon, you must have watched Coronation Street). That’s what Coey and company wanted to establish with Northern Quarter. A place where you want to hang. Unpretentious but upscale. “We really wanted to make a place where people of all ages would feel comfortable and not out of place,” says Marticorena, suggesting that communal, everyone-in energy of Montreal, St. John’s, Newfoundland, or even Europe. Coey nods. “Making it feel like it’s a home when

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you come into it,” he says. “It’s a laid-back kind of vibe, combining that pub feel with a restaurant feel.” MAKING THE SCENE The three owners started to notice regulars and newbies coming in for the experience of being at Northern Quarter, ready to experience a mix of music, mixology and merriment. Yeah, there was a tap of something from all the brand-new breweries, chef Torin Egan’s take on hyperlocal don’tcall-it-pub-food cuisine and, at last count, 350 live shows. But there’s an intangible at play that every nightspot is chasing. Jeff Kalesnikoff puts it eloquently. The frontman for local rockers Acres of Lions and former cook at Northern Quarter saw a gap in the scene that needed to be plugged by an establishment where the musical taste and spectrum was balanced and reflected with an exciting, envelope-pushing menu that is nostalgic and familiar at the same time. “Sure,” he points out, “there are a number of venues and restaurants on the Island that have a similar idea, but I feel none have embraced the marriage between entertainment and dining like Northern Quarter has, which is why it is incredibly unique to our community.” Foodies know Chef Egan was the guy in the kitchen who made the Superior such a go-to spot. His farm-fresh fare at Northern Quarter plays to a fine-dining crowd but is sleeves-rolled-up pub perfect. Kalesnikoff recommends the chicken liver and bacon jam toasts, any of the house-made charcuterie, the NQ burger (“which should be in competition for best burger in town”), the crispy pig ears (“when they’re on the menu”) and “anything Torin infuses with alcohol, which I think right now are Negroni Popsicles and Hoyne Dark Matter Ice Cream.” COME FOR THE QUIZ, STAY FOR THE TUNES Marticorena studied engineering and learned carpentry and construction as a function of necessity. “It’s the Victoria way,” he says. “You’ve got to be resourceful.” He designed and built the centrepiece rolling wave of wooden cedar slats that defines the Northern Quarter, suspended from the ceiling, appearing as sculpture, acting as sound baffle, giving the 85-seat room a first-rate acoustic experience. “I was trying to mimic what it would look like looking up through the boughs of a tree,” explains Marticorena. “It’s a brilliant design,” Kalesnikoff says of the room, “as it lets the band still have that loud and sometimes aggressive energy, but keeps it warm and welcoming so that even when the foodies and serious diners outweigh the concertgoers, they can still have a


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URBAN FLAVOUR Asked to describe the menu at Northern Quarter, Torin Egan is the master of culinary understatement. “You won’t find your typical french fries here!” says Northern Quarter’s co-owner and chef whose menu offerings can only be described as flavour revelations. Think lamb corndogs, miso and maple doughnuts, or pig and fig flatbread (pictured above). Like its roster of musical guests, Northern Quarter’s feature menu is an ever-evolving ode to eclectic urbanism, with a B.C.-first focus, from kitchen to bar. The small-plate menu is nights-onthe-town nosh, balanced with large-plate choices for anyone with a hankering for pork ribs with a maple-mustard glaze or a tomato flatbread with roasted garlic, basil and fior di latte. And when you wake up on a Sunday morning craving more, Northern Quarter does brunch too, with creative offerings like smoked tuna omelettes with bacon, brie and pickled fennel, and fried chicken sandwiches with spicy mayo, arugula and fried egg. “You can go to many different places around town to get a burger, beer and live music,” Egan says. “Our focus is on a local and sustainable menu where the food and live music complement each other.”

comfortable conversation with the music still going in full.” Coey, who drums with Victoria’s Roy Orbison tribute band, The Lonely, doesn’t underestimate the advantage of good clean volume without muddiness. Tony Genge’s jazz piano sounds as crisp as Hank Pine and his band dressed as astronauts. Improv nights, comedy, disco, karaoke, the open mic, even flamenco … it all rolls around the walls just so. “Loudish things,” suggests Coey, “but not too loud for the room. You don’t have to shout at people. It sounds like you’re playing in your living room.” And that’s the nub. NQ is like home. Someone else’s really cool home. Or, as Marticorena puts it, a venue that showcases the best: culinary, music, visual art, community building. “And hey, that’s a moving target, not a fixed point … it’s a small community. You need to give them a reason to come back.” ::

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

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GOOD EATS

By Cinda Chavich

Northern Spy

Liberty

Summer Red

Eaten fresh or cooked into sweet pies or savoury dishes, heirloom apples possess unique flavours and fascinating heritage stories that make them the hidden gems of B.C.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fall bounty.

Gravenstein

Cortland

Mutsu

Transparent Early Gold

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Just some of the heirloom or unique varieties grown on Vancouver Island. All apples provided by The Rootcellar.

PHOTO BY JEFFREY BOSDET AND STYLING BY JANICE HILDYBRANT/YAM MAGAZINE

Spartan


HAPPINESS IS AN HEIRLOOM APPLE

I

’m standing in a secret garden, a pretty In fact, with China now producing nearly pocket orchard that’s home to one of the half the world’s apples, and big retailers widest selections of heritage apple trees having strict requirements, even the beloved in Canada. Mac (namesake of Apple’s original Macintosh It’s right in the heart of the city, and if computer) may soon be a rare breed. that’s not surprising enough, this orchard — Luckily, there are still some small growers with its 230 fruit trees, including more than 100 supplying unusual apples, and opportunities varieties of rare apples — is also a public park. to taste at local markets and apple festivals. The late Rex Welland, a well-known local Last fall, I headed to the UBC Botanical fruit grower and conservationist, left his Garden’s annual Apple Festival (this year’s bountiful backyard to the town of View Royal festival runs from Saturday, October 15 to and now the 2/3-acre Welland Legacy Park Sunday, October 16) to taste my way through Orchard is open to all. apples collected from orchards across “Rex Welland was collecting all of the the province, and I hauled home bags of specific varieties that were Gravensteins for perfect pies and Did you growing in the city — every single flavourful Cox’s Orange Pippin know? one is different,” says Julia Ford, and Grimes Golden from the the orchard coordinator who 50,000 pounds of apples on offer. presides over the work parties of “There are more than 70 volunteers that keep this public varieties here from B.C. growers,” orchard pruned, picked and said Katie Teed as we worked carefully preserved. our way through the giant Thanks to Welland’s generosity, apple-tasting to nibble on a wide anyone can now wander among variety of unique apples. Then we his carefully espaliered rows of stopped for a classic slice of apple unusual apples, lounge in the pie and a sip of warm apple cider shade of huge, 80-year-old King before heading into the market apple trees and reach up to pluck, area, where bags of rare apples, and taste, the kind of apples you’ll collected from small growers never find in a big supermarket. across B.C., are sold to discerning buyers. TASTING IS BELIEVING The annual Salt Spring Island If you’re lucky enough to have Apple Festival (held this year an old apple tree in your backyard or a on Sunday, October 2) is another venue for neighbour who shares her bounty, you’ll apple lovers to taste more than 350 varieties already understand why preserving heirloom of organic apples, all grown on the Island, apple varieties is important. including heritage varieties that date to the There’s nothing quite like the sweet and 1860s. tart flavour of a fresh McIntosh (Canada’s Salt Spring Island Apple Co. and Apple “national apple,” discovered in 1811); a sweet Luscious Organic Orchards, growing 333 and (circa 1845) Golden Russet, known as the more than 200 varieties of apples respectively, Champagne of cider apples; or a pie made also sell their heritage apples at farm markets with the legendary 17th-century Gravenstein. and small retail stores in Victoria. But thanks to our modern obsession with HARVESTING THE URBAN ORCHARD dense, sweet “dessert” apples — the kind that store indefinitely and stand up to global The setting for Welland’s orchard is transport — many of these older apple perfect for fruit trees, a sunny slope with varieties have lost favour with commercial a royal view out across Portage Inlet. But growers and are almost impossible to buy. it’s just one example of the bounty of

Lemon Pippin trees planted 160 years ago near Sooke are among the oldest apple trees in the province.

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

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apples growing across the region. Scratch the surface of almost any neighbourhood and you’ll find old apple trees in suburban backyards, remnants of a time when the rural areas around Victoria and Salt Spring Island backyards were the primary source of fresh apples in B.C. Lemon Pippin trees planted 160 years ago near Sooke are among the oldest apple trees in the province. The LifeCycles Project, the community organization that manages the Welland Legacy Park Orchard, has tapped into this local resource, gleaning fruit from 600 city trees that might otherwise go to waste. Anyone can register their backyard tree for picking or volunteer to help pick fruit, says Jenny McCartney, the Fruit Tree Project coordinator. Last year, 200 volunteers harvested 50,000 pounds of fruit, sharing the bounty among homeowners, pickers and local food banks. Some fruit even went into products like Spinnaker’s Backyard Blend hard cider and apple cider vinegar — with all profits supporting LifeCycles’ school garden, seed bank and other sustainable food programs. McCartney says the group picks apples from heirloom trees in several neighbourhoods, from the Gorge-Tillicum area to Oak Bay, Gordon Head and even the region around Hillside Mall, but there’s no map of the urban orchard or a comprehensive inventory of Victoria’s apple trees. “I’ve tried to estimate the number of old trees out there, but I don’t know where to begin,” she says. “Sometimes, when we’re harvesting, we look past the fence and realize that it must be part of an old orchard.” AN APPLE A DAY Picking your own fruit or buying direct from local growers opens up a new world of apples. With more than 200 varieties of apples still grown commercially in B.C., plus the many heirlooms from Island growers, it’s possible to enjoy a different apple every day. The Rootcellar carries 42 different varieties of apples, most from Okanagan orchards, but also heirlooms from backyard trees and organic local growers at Kildara Farms and Healing Farm. “Most are from the larger orchards, but a lot are considered unique varietals,” says co-owner Daisy Orser. “We buy farm direct, and usually in 400-pound bins, but for some, like Transparents or Early Gold, the supply is tiny and there’s only a threeor four-week window.” Among the “modern” varieties is Ambrosia, a popular new apple first


discovered in an orchard in southern B.C. It’s sweet and crisp for eating and retains its shape when cooked. The tart green Granny Smith makes a good foil for the sugary caramel in a classic tart tatin, and the Idared produces pretty pink applesauce, intensifying in flavour as it cooks. Don’t use Red Delicious apples for apple pie (they turn to mush), but both the Mac and Northern Spy make good pies. Cortland and Granny Smith resist browning so are perfect to serve alongside sharp cheddar for snacking, or to include in a creamy coleslaw with cabbage, mayo and dill. If you want to know more, stroll down to Welland Legacy Park, try an heirloom apple, and learn how to coax your own trees to bear fruit. “It’s a community resource, a place where people can learn about the wide diversity of fruit we can grow here,” says Ford, who also hosts pruning and grafting workshops in the orchard. “We want people to come to taste these delicious varieties, to walk through and pick a ripe heirloom apple for a snack,” she says. “There’s a huge benefit to having an understanding of what fruit can really taste like.” ::

APPLE CINNAMON STRATA

Recipe courtesy of Cinda Chavich This strata is like an upside-down bread pudding — the fruit, eggs, bread and milk make it a perfect dish to serve for Sunday brunch or as a home-style dessert, topped with a dollop of vanilla yogurt or ice cream. The recipe is from The Girl Can’t Cook by Cinda Chavich. • 4 tablespoons butter • 2 to 3 large baking apples, peeled, cored and sliced • 1/2 cup dark brown sugar, packed • 2 tablespoons maple syrup • 1 teaspoon cinnamon • 8 slices rich egg bread or brioche • 3 large eggs • 1 1/2 cups milk • 4 tablespoons sugar

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• 1 teaspoon vanilla • 1/4 cup chopped hazelnuts, toasted Grease a shallow, pretty 10-inch (25-cm) round tart dish or cake pan. Melt butter in a sauté pan over medium heat and cook the apples until almost tender. Add the brown sugar, maple syrup and cinnamon and continue to cook until the sugar dissolves and the apples are beginning to caramelize. Pour into the baking pan, overlapping apple slices artfully in a single layer. Arrange the bread slices over apples, overlapping them in concentric circles to cover the dish completely. Beat the eggs with milk, sugar and vanilla and drizzle over the bread to soak each piece. Cover the pan with plastic. Find a plate that just fits inside the dish and invert it over top. Place the strata in the refrigerator overnight, topped with a weight (a can of soup or beans will do). This will ensure that the strata is evenly compressed and that all of the bread is submerged in the milk mixture. The next morning, preheat the oven to 400°F (200°C). Remove the plastic from the baking pan. Bake the strata for 30 minutes, or until the bread layer is firm and golden. Let cool for 10 minutes. Place large serving platter over the baking pan and flip so that apple layer is on top. Lift the baking pan to reveal the apple layer. Sprinkle liberally with toasted hazelnuts. Cut into wedges to serve. Serves 6.

