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JUL/AUG 2016

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SUMMER ISSUE DIY CHEESE • PROJECT YOU • G &T LOVE A HOME BY THE SEA • SUMMER STYLE WATCH COASTAL CLAMS • HAPPIEST HAPPY HOURS YAMMAGAZIN

E.COM


MAKE THE MOST OF THE ROAD AHEAD. Servtronic

BMW Victoria

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Brake energy regeneration Kinetic energy created during coasting and braking is converted into electricity used to charge the battery.

THE 2016 BMW 428i xDRIVE COUPÉ FROM $51,745* BMW Victoria

A Division of the GAIN Dealer Group

95 Esquimalt Road | 250.995.9250 | bmwvictoria.ca European models shown for illustration purposes only.*Starting from price of $51,745 based on the 2016 BMW 428i xDrive Coupé with automatic transmission with a MSRP of $49,450 and includes freight & PDI ($2,295). DOC fees ($395), tire levy ($20), environmental levies ($100), license, taxes, insurance and registration and if applicable PPSA (up to $45.48) are extra. ©2016 BMW Canada Inc. “BMW”, the BMW logo, BMW model designations and all other BMW related marks, images and symbols are the exclusive properties and/or trademarks of BMW AG, used under licence. See BMW Victoria for complete details. DL 10135 #31009


James LeBlanc

Scott Piercy

Jason Binab

Brian Danyliw

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CONTENTS

34

summer issue Summer by the Sea A Gulf Island escape doesn’t get any dreamier than this Pender Island home, designed for inviting family gatherings. BY CAROLYN HEIMAN

62 Project You Fitness not only shapes our bodies; it has the power to completely transform our lives in powerful and positive ways. BY ATHENA McKENZIE

28

4

Come On Get Happy

Designed to Last

YAM goes in search of Victoria’s happiest happy hours and discovers a city that has embraced a new tradition.

This unique home, designed to last centuries, blends commercial architecture with residential construction and repurposed treasures.

BY DAVID LENNAM

BY THERESA O’LEARY

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

56

48

COVER STORY

Dig Deep: In Search of the Elusive Coastal Clam What’s more fun than finding a delicious free dinner in the sand? BY CINDA CHAVICH


6

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016 Starting from

$22,500*

Volkswagen

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Blue Roots Farm

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Studio Revisions

74 LAST PAGE

By Anneke Feuermann

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File Name: YAM-3rd-2.39x9.58-VW-2016.indd Trim: 2.39” (w) x 9.58” (h) (Exported in horizontal layout to be flipped to vertical position in magazine) Bleed: 0.125” x 0.125” Live: N/A Colours: 4C Studio: SW Notes: No crop marks for YAM Magazine exports.

AD #: Volkswagen-YAM-07012016-2.39x9.58-2016golf-julyaug.pdf Client: Volkswagen Victoria Publication: YAM Magazine Insert Date: July/Aug 2016

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2546 Government Street, Victoria, BC, V8T 4P7 • T 778.406.1380 Ext 459 Premier Dealer Group

2016-06-07 4:48 PM

Highland model shown for illustration purposes only. Vehicles may not be exactly as shown. *Starting from price of $22,500 is based on the 2016 Golf 5-Door Trendline 1.8 TSI 170 HP 5-speed manual transmission with a MSRP ($20,895) and freight/PDI ($1605). DOC ($395), environmental levies ($100), tire levy ($25), license, insurance PPSA fee (up to $45.48, if applicable), registration ($495), options, any dealer or other charges, and applicable taxes are extra. Visit Volkswagen Victoria to view current offers. “Volkswagen”, the Volkswagen logo, “Trendline” and “Golf”, are registered trademarks of Volkswagen AG. ©2016 Volkswagen Canada. DL 49914428 #31186

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IN EVERY ISSUE

7 EDITOR’S NOTE

9 YAM LOVE A hot fashion show, a VIP ticket giveaway and a peek behind the scenes at a Style Watch photo shoot

13 TOP OF MIND Fabulous food trucks, hip summer décor, red meets blue, natural abstracts and cool local treats

72 BOOKMARKS Your essential summer reading

By Carolyn Camilleri

14

66 FOOD + DRINK

16 GOOD EATS DIY cheese: a raw-milk revolution

By Cinda Chavich

22 DIVINE DRINKS The classic gin and tonic

By Adem Tepedelen

16 26

HOME + GARDEN

26 LIVING SMART

Living the outdoor dream

By Athena McKenzie

34 OUTSTANDING HOMES

Summer by the sea

By Carolyn Heiman

FASHION

66 STYLE WATCH

True West fashion

By Janine Metcalfe


EDITOR’S NOTE By Kerry Slavens

WHOSE RULES ARE WE PLAYING BY ANYWAY?

I

confess to wearing hoop earrings, but according to a recycled post making its way around Facebook, women past age 30 (that’s me) should shun hoops, graphic tees, big sunglasses and 21 other items listed on the blog post on RantChic.com. I first became aware of that Facebook post when a 40-something friend of mine who loves oversized sunglasses sent it to me and asked if that meant she must stop wearing her big, bold shades. Absolutely not, I told her. First, she does look fabulous in her shades; second, she should not give in to the age-shaming that has emerged as a way to put women in their place. Think I’m kidding? Type in anything to do with “As soon as a woman gets women, age and fashion on Google and see what to an age where she has comes up. My first hit was “Dressing Your Age: opinions and she’s vital When 12 Real Women Retired Certain Fashion and she’s strong, she’s Items” from whowhatwear.com. The theme, of course, is that the older you get, the less fun you systematically shamed should have with fashion. Become a wallflower. into hiding under a rock.” This morning, our associate editor Athena — SARAH SILVERMAN asked me if I’d seen the Inside Amy Schumer sketch that talks about how actor Sally Fields morphed almost overnight from playing Tom Hanks’ crush in Punchline in 1988 to playing his mother in Forrest Gump in 1994. And Tom hardly aged at all! When it comes to age-shaming, I think the comedian Sarah Silverman nailed it when she said, “As soon as a woman gets to an age where she has opinions and she’s vital and she’s strong, she’s systematically shamed into hiding under a rock.” Age-shaming often masquerades as fashion advice, but make no mistake, its intent goes deeper: the older we get, the more invisible we are supposed to become, until finally we just fade away as nice little old ladies. When I was a kid, I worshipped Princess Leia from Stars Wars, so I was thrilled last year that actor Carrie Fisher, who was 19 years old when the first Star Wars movie premiered, was reprising her role 32 years later. But instead of applauding a strong feminine leader, the internet decided to ageshame her, pointing out that she hadn’t aged well. But here’s the thing, she hadn’t aged badly. At 59, she simply looked her age. We’re living in a time of massive generational change, with my GenX sandwiched between the Boomers and the Millennials. Perhaps because my age falls into the cracks of these two powerful generations, I’ve become age blind. I make friends in every age category, from 25 to 90. Sure, I’d be lying if I said I never envied women under 30, but I don’t wish to be under 30 again. There’s a lot of anxiety in that zone. I didn’t have a grain of the confidence I have now and, despite having a body that looked good in a bikini, I didn’t like my body any more then than I do now. So much for that. So how about this? Let’s look at each woman as an individual, not as an age category to which we apply rules. As for me, I’ll wear hoop earrings or whatever else I think looks good on me. After all, it’s my life, my rules. ­­— Kerry Email me at kslavens@pageonepublishing.ca

facebook.com /YAMmagazine

twitter.com /YAMmagazine

@ yam_magazine

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

7


yam LIVING SMART

LIVING WELL

PUBLISHERS Lise Gyorkos, Georgina Camilleri EDITOR-IN-CHIEF Kerry Slavens

CREATIVE AND TECHNICAL MANAGER Jeffrey Bosdet

PRODUCTION MANAGER Jennifer Kühtz

EDITORIAL DESIGNER Janice Hildybrant

ASSOCIATE EDITOR Athena McKenzie

EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Anneke Feuermann

PROOFREADER Vivian Sinclair CONTRIBUTING DESIGNER Jo-Ann Loro CONTRIBUTING WRITERS David Alexander, Carolyn Camilleri, Cinda Chavich, Carolyn Heiman, David Lennam, Theresa O’Leary, Adem Tepedelen CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITOR Janine Metcalfe

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Jeffrey Bosdet, Kelly Brown, Derek Ford, Deddeda White

CONTRIBUTING AGENCIES Stocksy p.22; Shutterstock pp.59, 60; ThinkStock pp. 29, 56 ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Vicki Clark, Lory Couroux, Cynthia Hanischuk GENERAL INQUIRIES info@yammagazine.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR letters@yammagazine.com TO SUBSCRIBE TO YAM subscriptions@yammagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES sales@yammagazine.com ONLINE yammagazine.com FACEBOOK YAM magazine – Victoria TWITTER twitter.com/YAMmagazine INSTAGRAM @yam_magazine COVER Happy hour at Agrius on Yates Street

Photo by Jeffrey Bosdet/ YAM magazine Published by PAGE ONE PUBLISHING 580 Ardersier Road, Victoria, BC V8Z 1C7 T 250-595-7243 info@pageonepublishing.ca pageonepublishing.ca

Printed in Canada by Transcontinental Printing. Ideas and opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of Page One Publishing Inc. or its affiliates; no official endorsement should be inferred. The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertisement and any and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertiser and not the publisher. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, in all or part, in any form — printed or electronic — without the express permission of the publisher. The publisher cannot be held responsible for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #41295544 ADVERTISE IN YAM MAGAZINE YAM magazine is Victoria’s leading home and lifestyle magazine. Established in 2009, YAM was created for people who want to live well, live smart and make the most of their lifestyle. For advertising info, please call us at 250-595-7243 or email sales@yammagazine.com.

8

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016


YAM LOVE

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

SUMMER’S HOTTEST TICKET

VIP Where can you go this summer to have a great time while donating to a great cause?

C

apital Iron and YAM magazine’s fourth annual Fashion Inferno is the hottest event of the season! From models and firefighters showcasing the latest fashions to live entertainment by Backstage Whiskey and Passion & Performance, the night promises to be one to remember — and all proceeds raised from tickets, food and beverages will go directly to the Victoria Firefighters Charitable Foundation. So, sit back, relax and enjoy the show, all the while being served in style by local firefighters. For tickets, go to bit.ly/inferno2016.

WIN VIP TREATMENT FOR THIS END-OFSUMMER EVENT! Enter YAM’s #FashionInferno giveaway for two VIP tickets, including premium seating, special eats and an exclusive runway program! Visit yammagazine.com for giveaway details.

BEAUTIFUL SKIN BEGINS NOW

E SCENES BEHIND TH

HORSIN’ AROUND PHOTOS: JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

Even Harry the horse was captivated by model Lilian L. and her True West fashions in this issue’s Style Watch (page 66). Showcasing looks from cowgirl chic to classic country, the shoot found its perfect setting at Harry’s home, Westside Stables, with its picturesque Central Saanich landscape and quintessential barn.

FIND YOUR ENERGY AT WILLOW STREAM SPA fairmont.com/empress

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Love all things local? Like us at facebook.com /YAMmagazine

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

9


LOCAL LOCAL EXPERTISE, EXPERTISE, GLOBAL GLOBAL CONNECTIONS CONNECTIONS

5640 Batu Road, Victoria

NEW LISTING

$8,250,000

$6,288,800

$4,900,000

$3,300,000

2560 Queenswood Dr., Victoria

4563 Stonehaven Ave., North Vancouver

1600 Glen Ln., Mill Bay

2584 Esplanade Ave., Victoria

Spectacular custom Queenswood home on 1.79 acres of idyllic oceanside living. Every room in the 6,638 sq. ft. home has unobstructed mountain and ocean vistas.

This exquisite 4,300 sq.ft., 5 bedroom/ 5 bathroom home is situated on a spectacular waterfront property ideal for kayaking, swimming, boating and even a seaplane.

5,300 sq. ft. waterfront home surrounded by 80 acres of west coast woodland. 35 minutes north of Victoria, this home overlooks the Saanich Inlet and has 1,200 ft. of waterfront.

