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Resources WHAT RESOURCES WITHIN THE ECOSYSTEM CAN BE OPTIMIZED AND PRESERVED.

Usage SET PROJECT GOALS FOR WATER AND EMISSIONS USAGE.

S U S TA I N A B L E

Campus Planning An early visioning sustainability plan shows what is possible when there is still the opportunity to implement solutions. By planning for solutions from the beginning, the likelihood of their success increases and their impact on project costs often decreases. We strategically measure project impacts to first establish goals and then map out the path to achieve them.

Impacts MEASURE WATER AND EMISSIONS IMPACTS AND PROVIDE GUIDANCE FOR CONSERVATION OPPORTUNITIES.

Solutions REDUCE IMPACTS OF THE PROJECT AND CREATE REGENERATIVE SOLUTIONS.


Confidential S U S TA I N A B L E DEVELOPMENT PLAN PROJECT DESCRIPTION

This luxury eco-village is located in a tucked away tourist destination in the American Southwest. With a total site area of approximately 160 acres, the project consists of new and existing buildings. The development includes shared and individual guest lodging, employee apartments, a community center, health and wellness facilities, and food services. This project will inspire a new, modern living standard — a holistic approach to highly sustainable living where the lines between the built and natural environment are blurred. The resort will mimic the patterns of a functional ecosystems simultaneously serving guests with the highest standard of care and benefiting the broader ecology. A functional ecosystem is a thriving and dynamically balanced system. It harnesses energy from the sun and materials cycle through the system such that they can be utilized again and again. Through its interconnected network it offers resilience, strength, and resistance to disturbances.

ECOLOGICAL + CULTURAL SUCCESSION

Designing with succession in mind allows promotes adaptation and allows for improvements over time. Leaving room in the design to change and adapt overtime like an ecosystem promotes strength and resilience in food systems, energy and water resources.

Our work on this project includes the following: HIGHLIGHTS

— Energy modeling

— Renewable energy analysis

— Water cycle analysis

— Preliminary high-performance building system options

— Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for both embodied and operational carbon — Weather analysis — Energy and water use benchmarking along with goal setting

— All-electric building strategies — PV + battery microgrid analysis


Confidential S U S TA I N A B L E D E V E L O P M E N T P L A N

Water Systems WATER RESOURCES AVAILABLE

– Well Water from Aquifer – Rainwater collected from roof area – Reclaim water from village scale treatment system

WATER SYSTEM RECOMMENDATIONS

— Potable water supplied from the resort potable water system — Rainwater from the roof routed to contour based landscape feature that allows water to sink into the ground and minimize evaporation — Greywater routed to a contour based landscape feature that allows water to sink into the ground and minimize evaporation — Utilize composting toilet systems where it is cost prohibitive to connect to a village scale water treatment system

ECOLOGICAL BENEFITS

— Rehydrating the landscape with greywater and rainwater will create a an oasis (microclimate) at the building. This feature could benefit the user experience, increases biodiversity, creates an opportunity for ecological success, and reduces overall urban heat island impacts. — Nutrients from the composting toilet system could be used to enhance the site ecological function.


BUILDING EMISSIONS

Confidential

BUSINESS AS USUAL

ONE YEAR IN MT CONCEPT

S U S TA I N A B L E C A M P U S P L A N PROJECT DESCRIPTION

The development team had a vision to create a ski and lifestyle club that promotes wellness and respects the environment in a sustainable way. Our responsibility in developing the sustainable master plan was to evaluate the development usage demands, help identify strategies to minimize resource (i.e., energy and water) needs and provide a path to a carbon neutral stance. Starting with understanding the scale and source of the usage demands is very helpful in targeting the biggest energy, water and carbon footprint contributors, then creating a proactive plan to achieve the project sustainability goals. Our work on this project includes the following: HIGHLIGHTS

WATER PUMPING EMISSIONS ONE YEAR IN MT

SITE ELEMENT EMISSIONS ONE YEAR IN MT

BUSINESS AS USUAL

CONCEPT

BUSINESS AS USUAL

CONCEPT

— Energy modeling — Water cycle analysis — Greenhouse gas (GHG) emissions for both embodied and operational carbon — Weather analysis — Energy and water use benchmarking along with goal setting — Renewable energy analysis

RESIDENTIAL EMISSIONS

BUSINESS AS USUAL

ONE YEAR IN MT CONCEPT

— Preliminary high-performance building system options — Central heating and cooling plant options — All-electric building strategies

ANNUAL GREENHOUSE GAS EMISSIONS This graphic is an illustration of the estimated annual GHG emissions for the development with a “Business as Usual” and conceptual high-performance strategy. Not only do we get to see which development components have the biggest carbon footprint, we can also understand what sustainable design strategies have the largest positive impact.


The Endeavor MASTER PLAN PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Nestled in the open skies of Montana, Endeavor set out ask what is possible for the modern built environment. The large campus had a goal to be completely off-grid with facilities designed to last 300 years, which required every system from energy to water to food to be viewed through a new design lens. Instead of the usual reliance on outside resources for energy and water, the plan instead focused on what were identified as the “Gifts from the Earth” within the boundary of the site. To understand these local resources, PAE provided an in-depth analysis of local climate, aquifer capacities, and solar and wind potential in addition to research on both ancient and modern solutions for energy storage, water purification and building design.

HIGHLIGHTS

Large campus with a goal to be fully off-grid with the energy and water needs met only with onsite resources In-depth research on ancient and modern solutions for challenges such as energy generation, water purification and thermal comfort of buildings Analysis included unique systems such as ground thermal storage, regenerative biomass, rocket stove heating and utility scale photovoltage and battery storage systems

RADIANT HEAT

SOLAR PANELS

140˚F

Storage Tank and Heat Exchanger

100˚F

100˚F 125˚F

ELECTRICAL PUMP

AIR HANDLING UNIT

100˚F

130˚F

VERTICAL BORE FIELD


Mission Rock

562

DISTRICT ENERGY SYSTEM

equivalent to powering a 300,000 sq. ft. office

PROJECT DESCRIPTION

Located along the San Francisco Bay, this 11-building development spans across 28 acres and includes a mix of residential, commercial office, and retail space. With a diverse program, peak cooling and heating loads for each program varies significantly as each program type has different operating needs and usage schedules. With the site’s proximity to San Francisco Bay, the Mission Rock team utilizes a Bay Water Exchange system to accomplish zero on-site carbon emissions and zero HVAC water usage. This project will respond to the Bay Area’s climate and ecosystem to create a comfortable and sustainable environment, and buildings will be organized and shaped to optimize views while using materials that will tie the buildings and neighborhood together.

HIGHLIGHTS

— Analysis included the exploration and lifecycle assessment of multiple alternative centralized and decentralized heating and cooling plant systems — Creating master load profiles for the entire development to identify synergies between program types (retail, commercial, and residential) for heating, cooling, and water use — All-electric central plant strategies — Bay water thermal exchange system — Weather analysis — Energy modeling — Energy and water use benchmarking and goal setting — Preliminary renewable energy evaluations — High-performance building system options

Electric Vehicle Charging Stations

MISSION ROCK MISSION BAY

100

%

Community Solar Access cutting energy bills for all residents

100%

Recycled NonPotable Water

AT&T PARK

60%

providing water to both Mission Rock and Mission Bay

Reduction in Energy Use an 1,800 tons/year reduction in CO2 emissions

Profile for _PAE_

Sustainable Campus Planning  

PAE | Sustainable Campus Planning

Sustainable Campus Planning  

PAE | Sustainable Campus Planning

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