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DIVINE DRINKS

By Adem Tepedelen

As worldwide demand grows, whisky changes with the times.

WILD ABOUT

whisky

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

An ex-pat Scot and fermentation engineer, Graeme Macaloney, president and CEO of Victoria Caledonian Brewery & Distillery, holds a 30-litre cask of personally designed house whisky.

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YOUTH MOVEMENT As with wine, so much of the marketing around whisky, particularly in regards to Scotch, is tied to its age. Older Scotch — say, an 18-year versus a 12-year — is seen as a more premium product and frequently costs more. However, in many ways age is irrelevant, as it only indicates the youngest whisky used in creating it. All age-statement whiskies are a combination of many vintages from a distillery that are used to create a specific flavour profile. So as demand grows and the availability of older liquid shrinks, age statements are being swapped for names (such as Macallan 1824 series) based on other attributes, such as the colour or the type of barrels the whisky is aged or finished in (sherry, bourbon, rum, port or Madeira, for example). Shifting the emphasis away from age statements can only benefit burgeoning whisky-making regions in the Pacific Rim. West-coast craft distilling has exploded both in Canada and the U.S., and since we’re many centuries behind the more notable whisky producers of the world, a 12-year B.C. whisky is still a ways off. However, since a Canadian single malt whisky is only required to be aged in oak barrels for a minimum of three years, we are just now seeing small releases of local offerings, such as Shelter Point’s Artisanal Single Malt Whisky from Campbell River, which arrived in the spring. Closer to home, Victoria Spirits released a very small batch of its Craigdarroch Whisky in 2015 (which sold out immediately) and has plans to produce more in the future. As I write this, Victoria’s newest distillery

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nnovation and change aren’t words one typically associates with whisky. It’s a spirit that requires many years to develop character, and within the industry there are very rigid rules as to what can be called, for instance, Scotch single malt or Kentucky bourbon. There is, not surprisingly, an inherent degree of tradition and staidness to this wonderfully complex elixir. The topic of “whisky trends” may seem to be an oxymoron, but change is afoot — in B.C. and around the world. The driving force behind this change is quite simply the rising popularity of the spirit. Increased demand for fine whisky — from Canada, Scotland, the U.S., Japan and beyond — has actually put pressure on the industry to do things differently. And change isn’t always a bad thing, as long as the quality remains uncompromised.

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(and whisky maker) is set to open. Victoria Caledonian Brewery & Distillery, located in Saanich just off the Pat Bay Highway, will be dedicated to making fine Canadian single malt and has enlisted the services of “world-class staff and consultants” from the Scotch industry to be part of the team. Big plans are afoot (see sidebar on page 29) for its whisky program, while former Lighthouse production manager Dean McLeod will head up the brewery.

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

WHISKY TOWN Homegrown whisky seems like a natural extension of the fervent local interest in the spirit. Victoria’s annual Whisky Festival, held every January since 2006, is not only a hugely popular local event, but also brings industry giants from around the world to showcase their product and offer informative seminars and tastings. It’s widely regarded as one of the best in the world for whisky enthusiasts. And tickets are darn hard to come by because the festival is intentionally kept small — only about 1,000 attendees in 2016 — to provide an intimate experience. The Victoria Whisky Festival is, however, an event worth attending for both curious newcomers and seasoned enthusiasts alike. The entire spectrum of whisky — from Canadian rye to Kentucky bourbon and, of course, the finest Scotch — is represented, and you’ll likely get the opportunity to try some exceptional

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ALL HAIL

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drams and chat with the very people who made them. Tickets for the various events go on sale at the Strath liquor store (919 Douglas Street) on the first Saturday in November (November 5, this year), and the event will be held at the Hotel Grand Pacific (463 Belleville Street) from January 19 to 22, 2017. Festival organizers recommend you line up early, as the popular events sell out quickly. Check victoriawhiskyfestival.com for a listing of the sessions.

BUILD YOUR OWN SINGLE MALT The opportunity to pour a house whisky you’ve personally designed — that no one else in the world has access to — is a dream come true for whisky drinkers. Victoria Caledonian Brewery & Distillery can make that dream happen. You get to call the shots, choosing from a variety of five new-make spirits (including peated and non-peated) and 10 oak choices, for your very own 30-litre cask. The only requirements for this offer? Patience and a good chunk of change. Each 30-litre personalized cask costs $2,372 (deposit plus $622 when the whisky reaches maturity). All the more reason to order yours now.

CLASSES WITH GLASSES Your whisky appreciation and learning needn’t be relegated to a weekend in January, however. Victoria’s passion for all things whisky has spawned local groups that celebrate it in various ways. The Scotch Malt Whisky Society, a worldwide “club,” has a Victoria chapter run out of the Strath. It specializes in providing members exclusive access to unique single-cask bottlings. In addition to offering the opportunity for members to purchase these rare bottles, tastings are held the first Friday of every month. Contact the Strath or go to smws.ca for details. There are also two local chapters of the Companions of The Quaich (one on the Westshore and one in Sidney). This society is dedicated to “promoting and sharing knowledge and enjoyment of single malt whisky.” Both chapters offer dinner and whisky tastings as part of their monthly meetings. Visit thequaich.com for more information. Even Victoria’s Highland Games & Celtic Festival, an annual celebration of all things Scottish, now into its eighth decade, hosts sessions of “Whisky School” as part of its May-long-weekend celebrations. Eight classes will be offered from May 20 to 22, 2017. Tickets typically go on sale a month prior. Visit victoriahighlandgames.com for details. Tradition will, of course, always be a part of the making and enjoyment of whisky. But as interest in whisky expands, the introduction of new influences is inevitable. Whisky is having a moment now, and we’re certainly feeling it here in B.C. as we embrace both its foundation and its future. ::

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South Island

South Island

Sidney

The Shortest Distance to Far Away

O

ver the past few years, Sidney has become known as one of the most unique shopping districts on Vancouver Island. It is a true fashion haven, drawing shoppers from across the Pacific Northwest and beyond, each shopper looking for that special look, that unique design, or one-of-a-kind accessory. Men’s, women’s and children’s fashions — Sidney’s got it all. Stroll Sidney’s downtown core and be amazed at the quality and diversity of apparel available in this beautiful seaside town. Whether you are looking for something with flair or more traditional, Sidney’s fashion and shoe shops provide incredible choice. And while you are enjoying your Sidney outing, take a few minutes to have a drink and a bite to eat at one of Sidney’s bustling cafés and restaurants. Sidney enjoys a rich coffee culture — from the familiar chains to locally owned and operated shops. Each has its own particular vibe, great snacks and sandwiches, and friendly staff and patrons. Take time to soak up the ambiance — as well as that special coffee, tea or treat!

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Mentioning treats, why not enjoy lunch or dinner at one of Sidney’s fine restaurants either before or after your shopping excursion? Celebrating a wide variety of cuisines, Sidney offers great eating spots, several overlooking the beautiful Salish Sea. Shopping for gifts in Sidney is special, too. With so many possibilities, you’ll want to explore the downtown core in depth! From the finest in chocolates and sweets to stunning bouquets of flowers; locally made soaps and cosmetic products to stunning artwork and unique cards, Sidney really does have it all. And remember, Sidney is Canada’s only Booktown, proudly boasting more bookshops per capita than anywhere else in Canada!

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L I V ING SM A RT By Athena McKenzie

W

ith their soaring high ceilings and unique character elements — picture original factory windows or exposed brick — lofts are considered by many to be the pinnacle of stylish living for urban dwellers. This lifestyle’s arty esthetic embraces an eclectic mix of styles, periods and textures, with discerning use of colour, and its open spaces are made more cozy when divided using furniture, such as a modern sectional. Storage solutions include ingenious multi-functional pieces: think a wallmounted bike rack that doubles as a shelf or a dramatic aluminum cupboard, which is equally suitable for housing your dishware as your vinyl collection. Whether or not you live in a lofty space, these décor elements can elevate the style quotient of any home. ::

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Lofty Ambitions

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I N P ER SO N By Danielle Pope

LOVE JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

is all you need

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ELATE CLEAN COSMETICS CREATOR MELODIE REYNOLDS HAS REJECTED BEAUTY MARKETING THAT PLAYS ON FEAR AND INADEQUACY. HER MESSAGE: SHOW YOURSELF SOME LOVE.