Overlooking Willows Beach and built in 1956, offering a wonderful beach-living environment. 4,236 sq. ft, providing comfortable living and stunning panoramic views.

Glynis MacLeod PREC

Katherine Gray

Andrew Maxwell

Sophia Briggs

250.661.7232

250.516.4563

250.213.2104

250.418.5569

$1,750,000

$ 1,625,000

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$1,299,000

4980 Echo Dr., Victoria

2454 Ligget Rd., Mill Bay

5722 East Sooke Rd., Sooke

1830 Thrush Rd., Victoria

Stunning 10 acre Prospect Lake waterfront with 300 feet of shoreline. This serene west facing property has light throughout the day and great depth off the dock.

This stunning ocean view home is incredible: 6,000 sq. ft. home, 180 degree ocean views, 2 in-law suites, huge shop w/ 5ton crane & 3 phase power & the list goes on.

One of a kind private waterfront oasis in East Sooke ensures peace and solitude! This dramatic open-concept south facing 4,260 sq. ft. estate rests on 5 tranquil acres.

Shawnigan Lake Waterfront Home. 142 ft. of west-facing lake frontage. 4,200 sq. ft. home on 1.46 acres includes a fantastic A- frame one bedroom guest cottage.

Scott & Mike Garman

D’Arcy Harris

Brad Maclaren PREC

Nancy Stratton

250.896.7099

250.686.2375

250.727.5448

250.857.5482

NEW LISTING

$749,900

$729,000

$489,000

Price upon request

2202/2204 Cook St., Victoria

604 - 139 Clarence St., Victoria

2931 Carol Ann Pl., Colwood

5, 906 Pemberton Rd., Victoria

Incredible revenue opportunity in prime location - full legal side by side duplex at corner of Cook and Princess streets, across from George Jay Elementary School.

Updated & sizable 1,250,sq .ft. condo, 2 bed/2 bath with stunning views. Steel & concrete building in heart of James Bay. Too many details to list and a must see.

Great for a family or first time buyer. A well maintained 3 bedroom, 2 bathroom. Suite potential or students. Close to parks, schools, shopping and transit.

Nestled in Rockland, this Samuel Maclure design marries history with modern luxury. At over 7,200 sq. ft., the Tudor Revival’s gorgeous detailing fills each room with character.

Donald St. Germain

Dean Boorman

Tammy Gray

Andy Stephenson

Andy Stephenson VICTORIA VICTORIA 250.380.3933 250.380.3933

250.744.7136

Andrew Maxwell

NEW NEW YORK YORK

Brad Maclaren SALT SALT SPRING SPRING 250.537.1778 250.537.1778

250.882.0234

D’Arcy Harris

Dean Boorman

HONG HONG KONG KONG

Donald St. Germain

VANCOUVER VANCOUVER 604.632.3300 604.632.3300

250.857.4729

George Papaloukas

MOSCOW MOSCOW

Glynis MacLeod CALGARY CALGARY 403.254.5315 403.254.5315

250.532.0888

John Fraser

Katherine Gray

VENICE VENICE

TORONTO TORONTO 416.960.9995 416.960.9995

Sotheby’s Sotheby’s International International Realty Realty Canada, Canada, Independently Independently Owned Owned andand Operated. Operated. E.&O.E.: E.&O.E.: ThisThis information information is from is from sources sources which which we deem we deem reliable, reliable, but but must must be verified be verified by prospective by prospective Purchasers Purchasers andand maymay be subject be subject to change to change or withdrawal. or withdrawal.


1.877.530.3933 1.877.530.3933sothebysrealty.ca sothebysrealty.ca

205 - 368 Main Street, Tofino

$3,188,888

$2,850,000

$2,599,000

$2,276,000

7107 Deerlepe Rd., Victoria

5009 Cordova Bay Rd., Victoria

2904 Mt. Baker View Rd., Saanich

5640 Batu Rd., Victoria

32+ Acres of prized natural Canadian West Coast real estate. 2,500+ ft. of private oceanfront oriented S to SW. Bring your architect and come visit, just 45 min from downtown.

Rare outstanding beachfront home finished to perfection. This property has unbelievable design, value and flexibility with three beautiful, self contained suites.

Stunning Ten Mile Point waterfront executive home with 4,500 sq.ft. of wonderful living space. Situated on a private 30,000 sq.ft. lot with sweeping ocean views.

Gorgeous country-style estate on a private gated 5 acre property. Views over Elk Lake to the Olympic mountains. Expansive 5-6 bedroom house thouroughly updated & more.

Neal Carmichael

Logan Wilson

Scott & Mike Garman

Lisa Williams

250.857.2067

250.857.0609

250.896.7099

250.514.1966

NEW LISTING

$1,150,000

$950,000

$939,000

$849,000

205 - 368 Main St., Tofino

4574 Vantreight Dr., Victoria, BC

813 Royal Wood Pl., Victoria

7711 Richards Trail., Duncan

Own the perfect waterfront location in Tofino’s Downtown. Includes secure storage as well as two parking spaces. Private moorage is available by lease. By appointment only.

You’ll love the ideal layout of this 4 bedroom /3 bathrooms 2,300 sq. ft. home nestled on a private, large 0.35 acre lot on a quiet street in Gordon Head. 4574vantreight.com

This 1912 heritage home is full of rich history. Quality restoration, original fireplaces, extensive woodwork, chef’s kitchen. Beautiful gardens; oversized porch.

Awash with country charm this 9.58 acre retreat offers peaceful country living. The renovated kitchen includes top of the line appliances and stunning views.

John Fraser

Donald St. Germain

Melissa Kurtz

Rebecca Barritt

250.726.8456

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dozens of exclusive websites and publications visit sothebysrealty.ca to learn more.

4.1 million annual visits

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Lisa Williams WHITE WHITE ROCK ROCK 604.385.1840 604.385.1840

Logan Wilson

LONDON LONDON

Mike Garman

Melissa Kurtz

WHISTLER WHISTLER 604.932.3388 604.932.3388

Nancy Stratton

PARIS PARIS

Neal Carmichael

SUN SUN PEAKS PEAKS 250.578.7773 250.578.7773

Rebecca Barritt

TOKYO TOKYO

Sophia Briggs KELOWNA KELOWNA 250.469.9547 250.469.9547

Scott Garman

SYDNEY SYDNEY

Tammy Gray MONTREAL MONTREAL 514.933.4777 514.933.4777

Sotheby’s Sotheby’s International International Realty Realty Canada, Canada, Independently Independently Owned Owned andand Operated. Operated. E.&O.E.: E.&O.E.: ThisThis information information is from is from sources sources which which we deem we deem reliable, reliable, but but must must be verified be verified by prospective by prospective Purchasers Purchasers andand maymay be subject be subject to change to change or withdrawal. or withdrawal.


HAVE YOU SEEN US LATELY? Our newest location, at 620 Broughton Street in Victoria, features some new looks and lines, in addition to the great collection of luxury sportswear you’re used to seeing in our Sidney store. We are proud to offer brands you know and trust and we work closely with our suppliers to fill the needs of our customers. So if you’re looking for something, please ask! It might just be the next great addition to our product line up. you’ in the neighbourhood with a few extra minutes, please If you’re pop by and say hello! We would love to see you!

d.g.bremner & co.


TO P O F M I N D

14

ON OUR RADAR

16

GOOD EATS

22

DIVINE DRINKS

DEREK FORD

FOOD TRUCK FANATICS This summer, make sure you don’t miss out on the fabulous food trucks around Victoria, including Deadbeetz (shown here), Hungry Rooster, Rolling Reef and many more. Find some of these great street eats using the app Street Food Victoria or head to Ogden Point for their Bites, Brews and Bands on the Barge every Friday (except July 1) this summer.

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

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T OP O F M I ND

ON OUR RADAR

A collection of our favourite things

1 2 SUMMER LOVIN’ From hip portable gardens to eco serving trays, welcome summer into your home with open arms and celebrate everything this relaxing season has to offer.

6 5

1 Kick back on the worry-free outdoor Premise sofa, locally made with commercial-grade aluminum that won’t rust and designer upholstery with water-draining foam (Luxe Home Interiors and dodeka.ca, $2,795) 2 The Invivo Saddle, made from reclaimed billboard ads, allows you to create a vertical garden on a balcony or fence (invivo-design.com, $59) 3 Haws watering cans are not only prime in form and function, they look perfect beside a nice patch of greens! (Dig This, $95) 4 Every time you buy a packet of West Coast Seeds at Capital Iron, they donate 50 cents to the Canadian Honey Council’s research fund (Capital Iron, $3 to $9) 5 Serve in style with a dishwasher- safe birch tray, designed in Canada and made in Sweden (West Coast Eco Home, $48) 6 Brightly hued chopsticks are perfect for summer Asian fare (storiebrooke, etsy.ca, $25).

3

4

SODA SO FINE LOCALLY MADE SODAS IN REAL GLASS BOTTLES ARE RIDICULOUSLY REFRESHING With 16 flavours to choose from (think Maple Bacon Cream and Blue Bridge Blueberry) and sweetened with real cane sugar, L to R: Lemon Cream, Happy Grapefruit, Chocolate Truffle, London Fog, Oatmeal you’ll never get bored with Victoria Soda Chocolate Chip Cookie Works. Looking for guilt-free? With zero HEAVENLY COOL sweeteners and zero calories, their Mile Zero Seltzers are perfect on their own Decadent, creamy, smooth Parachute ice cream will seduce your — or add your own splash of gin or tastebuds. They even make special batches with water buffalo milk vodka and head for the patio. from McClintock’s Farm. Brought to you by Victoria Pie Co., this new Bridge Street ice-cream parlour may just become your #1 summer Visit victoriasodaworks.com hangout. (Parachute Ice Cream, $9 per pint.) for locations.

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016


1

2

Red Meets Blue Refresh your summer wardrobe with the perfect blend of hot style and cool chic.

3

1 With hummingbird detailing, this Kapow dress is perfect for lazy luncheons or dressy patio parties. Did we mention it has pockets? (Smoking Lily + Tonic Jewellry Pop-Up Shop at the Bay Centre, $136) 2 Every outfit needs a statement necklace, like these clay beauties (Lore General Store, $45 each) 3 Go bold with a royal blue Matt & Nat bag that changes structure — two purses in one! (She She Bags, $140) 4 Step confidently in The Art Company’s “Feel” sandals, ideal for hot summer barbecues (Cardino Shoes, $215).

SHOP YOUR WAY. HERE. #LoveLifeBayCentre thebaycentre.ca

4

ESCAPE REALITY ENTER THE NATURAL WORLD OF THE IMAGINATION Local abstract painter Blu Smith uses bright, glowing colours that entice your mind away from the ordinary. Pot of Gold by Blu Smith (42" x 80," acrylic and mixed media on canvas, The Avenue Gallery, $7,100)

BCBGMAXAZRIA • CLUB MONACO L’OCCITANE • MELANIE LYNE MIGRATION • LE CHATEAU

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

bayc_9327_Yam Ad.indd 1

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2016-03-08 9:18 AM


GOOD EATS

By Cinda Chavich

IN COASTAL CLASSROOMS, DAVID ASHER, THE CHEESEMAKING CELEBRITY AND FOOD ACTIVIST, IS TEACHING STUDENTS HOW TO MAKE CHEESES FROM RAW — AND YES, ILLEGAL — UNPASTEURIZED MILK. IT’S ALL DELICIOUSLY UNDERGROUND.

