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SPRING 2019

T H E M A G A Z I N E O F PA C E A C A D E M Y

WINTER

SPORTS The World Comes to Pace The Global Education Benchmark Group's Global Educators Conference

plus!

S P R I NG BREAK

STUDY TOURS


LETTER FROM THE EDITOR

TOP: Rock of Ages: Middle School Edition took the Fine Arts Center stage in late February. The production included more than 50 students—on stage and behind the scenes. Read the story on page 26.

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I’m a big fan of Pace Arts, and I’m constantly in awe of the work our students produce—on stage, in the studio and behind the lens. In this issue of the KnightTimes, we share stories from several student-artists, look back at the semester in the arts and salute our Arts Laureates and Lower School Knights of the Arts—students selected by the faculty and their peers for their talents and dedication to music, dance, painting, sculpture, photography and every medium in between. One of the things I love most about the arts at Pace is that our performers, painters and potters also pursue activities and passions within the school community that fall outside the scope of their crafts. Senior Laureate and award-winning sculptor CONOR HARTMAN plays on the varsity soccer team; Middle School Laureate OLIVER LOREE is in the pool during the water polo and swimming seasons; and Upper School art teacher DONICE BLOODWORTH coaches the state-runner-up baseball team (more on the team’s amazing postseason run in our next issue). At Pace, we encourage students and faculty to take advantage of the myriad opportunities available to them, and we cheer them on— win or lose, rave review or flop—in every arena.

CAI T LI N G O O D R I C H J O N E S ’00 D I R E C TO R O F C O M M U N I C AT I O N S

PACE CARES When our families and staff are in need, Pace Cares.

Contact us to deliver a meal: pacecares@paceacademy.org


KnightTimes 966 W. Paces Ferry Road NW Atlanta, Georgia 30327 www.paceacademy.org

GUEST WRITER

HEAD OF SCHOOL

H A NN A H

FRED ASSAF

HANNAH KELLY is a senior at Duke University studying English and computer science. While at Pace, Kelly was a member of the Barbara and Sanford Orkin Society, the National Honor Society and the Cum Laude Society. In her free time, she enjoys reading, running and playing with her cat.

DIVISION HEADS MICHAEL GANNON Head of Upper School GRAHAM ANTHONY Head of Middle School

K E L LY

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SYREETA MOSELEY Head of Lower School

COMMUNICATIONS DEPARTMENT CAITLIN GOODRICH JONES ’00 Director of Communications, Editor OMAR LÓPEZ THISMÓN Digital Content Producer

CONTENTS 06 NEWS

RYAN VIHLEN Creative Services Manager, Graphic Designer LELA WALLACE Digital Communications Manager

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

06 SCHOLASTIC ART & WRITING AWARDS 08 STAR STUDENT CHARLIE HIRSCH '19 10

AROUND PACE A look at what's happening on campus

FRED ASSAF

10 SPIRIT WEEK

GEMSHOTS PHOTOGRAPHIC www.gemshots.com

11 A DIAMOND KNIGHT The Parents Club's auction celebrates the school's 60th year

LAURA INMAN SMAX PHOTOGRAPHY www.smaxart.com ASHTON STANISZEWSKI

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MELANIE POPE DANA RAWLS HAYLEY SHOJI ’12

12 PACE FUND PROFILE MICHAEL GANNON 14 FACES OF PACE KAITLYN FORTIER, ELIZABETH GLASS and KEVIN JOHNSON 16 BLACK HISTORY MONTH 18 CASTLE CIRCLE PROFILE THE MCDONALD FAMILY 20 ALL ABOUT PACE ARTS

OUR MISSION

22 KNIGHT OF JAZZ

To create prepared, confident citizens of the world who honor the values and legacy of Pace Academy.

24 WINTER SHOWCASE

To contribute ideas for the KnightTimes, please email Caitlin Jones at caitlin.jones@paceacademy.org.

