YAM magazine September/October 2021

Page 1

ISSUE 74 SEP/OCT 2021

yammagazine.com

LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

Fashion to take you around the world

Elevated wardrobe essentials

TRENDING HOME DÉCOR

Beauty from the sea

LIVING WITH

STYLE

+ Tips for

your digital detox


Modern luxury reaches a whole new level With the new S-Class, the sun rises on a new era for the automobile. More thoughtful of its passengers. More in tune with its driver. More protective of those within or even near its elegant presence. Everything that matters most to you, matters more than ever to the S-Class. Start your journey into the next generation of luxury today.

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©2021Mercedes-Benz Canada Inc. Vehicle features for illustration purposes only. Factory order may be required. Please see Three Point Motors for complete details. DL 9818 #30817.


Your future is bright at Trillium Communities. Independent living, assisted living, and long term care that’s safe, engaging, and as unique as you. Come see us today. Locally Owned & Operated | 250.383.6509 trilliumcommunities.com


2 11 5 55 5 E ER R II N NA AN N B BO OU UL LE EV VA AR RD D ,, S SO OO OK KE E 2

U NUII Q Q UOE EP O O PP P O RT T U NI E TSII E E»S S » » U NU I QN EU PO P RO TU R NU I TN II T INTRODUCING INTRODUCING

$7,899,999 $7,899,999

$14,000,000 $14,000,000

$5,200,000 $5,200,000

230 Smith Smith Rd., Rd., Salt Salt Spring Spring Island Island 230

Sear Island, Island, Gulf Gulf Islands Islands Sear

BEDS: BEDS: 20 20 BATHS: BATHS: 10 10 11,375 11,375 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. 232 232 ACRES ACRES

BEDS: BEDS: 9 9 BATHS: BATHS: 4 4 4,500 4,500 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. 28 28 ACRES ACRES

PREC Logan Logan Wilson Wilson PREC

PREC Nico Nico Grauer Grauer PREC

250.857.0609 250.857.0609

250.228.3858 250.228.3858

$3,188,800 $3,188,800

Sidney Sidney Development Development Opportunity Opportunity 18,000 SQ. SQ. FT FT 18,000

Marsha Marsha Graham Graham

250.857.6683 250.857.6683

356 356 East East West West Rd., Rd., Mayne Mayne Island Island BEDS: BEDS: 4 4 BATHS: BATHS: 3 3 1,910 1,910 SQ. SQ. FT. FT.

Harley Harley Shim Shim

250.881.3601 250.881.3601

G E FA M S I NS LE H OH MO SE SGII N N GL LFA EM FAI LY M II LY LY H OEM M E»S S » » RECENTLY RECENTLY SOLD SOLD

$8,880,000 $8,880,000 4035 Locarno Lane, Lane, Victoria Victoria 4035 Locarno

$8,990,000 $8,990,000

4823 Major Major Rd., Rd., Saanich Saanich 4823

BEDS: BEDS: 5 5 BATHS: BATHS: 6 6 6,044 6,044 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. 1.01 1.01 ACRES ACRES

BEDS: BEDS: 7 7 BATHS: BATHS: 8 8 7,896 7,896 SQ. SQ. FT. FT.

Lisa Williams Williams Lisa

250.514.1966 250.514.1966

PREC PREC

PREC Glynis Glynis MacLeod MacLeod PREC Kirsten Kirsten MacLeod MacLeod

250.661.7232 250.661.7232 250.686.3385 250.686.3385

$3,200,000 $3,200,000 236 236 Stevens Stevens Rd., Rd., Prospect Prospect Lake Lake

$2,980,000 $2,980,000 5640 5640 Batu Batu Rd., Rd., Victoria Victoria

BEDS: 4 4 BATHS: BATHS: 3 3 2,900 2,900 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. 10 10 ACRES ACRES BEDS:

BEDS: 5 5 BATHS: BATHS: 6 6 5,983 5,983 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. BEDS:

Beth Hayhurst Hayhurst Beth

Andy Stephenson Stephenson Andy

250.896.0766 250.896.0766

250.532.0888 250.532.0888

SGII N N GL LFA EM FAI LY M II LY LY H OEM M E»S S » » S I NS LE G E FA M H OH MO SE INTRODUCING INTRODUCING

INTRODUCING INTRODUCING

$1,199,000 $1,199,000

$1,498,800 $1,498,800 8720 Pender Pender Park Park Dr., Dr., North North Saanich Saanich 8720 BEDS: BEDS: 6 6 BATHS: BATHS: 5 5 3,814 3,814 SQ. SQ. FT. FT.

Robyn Robyn Wildman Wildman

PREC Don Don St. St. Germain Germain PREC

250.818.8522 250.818.8522

$969,900 $969,900

2111 Wenman Wenman Dr., Dr., Saanich Saanich 2111

$1,025,000 $1,025,000 2155 Erinan Erinan Boulevard, Boulevard, Sooke Sooke 2155

398 Goward Goward Rd., Rd., Saanich Saanich 398

BED: BED: 5 5 BATH: BATH: 2 2 2,375 2,375 SQ.FT. SQ.FT.

BEDS: 3 3 BATHS: BATHS: 2 2 2,102 2,102 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. BEDS:

BEDS: BEDS: 3 3 BATHS: BATHS: 2 2 1,929 1,929 SQ.FT. SQ.FT.

Samantha Samantha Jensson Jensson

Marnie Marnie Ross Ross

250.744.7136 250.744.7136

250.818.2006 250.818.2006

250.514.4363 250.514.4363

Connect with your local experts.

Andy Stephenson Stephenson Andy

Andrew Maxwell Maxwell Andrew

Victoria Victoria 250.380.3933 250.380.3933

Beth Hayhurst Hayhurst Beth

Salt Spring Spring Island Island Salt 250.537.1778 250.537.1778

Brad Maclaren Maclaren Brad

Brayden Brayden Klein Klein

Vancouver Vancouver 604.632.3300 604.632.3300

Brett Cooper Cooper Brett

West Vancouver Vancouver West 604.922.6995 604.922.6995

Christine Ryan Ryan Christine

Dean Innes Innes Dean

White Rock Rock White 604.385.1840 604.385.1840

Don St. St. Germain Germain Don

Whistler Whistler 604.932.3388 604.932.3388

Glynis MacLeod MacLeod Glynis

Kirsten MacLeod MacLeod Kirsten

Kelowna Kelowna 250.469.9547 250.469.9547

Harley Shim Shim Harley

Sun Peaks Peaks Sun 250.578.7773 250.578.7773


Move Beyond Your Expectations S O T H E B Y S R E A L T Y. C A 32 27 75 5 C CA AM MP P II O ON N R RD D .. ,, C CE EN NT TR RA AL L S SA AA AN N II C CH H 3

«NU U NUII Q Q UOE EP O O PP P O RT T U NI E TSII E ES SS I N G L E FA M I LY H O M E S » « U« I QN EU PO RO NU I TN P TU R II T INTRODUCING

SOLD

INTRODUCING

$638,888

$3,150,000

$319,000 101-821 Burdett Ave., Victoria

$11,888,000 3275 Campion Rd., Central Saanich

BUILD BUILD YOUR YOUR DREAM DREAM HOME HOME -- 7,178 7,178 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. LOT LOT

860 860 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. OFFICE OFFICE OPPORTUNITY OPPORTUNITY

BEDS: BEDS: 5 5 BATHS: BATHS: 7 7 9,156 9,156 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. 8.39 8.39 ACRES ACRES

Natalie Zachary

Sandy Berry

Brayden Klein

1335 Stelly’s Cross Rd., Central Saanich

789 Lily Ave., Saanich

BEDS: BEDS: 3 3 BATHS: BATHS: 3 3 3,496 3,496 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. 20 20 ACRES ACRES

Dean Innes

250.686.0279

«

250.882.2966

250.818.8736

250.588.2466

G E FA M « S I« LE H OH MO SE «NS SGII N N GL LFA EM FAI LY M II LY LY H OEM M ES S

$1,895,000

$2,750,000

$1,760,000

9544 Ardmore Dr., North Saanich

3595 Crab Pot Lane, Cobble Hill

3595 Ocean View Cres., Cobble Hill

$1,599,000 4394 Wildflower Lane, Saanich

BEDS: BEDS: 3 3 BATHS: BATHS: 4 4 2,900 2,900 SQ. SQ. FT. FT.

BEDS: BEDS: 3 3 BATHS: BATHS: 3 3 3,366 3,366 SQ. SQ. FT. FT.

BEDS: BEDS: 3 3 BATHS: BATHS: 4 4 3,591 3,591 SQ. SQ. FT. FT.

BEDS: 5 5 BATHS: BATHS: 4 4 3,654 3,654 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. BEDS:

Christine Ryan

Andrew Maxwell

Andrew Maxwell

PREC Brad Maclaren PREC

778.533.3205

250.213.2104

250.213.2104

«I NS SGII N N GL LFA EM FAI LY M II LY LY H OEM M EC S O N D O S & TOW N H O M E S » « S« LE G E FA M H OH MO SE S

« C O N D O S & TOW N H O M E S

RECENTLY SOLD

INTRODUCING

$789,000

6920 East Sooke Rd., Sooke

S304-1411 Cook St., Victoria

BEDS: BEDS: 11 BATHS: BATHS: 11 732 732 SQ.FT. SQ.FT.

BEDS: BEDS: 2 2 BATHS: BATHS: 2 2 1,094 1,094 SQ. SQ. FT. FT.

Tom De Cosson

250.858.5841

Lisa Williams Williams Lisa

Logan Wilson Wilson Logan

Toronto

Paris

PREC Brett Cooper PREC

Marsha Graham Graham Marsha

New York

Marnie Ross Ross Marnie

$529,000 319 - 1335 Bear Mountain Pkwy, Victoria BEDS: 2 2 BATHS: BATHS: 2 2 1,110 1,110 SQ. SQ. FT. FT. BEDS:

250.858.6524

Natalie Zachary Zachary Natalie

Tokyo

250.727.5448

PREC Glynis MacLeod PREC Kirsten MacLeod

Nico Grauer Grauer Nico

Hong Kong

Peter Crichton Crichton Peter

Montréal

250.661.7232 250.686.3385

Robyn Wildman Wildman Robyn

RECENTLY SOLD

$419,000 108-2710 Grosvenor Rd., Victoria BEDS: BEDS: 2 2 BATHS: BATHS: 2 2 807 807 SQ. SQ. FT. FT.

Peter Crichton

Sandy Berry Berry Sandy

Samantha Jensson Jensson Samantha

250.889.4000

Tom de de Cosson Cosson Tom

S OT H E B YS R E A LT Y.C A

Independently Owned Owned and and Operated. Operated. E.&O.E.: E.&O.E.: This This information information is is from from sources sources which which we we deem deem reliable, reliable, but but must must be be verified verified by by prospective prospective Purchasers Purchasers and and may may be be subject subject to to change change or or withdrawal. withdrawal. PREC PREC is is Personal Personal Real Real Estate Estate Corporation. Corporation. Independently


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LIVING WITH STYLE ISSUE

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CONTENTS 10 EDITOR’S NOTE

40 READY TO WEAR

13 HERE + NOW

This season’s key pieces embrace an elevated yet casual esthetic — perfectly suited to Victoria’s laidback lifestyle.

YAM’s latest finds in home décor, fashion, lifestyle and food.

By Janine Metcalfe

20 IN PERSON

46 BEAUTY FROM THE SEA

The renegade artist Robert Burke.

Loaded with beneficial ingredients, Vancouver Island seaweed is the latest luxury skincare essential.

By Shannon Moneo

24 STYLE WATCH

By Linda Barnard

52 STYLE AT HOME

Fashion to take you around the world. Styled by Janine Metcalfe

30 HOME + LIFESTYLE

A look at maximalism, Scandi rustic and cottagecore: three interior design looks that define our times.

This downtown penthouse is part art gallery, part big-city loft.

By Athena McKenzie

58 TIME FOR A DIGITAL DETOX?

By Danielle Pope

72 SCENE

YAM gets advice from the experts on how to manage your digital behaviour. By Carolyn Camilleri

64 THE FIFTH FLAVOUR Intangible and mysterious, the savoury notes of umami are having a culinary moment. By Cinda Chavich

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The new Tofino Gallery of Contemporary Art.