O

bserving Melodie Reynolds at work is like watching a magician. You can closely watch everything she does, but you still don’t quite know how she does it. On a summer day in June, a model sits quietly as Reynolds’ brush flits from eye to eye, lip crease to cheekbone. A few sweeps, and the model’s face is glowing. Effervescent laughter fills the room. There’s talk of busy lives, eyeshadow, favourite wines and self-image. Sometimes, there are tears — but the mascara holds up well. Reynolds is the founder and chief adventurer of Elate Clean Cosmetics. She’s also the woman on a mission to build a better business model for beauty — one that focuses on self-confidence and well-being, through a core principle of her own: kindness. “I struggled with self-esteem my whole life, so my journey into wellness was really about coming to terms with how to love myself,” she says. “Today, when I look in the mirror, I love who I am. I can’t tell you you’re worth it; you have to know you are, but I can give you a few tools to take good care of yourself.” WHEN EVERYTHING CHANGES A month before she was set to launch Elate, Reynolds went into the hospital for a stomach ache that wouldn’t go away. As a lifelong healthy person, she had been in hospital only twice before: “once to have my wisdom teeth removed, and once to have my baby.” So when the doctor told her oncologists believed she had Hodgkin lymphoma, a type of cancer, she was in disbelief. “I was about to launch this company focused on feeling good about who you are, but I might not have any hair and be going through cancer treatment,” she says. “I sat down with my business partner, who is also my husband, and he said, ‘If you want to just stop now, I’m fine with that.’ And I was, too. I was okay letting go of my dream if I had

to, which made me realize I was doing it for the right reasons. I was also prepared to go ahead.” But after two months of tests and hospital stays, Reynolds was granted a surprise: a clean bill of health. The scare had been a false alarm, and the results, negative. Although she would need routine check-ups, life could go back to “normal.” “I was so relieved, but also angry — it felt like I’d wasted two months,” she says. “Yet I also believe the universe points you in the right direction. I’d been so busy making sure [Elate’s] launch was perfect, and it was as though someone pressed a giant pause button and said, ‘Are you sure you want this to be your life?’ I realized I needed to focus on what I wanted my life to look like, not just what my business would look like, if I was going to go through with it.” In November 2014, Elate launched as a clean, vegan and cruelty-free cosmetics line — one Reynolds ensured would perform against the competition, be affordable and use Canadian materials. More than that, she was creating a company that would give people the opportunity to focus on self-care. As Elate’s mantra states: “Putting on mascara isn’t going to change the world, but it may change your perception of yourself, just a little, so you can.” GETTING TO HERE Before Elate was even on the horizon for Reynolds, she was a director for a large cosmetics company, but life wasn’t beautiful — she was suffering from severe self-confidence issues and struggling in her personal life. “I woke up one morning and decided I wanted to be different,” she recalls. “I wanted to live a more fulfilling life and have a deep connection with my self-care and self-esteem, because I came from a place of having none. So I packed up my things and moved across the country.” YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

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Soon after arriving in Victoria from London, Ontario, her environment, friendships and relationships became healthier. Some days, she says, she even liked herself. She also became serious about “cleaning up” what went into her body. Yet her professional role required her to sell products she no longer believed in. When she asked why certain ingredients were used, she was told, “This is how we do things.” Reynolds decided to leave the company she worked for, unaware that doing so would plant a seed for her future. With newfound freedom, she moved with her partner to the U.K. and started taking classes — how to cook, sew and make clothing. One class taught her how to create skincare products out of natural ingredients. She was hooked. As she overhauled her moisturizers and cleansers, she finally turned to her makeup kit. It was time to create a healthier option. “Marketing in the beauty industry has been pushing fear and inadequacy,” says Reynolds. “I wanted to create a company that tells women ‘you are great just as you are’ and that self-confidence is the best form of self-expression you can wear. I wanted to give people a choice, because choice equals freedom.” Today, Elate ships over 60 parcels a week to clients, with three to four wholesale orders a month. The products, like Elate’s sheer


“I WANTED TO CREATE A COMPANY THAT TELLS WOMEN ‘YOU ARE GREAT JUST AS YOU ARE’ AND THAT SELF-CONFIDENCE IS THE BEST FORM OF SELFEXPRESSION YOU CAN WEAR.”

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

lipsticks, pressed powders, eye-colour palettes, universal crèmes and legendary mascara, can be found in boutiques, salons and toxin-free beauty boxes throughout Canada and the U.S. Elate is the title sponsor of the Women’s Health and Fitness Summit presented by Bellyfit in Victoria this September, and is sponsoring the first Perth Eco Fashion Week in Australia in November. Reynolds’ goal isn’t to convince people to stop using certain products — it’s to provide a great cosmetics option that happens to be clean. Alongside the business, she devotes a lot of her energy to cancer patients, offering free makeovers and consultations to people who’ve been through treatment, and teaching women about the importance of kind self-care and “ritual” through skin-care workshops. She hopes one day Elate will be a global beauty brand, in the hearts and cosmetic bags of women everywhere. “Routine becomes ritual when the act is more important than the result,” says Reynolds. “How you show yourself love is essential, because that fuels self-confidence. Too often, anti-self-care becomes our routine. We get used to getting through the day, because we’re focused on others’ needs. It takes confidence to realize you are important.” As the mother of a three-year-old daughter and a two-year-old business, Reynolds is intimately familiar with the challenge of carving out time for self-care. Her nourishment comes from being in nature, playing with her daughter, cooking and the occasional glass of wine. “Starting my business wasn’t a get-richquick scheme. It was a way for me to make a small difference in the lives of others,” says Reynolds. “The thing about kindness is that it means more than sending a nice email or sharing kind words. If you can infuse everything you do with kindness, then you embody kindness in the world — and everyone gets a little peace from that.” ::

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Balance IN THE HEART OF OLD TOWN

BAL ANCE IN THE HEART OF OLD TOWN


OUTSTANDING HOMES By Carolyn Heiman Photography by James Dow / Patkau Architects

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CLIFF


HANGER HIGH ABOVE THE STRAIT OF GEORGIA ON QUADRA ISLAND IS A HOME OF SUCH BREATHTAKING BEAUTY AND SIGNIFICANT VISION THAT IT’S DRAWING WORLDWIDE ATTENTION AND THE KIND OF ARCHITECTURAL ACCLAIM USUALLY RESERVED FOR ART GALLERIES, LIBRARIES AND OTHER BUILDINGS OF PUBLIC SIGNIFICANCE. BUT FIRST, IT’S A HOME.

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C

antilevered 44 feet above a rock bluff on Quadra Island, and with a clear view of the Strait of Georgia, is a home of breathtaking beauty, already identified among a handful of buildings around the world that are “the most significant and inspirational of the year, demonstrating visionary, innovative thinking and excellence of execution.” Tula House, designed by Vancouver’s Patkau Architects, is shortlisted for the prestigious Royal Institute of British Architects’ International Prize. The competition is open to architects around the globe for projects that, in addition to the criteria above, also make a “generous contribution to society and its physical context — be it the public realm, the natural environment or both.” Significantly, the one-storey home, which nestles into the cliffside framed by a forest of red alder, bigleaf maples and towering firs, punches above its weight. It is one of the few residential properties making the short list dominated by public institutions like libraries and art galleries. “Just making it onto the list is a big honour,” says David Shone, a Patkau partner. The 4,500-square-foot Tula House is named after the charitable foundation that owners Eric Peterson and Christina Munck started after Peterson sold Mitra Imaging, the company he co-founded, to Belgium-based Agfa-Gevaert NV, reportedly for around $300 million. The foundation puts its assets to work in rural and indigenous regions of Guatemala and in two First Nations communities in B.C., plus the Hakai Institute, a science research centre that operates on Quadra and Calvert islands, UVic’s Environmental Law Centre Clinic and the Nature Conservancy of Canada. On Patkau Architects’ website, a sketch of a nautilus shell overlays

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From a rocky bluff, the low, one-storey structure appears to watch like an eye over the Strait of Georgia. With the exception of the nine-foot-high ceiling in the living room, the rest of the home’s ceilings reach 7.6 feet, further contributing to the sense that this home recedes into the landscape from its projection over the bluff.

Previous page: A palette of glass, white concrete and white- and black-stained oak blends with the sand, bleached driftwood and rock in the natural world. The custom coffee table was designed by Patkau Architects, while the low-profile sofa was sourced from Inform & Ital. In several places — including the triangle in the living room floor (see cover) and in the shower in the master ensuite — triplelaminated glass panels in the floor provide a view of the beach below.


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Glazed windows wrapping the perimeter of the courtyard offer the big reveal of the interior where natural light slips through narrow skylights, crisscrossing the roof like tossed pieces of driftwood.

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the drawings of the home, so it is easy to identify the mathematical sensibility of the shell’s shape with Tula House’s general form. You enter the home between two angled rock walls that draw visitors into a serene inner courtyard with a natural groundwater reflecting pool. Beyond the front door is a sweeping inner chamber that leads the visitor to the public spaces with panoramic vistas. Asked whether there are architects or projects that inspired Tula House, Shone simply says: “We’re not attempting to emulate anyone.” In going their own way, they have created a home attracting global attention. Floorto-ceiling windows sweep open to the sea or offer peek-a-boo glimpses into the home from the inner courtyard. In the bedrooms, low windows start at the floor line, stretch the full length of the walls and open like camera apertures to the landscape below. A concealed motorized blind system by Solarfective shields the home from the sun and provides privacy, something rarely necessary because of the home’s remote location. Peterson says he and his wife chose Patkau because “It felt to us more that we were commissioning a work of art rather than a dwelling. In fact, it has turned out to be wonderfully successful in both regards.” He notes that he and Christina “fought the impulse to be involved in the design. “Our approach was to find an architect who had the vision and confidence to create an ambitious structure that was inspired by the landscape and in harmony with it,” he says. “We knew that we shared sensibilities with the architects, including respect for the California modern ‘cliffhanger’ tradition that can be seen in Arthur Erickson’s early houses like the Graham House and modern Japanese architecture. Beyond that, we didn’t second-guess what the architects had in mind. We like the fact that the house has a few big ideas, executed with consistency and confidence throughout. “People speculate that the house, with all that concrete and glass, would be sterile and rather cold, but in fact it is very warm and quite intimate in its way. It is a wonderful place to work. Our work is so much concerned with the coastal oceans of B.C., so the house’s setting puts us right in the context of our work.”


JODY BECK

design | interiors

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250.360.2144

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

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Tula House is “very connected to its site,” says Shone, adding: “I don’t think it would ever be built in another location.” The form of the house is a series of stacked angular and irregular geometric shapes. Patkau’s brochure on the home describes the shoreline below the house as “littered with the flotsam and jetsam of the ocean where logs and rocks have been tossed around by the tides and storms like a child’s game of ‘pickup sticks.’” Six years in the making, the result was even more exceptional than first envisioned. A decision to work closely with “some remarkable” local craftsmen and trades on the island, guiding them to adapt to techniques “not characteristic in the Quadra Island construction palette,” was a factor in the time the project took to complete. In some instances, it was the first time local trades had used the architect-chosen materials like steel and exposed white concrete. To ensure the exposed white concrete was completed to the highest standards, the technique was first perfected in unseen areas before working in areas where the material would be seen at its optimal luminescence. Peterson says the house is a celebration of “design, engineering and craftsmanship.” His father, Ben Peterson, now retired, was a Victoria architect; his brother, Chris Peterson, served as the structural engineer on the house; and contractor John Toelle and most of the crew count as personal friends and neighbours. “We have a personal investment in all three disciplines … Without that tradition of craftsmanship, creativity, ingenuity and patience, the project would never have come together.” ::

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The powder room, like the three ensuite bathrooms, has a Patkau-designed pedestal sink fabricated in stainless steel by Quest Metal Works in Vancouver. The autonomous floating form is another “flotsam and jetsam” element, and the reflective stainless steel becomes animated by the surrounding materials.

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A floating island blanketed in white Corian faces a luscious tropical vertical green wall installed and designed by Vancouver’s Green Over Grey Living Walls and Design, which has installations around the world. The cabinets are a combination of stainless steel (uppers) and white oak (lower), riffing off nature’s palette. No expense was spared on the appliances which include a Fisher & Paykel gas cooktop, Sub-Zero integrated refrigerator freezer and GE Monogram built-in ovens.

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The approach to the house includes a mix of gravel, trees and low stone walls that guide the visitor to the entry courtyard. There, a small pool, created from groundwater naturally passing through the site and momentarily at the surface, instills calm before arrival. Swisspearl fibre cement cladding in charcoal brown permits the home to meld into the nearby coniferous forest. In places like the interior courtyard, the panelling has been arranged into a tilted, shingled pattern to create ever-changing shadows on the facade.

File Name: YAM-3rd-2.39x9.58-VW-2016.indd Trim: 2.39” (w) x 9.58” (h) (Exported in horizontal layout to be flipped to vertical position in magazine) Bleed: 0.125” x 0.125” Live: N/A Colours: 4C Studio: NF Notes: No crop marks for YAM Magazine exports.