26 ROCK OF AGES 28 WINTER SPORTS HIGHLIGHTS Swimming and diving, basketball, wrestling, basketball cheerleading and equestrian 30 KAYE FAMILY SPOTLIGHT

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34 ICGL The Isdell Center for Global Leadership 34 2019 ICGL SHOWCASE Students present their findings from The Year of Energy 35 PRECE PARTNERSHIP Pace hosts students and faculty from Brazil 36 SPRING-BREAK STUDY TOURS Argentina, China and Taiwan, Cuba, Iceland, Mexico, Morocco, Paraguay and South Africa 40 GLOBAL LEADERS Inspiring individuals within the Pace community 42 FACULTY PROFILE JANIE ROWE 44 THE ARTS AT PACE ACADEMY Learn more about our thriving visual and performing arts programs from our talented student-artists 50 WELCOMING THE WORLD The Global Education Benchmark Group's Global Educators Conference brings innovative educators to Pace 54 ALUMNI UPDATES 59 OUT & ABOUT 60 KNIGHT CAP 62 LEADERSHIP PACE


LETTER FROM THE HE AD OF SCHOOL Dear Pace Family,

THE COVER Sophomore CHASE AUSTIN was one of the many talented musicians to perform in this year’s Knight of Jazz concert in February. Read about the collaborative performance on page 22. Photograph by LAURA INMAN

Five years ago, Pace Academy received a generous gift that enabled the launch of the Isdell Center for Global Leadership (ICGL). Our school had long been committed to the notion of a global education, but the Isdell family’s bequest elevated our thinking and allowed us to reimagine our approach to our mission: To create prepared, confident citizens of the world. Thanks to our expert faculty and the strategic vision of our Board of Trustees, Pace quickly became a leader in the global-education arena, and this past April, we were honored to host the Global Education Benchmark Group’s annual conference, a gathering of more than 300 educators from around the world (see story on page 50). The integration of the ICGL into the daily lives of Pace students, faculty and families has transformed our school in ways we could not have imagined, and its outcomes continue to enrich the Pace student experience. During their years at Pace, members of the Class of 2019 traveled to Australia, Botswana, Brazil, Cambodia, China, Cuba, the Dominican Republic, England, Germany, Greece, Hungary, India, Italy, Lesotho, Madagascar, Paraguay, Patagonia, Peru, South Africa and Thailand—building connections and broadening perspectives. Our students and faculty bring those international experiences back to Pace—informing classroom discussions and daily interactions, and making us better as a school community. You’ll find coverage of this year’s spring-break study tours on page 36, and you’ll learn more about how we’ve explored the ICGL theme of Energy on page 34. Thank you for your support of our mission! I’m excited to see what the next five years hold for Pace and the ICGL. Sincerely,

TOP OF PAGE Senior MAX CREASMAN and a group of 19 other Upper School students traveled to Patagonia during spring break. Learn more about the ICGL study tour on page 39.

FRED ASSAF

HEAD OF SCHOOL

KnightTimes | Spring 2019

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Art & Writing Awards honorees are: GOLD KEY INDIA BEHL, photography JARED RAYMAN, ceramics BLAISE REYES, photography TANNER WALTON, photography (2) S I LV E R K E Y JACK BROWN, poetry MARY LAWSON BRING, photography INDIA BEHL, photography CONOR HARTMAN, ceramics RYAN KANN, sculpture CHASE KARAMANOLIS, ceramics BLAISE REYES, photography (3) TANNER WALTON, photography HONORABLE MENTION INDIA BEHL, photography (4) JACK BROWN, poetry CONOR HARTMAN, ceramics (2) JARED RAYMAN, ceramics BLAISE REYES, photography (2)

CERAMIC ARTS AWARDS RECOGNIZE PACE ARTISTS

R AT L I F F

Thousands of students all over the country enter the Scholastic Art & Writing Awards each year for the opportunity to earn scholarships and have their works exhibited or published. This year, Upper School student-artists received 24 Scholastic Art & Writing Awards in categories including painting, photography, sculpture, poetry and ceramics. Entries that earn Gold Keys at the regional level automatically advance to the national competition, and one of junior TANNER WALTON’S two Gold Key-winning photographs, A Ride Through Delhi (pictured above), won a National Silver Medal for photography. Walton took the photograph on a 2018 Isdell Center for Global Leadership study tour to India.

This year’s Scholastic H A R T M A N

Walton’s Ride Through Delhi Receives National Silver Key

E R I CK S T R

NEWS What you ne ed to know

Three Upper School student-artists received Honorable Mention recognition in this year’s Georgia Ceramic Arts Awards, which took place at LaGrange College. The Awards recognized senior CONOR HARTMAN’S ceramic teapot, senior LAWSON STRICKER’S ceramic sculpture and junior SASHA RATLIFF’S ceramic sculptural vessel.