By David Lennam

74 DO TELL

A Proust-style interview with JIMBO. By Aldyn Chwelos


Many thanks to Janis Jean Photography and the Church and State Winery.

HORST SUITS 100% wool Made in Europe Stretch fabric 5 colours Under $500 TAKE ONE FOR A TEST DRIVE TODAY.

FA S H I O N C H A N G E S . STYLE REMAINS.

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620 broughton street, victoria 778.265.5340 dgb-victoria@shaw.ca


Sidney by the Sea Situated at the shore of the Salish Sea, Sidney’s historic and vibrant downtown district is the heart of the Saanich Peninsula.

Locally owned storefronts, coffee shops and eateries offer unique and memorable opportunities year-round. With new restaurants and retail spaces opening regularly, there is something new to discover with each visit! Whether you stroll the Sea Walk, pick up lunch, bring the kids to visit the Shaw Centre for the Salish Sea, en oy a bike ride along the Lochside rail, visit the Sidney Museum, or take in a show at the Mary Winspear Centre, downtown Sidney has something for everyone. Plan your visit at ExploreSidney.ca


tug-o-war no more Have you ever played duvet tug-o-war with your partner? You're not alone! St Genève’s new Euro Twin size was developed to bring peace back to your bed with two individual duvets, so that each sleeper can have a good night’s sleep tailored to their needs. Visit us at Muffet & Louisa, we would love to help you choose the perfect duvets.

MODERN BATH ACCESSORIES Shower Curtains • Towels • Mirrors • Hardware Beacon Avenue, Sidney 250-655-7732

You’ll dig our washable Merino wool sweaters made in BC!

Demi-fine jewelry inspired by world travels

9813 Third St. Sidney, BC 778.426.1998

luxurious cashmere 250-656-5606 250-656-5606

#109 -2506 beacon ave sidney 250.655.7271

101-2537 Beacon Avenue, Sidney 101-2537 Beacon Avenue, Sidney info@waterlilyshoes.com info@waterlilyshoes.com

WATERLILYSHOES.COM WATERLILYSHOES.COM


EDITOR’S NOTE

Style as Self Expression

P

Get Canada’s leading banks to compete for your mortgage. Whether you are purchasing, renewing or refinancing, Jodie can help you find the best terms and conditions. It’s what she does best. Give her a call to find out how easy a professional mortgage broker can make your mortgage negotiations.

250-885-5738 jodie@modernmortgagegroup.ca www.jodiesmortgages.ca

lanning our Living With Style issue always raises some interesting conversations. The concept of style can be enigmatic. At first, it’s easy to get caught up in the style-equals-fashion excitement — especially for the fall, which is my absolute favourite time to invest in some new pieces (hello leopard-print coat and military boots). But then, our team inevitably returns to the issue’s true significance: style is much more than the clothes one wears. Style is something that belongs to an individual. Athena McKenzie, Editor-at-large It’s a form of self expression, whether we’re talking about fashion, hair, makeup, décor choices or esthetic — or even one’s “personal brand,” a concept that has migrated, thanks to social media, from entrepreneurship to the world at large, for good or evil. Style means many different things to different people. For some, it may be the timeless elegance one associates with the French. For others, it’s being fabulous and bold and owning every room they walk into — like Victoria’s own JIMBO, on page 74. Living with style is all about developing a sense of self and presenting that self to the world. My earliest style lessons came from my maternal grandmother, who never left the house without her pearl earrings and red lipstick. (I often think how horrified she’d be if she could see how I look when I run my errands on the weekends.) Despite my years as a beauty editor, I never mastered wearing lipstick on a daily basis. It never felt authentic to me, though I do love wearing it for special events. But I always wear eyeliner, and my signature owl necklace that completes whatever outfit I may be wearing. My grandmother also valued natural beauty (plus lipstick, of course) and never understood why I always insisted on getting my curly hair straightened. I like to think she’d applaud my recent embrace of my natural curls and their silver streaks. It feels like something of a personal style statement. Being editor of YAM has been an immersion in style — from interviewing fashion and interior designers and artists to visiting galleries, studios and creative spaces. One of my biggest takeaways has been that the key to style is embracing originality over artifice, and favouring personality over perfection. It’s a lesson I will take with me as I move on to a new editor role in Vancouver. I will miss this creative team at YAM — individuals who truly know how to live with style. I look forward to reading future issues and seeing how the new editor brings their own flair to its pages.

“Living with style is all about developing a sense of self and presenting that self to the world.”

Athena’s first style influence, her grandmother Blanche Abbott, holding Athena’s mother as a baby.

editor@ pageonepublishing.ca

DLC - Modern Mortgage Group 207-3531 Uptown Blvd. Victoria, BC V8Z 0B9

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021


“Better to illuminate than to merely shine.” — Thomas Aquinas

You are unique, your home is unique, and Luxe is not your typical furniture store. At Luxe Home Interiors we believe in curating an inspiring shopping experience where customers can see, touch and feel great treasures that cannot be found anywhere else. We believe in shopping local, and relish the beautiful human connections that happen with in-person shopping. All of our sales people are skilled designers. Let us help you tell your unique story. Visit us at our new home at 564 Yates Street, conveniently located across from the Bastion Square Parkade (first hour free)!

564 Yates St 250.386.7632 luxevictoria.ca


VICTORIA’S LIFESTYLE MAGAZINE

Décor that warms the heart

PUBLISHERS Lise Gyorkos, Georgina Camilleri EDITOR-AT-LARGE Athena McKenzie DIRECTOR OF PHOTOGRAPHY Jeffrey Bosdet PRODUCTION MANAGER Jennifer Kühtz DIGITAL MARKETING MANAGER Amanda Wilson LEAD GRAPHIC DESIGNER Janice Hildybrant

ASSOCIATE GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Jo-Ann Loro, Caroline Segonnes

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR Carla Sorrell EDITORIAL ASSISTANT Aldyn Chwelos ADVERTISING COORDINATOR Rebecca Juetten

ADVERTISING REPRESENTATIVES Deana Brown, Cynthia Hanischuk, Brenda Knapik

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Linda Barnard, Carolyn Camilleri, Cinda Chavich, Emily Dobby, David Lennam, Janine Metcalfe, Shannon Moneo, Danielle Pope

CONTRIBUTING FASHION EDITOR Janine Metcalfe

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Jeffrey Bosdet, Helene Cyr, Joshua Lawrence, Michelle Proctor

PROOFREADER Paula Marchese CONTRIBUTING AGENCIES Getty Images p. 46, 49, 50, 58, 60, 62, 67, 71; Living4Media p. 52, 53, 57; Stocksy p. 40, 54, 55, 56, 64; Unsplash p. 54

New location: 523 Fisgard Street | 250-382-4424 | www.fantanvictoria.com

Red Wing Work Boots and Red Wing Heritage for the weekends!!

GENERAL INQUIRIES info@yammagazine.com LETTERS TO THE EDITOR letters@yammagazine.com TO SUBSCRIBE TO YAM subscriptions@yammagazine.com ADVERTISING INQUIRIES sales@yammagazine.com ONLINE yammagazine.com FACEBOOK facebook.com/YAMmagazine TWITTER twitter.com/YAMmagazine INSTAGRAM @yam_magazine

ON THE COVER Destination Style See story on page 24. Photo by Michelle Proctor.

Published by PAGE ONE PUBLISHING 580 Ardersier Road, Victoria, B.C. V8Z 1C7 T 250-595-7243 info@pageonepublishing.ca pageonepublishing.ca

Printed in Canada by Transcontinental Printing. Ideas and opinions expressed in this publication do not necessarily reflect the views of Page One Publishing Inc. or its affiliates; no official endorsement should be inferred. The publisher does not assume any responsibility for the contents of any advertisement, and any and all representations or warranties made in such advertising are those of the advertiser and not the publisher. No part of this magazine may be reproduced, in all or part, in any form — printed or electronic — without the express permission of the publisher. The publisher cannot be held responsible for unsolicited manuscripts and photographs. Canadian Publications Mail Product Sales Agreement #41295544

ADVERTISE IN YAM MAGAZINE YAM is Victoria’s lifestyle magazine, connecting readers to the distinctive lifestyle and authentic luxury of the West Coast. For advertising info, please call 250-595-7243 or email sales@yammagazine.com.

1023 Fort Street | 250.920.7653 | heartandsoleshoes.ca

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021

BC


HERE + NOW

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

A TOAST TO LOCAL LOVE

As Marianne Scott shares in her recent book, The Distilleries of Vancouver Island: A Guided Tour of West Coast Craft and Artisan Spirits, local handmade artisan fare offers a freshness and innovative taste that isn’t found in mass-produced goods. “Experimentation with different ingredients and flavourings to fashion distinct tipples can be achieved only in small-batch distilleries using the distiller’s ingenuity,” she writes. Along with insights into the distillers and their products, as well as their craft and techniques, Scott shares a tempting selection of cocktails to try, such as The Smoky Mac Roy from Macaloney’s Caledonian Distillery. Find the recipe online at yammagazine.ca.

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021

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Everyday keepsakes Loops Jewellery designs pieces for all of life’s adventures. By Aldyn Chwelos

M Ay Lelum, a Coast Salish Design House, shares their family stories through garments and music. By Aldyn Chwelos

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021

“Oftentimes, we have a bit of the music before we have the fabric,” adds Seward-Good. The musical story informs them as they develop the fabric and shape the garments. “We literally listen to the new songs on repeat.”

From the top: Long Spindle Whorl Jacket; Sophia SewardGood (left) and Aunalee BoydGood in their own designs; men’s recycled Dinex Jacket with an eagle, killer whale and serpent design by their brother Joel Good.

PAIGE OWEN

F

or the sisters behind Ay Lelum — The Good House of Design, a second-generation Coast Salish design house, their work is all about continuing their parents’ legacy and documenting their oral history. Aunalee Boyd-Good and Sophia Seward-Good grew up in the industry — their parents ran a design house in the 1990s — and their art has remained a family process. The artwork for their designs is created by their father and brother, while their mother is instrumental in designing the garments themselves. “What we do allows us to work with our family and to learn more from our father

and mother, more of our history and our traditions and our laws,” says Seward-Good. “And we’re able to incorporate that into a modern art form and storytelling.” “And we’re able to document so that the next generation has access to it,” adds Boyd-Good. They use non-ceremonial artwork so that everyone can wear their designs, and their work covers a wide range from ready-to-wear to couture. “We found that many people want to purchase from artists, but not everyone has the ability to purchase high-end works of art,” says Boyd-Good. “Our parents did that as well. They had everything from a T-shirt to a high-end cape.” Boyd-Good and SewardGood are preparing for New York Fashion Week and that means they begin with music. Each collection they create is developed in tandem with a song, sung in Hul’q’umi’num’, and inspired by their family’s stories. “We envision the garments while we write the music,” says Boyd-Good.

PHOTOS: HELENA LINES

WEARABLE LEGACY

any of us have that one piece of jewelry we wear, no matter the occasion. It has seen work days, camping adventures and chlorine-heavy swimming pools — maybe we’ve even had to rescue it from a sink drain. “This is the never-take-it-off-again jewellery,” says Jill Bernakevitch, creator of Loops Jewellery, and it’s what inspires her art. Her stud earrings and stacking rings are staple pieces for many wardrobes. Bernakevitch creates “keepsakes to celebrate the love of the outdoors but that are also wearable enough to be worn with us on our adventures.” Loops Jewellery emerged during downtime at her husband’s golf tournaments. Between “looping it” (caddying), Bernakevitch returned to a childhood pastime, making necklaces and earrings. Her minimalist silver, gold-fill and rose-gold jewellery often features West Coast imagery and are handcrafted from sustainably sourced materials. “My designs are greatly inspired by nature,” says Bernakevitch. “We live in such a beautiful part of the world, and I spend a lot of time outside.” The most rewarding part of her wearable designs are the stories that come from each piece. “I often get customers coming to me at markets telling stories of the necklace they have worn for years and haven’t taken off.”

Above: Illumine necklace and Into the Wild Trees + Waves necklace; Left: Heart Mountain bracelet


“Community Salon ... treats everyone equally.”

