Page 1

the Kulture Files

Tête-à-tête

Urban Canvas with el Seed interview by Naji Moujaes

Kuwait Mnemonics by PAD10

Critical Infographic Essay

Speculative Urbanism

Post-Arab Spring Square by PAD10

Critical Essay

The Venice Architectural Biennale 2014 by Naji Moujaes

Foresight

The Role of Facilities Management in Qualifying ‘World Heritage’ Candidacy by Paul Zalloua

Snapshots

#pearlmarzook

Event Listings

Vol. 06 November 1, 2014

Vol. 06 November 1, 2014

Editor’s Note

Kuwait managed to dream and build modern masterpieces in the 60’s and 70’s, yet fails to cope with maintaining them; this is essential to accrue its share of world heritage. The certainty of demolishing Kuwaiti heritage of modern architecture, analogous to the recent razing of the former Kuwait Chamber of Commerce and Industry building in Mubarakiya, is only matched by the lack of decision making when it comes to a systematic plan to preserve or retool landmarks of cultural significance. We expose the intrinsic role of facilities management in qualifying and keeping a ‘world heritage’ candidacy. Additionally and mnemonically, we tangle the economic and political developments in Kuwait and their impact on urban and architectural developments due to socio-demographical transformations. We collect a significant list of modern landmarks that stand witness to Kuwait’s past development, with the risk of voluntary forgetfulness, due to inept measures in maintaining and retooling the same.

On a good note and by sheer coincidence, el Seed’s calligrafitti surfs the Carioca landscapes of Rio de Janeiro and the banks of the Seine, both of which are on the World Heritage list. El Seed’s works cross cultures and media to blur the seemingly thick boundaries between east and west, and graffiti and calligraphy. In this issue, we feature PASS (Post-Arab-Spring Square), an urban civic place that connects the parliament, the national museum, the national library, and Dar Al-Athar Al-Islamiyyah in a lush green park, diverting the Gulf Road underground, connecting the city to the sea, and reclaiming the meaning of Spring to constructively communicate ideas that emanate from the civic pillars of a nation. Last, we announce the Instagram-winners partaking the documentation for the retooling of Pearl Marzouq, a mixed-use complex built in the 70’s, on #pearlmarzook.


of Arabic language. Bringing calligraphy into graffiti became a natural way of expressing myself. My artistic approach is the fruit of my social conditions, my roots, and the choice of my parents to move from Tunisia to France. I was inspired by the proverbial tradition, as it was at the time, of the ‘Mu’alaqqat Assab’a’ and started writing messages. Using two parts of identity and mixing them with the right balance. - What is your present state of mind?

Tête-à-tête Urban Canvas with

el Seed

interview by Naji Moujaes

Make sure your dreams are big enough so you don’t lose them when you chase after them.

- As tools, are you inclined more to use those for graffiti or for calligraphy? Does this get affected when working on canvas rather than a plastered wall, in what ways?

I started with western graffiti. I’ve never learned Arabic calligraphy as it is known in the Arab world with all the rules and conditions. When I discovered Arabic calligraphy in 2004 I instantly fell in love with it, but I didn’t find any teacher. Then, I started to reproduce old classical calligraphy and gradually, without noticing, added my own touch to it. Later, I knew that there were all those rules to it. Today, I don’t want to learn them.

- Your idea of Happiness?

Being in peace with yourself.

- Your favourite heroes in fiction?

Spider-Man.

- Your idea of misery?

Not being loved.

- Your favourite poets?

Mahmoud Darwish.

el Seed at Rio de Janeiro - Brazil

- What role does the city play in your work of art

A

mix of Proustian and specific questions articulate the rich intense world and works of el Seed. - Islamic Calligraphy is a message through art, yet in France where you grew up it may run the risk of gaining a political dimension, considering western islamophobia. Graffiti’s counterculture, mixed with politicized calligraphy, demands an assertive hand, a rebellious soul, and a driven artist humanizing all what he touches into familiar poetry. I wish to know which medium appealed to you first and how you reached out into the latter, socially, culturally, and technically?

I’ve always been into art. I got into graffiti and hip hop culture in general at a young age. As a graffiti artist, with the few walls I painted when I was younger, I was just excited by the act of painting in the streets in a large scale. As a teenager, I felt excluded from the ‘French model’ of integration and felt the need to get back to my roots and learn about where I was originally from; about my history, culture and traditions. All that, brought me the study

and do you get to choose your sites nowadays, especially when invited for a commission? If the site is preset, does it pose any limitations to the

- Your favourite composers?

idea of guerilla art in your opinion?

- Calligraffiti elevated graffiti to mainstream art in the relatively conservative Middle East, as it did render calligraphy more accessible and lively. This push and pull within two disciplines into a unique one must have rattled eccentrics within each, yet emerged a new form, set of techniques, and messages. Are you comfortable to identify the new qualities inherent to ‘calligraffiti’, and why is it neither exclusively graffiti nor exclusively calligraphy?

My friends always make fun of me because I don’t look at the city and the urban space like other people. Sometimes when we are driving, I jump with excitement because I see a potential ‘target’. I’ve always chosen where I want to paint. If I am commissioned an artwork, I need to approve the wall as well. I always pick the wall depending on the picture that I can get once the piece is finished. I always want to include the context of the wall. - Where would you like to live?

I would say Jordan even if I’ve never been there. I’ve always wanted to live there. I don’t know why.

Ludovico Einaudi.

I believe calligraffiti is born out of a certain political, social and economical context. It is a hybrid form of art and it is just the reflection of the world we live in; a mix of culture, traditions, origins... - If not yourself, who would you be?

I don’t even want to imagine.

- Your favourite painters?

My daughter and ...the list is really long.

- What characters in history do you most dislike?

Christopher Columbus.

- Your favourite heroes in real life?

My mum and dad.

- Your favourite motto?

Never forget where you come from.


el Seed at l’Institut du Monde Arabe, Paris - France


KUWAIT MNEMONICS

PROJECTS INDEX

900s Pre-1 RS OTHE 19 00

US JP GB

KW

19

10

01

IQ Wo 191 rld Wa r 4191 I 8

IR G.C.C M.E

fi r s t car Minv in K erv u w a 19 ait 12

Cultu re P e to M arls com arke t 191 e 6

1920

Re Line d Agreement 1928

1930 t Oil Firs or t Exp 6 194

Oil ery of Discov 1938

n Depressio 3 1929-193

n Depressio 7 1930-193

Treaty uwaiti Anglo-K 1899-1961

The Great

The Great

Ir Re 1

Six Day War 1967

Ahm adi

1940

O Cr 1

Ma

MP 1K itted 2 bm 95 Su 1

plan ster 947 1

r II Wa 5 rld Wo - 194 9 193

02

Ab

0

/5 50

ian stin Pale xodus E 8 194

du

Ag

ns

5 19

t en 1 em 195

re

io lat Re

0

US n ga Be 951 1

lla

hA

lS

ali

m 1st Al Em Sa ir b 19 ah 61 S

aba

h Al

Sali 2nd E mA m l Sa ir bah 196 5

1 Develo KMP pmen t 1967

2KMP Submitted 1970

OAPEC Formed 1968

0

04

19 6

KEY LEGEND AND ABBREVIATIONS OTHERS US JP GB

Rest of World United States of America Japan Great Britian

KW

Kuwait

IQ IR G.C.C M.E

Iraq Iran Gulf Cooperation Council Middle East Development Conflict Item Highlighed National Assembly Disbanded