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create your dream furniture The home’s position on the site takes into consideration the views of the open water, a nearby island and distant mountains. To the south there is a small tidal basin, while basalt mounds and a Douglas fir forest interspersed with deciduous trees back the rear of the property. The home is pushed into the side of the cliff and its mossy green roof seamlessly integrates into the natural surroundings so well that sometimes foraging deer wander on top. Its natural look belies its mechanical supports, including a water-to-air heat pump, infloor radiant heating and heat ventilation recovery controlled by an automated building- management system.

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Enticed to the Cowichan Valley by the wine, farm bounty and artisan flavours, the team from YAM magazine spends a day in Vancouver Island’s Warm Land. BY CINDA CHAVICH < The restaurant at Unsworth Vineyards, housed in a restored early 1900s farmhouse, sits near the winery’s 12-acre vineyard.

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ocal food lovers know that the Cowichan Valley is the source of many of the Island’s favourite flavours. From live spot prawns fresh from the fishing boats in Cowichan Bay to artisan bakers, cheese and charcuterie makers, organic farms and boutique wineries, this is the place to find fresh, local food products of all kinds. Just a short 30-minute drive from the city, it’s the perfect place to fill your pantry or your picnic basket. So we gathered up some of the YAM team into one of L.A. Limousines’ Mercedes vans and hit the road, with coolers tucked in the back, to explore this delicious destination.

The seven-acre vineyard at Blue Grouse Estate Winery provides a scenic backdrop for the YAM team photo. JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

HOW GREEN IS OUR VALLEY The panoramic view over the Saanich Inlet from the top of the Malahat signals we’ve begun our descent into the Cowichan Valley, a place the Salish First Nations called “The Warm Land.” Others have dubbed the valley “Canada’s Provence,” for, like the south of France, it’s hot, dry and sunny — warmer on average than any other place in Canada — and the perfect terroir for growing apples and asparagus, wine grapes and even tea plants. It’s easy to miss the Cowichan’s hidden network of small farms from the busy TransCanada, but if you turn off onto the winding back roads on either side of the highway you’ll enter the Island’s market garden, a rural region that’s been home to farm families for more than a century. The pace slows almost instantly along these country lanes that pass rolling pastures dotted with farm-gate food stands and forested trails where wild mushrooms grow. It’s the perfect place to poke around without a plan. You can also organize your trip around the weekly Duncan Farmer’s Market, held every Saturday morning in the city centre, and discover all of this local bounty in one place, whether it’s organic vegetables and chicken from Kilrenny Farm, unpasteurized goat-milk feta and aged Tomme de Vallée from The Happy Goat cheesemakers or the toothsome wholegrain pasta cranked out at Cowichan Pasta Company.

SEAN FENZ

THE ARTISANS Our driver turns off the main highway at Cobble Hill Road, and we pile out of the van to explore Cowichan Pasta’s small production kitchen behind Cure Artisan Meat and Cheese. Pasta maker and business owner Matt Horn is hard at work. “We’re starting with stone-ground ancient grains like emmer and kamut,” says Horn, offering us a taste of his smoked-oyster-and-nettle-stuffed ravioli, made with nutty organic flour ground from the True Grain Bread in nearby Cowichan Bay. Horn’s other addictive ravioli combinations include Dungeness crab and squash, venison and chanterelle, and goat cheese with fresh peas and hazelnuts. This chef-turned-pasta-guru creates seasonal combinations that reflect the local ingredients at hand. His sleek Italian pasta machine, with its special bronze dies, pushes out the kind of rough-textured artisan pasta that perfectly captures any sauce with ease. “It’s just a big Play-Doh machine with a cutter that spins,” says Horn as we inspect the bins of dried spaghetti, lumache and rigatoni for sale in the retail space he shares with the Cure’s charcuterie chef, Brad Boisvert.

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Brad Boisvert of Cure Artisan Meat and Cheese offering samples of his house-smoked cheddar, kielbasa and landjaeger.

Boisvert is the mad scientist of curing, fermenting and preserving all kinds of meats and local produce. There’s plenty to add to your picnic cooler in his deli, from his dry-cured landjaeger sausage to duck confit, to unique sauces and condiments. I’m tempted by the beautiful Grey Owl and bloomy Paillot de Chevre cheeses from Quebec, braised beef meat pies and bottles of Ocean Wise clamato juice for cocktails. Boisvert also offers takeout charcuterie and cheeseboards, sandwiches and hot specials, so you might find Horn’s emmer fettuccini smothered in Cure’s meaty bolognese on the menu for lunch. With its supermarket, used bookstore and clinics, Valleyview Centre is the gathering spot in rural Cobble Hill. We visit family-owned Drumroaster Coffee for a freshly roasted brew and some serious pastry (I’m partial to their tender brioche roll dusted with cinnamon and sugar) before heading back on the road. From this juncture, you can take the main highway into Duncan or add to your picnic provisions by winding along the scenic route through Cowichan Bay, with a stop at True Grain Bread for an artisan loaf, croissant or fat pretzel made with the organic B.C.-grown grains milled on site. Then carry on to historic Providence Farm, a therapeutic farm for adults with 56

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016


mental health and developmental challenges, where there’s organic produce at the farm store and a seasonal menu at The Farm Table café, created by students from Vancouver Island University’s culinary program.

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

With our picnic basket filled with good food, we turn our search to drink. The Cowichan is becoming famous for its artisan beverage makers, and beyond the many wineries there are craft cider and beer makers and small distillers to discover. Today, we head to one of the newest kids on the block, Duncan’s Red Arrow Brewing Company. Open just a year, the micro-brewery is set in a cool little brick building next to the main road into town, originally home to Red Arrow Custom Cycles motorcycle shop. Chris Gress, former brewmaster at Duncan’s Craig Street Brewpub, is behind the award-winning beer at Red Arrow. Some of his very first brews — both the ruddy Midnight Umber Ale and Piggy Pale Ale, named for the local rugby club — won bronze medals at the recent Canadian Brewing Awards. With a funky shop filled with beer T-shirts and other swag, and every brew on tap, it makes a great stop for a refreshment and a little retail therapy.

Tasting flight at Red Arrow Brewing Company

Another craft beverage I always recommend is the organic Ampersand Gin made by father-and-son team Stephen and Jeremy Schacht (both engineers) in their little farm-based distillery near Duncan. Merridale Ciderworks has turned its hand to spirits too, and it’s worth heading out to its orchard bistro and cider bar to try the fruit brandies and new Cowichan Gin, flavoured with wild botanicals from the valley. Thankfully, we have a driver and van to squire us between sips and stops, but many of these local liquors are also available to try and buy at Duncan’s Saturday-morning market.

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EAT, THEN DRINK


Stepping into the ultra-modern concrete and glass tasting room at Blue Grouse Estate Winery, it’s hard to imagine some of the first Island vines took root here nearly 40 years ago. Blue Grouse is one of the Island’s original wineries, and winemaker Bailey Williamson says the carefully selected vineyard is still one of the best in the valley. “In 1977, they chose these south-facing slopes to plant the first experimental vineyards, because it was a perfect spot to grow grapes,” says Williamson, surveying a row of gnarly old Ortega and Bacchus vines, Island varietals that Hans Kiltz, the winery’s original owner, pioneered and popularized. The new owner is Paul Brunner, former CEO of an international drilling company, who splits his time between Peru and Canada. He bought the property in 2012 and has reimagined it, opening this impressive new building last year, with its long tasting bar, cozy fireplace and expansive mezzanine overlooking lush vineyards. We’re feted with a glass of Blue Grouse bubbly while inspecting the French racks, where the méthode champenoise sparkler is hand-riddled, and the big barrel room filled with dozens of imported oak casks. There’s a new stylish label, too. We gather at a long table to sip the 2015 Estate Pinot Gris with

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Blue Grouse Estate Winery

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

WINE AND DINE

bites of local Cure chorizo, pretty pink Rosé with duck liver paté, and buttery Bleu Claire from Little Qualicum Cheeseworks alongside the award-winning 2014 Quill Red. Though there’s no restaurant on site, Williamson says this kind of cheese and charcuterie from Boisvert’s Cure kitchen will be available for visitors to purchase for impromptu picnics on the winery’s patio. Renovations to the original residence are underway to add two elegant B&B suites for longer stays.

THE GRAND FINALE That might seem like more than enough noshing, but there’s one more stop on our decadent day trip, and it’s a culinary capper. Our driver heads down Shawnigan Lake Road toward Unsworth Vineyards, a short five kilometres from the main highway, but a world away. This is where fine winemaking and fine dining meet — the exceptional cuisine of Belgian-trained chef Steve Elskens perfectly complements the new winemaking at this


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historic property owned by the Turyk family, with son Christopher managing the vineyards. Winemaker Daniel Cosman and his wife, Sarah, the general manager, and chef Elskens’ wife, Christle Pope, oversee the restaurant. Unsworth is another case of new investment in the Island wine industry. Tim Turyk bought the property in 2009 after retiring as president of Delta’s Bella Coola Fisheries processing plant. He built a new winery and tasting room, planted new vineyards and named it for his mother, who summered as a child at nearby Shawnigan Lake. Sitting at our own long table in the comfortable dining room of the restored historic farmhouse, we’re treated to a wine-matched menu, my seared albacore with beet tartare arriving with the citrusy 2015 Unsworth Pinot Gris, a grape that perfectly reflects our unique Island terroir. Next, it’s a rustic bowl of braised Moroccan-style chicken with fat pearls of couscous to complement the 2014 Unsworth Rosé. The Unsworth Ovation, a rich, fortified dessert wine, is nicely reflected in the fig-and-cherry compote that’s spooned over my slice of lemony goat cheesecake for dessert. Outside, beyond a flower-filled pergola, there’s a modern winery, sunny wine shop and 12 acres of vineyards, where colourful heirloom chickens wander among the vines to naturally reduce pests while providing farm-fresh eggs for the kitchen. We belly up to the tasting bar for sips of the just-released Allegro, a blend of Island-grown Sauvignette and Petit Milo, then try the Tim Buck Two Riesling (made with Okanagan fruit) and learn more about the estate’s Marechal Foch grapes that go into the award-winning Ovation.


JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

Left: The tasting room at Unsworth Vineyards. Above: Unsworth’s chef Steve Elskens won the heart of our food writer for his Seared Albacore Tuna with Beet Tartare.