NEWS

THRILL S

TRILL S

Six Flags Over Georgia, home to memorable thrill rides like The Great American Scream Machine and Superman Ultimate Flight, hosts the Southern Star Music Festival, an annual two day-event that brings together bands, choirs and orchestras from K–12 schools around the country. Select members of the Upper School chorus participated in this

year’s competition and choral clinic —while managing to hop on a roller coaster or two. Their performance of Tshotsholoza and Nine Hundred Miles received three gold ratings, the competition’s highest, and won the Grand Champion award in the high-school choral division.

LU N D

Senior ABIGAIL LUND and Technical Director SCOTT SARGENT make quite a team. The duo received Honorable Mention recognition in the technical execution category of the 2019 Georgia High School Musical Theatre Awards—Shuler Hensley Awards, which celebrate excellence in high-school musical theatre. The honor recognizes Lund and Sargent’s work on the 2018 Upper School production of Beauty and the Beast. Sargent provided technical direction and set design for the show, while Lund served as assistant director and booth manager.

T G E N SA R

TECHNICALLY EXCELLENT

Extemporaneous speaking, oral interpretation and rhetorical essay are just a few of the categories in which students can earn titles at the Georgia High School Association State Literary Championship. In recent years, Pace Academy student-artists have won gold in the girls solo and trio categories, and senior vocalist GRACE POTTORFF (shown below) continued that tradition of excellence at the 2019 competition. Pottorff’s performances of Maman, dites-moi arranged by Jean-Baptiste Weckerlin and A Change in Me from Beauty and the Beast claimed the girls solo state title, while senior DAVIS MATHIS took fourth place in the personal essay category.

A StateChampion Singer

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NEWS

Ite, Equites! Latin lives on at Pace Academy! In April, 10 Upper School Latin students traveled with faculty advisers ELIZABETH KANN and STEWART TARVIN to the Rock Eagle 4-H Center in Eatonton, Ga., to take part in the 2019 Georgia Junior Classical League (GJCL) State Convention. The three-day event brings together students from across the state to “spread JCL love” and test their Latin acumen. Members of the Pace delegation—the defending division champion—earned 31 individual top-five awards in events such as classical art, Latin derivatives, reading comprehension and Greek culture. The students’ cumulative efforts merited a repeat GJCL division title, as well as a second-place trophy for points earned per delegate across all divisions. In addition, sophomore HARLEY RYAN (pictured) placed first in the Roman history competition for the second year in a row.

E CHARLI

HIRSCH

GUS

WHY TE

EACH YEAR, the Professional Association of Georgia Educators Foundation, the Georgia Chamber of Commerce and the Georgia Department of Education partner to present the STAR (Student Teacher Achievement Recognition) program. The program requires that nominees achieve the top SAT score on a single test date and be in the top 10 percent of their classes. STAR Students then choose a STAR Teacher who has inspired them to strive for excellence. Senior CHARLIE HIRSCH was named Pace’s 2019 STAR Student and selected Upper School math department chair GUS WHYTE as his STAR Teacher. Hirsch is co-editor-inchief of The Knightly News, captain of the varsity tennis team and president of the Knight Capital Investment and Pace Academy Jewish clubs. In addition, Hirsch was part of a team that competed in the 2018 MathWorks National Math Modeling Challenge and placed among the top 20% of teams in the nation. His team also finished third out of 600 teams in the 2018 Leukemia and Lymphoma Society Students of the Year contest and raised more than $240,000 to help find a cure for blood cancers—a feat that merited a mention in Forbes magazine.

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MEET OU R 2 0 19

STAR STUDENT


BEHL K ARGIL

PR ADEEP

MAT H L E T E S TO THE MA X

YANG HEN STEP

IN MARCH, the junior varsity math team of freshmen KARGIL BEHL and PRANAVH PRADEEP, seventh-grader PRABHAVH PRADEEP, and sixth-grader STEPHEN YANG competed in the Junior Varsity State Math Tournament in Macon, Ga. At the tournament, which includes students in grades six through 10, the team finished first overall in the large school division. In addition, Yang placed eighth in the Georgia MATHCOUNTS State Competition, a program for middle schoolers.