Oil Embargo 1967

1970

O Fo PEC rm 19 ed 60

1965

001 -Amricani Hospital 002 -Ahmadi Master Plan 003 -US Embassy 004 -1KMP - First Kuwait Master Plan 005 -Rumaithiya Block 006 -Municipality Building 007 -Kuwait Fund for Arab Economic Development 008 -Kuwait University Khaldiya Campus 009 -Al Andulus Residential Complex 010 -2KMP - Second Kuwait Master Plan 011 -Kuwait Zoo 012 -Kuwait University Housing 013 -Souk Al Manakh 014 -Souk Safat 015 -Souk Kabeer 016 -Souk Kuwait 017 -Kuwait Ministry of Foreign Affairs 018 -Pearl Marzouq Complex 019 -Central Bank of Kuwait 020 -Sawaber 021 -Joint Banking Towers 022 -Kuwait Towers 023 -Hilton Housing Project / Masaleh 024 -Ministries Complex 025 -Souk Gold 026 -Souk Wataniya 027 -Jazeera Center 028 -Kuwait Airport 029 -Al Ahli Bank 030 -Kuwait Insitute for Scientific Research 031 -Nogra South Complex 032 -Kuwait Water Towers 033 -Four Kuwait Residences 034 -Kuwait News Agency 035 -Kuwait City Waterfront Development / Green Island 036 -Kuwait Foundation for the Advancement of Science 037 -Zahra Complex 038 -Kuwait National Museum 039 -Souk Al Watya 040 -Awqaf Commercial Complex 041 -Kuwait Bus Station 042 -Muthanna Complex 043 -Rihab Complex 044 -Residential Complex 045 -Ministry of Justice 046 -Masjid Al Kabir 047 -Kuwait Stock Exchange 048 -Kuwait National Assembly 049 -Nogra North Complex 050 -Public Authority for Civil Information 051 -Wafra Blue Tower 052 -Kuwait Liberation Tower 053 -Wafra Green Tower 054 -Embassy of India 055 -Arab Organization Headquarters 056 -Fresh Food Souks 057 -Wafra Breeze 058 -Souq Sharq and Waterfront 059 -Sheikha Complex 060 -National Chamber of Commerce and Industry 061 -Souk Al Zal 062 -Scientific Center 063 -Muhallab 064 -Marina Mall 065 -AUK Campus 066 -ACK Campus 067 -Jaber Al Ahmad International Stadium 068 -Central Bank of Kuwait 069 -Hamra Tower 070 -Kuwait Metro and National Railroad 071 -360 Mall 072 -Oil Sector Complex 073 -Arraya Tower 074 -3KMP - Third Kuwait Master Plan 075 -Aveunes Mall- Phase I 076 -Kuwait National Library 077 -Jabar Al Ahmad Al Sabah Hospital 078 -Kuwait University New Campus 079 -GUST Campus 080 -Sarah Complex 081 -The Cliffs 082 -Central Agency for Information Technology 083 -Aveunes Mall- Phase II 084 -Amiri Terminal 085 -KIPCO Tower 086 -Kout Mall 087 -Ministry of Education Headquarters Project 088 -Wafra Living 089 -Crystal Tower 090 -Kuwait Airport 091 -Aveunes Mall- Phase III 092 -Salmiya Park - The Boluveard 093 -Gate Mall 094 -Wafra 4th Ring 095 -Al Shaheed Park 096 -Sabah Al Ahmad City Cultural Center 097 -Sheikh Jaber Al Ahmad Cultural Center 098 -Sheikh Abdullah Al Salem Cultural Center 099 - Kuwait University - Student Activities and Athletic Facilites 100 - Kuwait University - Administration Facilities


100 85 98

99 86

84

82 97

96

83 79 95

94

81 78 92

93

75

77 90

91

74 80

89

88

87

72

76 73

201

71

69

4 70

A Inter ven merican ti o n in Ira 2014 q -

20

67

10

64

68 63

65

66

Inv as i 20 on o 0 3- f Ira 20 q 11

20

05

b a h A 5th l Em S ab ir 20 ah 09

MP 3K sion e t n 05 Ex 20

Sa

2000

r Emi 4th bah a S l m A 2006 Sali

61

56

59 62

Ar Spr ab 201 ing 0-

d Al

57

Saa

60

3KMP Submitted 1997

58

Persia Gulf W n ar 1990

95 54

55

53

Oil Pri ce Shoc k 1990

se ane ar Leb ivil W 90 C -19 75 19

Ira n 19 -Ira 80 q W -1 a 98 r 8

ian ran tion u l o ev -1980 978

Oil risis 973

M an Cr akh 19 ash 82

Re 2KM vis ion P 19 2 83

1990 49

So

uk

Al

52

P 2KM 1 ion 7 s i v Re 197

l Ah

85

ir A

51

ir Em 3rd abah S l 7 A 197 mad

19

Jab

48

50

t Glu Oil 980 1

80 19

33

34

1975

32

is Oil Cris 1973

19

36

38

35

20

37

12

40

39

21

06

09

22

13

41

44

07

15

45

10 25 14

26

16

42

30

29

27 08

18

28 11

17

46

24

23

31

43

47


pre-1960s Before the discovery of oil, the residents of Kuwait occupied modestly constructed dwellings. The structure and walls were mostly made of locally available mud bricks and rubble stones, while the ceilings were made of mangrove or wood impor ted from East Africa or India. Kuwait Oil Company (KOC) was established in 1934. Serious exploration was delayed until after WWII, before which Kuwait was economically impoverished with the dying pearl industry. In the 1950’s oil exploration began to reflect socially, especially after Sheikh Abdullah struck a deal, namely the 50/50 agreement, whereby the state shares equally KOC’s expor t profits in 1951. This led to the launching of major public works to raise the standard of living.

1960s In 1960, OPEC was formed by Kuwait, Iran, Iraq, Saudi Arabia, and Venezuela to control prices of crude oil.

DWELLING TRADITIONAL

$$$$$

16+

A/C

With the generated profits by KOC, the government’s coordinated effor ts helped cope with the growth by allowing new technologies be acquired to cater for embettering locals’ lives and hosting incoming expats; concrete and aluminum were introduced into the construction boom. Although use of cement star ted in 1912, when brought in barrels by the American Mission for the construction of the Amricani Hospital, its widespread use star ted in the 70’s upon the establishment of Kuwait Cement Company in 1968.