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

But it’s getting late. Sated and spinning with new ideas and fresh obsessions, we pack up our coolers and head back to the city. It’s been an eye- and palate-opening experience — but you can’t visit every hidden gem along these bucolic back roads in a single day. We’ll be back! ::

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TAKE A SEAT in style

MANY OF THE GREAT LEAPS FORWARD IN DESIGN HAVE FOUND THEIR EXPRESSION IN THE REIMAGINING OF THE CHAIR. YAM EXPLORES THIS OFTEN OVERLOOKED LIFESTYLE STAPLE AND HOW TO FIND THAT PERFECT CHAIR FOR YOUR HOME AND PERSONAL STYLE. by Melissa Gignac

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merican composer Morton Feldman once professed to The New Yorker, “For years I said if I could only find a comfortable chair I would rival Mozart.” While I don’t have Feldman’s chutzpah, I am confident that with a little legwork — or should I say derrière work — we can all be sitting a little prettier and, more importantly, a lot more comfortably.  It’s hard to imagine homes without chairs, but these seating solutions — generally known today as four-legged furnishings with seats and backs — did not become de rigueur until the 15th century. Examples of Egyptian seating taking this form date back to 2680 BC — perhaps the best known is the ornate throne of Pharoah Tutankhamun — but for the first few chapters of western history, chairs were reserved for royalty and high-ranking church officials. It was centuries before commoners were elevated beyond stools or backless benches.  With the democratization of seating came an expansion in design, and forms emerged that would have a lasting impact on the way we sit. The wingback chair is an example C of form following function — the wings projecting from the back were designed to M retain heat from the fireplace and shield the Y sitter from drafts. Introduced in the 1600s CM in England, the first models were crafted completely of wood; by the 19th century MY horsehair padding and upholstery had been CY incorporated, often with ornate textile embellishments. CMY Three hundred years ago, K the French contributed the bergère, which retains the general shape of wingback, but with a deeper, wider seat and flatter back. Some have side panels; Papa Bear chair others don’t. If the classic English wingback is the dignified granddaddy of chairs, Hans Wegner’s iconic Papa Bear chair, designed in 1951, is the cool grandson. It mimics the wingback form to the side, where the arm separates and is lifted from the seat. Glossy wood handrests emerge like paws from the end of the arm.   The ubiquitous club chair emerged late in the 19th century from gentlemen’s clubs — the original man caves. These plush, low-back chairs, traditionally upholstered in leather, feature armrests that are Wassily chair

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usually the same height as the back, forming small caves in themselves. In 1925, Marcel Breuer took inspiration from his bicycle, reducing the classic club chair to its prime elements with the unapologetically industrial Wassily chair. Created for its namesake Wassily Kandinsky’s residence, the chair introduced steel tubing into homefurnishing design and took a huge leap from the full-leather hug of the club chair. The Wassily’s style even endured as comfortable through the cool minimalism of the ’80s, when it was featured in a living room scene from the Mickey Rourke film 9 1/2 Weeks. Today, it’s a design-aficionado favourite. Whatever your chair profile preference, there’s likely a version that will appeal to your style and coexist in harmony with your current furnishings. The key is to determine your style and functional needs.

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furniture tends to “grow”; what looks reasonable in a store might look gargantuan once settled in your home. By all means, if you have the room, go for a cushy armchair with plenty of room to snuggle in and tuck up those feet. In a small condo, though, Adelman suggests sticking to chairs no more than 30 inches wide, armless or with open arms. Surroundings’ Kristiane Baskerville notes that in small spaces, it’s nice to see a lot of leg. An airy frame creates a sense of openness, rather than closing off a space the way a solid club chair might. For open plans, when chairs may have to perform double duty, swivel chairs are an excellent option. It’s not just the scale of the room that requires consideration, but also the scale of the sitter. “Every chair ARE YOU SITTING COMFORTABLY? is comfortable for Believe it or not, your quest for the someone,” notes perfect chair James, “but not shouldn’t start everyone.” with the question, Testing out chairs “Does it match the at Luxe Home couch?” Interiors, I become Think a little keenly aware of this more broadly. observation. In a What is the chair’s deep armchair with function? Are you a firm cushion core, looking to tuck my legs project out into a comfortable like Lily Tomlin’s reading chair precocious Saturday with a book, or do Night Live character, you need a pair Edith Ann. In a chair of accent chairs of equal height and for extra social depth, but boasting a seating? Do you cushy drift of down, like the sleek lines I sink in a little. With of teak or prefer my core positioned the traditional a little lower, my elegance of a legs take on the In small spaces, an airy frame will create a sense turned leg and of openness visually, rather than closing off a relative proportions space the way a solid club chair might. English arm? of an average human “A chair first has woman. Age is a to be esthetically consideration, too. pleasing,” says The Fabulous Find’s Greg Seniors will be better served by a chair with James. “It has to be comfortable for you or arms than a sleek slipper chair, as they’ll likely your family members, and it has to work in need to push down to achieve liftoff.  the room it is intended for.” SIZE AND SCALE To that point, Parc Modern Interiors’ You might be immediately drawn to a David Adelman says, “The design has to fit particular chair for its comfort or style, but what you’re trying to achieve in your home. before buying, consider if it will play well with Whether it’s mid-century, contemporary or a others in both size and scale. This is where more transitional theme, you have to be aware working with a designer can save a lot of of the style.” headache. “That’s why we work with people,” You also have to be aware of your space. Namur notes. “We want to see pictures. We When it comes to chairs, the goal is not to want to go out to their home and see their go big or go home. Luxe Home Interiors’ room to be sure things ... complement one Colleen Namur cautions to keep in mind another and speak to one another, but they that in a showroom, a chair has a lot of space don’t have to be matchy.”  to breathe, so keep scale in mind because 64

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

Tip: In small spaces, show some leg.


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Don’t be afraid to mix styles and eras; antiques can mix beautifully with more contemporary furnishings. A couple of bergères would look lovely paired opposite a contemporary sofa, so long as the sofa isn’t imposingly weighty. Aim for an interesting environment that reflects who you are.

TEXTILE AND TASTE Keep an open mind when cruising homefurnishing showrooms. Floor models may be presented in a particular textile or colour, but the brand may offer dozens of customizable options, so don’t be put off by a chair that isn’t dressed in the manner you prefer. Does that herringbone wool strike you as stuffy? Look again — at the lines, the depth, the curve of the chair’s arms. Now picture it dressed in the warm, buttery leather of your dreams. Choose a textile that works with your lifestyle. Baskerville says people are often intimidated by velvet, but it’s actually an easy fabric to maintain. And, as a bonus for those with four-legged family members, it’s hard for Sir Kitty to get his claws into velvet or most tightly woven textiles. Leather, says Adelman, is “ease of living and peace of mind,” which is particularly important now that the line between kitchen and living space has blurred. Leather may cost more upfront, but it’s less expensive in the long run as it won’t need the frequent professional cleanings of some textiles. He encourages clients to stick to classic textiles in neutral tones for main pieces, and to have a little fun with subtle patterns and textures on chairs. Baskerville also steers clients away from trend textiles, noting that microfibre is a trend that had a short shelf life. Case in point — Craigslist is a wasteland of boxy microfibre armchairs, sent there by owners who realized the fabrics boast an uncanny ability to retain butt marks. Instead, use art, rugs, throws and cushions to infuse pops of colour and pattern. These items can be easily swapped out as your Tip: Velvet

is an easy fabric to maintain.


DESIGN AND THE GREAT DANES When it comes to 20th-century chair design, no one has done it quite as well as the Danish. home to architect/designer Finn Juhl, best known for his furniture design, including two of James’ favourite chairs: the Spade, inspired by outdoor lounge seating design, and the Chieftain, a sculptural wonder informed by primitive weaponry. And then there’s “The Chair” created by Hans J. Wegner, a 20th-century master of Danish design. You know you’ve created an iconic furnishing when it’s known simply as “The Chair.” Maybe you’ve seen it in clips of the 1960 Kennedy-

Nixon presidential debate. “The whole set was extremely modern, and that gave a sense of faith in the future,” said designer Carl Magnusson. Architects and furniture designers Peter Hvidt and Orla Mølgaard-Nielsen took a cue from the Eames — notable American designers who gave us the famous Eames Lounge Chair — and became the first Danes to use doublecurved laminated wood in the construction of their AX chair. Also a design power piece is their Boomerang chair, which

takes its moniker from the sleek, curved profile of the chair’s frame. “The beauty of high-quality mid-century chairs,” says James, “is that they keep going up in value. They’re investment pieces.” James recently assessed a client’s reading chair, bought in the 1960s. That chair, a Wegner Papa Bear, would now sell for at least $8,000. The ottoman alone could fetch $1,000 and up. What other furnishing can you sit on for 50 years and find yourself atop a figurative gold mine?

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Mid-century modern, a term coined by writer and historian Cara Greenberg in 1984, refers to the sleek, functional and elegant furnishing manufactured from the mid-’40s through mid-’60s. MCM, as it’s also known, is experiencing a resurgence in popularity, due in part to AMC’s now-finished series Mad Men. The Fabulous Find’s Greg James and Trena Danbrook are both enthusiasts of that era. For them, when it comes to chairs, Denmark is the only mark on the map because it’s

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Tip: Go for pattern and texture on accent chairs.

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personal style evolves, or seasonally for the particularly ambitious.

A CHAIR THAT LASTS Given the investment you’re about to embark on, it’s important to seriously consider quality. Namur points out a sleek seat with mid-century modern leanings. Constructed of walnut, with lush wool upholstery, this is a chair that will go the distance. You may be able to find a reproduction at a lower price, but not one that will have the durability of the original. Imitation might be the highest form of flattery, but it certainly isn’t a strong indicator of quality. Look at the details — if there’s welting, is it straight or can you see a wave? If there’s tufting, is the depth and spacing even? For James, who restores many of his vintage wares, quality means 100-per-cent Kvadrat wool in solid colours; pure elegance. Baskerville says that compared to sofas, “the engineering that goes into a chair is tenfold. They’re engineered to support and to be beautiful.” “It doesn’t matter what you choose for the fabric if the construction of the chair isn’t good,” Adelman notes. Look for hardwood frames or a metal frame that’s bolted. Screwed, glued, corner blocked — these are the hallmarks of quality and stability. Ask how the chair is sprung — sinuous, or eight-way hand-tied coils? Is the foam high-density? Latex is preferable to cheaper foams, which might off-gas and also break down quicker. There’s a lot to consider under the hood, so ask a lot of questions. And don’t forget the warranty, which may have specific coverage for frames and cushion cores.

A PERFECT RELATIONSHIP Buying a chair might seem overwhelming, so it’s worth taking the time, and investing in the help of a professional, to find your perfect match. Think of it like choosing a life partner — you want one that’s really going to last. And in this case, you really do get what you pay for. ::


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TWO IF BY SEA Tucked down on the waterfront of the village of Cowichan Bay, the idyllic store Beachology entices passersby with its inviting coastal charm. Cushions and throws in sea-inspired tones beckon from the porch, and inside, its restful ambience has inspired more than one visitor to engage owner Kim Robertson to work her magic. The store, previously known as Kim’s Beach Interiors, is run by Kim and her son Noah. While Kim, a trained colour specialist, focuses on the décor side, Noah helps source the clothing, a draw for regulars who come from as far away as Vancouver and Calgary. “That’s why we recently changed our name to Beachology,” Kim explains. “It was scary, as we felt like we had just established ourselves, but we were losing people who were walking by thinking we were just home décor.” The new name is a play off of the name Anthropologie, a brand Kim loves. “The combination of the two has just been amazing,” she says. “I call it homeware you wear. Your home should display who you are, as should how you dress. And they usually go hand in hand. It should be a whole feeling you create.” For Beachology, Kim wanted to create a feeling of “barefoot luxe,” both with the décor and fashion. She says it’s all about being comfortable in your own skin and using items and design concepts that can be dressed up or dressed down. The focus is on natural fabrics and textures and a soothing ocean palette. Another requirement? If it goes with a pair of jeans, it comes into the store. Both Kim and Noah have seen customers discover < Kim Robertson (left) and Noah Robertson look to fuse a boho vibe with a modern sensibility at their boutique Beachology, located in the village of Cowichan Bay.