HAIR TO HELP An inclusive salon catering to the community. By Emily Dobby

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

I

f you’ve had brunch at Bear & Joey recently, you may have noticed a line gathering across the street at Community Salon. Opened this May by Jamie McCallum, the space looks to fill the gaps McCallum noticed in the industry. “Salons can be intimidating and can make many of us feel out of place,” says McCallum. “Community Salon is inclusive, focuses on personal style rather than trends and treats everyone equally.” Wherever possible, Community Salon supports their neighbours and sources all of their products based on distance from the salon, sustainability and performance. Prices for cuts are based on time spent rather than gender. McCallum also started a pay-itforward program. “Our pay-it-forward Hair Bank allows community members who are displaced, in transition or having a difficult time making ends meet to get their hair cut free of charge,” he says. “Clients with the means and desire to do so can purchase an increment or a full haircut, and I will match it and place it in the Bank, thus allowing a community member in need to receive a free haircut.”

Lifestyle Plus Luxe Home Interiors’ new downtown digs.

W

hile Luxe Home Interiors has always carried decor, their new Yates Street location has upped the selection. “Now with being downtown, we’re trying to have more of a focus on some of the smaller items,” says co-owner Scott Elias. “We’re carrying more work from local artisans from Vancouver Island.” From prints by Kwakwaka’wakw multimedia artist Rande Cook and metal work from Nanaimo-based Anvil Island Design to liveedge charcuterie boards from Modern Bodger, the lifestyle items bring new offerings to customers. ‘People are really drawn to these things, and it’s been really positive for us,” Elias says. “For the first time, people are coming to us looking for gifts for holidays, and that’s great.” The location at 564 Yates Street, with its easy access to the Yates Street parkade, is in an area with a vibrant sense of history. The building is believed to have started as Nathaniel Moore’s Dry Goods store in 1860, then became the Majestic Theatre after a radical renovation. “The interior exposed brick wall is pretty amazing and looks spectacular, and we have skylights, so it’s bright and inviting,” Elias says. “And to have the energy of downtown has just been really exciting.” PHOTOS: JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021

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Cannabis culture has evolved a long way from the head shops of the past, and inviting boutiques, like Flight Cannabis in Langford, now offer personalized service.

C

annabis still has that little bit of novelty to it,” says GM Aaron Miller. “People are coming in saying, ‘I’ve never tried it before.’ That’s exciting for me. Let us get you started on this journey. We know how to do it so that it’s safe, and so you’ll enjoy the experience.” An advocate of cannabis since his early 20s, Miller uses it as a way to help with anxiety, depression and an adult diagnosis of ADHD. His goal with Flight Cannabis is to elevate the cannabis retail experience for both novice and experienced users. “Cannabis can be a very personal experience for people, depending on what they’re using it for, whether that’s trying to support mental health, just using it as an escape or whatever the reason is,” he says. In the constantly expanding landscape, a highlight of his role is sharing new products with customers. “The really cool thing about cannabis is that it comes in so many formats — you can apply it to almost any type of product that you want,” he says. “My team and I are constantly trying products to be able to tell people about them. We bring the experience.”

A NEW SEASON TO MAKE A BOLD STATEMENT

Enjoy the wonders of wire-free. Bra fittings available 7 days a week.

MODEN & MODEN ESSENTIALS 2418 & 2416 Beacon Avenue, Sidney 250.655.0774 modenboutique.com

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021

PHOTOS: JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

ELEVATED HIGH


Stories in a Bottle

JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

Palma Cafolla wants to return us to our sense of smell. Her perfume store, Zingaro, focuses on nonsynthetic scents that explore the full complexity of nature.

By Aldyn Chwelos

W

ith a rose, there’s the flower, but there’s also the stem, the soil, the decomposing,” says Palma Cafolla. Cafolla was always intrigued by scent and began her career as a florist. Studying in Grasse, France, the perfume capital of the world, she learned how different natural scents are from the synthetics we’ve grown accustomed to. From there, Cafolla travelled and gathered different “noses” — as scents are referred to — until the Dublin native wound up in Edmonton and met her business partner, Del Thomson. Together they opened Zingaro and poured their fragrances into perfumes, candles, oils, soaps and incense. “All those smells came out of the vault in the archive,” says Cafolla. “And the scents were born.” When visiting a friend on the Island, Cafolla found herself on Johnson Street admiring a lovely little shop. “I closed my eyes, and the scent came out of the store,” says Cafolla, and so she and Thomson moved Zingaro to Victoria. To create new scents, Cafolla often works from memory, trying to recreate a moment or sense of place. Every new fragrance takes months to fully develop. “Each perfume is like a story in a bottle, and I get excited every time someone opens it because it’s like the story is coming out.”

gardenstone.ca 250 715 7220

Old Farm Garden Stone, 5174 Francis Street, Koksilah B.C. Just south of Duncan, next to the Old Farm Market YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021

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TASTES+TRENDS By Cinda Chavich

Friends Feeding Friends

V

ictoria restaurants and food producers are joining forces in various new ventures, literally getting by with a little help from their friends. And suburbanites are the winners with several spots offering a curated collection of local provisions from some of the city’s best chefs and artisan makers. Chef Castro Boateng is the latest to announce a new collaborative business idea, expanding his House of Boateng Café in Langford with a new location, HOB Pantry. Boateng is renovating a former restaurant space, just down the street from his popular restaurant, with plans to offer his own healthy grab-and-go lunches, salads, sandwiches and prepared meals, along with a wide variety of products gleaned from Victoria chefs and food producers. The retail space will have shelf-stable sauces and condiments for sale, including HOB jerk marinade, jerk ketchup and hot sauce, plus coolers and freezers for prepared foods, and an

open kitchen/bar designed for specialty dinners, private events and cooking classes. Boateng says he will invite likeminded chefs from across the city to share the cooking school space for collaborations while giving

customers access to a variety of local gourmet foods from 900 Degrees pizza dough and Zambri’s tomato sauce to Wild Mountain Food + Drink honey. “We’ll be an artisan convenience store,” says Boateng of HOB Pantry. “The goal is to build it and give everyone an opportunity to sell their products in Langford.” The new space will also house Boateng’s catering kitchen and be the first independent venue for private functions in that city, he says, while the original HOB Café continues its creative lunch/ brunch and dinner service. houseofboateng.ca You’ll find other collaborative shops popping up around the city too, from the bustling Niche Grocerant in Royal Oak to the tiny Rock Bay Market and the selection of locally made foods at Beauregard Café & Provisions in Brentwood Bay. The Rock Bay Market sells a variety of local, seasonal and sustainable provisions, from their own Cultured Kombucha and

Mushroom Season

The Saanich-based company specializes in edible fungi of all kinds, especially the fresh blue, pink and golden oyster mushrooms and meaty Lion’s Mane mushrooms, all grown indoors in their controlled environment. Their boxed mushroom kits come with a mycelium inoculated substrate that will produce a pound or two of oyster, lion’s mane or reishi mushrooms in a few weeks, with at least two successive harvests from each kit. Co-owner Jonathan Wright says the company began as a passion project for fellow foragers Janusz Urban and Brendan Harris, the partners now cultivating mushrooms, using a unique sterile system, set in a 40-foot shipping container. The farm can produce 200 pounds of fresh mushrooms a week, and they are expanding their operation with a second facility in the Cowichan Valley and some value-added mushroom products, including pickled shiitake mushrooms, dried mushrooms and rubs. Foragers Galley supplies mushrooms to 15 restaurants in the City, along with several local grocery retailers, including The Root Cellar, Market on Yates and Red Barn Market. foragersgalley.com

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MOLLY JANE

As the weather cools, foragers head to the woods for fall chanterelles and other wild mushrooms. But you can also grow your own fungi with a mushroom kit from Foragers Galley.

other fermented preserves to seafood sourced from Island fishermen and ready-to-cook meal kits. You’ll find house made fish taco kits, hake croquettes, seafood chowder and steamed swimming scallops on the takeout menu, all available to purchase from their online shop for pickup or delivery. rockbaymarket.ca And in Brentwood Bay, Doug Mutch has opened his Beauregard Café’s kitchen to several local food producers after hours — including Bicycle Pizza, Sidney Scones and Umami Bomb. After they’ve finished producing their own line of Beauregard Café baked goods and takeout meals (from frozen shepherd’s pie to wild mushroom risotto, vegetable tagines, soups and fresh salads), other makers take over the commercial kitchen to produce their wares. It’s a “regenerative enterprise,” says Mutch — an idea that feeds the whole community. Beauregard Café, popular with locals for coffee and lunch, now has a growing selection of groceries and prepared foods for sale in its eclectic retail space. You may find fresh blue oyster mushrooms, select B.C. wines, frozen pizza and even clothing from local makers. beauregardcafe.com


Simply Cider If you love a crisp, heirloom apple cider — but not the alcohol — Sea Cider has a solution. Their new line of organic Temperance ciders have all of the same fresh apple flavour without the kick of hard cider, an aromatic bubbly for all ages. Temperance Eden is straw coloured with bright apple, citrus and pineapple flavours, while Temperance Bonnie is a ruby red juice, infused with blackberries. It’s named for Dr. Bonnie Henry, B.C.’s first female provincial health officer and an ongoing inspiration for community wellness. Temperance is 100 per cent pure organic fruit juice, with a spritz from carbon dioxide. It’s an alcohol-free alternative with a portion of the sale price going to programs that “nurture physical, mental and spiritual well-being.” Find it in the cooler at your favourite local grocers.

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YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021

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IN PERSON

THE RENEGADE ARTIST In his paintings, Robert Burke melds the experiences of his life into vibrant narratives. By Shannon Moneo

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JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

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obert Burke, 77, did not start his art career until he was 53, as a student at the Victoria College of Art. Before that he was a heavy-duty mechanic and a logging contractor, a father and a seeker. His vivid and daring art has been heavily influenced by his early years. Burke’s mother was Métis and his father was a Black American who, as part of the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, arrived in the Northwest Territories to build road and pipeline infrastructure in the mid-1940s. Burke did not know his father and at the age of four, Burke’s mother sent him to a residential school. “The Indians hated me; the Negros hated me,” Burke explains. “I didn’t understand who I was. I was crushed so much in my life. I had a lot of anger. I was a hellraiser, but I had the power to educate myself. I had to fight for what I got. By the time I got married, I learned to be reasonable. I am a decent person. I’m a pretty powerful person. I know who I am.” As the residential school experience continues to shape the news and the Canadian consciousness, Burke speaks with unflinching emotions about his early years. “My mother had 11 kids. She abandoned me. No one looked after me,” he recalls. “The nuns were vicious. They tried to depersonalize us. You were considered a savage, considered a well-trained dog. I used to work, wasn’t fed.” Burke became a heavy-duty mechanic and a logging contractor, focused on the cedarsalvaging business. “I lived an exciting life,” he says, “but I didn’t walk away with the wealth. When I was a boss, I should’ve been just a boss, but I wanted to be the guy who took that big tree out.” Burke had always been fascinated by art and enjoyed being a casual artist. When he left the hard grind of the cedar business, he decided to take up a less dangerous career and become an artist with something of a mission.

“I didn’t understand who I was. I was crushed so much in my life. I had a lot of anger. I was a hellraiser, but I had the power to educate myself.”


Painter Robert Burke in his studio north of Duncan.

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This page: Journey Begins (triptych), 2013, acrylic on canvas, 60 x 90 inches.