APARTMENT STUDIO

1-2

1

$$$$$

A/C

In 1961, Kuwait declared independence. An Amiri decree was issued in 19 August 1961 to establish a Foreign Depar tment ministry.

APARTMENT STANDARD

Al-Ahmadi ‘suburb’ was founded in 1946 to cater for KOC staff, implementing new urban ideas and construction methods, using brick-andmor tar.

4-6

1-2

1970s Amidst regional turmoil, with ‘baathism’ coup d’états and Arab-Israeli wars in the 60’s, Kuwait’s prospering economy provided a refuge and a destination to many in the region and around the world. With the influx of labourers and white-collar businessmen and professionals alike from outside, combined with sharp decline in death rates inside due to improved and free medical services, Kuwait witnessed an unprecedented population growth. This resulted in a real-estate boom, where modern apar tment blocks and shanty dwellings swept the deser tscape. This overwhelmed any sustained growth, where the infrastructure and the superstructure took a toll with high demand and lax regulations.

VILLA

SINGLE FAMILY 10+

4+

$$$$$

A/C

DWELLING

1980s

The Kuwait Water Towers APARTMENT (1976), the new Airpor t STUDIO (1977), and the launching of the Parliament (1978) 1-2 were emblematic of a A/C hopeful and prosperous nation that was adamant on asser ting its modernization through avant-garde buildings, designed by internationally renowned architects.

APARTMENT DUPLEX $$$$$

1

4-6

4-6

$$$$$

A/C

In response to the six-day war in 1973, an oil embargo took place from the Arab country members of OPEC, plus Egypt, Syria and Tunisia. The consequences of this singular action led to the price of oil rising from $3 per barrel to nearly $12 in a duration of weeks, affecting the global market worldwide.

VILLA CHALET

STANDARD

4-6

$$$$$

A/C

APARTMENT

SHANTY

1-2

$$$$$

1-2

10+

A/C

2-4

$$$$$

A/C

Sasaki Associates won the water front project in 1982, with a concept providing a stretch of 21 km, from Shuweikh in the west, to Ras al-Ardh in the east, with continuous recreational activities along the main coastal areas. Otherwise, the 80’s brought instability to the door steps of Kuwait. With the Iraq-Iran war (1980), the 1982 Souk Al-Manakh stock market crash, and the mid-1980s drop in oil prices, did not help in bringing forward any grand projects. Still, the housing market maintained a steady growth with an increasing population boom by expatriates.

VILLA

SINGLE FAMILY 10+

4+

$$$$$

1

$$$$$

A/C

VILLA

ANNEX DWELLING 1-2

A/C

Around 1983 the former Hawalli governorate split into that of the governorates of Farwaniya and Hawalli as two entities primarily aimed towards expatriates’ population.

$$$$$

A/C

Internal social mobility, welfare programs, and an influx of

VILLA

FAMILY BRANCH 16+

2-4

$$$$$

A/C

VILLA

SINGLE FAMILY 10+

2-4

$$$$$

A/C

1952

1967

1KMP - First Kuwait Master Plan Minoprio and Spencely

1970

Municipal development on 1KMP

1977

2KMP - Second Kuwait Master Plan Sir Colin Buchanan and Alan McCulloh

1983

First redevelopment of 2KMP

Second redevelopment of 2KMP

027.0

1985

expats posed new challenges and oppor tunities, where the automobile and urban planning came hand in hand to modernize city growth along First Kuwait Master plan guidelines.

Population 1,697,300

033.5

Population 1,357,950

New Street, the first paved road in 1930, connected the docks to Safat Square. Reminiscent of the old city, Safat Square was a civic space and an urban node where 3 paths converged from old destinations: westward ran the caravan route to Jahra Village, aka Fahad Al-Salem or Jahra Road, southward to the spring wells of Al Shamieh, aka Shamieh Road or Abdallah AlSalem Street, and cross-town connector, aka the Dasman Road or Ahmad Al-Jaber Street. The Municipality Building (1932), the Law Cour ts (1936), and the Police Station (1940’s) flanked the southern edge of Safat, to contain its openness.

010.5

Population 994,837

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

1965 001.6

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

1960

Population 261,994

Expatriate Population 154,576

Citizen Population 107,418

PRODUCTION 1,690,000 b/d CONSUMPTION 05.92% 100,000 b/d

Population 467,339

Expatriate

Population 738,662

Population 191,609

Expatriate Population 1,171,140

CONSUMPTION 03.03% 63,470 b/d

Expatriate

CONSUMPTION 02.94% 88,970 b/d

Population 784,610

Expatriate Expatriate

Population 586,954

Population 435,811

Citizen

Population 275,730

Citizen

CONSUMPTION 05.20% 86,200 b/d

PRODUCTION 2,080,000 b/d

PRODUCTION 2,990,000 b/d

PRODUCTION 2,360,000 b/d CONSUMPTION 04.36% 103,950 b/d

PRODUCTION 1,656,000 b/d

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

1970 001.4

CONSUMPTION 15.84% 162,340 b/d

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

1975 001.2

PRODUCTION 1,023,000 b/d

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel l

1980

Safat Square

FIRST CENSUS TAKEN IN KUWAIT WAS DURING 1957

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

Citizen Population 302,851

Citizen Population 407,883

Population 573,340

Citizen Population 525,860


1990s

2000s

On 2nd of August 1990, Iraq invaded Kuwait, APARTMENT STUDIO igniting the Gulf War. With an international coalition, 1-2 suppor ted by internal A/C resistance, Kuwait was freed on 28th of February 1991. New political, economic and social alignments resulted in internal and international restructuring. Amidst economic stagnation, the autonomous villa was expanded to host extended family members and rental tenants; locals and expatriates.

VILLA

RENTABLE WHOLE 8+

$$$$$

1

4+

$$$$$

A/C

APARTMENT

VILLA

STANDARD

RENTABLE FLOOR

4-6

1-2

4+

$$$$$

1-2

$$$$$

A/C

A/C

VILLA

CHALET

Kuwait was still in a state of recovery after the Gulf War, tactically progressing and growing as a country. However, once the war on Iraq in 2003 resulted with the downfall of its ruling par ty, Kuwait accelerated its development to match the pace of neighbouring countries. Kuwait witnessed the addition and creation of new governmental facilities, large urban projects, iconic skyscrapers, etc., underwent a revision of the municipality documents, and sought new potential investments with local and foreign par ties.

APARTMENT

10+

STUDIO

10+

4+

$$$$$

16+

6+

$$$$$

1-2

$$$$$

1

A/C

VILLA

APARTMENT

SINGLE FAMILY

STANDARD

4-6

$$$$$

2-4

4-6

A/C

A/C

4+

$$$$$

The global financial melt down slowed down the pace of growth and development in Kuwait in late 2000’s. The government was criticized for not injecting enough financial suppor t to reinvigorate the stagnating economy. While unable to keep pace with baby-boomers’ housing demands, the government invested in long-due projects in healthcare, education, and cultural sectors, to compensate for lack of such developments in the past two decades. With the Arab Spring Movement embroiling the region, Kuwait was spared. Inflation, random regulations, and regional instability draw a bleak foresight for developments to come, unless a clear vision shapes up somehow!