PRADEEP

Fifth-grader MADDIE SNYDER just can’t stop reading, and her insatiable appetite for mythology, young-adult fiction and fantasy has led to a related passion: writing. “I read so much,” Snyder says. “I’m never without a book. Last year, some other students and I started a book club, but instead of reading books, we would each write two or three chapters of a book. This year, I’m part of an essay-writing group. We have a website and a YouTube channel.” Snyder’s loves collided when a poster in fifth-grade teacher REBECCA RHODES’ classroom advertised the Scholastic Book Clubs Rick Riordan Writing Contest. The contest, part of the live webcast Rick Riordan Presents: The Making of a Myth, asked students to imagine discovering that they have a mythological god for a parent and to write a two-page story about their first meeting. Snyder knew she had to participate. “When the contest came up, I decided to set my story in a place I always wanted to go—Hawaii—and to translate the Greek myth of Artemis, the goddess of the moon, into Hawaiian mythology,” Snyder reports. “I did a lot of research, and I worked with Ms. Rhodes, [fifth-grade associate teacher HAYLEY HARDWICK] and my mom to edit it.” The resulting story, Moon Running, was one of three pieces chosen from 5,000 entrants nationwide as a first-place winner in the contest. The three winners received an all-expenses-paid trip to New York City—including tours of landmarks in children’s literature—and attended a live event hosted by Rick Riordan, the #1 New York Times bestselling author of over 20 novels, including the Percy Jackson series. Winners also met authors J.C. Cervantes, Yoon Ha Lee and Roshani Chokshi. “Rick Riordan has been one of my favorite authors since the third grade,” Snyder says. “It was incredible to think that my hero had read my work. He signed a book for me, and in it he wrote, ‘Keep writing.’” Snyder plans to take his advice.

PRABHAV H

S N Y D E R W I N S N AT I O N A L WRITING CONTEST

PR ANAVH

The Next Rick Riordan

NEWS

Shuntá Jordan HAL L

OF

F A M E R

J. B. Fuqua Chair of Speech and Debate SHUNTÁ JORDAN has been inducted into the Georgia Forensic Coaches Association (GFCA) Hall of Fame. To be eligible for the Hall of Fame, coaches must have coached in Georgia for at least five years, promoted interest in debate through the strength of their program and the GFCA, and demonstrated that speech and debate are the ultimate tools for education and communication. Jordan also received the GFCA’s Richard Bracknell Service Award, which honors an individual annually for service to the organization.

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AROUND PACE A look at what's happening at Pace

A S u pe r

Spi r i t Wee k Monsters Inc., Space Jam and High School Musical proved no match for the Class of 2019’s Super Mario Bros. theme. The seniors reigned supreme during Spirit Week, the Upper School’s annual competition between classes.

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AROUND PACE

A Shimmering, Shining

Diamond Knight

The Parents Club Auction and Celebration spotlights 60 years of Pace Academy. ON MARCH 30, the Pace Academy community gathered at Mason Fine Art for A Diamond Knight, the Parents Club’s Auction and Celebration honoring the school’s 60th anniversary. The evening included silent and live auctions, food and entertainment, and the debut of Celebrating 60 Years of Pace Academy, a film by Chispa House. Special thanks to Parents Club President ALISON ARENTH; Auction Co-Chairs ELIZABETH DANGAR CLEVELAND '92, COURTENAY GABRIEL and LESLIE STEBBINS; and the army of volunteers and generous sponsors who made A Diamond Knight such a sparkling celebration of our school!

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AROUND PACE

I

t was the spring of 1996 and a soonto-be-married MIKE GANNON planned to move to Georgia with his bride, Atlanta native CHANLEY SMALL, who had been hired to teach science at the Westminster Schools. A New Yorker and a graduate of Brown University, Gannon had rarely visited the southern city, but he hoped his experience as a history and English teacher at the Dunn School in Los Olivos, Calif., would translate to Atlanta’s independent-school community. It turned out Pace Academy was hiring. “MISSY THURMAN, who worked at the Castle front desk, knew Chanley, and she helped guide me—or better yet, she helped get my resume in the right pile,” Gannon remembers. The connection led to interviews with then Head of Upper School DAVE WOOD and Headmaster PETER COBB. When Pace offered Gannon a position teaching Upper School American history, he gladly accepted.