CHEESE

ALL PHOTOS: KELLY BROWN

A raw-milk revolution

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016


D

avid Asher draws the blade slowly through a big pot of jiggly warm junket, the product of raw milk softly coagulated with kefir grains and rennet. Cutting this curd, and releasing the whey that it holds, is a universal step in making almost every cheese, from Camembert to cheddar. But for Asher, teaching these traditional cheesemaking skills is more than an educational event; it’s stirring the pot of a food revolution. “I’m a guerrilla cheesemaker — I make cheese illegally,” he tells the group of 20 students packed into a room at Nourish restaurant for an afternoon session of The Black Sheep School of Cheesemaking. “I’ve been making cheese for 10 years, but I am making it underground. I can’t sell it — I give it away and share it with friends.” What’s illegal about Asher’s cheese is the raw material — the raw, unpasteurized milk from his own organic farm and others on Salt Spring Island. He’s among a growing group of food activists who believe that denying consumers access to fresh raw milk (it’s illegal to buy or sell raw milk in Canada) is a symptom of a food system gone wrong. Asher’s new book The Art of Natural Cheesemaking is a kind of cheesemaker’s manifesto, arguing that making raw-milk cheese is one step along the road to food sovereignty. Like naturally fermented kimchi and kraut, backyard chickens or DIY kombucha, it’s all part of the growing movement to put food production back in the hands of the people. “Industry and science hijacked cheesemaking from the artisans and farmers some 150 years ago, and since then, few new styles of cheese have been created,” Asher writes, “yet during that time, hundreds, possibly thousands, of unique cheeses have been lost. “Cheese comes from the land and is one of our most celebrated foods,” he adds, “yet its current production methods are environmentally destructive, corporately controlled, and chemically dependent.” Asher says pasteurization strips fresh milk of all the natural cultures that create great cheeses, and that making natural cheese is just one of the DIY skills that is part of a healthy sustainable food system. < Some gorgeous cheeses featured in David Asher’s book The Art of Natural Cheesemaking (Chelsea Green Publishing). Top shelf: young and old cloth-bound cheddars. Bottom shelf (left to right): Shankleesh (yogurt cheese preserved in olive oil) and Mason Jar Saint Marcellin.

Local producers have a special place in our hearts. Since we opened our doors in 1977, we have valued the relationships we share with our local partners and neighbours in communities throughout BC. We look forward to this continued partnership in the years to come.

Customer Care: 1.800.667.8280 | thriftyfoods.com

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

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But even if you’re not ready to take on Big Dairy, learning how to make fresh cheese at home is both fascinating and fun. THE CHEESEMAKING CURVE Asher urges students in his cheesemaking courses to go cross-border shopping for raw milk — each person can legally bring 20 kilograms of milk, cheese or dairy products into Canada, including legal raw milk. Otherwise, he says, start with very fresh, local pasteurized milk that’s been inoculated with milk kefir grains, the live culture used to make the fermented probiotic milk beverage called kefir. The

kefir, he says, repopulates the milk with “a diverse community of bacteria, yeast and fungi” that’s required for cheesemaking, eliminating the need to use commercially produced freeze-dried cultures. The cheesemaking learning curve can be as steep as you want to make it. And the easiest place to start is culturing a little crème fraîche and yogurt, or making a batch of paneer, sweet ricotta or fresh mozzarella. My first foray into cheesemaking was kneading hot curds into fresh balls of mozzarella with Ella Kinloch of Make Cheese Inc., a mail-order homecheesemaking business based in Calgary.

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Cheesemaking is pretty simple — it all starts with a few standard steps, then a particular culture and aging process to turn milk into a wide variety of young, creamy, bloomy, nutty, stinky or dry cheeses. It takes little more than a scoop of natural yogurt or kefir added to milk to ferment a new batch on the kitchen counter. When I made my first batch of fresh ricotta I started with goat milk, heated it up with a little buttermilk and lemon juice, and almost instantly had sweet, delicate curds. After just an hour of draining in a cheesecloth-lined sieve in the refrigerator, it was a soft but solid cheese that I served with blueberries for breakfast and cut into cubes to drizzle with olive oil and sea salt for snacks. Mixed with fresh herbs or garlic, this lovely fromage blanc becomes your own Boursin. You get about half a kilo of fresh cheese from four litres of milk, so it’s a bargain too. Mozzarella and other pasta filata stretched cheeses are especially fun to make — once you feel that curd magically turn from a jiggly mass to a delicate round of cheese in your hands, it’s addictive. WHERE TO LEARN

MELISSA KURTZ 250.508.5325 welcomehomevictoria.com

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

Visit David Asher’s website, theblacksheepschool.com, to learn more about his new book and upcoming cheesemaking classes, or contact him to organize a workshop. You may find other cheesemaking classes and workshops in town, too — the Fairfield Gonzales Community Association has hosted Gabriola Island-based artisan cheesemaker Paula Maddison for a series of her cheesemaking classes (maddacres.ca). Or look to Ella Kinloch’s website, makecheese.ca, for supplies and video tutorials to inspire your home-cheesemaking adventures.


It is essential to follow hygiene rules when working with raw milk. Do keep milk at low temperatures to avoid the development of pathogenic bacteria, and do store in hygienic containers. For safety, we recommend consulting experts before making or ingesting raw-milk products.

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

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2016-06-07 5:15 PM YAM-3rd-9.58x2.39-VW-2015-layout-copy.indd 1

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She sells cheesemaking kits and supplies through makecheese.ca, including rennet, commercial cultures, waxes and molds, with video tutorials and recipes. There are other sources of cheesemaking supplies, including Glengarry Cheesemaking in Ontario (glengarrycheesemaking.on.ca). Lifestyle Markets sells organic milk, kefir and yogurt cultures, and rennet. David Asher’s book eschews commercial kits and gives step-by-step advice for creating your own cultures, even how to grow blue mold for blue cheese and how to harvest rennet. You’ll also find tips for improvising with everyday household equipment, including fashioning a cheese press with plastic buckets. Making cheese is a bit of a science experiment, but it’s a thrill when it works. I’ve cultured beautiful crème fraîche in 24 hours on the kitchen counter, made mason jars of spritzy probiotic milk kefir to drink,

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

and quick ricotta with nothing more than a gallon of milk, a little fresh lemon juice and a bit of cheesecloth. Chevre and mozzarella are easy to make at home. But once you start with these simple fresh cheeses — so perfect to serve alongside summer fruits — you may get hooked and delve deeper into the art and science of it. Cheesemaking is also a great skill to cultivate if you have a small farm or access to fresh cow, goat, sheep or, if you’re lucky, water buffalo milk. It’s the traditional way to ensure no fresh milk goes to waste, and the whey left over from the cheesemaking process can be used to feed farm animals, water plants, make biscuits and borscht, or even start more cheese. Asher is a bit of a celebrity in the world of natural cheese, and he lives right in our backyard. When I met him, he was off to the U.S. and then to Australia to spread the radical word of raw-milk cheesemaking, but you may find him setting up another of his travelling cheese schools in the city again soon. “The methods described herein challenge the beliefs of the conventional cheesemaking paradigm,” Asher writes in his breakthrough book. “I will show you how to take back your cheese.” So much political power in a creamy pot of curd. ::


DIVINE DRINKS

By Adem Tepedelen

G&T

NAOKA KAKUTA/STOCKSY

>> A gin & tonic on a sunny patio is the best cure for the summertime blues

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016


A

s an American expatriate living in Victoria, I’ve always been acutely aware of the English presence here. Coming from a country largely founded on separating itself from jolly ol’ England, I’ve noticed many small things — from certain foods and beverages to the omnipresence of Englishaccented residents — that have seemed the most “foreign” to me. Canada and the U.S. obviously have much in common, but a connection to England isn’t one of them. One English export that we share a kindred appreciation for — especially in the summer — is the gin and tonic. The satisfying pleasure of a light, refreshing and delightfully complex cocktail, it seems, is something that we see eye to eye on. Two simple ingredients (three, if you include a wedge of lime) poured over ice and given a gentle stir, I think we can all agree, is a lovely thing to enjoy outside on a warm, sunny day.

CITRUS, SPICE AND EVERYTHING NICE The process of adding aromatic botanicals to a neutral distilled spirit and transforming it into gin is done primarily in two ways. The first is called “compounding,” whereby botanicals are simply added to a neutral spirit to impart the flavours. The second is to add botanicals to a neutral spirit and then redistill that spirit. Juniper has obviously always been the predominant ingredient, but it’s typically complemented by a wide variety of other additions, from citrusy inclusions such as lime, orange or grapefruit peel to a wide variety of spices like anise, angelica root, cardamom, cinnamon, coriander, licorice root and even flowers. Our numerous B.C.-made, New World versions tend to favour the local terroir and use an abundance of hand-picked ingredients such as cedar, fir, lavender, bay laurel and, of course, juniper. Gin, more specifically Victoria Distillers’ Victoria Gin, was at the vanguard of the current explosion of locally distilled spirits. Nearly every upstart distillery that has followed the path Victoria Distillers (formerly Victoria Spirits) blazed has come up with its own unique take on the spirit. And this is at the heart of what makes gin so fascinating. In the same way the craftbeer revolution was fueled by brewers taking classic European styles and putting their own North American twists on them, craft distillers are creating their unique botanical recipes to distinguish their product. Mass-produced brands, such as Bombay Sapphire and Beefeater, largely have a “classic” gin profile that leans heavily on juniper. Not so in B.C., where distillers like Vancouver’s The Liberty Distillery, for instance, offer three gins — Endeavour, Endeavour Origins and Endeavour Pink — each with distinctive botanical additions and flavour profiles. Victoria craft brewery Phillips recently launched its distilledspirits line, Phillips Fermentorium, and distinguished its Stump gin with the addition of hops, an ingredient typically used for bittering and flavouring beer, but with many gin-friendly notes to it. Another way B.C. gins have distinguished themselves is with the many different agricultural products — from apples to grapes to honey — used to distill the spirit, and the use of locally sourced botanicals.

It was in colonial India in the mid-19th century where gin met tonic.

TAKE AS NEEDED Like many of the alcoholic beverages we enjoy today, gin evolved from an herbal elixir consumed for medicinal purposes. Juniper “berries” (technically, cones) impart clean, bitter pine and citrus flavours and aromas and were thought to be helpful for everything from stimulating the appetite to providing relief from rheumatism and arthritis. They have been consumed in many cultures around the world for centuries. The Dutch, however, popularized a juniper-based spirit, called genever (which means juniper), in the 17th century, and when Dutch ruler William of Orange occupied Scotland, Ireland and England, he brought the drink with him. Anglicizing it as gin, the British put their own spin on it with unique combinations of aromatic botanicals and brought it to the far corners of the world. It was, in fact, in colonial India in the mid-19th century where gin met tonic. Again “medicinal use” enters the picture. This medicinal “tonic,” a quinine-based drink with a bit of sugar added, was consumed to prevent malaria. In order to make this medicine more palatable, the locals began mixing it with gin. Thus, two beverages previously used to cure one’s ills became a classic cocktail that is today enjoyed for entirely different reasons. The addition of a lime wedge — which I suppose has its own health benefits — sealed the deal.

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Victoria Distillers opened its waterfront distillery at Seaport Place in Sidney this May. The distillery was designed to showcase, through public tours and tastings, the experience of creating artisan spirits. There’s even a cocktail lounge to try that G&T straight from the source. Headed up by Master Distiller Peter Hunt, the distillery itself features two copper pot stills, which produce the distillery’s flagship Victoria Gin and other premium handmade spirits. It’s an edgy evolution for the former Victoria Spirits brand.

TONIC WITH A TWIST Tonic is, of course, an integral part of a G & T, but it’s typically the silent partner. It’s the yin to gin’s yang, offering a balancing bitterness, a touch of sweetness and a refreshing effervescence. However, Phillips Fermentorium has attempted to elevate tonic with the fourpacks it sells at grocery stores and liquor stores. Each quartet features a bottle each of Phillips’ unique recipes. The Artisanal Dry is a classic tonic with a twist provided by the addition of fruit and citrus notes; Botanical Brew is pink and offers pleasant floral notes; Philosopher’s Brew is based on a popular Silk Road herbal tea of the same name and offers floral and citrus herbal-tea notes; the Cucumber Mint is like summer in a bottle, offering refreshing, clean savoury notes with a tart finish. Part of the beauty of the G & T, however, is its simplicity. It’s a cocktail you can easily make with inexpensive ingredients (save for the alcohol) sourced from any grocery store. Fancy tonics can be fun, but Canada Dry and a lime will do just fine, thank you. I may not have any strong opinions about whether Red Rose or Tetley is the better tea, but I can appreciate the timeless appeal of a gin and tonic or two while enjoying some West Coast sunshine on a warm summer day. ::


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COME ON

y p p a h get By David Lennam

The Commons at 10 Acres is a welcoming place to enjoy a few drinks or a sharing platter with friends, with live music on Wednesdays and buck-a-shuck from 6 p.m. 28 4 to YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

YAM goes in search of Victoriaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s happiest happy hours and discovers a city that has embraced a tradition once denied us by our B.C. government. In bars and on patios everywhere, Victorians are blissing out with their favourite beers or cocktails.