EXTENDED FAMILY

A/C

4+

A/C

VILLA

CHALET

2010s

VILLA

$$$$$

A/C

77.4

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

2010

Population 3,065,850

050.9

Population 2,193,650

022.6

027.6

Population 2,060,000

016.9

Population 1,941,000

$$$$$

4-6

$$$$$

2-4

A/C

2025

Est. Population 4,432,000

APARTMENT STANDARD

4-6

2-4

$$$$$

A/C

2020

Est. Population 4,015,000

104.8

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

2014

Population 3,406,809

PRODUCTION 2,650,000 b/d CONSUMPTION 18.64% 494,350 b/d

2015

Est. Population 3,404,170

2030

Expatriate

Expected development with two new additional ring roads

Population 2,221,809

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

2000

CONSUMPTION 08.94% 105,990 b/d

1

CONSUMPTION 14.75% 373,820 b/d

First extension of 3KMP

PRODUCTION 1,175,000 b/d

1-2

A/C

PRODUCTION 2,529,178 b/d

2005

3KMP - Third Kuwait Master Plan Implemented

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

1990

CONSUMPTION 21.13% 486,640 b/d

SINGLE FAMILY

STUDIO

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

2005

1997

PRODUCTION 2,300,411 b/d

VILLA

APARTMENT

Expatriate

PRODUCTION 2,078,500 b/d

Population 1,992,800

CONSUMPTION 12.37% 257,270 b/d

avg. U.S. dollars per barrel

1995

Population 1,575,570

PRODUCTION 2,057,411 b/d CONSUMPTION 06.91% 142,040 b/d

Expatriate

Expatriate

Population 1,462,600

Population 1,338,130

LEGEND KEY UNIT SURRONDINGS

Expatriate Citizen

Population 1,067,550

UNIT VARIABLES

Population 929,586

Citizen Population 1,073,050

Citizen Citizen Population 598,000

Expatriate Population 645,984

Population 873,450

Citizen Population 855,520

Population 1,185,000

XX

NUMBER OF OCCUPANTS

XX

NUMBER OF VEHICLES

$$$$$

Public Authority for Civil Information Records U.S Energy Information Adminstration - OPEC Crude Oil Consumption and Production

[03]

Municipality of Kuwait - Master Planning Division

[04]

ARCHnet historical records

[05]

Skyscrapercity online documents

[06]

Logbook Vol. IV Prefab Kuwait National Assembly Jorn Utzon

[07]

Kuwait Arts and Architecture Compiled by Arlene Fullerton and Geza Fehervari

[08]

The Kuwait Urbanization Being an Urbanistic Case-Study of a Developing Country Saba George Shiber

VIEW AVAILABLE

PLUMBING SYSTEM ELECTRICAL SYSTEM LIGHTING SYSTEM

NO ODOR PRESENT DAYLIGHT AVAILABLE NO / PARTIAL DAYLIGHT

A/C

CENTRAL AIR CONDITIONING INDOOR ACTIVITY SPACES SWIMMING POOL ELEVATORS

REFERENCES AND RESOURCES [02]

LANDSCAPE / GREENERY

ODOR PRESENT

COST OF LIVING

[01]

NO NOISE / PARTIAL

NO VIEW AVAILABLE

UNIT SIZE (S,M,L,XL)

Citizen

FACILITIES AND SYSTEMS

NOISE PRESENT

B/D Barrels per day

[09]

Kuwait History Heritage Architecture Compiled by National Council for Culture Art and Letters (NCCAL)

[10]

Kuwait Miracle on the Desert David C. Cooke

[11]

Kuwait City Parks Subhi Abdullah Al-Mutawa

[12]

Online records of architectural projects by local and International firms AGi Architects, Al-Jazeera Consultants, Gulf Consult, KEO, Norman Foster partners, PACE, SOM, Wafra Real Estate

[13]

OFFICEus Agenda Edited by Eva Franch i Gilabert, Amanda Reeser Lawrence, Ana Milijacki and Ashley Schafer


Post-Arab Spring Square P.A.S.S. by PAD10

An urban action calls to connect the city to its sea and the institutions to the people. We call for diverting the Arabian Gulf Road below ground and erasing the urban infrastructures all around, except for the civic and governmental institutions. A public park with lush landscape surrounds and connects national and architectural beacons that will become platforms of constructive expressions and aspirations. The National Museum, the National Assembly, the National Library, Dar Al-Athar al-Islamiyya (DAI), among other ‘pavilions’ in the landscape, proliferate public performance areas within the landscape or that open to it, all at a walking or cycling distance from one another. These areas are connected to parks and recreational

areas, green meadows, sand beaches, sports fields, etc. stretching along 1 mile of coastline encounter. Opportunistically, in this setting, urbanism has the capability to channel all aspirations of constructive nature through the pillars of a nation represented through legislative and cultural institutions that refocus the identity of Kuwait and play a proactive role in shaping its future; this will be the first civic place of national scale. A meandrous series of paths splice through the park to tangentially connect with other paths, linking the different edifices to the open lawn, shaded with giant trees, playgrounds, amphitheaters, reflecting pools, water fountains, cascading gardens,

and fishing piers. An artificial hill, in between the National Assembly and the National Museum, creates a raised vantage point towards the sea and embeds a multi-storey parking underneath connected to the First Ring Road. With a growing urbanization rippling in depth to a ‘Seventh Ring Road’, we call for de-congesting the epicenter of Kuwait City by reversing urbanism within the ‘First Ring Road’ and rendering the area a car-free green zone. A performance arts peninsula stretches down, from DAI to the sea, to become a dock for a floating ‘performance’ theatre that travels between different coastal cities in Kuwait, to provide a breathing platform, from culture-à-la-carte to improvised performances.