“I was also told that I would coach volleyball, which I had never seen, nor played,” Gannon recalls with a laugh. “My first fall at Pace, I coached varsity volleyball with KRISTA WILHELMSEN, taught five sections of 11th-grade history—85 or more students!—and coached ninth-grade basketball. The following year, I convinced then Headmaster MIKE MURPHY to start a lacrosse program.” Gannon, an All-American lacrosse player at Brown, had not always aspired to teach or coach. “At one point, I couldn’t have imagined being a teacher,” he says. “I began my career in investment banking, and while it was good for me, I knew within a couple of weeks that I wasn’t where I was meant to be. My parents were coaches and teachers. They really loved their work, and it was meaningful to them. I certainly saw that and needed to find something that was meaningful to me. The rest is history, literally.”

Over the past 22 years, Gannon has taken on myriad roles within the Pace community—from teacher and coach to college counselor and, now, Head of Upper School. In 2016, the senior history award was named the Mike Gannon Award for Excellence in History in celebration of Gannon’s two decades at the school. During his tenure, Gannon has watched Pace grow and change, and he points to the 2014 opening of the Arthur M. Blank Family Upper School as his proudest Pace moment. “The building is such an incredible statement of who we are and what we value,” Gannon says. “For me, cutting that ribbon was the moment we, as a Pace community, arrived. It was built on the backs of people like [longtime faculty members] HELEN SMITH, CHARLIE OWENS, MARTHA KASILUS, NEIL DEROSA, BJ HAYES and others. The opening of the new Upper School was the

MIKE N O N N GA PA C E FUND DONOR SPO T LIGH T 12

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AROUND PACE

physical manifestation of their efforts. It was just remarkable.” Gannon’s Pace experience has been made all the more memorable because he has shared much of it with his children: PAYTON GANNON ’16, junior AIDAN GANNON and COLEMAN GANNON, who attended Pace through seventh grade. “Several years ago, Payton and her classmates painted their Spirit Week banner in our basement—I think some of the glitter is still there,” he recalls. “Watching them gave me this tangible view into the experiences of students who may not have interacted socially before, but were working toward a common goal and having fun.

I often get to witness those sort of bridgebuilding events, like Spirit Week, across the Pace community. I love those moments.” Gannon, now a member of the Georgia Lacrosse Coaches Hall of Fame, also has

fond memories of the early days of Pace lacrosse. At the start of the program, on-campus practice space was limited, so Gannon’s players piled into each others’ cars and drove to various public parks to practice. “We parked on the side of the road and carried our lacrosse goals out onto the field—often a dog park—and played,” he recalls. “I would fill water buckets here at Pace and put them in my car, and at least twice that first year, the buckets tipped over, which meant we had nothing to drink and my car was swamped with gallons of water.” Gannon’s experience launching the lacrosse program is just one the many rea-

sons he gives to The Pace Fund. “Without The Pace Fund, that first team never would have been,” he says. “I asked for jerseys, balls and water buckets. The total bill was

probably a thousand dollars, and The Pace Fund was the resource that got us out of the blocks. Now, years later, the lacrosse team has an amazing facility, and we don’t travel to dog parks. But there are programs that need the same sort of support ours once did.” A steadfast belief in Pace’s mission and values also motivates Gannon’s philanthropy. “I work with fabulous students and a tremendous faculty— they’re really amazing people,” he says. “And we want students to have the courage to strive for excellence and be committed to good academic work. Our school values families, and we partner with parents to help children grow. I believe that Pace Academy’s values from 60 years ago will remain true 60 years from now.” l

THIS PAGE Gannon with students in October 2017 in the Arthur M. Blank Family Upper School OPPOSITE PAGE Gannon teaching in Bridges Hall during the 1997–1998 school year

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Get to know the Pace

Academy staff members who make the business

of school happen.

Kevin Johnson

Kaitlyn Fortier A SSIS TANT TO THE HE AD OF SCHOOL How did you come to work at Pace? I had been a big fan of Head of School FRED ASSAF for many years (Fortier attended Miller School in Charlottesville, Va., where Assaf once taught), so when I learned there was an opportunity to work for him, I did not hesitate to leave my retail-management position and jump into the exciting world of Pace. I grew up at a boarding school, so I have a great appreciation for independent schools and how they create strong foundations for success and well-being. I was excited to be part of this transformative organization. What do you do at Pace that falls beyond the scope of your job description? I help manage Booster Club parking at home football games and also help organize and manage events on campus. Why is Pace a special place to work? The strong sense of community and belonging makes Pace a special place. The community strives for excellence in all facets of the school and pushes every member to be their best self. It is an environment that evokes respect, compassion and understanding.