“L

ook, Victoria has officially become fashionable,” says Jen Wise, frothy pint in hand, taking in the happy hour scene on the sunny patio at The Commons on Humboldt Street. There’s not a seat to be had. Typical. If we were solar powered, we’d be fully charged. And fresh oysters are buck-a-shuck. Drinks? Well, I’m sure something’s on special. Coupla beers for me. Same as always. But it’s not the lure of cheap booze bringing me out. I came for the oysters and the scene. The happy hour scene-and-be-seen. A relatively new tradition in a town that’s just had its mojo tweaked. Wise’s comment about Victoria’s burgeoning brand of global “cool” has something to do with those articles in Vogue and the Toronto Star coinciding with Doogie Howser’s Tofino Instagram love-in. One of those guys who twists balloons into dachshunds and motorcycles stops by with some dachshunds and motorcycles. Another table converses in German, laughing loudly. (I thought Germans weren’t supposed to laugh.) There’s one guy in a Tilley hat who must be 80 amid the obligatory smattering of twentysomethings. In this hour, I’m pretty happy. And since I live in Victoria, that hour is eternal. “Sitting right here facing southwest, overlooking the Legislature, with this lovely mix of tourists and cool locals,” Wise continues, “this patio is the place.”

LOCAL HAPPY HOUR FAVES

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SI

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D

A

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AGRIUS

2:30-5pm M-F

$5 beer & wine

$5 appies

732 Yates St

THE BEAGLE PUB

2-4pm 9pm to close

$5 pints

$7 appies

301 Cook St

BODEGA

3-6pm

$6 wine $6 sleeves

Free tapa with drink

1210 Broad St

CANOE BREWPUB

3-5pm wknds

Rotating

Weekly

450 Swift St

740 Burdett Ave

CLIVE’S

4-6pm

$5 feature lager

Discounted specials

THE COMMONS

4-6pm 9pm to close

$4 sleeves $4 highballs

Buck-a-schuk 4-6pm

620 Humboldt St

THE CROOKED GOOSE

2:30-5:30pm 9pm to close

$3.50 sleeves $3.50 highballs $5 house wine

Weekly

4136 Wilkinson Rd

DARCY’S

3-5pm M-T

$4.50 sleeves & wine

Half-price appies

1127 Wharf St

FERNWOOD INN

3-6pm

Rotating beer

1302 Gladstone Ave

GLO

2-5pm

$5 drinks

$6-$9 specials

2940 Jutland Rd

THE GUILD

3-5pm 2-5pm wknds

$5 draft $5 wine

2-for-1 bar specials

1250 Wharf St

LITTLE JUMBO

5-6pm 10:30 to close

$8 cocktails $5 rotating taps

$6-8 desserts

506 Fort St

LURE

3-6pm

$5 highballs

Daily

100 Harbour Rd

THE MINT

5-7pm

$5 pints $5 mojitos

$6 appies

1414 Douglas St

NORTH 48

4-5:30pm

$5 wine $4 pints $3 highballs

$4-$7 appies

1005 Langley St

PAGLIACCI’S

3-5pm

25% off drinks

$10-$14

1011 Broad St

SPINNAKERS

3-5pm M-F

$5 pints $5 wine

$5-$9

308 Catherine St

TRE FANTASTICO

5-6pm M-F

$3.50 beer

$3.50 plates

810 Humboldt St

VENETO

4-6pm M-F

$6.60-$9 drinks

Half-price appies

1450 Douglas St

3-6pm

$5.50 pint of the day

$7-$8 appies

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She’s right. But, it turns out, every place is the place. Every day has a happy hour, pretty well everywhere. My local. Someone else’s local. Everyone else’s local. The sushi place down the street. Even my mum’s seniors’ home has one. I’m just waiting until the neighbourhood weed store advertises half-price doobies from 4 to 5 p.m. EVERYWHERE AND ALL THE TIME Some are late-night happy hours. Most are 4 to 6. Is there a best? A worst? A more cold Phillips or spicier 50-cent wings? In true deep-digging journalistic fashion, I put the question out to Facebook. Twenty friends responded. With 20 different answers. The Crooked Goose, Yates Street Taphouse, Veneto, The Mint, N48, Bodega, Tre Fantastico, The Guild, Pag’s, Lure. Someone even sent me a photo of a sidewalk sign out front of Brown’s the Florist: “Happy Hour Thursday and Friday, 4 to Close. Bouquets, Arrangements, Cut flowers.” “The idea of [happy hour] never enters my realm,” snarks one guy at our Commons table who works in the arts and fancies himself a bit of a Europhile. “It’s too early,” he says. “Maybe if you work in government and start at some ludicrous hour like 8:30,

I can see the temptation when 4:30 comes around and you want to get away from your Liberal-slash-NDP masters. If you’re driven by price, it becomes an attraction. And if you want to get hammered before 7, this is the way to do it.” Happy hours were always best appreciated elsewhere. On vacation was where I found them. On a Manhattan rooftop. Pupus on the lanai in Maui. Or beard-to-beard with 10 dozen hipsters at some pub-of-the-moment in Vancouver’s Gastown. Victoria had never identified as a happyhour mecca. We were always $7 or $8 pints and some potato skins for a buck off while grousing about the weather. We were the only province in Canada not allowing bars and restaurants to alter liquor prices during the course of the day. That all changed two years ago when our liquor board overlords relented. Happy hours started happening. We finally had the kind of fun other jurisdictions had been clinking glasses to since the first lunar landing. Or Prohibition. READY TO TRY SOMETHING NEW? While binge drinkers may proliferate in other places, in the capital city it’s more about seeking experiences than bacchanalian excess.

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

Local bartending hero Shawn Soole, who currently runs an everything-aboutliquor consultancy, S/Squared Hospitality Concepts, says, “It’s not just cheap drinks for the sake of cheap drinks.” One of Soole’s favourites is Bodega Bar, where happy hour is all about sherry. And who drinks sherry, anyway? Turns out enough of us to make Bodega have one of the biggest sherry accounts in the province. Soole thinks success is having a focused happy hour that builds on the culture of a place, not just downing as many $5 pints of Canadian as your buddies. “Dropping $4 and trying a Negroni isn’t going to break you,” he says. “It’s become like a mini Dine Around every day of the week.” Solomon Siegel, GM at Pagliacci’s, agrees. In fact, you might find the pair of them sipping five-buck sherries at Bodega, where, he says, happy hour works because they extend the core values of their establishment, attract a faithful crowd, as well as a new crowd, and turn them all on to something they might not normally order. In Bodega’s case, sherry. “And it spreads their gospel that makes their place great,” says Siegel. “If you’re a beer place, pick some weird beer you don’t sell a lot of that you think is amazing to get people in for happy hour.”


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until they come in. They about Spinnakers. I just don’t know it’s 25 per cent off know what (beer) it’s going to drinks, so they’ll wait for it.” be when I show up.” Benji Coey, co-owner The Guild, notes Soole, is of Northern Quarter, does another where there’s variety not yet offer a happy hour, and surprise. though he’s thinking about “It’s probably one of the starting up a late-night one best beer bars in town and when things are traditionally their happy hour is based a bit quiet — maybe around showcasing local beers following the lead of The and their bar snacks. It’s very Beagle Pub in Cook Street curated...” Village, where 20-oz. pints HAPPY, WHENEVER of any craft beer are $5 from IT HAPPENS 9 until midnight. Happy hour is more than “That’s brilliant,” he says. ON THE COVER an obligatory exercise in “But how they can afford to With its airy contemporary doing what the next guy do that, I don’t know.” space and slow-food does … only cheaper. It’s Coey is another industry ethos, Agrius is another an opportunity to do some veteran whose ideal happy restaurant adding to R&D on your clientele, open hour is one that’s all about Victoria’s amped-up cool the door to the curious and the experience over dollarcred. Stop by weekdays create the sort of memorable off margaritas. His go-to is 2:30 to 5:00 p.m. to check beer-advert backdrop that Spinnakers, his own local. out the zinc-topped bar invites regulars. and for $5 wine and beer Weekdays at 3, Spinnakers and $5 appies. “If you have a built-in opens a new cask of beer audience it’s almost like a perk they’ve brewed, puts it on for them,” muses Coey. “Like the bar and serves $5 pints a ‘Thank you for supporting us; we’ll give this until it’s done. back to you.’ A bit like customer appreciation.” “They’re offering something unique that So here’s wishing you a happy hour — isn’t offered all the time,” says Coey. “And it’s offered at a special price. That’s what I like whatever time it is. :: JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

A RITUAL WORTH HAVING Drinks and deals aside, the pull of a really great happy hour is following ritual. Like meeting up with the same pack of friends at the same place at the same time, at, maybe, the enormous (and packed) patio at Canoe Brewpub. That’s where Emmy Marshall-Hill might be holding court. “There’s a familiarity of the hour you meet, the location, the price of drinks,” she explains. “It’s comfortable. It creates the conditions of possibility — and all you have to do is show up.” And, she continues, achieving critical mass along your preferred run of bar stools is less about what’s on the menu, or the price of drinks but, during our notoriously off-and-on summers, than it is essentially returning to that spot where the lateafternoon sun makes you feel like you’re on vacation. “Canoe [Brewpub]. I love the location,” Marshall-Hill says. “Glo. Hey, the Fernwood Inn has a sunny patio.” Siegel introduced a happy hour to Pag’s so he could fill some seats during the only time the Broad Street eatery isn’t lineup busy. Now he gets a crowd at 4:30 that buys a bottle of wine and stays for dinner. “I know we have regular customers now who will specifically wait until 3 o’clock

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SURROUNDED BY THE OCEAN, THIS AIRY AND ARTISTIC

GULF ISLAND HOME IS SO FILLED WITH LIGHT AND SPACE,

YOU CAN ALMOST IMAGINE YOU ARE FLOATING ON THE SEA.

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016


SUMMER BY THE SEA

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

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A

Gulf Island escape doesn’t get any dreamier than Ani and Daniel Feuermann’s Pender Island home. On a warm summer day the scent and temperate breeze from the ocean touch you the moment you enter the home. Accordion doors are flung open and stay that way for most of the day, sweeping aside visual obstructions to the dimpled bay beyond. It’s near lunch and the aroma of grilled salmon and chicken wafts through the much-used al fresco kitchen designed for big, warm and casual family gatherings. Inside, the white-on-white interior creates a gallery for the couple’s objects d’art collected on world travels. “I have a lot of trinkets,” Ani acknowledges. She likes to showcase these objects because each one evokes a memory — and it is memories that make a home. To keep the spaces tidy, she rotates the pieces, putting some away for a short time and putting others on display when she is tired of what’s currently on view. Some of those objects are made by Ani

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and Daniel themselves. Since moving from Vancouver, where they had the luxury-goods Cartier store, they have been working on artistic pursuits. Ani is an accomplished photographer, capturing painterly images with her shutter, while Daniel has been honing his sketching and watercolour skills. Often during the couple’s travels, Ani will wander solo around a new city, looking for great photographic possibilities, while Daniel will unfold a portable painter’s stool where he can sit for hours interpreting the scene in front of him with pen and paint. They will meet over lunch and share each other’s observations and accomplishments. At 2,000 square feet, the couple’s new home is considerably smaller than their previous one — and for designer Jack Ferguson of J.D. Ferguson Design this was the biggest challenge. Nonetheless, the home creates a big statement, and Ferguson applauds the Feuermanns for making the commitment to keep the home’s footprint small. Doing so meant restricting the size of things like the walk in-closet, the couple’s bedroom and guest room, and

there is no powder room, just a guest bathroom that doubles as the bathroom for all visitors — but it’s all worth it. The one-level home is essentially a long rectangle with two bedrooms bookending a combined kitchen, dining and livingroom area. But that simplistic description does a disservice to the intricate balance of form and function that came about over months and months of careful planning and reviewing all the details. Ani and Daniel capitalized on unexpected developments that arose during construction. For instance, when a structural engineer told them that a retaining wall would be needed on the east side of the property, Ani had a eureka moment. That wall, she thought, could be the perfect backdrop for an outdoor kitchen. And so, with an engineer’s blessing, the roof line was extended over the area and retractable rolling awnings installed for shelter from wind or rain. The space now augments the functional living area with a very comfortable al fresco dining area made for a large number of people. The Feuermanns made a significant


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(Far left) Items collected during the homeowners’ travels include kneeling Balinese wedding figurines from Indonesia, which are displayed on the coffee table. The concrete fireplace wall’s old-world patina makes a natural backdrop for the oversized chandelier from Restoration Hardware.