Swimming Pools Aqua Park Water slides Kuwait Towers Symbol

Souk Sharq

Parking

Religion Grand Mosque Offices Central Stock Exchange

Hamra Tower High Rise Offices Exhibition Halls

Outdoor Outdoor Outdoor Gallery Volunteer Library Concert Outdoor Centre Community Knowlegde Thrift Classrooms Biking BMX Tennis Centre National Station Cycling Skateboarding Centre Kuwait Offices Stores Inline Boat Dock Qabliya Volleyball Yoga Lecture Hall Council for Souk Al National Skating Cricket Basketball School Arts and Swimming Parking Library Kuwait Football Sport Fields Artworks Letters Stretching Sunbathing Parking Bait Al Sadu Jogging Amphitheatre Tradition Lecture Series Ice Skating Fishing Sandpits Souk Market Space Fireworks Scuba Outdoor Seating Shipyard Kuwait Mubrarkiya Sculpture Flea Sunrise Beachfront Dining Parking Yacht Rental Seafront Pier Garden Market Market Space Runway National Historical Project Sailing Space Muesum School Tours Thrift Stores Parking Souk Safat Sea Tour Doha Botanical Garden Rock Climbing Chess

Planetarium Open Courtyard Historical Paths Hiking Skyline View Assembly Hall Kuwait Playground Mounds Ski Slope High Point Bureaucracy National Thrift Palace of Stores Offices Kayaking Reflective Pool Assembly Justice Nightwalk Water Paddling Picnic Area Souk Al Amphitheatre Public Garden Moon Spring Kabeer Theatre Playground Garden Flower Parking Cinema Exhibition Space Show Residence Annual Festivals Muthana Moving Theatre Forums Dar Al Athar Deck Terraced Cultural Al Islamiyyah Complex Gallery Venue Garden Centre Offices Lecture Hall Parking Film Forum Lecture Series J.W. Marriott Parking Hotel Restaurants

Thrift Stores

Cruiseline

Framing

Maritime History the City

Observation Deck Symbol Kuwait Liberation Tower Telecommunications

Parking Sawaber Residence


A performance arts peninsula stretches down, from DAI to the sea, to become a dock for a floating ‘performance’ theatre that travels between different coastal cities in Kuwait, to provide a breathing platform, from culture-Ă -la-carte to improvised performances.


I. SPECIAL ACTIVITIES

II. EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL ACTIVITES

III. SPRING / AUTUMN ACTIVITIES

IV. WATER ACTIVITIES shallow

V. SUMMER ACTIVITIES

VI. WATER ACTIVITIES deep

VII. WINTER ACTIVITIES

VIII. PHYSICAL ACTIVITIES

IX. ENTERTAINMENT

X. OPEN MARKET

XI. HIGH ENDURANCE ACTIVITIES


The Venice Architectural Biennale 2014 First day at the Giardini, 24th of August, 2014, by Naji Moujaes The Venice Biennale 2014, fundamentals, is the alphabet of architecture revisited, whereby the discipline is re-examined through elemental basics. These elements are suspended beyond the discipline at large, amplifying rather than detaching from their political dimensions. They are not delaminated from architecture to an abstract state, as from them emanates a political stature for architecture at large; architecture becomes the sum of its parts, in a world where parts have been taken for granted. Typology, morphology, aesthetics, ethics, etc. are broken down to a state beyond recognition to visit elements that make architecture flow, stand, move, stop, fall, fly, aggrandize, enter, exit, incline, decline, separate, join, shelter, close, open, shield, reveal, conceal, overlook, gaze, link… it is architecture as a verb at its making. Nothing is taken for granted from now on, as the act of making it is the outcome with no pretensions. The first day at Giardini was looking at organs without bodies. Organs are polarized to become the essence rather than the accessory. It may sound nihilistic to some critics when architecture loses the drape of its wholeness, context, authorship, patronage, etc. The exhibition does not aim to simplify, abstract, or denigrate architecture into simplistic elements that can be put together by non-architects, yet it charges and highlights the significance of those fundamental elements to architects, as the means may be the end and not the other way around. Looking inwards at architectural making serves as a back window to the world it serves; by revisiting and dissecting the lexicon of architectural making, architects may be able to expand and make relevant the language of architecture today. It seems while architects have been repressed under the clout of architectural discourse led by non-architect patriarchs, attempting to adhere with and cling to the ends, the engineers and industrialists have filled the void with knots and bolts to make it happen. Architects are empowered to rewrite architecture in the making of it by laying it out for them in the best way that is humanly possible.

The Role of Facilities Management In Qualifying ‘World Heritage’ Candidacy

by Paul Zalloua, Director of Operations, United Facilities Management

Current Status Of Facilities Management The idea of applying facilities management services to large real estate development projects is gaining momentum in the region, both in terms of financial importance and operational needs. After all, it is elementary to realize that large and complex buildings require comprehensive servicing, so you think! Although the purpose of this article is to explore the role of facilities management in qualifying against the candidacy for UNESCO World Heritage, it is imperative to initially analyze the current status of such discipline in Kuwait. It serves as a reference or rather a baseline upon which we contemplate our forging ahead in establishing permanent roles for facilities management, not only for our heritage sites and buildings, but also for all of our public and commercial facilities.

To be successful, facilities management services need to be considered in a holistic framework in which the interaction between the physical, represented by the built-environment, the functional, characterized by the activities that take place in the built-environment and the human element, expressed by the behavior of the tenants that occupy the built environment, ought to be harmonized, efficient and ultimately optimized to the purpose of the facility. A simple observation of some of our local facilities in Kuwait such as major retail malls, government buildings or high-end residential dwellings leads to the conclusion that facilities management services are currently reduced to their minimum. They are limited only to securing, cleaning and, if advanced, maintaining the physical element of the facility. And these services are being applied in silos, each delivered by a different

service provider. The concept of an integrated facilities management has not yet reached the awareness level of being an integral part of the built environment in the minds of the developers, the architects and the operators of commercial facilities, let alone the government buildings and campuses. The prevailing mentality among the majority of developers remains rudimentary when it comes to facilities management services. The business goal of facilities is reduced to short-term financial gain to secure a rapid return on investment. Operating costs are kept at minimum. The notion of sustaining the value of the asset is absent. The continual enhancement of both the physical and the functional aspects of the facility is kept at a necessity level. Changes in the interaction between occupants and the built environment are not addressed and hence the end result is an incoherent service delivery platform that does not add value to the facility. Indeed there are exceptions to the rule and there exist buildings in Kuwait that are well serviced and maintained according to best practices in facilities management. The “Arab Fund for Economic & Social Development” building is one of such few facilities. Other facilities, commercial and of cultural nature, are in the process of enhancing the delivery of facilities management services having reached the conclusion that indeed a comprehensive approach to servicing buildings is a strategic value to the owners, the occupants and the community in general. This is good news. It is an indication that the awareness level for the need of facilities management has reached a point where we, as a society, can expect professional support when it comes to maintaining and servicing heritage buildings or any facility in Kuwait with outstanding cultural significance.