“I decided to explore Indian life,” he says. “I got an $80,000 Canada Council grant. When I started painting, I did lots of research.” His rich art is both a visual exorcism and an honouring of his bloodlines. Burke has painted at a studio, at a farm outside of Duncan, but lately he has been creating downstairs at his Lake Cowichan home, where he lives with wife, Debora. “I paint during the day,” he says. “I’ll go upstairs, do gardening, go back to painting. I go for walks, kayak.” He and Debora have three children (Kevin, Sheila and Ryan) and four grandchildren who all live close by. A fourth child, Shawn, died in 2020. Each side of his heritage has recognized his work. In 2018, Burke’s art was featured in Big Dreamers: The Canadian Black History Activity Book for Kids. And in 2016, Burke had one of his first exhibits. It was in Yellowknife, NWT: “My Residential School Experience.” In October, Oak Bay’s Winchester Galleries will display Burke’s creations at Art Toronto. “His story was very touching,” says Anahita Ranjbar, an art curator at Winchester Galleries, who initially documented Burke’s work over two years ago. “He was a solo artist who developed all his symbols by himself. He creates a narrative based on his own life stories and discusses social issues and personal challenges as Black and Indigenous. His art is about how he couldn’t fit into any Indigenous community. He’s always been a solo soul. He’s a renegade artist.” Ranjbar notes that while Burke has the skills and training to do landscape and portrait art, he decided to create twodimensional pieces that may seem to lack perspective, yet possess many symbols.

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JEFFREY BOSDET/YAM MAGAZINE

Opposite page: The Chosen One, 2007, acrylic on canvas, 48 x 36 inches (both available through Winchester Galleries).


“His art is about how he couldn’t fit into any Indigenous community. He’s always been a solo soul. He’s a renegade artist.”

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“It’s what he calls primitive art,” she says. “He was never trained by his ancestors. He has learned how to improvise in his own style.” Ranjbar is keen to have the West Coast art community view Burke’s works, not only for the quality but for the timely messages portrayed. “It’s been fascinating to see Robert’s process and how he’s trying to find reconciliation in his art,” Ranjbar says. “His story is worth telling.” Burke wasn’t certain what would be in the show. He planned on working on three triptychs, some featuring nuns but other images from his memory may evolve. “I was going to do a painting of bones six or seven years ago. I started it last year,” he says. “My show will have some emphasis on residential schools … social issues. I’m a shamanist when I tell the story.” But he’s beginning to wonder which path he should follow. “I’m the outsider. I’m beginning to feel, with the residential school story, that it’s the Indians’ story. The group’s attitude is more important than mine,” Burke says. “I’m talking to the whites. White people see the potential in my work.”

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STYLE WATCH Fashion Stylist: Janine Metcalfe Photography: Michelle Proctor

Destination

Style

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Vintage-inspired fashion to take you from Victoria to the streets of Europe.


This page: vintage Saville petite tweed pantsuit, vintage Long Tall Sally trench coat, vintage silk scarf and Fossil leather bag, all available at House of Lily Koi; vintage Ferragamo pumps, available at House of Savoy. Opposite page: Teri Jon organza shirt-dress, available at Bernstein & Gold; Comfort Shoes Mono sandal, available at Heart & Sole Shoes; Parkhurst beret, available at Barbara’s Boutique; vintage suitcases provided by House of Savoy. Page 6: Frank Lyman sweater, available at Barbara’s Boutique; Maria Curcic Millinery blocked wool ivory hat, available at Heart & Sole Shoes.



This page: vintage silk two-piece suit and vintage Oscar de la Renta scarf, both available at House of Savoy; Fossil leather bag, available at House of Lily Koi. Opposite page: Nanette Top in Tiger Print and Elsbeth pant, available at Smoking Lily; Lizzie Fortunato necklace and Smythe Duchess blazer, available at Bernstein & Gold. Black bag provided by House of Savoy.


This page: ELK Rose Agna cardigan, White + Warren cashmere sweater and AG ExBoyfriend Slim denim jean, all available at Tulipe Noire; Parkhurst beret, available at Barbara’s Boutique. Opposite page: Parkhurst turtleneck, Joseph Ribkoff pant and faux suede jacket, all available at Barbara’s Boutique; Gladys Tamez floppy hat, available at House of Lily Koi; vintage suitcases provided by House of Savoy.


Model: Jo Marie/Lizbell Agency Hair & makeup: Anya Ellis/Lizbell Agency using SAPPHO Organic cosmetics and Morroccanoil hair products Style assistant: Heather Clark


HOME + LIFESTYLE

Capital Style Part art gallery, part big-city loft, this downtown penthouse offers a unique take on the West Coast urban lifestyle.

BY DANIELLE POPE PHOTOS BY JOSHUA LAWRENCE

K

aty and her husband Michael knew they were ready to downsize before many of their friends. With four grown children, the pair wanted to capitalize on their freedom and embrace a coveted urban lifestyle together. They traded in their large home on the south coast of the Island for a unique condo in the heart of downtown, overlooking the Inner Harbour. What started as a dream, transformed into one part West Coast art gallery and one part New York penthouse, with bold style and the spaciousness to accommodate beloved guests. “We loved this space as soon as we saw it, but we knew we would only say yes if Kevin Painting, the contractor who worked on our house, was willing to do it,” says Katy. “He took one look at it and said, ‘Absolutely — but this will be a wild ride.’ And it was.” Their building was first constructed in the mid-1800s, and was briefly home to Victoria’s first-known pub. With a rumoured history of catering to the City’s grumblers and malcontents, it’s little wonder Katy’s entryway still has signs of an old speakeasy — with the building’s original ship ballast stones adorning one wall. In the late 1970s, this heritage building was redeveloped into a commercial space with the residential area added above. “We had all of these dreams, like we wanted to install in-floor heating, and pretty quickly we learned it was going to be a lot harder than we thought,” says Katy. “For perspective, there are 59 stairs between the trunk of our car and our kitchen counter. It’s urban, and it has its wonderful peculiarities.” Kevin Painting of St. James Construction helped the couple see their vision through. The 2,200-square-foot condo still stands out to Painting as one of the most complex projects he’s ever worked on. “My initial thought when I first saw the place was: I can’t believe all this is behind that tiny doorway and narrow staircase,” says Painting. “You’re in town, everything seems so tight and then suddenly you’re in what looks like a movie scene of an inner city loft. It’s such a cool space.”

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“We loved this space as soon as we saw it ...” The condo’s striking vaulted ceiling, made from cedar and exposed heritage beams, is one of the original features of the space, as are the ballast stones adorning the entry wall. Left: Contrasting textures add visual interest, from the soft chenille fabrics to the structural totem handcrafted by Haida Gwaii artist Eric Olson.


Potential aside, Painting and the homeowners agreed the space needed a great deal of fixing up. From the tiny galley-style, linoleum-floored kitchen to awkward rooms and weathered flooring, the condo still bore the signs of its ’70s construction. What would stay was the rich cedar vaulted ceiling, the exposed heritage beams and the breathtaking views. The rest had to go — largely by hand. While breaking up 52,000 pounds of concrete flooring was no easy task in itself, nor was carrying it down flights of stairs to the bins below, what made it worse was the impact it had on the lower-level businesses. “We had to work with the restaurant below us to figure out ideal times when we could use the jackhammers because then we’d be running down and sweeping their floors and cleaning the dust off their tables before their lunch or dinner rush,” says Katy. “There are some unique parts to rebuilding your home over top of a commercial space.”

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The kitchen remains the home’s centrepiece and required a significant renovation — which included removing a wall to open the space. The extended wide format and oversized island leaves plenty of room for guests to gather. In order to make the area “a great living space,” strategic choices included the installation of a secret pullout cupboard for stemware, a steam oven and induction stove, quartz counters and specialized cabinets coloured with the iridescent metallic sheen of automotive paint. A stylized rhinestone multimedia collage of the queen, from the homeowner’s private collection, can be seen in the dining area.

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250 589 6955 YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021

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Clockwise from top left: Concrete flooring was installed throughout the kitchen and main floor, and took the design team painstaking effort to complete; a sliding glass garage door exits onto the mainlevel porch, welcoming light and adding industrial intrigue to the space. The dining area is punctuated by a Foucault’s Orb chandelier by Timothy Oulton; the loft level doubles as guest quarters and entertainment room, with a hutch exit onto the rooftop patio. A trio of paintings by Canadian artist Amelia Hutchison is seen over the glass banister, along with a driftwood sculpture by B.C. artist Guthrie Gloag; the main-level porch — featuring recreated ballast stones — offers great views of the Inner Harbour, paralleling the ship motif inside and out.

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More challenges ensued, from revamping the electrical system to pouring cement through a line pump into the penthouse to renovating the restaurant’s HVAC system (which ran directly through the home out the roof) to rebuilding the roof, and shuttling appliances up a challenging flight of stairs. The feat was no easy one. Still, with a January to September construction window, the mission was completed. “Every little problem we had — which you always do have — we came up with a solution, even when it took a little bit of head scratching,” says Painting. “Trust is a huge factor in these projects because there are just so many unknown factors.” Today, Katy says the space has become her and Michael’s dream home. On nights when they watch the Inner Harbour from their rooftop patio, or entertain family visiting for the holidays, she knows all the work was worth it. “People will say doing a project like this could make or break a marriage, but we had no hesitancy at all — we had already done this once with our larger home,” says Katy. “During construction, in the evenings, we would pour a glass of wine and walk through to see all the progress. It was incredible watching how it all came together. We loved it. And now, here we are.”

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The master bedroom on the condo’s upper level is highlighted by heritage archway windows and eco-focused skylights. The ballast stone motif makes another appearance in this segment of the home, and Hawaiian sculptural art by Louise Warner brings an antique flair to the modern space. The master walk-in dressing room provides ample storage room for this couple, with a special vanity set up for getting ready each day.

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WHERE IT ALL HAPPENS Over the years, Langford has flourished and attracted international retail stores, smaller owner-operated boutique shops and cultivated a vibrant, chef-owned restaurant scene. With its unique geography and quaint downtown core, Langford is packed with welcoming patios and eclectic menus that are perfect for connecting with family or celebrating with friends. For a directory of Langford shops and restaurants, visit:

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Ready to WEAR This season’s key pieces embrace an elevated casual esthetic — perfectly suited to Victoria’s elegantly laidback West Coast lifestyle.

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JAVIER DIEZ/STOCKSY

By Janine Metcalfe


It’s time

to be bold and optimistic. This fall our wardrobes will need to take us beyond the everything-from-home life. But that doesn’t mean we’re leaving ease and function behind — people are people, and we’ve all had 18 months of being comfortable. While some designers made a big swing back into extreme couture in their fall fashion shows (Manolo Blanik announced he’s bringing “sexy back” with five-inch heels), most offered casual looks with an elevated esthetic and polish. The key pieces are versatile and seasonless — perfect for that Zoom meeting before heading out to meet up with friends for a Friday evening cocktail.

Seeing Spots Animal prints are timeless, and one of the biggest trends for women is the leopard-print coat. Designers such as Michael Kors offered versions of this striking piece of outerwear. It’s a fun way to make any outfit instantly fabulous, and it pairs well with the season’s other popular pieces. Wear it over high-waisted denim with a pair of militarystyle boots.

Left to right: Aritzia; Victoria Beckham; Celine; Scotch and Soda (available through Frances Grey)

Denim For Days It’s no exaggeration to say everybody’s doing denim. Designer Victoria Beckham even presented a full-on Canadian tuxedo for fall. In case you didn’t get the memo, if you want to look current, skinny jeans are out — for now. Almost every other style gets the nod from stylesetters, including low rise, medium- to high-waisted, straight, flared, boot cut and boyfriend jeans.

Left to right: Michael Kors; Juicy Couture; Mango


Yes to Pleats Men’s fashion also brings an elevated look to comfortable pieces with some vintage flair. This is especially true with the high-waisted pleated pants that are currently popular, such as those shown by Giorgio Armani. This versatile item can be part of a suit, but is even better paired with fall’s other essentials, such as the oversized hoodie and the pea coat. Pleated perfection.

All photos: Armani

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Vested Interest Fans of the sweater vest, it’s your time to shine. This key piece, shown everywhere from Gucci and Phillip Lim to H&M, is fashionable in a variety of styles from oversized and tight-fitting to vintage-inspired (think crochet and stripes) and modern prints. Wear it over tees, buttondowns or even with trendy puff-sleeve blouses.

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CLIENT: MAYCOCK EYECARE YAM MAGAZINE SEP/OCT 2021 PUBLICATION: YAM MAGAZINE SHIPPING DATE: APRIL 2021; AD SIZE: 4.94” x 4.7”

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Left to right: Lena Hoschek; Selected Femme; Paris 99

prairie girl 2.0 The cottagecore trend takes traditional countryside-inspired dressing to the next level. Think floaty maxi dresses, tiered skirts and chunky-knit sweaters. Another example of this look is puff sleeves, which were big in the spring and will be even bigger in the fall (both in the size of the puff and the size of the trend).