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a new sense of style while browsing the racks at Beachology. “Between the two of us, we’re able to help them feel a new confidence and see a new breezy image of themselves,” Noah says. “Some people walk in and they are a little hesitant to try on the breezy vacation look, but you can tell they want to. I always encourage them to try it on, and I always give an honest opinion, which people appreciate. I’ve had ladies tell me, ‘I like you; you’re not one of those typical salespeople.’”

BRIGHT THINGS STYLE TIP

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“Not in, not out, but timeless,” says Deanna Young, explaining the name of NINO Designs, her collaboration with artist and jewelry designer Karin Holdegaard. Hammered metal earrings, knitted fine-chain bracelets, elegant lariats and statement necklaces of clustered chain and gemstones all feature in this unique jewelry line. While the two women have only been working together for just over a year, they first met in 2005. Young — an admired event planner most recently lauded for this summer’s Bites, Brews and Bands at Ogden Point — was then co-owner of Art & Grace, a clothing store in Victoria, when she was diagnosed with breast cancer and had to take a break from the business. “Karin stepped in and helped my partner out,” Young says. “That’s how we met. She jumped to my aid.” Holdegaard was herself diagnosed with an osteosarcoma in her leg in 2009 and, although she recovered, has since found it difficult to get around and work outside of the house. That led her back to designing jewelry, something she did a lot of in the 1980s, when Nordstrom carried her designs. Holdegaard, who is also an abstract artist, draws inspiration for her jewelry designs from a multitude of sources, even the combinations in the colours of the food on her plate. “I’ll see two colours in a tree, or jewelry on someone, or fashions in a magazine or on television,” she says. “Inspiration is everywhere.” When Young was sourcing from her friends for a charity auction, she discovered the amount of finished product that Holdegaard had sitting around her house. So Young suggested the two collaborate, pairing her marketing know-how and her previous jewelry-design experience with Holdegaard’s abundant creative output. “We inspire and feed off each other,” Young says in describing the joint design sessions at Holdegaard’s arty home studio. “We’ve discovered that what works best for us are pop-up shops and hosting parties at women’s houses. It’s great for Karin, because she can be there to speak to the designs.” And how do they know they have a product that catches the eye? “It’s not uncommon for people to buy the stuff right off me if I’m wearing it when I go out,” Holdegaard says with a laugh.


STYLE TIP

When it comes to wearing jewelry, wear what you are comfortable in because you can always tell if someone is uncomfortable. And there are no rules. We even love mixing metals, such as gunmetal and gold. The juxtaposition of the different tones really works.

Deanna Young (left) and Karin Holdegaard both wear accessories from their jewelry line, NINO Designs. (Deanna is wearing fashions from local boutique Meraki.)

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STYLE TIP

Style should evoke a feeling. What décor elements make you feel happy? Think about what those things are — colours or patterns or textures — and incorporate them into your décor.


There is much to enchant in the Timothy Oulton Gallery at Luxe Home Interiors. Extravagant crystal chandeliers are paired with edgy leather sofas and cheeky oversized framed playing cards, all set against matte black walls and shiny aluminum shelving. It’s a look Luxe co-owner Darren Ausmus describes as masculine and industrial, saying the line has found many fans in Victoria. Ausmus and Scott Elias — his partner both in business and life — first discovered the Oulton line at High Point Market in North Carolina, just one of the many furniture shows around the world the duo has travelled to looking for original finds to bring back to Victoria. “It’s interesting to go on our buying trips to see who’s putting out the ideas of what might be next,” Ausmus says. “SOMETIMES “What trend is THINGS ARE TOO OUT THERE going to follow FOR VICTORIA, the industrial look we’re seeing now? BUT IT’S NICE Sometimes things TO PUSH THE are too out there EXCITEMENT for Victoria, but AROUND it’s nice to push DESIGN AND the excitement POSSIBILITY.” around design and possibility.” Ausmus and Elias took over Luxe in 2010, after working in public education. While the career change might seem contradictory, Elias believes their role at Luxe blends several aspects of their former lives. When they were teachers in Vancouver, working in special education, they also flipped homes. “Making a difference was important to us,” Elias says. “Fixing up homes and making them look nice was the fun part. When Luxe came along it had the potential to blend the two, especially because we can really focus on community involvement.” The pair considers the space more of a design and inspiration space than a simple furniture store. And they want to push Victoria’s boundaries when it comes to design. “You do have to make sense of the fashions,” Elias says. “What works in Texas isn’t necessarily going to work in Victoria.” And despite its reputation as a colonial outpost, they believe Victoria is a cosmopolitan city hungry for design from around the world. “It’s nice to be challenged by our customers who are coming in expecting and wanting to see what is new,” Ausmus says. “We’ll have clients who have already furnished their homes but who come in for a cup of tea just to see what’s new.”

End of the Day (detail), 36 x 36, Acrylic on canvas

PURVEYORS OF COOL

A

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STYLE TIP

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re just meeting a new hair stylist, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s important to come in with your hair styled as you would style it and dressed like you would be for the day. A lot of people come in with their hair tied back, and wearing sweatpants, but it really helps your stylist if she sees you as you see yourself.

Chantelle Pasychny and Kurtis Brown on the Davines colour bar at designHouse Salon in the Hudson building.

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At designHouse Salon in the historic Hudson building, a vibrant living wall dominates one end of the industrialinspired space. Conceived by co-owners and couple Chantelle Pasychny and Kurtis Brown, it makes a fitting emblem for their fully sustainable and holistic beauty salon. “So many people walk in to the salon and talk about the energy,” Pasychny says. “They say it’s their happy place. That’s special because the salon industry can be intimidating and loud and busy.” As part of their commitment to sustainability, designHouse uses the product line Davines, whose motto is “Sustainable Beauty” and whose mission is “to be the most sustainable eco-friendly product on the planet.” Even its packaging is reusable and food-grade safe. “There weren’t a lot of brands that fully encompassed environmental sustainability and didn’t just use it for greenwashing,” Pasychny says. “We were the first Davines salon on the Island. To start one where none of the staff or clients knew the line was a very big risk, but it helped knowing it was completely in line with our values. People recognize that we are being “... PROMOTING true and honest LOCAL BUSINESS to who we are.” IS ALL PART OF Brown and BEING AN ENGAGED Pasychny were MEMBER OF OUR also one of the COMMUNITY.” first businesses in the Hudson district and have seen it evolve from a quiet block, with practically no one walking by their storefront, to a bustling, happening neighbourhood with its own vibe. Brown is especially passionate about connecting with nearby businesses and advocating for the downtown. A recent collaboration saw the salon, along with like-minded businesses, host a fashion-show fundraiser for the Food Eco District (FED) at the Robert Bateman Centre, as part of Davines Sustainability Month. “We’re ambassadors for cool local culture,” he says. “That fits into the salon experience in general. People always ask, ‘Where do you shop? Where do you eat? Where do you hang out? We’re downtown in a cool, trendy neighbourhood, and promoting local business is all part of being an engaged member of our community.” Brown not only talks the talk, he walks the walk. Always a dapper dresser, part of his regular wardrobe is wearing local logoed T-shirts. “My personal ethics carry over to personal style,” he explains. “I get to promote local business doing something cool.” ::

Mystic Beach (detail), 36 x 30, Oil on canvas

THE URBANITES

A

Ron Parker – Juan de Fuca | Oct. 6-17 PREMIERE

BOUTIQUE GALLERYGALLERY VICTORIA’S PREMIERE BOUTIQUE OF THE PACIFIC NORTHWEST

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*As used in this document, the term ‘Investment Specialist’ refers to a Scotia Securities Inc. mutual fund representative. When you purchase mutual funds or other investments or services through or from Scotia Securities Inc., you are dealing with employees of Scotia Securities Inc. Scotiabank may also employ these individuals in the sale of other financial products and services. Activities conducted solely on behalf of Scotiabank are not the business or responsibility of Scotia Securities Inc. Scotia Securities Inc. is a member of the Mutual Fund Dealers Association. ® Registered trademarks of The Bank of Nova Scotia, used under licence. Scotiabank includes The Bank of Nova Scotia and its subsidiaries and affiliates, including Scotia Securities Inc. 2610-2016-0624_R8

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friendship FACTOR

LUMINA/STOCKSY

THE

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Model: Stela Licina

Finding — and keeping — friends in adulthood can be a challenge, but by shifting the focus from you to others, you’ll open the door to the best friendships you’ve ever experienced. By Alex Van Tol

Y

ou know friends are good for you. You know you’ll live longer with a bundle of buddies. You know you need people to support you when things spiral. So why, on a Tuesday evening, are you sitting on the couch watching cats playing patty cake on YouTube? It’s high time you put down the mouse (oh, good one) and went back to the basics: your face-to-face friends. Because that’s where you’ll find bigger, brighter joy — and better nourishment for your soul. WHY FRIENDSHIP MATTERS “Loneliness and isolation are reaching epidemic levels,” says Victoria counsellor Matthew Gardner. “At least half of my clients are seeing me for issues that would probably take care of themselves if they had a supportive network of friends.” Our nervous systems respond to empathy and connection, Gardner adds, and we suffer “dis-ease” if we don’t have those. He points out that as herd animals, isolation from the community has historically been used as one of the biggest human punishments. Being human means being interdependent, agrees Maybe you’ve heard this silly non-violent-communication facilitator and trainer rumour? And because you’ve Mitch Miyagawa, who leads workshops in Victoria and heard it, you believe it. And from his Gabriola Island home. if you believe it, well, that “Much as I want to be independent, I can’t meet all shapes what you see. So shift my own needs,” he adds. “There are these universal your perspective. Remember longings; I can’t fulfil those on my own.” that we’re all still human, and we all still need to be seen, But instead of focusing on “friendship,” Miyagawa heard and valued. That’s all asks himself how he can continually engage the people you need to break in here. around him in somehow helping him to follow those That, some eye contact and longings while also helping them to do the same. laughter, and a willingness to “I recognize that if they’re not getting what they share your own story. want, then I’m not going to get what I want,” says the What are your values? soft-spoken father of two. “I want to think of friends “Follow these, and they will lead as the people we’re with in this project of helping to you to places where like-minded people gather,” says Victoria support each other to meet certain needs.” counsellor Matthew Gardner. Following Miyagawa’s reasoning a little farther, we “Common ground is the fertile can see that different friends can help us meet different soil where connection grows.” needs. That takes a bit of pressure off the “best friend” Find your people through a ideal — that one person we imagine as our 100 per meetup group. Join a rowing cent go-to. Miyagawa suggests looking at your friends’ team or show up on Sunday strengths: Who’s great for having fun with? Who do you morning at the yacht club and get picked up as extra crew. connect with over a shared sense of purpose? Who’s best Dance. Borrow someone’s dog for those where-is-my-relationship-going conversations? and go to the off-leash areas. “I don’t need to get stuck on any one person doing all Volunteer — often it takes a those things,” says Miyagawa. “As soon as you get stuck few times to meet and talk on what a friend should do — be loyal, call when they with someone to know whether know you’re having a hard time, spend time with you there’s a spark, so a job is a once a week — you feel disempowered, or you suffer perfect path to friendship. feelings of betrayal.” Go for beers with your barber. Talk to your librarian. Better to spread your needs around and get them Love is all around you. Go met by a few different people. Just be sure to return the give some. favour.