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SECURIT Y MANAGER &

DIREC TOR OF TR ANSPORTATION

How did you come to work at Pace?

Elizabeth Glass ADVANCEMENT E VENTS MANAGER How did you come to work at Pace? I began as a volunteer when my older daughter [senior MERRITT ANN GLASS] started in Pre-First. About six years later, an opportunity arose in the Office of Advancement that just happened to match my skill set. It was the right job at the right time. I now work primarily on donor recognition, which ranges from events to naming opportunities and beyond. What do you do at Pace that falls beyond the scope of your job description? With two daughters at Pace [Merritt Ann and freshman KATHLEEN GLASS], I am a volunteer, arts fan, sports fan… the list goes on. Why is Pace a special place to work? It's a unique opportunity to have a glimpse into the world of kids today. I feel fortunate to have a bird’s-eye view of the daily life that my girls are part of—while keeping my distance, of course!

I joined the Pace staff nine years ago after moving to Atlanta from Brooklyn. In addition to my job with our facilities team, I took a leadership role in building the school’s varsity football program, which was new at the time. What do you do at Pace that falls beyond the scope of your job description? I coach varsity football, junior varsity basketball, and coordinate spring and summer football camps. As a coach, you are “Mr. Everything” to the students you serve. Why is Pace a special place to work? Pace is special to me because I've been given opportunities to change lives, on and off the field. My job requires me to wear so many different hats. That's why I come to work with a smile on my face and a song in my heart. I have to set a great example for our student-athletes, expose them to college coaches and make sure every kid in the program leaves as a better person.

Faces of PACE


AROUND PACE

Happy Birthday, PACE ACADEMY! Sharing the Memories

Watch Celebrating 60 Years of Pace Academy, a film by SAM BIRDSONG ’08 and the team at Chispa House, at www.paceacademy.org/history.

While parents, faculty and staff toasted Pace Academy’s 60th anniversary at A Diamond Knight, the Parents Club’s annual Auction, students commemorated the occasion with a 1960s-themed birthday bash on campus. Students and faculty donned their grooviest attire while playing games originating in the 1960s and scarfing down 60s signature snacks and cafeteria fare. Birthday cakes in each division also helped mark the milestone.

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AROUND PACE

A Black History Month for the Books PACE ACADEMY recognized Black History Month throughout February. The annual celebration of the central role of blacks in U.S. history served as a vehicle for meaningful conversations around race and educational, age-appropriate activities. In the Lower School, a bulletin board told the stories of black leaders in American history, while displays in the Woodruff Library highlighted African-American heroes and works by black authors. Assistant Head of Middle School for Student Life MARK SOMMERVILLE shared “Inspirational Moments” related to black history in morning assemblies. Director of Diversity & Inclusion JOANNE BROWN and Ted Ward, education coordinator for The Center for Civil and Human Rights, spoke to Upper School students about the history of school desegregation in the U.S. and Atlanta. Upper School students joined them for a panel discussion. A special assembly planned by Upper School students for their peers closed out the month. The community heard spoken word artist Adán Bean (pictured above); students performed a poem as a call and response; Upper School debate and public speaking teacher SHUNTÁ JORDAN and sophomore CHRISTIAN BING presented on the tradition and history of Black Greek-letter organizations; Director of College Counseling JONATHAN FERRELL and senior DERON MOORE (right) performed the Oscar-winning song GLORY; and the entire student body sang the black national anthem, Lift Every Voice and Sing.

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AROUND PACE

Up and Down the East Coast

Students crisscross the South on college tours.

THROUGHOUT the college search, Pace Academy’s Office of College Counseling strives to prepare students and their families for life beyond Pace by equipping them with the knowledge necessary to make an informed decision when the time arrives. In addition to on-campus programming for students and parents, College Counseling offers annual college tours to interested sophomores and juniors. In January, 17 students visited seven schools in Virginia—Georgetown University, Howard University, George Washington University, the University of Virginia, the University of Richmond, Washington and Lee University and Roanoke College—representing a wide variety of academic and cultural offerings and campus environments. The next month, a group of 47 students hit the road to tour schools throughout the Carolinas. Students made stops at Clemson University, Furman University, Duke University, North Carolina State University, the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, Wake Forest University, High Point University, Elon University and Davidson College. “We hope that the opportunity to catch a glimpse of life at a number of different schools helps students understand their options and the qualities they hope to find in their eventual college homes,” says Director of College Counseling JONATHAN FERRELL. “Ultimately, we want to minimize the stress of the search by arming students with information.”