See page 56 for more on the cottagecore décor trend.

Sole of the Matter For both men and women, military boots and sneakers are the biggest thing in footwear. And you can wear either with almost anything, even dressing them up to go to a party. Combat boots have been given a bit of a style makeover, with contrast stitching, chunky soles and extra straps and hardware. Designers are also embracing the sportier side of footwear, so you could elevate your sneaker game to couture levels, but why bother when brands such as Puma, Nike and Adidas deliver such charming kicks? Clockwise from top left: Nike; Puma x Karl Lagerfeld; Dr. Martens

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The Forget-me-not Bracelet

Oversize tote bags (like the iconic “The Tote Bag” by Marc Jacobs that was all over Instagram in the spring) will still be in demand. Not only do they make a statement, they fit everything you’ll need to carry — and more. On the other end of the size spectrum, mini handle bags are the statement piece for the fall. Along with micro bags, they are very popular with street-style and Instagram influencers.

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Beauty

Sea

from the

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O U T L OOKS

LUXURIATE IN THE BENEFICIAL QUALITIES OF VANCOUVER ISLAND SEAWEED — THE LATEST LUXURY SKINCARE ESSENTIAL.

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Above: A session in the outdoor baths at Avacena lasts 1.5 hours, including time to change, soak and lounge.

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ermaids have the right idea, I thought, relaxing in an outdoor tub filled with pleasantly hot water scattered with colourful seaweed. My seaweed bath, experienced at Avacena in Qualicum Beach, smelled pleasantly of the ocean and the essential oils added to the water. The cool strips and pods of green, brown and purple seaweed were slippery, soothing and fun to play with, especially the crab-claw-shaped bladderwrack, which, when popped, released a cool gel for a face mask . The bumpy surface on the purple Turkish towel seaweed did double duty, exfoliating and moisturizing. Afterward, my skin felt smooth and tight. There was also a good night’s sleep to follow; vitamin and mineral-rich seaweed also contain melatonin. Thalassotherapy — skincare using seaweed, marine mud and sea water — is an ancient practice that’s a modern skincare darling. Scientific research shows nutrient and mineral-packed seaweed promotes healthy skin and body, inside and out. Luckily for us, we’re surrounded by seaweed on Vancouver Island, a massive ocean garden that’s home to about 650 species. We can experience this seaweed in many ways, from trying luxe skincare products and relaxing spa treatments to using locally harvested, dried seaweed for at-home treatments and baths. Avacena owner and “curator of seaweed experiences” Liz Glowacki has been fascinated with seaweed for its natural beauty properties and effectiveness since she discovered it calmed her eczema. She started Avacena in 2019, creating a backyard spa with a pair of bright yellow clawfoot bathtubs on a sheltered deck, overlooking her garden. The baths are open April to October.

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Glowacki studied with marine biologist and long-time seaweed harvester Amanda Swinimer of Dakini Tidal Wilds, a Shirley seaweed expert dubbed the “mermaid of the Pacific.” Glowacki gathers seaweed at low tide. After a storm, she finds large pieces of seaweed on the beach that have torn from their holdfasts in deeper water. She dries the seaweed for future use. The waters from northern California to Alaska make up the greatest cold-water seaweed diversity anywhere in the world, says Swinimer, who has been sustainably harvesting seaweed from Sooke-area beaches with Dakini Tidal Wilds since 2003. “I love this mysterious hold [seaweed] has on beauty,” says Swinimer. “They’ve been used for thousands of years to promote beauty, promote health, promote vitality, promote a strong constitution.” The seaweed she harvests is a favourite with chefs. It’s also used for body care. She sells packages of dried winged kelp and bull kelp on her website, as well as Mermaid’s Shake — flaked dried kelp to sprinkle on food or bloom in a small dish of fresh warm water to use as a masque or body wrap. Toss a piece of dried kelp in a hot bath for health and relaxation, she says, or soak it and wrap it around a pulled muscle, secured with a tensor bandage for pain relief. “We’re absolutely just scratching the surface,” Swinimer says. “I started my business 19 years ago, and at that time, I was only selling seaweed to health food stores, and people were mostly eating it to get the health benefits.”

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Coastal First Nations people have used seaweed in many ways for generations, including for food and health. It was a prized trade item, Swinimer says. Today, as the protective benefits of seaweed become better known and scientifically proven, it’s become a hot ticket, she says. Swinimer is especially excited about studies exploring fucoidan, found in some brown seaweeds, for its anti-cancer properties. Seaweed enhances immunity and prevents diseases associated with aging, including cancer, Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease, says Swinimer. It even protects the skin from harmful UV rays, whether it is applied or eaten. It’s a nutritional powerhouse (see sidebar on page 50) and the planet’s most concentrated food source of minerals, many of which can be absorbed through the skin. Beneficial seaweed gets into our bodies very effectively.

KEEPING IT NATURAL Sooke-based Seaflora Skincare makes smallbatch face and body products from nine varieties of seaweed, hand-harvested around Sooke and up the coast by company CEO Adam Butcher. His father, marine biologist George Butcher, occasionally pitches in. Seaweed is the first ingredient listed on Seaflora products, an indication that it is the primary ingredient. Butcher’s mother, local seaweed pioneer Diane Bernard, started the company 22 years ago, harvesting seaweed for local chefs.

THE WATERS FROM NORTHERN CALIFORNIA TO ALASKA MAKE UP THE GREATEST COLD-WATER SEAWEED DIVERSITY ANYWHERE IN THE WORLD.

Amanda Swinimer, founder of Dakini Tidal Wilds, hand harvests wild seaweed for food as well as body care.


KNOW YOUR COLOURS There are three main groups of seaweed: brown, green and red.

Brown seaweed, like kelp, has the most B vitamins and are best for tissue repair and circulation. They also have a compound called fucoidan, shown in studies to have anticancer qualities.

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Green seaweed, like sea lettuce, is the most detoxifying, says Chantelle Line, sales and marketing manager of Seaflora Skincare.

Red seaweed, including bumpysurfaced Turkish towel, has the most protein, Line says. Red seaweed is in almost all of Seaflora’s products because it’s the best for anti-aging.

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LINDA BARNARD

Dismayed that some beauty companies were alginate properties, Willard says. Let it warm selling skin care products made with heavily up slowly for 15 minutes and apply to the skin. processed, bleached and powdered seaweed, Willard also uses it as a masque to tame her Bernard decided to make her own products with frizzy hair. raw, locally harvested seaweed. SUSTAINABLE SELF-CARE “It matters how the seaweeds are processed Oak Bay Beach Hotel spa manager Avneet because you want to keep the fibres in; you want Manchanda has been using seaweed treatments to keep the vitamins and the minerals and all the for clients since her days with a luxury hotel in compounds intact,” Butcher says. Mumbai. She also uses seaweed at home as part Butcher and Seaflora sales and marketing of her body-care routine. manager Chantelle Line took me on a seaweed “Seaweed definitely has a lot of health education walk along a Sooke-area beach at low benefits,” Manchanda says, adding it has tide to show me the rich variety of seaweed there. vitamins A, C, D and K, as well as zinc. “It helps Based on what you see (and smell) on beach in hydration, it is anti-inflammatory, it helps in walks, you may think of seaweed as stinky and increasing the collagen production, increasing slimy. It’s neither. Fresh, healthy seaweed smells cell growth.” like the ocean, says Butcher. It’s pleasantly I indulged in a one-hour Ocean Elements Body slippery, not slimy. Ritual at the hotel’s Boathouse Spa & Baths, which “Seaweed is in beauty products because it begins with giant kelp fronds harvested off Haida gives your body everything it needs to slow the Gwaii. Fun fact: giant kelp is the fastest-growing aging process, to detoxify,” Line says, adding organism on the the alginate planet, gaining as in seaweed much as 60 cm soothes and a day. plumps the The seaweed skin. We was soaked in stopped to warm water to admire the plump up, then iridescent massaged along sheen of my body and rainbow left on my back, seaweed, one of legs and chest. three seaweeds Cool glacial in Seaflora’s Canadian marine Seaweed clay was applied Bath, a home next, followed thalassotherapy by a luxurious treatment. massage with The bag of Seaflora CEO Adam Butcher (left), with sales and marketing Pacific Seaweed dried seaweed, manager Chantelle Line, on a seaweed walk on a beach in Sooke. Body Butter, both sea salts and from Vancouver aromatic company Beauty Through Balance. An application essential oils comes with two reusable hemp of Green Tea Indian Spice Oil was the final bags to make a kind of tea in bathwater. relaxing element. Squeezing the wet seaweed in the bag releases While Angela Willard is happy to see a soothing gel to apply to the skin. The seaweed nutritious seaweed gaining ground as a healthy, can be dumped in the garden as compost organic skincare treatment, it needs to be afterward. harvested responsibly and sustainably. Cumberland-area clinical herbalist Angela “Anything that becomes a popular trend has Willard, cofounder of Harmonic Arts Botanical the potential of being overused or misused in Dispensary, has been studying seaweed for terms of how it’s harvested and collected and 15 years. She says while seaweed has been gathered and even cultivated,” she says. “As long a popular food item on Vancouver Island, as we’ve got a set standard of healthy practices increasingly people are realizing it has many for the environment and then also the social benefits when used topically. aspect of healthy businesses that are being Harmonic Arts’ colourful Sea-Veg blend can created around seaweed, then I think, absolutely, be used in food or as a body treatment. it has a huge potential here.” Hot water extracts seaweed’s emollient

LEARN MORE Amanda Swinimer of Dakini Tidal Wilds teaches seaweed harvesting classes and leads low-tide beach tours. Her book The Science and Spirit of Seaweed is out this fall from Harbour Publishing. Go to dakinitidalwilds.com for information. Angela Willard of Harmonic Arts Botanical Dispensary teaches an in-depth online course in seaweed therapeutics through Wild Rose College of Natural Healing. For details, go to wildrosecollege.com/product/seaweed-therapeutics.

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SUPER SEAWEED “I’ve always stood by the motto ‘Don’t put anything on your skin that you wouldn’t eat.’ Skin absolutely absorbs what you put on it,” says marine biologist and seaweed expert Amanda Swinimer of Dakini Tidal Wilds. Ask her what makes seaweed so healthy for skin and body and the list is long. Seaweed has compounds called phlorotannins, among the most powerful antioxidants ever discovered and tested on Earth, Swinimer says. That makes them popular in anti-aging creams. It is hydrophilic, drawing in moisture, so it’s very hydrating. Seaweed creates a gelatinous UV barrier to protect its sex cells from sunlight, creating sun protection whether used topically or eaten. Seaweed has significant amounts of melatonin, which helps to induce a good night’s sleep. It increases circulation and quiets the central nervous system, creating a sense of comfort and relaxation. Fucoidan, found in some brown seaweed, has been shown in studies to have anti-cancer qualities. Seaweed is anti-bacterial and has anti-inflammatory properties, helping cleanse lactic acid, making a seaweed bath excellent for muscle pain. Seaweed has been touted to increase collagen production, but Swinimer said she couldn’t confirm that in scientific literature. Brown seaweed contains sodium alginate, which draws toxins, including heavy metals like mercury and lead, along with radioactive isotopes, dioxins and other harmful chemicals, before safely passing them from the body through stools. Seaweed is the most concentrated food source of minerals on the planet. It includes calcium, magnesium, manganese, protein, zinc, iodine and iron. It is rich in B vitamins as well as vitamin A, C, D, E and K.



STYLE AT HOME 3 INTERIOR DESIGN LOOKS THAT DEFINE OUR TIMES By Athena McKenzie

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y good friend often deploys a quirky parlour game when she’s entertaining new guests: she asks everyone to define their décor esthetic. On the rare occasion, she’s been met with alarmed silence, but more often than not, a writerly round of one-upmanship follows. “Bohemian science-lab.” “Victorian funeral-parlour chic.” “Bordello meets natural history museum.” “1980s stockbroker party pad.” In our home, where my partner and I have combined massive book collections, we call our vibe “Hipster bookshop hygge.” Recognized interior design styles, which have decidedly more serious names, run the gamut from minimalist and Hollywood regency to bohemian and mid-century modern. The popularity of these styles are constantly in flux, and they evolve with the times. While most people’s homes do not fall within one specific, well-defined style, there are looks that one may gravitate to and use for inspiration. Here are three trends that offer a little something for everyone: the bold more-is-more of maximalism, the natural minimalism of Scandi rustic, and the quaint appeal of cottagecore.