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LEND ME YOUR EAR The cardinal rule of getting people interested in you is to make them comfortable. “Becoming a friend is the process of being willing to suspend your own insecurity and create a safe container for someone else,” says Carmen Spagnola, registered clinical hypnotherapist. “You need to pull your functioning up and be generous enough to walk up to someone and strike up a conversation and be interested in them.” Put the focus on the other. The best way to do this is to ask questions. Almost everybody is willing to talk about themselves. “Saving someone from awkwardness at functions is one of the best ways to empathize,” says Spagnola. Once they get started, pick up on the little threads of info and ask about those. Share a bit about yourself to show what you have in common and to keep the talk going, but don’t talk about yourself too much. The people we tend to think of as the best conversationalists are those who ask the questions that keep the talk rolling. Look around at your next dinner party and see if you agree. When you’re engaged in a conversation, give it your full attention. Often we feel

MEN NEED FRIENDS, TOO

M

en are largely socialized to avoid intimate friendship with each other. This negative socialization is the biggest hurdle to forming meaningful connections. As men get older, the demands of marriage and a career take over, leaving them with no one to share intimacy with other than their significant others. “Sometimes they need to connect deeply with someone else,” says counsellor Bruce Chambers, who runs Tools for Building Friendship, a men’s friendship group at Citizens’ Counselling. “Women seem to be better at it. They hang onto and nurture their friendships through different stages of life, whereas men — because we’re socialized to be cold and strong and not ask for help — let these things go

The greatest challenge men need to overcome is the constraining nature of male socialization. and think we don’t need them, when in fact we do.” Chambers walks guys of all ages through sharing stories about their lives, giving and receiving compliments, making eye contact and practising the small talk that paves the way to deeper connection. The greatest challenge men need to overcome,

Chambers says, is the constraining nature of male socialization: the strong pressure not to ask for help, look other men in the eye or approach men in a friendly way. “It’s easy enough for a man to ask a woman out or to approach a sales prospect,” says Chambers, “but it is petrifying to reach out to another man for friendship. We have to relax these rigid roles.” Get to know other guys with side-by-side activities: watching the kids play basketball or taking them fishing. Chat about meaningless stuff. (Chambers recommends practising small talk with everyone you meet, so it feels comfortable when it counts.) The more times you bump into your new pal and chat, the easier it’ll be to go for a hike or a beer and open up about your life.

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Friendship Resources • Dr. Irene Levine’s The Friendship Blog is an excellent resource with advice for navigating friendships at every stage of life. thefriendshipblog.com • youUnlimited is conferences, events and workshops, but really it’s thoughtfully created experiences, from Women in the Woods to Soul Circles to inspiring luncheons designed for women who want more connection and community in their lives and want to find a place to do this. younlimited.com • For introverts, trying to make friends in a culture of extroversion can be daunting and exhausting. Michaela Chung’s book The Irresistible Introvert: Harness the Power of Quiet Charisma in a Loud World shows you how to master the art of quiet magnetism in a noisy world. No personality change required! (Skyhorse Publishing, 2016)

self-conscious, so our minds drift: Is there spinach between my teeth? or What do I say next? Keep your focus on your friend’s words. That way you can nimbly catch the conversation ball and lob it back in the form of an agreement, a question or a tiny anecdote to carry things deeper. This is an important thing for men especially, who are trained to be leaders and therefore tend to dominate conversations — or else they hold back entirely, unwilling to self-disclose. A good rule of thumb is to listen 80 per cent of the time, talk 20 per cent. Resist the temptation to fix or advise. At bottom, all of us are dying to be heard. You can give that gift every time you speak with someone. ACKNOWLEDGE AND CELEBRATE Be open with your admiration. If you think that the woman ahead of you in the coffee line has the most gorgeous hair ever, say it. You’re going to totally reshape her day — and yours. Tell your friends what you appreciate about them. Acknowledge their excellent characteristics. Give gratitude. It doesn’t have to be corny. All you need to say is, “You’re so measured and respectful in the way you deal with your teenagers. I admire that about you.” Full stop. You’ll be surprised at how good it feels — and how easy it is to do. Once you start being open about what you like in other people, you will begin to feel your power centre shift a little. Making friends in adulthood takes some work. Just lead with your heart, and look for ways to be that light — that safe container — for someone else’s soul. Pretty soon you’ll have the support you need, too. :: YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

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STYLE WATCH Fashion Stylist: Janine Metcalfe Photography by Jeffrey Bosdet

BETWEEN WORLDS A leaf on the edge of autumn. Lichen draped from branches. Grass clinging to volcanic rocks at the edge of the sea ... The intricacies and patterns of nature are echoed in couture fashions with embroidery and beadwork, sequins and lace. Myth comes alive behind masks by contemporary Northwest Coast artist Rande Cook.

APPARITION White cape ($2,800), crop top ($225) and pants ($375), all available by special order at dicarlocouture. com); rings ($175-$1,100, athenaatelier.com); “The Chieftain” gold leaf and red cedar mask by Rande Cook.

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PORTAL Gold and black floral gown with peekaboo details ($995, available by special order at narces.com); Bronze rope choker and bracelet ($175-$1,100, athenaatelier.com); A.S. black ankle boots ($415, Cardino Shoes).


MODERN MYTH Black floral and vegan leather Charley dress ($795, available by special order at narces.com); bronze ribbon choker and ring ($175-$1,100, athenaatelier.com).


STARFISH Gold sequin gown with mesh detailing (custom order from narces.com); gold leaf necklace ($175-$1,100, athenaatelier.com); â&#x20AC;&#x153;The Poetâ&#x20AC;? gold leaf and red cedar mask by Rande Cook.


SHEER DRAMA Melania two-piece sequin blouse with organza bow ($625) and flare skirt ($1,900), both available by special order at dicarlocouture.com; Shannon Munro Metropolis earrings ($275, Little Gold); silver bow rings ($175-$1,100, athenaatelier.com).


RAVEN REVEALED High-low embroidered Cyrene gown ($1,095, available by special order at christopherpaunil.com); Shannon Munro ‘Valley Below’ earrings ($290, Picot Collective); rings ($175-$1,100, athenaatelier. com); A.S. black ankle boots ($385, Cardino Shoes); sheer stockings with detail (found at Heart & Sole Shoes); “The Mystery” red cedar mask, with black feathers, by Rande Cook.

Model: Mikayla Mifsud, Key Model Management Hair and Makeup: Anya Ellis, Lizbell Agency Stylist Assistant: Brooklyn Koenig Shot on location at Cole Island National Historic Site, Colwood, B.C. Thanks to the Friends of Cole Island.


WHERE ART MEETS FASHION Behind the scenes at YAM’s fashion shoot. | By Kerry Slavens

Mon–Sat: 10 am–5:30 pm Sun: noon–4 pm Mill Bay Centre, Mill Bay 315–2720 Mill Bay Road www.patrykadesigns.com

250.743.3531

The Atrium
 1323 Blanshard Street
 headoverheelsvictoria.ca
 250.590.5154

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Alchemy is a process by which something is transformed in a powerful or mysterious way. And alchemy certainly was at play during our photo shoot for this month’s Style Watch, which brought together YAM’s fashion editor Janine Metcalfe and Director of Photography Jeffrey Bosdet with contemporary Northwest Coast artist Rande Cook. I was introduced to Rande’s work two years ago at an Art Gallery of Greater Victoria exhibition called Urban Thunderbirds/Ravens in a Material World. What struck me was that instead of featuring his masks as disembodied carvings on gallery walls, Rande brought them to life. While studying in New York, he created a cedar mask with gold inlay and a Louis Vuitton logo on it. Then, accompanied by artist and photographer Luke Marston, Rande wore the mask to Wall Street where he climbed on the famous bull statue, the ultimate symbol of material excess. An artist of First Nations ancestry from the ‘Namgis tribe of Alert Bay, Rande is shaped not only by tradition but also by artistic forces that compel him to create beyond constraints of the market for traditional Northwest Coast art. “That urge — that need — to push boundaries is how I grow as an artist,” he says. “For me, it’s an absurdity to limit myself to the belief that we can only create in the past. I live in this century and I want to keep my culture alive and growing.” When I told YAM’s fashion editor Janine Metcalfe about Rande, I could see her wheels of creativity turning. For Janine, fashion is more than clothing on display — it’s a kind of visual poetry. Like Rande, there is depth or subtext to her work. She immediately conjured up visions of models in couture gowns and masks, immersed in nature. Rande offered up three red cedar masks for the YAM shoot: “The Chieftain,” “The Poet” and “The Mystery,” a beaked mask that evokes Raven or Trickster. “This mask was made especially for [this shoot],” he says, “so I said ‘this needs to be strong.’ And nothing is stronger than black.” For a location, YAM’s Director of


JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

Rande Cook adds feathers to his mask, “The Poet.”

Created by women for women, FDJ combines easy care, easy wear fabrics into a collection of essential styles and fashion pieces that offer a multitude of combinations to simplify her life.

lalliah’s boutique at Pharmasave Broadmead Photography Jeffrey Bosdet suggested Cole Island at the head of Esquimalt Harbour, a traditional fishing and lodging spot for local First Nations. In 1860, it became a Royal Navy ammunition depot. Abandoned during WWII, the island later became part of nearby Fort Rodd Hill National Historic Park. Over the years, vandals destroyed much of its infrastructure, so the Friends of Cole Island formed in 2005 to help preserve the site. Of the 16 structures on the island, five still stand. Considering the fashion shoot’s theme “Between Worlds,” Cole Island’s dreamlike atmosphere proved ideal. In this in-between place, the fashion shoot that emerged is one of our strongest. Janine chose couture gowns that reflect the coastal landscape, from the gleam of sunlight in a tidal pool to the patterns in the sea grass at the powerful place where ocean meets land. Amidst it all, the personas behind Rande’s masks — The Poet, The Chieftain and The Mystery — come alive. ::

Broadmead Village Shopping Centre 310-777 Royal Oak Drive | Phone: 250-727-3505 www.pharmasavebroadmead.com

Bring in your copy of ine YAM magaz % 15 e iv to rece ed ic pr llfu ff o items

Unique Clothing, Swimwear & Accessories

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

The historic buildings of Cole Island

613 Johnson Street 250-386-6968

paradiseboutique.ca

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J OE DA NDY By David Alexander

The designers who outfit Victoria’s men in casual wear are a diverse lot, united by a sense of style and influenced by the Pacific landscape and coastal city life.

This camel cashmere wool coat ($395) from Victoria designer Alex Davies of Dangerfield (dangerfield.ca) is a thing of beauty. Wear it over a shirt and tie to the office or with a sweater for a casual night out.

TAKING IT TO THE STREET

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JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

T

here are some very interesting things happening in menswear right here in our capital city. Not only do we have a host of clothing stores now catering to just about every man you want to be, but we also have some talented designers who have set up shop and are putting Victoria on the map for casual menswear. This is important for a bunch of reasons. Victoria is a unique place where climate, location, architecture and people all come together to create a gentle yet edgy creative vibe that translates to our fashion preferences. Clothes designed here make sense for here. Designers who live right next door understand what the men who live here need, how the clothes have to fit, protect from the elements and quickly go from fancy to hardy as you head from office to beach. Fostering a community of designers — and that means trying out their wares — makes us a more vibrant city and adds to our economy and diversity of choices. A thriving creative class also makes for a richer city. And in the end, why wouldn’t you want to wear something made locally instead of designed across the country or made in a far-flung metropolis that has little connection to our coastal cachet?