Distinctive cookware, including tagines from Casablanca in Morocco, can be found throughout the kitchen. A baguette basket from Provence, France, is used to display lemons on the dining table. A wine rack built into the kitchen island is filled with bottles from Pender Island’s Sea Star Winery, including the homeowners’ favourite blanc de noir, a rosé.

Client: Maycock Eyecare YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016 Publication: YAM Magazine - JULY/AUG 2016 Shipping Date: TBD Ad Size: 4.94” X 4.7”

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investment by installing an infinity pool that wasn’t originally in the plans. It proved to be an elegant solution to a building-code requirement for railings around the patio, which would have impeded their view of the water. The infinity pool meant railings were no longer required, and an unexpected bonus is that the pool has become a play, fitness and family-gathering mecca. It’s been the best investment ever, says Ani, who regularly uses the pool, which is equipped with a swimming machine for lap swimming. Adds Daniel: “When the grandkids are here and get up in the morning and come down to the house for breakfast, they are already in their bathing suits, ready for the pool.” And everyone swims more in the cool ocean now because the pool is handy for getting warm after a brisk saltwater splash. This artistically designed home is Gulf Island living at its best, drawing its inspiration from the natural world and inspiring its owners and their friends and family in turn, just like a great house should. ::

The high vaulted ceilings and heated concrete floors extend into the master ensuite, which has an open, airy feel. The window in the walk-in shower overlooks the water.

A mostly white interior, including the sloped plank ceiling, creates a crisp, clean space and a neutral backdrop for showcasing books and art, such as the painting, by Argentinian artist Salvador Benjuya, in the alcove leading to the guest suite. Polished concrete floors perfectly complement the esthetic and provide excellent conduction for the in-floor radiant-heating system.

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

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PH 778.432.4611 E team@modernrev.com www.modernrev.com


On summer mornings the accordion window wall is flung open, instantly magnifying the living space and truly bringing nature into the home. The system came from LaCantina Doors in California. The home features a view unobstructed by patio railings. Glass doors open to the sea, so the indoors merges with the outdoors. The functionality of the outdoor area surrounding the compact home significantly magnifies the usable space. A large roof extension provides weather protection over an outdoor kitchen and dining area. Complete with a pizza oven, the area is a natural gathering place for family and friends.

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RESOURCE LIST Home designer: Jack Ferguson, J.D. Ferguson Design General contractor: Steve Wright, South Island Woodworks Electrical contractor: Jay E Electric Plumbing, gas and heating: Scott Elliot Roofing: Skytech Sliding doors: LaCantina Doors Windows and glazing: Walnut Grove Glass & Aluminum Entry door: K.W. Doors & Windows

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Site preparation: Ron Henshaw Landscape architects: Nori and Sandra Pope Landscaping: Gulf Islands Greenscapes

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CELEBRATING BUILDING & DESIGN EXCELLENCE ON VANCOUVER ISLAND 2016 VIBE Awards Honour Exceptional Vancouver Island Building, Design and Innovation

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ome of the finest builders and projects on Vancouver Island were recognized at the 2016 VIBE Awards (Vancouver Island Building Excellence). Hosted by the Canadian Home Builders’ Association– Vancouver Island (CHBA-VI) and supported by Diamond Presenting Partners BC Housing and The Homeowner Protection Office, the coveted awards were presented on April 16 at the Vancouver Island Conference Centre in Nanaimo. Companies from all over Vancouver Island were recognized, including multiple-award

WINNER: Pheasant Hill Homes Ltd., Nanaimo Best Single-Family Home between 1,500 and 3,000 sq.ft.

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winners MAC Renovations (Victoria), which won Renovator of the Year, and Pheasant Hill Homes Ltd. (Nanaimo), which won Single-Family Builder of the Year and the FortisBC Award for Excellence in Energy Efficiency. GNB Builders Inc. (Ladysmith) took home three VIBE Awards, while Keith Baker Design Inc. (Victoria) won Project of the Year for Hawks Nest, and B. Gallant Homes (Nanaimo) won the Award for Innovative Feature–New or Renovation. CA Design won Best Residential Community of the Year for West Ridge–Phase 1. “The VIBE Awards are not only a chance to recognize excellence in the residential

Visit VIBEawards.ca to see all the finalists and winners and project pictures. For more information on the CHBAVI and the members, go to chbavi.com.


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construction industry but are valuable for consumers,” said CHBA-VI Executive Officer Kelsey Botting. “Companies entering a professional awards program are communicating clearly that they are professional, committed to their business and proud of their work. This can be an important factor for consumers in hiring a contractor.” CHBA-VI membership is a voluntary affiliation representing every area of the residential construction industry, including homebuilders and renovators, developers, trades, suppliers and product manufacturers. As the voice of their members, the association works to educate THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS DIAMOND SPONSORS

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Congratulations to the Winners of the 2016 VIBE Awards (Vancouver Island Building Excellence) Best Residential Renovation between $50,000 and $150,000 — sponsored by CHBA-BC: MAC Renovations, Victoria, for Into the Light Best Single Family Home between 1,500 and 3,000 sq.ft. — sponsored by Aviva Canada– National Home Warranty: Pheasant Hill Homes Ltd., Nanaimo, for Efficient Living at The Ridge Best Residential Renovation under $50,000 — sponsored by Lehigh Hanson Materials Ltd.: B.Gallant Homes, Nanaimo, and Project Partner Georgia Strait Kitchen & Bath for Schooner Cove Ensuite Best Single-Family Home over 3,000 sq.ft. — sponsored by Travelers Insurance Company of Canada: Award Builders Ltd., Victoria, and Project Partner Graham Sherwin Studio for No Visible Means of Support Best Single-Family Kitchen Renovation under $50,000 — sponsored by CHBA-VI: Nu-View Homes, Sidney, for The Isabella–Unit 1 Best Single-Family Kitchen Renovation over $50,000 — sponsored by CHBA: MAC Renovations, Victoria for Sophisticated Kitchen Single-Family Production Home — sponsored by Coastal Community Credit Union: GNB Builders Inc., Ladysmith, and Project Partner The Gales Development for The Gales

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YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

consumers to make informed choices when hiring a contractor. Through its national “Get It In Writing” campaign (www.hiringacontractor.com), the CHBA helps consumers hire professionals and avoid underground deals. “There’s nothing worse than hearing from a consumer who’s gotten caught in a project gone bad. We want to get the message out to call us first! We’ll connect consumers with our professional members and resources to help them take control of their projects so it goes as smoothly as possible,” says Botting. The association is supported by the provincial and national CHBA offices and works on behalf of members to advocate for the industry at all three levels to ensure government officials recognize the size and scale of the residential construction industry and the important role it plays in B.C. The residential construction industry is essential to Vancouver Island’s longterm economic strength and prosperity. Providing more than 14,900 on-site and off-site jobs, $846M in wages and $1.7B in investment value, new home purchases and renovations are the largest single wealthbuilder for most families.


Best Townhouse Development — sponsored by CTV: Bernhardt Contracting, Victoria, for North Park Passive House Best Residential Renovation between $150,000 and $350,000 — sponsored by CHBA-BC: MAC Renovations, Victoria, for Sophisticated Condo Best Residential Renovation $350,000 and over — sponsored by Black Press: Nu-View Homes, Sidney, for The Isabella Best Single-Family Kitchen New under $50,000 — sponsored by FortisBC: Pheasant Hill Homes Ltd., Nanaimo, for Efficient Living at the Ridge Best Single-Family Kitchen – New over $50,000 — sponsored by CHBA-VI: GNB Builders Inc., Ladysmith, and Project Partner Katherine Hildebrand Design for Maison de Campagne Best Multi-Family Low Rise Development — sponsored by VIREB: Denford Construction Management Ltd., Victoria, for Retirement Community in Campbell River

Best Innovative Feature – New or Renovation — sponsored by Y.A.M. Magazine: B.Gallant Homes, Nanaimo, and Project Partner Make-A-Wish Foundation BC & Yukon for Lucas’ Playhouse Best Outdoor Living Space – New or Renovation — sponsored by CHBA-VI: Flintstones Masonry & Home Improvements Ltd., Victoria, and Project Partners Jonathan Craggs and Capital Iron for Wildflower Best Landscape Design – New or Renovation — sponsored by CHBA: Denford Construction Management Ltd., Victoria, for Retirement Community in Campbell River Best Interior Design Custom Residence – New or Renovation — sponsored by Concept Photography: tdSwansburg design studio, Victoria, and Project Partner Martin Custom Builders for Ballenas Bluff Best Any Room, sponsored by Island Savings — GNB Builders Inc., Ladysmith, and Project Partner Katherine Hildebrand for Maison de Campagne Best Environmental Initiative — sponsored by Applied Science and Technologists of BC:

Bernhardt Contracting, Victoria, for North Park Passive House FortisBC Award for Excellence in Energy Efficiency in new Residential Construction — sponsored by FortisBC: Pheasant Hill Homes Ltd., Nanaimo, for Efficient Living at the Ridge GRAND VIBE AWARD WINNERS Residential Community of the Year — sponsored by BC Housing: CA Design, Qualicum Beach, for West Ridge–Phase 1 Single-Family Builder of the Year — sponsored by Slegg Building Materials: Pheasant Hill Homes Ltd., Nanaimo Renovator of the Year — sponsored by Slegg Building Materials: MAC Renovations, Victoria Project of the Year — sponsored by HPO: Keith Baker Design Inc., Victoria, for Hawks Nest

For more information and pictures of the winning projects, go to www.VIBEawards.ca or visit our facebook page: www.facebook.com/CHBAVI.