“Maximalist interiors have had a bad rap in the past, because spaces can look like they’ve been decorated by someone who’s had seven cups of coffee while nursing a hangover.”

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LIVING LARGE If the internet is anything to go by, the embrace of the maximalism trend can be placed squarely at the feet of Marie Kondo. Tired of minimalism and decluttering, many are embracing the sea change in the world of interiors and leaning into maximalism. The ornate look encourages personalizing your space in the boldest way possible. As the name suggests, maximalism is a highly stylized type of décor that experiments with materiality, colour, form, texture and layering. It is a strikingly visual style, with an old-world feel that makes abundant use of patterns, excessive — but curated — collections and saturated colours. “It’s curating elements in the right order and in the right proportion,” says Victoria-based interior designer Ivàn Meade, who describes many of his own projects as maximalist. “It’s creating a sense of rhythm and scale.” He cautions that eclecticism and maximalism are not the same things. While eclecticism, which mixes and matches different elements, can be maximalist, maximalism is highly curated and may not be eclectic. A common misconception around maximalism is that it’s just glorified clutter. While it does embraces the use of excess, it’s meant to be done in a mindful, curated method. “Maximalist interiors have had a bad rap in the past, because spaces can look like they’ve been decorated by someone who’s had seven cups of coffee while nursing a hangover: chaotic and messy with overwhelming thoughtlessness and disarray that feels jarring

and not at all serene,” writes international design influencer Abigail Ahern in her recent book Everything: A Maximalist Style Guide. “Yet it doesn’t have to be that way. I’m championing a new kind of maximalism. One that — when you get it right — feels considered, curated and magical.” She describes maximalism as “a highly stylized type of décor, and it holds comfort at its very centre. It’s a full-on sensory experience that lifts your spirits and provides inspiration in a way that minimalism just can’t.” To bring the maximalist esthetic into your own décor, it’s important to tap into your own personal sense of style. Be sure to include rich, bold colours; layers of texture; the repetitive use of patterns (such as florals, abstract and

animal prints); unique statement pieces; vignettes of items, such as statues, artwork and books. “A great starting point is your colour palette,” Meade says. “That will add continuity to your space, and you can bring it in through wall treatments, textures and fabrics.” He also believes the maximalist look is a wonderful way to use some of Victoria’s specialized artisans. “From Victoria Lampshade, who creates beautiful bespoke lampshades, to the plaster expert who can install unique ornamental elements, such as cornices, these are the ways we add different layers to make the space more special,” Meade says. “At the end of the day, it’s the combination of these small details that make a maximalist space so memorable.”

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NATURAL APPEAL

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If “beauty in simplicity” sounds more like your speed, the Scandi rustic trend might be just your thing. While white walls, wood floors, modern furniture and minimalist décor are all hallmark traits of the Scandinavian esthetic, this design trend has evolved by bringing in homespun and natural elements. As Rebecca Lawson and Reena Simon write in Scandi Rustic: Creating a Cozy & Happy Home, this design sensibility grew out of the practice of hygge, and treating one’s home as a sanctuary, which should create feelings of well-being and contentment. Rustic Scandinavian interiors achieve this sense of comfort and calm by creating a strong connection with nature. “One way to do this is by adding texture that is derived from nature,” says Mari O’Meara, principal designer of Mari Kushino Design in Victoria. “Wood elements can create a more cozy, welcoming feel to what could be a stark space. Incorporating greenery, which can be landscape greenery through the windows or indoor plants, is one way to fill negative space and add texture. Even sheepskins add so much dimension and texture.”

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“ If your interior palette is minimalist, it allows you to calm your mind.”

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Other defining features are the simple monochrome colour palette and pared-down décor. “If your interior palette is minimalist, it allows you to calm your mind,” says O’Meara. While there are no hard and fast rules, Lawson and Simon recommend using three or four key neutral shades and repeating them for a sense of rhythm, continuity and flow. Pale bleached tones are the ones most commonly used with this look, though dark and moody shades, such as charcoal, midnight blue and earthy brown, can also lend a rustic feel. Lighting is one of the most important considerations with any look, and it plays a crucial role in creating the right atmosphere in a Scandi rustic space. “Light fixtures are a great way to bring in natural texture and organic lines,” O’Meara says. In their book, Lawson and Simon suggest that each room should have three to four layers of light, including ambient, statement and task lighting. Ideally, these fixtures should be beautiful in form and practical in function. These elements all work together to create a living space that invites the mind to rest. “I personally think the appeal of this look is that it allows you to clear your mind,” O’Meara says. “It allows you to live in the moment.”

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If you’ve somehow escaped hearing the ubiquitous term “cottagecore” this past year, it’s the movement taking over everything from fashion and gardening to cooking and décor. Basically, it’s a call back to a simpler agricultural life that is more harmonious with nature. Or as the New York Times described it in a recent piece: “Take modern escapist fantasies like tiny homes, voluntary simplicity, forest bathing and screen-free childhoods, then place them inside a delicate, moss-filled terrarium, and the result will look a lot like cottagecore.” From a décor perspective, it’s a nod to a traditional English countryside style, fully embracing the romantic and nostalgic. It should be noted that cottagecore is more of a way of life than a true décor trend. It often involves the pursuit of traditional skills, and these endeavours — such as container gardening, quilting and candle making — often end up affecting a person’s surroundings. One has to display all their knitted throws, macramé plant holders and handspun ceramics, after all. As with Scandi rustic, a key component of the vibe is bringing natural elements indoors but with a more maximalist, vintage feel. The colour palette is also neutral but leans to the warm tones. Think bunches of dried flowers or fresh flowers and houseplants, floral wallpaper, collections of vintage dishes and muted chalk paints. Handmade elements are a trademark of this look. If you have a collection of crocheted quilts or woven wall hangings, this is the time for them to shine. Sleek, modern materials and minimalist design are not a part of this movement. Vintage furniture, wooden kitchen counters and open shelving are all embraced. The best part? Perfection is not the goal with cottagecore. This look lets you create a homespun, cozy, comfy space that takes granny chic to a whole new level.

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From a décor perspective, it’s a nod to a traditional English countryside style, fully embracing the romantic and nostalgic.

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Time for a

digital detox? By Carolyn Camilleri

D

oes the thought of having no Wi-Fi send a wave of panic through you? It does for me. My job depends on being connected, and it’s how I stay in touch with friends and family. The volunteering I do wouldn’t even be possible without online communication. Hobbies, interests, entertainment, how many steps I walk daily — it’s all in my phone. And I’m okay with that. I love living in the digital age. But there is a dark side — and everyone knows it. It’s a line that gets crossed. Endless messages and emails. The aggravation of notifications. The pressure to look and respond right away. Bouncing from topic to topic, chat to chat. Hours go by scrolling social media and retail sites, and it’s so easy to forget why you were online in the first place. Well, here’s one for you: Google “digital detox.” I got 76,700,000 results. “Digital detox British Columbia” gave me 763,000 results. Page after page of information and suggestions. You can even download apps to fight “phone addiction.” It’s a rabbit hole. But digital behaviour is something to take seriously, and you don’t need your phone to take the first step.

You know your phone is stressing you out, right?

Putting down your phone and reconnecting with the real world is good for you. But it’s harder than it sounds. YAM gets advice from the experts on how to manage your digital behaviour.

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Monica Kvas is a registered clinical counsellor (RCC) who specializes in helping people with anxiety and stress at her practice, MK Life Coaching and Counselling. She says our connection to our devices was bad before and has gotten worse since the pandemic. But it’s not just social media — it’s also work, overlapping with our free time. “When technology became available, it was supposed to make our lives easier, and, instead, it has made our lives harder,” says Kvas. “There’s no off switch for people. Before technology, you would get home and you had a telephone, but there were no emails. You had time to mentally and physically relax. Now, people get emails at all hours and it’s expected that they answer.” Kvas says people are showing acute and chronic conditions, including anxiety, depression and burnout. A digital detox is one of the ways Kvas helps people combat that stress. She often starts with this exercise. “I encourage people to not look at their phone for the first 30 minutes of their day, and a lot of people find that difficult,” she says. “Then it becomes, okay, what can you do? Can we start with five minutes? Can you give 10 minutes?” For people who don’t think they have a problem, that little assignment is a wake-up call. Next steps may involve deep breathing and mindfulness, noting that mindfulness is a broad term. “There are so many things you can do: yoga, meditation,” Kvas says. “And there are so many different types of meditation, qigong, tai-chi.”


She helps people find something that resonates with them. “I’ll have one client start yoga and absolutely love it, and another hate it. And that’s okay. Let’s try something else.” Mindfulness doesn’t have to be complicated. “You can bring mindfulness into folding laundry or washing dishes by bringing all your senses into it, bringing yourself into the present moment and just focusing on that one task — that’s mindfulness,” says Kvas. “And trying to use dead time, like if you’re waiting in line or even driving. In a supermarket line, everybody’s on their phones waiting, but that could be an opportunity to do some deep breathing and just ground yourself.” She encourages people to remove social media apps from their phones. “Look at them if you have to once a day on your computer, so it’s a little bit more work.” But be prepared for what happens when you do turn off the phone. “Because technology is so addictive, it’s very overstimulating,” says Kvas. “When people do actually shut everything off, it’s almost an eerie feeling for them to be alone with themselves. That can be really scary, and that’s when uncomfortable emotions can come up.” Remember that a detox period needs to be sustained and change takes time. “Because everything is so instant in our society, we expect instant results,” she says. “But it takes time, especially if you’re someone who’s been under intense stress for years. You’re not going to feel the benefits right away.” But the benefits are worth it. “It’s about getting back even just small pockets of groundedness so you can hear yourself think and feel calmer, because you’re more efficient when you’re calm and grounded throughout the day.”

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What if you really, really can’t put the phone down? Benjamin Shing Pan Wong, RCC, helps people and their families address issues related to digital use, specifically gaming disorder. “Given what we know of how our brains work — the most up-to-date neuroscientific understanding of our brain and our behaviours — we’re creatures of habit,” says Wong. “The more time and energy we invest in certain activities and behaviours, they become our go-to option in almost every endeavour.” For example, if we’re shopping or looking for a meal, entertainment or legal advice, where do we look first? Probably online. “That’s what everybody does, which by itself is not necessarily a problem, but now our options are limited by such conditioning,” says Wong. “And for some people, they take a step back to re-evaluate

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People are showing acute and chronic conditions, including anxiety, depression and burnout.

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their lives and how they want to spend their time, and they may say, ‘Well, that’s not exactly how I want to spend my time.’ ” Often it’s much more time than originally planned. “That speaks to the power of how electronic devices engage our attention,” says Wong. “They’ve got a certain draw, a certain pull, a certain personality of their own. These devices, they’re not neutral in the sense of a tool.” Part of it has to do with how powerful and portable our devices have become — they are designed to accompany us everywhere, and we are willingly tethered to them. “We want those benefits to accompany us always, 24/7,” says Wong. “And there’s the reason behind what electronic devices do to us psychologically, physiologically, mentally, socially — how all of these questions have formed perhaps the fastest-growing emerging field in psychological research.” How do you know if you have a problem? Without going into the clinical details of a diagnosis, three conditions are considered, all of them starting with the letter C. “The issue of control is, ‘Am I in control of my devices or are my devices leading my way?’ That’s the first issue to think about,” Wong says. The second is compulsion: “If, in my conversation with you right now, in the back of my head, I’m thinking about that photo I loaded up onto my Instagram account, and I’m wondering how many likes and hearts that photo is generating. In a sense, my mind is not quite here with you. My mind is someplace else. That’s compulsion.” The third is consequences: “If my digital behaviours are already bringing into my life

negative consequences — consequences that are not desirable; consequences that are destructive of my health, my relationships, my ability to attend to important matters in my life — and yet I continue to maintain the same level of engagement, spending the same amount of time, or possibly even more, then I’ve got a problem.” If all three C’s are checked, Wong’s recommendation is to start a conversation with a professional who deals with these issues. If you’re not quite at the 3-C level, think about your schedule and try to be more purposeful with your online activities. “It’s about being disciplined,” says Wong. “And, keep in mind, not all screen time is created equal. There is productive screen time and unproductive screen time. Unproductive screen time is what we want to reduce and eliminate, if possible.” When you find yourself browsing mindlessly or playing video games with no exact ending, it’s time to detach and do something else.