The Importance Of Fm In World Heritage Projects The conservation of heritage buildings is considered a strategic asset for the country and a historical necessity for future generations. They carry enormous significance that reflects the vision of the society in general and the government in particular. When well-kept and properly maintained, heritage buildings mirror a high degree of historical awareness, pride and cultural maturity. Such

buildings have outstanding local and regional value and require an outstanding universal value to be considered as UNESCO’s World Heritage candidate. In either case, the day-to-day management of heritage buildings and their contents poses real challenges to their custodians whether they are considered for UNESCO’s candidacy or not. The high level of care, intelligent monitoring and accurate environmental control assert additional requirements to basic facilities management services. Buildings with historical and cultural importance ought to be managed and maintained at the highest possible standards of integrated facilities management. Irredeemable cultural objects and artifacts exhibited in heritage buildings are exposed to high risks including climate change, theft, perils and environmental quality. Sustained performance of material, structures, fixtures, fittings and fabrics is crucial. Hence the essential requirements for an integrated facilities management solution in mitigating such risks. With the establishment of integration of facilities management services in heritage facilities, adherence to international standards in the deployment of services is then possible. Strict programs are then followed to guide the delivery of soft and hard services, terms used in the facilities management industry. Soft services refer to any activity related to housekeeping such as cleaning, security, waste management and visitor management. Hard services include engineering, environmental control, fire and safety and infrastructural maintenance. When applied correctly, these services become an established and key component of preventive conservation. It is one of the basic steps forward towards preparedness for UNESCO’s classification for world heritage candidacy. Building maintenance is also another feature of facilities management services that becomes critical to ensure heritage assets and the often fragile contents that are housed are to be protected. Architectural elements require specialized maintenance and services to preserve their unique characteristics. Effective measures in both soft and hard services is required to maintain authenticity and preserve historical elements in heritage buildings. The need for integrated facilities management is fundamental for successful and sustainable


management of heritage facilities.

Numerous international charters including UNESCO’s World Heritage program assert the necessity of multi-faceted, integrating approach to management of facilities aspiring to be categorized as World Heritage buildings. The role of facilities management is considered to be an intrinsic part of conservation principles that ought to be adopted. Facilities management acts like an umbrella under which the monitoring of external and internal environment, the maintenance of the built environment and the servicing of the contents and occupants converge together for the benefits of sustaining the value of the heritage site. Facilities management services are required to be delivered in a continuous, holistic and pro-active approach to ensure that all facets of conservations are being applied. One key requirement by UNESCO World Heritage specify the need for managing and tracking the impact of change to facilities and contents. An integrated facilities management entity is best positioned to play such role since its services touch all aspects of the facility. Monitoring the effects of any change, be it physical or environmental is rather straightforward for facility management personnel equipped with the appropriate equipment and technology systems. Facilities management role is central in preparing buildings for UNESCO’s world heritage candidacy, both at the macro and micro levels. Facilities management professionals have to work with the custodian of the building, the architect, the construction manager and the content manager (curator, or collection conservator) as an integrated team to ensure the availability of sufficient competency and specialized knowledge.

At the macro level, facilities management function ought to consider elements that affect the heritage site in its totality. Policies, contingency procedures and disaster recovery systems are to be implemented to address consequences of climate change, vandalism, terrorism, flooding and natural disasters. Fire and security precautions and procedures are to be implemented including measures that are both passive (fabric and building hardware) and active (security guards and electronic systems). Facilities management responsibility is to be extended to the monitoring of nearby construction development that could potentially affect the heritage facility and the impact of chemical or aesthetic treatments on the heritage asset.

Equally important, the facilities management services ought to address activities at the micro level and apply the appropriate resources to manage such services with care and attention to details. Compatibility issues between the design of the building and the nature of the content housed is to be examined as early as possible. Management control on the access of the facility has to be precise and strict in terms of opening hours. Extended visiting hours can have a negative impact on fabric and contents. Strict policies for photography, limiting the number of visitors per hour and controlling access through predefined routes are some of the activities that facilities management have to undertake with professional discipline. Humidity monitoring, heating and cooling levels, indoor air quality, pollution and contamination control, management of wear and tear and other conservation measures complement the regular preemptive maintenance and soft services activities. Facilities management is also responsible for the management of visitors centers, catering services for special events. Strict rules about food handling, consumption and disposal play an effective role in reducing or eliminating the risk of bacteria, mold and pest infections. In many cases, conflicting requirements may occur and it is the job of the facilities management professionals to assess the trade-offs and present them to the concerned stakeholders such as the custodian of the heritage facility, the architect and the content manager. This is some of the complexities that need to be addressed day-after-day and without an integrated approach to facilities management, managing the facility’s fabric, building systems, services and contents becomes challenging and difficult to accomplish.

Snapshot Of Unesco’s Requirements UNESCO’s classification of heritage sites is divided into three major classes: the core, the surrounding buffer zone, and the transition zone. Each zone has its own requirements in terms of legal protection and

degree of conservation. Such classification dictates the use of various methods of facilities management. Measures deployed at the core area differ from the ones used in the buffer or transition zones. Nonetheless, facilities management principles and general guidelines apply to all three classes. The degree of involvement differs from one class to another. The use of technology

assists tremendously in covering large areas within a dedicated facility or a network of facilities in a single or multiple heritage sites. Although UNESCO’s criteria for world heritage candidacy does not dictate the extensive use of technology in facilities management, the requirements for meticulous conservational measures mandate the use of technology systems and solutions in servicing, maintaining, monitoring and controlling facilities. Construction of a large facilities management database in which every asset and service are captured in the system assists in producing instant access to information about a single site or a network of world heritage sites in the country. The database is then used as a repository of information that can be used by all stakeholders while facilitating the work of facilities management. UNESCO’s Operational Guidelines for the Implementation of the World Heritage Convention, released in July 2013 does not specifically request the use of facilities management. It stipulates operational measures and activities that require the use of total facilities management. Taking a singular approach to each service does not yield compliance with the stringent requirements specified in the guideline. Facilities management offers a holistic solution which is flexible and comprehensive. It enables informed, mes to educated and balanced judgments when it comes tional, the balancing act between operational, conservational, regulatory and financial restraints.

Conclusion Engaging facilities management early on inn the project of identification of sites and preparation ration for UNESCO’s World Heritage candidacy is crucial rucial to the success of project. Facilities management ement professionals combine the understandingg of requirements and competencies needed forr any heritage site with pragmatism. The role of facilities cilities management is rather critical to both the eligibility gibility of applying for world heritage and the real time management of the heritage facility. It is imperative to consider the introduction on of integrated facilities management to all heritage ritage sites in Kuwait independent of whether orr not such sites are to be prepared for UNESCO’s world heritage convention. Proper deployment of facilities cilities management services is effective in mitigating risks and sustaining cultural objects, national artifacts, facts, historical buildings and iconic structures for or the benefit of the future generations.