The CHBA recognizes the importance of continued professional development and has long advocated for mandatory education to meet minimum qualification standards. A new enhanced licensing system for residential builders was implemented last year in B.C., which includes annual mandatory education and training. Through the CHBA, members have access to technical information and specialized education and training courses. CHBA members agree to abide by the code of ethics requiring high standards in customer relations and business practices. Members act with integrity and professionalism in all aspects of their companies’ operations and are committed to industry excellence. The VIBE Awards are another way for industry professionals to communicate their commitment to industry standards. Projects were evaluated anonymously by a panel of long-time CHBA members from outside Vancouver Island. Factors considered included design, materials, environmental measures, functionality of the floor plan and land use. ■

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DESIGNED TO LAST Constructed of steel and tempered skyscraper windows, Marian and Jim Knock’s uniquely designed and eco-friendly home is designed to last for at least a millennium. Some might call it a prototype for the ideal home for the 21st century and beyond. BY THERESA O’LEARY // PHOTOS BY JEFFREY BOSDET

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A

East-facing windows stretch from floor to ceiling across the front of the house, providing a stunning view across Dallas Road over the Strait of Juan de Fuca. The open concept was designed using no internal supporting walls so future layout changes will be easy and inexpensive.

t first glance, the futuristic home on Dallas Road in Victoria could be mistaken for a public building such as an embassy. A closer look reveals the structure is, in fact, a residential home with much in common with architecturally designed public spaces. Forty tons of steel provides the skeleton for this two-storey structure. This house is heavy — about 100 tons, or 10 times heavier than the average wooden bungalow. The roof, made of stainless steel, is designed to endure for as long as 1,000 years. In fact, owner and designer Jim Knock notes that using stainless steel for the roof in his house was inspired by the roof of the Chrysler Building in New York City. And speaking of New York City, when Jim visited the Big Apple several years ago, he took in the Empire State Building. Not surprisingly, he picked up a few ideas for the construction of his home. Today, he beams while noting that his home’s 22-inch-wide support beam weighs almost three tons and is larger than any beam used to build the American landmark. No, it doesn’t make his home a “wonder of the world” like the Empire State Building, but Jim hopes his “labour of love” will inspire others, far into the future, to build sustainably. A lifetime of work in engineering systems and design fed Jim’s imagination as he envisioned and built his deceptively small but strong waterfront 2,836 squarefoot home on just under 7,089 square feet of prime Victoria real estate. Jim spent 15 years designing the “ideal” home environment, searching out ways to blend commercial-design concepts into the traditional model of residential construction. It took four years to build the home. “I wanted to build a home that would last, possibly for centuries — one that wouldn’t deteriorate in 30 or 40 years as most wooden houses do,” he says. While Jim loves the details of construction, for his wife, Marian, the magnificent view is the most compelling feature of the home. “The view is ultimately what made me decide we’ll stay in this house after many years of travelling the globe,” says Marian. Indeed, east-facing windows stretch from floor to ceiling across the front of the house, opening it to the sea light. But while Jim also appreciates the view, it’s clear that it’s the design that most excites him. “The windows are similar to the tempered-glass windows used in most tall buildings and skyscrapers,” he says. “Hence, it can survive strong weather changes easily, heavy winds and rains or an earthquake or tsunami. “The design of the house exceeds any current standards for building construction in earthquake zones,” he claims. “Of course, a quake could cause things to fall, and possibly some large windows may become overstressed and shatter, but since the glass is tempered, it will not ever create any dangerous glass splinters that could harm people. There is no safer structure in Victoria.”

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

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The exterior of the home, covered with factory-painted steel, stainless steel, aluminum and galvanized trim, stone and concrete, has been designed to handle the sea’s salt spray and the big winds. Wall thickness approaches nine inches, which Jim says “ensures no water will be trapped and cause a leaky-condo problem — and little energy is lost through the walls and the steel panels on the roof.” And that Chrysler-esque roof? “The elements [on the coast] make our roofs one of the most corrosive sites on the planet, especially near the ocean,” Jim explains. “The roof is the most vulnerable part of a house. So I decided it had to be made of steel if it were to survive ...” THE RECLAIMED HOME “I see architecture as the most universal expression of the human need for an ability to create a positive personal environment,” says Jim. “It can be art made real and personal if done right.” Durable bamboo and eucalyptus floors warm the huge space, as does the rich cherrywood flooring covering the walls. Laminate floor panels were also used to cover some walls in the living room and closets. The panels were originally customdesigned temporary doors used during construction of the new Royal Jubilee Hospital. Reclaiming is part of the rich story of this home. For decades, Jim collected discarded materials from government surplus and auctions, knowing he would one day find a use for them. He gets a charge out of reusing or repurposing everything he can. That passion shows up throughout the house, including in a stunning “welcoming light” designed to suggest the moon, sun and clouds. The light’s glass came from ReStore. The base is an old wok cast into the massive concrete pillar that supports most of the front of the house. The “welcoming light” Two oak boards salvaged from the old Eaton’s store in the mid-80s are used to represent the clouds. Throughout the home are sliding doors reclaimed from the MacLaurin Building at University of Victoria and bought through government surplus. “The doors had to be extensively reworked,” says Jim. However, because they are made from beautiful Honduras mahogany laminated over cedar, it was well worth the effort to bring them “back to life.” 50

YAM MAGAZINE JUL/AUG 2016

The homeowner’s first-floor office is just inside the carport. A guest room and bath are also on the first floor. Stairs lead up to the open-concept living room.

Wide sliding doors, reclaimed from the MacLaurin Building at the University of Victoria, are used throughout the home instead of swing doors, to allow for easier wheelchair access. An elevator shaft was also built in so that a lift can be installed if the stairs ever become difficult for the homeowners, allowing them to stay in their home longer.


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In the bedroom, the headboard is made from reclaimed materials, including construction scraps, to create the feeling of mountains; and an LED floor lamp was made from a glass shade found by the roadside and a cooking pot and a spun-metal base, one of many purchased at a hotel-demolition sale. Spun metal bases are also featured on the coffee tables made from pieces of waste stone. DESIGNED TO EVOLVE The home’s interior features an open concept with no internal supporting walls. According to Jim, it was designed so layout changes would be easy and inexpensive in the future. “Since we tend to ignore very predictable changes in our housing needs, we usually change homes many times during our personal journeys through life,” he says. However, he points out, a structure can be designed and built, as his home was, so that the house adjusts to the occupants rather than the reverse. This principle of the evolving home guided much of Jim’s design. Both he and Marian are fit and active now, but they are realistic about the future. Sliding doors provide ground-level entry to allow for wheelchair accessibility, should they ever require it. An elevator shaft was built in so that a lift can be installed if the stairs ever become difficult for the couple.

Looking to the future, the homeowner included a caregiver suite in the home’s design, so that he and his wife can age in the home they built.

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Each tread on the cantilevered staircase is unique, with a different inlay. The bannister features a distinctive leather covering. Reclaimed laminate floor panels have been used throughout the home, but as wall coverings. The dancer was found in a box at a local auction around 20 years ago. The homeowner cleaned away the paint and dirt and found a highly detailed lead art-deco figurine, which was probably created in the late 1920s or early 1930s. He had Waterglass Studios cast a bronze base for the figure, which was mounted at the top of the stairs.

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The home’s unusual exterior is covered with factory-painted steel, stainless steel, aluminum and galvanized trim, stone and concrete, and was designed to handle the sea’s salt spray and the big winds that can be experienced on Dallas Road. A large part of the yard is covered with a grid made of plastic shelving purchased from government surplus. The eavestrough, constructed from recycled material, collects rainwater and redirects it to the garden in front of the home.

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“Everyone needs caregiving at the end of life,” says Jim, “so I included a [caregiver] suite for that purpose in the house design.” ECOLOGICAL THINKING Eco-friendly features are apparent throughout. For the front garden, Jim designed an efficient water-retention field, a priority for a guy who grew up on a farm on the Canadian prairie. The only eavestrough on the slightly sloping roof is a downspout crafted from scrap aluminum pipes. It carries rainwater down into a stainless steel tank (a hospitaldiscarded fume hood) that slowly releases the water to the water-retention field. Just beneath the ground surface, the lot has been filled with porous rock that can store as much rainwater as would fill a small bedroom. “This equals dozens of water barrels,” says Jim, “and because of its location, the larger plants withdraw water as they need it — just like they would have before houses were built in the area.” In addition, a large part of the yard is covered with a grid made of plastic shelving purchased from government surplus. Paved areas were punctured with decorative holes to ensure all rain enters the water-retention field. A HOME FOR NOW AND THE FUTURE Housing experts like McGill architecture professor and author Avi Friedman have called for a housing revolution, suggesting “the rapid global changes of the 21st century are provoking an urgent priority to redesign residential environments.” Using Friedman’s categories for this shift in home construction, the Knocks have built a home that scores well in sustainability values such as solar and water efficiency, green roof (solar panels), innovative landscaping, adaptable housing and more. The house is undeniably a focal point in the Clover Point and Ross Bay area. Many passersby pause to observe and learn about the intriguing structure, some to critique it. “One man who admires it brought his daughter immediately from the airport to show her the house,” says Jim, chuckling. He admits people either love it or hate it. A local woman who is loyal to Victorian home design stopped by and told Jim, “It’s the ugliest thing I’ve ever seen.” Jim takes it in stride, focusing instead on the satisfaction of having created his own vision of “the home of the future,” a prototype that may inspire future builders to think beyond wood and asphalt when setting out to construct new homes. The house was recently added to a tour of historic houses in Victoria. Organizer Davyd McMinn says, “It is very exciting to have one of the most innovative, 21st-century-designed residences in the city in our historic home tour.” ::

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DIG DEEP

AT LOW TIDE, THE BEACH LOOKS ROCKY AND MUDDY, BUT IT’S LITERALLY ALIVE WITH FOOD — THE WHITE SHELLS OF SEA-TUMBLED OYSTERS LITTERED ACROSS FORESTS OF BARNACLES, GIANT MOON SNAILS AND THOUSANDS OF DEPRESSIONS WHERE CLAMS LAY BURIED.

IN SEARCH OF THE ELUSIVE COASTAL CLAM By Cinda Chavich

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HOW, WHERE AND WHEN TO DIG I asked Rick Harbo, a former Department of Fisheries and Oceans (DFO) biologist, marine science writer and clam digger of note, to help school me in the finer points of shellfish foraging, and we met on a beach that’s designated as a “recreational shellfish reserve” near Nanaimo. The author of several great books, Harbo knows a lot about clams, an awful lot. Like any good sport fisher, he has some good pointers for a landlubber like me. First, in these parts at least, you need a licence to harvest clams, mussels and other mollusks on the shore, the same Tidal Waters Sport Fishing Licence needed for any fish or shellfish, which costs about $23 annually for a B.C. resident. And while you’ll find fishing guides to take you out for salmon or halibut, when you’re digging clams, it’s a mostly DIY proposition. Check tide tables online and plan your clam dig around the lowest tides — you’ll have an hour or two on each side of the low tide to dig. A shovel or a rake are the implements of choice. And you’ll need a food-safe bucket to collect the clams you find. Rubber boots or hip waders are de rigueur for clam digs — it can be a dirty, muddy business. I quickly had my visions of sifting through the soft sands of beautiful wide beaches (think Parksville or Qualicum Beach) dashed. Clams don’t like soft sand, says Harbo. It’s the rockier, muddier corners of those coastal coves where you’ll find clams, the shallow mud flats. And, due to closures for natural toxins (paralytic shellfish poisoning or red tide) and other contaminants, you’ll need to do your research carefully before you decide where to dig. “It’s getting harder and harder to find areas for clamming that are not contaminated,” says Harbo, noting that clams, oysters, mussels and other bivalves are “filter feeders” that concentrate contaminants in their bodies,

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GARDENS OF CLAMS You can’t walk far along a beach, or kayak along the shoreline, before you run into the evidence that coastal people have been harvesting shellfish on Vancouver Island for thousands of years. I first marveled at the deep layers of compressed white shells, or shell middens, while paddling along the shores of Valdes Island, but I’ve also seen the tell-tale bleached layers in the shoreline along The Gorge, right in the centre of the city. It’s a reminder that First Nations relied on clams as a food source, and that these beautiful and tasty bivalves are still alive and well, if hidden, along the water’s edge. There’s even some evidence that early coastal people encouraged these crops of wild edibles to flourish — clearing beaches of rocks to create “clam gardens” in protected coves.

According to the Sport Fishing Institute of British Columbia, both big butter clams and native littleneck clams are common in protected beaches, bays and estuaries along the B.C. coast. Manila clams are an imported species, found along Georgia Strait, near Bella Bella, and on the west coast of Vancouver Island. The aptly named razor clam, with its long narrow shell reminiscent of a vintage straight razor, is only found on surf-swept beaches, like Long Beach outside Tofino or on the rugged coast of Haida Gwaii. And though most clams sit just below the surface of the sand at low tide — a mere four to 10 inches — it takes some sleuthing to find them.

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he First Nations have an expression on the coast — ‘when the tide is out, the table is set,’” says Brian Kingzett, plunging his shovel into the muck and uncovering a handful of Manilas, littlenecks and fat butter clams. “There’s a whole level of protein here under the sand, chowder for four in a square foot.” But you have to know where — and how — to dig. As a recent transplant to the Island, with my deep Prairie roots, I’m keen to learn more about foraging for shellfish on the beach. And here at the end of Baynes Sound, the channel that separates Vancouver Island from nearby Denman Island, is a good place to start. Known as the shellfish capital of B.C., the beaches of Baynes Sound are where the oyster industry has flourished for decades, in tiny towns like Mud Bay, Deep Bay and the now-famous Fanny Bay. And it’s here that coastal people came to live and harvest clams, the deep layers of discarded clamshells, called shell middens, just beneath the surface of the shore evidence of more than 4,000 years of human habitation. Now it’s also the site of the newly opened Deep Bay Marine Field Station, where scientists like Kingzett study shellfish, especially the native geoduck clam, Panopea generosa, the largest clam in the world. “Last year we had an experimental hatchery for geoduck,” he says, holding in his outstretched palm several miniature geoduck “babies” destined for geoduck aquaculture experiments. “Half of all the shellfish in B.C. come from this area — it’s the same reason the Coast Salish were here.” And it’s a good place to begin your own shellfish studies, whether handling local species in the touch tank or heading down to the beach at low tide.