You are surrounded by the greatest digital detox opportunity there is ... John Fraser, RCC, calls himself a nature connection mentor. “Reconnecting with nature is powerful, powerful therapy, but not just therapy,” he says. “Even from a perspective of recentering you, getting a bit of calm, getting out of the rat race for a little while — on so many fronts, people are drawn into nature.” As a complement to his counselling practice, Fraser operates Elemental Magick Adventures, offering Mystical Rainforest Tours for groups and Self-Discovery Quests for individuals. Both combine classic forest


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Forest bathing is mindfulness. “It’s slowing down, being in the present moment, really seeing, smelling, touching, hearing.” bathing with what Fraser calls “a little bit of nature mysticism.” Forest bathing is mindfulness. “It’s slowing down, being in the present moment, really seeing, smelling, touching, hearing. Intentionally bringing yourself into the present moment, looking at the different shades of green, watching the leaves dance in the wind, listening to the birds singing, closing your eyes and listening to a stream.” Nature mysticism is the idea that the forest is aware of you — that there’s sentience. “If you’re open to the idea that the forest senses you, knows you’re there and is reaching out to offer you some kind of guidance, support, nurturing, healing — whatever it is you need — if you’re open to it, there are certain tools and techniques to tune into and hear that calling,” he says. Fraser teaches people how to connect with nature as a therapist, as a tool they can use, and not just for peace and relaxation but for genuine healing. The forest works like a sedative without side effects, shifting the nervous system and lowering blood pressure. It can change someone at a profound, fundamental level. To counter too much time online, Fraser says go for a walk in a forest and don’t take your phone. “If you are really feeling like you’re going through withdrawal if you don’t bring a phone, be mindful of that anxiety,” he says. “Acknowledge it, but distract yourself with mindfulness. Bring your focus back to what’s going on around you.” For people who fail at meditating, bringing your focus into nature is much easier. If you want to return down the rabbit hole of a digital detox Google search, sure, spend some time scrolling through pages. Then put down your phone, do some deep breathing and go for a walk in the trees.


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UMAMI IS HAVING A MOMENT.

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The Fifth

Flavour

Island stores Island Style Island Living

By Cinda Chavich

I

first learned about umami while writing a wine column for a daily newspaper. Swishing a newly vinted Syrah or Cabernet across my palate, I’d tease out every nuance in the wine, looking for the classic sweet, sour, salty and bitter flavours, along with the elusive “fifth flavour” — umami. Umami is described as a rich, savoury, meaty taste, one you might usually find in a rare steak, an earthy mushroom, an aged cheese, or almost any fermented food. In wine, that savoury note is a result of fermenting on the grape skins or the yeasty lees, so it’s often a big red or a vintage champagne that displays a subtle note of umami. Umami was once a fairly esoteric concept in the food and wine world, but “the fifth” is having a moment, the darling of chefs and marketers, and a word that has become synonymous with flavour. And even if most people can’t put their finger on the exact taste of elusive umami, thanks to the popularity of vegan diets, wild fermented kombucha and kimchi, artisan cheese and charcuterie, umami is now on everyone’s lips.

UMAMI OR MSG? The savoury flavour known as umami comes from the glutamic acids that occur naturally in many foods, including mushrooms, yeast and seaweed, and they are concentrated in others through aging, drying and fermentation. Sweet, sour, bitter, salty and glutamate (umami) receptors are not only spread across the entire tongue, but they are even found in your stomach. Umami tames bitterness and enhances all other flavours, so when umami is present in food, your brain says, “Yum!” Named for the Japanese word umai (meaning delicious taste), umami was first identified as “the fifth flavour” in 1908 by chemist Kikunae Ikeda in Tokyo, who found glutamates, derived from kelp, added delicious depth to dashi broth. His discovery led to isolating those glutamic acids and creating monosodium glutamate (MSG), a flavour-enhancing ingredient that would become ubiquitous in processed foods and seasonings. Ironically, even as we now seek umami-rich foods for their flavourboosting properties, MSG is often avoided. Though there is little scientific proof that MSG is harmful, it has become such a polarizing ingredient that many food companies have removed MSG from their products, substituting glutamate-rich alternatives, including autolyzed yeast, textured vegetable protein, yeast extract, glutamic acid, gelatin, soy protein isolate and soy extracts (essentially, MSG from natural sources, perceived identically by our brains). It’s also interesting to note that many “healthy” low-salt products have added glutamates to compensate for the flavour lost when sodium is reduced.

‹ Umami is the savoury flavour from glutamic acids that occur naturally in many foods, including mushrooms and seaweed.

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GRACE RUTHVEN/TASTING VICTORIA

Aura’s smoked duck is cured with shio koji and is served with preserved rhubarb and purple shiso umeboshi.

BUILDING UMAMI IN THE KITCHEN Cooks around the world have always used umami-rich ingredients in their recipes, even if they didn’t know the scientific reason for the delicious synergies. It’s the umami flavour in aged Parmesan cheese, tomato paste and anchovies that enhances traditional Italian dishes, and the sautéed mushrooms that add an extra boost of umami to a grilled steak. Fermented soybean miso and kelp make classic miso soup a satisfying sip. And a splash of Vietnamese fish sauce is a chef’s secret hack to lift the flavour of almost any sauce, stew or soup. Dried shiitake mushrooms and seaweed are at the top of the scoreboard when it comes to natural levels of umami. Ripening, aging, curing and drying concentrates umami too, whether you’re talking about salami, dry-aged beef or salted cod and bonito flakes. There’s concentrated umami in many fermented foods, from soy sauce to sauerkraut. Worcestershire gets its umami from fermented

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vegetables and anchovies. Lauren Isherwood and Nick Baingo are the makers of a new local product called Umami Bomb, a spicy vegan condiment that relies on puréed shiitake mushrooms, tamari and tomato paste for its concentrated hit of umami. It was a switch to a vegan diet that inspired the couple to create their punchy chili oil, seeking the savoury note they were missing without meat. They use it as a dip for dumplings, toss it with noodles or any vegetable — from sautéed shishito peppers and green beans to crispy air fryer cauliflower wings. “We recommend a generous tablespoon (or two) per serving and to add it after cooking,” Isherwood says, noting the sauce now comes in four spicy variations. “It is extremely flavourful and adds umami to any dish.”

A JAPANESE ESSENTIAL Though it was dashi that first sent a Japanese chemist on a quest to understand umami, it wasn’t until the 1980s that western scientists delved

deeper into glutamate’s unique properties, and only in recent years have chefs learned how to harness the power of umami. “The presence of umami has a way of waking up your mouth,” says Ken Nakano, executive chef at the Inn at Laurel Point. “It’s a flavour that I’ve always loved.” Chef Nakano says umami-rich ingredients don’t need to dominate a dish, but their natural glutamates add a subtle “depth of flavour.” Whether it’s sake kasu (the lees from sake making), koji, miso, soy sauce or kimchi, fermented ingredients contain umami and are “one of the building blocks” to seasoning a balanced dish, he says. At Aura, the hotel’s waterfront restaurant, most dishes on the menu include an element of umami, whether it’s the beef braised in dashi broth or smoked duck cured with shio koji and served alongside a preserved rhubarb and purple shiso umeboshi. “That’s a double hit of umami,” he says, pointing to other umami-rich combinations,


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Kombu (dried kelp) adds umami to dashi broth and is in nori furikake, a Japanese seasoning of toasted sesame seeds, seaweed and chilies. Shake it over your popcorn or noodle bowl — it even adds a tasty finishing touch to a pizza or a grilled cheese sandwich. Get more savoury umami flavour with hard cheeses of all kinds — a shower of grated Parmesan or a bit of old cheddar is a quick way to add umami to a dish. Fish sauce (nam pla) gets its umami from fermented fish and is an important flavour in Vietnamese and Thai cuisines. A dash invisibly lifts the flavour of any soup, tomato sauce or gravy. Like fish sauce, dried anchovies add umami. Anchovies are the base of Worcestershire

sauce, and other dried fish, from Asian shrimp paste to Italian bottarga (dried fish eggs), provide natural umami too. When you have miso, Korean red pepper paste, soybean paste, soy sauce, kimchi or sauerkraut in your pantry, you have instant umami to enhance soups, sauces, dressings and stir-fries. Tomatoes have umami, especially when they’re cooked down into sauces. Add a spoonful of tomato paste to add umami to soups and sauces. Make a Caesar cocktail with umami-rich Clamato and Worcestershire sauce. Mushrooms are a natural source of umami, and its concentrated when they’re dried. Pulverize dried mushrooms to a powder in a blender to use as a seasoning or rub for meats. Add a splash of soy sauce to sautéed mushrooms or mushroom soup to up the umami.

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including his kimchi-braised short ribs or seafood risotto flavoured with dried shrimp. “We’re looking into Japanese and Asian ingredients, but the common thread is umami — we rely on it for flavour.” On his latest menu, Nakano serves a fresh tomato salad with dashi vinaigrette and makes a miso butter yuzu kosho sauce, “full of umami,” for spot prawns. Using Japanese and Korean ingredients is an easy way to add umami to your daily dinners too, with a little sprinkling of nori furikake seasoning or a swirl of miso in your mayo.

NUTRITIONAL NOOCH Umami-rich nutritional yeast (a.k.a. “nooch”) is having a moment of its own. What a generation of hippies knew in the 1970s has come full circle today — nutritional yeast is a vegan ingredient that tastes a lot like cheese, and it’s good for you too. Nutritional yeast is a dried, inactivated form of brewer’s yeast, rich in protein, B vitamins and umami. You can buy it in the bulk bins at your local grocer and use it to add a Parmesan-like flavour to vegan mac and cheese, Caesar salads or a plate of pasta. The Cultured Nut creates its vegan “cheez” slices and spreads from cashews, chickpea miso and a cheesy shot of nutritional yeast. Islandmade Yeshi salad dressings utilize nutritional yeast in their recipes too. And NoochPOP is a tasty popcorn snack from Vancouver, flavoured with nutritional yeast.


UMAMI = FLAVOUR

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So next time you’re wondering why that Thai curry is so more-ish, think about umami. Try the triple whammy of umami in the Umami Fries at Part and Parcel, dusted with a mushroom and seaweed powder and served with anchovy mayo for dipping. Taste the umami in the golden, salt-cured duck egg yolks shaved over spinach salad at Wild Mountain Food + Drink. Or add umami to your favourite takeout dish at Foo with a side of kimchi. And plan to add more mouthwatering umami to your everyday meals — your taste buds will come alive! The vegan Bold Cheddah “cheez” from The Cultured Nut gets an umami kick from ingredients such as cashews, chickpea miso and nutritional yeast.

NOOCH DRESSING Use this creamy dressing for kale or cabbage salads or grains like quinoa, brown rice or wheat berries. It keeps in the refrigerator for a week. • 1 clove garlic, chopped • 1/4 cup nutritional yeast flakes • 3 tablespoons tamari (Japanese soy sauce) • 1 tablespoon Dijon mustard • 2 tablespoons apple cider vinegar • 2 tablespoons water • 1/2 cup olive oil In a blender, combine the garlic, nutritional yeast, tamari, mustard, vinegar and water. With the machine running, slowly drizzle in the olive oil to form an emulsified dressing. Add a little more oil to thin the dressing to pouring consistency, if needed. Makes about 1/2 cup.