Alex Davies of Dangerfield began local,” Long adds. “We have a wide range of experimenting with design by tailoring customers: 14-year-olds coming in with their clothes he already owned. This eventually allowance, surfers living in a van on the led him to design his own pieces from beach — and then we have lawyers, bankers scratch. and government officials.” “The brand originated from never really FORM MEETS FUNCTION being satisfied with the way things fit and At 1014 Meares Street, you’ll find the how tailoring can entirely change how Bauhaus-inspired space of a man with a something looks on a body,” says Davies. passion for great design. Iain Russell is From pattern making to sewing, the talent behind the clothing line Is this Dangerfield’s clothing line is 100-per-cent Menswear? and he co-owns the retail shop of handmade in Victoria. the same name. “I buy many of the materials from local Russell says his line is founded on a love shops, right down to the labels, which are for the creative process, deriving inspiration made in Rock Bay,” he adds. from West Coast modernism, Davies is all about investing taking the best of the world COVETING in essential pieces for your and refining it for the coast wardrobe, items that are going to environment with materials like last an especially long time. Dintex, melton wool, Oxford “A piece of clothing might be cottons and ballistic nylon, which something that you have to save allow form and function to meet. up for,” he says, “but you’ll wear All items are designed in Victoria it all the time and know it’ll look and handmade in Vancouver. new for years.” “Design is and always will be SURF MEETS STYLE about people,” says Russell. “Form The Melton Wool In a cedar-sided, solarand function have a direct relation Shirt ($110) powered and totally off-the-grid to space and time. Great design is ANIÁN’s melton shop at 516 Discovery Street, love. It makes you laugh, it makes shirt is bread you’ll find ANIÁN, a design you cry, it makes you feel special and butter for shop built of 100-per-cent and brings out the best in you.” obvious reasons: recycled materials by owners Russell’s customers reflect the it’s nicely tailored, dense enough to Paul Long and Nick Van Buren. city, he says. University profs, withstand wind Unlike some design students, writers, the person and rain, but businesses that emerge out who just served you lunch, the breathable. In navy of the need to create, this one developer of your favourite app. or grey, it’s made began out of the owners’ driving From 15 to 60. And then there’s the for the coast — need “to surf every swell that brand’s online following. from a weekend hit Vancouver Island.” “Style is more about how you of camping to “We need wool shirts, treat others than it is about the drinks on the patio. (anianmfg.com) blankets and toques to go clothing you have on,” says Russell. surfing,” says Long, “but with “I grew up making things Japanese Cotton the waves being an hour-plus with my dad, so when it comes Oxford ($155) away, we often leave straight to design and seeing it come Iain Russell’s from work to surf, or vice versa. to life, it’s just kind of a natural shirts in solids This means that the clothing progression. I love that clothing and stripes are we wear has to keep us warm in exquisite. Made is something that stays with me. from soft cotton January on the beach but also It collects the stories of life.” and milled in must be fitted for the city.” Japan, they can be ISLAND STYLE Now branching out beyond worn with a loose What’s exciting about these Victoria, ANIÁN is starting tie or untucked guys is they are designing clothes to distribute its melton wool and free. Joe for Victoria. While clothes shirts around B.C. and into Dandy is partial to manufactured elsewhere might Alberta. These shirts, says the purple stripe. be cheaper and offer more choice, Long, are wind resistant, water (isthismenswear. clothes designed here capture that resistant but still 100-per-cent com) distinct Vancouver Island sense of breathable. “Typically you would see this style. weight of wool used for a coat. Things are happening here, and The design is based on a dress these designers are just the start. shirt; hardy enough for the woods Next time you want to spruce up but also fit for downtown living.” your wardrobe, give the locals a And if you think it’s just look first. You’ll be prepared for surfers who love ANIÁN, Victoria’s unique clime, and you’ll think again. “The city loves look damned good doing so. ::

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By Carolyn Camilleri

style pick

The Swans of Fifth Avenue by Melanie Benjamin (Delacorte Press, 368 pages)

File Name: YAM-3rd-2.39x9.58-VW-2016.indd Trim: 2.39” (w) x 9.58” (h) (Exported in horizontal layout to be flipped to vertical position in magazine) Bleed: 0.125” x 0.125” Live: N/A Colours: 4C Studio: SW Notes: No crop marks for YAM Magazine exports.

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AD #: Volkswagen-YAM-07012016-2.39x9.58-2016tiguan-julyaug.pdf Client: Volkswagen Victoria Publication: YAM Magazine Insert Date: July/Aug 2016

Studio Revisions

1

Remember that trend when people were tying scarves to their handbags? Babe Paley started that. On a warm day, she removed her scarf and didn’t want to crush it in her handbag. Just like that, she started a trend. That’s the kind of fashion power held by the Swans, a group of real-life, high-society, New York women, including Slim Keith, Gloria Guinness, C.Z. Guest, Pamela Churchill and especially Babe Paley. When Truman Capote infiltrated their group, he became their trusted confidante, as well as a welcomed source of entertainment. It was a friendship that lasted for years — until Capote wrote a story revealing what was hidden behind pristine appearances. It was a story that led to his own social suicide. Using a clever blend of fact, gossip and fiction, Benjamin’s novel explores the rise and fall of this close-knit circle of friends, taking the “poor little rich girl” theme to another level. Reading it gave me the disturbing but irresistible feeling I was listening in on conversations that were none of my business. Of course, I couldn’t stop reading. Or Googling. I searched these women a dozen times to see what they looked like, what they wore and if the events I was reading about really happened — and they really did. 2546 Government Street, Victoria, BC, V8T 4P7 • T 778.406.1380 Ext 459

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Volkswagen Victoria A Division of the GAIN Dealer Group 3329 Douglas Street | 250-475-2415 | vwvictoria.com

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

Highland model shown for illustration purposes only. Vehicles may not be exactly as shown. *Limited time finance purchase offer available through Volkswagen Finance, on approved credit, based on a new and unregistered 2016 Tiguan 2.0T Trendline base model with 6-speed manual transmission. Base MSRP of $26,885, including $1,795 freight and PDI, financed at 0% APR for 84 months equals 182 bi-weekly payments starting from $148. $0 down payment or equivalent trade-in, Essentials Package ($499), DOC ($395), Finance Admin Fee ($495) due at signing. Cost of borrowing is $0 for a total obligation of $26,936. PPSA fee ($45.48), license, insurance, admin fee ($495), environmental levies ($100), DOC ($395), any dealer or other charges, options and applicable taxes are extra. Visit Volkswagen Victoria to view current offers. “Volkswagen”, the Volkswagen logo, “Trendline” and “Tiguan”, are registered trademarks of Volkswagen AG. ©2016 Volkswagen Canada. DL 49914428 #31186

*

148 bi-weekly $

Finance as low as

2016 Tiguan

You name the destination and the 2016 Tiguan will get you there.

Unforgettable value. Luxury you can afford. 92

BOOKM A RKS

FABULOUS FALL READS

Peace Dancer

The Spawning Grounds

by Roy Henry Vickers and Robert Budd (Harbour Publishing, 40 pages)

by Gail Anderson-Dargatz (Knopf Canada, 320 pages)

Roy Henry Vickers is a legend in the Canadian art world: painter, printmaker, carver, design adviser, speaker, author and well-respected leader in First Nations communities. Released in time for his 70th birthday, Peace Dancer is the fourth and final book in the bestselling Northwest Coast Legends series, which Vickers collaborates on with Victoria author Robert Budd. Like the other three books, Peace Dancer is visually stunning and features 18 works of art. The story, set thousands of years ago in the village of Kitkatla, is a powerful lesson in anti-violence, demonstrating the value of peaceful action in the face of adversity.

The newest novel by the author of The Cure for Death by Lightning begins in September 1857, when homesteader Eugene Robertson wakes up one morning during a salmon run on the Thompson River and sees a vision. Generations later, his ancestors are still living on the same farm. This is a family saga that explores the blending of two cultures: that of the Indigenous Shuswap people and that of the white folks who settled during the gold rush. Hannah, the main character, is a strong young woman struggling to hold her family together while her wayward father, Jesse, seems intent on letting it slip away. There are many layers in this story, which moves fluidly between past and present, life and death, nature and humankind. Mysticism mingles with hard realities of environmental dangers. And always, there is the river that divides and unites and brings life and death.


Do Not Say We Have Nothing by Madeleine Thien (Knopf Canada, 480 pages)

This epic, tightly woven, complex novel covers two generations: the one that lived through China’s Cultural Revolution, and their children, who protested at Tiananmen Square. Leading us through the story is Marie — Jiang Li-ling — who lives in present-day Vancouver. When Marie was a child, her mother took in Ai-ming, a young woman who had fled post-massacre China. Ai-ming’s stories captivate Marie and launch us as readers on a journey into the past. It’s beautifully written and an outstanding study of Chinese culture and history.

Waiting for the Cyclone: Stories by Leesa Dean (Brindle & Glass, 224 pages)

Often in fiction, women are portrayed as “good.” They may slip up, but they eventually return to goodness. Not so in this collection of stories. These women land hard. They aren’t bad people, but neither are they especially likable. However, they do come across as real — almost uncomfortably authentic in a real-life-stripped-down kind of way. Whether it is a woman leaving a relationship or another in search of the mother who gave her up or a young girl looking at her female role models, there is a weight to these poignant stories that lingers.

By Gaslight by Steven Price (McClelland & Stewart, 752 pages)

Victoria writer Steven Price made news in 2014 by scoring a six-figure book deal with McClelland & Stewart. Well, two years later, here it is. Set in London in 1885, By Gaslight is a literary, historical-suspense novel about legendary detective William Pinkerton and Adam Foole, both in pursuit of a notorious thief named Edward Shade. The story moves from England to South Africa’s diamond mines to America during the Civil War. Brilliant writing, gritty and razor-sharp, with character and setting descriptions that made the hair on the back of my neck stand up. It is being classed with Patrick deWitt’s The Sisters Brothers and I can see why. I was completely hooked from the first page. It’s a knock out. :: YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

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LAST P AG E By Athena McKenzie

“I’m driven by inspiration, not obligation,” says Keith Gage-Cole, owner of Heart & Sole shoes on Fort Street. From his days in the late 1960s running the city’s “first hippie store” to learning leatherwork from fellow craftsmen in the artistic hub of 1970s Victoria to his time living in California and his travels to Mexico, Gage-Cole’s bohemian influences transcend trends and global boundaries. His discerning taste is reflected in the stylish and skillfully constructed shoe brands he carries at Heart & Sole, from John Fluevog to Bussola to Chanii.B. Known as the Sandalman, the leather craftsman has himself fashioned more than 5,000 pairs of shoes over his career, most notably his Lord of the Rings sandals, a distinctive strappy style he learned from leathersmith Davy Rippner back in 1976. “At the end of the day, I wanted to make more than money,” Gage-Cole says of his compulsion to learn leatherwork. “I wanted to create and have something to show for my work.” ::

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2016

Keith Gage-Cole (wearing his Lord of the Ring sandals) with Snippet, the shop dog.

SIMON DESROCHERS

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2017 E 300 4MATIC Sedan. Total Price from $63,495*

Š 2016 Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. Vehicle shown for illustration purposes only. *Total price of $63,495 is based on the 2017 E 300 4MATIC Sedan which includes MSRP of $61,200 and freight & PDI $2,295. DOC $395, environmental levies $100, tire levy $20, license, insurance, PPSA (up to $45.48), registration $495, and taxes extra. Visit Three Point Motors to learn more. DL 9818 #30817

Three Point Motors

A Division of the GAIN Dealer Group

2546 Government Street | 250-385-6737 | threepointmotors.ca

Now also accepting Union Pay Cards.

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