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so are the aquatic “canary in the coal mine” when it comes to biotoxins. Wild clams are really no different than farmed clams, at least those that are harvested by hand on the Island. We watched a group of men digging up Manila clams on the same beach where we found our clams — just a few hundred yards away in a section of the beach that has been leased to a commercial fishing company. Though some of these companies may “seed” their beaches with juvenile clams to harvest later, Harbo says clams release so much seed into the water when they spawn that it drifts many miles, so even seeded beaches will have a good population of wild native species. But you can’t always assume an area is safe for recreational harvest, even if you see commercial harvesters on the beach. Many commercially harvested wild clams go through a process called depuration to remove pathogens, viruses and bacteria, and are tested and certified safe before going to market. Always check for closures with the local DFO office — people have died from eating contaminated clams, so don’t ignore posted warning signs. That said, you’ll find clams in the Baynes Sound and Nanoose Bay recreational shellfish reserves or on the beaches around Courtenay. Just be sure to observe the commercial harvesting leases, marked by red concrete blocks or boulders. SEA SHELLS ON THE SEA SHORE The beach at Nanoose Bay is littered with evidence of clam colonies — piles of bleached-white and iridescent-purple shells tumbled together at the high water line — a sign it’s a promising place. We are after littlenecks and Manilas, and it isn’t long before we’ve scooped up our limit. The big butter clams, once a major fishery on the west coast of the Island, are here, too, and, because of their size, are easy to find at low tides. But butter clams store toxins in their tissues longer, six months or even a year, and on many beaches, butter-clam harvesting is closed year-round. Best to leave them behind if you’re unsure. Head to the intertidal zone, sink your shovel


IF YOU GO... GET THE GUIDE Pick up A Field Guide to Seashells & Shellfish of the Pacific Northwest by Rick Harbo. This is an inexpensive, waterproof pamphlet filled with colourful pictures to help you identify the shellfish you find. Harbo’s books Pacific Reef & Shore and Tidepool and Reef are also great guides for identifying common plants and animals in the intertidal zone.

FIND THE BEST BEACHES To find good Island beaches for clam digging — and to make sure there’s no deadly red tides or other toxins affecting local shellfish — contact the local Fisheries and Oceans Canada office. Check the ministry’s website at dfo-mpo.gc.ca for updated information.

into the sand, and turn over a few scoops. It’s like searching for new potatoes in the garden. If you’re in a good spot you’ll soon find clams. A small rake is useful to comb through the muddy sand and to separate the shellfish from the rocks. The littleneck is the native species, light coloured, small and round. The Manila clam, which arrived on our coast with oyster “seed” from Japan in the 30s, is tasty and more likely to open cleanly when cooked. Manilas are slightly oblong, mottled and a bit bigger than littlenecks, but it’s not easy to tell them apart. Butter clams are larger — two to three inches across — and you might find the purple mahogany or Savoury clam too. Giant geoduck clams and horse clams, with their long siphons, are buried much deeper and are only accessible on very low tides. TERROIR OF THE SEA We didn’t have the warm, sunny afternoon of my dreams for harvesting clams — our early spring outing was a little chilly and foggy, typical West Coast weather. But it’s always great to be out by the water, and a clam dig isn’t a huge time commitment. We collected 150 clams in less than an hour, and we carried them home in a bucket of sea water, then let them purge out any sand for a few hours. Then we gave them a scrub, steamed them in a little white wine until they opened, and feasted on the tender, sweet meat, dipped in melted butter for added effect. Harbo, like all fishermen, has some secret spots in the Gulf Islands that are only accessible by boat. He alluded to a “very good beach” on Galiano and a few spots on Valdes and Cortes islands to check for clams. COOK YOUR CATCH Wash mud and dirt off the clams, then place them in a food-safe bucket and cover them

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with sea water — in four to eight hours, after they’ve spit out any sand and grit, they’re ready to cook. Small Manila or littleneck clams are easiest. Just pop them in a big pot with a splash of white wine or beer and some minced shallots and garlic, then cover and steam for five to nine minutes, discarding any clams that don’t open. Divide the steamed clams into serving bowls and strain the cooking liquid into a clean pot, leaving any sand behind. Whisk in a few tablespoons of cold butter, parsley or chives, pour back over, then pass around some fresh baguettes to sop up the sauce and dig in! High in minerals and ultra low in fat, clams are good for you, too. Larger butter clams and razor clams should be blanched, shucked and cleaned before cooking. The meat will be chewier, so you’ll want to fillet the body before breading and quickly frying, or chop them up for fritters or chowder. For a beach bake, you can steam a mess of clams over a campfire, with the requisite seaweed, potatoes and corn, even a few Dungeness crabs. Or recreate the clambake at home, layered in a heavy pot and steamed over high heat on the stove. The Easy Campfire Bake recipe on the next page is perfect for a beach, kitchen or barbecue culinary experience. SALT, SAND AND TASTE Whether you plan your own clam adventure or find a local forager who’ll take you along, a clam dig is a great activity for all ages on a sunny afternoon. Because really, what’s more fun than finding a delicious free dinner in the sand?

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EASY CAMPFIRE (OR CITY) CLAMBAKE BY CINDA CHAVICH

My inspiration for digging clams comes from the kitchen (of course) and my romantic notion of gathering around a bonfire for a clambake on the beach. But you can also have a clambake in the oven — or even on the barbecue. This is how we do it at home or when we’re camping. Just remember to bring the aluminum foil! This recipe is for four. Multiply at will, and feel free to add other shellfish or even chunks of boneless halibut or ling cod to the packages. • 16 small new potatoes, halved or quartered • 1 large onion, thinly sliced • 2 to 3 cobs of fresh corn, cut into 2-inch pieces • 16 clams, scrubbed well

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• 16 mussels, debearded • 16 spot prawns, heads removed and deveined • 2 tbsp chopped fresh parsley • Salt and freshly ground pepper

Modestly fabulous…

• 1/2 cup white wine • 4 tbsp butter • Baguette for serving Make four packages using two 24-inch lengths of aluminum foil for each, arranged in a cross shape. Into the centre of each foil, place a quarter of the potatoes, onion slices, corn, clams, mussels and prawns. Sprinkle each with chopped parsley and season with salt and pepper. Pull up the foil around the ingredients to partially enclose, then add 2 tablespoons of wine and 1 tablespoon of butter to each packet. Tightly fold the seams to seal well. Set the foil packets on a baking sheet and bake at 350°F in the oven for 30 to 45 minutes, until potatoes are tender and shellfish has opened. You can also cook the packages on a medium-hot grill for 20 to 30 minutes (wait until the coals die down and are glowing, or use medium heat on a gas grill). Place each packet in a bowl to serve. Open carefully to release the steam, and serve with crusty baguettes on the side. ::

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Project

YOU From surfing to Jazzercise, fitness not only shapes our bodies, but also has the power to completely transform our lives in powerful and positive ways.

By Athena McKenzie

DEDDEDA WHITE

Surfer Shandy Kariatsumari, shown here on Tofino’s Chesterman Beach, says “just being in the ocean cleanses my mind, body and soul.”

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F

itness is often held up as the holy grail of weight loss, with workouts portrayed as something to be endured. Think Gillian Michaels red faced and screaming at contestants on the Biggest Loser. But the women whose stories are featured in this article show that inspiration, not intimidation, is the most powerful tool when you are embarking on Project You. A NEW MINDSET Vanessa Herman admits she used to make fun of the “ridiculous people” who would go running in the rain. “Now I’m one of those people, and I love it,” says the writer, landscaper and organizer of the Victoria Writers Festival. Calling herself a reformed couch potato, Herman ran her first 10K as part of the staff team for Russell Books when she was still living a sedentary lifestyle. “I felt so horribly out of shape and I knew I never wanted to feel like that again,” Herman says. But the mental hurdle was bigger than the physical one, and it took a full year before Herman committed to training, setting the goal of a 5K for her 31st birthday, two years ago. It wasn’t long before she was hooked, losing 40 pounds and discovering that 6.5K is her favourite run distance in the process.

While weight loss was one of the motivating factors, Herman says she was actually looking to change her life when she took up running. She was finished university and feeling depressed that her degree was not leading to the big opportunities she had imagined. Starting to run and to meditate were conscious decisions to pull herself out of that way of thinking. “It has cascaded into having a different mindset,” she says. “I’m looking at different jobs that I wouldn’t have considered before in landscaping and gardening. I’m in shape and really strong because of the running, and it’s opened the door to other opportunities.” Friends have remarked that Herman has more discipline, especially given her 5 a.m. runs. “This has been a tool of discipline that I’ve been able to apply to the rest of my life,” she says. “I never used to have that discipline, and I feel like I worked for it.”

SURF’S UP After experiencing an Endless Summer surfing camp in Santa Onofre, California, Shandy Kariatsumari, then an Alberta girl, knew she had to get to Canada’s own surfing sweet spot in Tofino. A move to Vancouver for art school in her early 20s provided the opportunity, and it wasn’t long before she made a permanent move to the wild coastal town, where she now teaches ocean lifesaving classes through the Lifesaving Society. “I grew up competitive swimming, and I thought surfing would be easy,” she says. “But I soon woke up to the fact that an open ocean and its changing environments are very different [from a pool]. Surfing brings a lot of real, in-themoment time.” When she first started, Kariatsumari surfed multiple times a day and travelled the world to find surf spots. But becoming a single parent eight years ago has changed her relationship with surfing. “My focus is on something so much more important now,” she says. “And when I got back to it, [I wondered] if I would be at the level I was at previously. If you haven’t done something for a little while, that feeling is only overcome by actually doing it. Between work and parenting, I now surf whenever I get a chance. Whether that’s a 20-minute session or four hours, it’s something I do with full gratitude.” She believes surfing is a self-empowering, self-motivating activity, because, while beginners should have a lesson and learn basic safety, ultimately you have to get yourself up on the board. “I always tell people, when they catch their first ride, even if it’s one inch of white water, it’s the same feeling all surfers feel of the ocean working for us,” she says. “It’s nature that we’re sliding on, and it’s ever changing.”

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“Whether that’s a 20-minute session or four hours, it’s something I do with full gratitude.”

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FITNESS BUDDIES For Colleen Leppky-Robertson, fitness, and the community it provided, was her path to move beyond a painful childhood. Her father died of cancer when she was five, and her mother had a psychotic breakdown when Leppky-Robertson was 10, leading authorities to remove her and her sister from the family home. “I felt like no one wanted us,” she says. “I never remember being happy as a child. It’s hard to find who you are when you never feel safe. I tried to control anything I could, and that was food and my body. I became anorexic. I was teaching dance through high school, and I would faint all the time.” When Leppky-Robertson became pregnant with her first child, after being told she wouldn’t be able to have children, she “thought it would magically fix everything. “I immediately gained 95 pounds and started to have a lot of issues with sore joints and high blood pressure.” Becoming a mom made her realize that it wasn’t just about her anymore. And she wanted her son to have the childhood she didn’t get to have. She knew that to be a good mother she needed to take better care of herself. Then a friend told her about Jazzercise. “You flashback to the 80s with the headbands,” she laughs, “and I didn’t really know if it was my thing. I started at the very back and I was nervous. Eight years later, I’m front row centre.” A big part of the appeal is the community and the leadership of instructor Vicki Waters. “Whether you’re in the back, middle or front [of class], you feel so much encouragement from the people around you,” Leppky-Robertson says. “You build friendships. It’s family run, and it’s the first thing you feel when you come. This community makes me feel safe and encouraged.” Her journey with Jazzercise has also seen her tackling her difficult relationship with food. “If I had a drug or alcohol addiction, I could cut that out of my life, but you can’t do that with food — food is fuel,” she says. “If I want to exercise, I have to give it fuel. You have to learn to make good, healthy choices. I still struggle. I know I still have work to do, but I can look in the mirror and feel happy.”