ARCHITECTURAL ASSOCIATION SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE VISITING SCHOOL AFRICA & THE MIDDLE EAST MAKKAH VS. MAKKAH

MAKKAH VS

MAKKAH

2-12 FEBRUARY 2015 The AA Visiting School Jeddah, will explore the holy city of Makkah beyond the boundaries of the holy mosque. We will dig deep into the heart of the city drawing both its visible and invisible aspects. We will work collectively to gather information and represent our findings, and using conversations with the locals and site excursions we will rediscover the Makkah that has always been there. Join us on our journey as we rediscover the city and speculate on what the future may hold. The AA Visiting School Jeddah is open to current architecture and design students, phd candidates and young professionals. Application online and further information can be found on our website

ΓέϭΪΑ AA Visiting School Jeddah' ϡϮϘΘγ Ύϣ ϚϟΫ ϲϓ ΎϤΑ ˬΔϣήϜϤϟ΍ ΔϜϣ ΔϨϳΪϤϟ ϞϣΎη ΚΤΑ ϞϤόϟ ϰϠϋ ϑήόΘϧ ϑϮγ ϲϜϤϟ΍ ϡήΤϟ΍ ΩϭΪΣ ΝέΎΧ Ϯϫ ϖϤόΘϟ΍ ϝϼΧ Ϧϣ ϦϴϔθϜΘδϤϛ ΔϨϳΪϤϟ΍ ήψϨϠϟ ΎϨΘϠΣέ ϲϓ ΎϨόϣ ΍ϮϤπϧ΍ ΔϘτϨϤϟ΍  ΔϴϧΎΣϭέ  ϲϓ  ΔγΪϘϤϟ΍ΔϨϳΪϤϟ΍ϞΒϘΘδϣϑΎθΘϛ΍ϲϓ ϞϛϞΒϘΘδΗ Visiting School Jeddah AA ΓέϭΩ ϦϓϯϮϬϳϦϣϭΔϳέΎϤόϤϟ΍ΔγΪϨϬϟ΍ΕΎΒϟΎρϭΏϼρϦϣ ϢϴϤμΘϟ΍ ϰΟήϳ ΕΎϣϮϠόϤϟ΍ Ϧϣ ΪϳΰϤϟ΍ ϰϠϋ ωϼρϼϟϭ ϞϴΠδΘϠϟ ϲϧϭήΘϜϟϻ΍ΎϨόϗϮϣΓέΎϳί 

jeddah.aaschool.ac.uk

The Kulture Files (TKF) is proud to feature and cover the AA Jeddah workshop, at https://twitter.com/theKultureFiles Architectural Association, 36 Bedford Square, London WC1B 3ES T +44 (0)20 7887 4000 F +44 (0)20 7414 0782. Architectural Association (Inc) Registered Charity No 311083. Company Limited by Guarantee.

The AA Visiting School is a worldwide network of design workshops and other programmes organised by the Architectural Association School of Architecture. To obtain further information or register for

or register for the programme please go to www.aaschool.ac.uk/ visitingschool or contact the Visiting School Director, Chris Pierce, visitingschool@aaschool.ac.uk

Scholarships: A small number of partial scholarships are available.

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#pearlmarzook


PAD10 and PRESS DESIGNS launched a competition six months back to instagram Pearl Marzouq’s construction progress, hashtagged #pearlmarzook. With 222 posts so far, spanning over 2 years and a half, #pearlmarzook stands witness to the transformation of a modern architectural beacon. The winners of hashtag #pearlmarzook are: 1st place

Noor Khudher @noorkhudher

2nd place

Rohan Almeida @roropad

We want to thank all other PRESS DESIGNS & PAD10 colleague instagrammers, including:

@pad10 @sylvette_blaimont @petercc74 who will also get a bundle of PRESS DESIGNS limited edition stationery.

Keep instagramming, as by construction completion, THE KULTURE FILES will release a #pearlmarzook photobook. All instagrammers partaking #pearlmarzook will get their own personalized copy.


Event listings October November December

January February March

April May

Decemober 15, 2014: New Milestones in the History of Ancient Arabia, lecture by Christian Robin at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. Decemober 22, 2014:

November 11, 2014: The Story of Qiu Ju film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

‫ﻣﻀﺎﻣني اﻟﺪراﻣﺎ اﻟﺘﻠﻔﺰﻳﻮﻧﻴﺔ اﻟﻌﺮﺑﻴﺔ‬ ‫ ودورﻫﺎ ﰲ ﺗﻌﺰﻳﺰ‬،‫ﺑﻌﺪ اﺣﺪاث اﻳﻠﻮﻟﻞ‬ ‫اﻟﺸﻚ واﻟﻜﺮاﻫﻴﺔ ﻟﻠﺜﻘﺎﻓﺔ اﻟﻌﺮﺑﻴﺔ‬ .‫ ﻣﺨﻠﺪ اﻟﺰﻳﻮدي‬،‫اﻻﺳﻼﻣﻴﺔ‬

January 5, 2015: Solid Illumination: Light in Islamic Architecture, lecture by Nasser Rabbat at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm. January 19, 2015: Persepolis: The life and demise of a forgotten “Ancient Wonder”, lecture by Shahrokh Razmjou at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

DAR AL FUNOON October 13-24, 2014: Painting exhibition by Chucrallah Fattouh, Lebanese artist.

January 26, 2015:

‫ﺻﻮر ادﺑﻴﺔ ﻣﻦ ﺧﻼل اﻟﺸﻮاﻫﺪ‬ ،‫اﻻﺛﺮﻳﺔ ﰲ ﺟﺰﻳﺮة اﻟﻌﺮب ﻗﺒﻞ اﻻﺳﻼم‬ ‫ﻳﻮﺳﻒ ﻣﺤﻤﺪ ﻋﺒﺪاﻟﻠﻪ‬

February 2, 2015: Making Museums’Relevant for Our Children, lecture by Sharon Shaffer at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm. February 9, 2015: The Àger Rock Crystal Chess Pieces in The Al-Sabah Collection, lecture by Deborah Freeman Fahid at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

October 27 to November 10, 2014: Exhibition of Textiles, Embroidery and Islamic Artefacts. November 24 to December 12, 2014: Exhibition of paintings, Khalid Tehmazi, Bahraini artist. December 15-31, 2014: Artisanat from Iran, showcasing studio artists. January 12-29, 2015: Exhibition of calligraphic works of Samir Sayegh, Lebanese artist and scholar.

February 16, 2015: Badgir: A sample of wise traditional Persian architecture, lecture by Mohamad Reza Owlia at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. February 23, 2015:

October 13, 2014: Kuwait Dube and Pleasure Rampart Gardens, lecture by Ricardo Camacho, at ACC Baha, 7:00pm. October 13, 2014: Poetry Reading This is an imprint by Nejoud Al-Yagout at ACC Rare Books Library, 5:00pm. October 20, 2014: The shock of the Traditional, lecture by Leila El-Wakil at ACC Baha, 7:00pm. October 27, 2014: The Influence of Ibn Tufayl’s Philosophy on Modern European Philosophers by Makram Abbes at ACC Baha, 7:00pm. November 3, 2014: Cosmic Thinking: Universe Beyond Earth, lecture by Adel Al-Wugayan at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm. November 10, 2014: The Meanings of Recycled Building Materials in the Islamic Architecture of Egypt, lecture by Doris Behrens-Abouseif at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm. November 17, 2014:

‫دور اﳌﻌﺠﻢ اﻟﻌﺮيب ﰲ اﺣﻴﺎء اﻟﱰاث‬ ‫وﺗﺼﻮﻳﺮ اﻟﻮاﻗﻊ واﺳﺘﴩاق اﳌﺴﺘﻘﺒﻞ‬ ‫ﺟﻮرج ﻋﺒﺪاﳌﺴﻴﺢ‬

November 24, 2014: How the ‘Kuwaitis’ Lived More Than 8 Thousand Years Ago: Exploration of the Bahra 1 settlement, lecture by Poitr Bielinski at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm. Decemober 1, 2014: The Touch and Sight of Islamic Talismanic Scrolls, lecture by Yasmine Al-Saleh at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. Decemober 8, 2014: Iranians, Greeks, Huns and Turks: The first millennium ce in the Near East and Western Central Asia, lecture by Prudence O. Harper at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

November 18, 2014: Indian Music workshop by Malini Viswanath at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. November 25, 2014: Man on Wire film at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

March 2, 2015: The Shared Lineage of a European and an Indian Dagger, lecture by Salam Kaoukji at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

،‫ ﺗﺤﻘﻴﻖ ﺟﺪﻳﺪ‬:‫ﺗﺎرﻳﺦ اﻟﻠﻐﺔ اﻟﻌﺮﺑﻴﺔ‬ ‫ﻣﺮﺳﻞ اﻟﻌﺠﻤﻲ‬

March 9, 2015: March 16, 2015:

DAR AL-ATHAR AL-ISLAMIYYAH Monday Nights

،‫دور اﳌﺮأة ﰲ ﻋامرة ﻣﻨﻄﻘﺔﻋﺴري‬ ‫ﻫﻴﻔﺎء اﻟﺤﺒﺎيب‬

November 18, 2014: Woodworking, workshop by Emad Allaho at ACC, 7:00pm.

،‫ﻋﻼﻗﺔ اﻟﺸﻴﺦ ﻣﺒﺎرك ﺑﺎﻟﺪوﻟﺔ اﻟﻌﺜامﻧﻴﺔ‬ ‫ﻓﻴﺼﻞ اﻟﻜﻨﺪري‬

March 30, 2015: Digital Fabrication Driven by Digital Design: Changing trends in architectural design, lecture by Hussain Dashti at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. April 6, 2015:

،‫اﻟﺮﻣﺰﻳﺔ واﻟﺪﻻﻟﺔ ﰲ اﻟﻔﻦ اﻻﺳﻼﻣﻲ‬ ‫ﻣﺤﻤﺪ اﻟﻜﺤﻼوي‬

April 13, 2015: Jerusalem: Art and the Holy City, 1000- 1400, lecture by Barbara Boehm at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm. April 20, 2015: Qur’anic Manuscripts in Umayyad Times, lecture by François Déroche at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm. April 27, 2015: Khaliji: Kuwait and its role in the development of popular peninsula music, lecture by Lisa Urkevich at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. May 4, 2015: Antique Alchemies in the Perspectiva of Wenzel Jamnitzer (1568), lecture by Heather Ecker at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. May 11, 2015:

،‫اﻟﻨﺰﻋﺎت اﳌﺆﺛﺮة ﰲ اﻟﻜﺘﺎﺑﺔ اﻟﺘﺎرﻳﺨﻴﺔ اﻻﺳﻼﻣﻴﺔ‬ ‫ﻋﺒﺪاﻟﻬﺎدي اﻟﻌﺠﻤﻲ‬

May 18, 2015: Gulf Encyclopedia for Sustainable Urbanism, lecture by Nader Ardalan at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm. May 25, 2015: Faces in Flower: Redrawing the figure in early modern Islamic art, lecture by Finbarr Barry Flood at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. Tuesday Nights October 28, 2014: Crocheting, workshop by Nawal Baker Albaker at ACC, 7:00pm. November 4, 2014: Ready, Steady, Recycle, workshop by Hanan Alshaye’a at ACC, 7:00pm.

December 2, 2014: Graffiti workshop by Abdulrazzaq Alshemali at ACC, 7:00pm. December 2, 2014: Mood Swings music workshop by David Miller at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. December 9, 2014: A Moment of Innocence film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.


December 16, 2014: Cyrano de Bergerac film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

February 17, 2015: Persian Carpets workshop by Homen Kazimi Nia at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

April 7, 2015: The Act of Killing film at AI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. April 17, 2015: Animation as an Art Form workshop by Ahmed Alibrahim at ACC, 7:00pm.

February 17, 2015: DAI Conservation Club Meeting at ACC, 7:00pm. April 21, 2015: DAI Conservation Club Meeting at ACC, 7:00pm. March 3, 2015: Being There film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. April 28, 2015: Tokyo Story film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. May 5, 2015: Kings of Pastry film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. May 19, 2015: Glass Painting workshop by Mashael Tarabulsi at ACC, 7:00pm. May 26, 2015: Egyptian Film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm. Wednesday Nights at DAI October 22, 2014: Amani al-Hajji concert at ACC Baha, 7:00pm. October 29, 2014: Oriental Music concert at ACC Baha, 7:00pm.

December 23, 2014: Zoomorphic Calligraphy workshop by Abdulaziz Alameer at ACC, 7:00pm.

November 5, 2014: Indian Music concert at DAI Yarmouk Theatre, 7:00pm.

January 13, 2015: Calligraphy workshop by Mustafa Khajah at ACC, 7:00pm.

November 12, 2014: Piano & Violin Recital concert at DAI - Yarmouk Theatre, 7:00pm.

January 20, 2015: Sweet Smell of Success film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

November 19, 2014: Preslav Marinov concert at DAI - Yarmouk Theatre, 7:00pm. March 10, 2015: Experiments in Surface Decoration workshop by Lubna Saif Abbas at ACC, 7:00pm.

November 26, 2014: North African Music concert at DAI - Yarmouk Theatre, 7:00pm.

March 17, 2015: DAI Conservation Club Meeting at ACC, 7:00pm. March 24, 2015: The Bicycle Thief film at DAI Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

December 3, 2014: Persian Music concert at DAI Yarmouk Theatre, 7:00pm.

January 27, 2015: Candle Photography worshop by Adil Javed at ACC, 7:00pm. February 10, 2015: Nostalgia for the Light film at DAI - Yarmouk, 7:00pm.

The Kulture Files (TKF) covers current cultural events:

https://twitter.com/theKultureFiles https://www.facebook.com/thekulturefiles http://instagram.com/thekulturefiles/


Ode To The Desert

A PAD 10 Publication. All rights reserved to: PAD 10 E info@pad10.com T +965 2 2913377/ 6/ 5 F +965 2 2913378 Kuwait City Sharq Darwaza 51 Tower Mubarak Al-Kabir Street Blk 6, Bldg 51, 10 floor P.O.Box 68364 Keifan 71964 Kuwait www.pad10.com Prinited at Four Films Printing Group

Zeri Crafts

Sylvette Blaimont

(965) 99 402 406 Instagram: zericrafts www.zericrafts.com

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