“We want to minimize the stress of the search by arming students with information.”

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“WE FEEL LIKE IT IS OUR RESPONSIBILITY TO CONTINUE TO SUPPORT SUCH AN IMPORTANT PLACE TO OUR FAMILY AND OTHERS, NOW AND INTO THE FUTURE. OUR PLANNED GIFT AND OUR PACE FUND GIFTS ARE INVESTMENTS IN PACE THAT WILL BENEFIT OUR CHILDREN AND FUTURE GENERATIONS OF CHILDREN.” — STEPHANIE & AUSTIN MCDONALD ’97

The McDonald family

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AROUND PACE

P

ace Academy alumnus AUSTIN MCDONALD ’97 has ties to Pace that stretch back to 1984, when he started school in the Pre-First class taught by Lower School Learning Specialist DEB COOK, then a classroom teacher. Those ties were strengthened recently when Austin, a “Lifer,” and his wife, STEPHANIE MCDONALD, the parents of fourth-grader ELOISE MCDONALD, second-grader HUDSON MCDONALD and Pre-Firster ALDEN MCDONALD, joined Pace’s Castle Circle by arranging for a future gift, or planned gift, to Pace. The McDonalds decided to designate Pace as a beneficiary of their retirement account—an easy and popular way of making a planned gift. Through their planned gift, the couple hopes “to support Pace in a meaningful way into the future and to help create a lasting legacy for Pace,” Stephanie explains. “Our school community stands on the shoulders of the donors who came before us, and planned giving is a way for us to pay it forward.” Continuing to be engaged with Pace has been a priority for Austin, who appreciates the supportive setting he found during his 13 years as a student. He thrived in the intimate environment and enjoyed the opportunities to try new things. “My favorite Pace memories include watching the baseball and soccer teams win state championships, learning I was selected for the Peer Leadership program and representing Pace in the state track-and-field meets my junior and senior years,” Austin says. “I never went very far from Pace,” he continues. “In college, I stayed in touch with the Pace alumni office, and after graduation, I volunteered for the annual fund as an alumni class caller. That transitioned into a six-year term on the Alumni Association Board, the last two years of which I served as the president.” Stephanie adds, “I have always loved that Austin has been a lifetime supporter of Pace and made it a priority to give back, even when we were just out of college and he was starting his career.” The couple, who met as undergraduate students at Vanderbilt University, married

after Stephanie graduated from the Emory University School of Law. A native of Los Angeles, Stephanie has developed her own deep Pace connections. She volunteers in their children’s classrooms and at school events like the Fall Fair, and she serves as a grade representative and chairs The Pace Fund’s New Family Committee. “Volunteering has been critical to developing relationships with teachers, administration and other parents,” she says. When it was time for Eloise, their oldest, to begin school, the McDonalds explored many of Atlanta’s independent-school options. Stephanie says that Austin tried to take a step back and contain his bias for Pace. However, both felt from the beginning that Pace was the right school. “Pace feels like home, and when you walk through the Randall House door, you feel the warmth of the community, the dedication of the teachers and the joy of the students,” she explains. “There was no place we would rather have our children attend school.” The McDonalds have found much to love in the Pace of today. “We expected that Pace would both nurture and challenge our children, and our expectations have

Austin, who is president and COO of McDonald Development, a privately owned, multi-generational company that develops, owns and manages real estate in markets across the Southeast, has also volunteered for The Pace Fund in recent years and currently serves on Pace’s Planned Giving Committee. “Pace gave me such a strong foundation for my life and is now doing the same for our three children,” he says. “Because of that, it is an important part of my past, our present and our future. We feel like it is our responsibility to continue to support such a meaningful place to our family and others, now and into the future.” l

THE CASTLE CIRCLE PROFILE

T H E M C D O N A LD FA M I LY been exceeded,” Stephanie says. “Two of the neatest things as a parent are to watch your children try new things, even if they fail the first time or many times, and to see them expand their outlook on the world. “It’s also pretty neat that our kids get to go to school in the same building where Austin went to school; they see some of the same faces that were there when he was a kid and participate in some of the same traditions. It is really full circle and very special,” she says.