BUCKWHEAT NOODLES WITH MUSHROOMS AND PEAS The makers of Umami Bomb shared this idea for a simple noodle dish made with sautéed mushrooms and frozen peas. It’s an adaptable starting point for a weekday meal. Feel free to add other vegetables, from bell peppers and green onions to bok choy or snow peas. • 4 oz. dried soba noodles (or udon) • 1 tablespoon vegetable oil • 2 to 3 cups sliced shiitake or oyster mushrooms • 1 to 2 tablespoons tamari (soy sauce) • 1/2 cup frozen peas • 1 to 2 tablespoons Umami Bomb sauce Cook the noodles according to the instructions on the package. Drain and rinse. Set aside. Heat the oil in a nonstick pan over medium-high heat, and sauté the mushrooms until they brown and start to release their moisture. Add a tablespoon or two of tamari to the mushrooms, and cook for a minute or two until the tamari is absorbed. (If you want to add additional vegetables, add to mushrooms and sauté for a few more minutes.) Defrost the frozen peas in the microwave. Drain and set aside. Add the noodles and peas to the mushrooms in the warm pan. Stir in a big tablespoon of Umami Bomb and heat through. Add more Umami Bomb to taste. Divide between two deep bowls to serve.

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UMAMI SEASONING Use a blender or spice grinder to pulverize dried shiitake mushrooms to a powder for this seasoning to sprinkle on anything from scrambled eggs to popcorn or to use as a rub on meats before grilling. • 1/2 cup dried shiitake mushroom powder • 2 teaspoons onion powder • 1 teaspoon crushed red chili flakes • 1 teaspoon mustard powder • salt and freshly ground black pepper Combine ingredients in spice grinder and whirl. Store in a jar in a cool, dark place. Makes just over 1/2 cup seasoning.

LOBSTER WITH MISO YUZU KOSHO SAUCE Chef Ken Nakano created this umami-rich miso butter to brush over grilled spot prawns, but he also recommends lobster tails (or halibut) cooked “en papillote” — baked in a parchment or foil packet — to keep the fish tender and juicy. Look for yuzu kosho (Japanese chili paste), yuzu juice and other Japanese ingredients at Fujiya and Junmai Nama sake from Artisan SakeMaker in Vancouver. • 4 Atlantic lobster tails Spicy Garlic Miso Butter: • 4 tablespoons white miso • 4 tablespoons soft butter • 1 tablespoon yuzu kosho • 2 teaspoons garlic, minced • 4 tablespoons Junmai Nama sake • 2 tablespoons soy sauce (Kikkoman) • 1 tablespoon mirin • salt to taste • fresh lime or yuzu juice to taste

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Preheat the oven to 375°F. In a small saucepan, combine the white miso, butter, yuzu kosho and garlic and warm over low heat. Whisk in the sake, soy sauce and mirin to incorporate ingredients and create a smooth sauce. Leave on low heat for 10 minutes to allow the flavours to develop, but do not boil. Season with salt to taste, and add a squeeze of lime juice or yuzu. Use kitchen shears to cut along both sides of the soft base of the lobster shell, then peel the shell away from the raw meat. Coat each lobster tail generously with the sauce. Place each portion on a piece of foil or parchment and fold over to enclose, crimping the edges to create a tight seal. Place packages on a sheetpan and roast in the preheated oven for approximately 2 to 3 minutes per ounce. Carefully cut packages open to release steam and serve. NOTE: This sauce creates a beautiful glaze when brushed over grilled prawns or halibut.


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UMAMI BURGERS WITH MISO MAYO When you add minced mushrooms to your ground beef mixture, then top grilled burgers with sautéed mushrooms and miso-infused mayo, its pure umami on a bun. • 1 pound brown or portobello mushrooms, divided • 2 tablespoons olive oil, divided • 1 medium onion or 3 shallots, minced, divided • 2 garlic cloves, minced • 1 pound lean ground beef • salt and freshly ground black pepper • 2 tablespoons butter • 1 tablespoon soy sauce • 4 burger buns

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Miso Mayo: • 1/4 cup low-fat mayonnaise • 2 teaspoons white miso Slice half of the mushrooms and set aside. Place remaining mushrooms into a food processor and pulse until finely chopped. Heat 1 tablespoon of oil in a non-stick pan over medium-high heat and sauté chopped mushrooms, half of the minced onion and half of the minced garlic together until starting to brown. Transfer to a bowl and cool, then mix in the ground beef, using your hands to combine well. Season with salt and pepper. Form mixture into four patties. Refrigerate patties at least one hour. Meanwhile, heat the remaining oil with the butter and sauté the sliced mushrooms with the remaining onion and garlic, seasoning with salt. When the mushrooms are starting to brown, add the soy sauce and cook until absorbed. Set aside. In a small bowl, whisk together the mayo and miso. Grill the burgers on medium-high heat for about 5 minutes per side, until cooked through. Slice buns and toast on the grill. Serve burgers on toasted buns, topped with miso mayo and sautéed sliced mushrooms. Serves 4.

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SCENE

Art of the Matter Tofino’s new gallery brings a contemporary offering to the area, focusing on local and Canadian artists across diverse mediums. By David Lennam

L

eah McDiarmid has always had a passion for art, with contemporary art being her particular enthusiasm. The 55-year-old — who’s been called a humble perfectionist (but she says, “I tend to focus with intensity, a.k.a. obsess, on certain details”) — has been a collector since she was in her early 20s, filling the walls of her Oak Bay home with pieces from Victoria’s Limner Group, original lithographs by Joan Miro and Paul Klee, and, most recently, a Sylvia Tait. The first piece she bought was Herbert Siebner’s “Woman and Man” from a lawyer she worked for in Victoria. “I would see it hanging in his office every day and fell in love with it,” she says. “He took a one-year sabbatical and said he’d sell it to me. I paid in instalments over four months.”

couldn’t see it, but the germ of an idea was there.” The roster is local and regional Canadian artists, from emerging to mid-career, in diverse mediums — abstracts, figurative works, photography, sculpture — including Irma Soltonovich, Ira Hoffecker, Graeme Masterton, Arden Rose, Fran Solar, Stacey Bodnaruk and Marion Evamy’s apropos surfer series. The artists will vary, and McDiarmid hopes to attract some big Canadian names in the future. Right now she’s keeping it local, small and manageable, laughing off notions of those really big names. “With my Dutch background, of course I love the Old Masters and post-impressionism,” she says. “But there are no Vermeers, Rembrandts or van Goghs hanging in our home, unfortunately.”

FOLLOW THE DOUGHNUTS Collecting for fun has recently taken a more serious twist. This June, McDiarmid opened a gallery in her other home, Tofino, filling a void for current Canadian art in the West Coast surf spot. The Tofino Gallery of Contemporary Art is in an intimate space off the main drag of Campbell Street behind Rhino Coffee House (just look for the long lineups and follow the smell of the doughnuts). The gallery is located in Campbell House, a building owned by McDiarmid and her husband, Bruce, where they used to run Tofino Vacation Rentals. They sold the business in 2015, freeing up some potential. “I always had this vision that this space could be a great gallery,” says McDiarmid. “A few people thought I was a little bit mad. They

Leah McDiarmid in her new Tofino Gallery of Contemporary Art next to a sculpture by Birgit Piskor.

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OWEN PERRY

GIVING EMERGING TALENT AN OPPORTUNITY McDiarmid is no artist (“I draw stick people”) but certainly knows her stuff, recently completing a degree in art history and visual studies at UVic. She’s discriminating about what she will sell. Deep Bay-based sculptor Birgit Piskor is excited to have her work shown in Tofino, and, more importantly, shown by McDiarmid, whom she greatly admires (“there’s just something about her Leah-ness,” exclaims Piskor). “She has a very good eye, she really does, and working with someone who is just so passionate and supportive of the local artists is an exciting opportunity. I love that she’s not afraid to say, ‘I don’t know.’ I know she’s going to be really honest and fair with her artists and very supportive.” Piskor, whose sensual, human-sized concrete sculptures are in galleries across North America, says this venture gives McDiarmid the chance to use her instincts to procure fantastic pieces as well as discover new artists. One of those new artists is Victoria’s Paula Callahan whose mixed media abstracts have become creative catharsis for years spent on the front lines with Doctors without Borders. McDiarmid had bought a couple of Callahan’s paintings after they became friends, then convinced the reluctant artist that it was time to show off her stuff. “It terrifies me because I am so private,” admits Callahan. “I really want to paint. It’s therapeutic and good for me. But it comes with a price — exposure — and I hate that so much.”


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A SPACE FOR TOFINO TO CELEBRATE McDiarmid and her husband Bruce are part of the family that owns the Wickaninnish Inn. A branch of Tofino royalty, if you will. Bruce’s father, Dr. Howard McDiarmid, Tofino’s only doctor back in 1955, opened the resort in 1996, was a Social Credit MLA and helped establish the Pacific Rim National Park Reserve. The couple also runs a trio of vacation rental Chesterman Beach homes — each filled with original art from McDiarmid’s collection. That she’s opened a gallery could be seen as Leah doing something for Leah, a venture away from hotels and rental houses. “It’s kind of my baby, and, as Bruce said, you came to Tofino with me, and we’re part of the opening of the Wickaninnish, and we’ve had a very successful business together.” Her timing could be impeccable as pandemic restrictions start to lift and Tofino gets its mojo back. But McDiarmid dashes assumptions her gallery is there to cater to visitors. (“It’s not touristy gimmicky. It’s thoughtfully curated.”) She’ll be inviting the locals, the yearrounders and the regulars, immersing herself in the local arts scene, in conjunction with the Tofino Arts Council. “I want this to be a community gallery and a space to hold events.” That pleases Maureen Fraser, Tofino Arts Council president, to see a contemporary gallery alongside already established galleries specializing in Indigenous art and photography. “It’s fabulous that Leah is opening one. There is a gap in our art galleries.” And it closes another gap — that between McDiarmid and art, her genuine love for it. “I think being exposed to the artists, the friendships that developed, being able to share the art with collectors … Somebody comes in and says, ‘Wow, this painting is incredible.’ To be able to say, ‘Let’s take it to your home’ — that’s the connection I feel.”

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DO TELL

Long Live the Queen JIMBO on making space for everybody to be weird.

By Aldyn Chwelos Photo by Helene Cyr

From their first runway on Canada’s Drag Race, Victoria-based queen JIMBO was a fan favourite for their humorous, boundarypushing characters. The clown-inspired performances weren’t always welcomed by the drag community, but JIMBO’s Drag Race success has led to more acceptance locally and globally. “It’s made space for other queens doing alternative drag as well,” says JIMBO. “A little more credibility to be weird, to be different, to be yourself.” When not touring Canada and the U.K. with their Drag Race sisters, JIMBO is creating a new sketch comedy show called House of Jimbo. The crowdfunded project will be filmed in their Chinatown studio full of sets, props and costumes and feature other drag queens and performers. “My biggest hope is to create a platform to showcase alternative artists,” says JIMBO. ”To create another platform to showcase drag outside of our competition setting, more in a setting of play and experimentation.”

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What is your idea of perfect happiness? My idea of perfect happiness is to have all I need, to give all I can and to be all I can be … and to twirl around in beautiful things. What is your greatest fear? My greatest fear is a combination of things: My face falling off would be the worst, being lost in outer space or dying alone and then being eaten by your pets is also terrifying. What is your greatest extravagance? My drag. Buying expensive things is part of the gig and to quote Dolly: “It costs a lot of money to look this cheap.” What do you consider the most overrated virtue? I’d say modesty is the most overrated virtue. Who has time to be modest these days? On what occasion do you lie? I lie mostly while I’m sleeping but occasionally on towels at the beach and on friends’ floors after parties.

What or who is the greatest love of your life? The greatest love of my life will be my capacity to love and to give in this world. To be open, to be accepting, to be patient, to be giving, to be joyful and generous. If you were to die and come back as a person or a thing, what would it be? Why? If I could die and come back as anything, I would be a blue whale because they have the biggest smile in the world. Or Inkalamu, the world’s largest emerald, ‘cause I’m that bitch. What is your most treasured possession? My most treasured possessions are our new kittens Misty and Milo, although I don’t really possess them, just love them and feed them. They are the sweetest little angels. Who are your heroes in real life? My heroes in my life are all the people I know who are loving, giving and keep going everyday. Life’s hard, and I think we are all heroes in our own ways.


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NUTCRACKER KIDS

VENUE

HOST HOTEL

MEDIA