MOVING TARGETS If someone had told Meredith Zaparinuk two years ago that she would become a fitness trainer, she would have “howled with laughter. “It’s absolutely changed my life; I love what I do.” The 55-year-old bookkeeper says fitness was never in her background. Though an avid walker, two years ago she was on steroids for allergies and suffering from arthritis in her feet. “The thought of going to the gym with a 20-something trainer wearing size zero was intimidating,” she says. But she learned about Vibes Fitness through friends at her golf course, and two 15-minute workouts later, she was hooked. She is now fitter and stronger than she’s ever been in her life, losing 80 pounds and actually getting off the steroids. Her trainer at Vibes, Lynne Wilson, who had been on a similar journey, suggested she get certified, and Zaparinuk is now also a trainer. “I absolutely notice benefits beyond the physical, too,” Zaparinuk says. “When you feel healthy, it makes everything else easy and better. You have better stamina, and you sleep better. It’s not about having muscles when I look in the mirror. It’s about having core strength and being able to do all the day-to-day activities.”COSM_9303_Chin Ad_R1.pdf 1 2016-05-05 10:02 AM

“It’s absolutely changed my life; I love what I do.”

NEW HEIGHTS For Jes Scott, who works in marketing and communications at the University of Victoria, a little adrenalin goes a long way. “I like to scare myself a little,” she admits. A trip to the indoor facility at Crag X Climbing Centre a few years ago led to Scott’s healthy obsession with climbing. Her focus now is mainly on outdoor climbing, and she documents her adventures to places such as the North Cascades in Washington and Nevada on her blog at jescott.ca. Along with the motivation to be strong — causing her to strengthtrain in the winter, bike to work and basically make lots of healthy choices — Scott’s favourite thing about her chosen activity is the break from technology. “I have a job that’s on the Internet a lot and using social media a lot, and I love that stuff, but it’s really nice to get away for a bit,” she says. “It allows you to be concerned with fewer things and just to focus on the people right in front of you, in that moment.” Her advice to someone looking to find their fitness activity is to pick something of interest and to start small. “As long as you’re having fun, go for it,” she says. NOTHING IS IMPOSSIBLE So what’s stopping you from lacing up your sneakers? For many of us, the mental hurdles are as big as the physical. LeppkyRobertson tackles every day as a choice. “It’s not about the moves and getting it right and looking like a movie star. It’s about showing up.” And from there, who knows where your fitness journey will take you. As Herman says, “Once you start doing the things you think are impossible for yourself, you realize nothing is.” ::

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STYLE WATCH Fashion Stylist: Janine Metcalfe Photography by Jeffrey Bosdet

TRUE WEST Take your fashion cue from country life this summer in textures, colours and patterns inspired by everything from weathered red barns to bales of blonde hay. Whether you choose denim, summer cashmere or gaucho-style culottes, itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the perfect time to revel in rural chic.

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BIG SKY Just Female shorts ($165), First Rite tank ($185), Brixton Tiller hat ($110), Not Too Niche necklace, all from Still Life; Brave leather belt ($95) and rings on right hand ($45 to $189) from Bernstein & Gold; MiskWill bracelet and rings on left hand (miskwill.com, $120 to $140).

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TWEED CHIC

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Black Orchid jeans ($295) and Aztec cape ($86) from Amelia Lee Boutique; Civilian blouse ($60) and Ness tweed vest ($139) from Out of Ireland; NINO Designs clustered necklace (ninodesigns.com, $225); MiskWill turquoise necklace and rings (miskwill.com, $120 to $140).


DENIM DAYS French Connection dress (Amelia Lee Boutique, $278); Levi’s jean jacket (Reunion Boutique, $98); Scala hat (Roberta’s Hats, $70); straw bag (Jovee Handcrafted, $129); Aigle ankle gumboots (Head Over Heels, $155); MiskWill rings (miskwill.com, $120 to $140).

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TASSLE OVER ALL

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Cheap Monday overalls (Reunion Boutique, $115); Part Two fringe blouse (Bagheera Boutique, $139); neck scarf (Still Life, $48); Vandica straw hat (Robertaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hats, $40); leather shoulder bag (Jovee Handcrafted, $209); Aigle gumboots (Head Over Heels, $209); MiskWill bracelet and statement stone rings (miskwill.com, YAM$120 MAGAZINE to $140).JUL/AUG 2016


SUMMER CASHMERE Cherish maxi dress (Folk, $89); Colour mix fringe cardigan (Black Goat Cashmere, $925); Scala cowboy hat (Robertaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hats, $70); Aigle ankle gumboots (Head Over Heels, $155); Forest & Waves woven blanket (Amelia Lee Boutique, $125); MiskWill bracelet and statement stone rings (miskwill.com, $120 to $140). On page 6: Cashmere poncho (Black Goat Cashmere, $735)

Model: Lilian L., Lizbell Agency Hair and Makeup: Anya Ellis, Lizbell Agency Stylist Assistant: Brooklyn Koenig Shot on location at Westside Stables

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BOOKM A RKS By Carolyn Camilleri

The House of Wives

fiction picks

by Simon Choa-Johnston (Penguin Canada, 320 pages)

Get Canada’s leading banks to compete for your mortgage. Jodie Kristian can help you get the best possible mortgage rate. It’s what she does best. Give her a call to find out how easy a professional mortgage broker can make your mortgage negotiations.

250-885-5738 jodie@modernmortgagegroup.ca www.jodiesmortgages.ca

DLC - Modern Mortgage Group 207-3531 Uptown Blvd. Victoria, BC V8Z 0B9

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Here’s a book that swept me up in minutes and held my attention until the very last page. Starting in the 1860s and set in Calcutta and Hong Kong, it’s the story of Emanuel Belilios, a young Jewish man — and a bit of a bumbler, really. Overshadowed by his handsome brother and tired of fighting with his father, Emanuel finds his own way to prosperity by establishing himself in the opium trade between India and China. It’s not entirely REAL-LIFE READS smooth sailing, of course: before he leaves Calcutta, he marries Semah, a strong-willed woman with her own In This Together: Fifteen fortune — and misfortunes. In Hong Kong, he falls Stories of Truth and in love with and marries Pearl, his business partner’s Reconciliation (Brindle daughter, and soon Emanuel has both wives under & Glass, 224 pages) is a one roof. Choa-Johnston’s descriptions vividly create collection of magazinea sense of place, whether it’s the sordid streets of style pieces by journalists, Calcutta’s Chinatown or a mansion in The Peak, Hong writers, academics, visual Kong’s most opulent neighbourhood, and his characters artists, filmmakers, city are wonderfully complex and real. Love, heartbreak, planners and lawyers — adventure, tragedy, rivalry and comedy — this tale has all of whom share their it all, and apparently, it’s inspired by the Richmondpersonal “light-bulb” based author’s own ancestors. moments regarding when and how they grappled with the harsh reality of colonization in Canada and Bucky F*cking Dent its harmful legacy. by David Duchovny

(Farrar, Straus and Giroux, 304 pages)

I liked this book. I am also an X-Files fan, so I may be biased. Yes, FBI Special Agent Fox Mulder is the author! And you know? He can write a decent story. It’s set in 1978, the year New York Yankee underdog player Bucky Dent famously broke the tie with the Boston Red Sox. Ted Fullilove is trying to be a writer but supports his rather Dude-like (as in The Big Lebowski) lifestyle by selling peanuts in the stands at baseball games, which has given him dubious renown as Mr. Peanut. Ted’s father, Marty, falls terminally ill, and, for the first time in many years, father and son are reunited. With the help of grief counsellor Mariana and a group of neighbourhood old guys, Ted manages to convince his father that the Red Sox are beating the Yankees, which keeps Marty’s spirits up long enough for Ted to discover the father — and the man — he never knew. What seems to be all comedy becomes a touching story of a complicated fatherson bond.

In the memoir January: A Woman Judge’s Season of Disillusionment (Broad Cove Press, 336 pages) Marie Corbett, a retired criminal trial judge and renowned champion of human rights, provides an enlightening look at the Canadian justice system from the inside out. Marie is a meticulous woman with a strong sense of correctness and gives us a heartfelt, honest examination of her own life and career, particularly focusing on the weeks that her closest friend, Anne Armstrong Gibson, undergoes cancer treatment. It’s a heartbreaking story — Anne is just 46 and a recently widowed mother of two young children — but it is also inspiring.


BEACH READS

The Forgetting Time by Sharon Guskin (Flatiron Books, 368 pages)

If the idea of reincarnation holds appeal, you might like this book. Janie is a single mother trying to raise her deeply troubled four-year-old son, Noah. She seeks help from Jerry Anderson, a psychiatrist with a debilitating disease, desperate to complete his life’s work: a book proving reincarnation. You meet some other interesting folks along the way, and the story moves at a good clip until near the end, when it seems to drag on a few too many chapters. I also have some quibbles about Noah’s character — but really, what do I know about four year olds?

Glory Over Everything by Kathleen Grissom (Simon & Schuster, 384 pages)

I almost didn’t read this book beyond the first 10 pages. You just know there is going to be much sadness and suffering, and while some characters are going to break your heart with their sweetness, others are going to make you furious. Set in the early- to mid-1800s, this is a saga about slavery and freedom, the North and the South, and James, a man who looks white but, because his mother is black, struggles with his identity and loyalties. Grissom’s first book, The Kitchen House, was a huge book-club hit, and this one is set to follow suit.

Client: HELIJET / Size: 4.94” x 4.70” / CMYK / Douglas Magazine

THE ISLAND EXPERIENCE

BRING THE FAMILY! Vancouver – Victoria: 35 minutes Vancouver – Nanaimo: 18 minutes

Company Town by Madeline Ashby (Tor Books, 288 pages)

Sci-fi fans may want to check out this futuristic story set in a city on an offshore oil rig in Canadian waters. Hwa, a bodyguard who protects sex-trade workers, is one tough cookie and the only truly organic human in the city (everyone else has had some kind of engineered enhancement). When Ottawa sells the city to a private company, Hwa is hired to protect the youngest family member. A series of murders and death threats adds to the intrigue in this exciting tale. ::

+ Free parking at all terminals, free drop off shuttle van service and kids fly free* *Terms and conditions apply

Pictured: Downtown Nanaimo Heliport

helijet.com | 1.800.665.4354

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L A ST P A GE By Anneke Feuermann

BLUE ROOTS FARM

BRIGHT AGROTECH

What’s the secret to Blue Roots Farm’s luscious legumes and nutrient-rich steelhead trout? Daniel Adelman and Courtney Edwards call it aquaponics: a fusion of soil-less agriculture and sustainable aquaculture, practised by people who think fish deserve healthy environments. This fusion creates a single foodproduction system, where the water from the fish is carried up through the plants, which clean the water and return it back to the fish tanks below. The beautiful result is fresh, local, high-quality greens, herbs and steelhead trout from the Cowichan, all year round. bluerootsfarm.com ::

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A Daimler Brand A Daimler Brand

Gripping beauty. Sleek, taut and exceptionally aerodynamic, the CLA’s flowing curves are enticing from every angle. Frameless door glass, expressive sculpting and a confident stance define it as a true — and truly modern — Mercedes-Benz coupe. Four doors and a surprisingly roomy trunk make it a dream car you can enjoy every day. 2016 CLA 250 4MATIC. Total Price from $38,110

© 2016 Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. Vehicle shown for illustration purposes only. Total price of $38,000 is based on the 2016 GLA Coupe with MSRP of $38,300, freight & PDI $2,295, DOC $395, environmental levies $100, tire levy $20. License, insurance, PPSA (up to $45,48), registration $495, and taxes extra. Visit Three Point Motors to learn more. DL 9818 #30817

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