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ALL ABOUT PACE ARTS

From Hamilton, hair metal, and school history to jazz standards and a stroll down the Yellow Brick Road, the visual and performing arts at Pace thrived throughout the semester.

Knight Stars In addition to performing at Grandparents & Special Friends Day and other school events, the Lower School Knight Stars took center court at State Farm Arena and performed the national anthem prior to the Atlanta Hawks’ March 1 game against the Chicago Bulls. DONNA POTTORFF directs the vocal ensemble.

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COVERING CLASSICS & MODERN MELODIES Members of the Lower, Middle and

Upper School strings ensembles performed for family and friends throughout February. Led by strings instructor NIRVANA SCOTT, 35 fourth- and fifth-grade students received an informal introduction to performing during their concert, which featured classics such as Twinkle Twinkle Little Star and Ode to Joy, as well as newer compositions like the Harry Potter theme. Under the direction of strings instructor TARA HARRIS, Middle and Upper School students presented their annual POPs concert, which included selections such as Happier by Marshmello, rock classic Smoke on the Water and, from the hit musical Hamilton, My Shot, featuring junior vocalist ALLIE APPEL.


ALL ABOUT PACE ARTS

Off to See the Wizard Third graders discovered that “there’s no place like home” in their production of The Wizard of Oz.

SUPER COOL

Student Talent on Display Talent oozed from every corner of the Fine Arts Center as 23 acts took the stage for Cabaret, the Middle School’s annual talent show. This year’s production included vocal performances, student bands, a spot-on re-creation of Napoleon Dynamite’s Canned Heat dance and more—all tied together thanks to the comedic genius of eighth-grade emcees BRIENNE HINGST, THOMAS STAMOULIS and JACK WAGREICH.

The cast and crew of the fifth-grade play, Too School for Cool, took a look back at the Class of 2026’s journey through the Lower School. Written by teachers and students, the play incorporated songs and historical events to tell the group’s story. “It was fun to relive all of the grades together because it is our last year in the Lower School,” says fifthgrader SYDNEY GAITHER. The fifth grade dedicated its performance to the members of the Class of 2019, who staged a similar production when they were in Pace's fifth grade. Many of this year’s seniors attended the show. “I like how we have role models in the seniors so we can create our own paths and goals,” says fifth-grader REESE HONEYCUTT.

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ALL ABOUT PACE ARTS

All That Jazz Earth Wind & Fire, Chicago, Bill Chase and Beyoncé were just a few of the artists whose work was showcased at this year’s Knight of Jazz, a collaboration between the Upper School band, vocalists and a steel drum ensemble. With direction from band instructors DANNY DOYLE and JACK WALKER, chorus teacher SUSAN WALLACE, and a group of professional musical mentors, students pulled off a performance that had audience members dancing in the aisles.

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KnightTimes | Spring 2019


Making Art With the Masters As part of its mission to support arts programming across all divisions at Pace, the Pace Arts Alliance (PAA) partners with the visual and performing arts department to bring professionals to Pace. In recent months, Jimmy King, trumpeter for singer-songwriter Bruno Mars, worked with Upper School choral and band students as they prepared for the Knight of Jazz—and convinced bandmates Dwayne Dugger and Kameron T. Whalum to do the same [1 & 2]. Strings students spent time with jazz violinist Christian Howes, while Upper School visual artists enjoyed two days with conceptual artist Gregor Turk, known for his public art installations, ceramic sculptures, photography and mixed-media constructions [3]. In addition, illustrator Mike Lowery, author of Slightly Jet Lagged: The Travel Sketchbooks of Mike Lowery, helped artistic adventurers in the Middle School prep for their spring-break travels with the Isdell Center for Global Leadership [4]; awardwinning ceramic artist Shadow May spent three days manipulating monolithic slabs of clay and thrown forms to create large, dynamic pieces in Upper School classes; and artist Kelly Robertson enthralled Lower, Middle and Upper School students with glass-blowing demonstrations during Spring Arts Festival [5] (see story on page 45).

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PUTTING ON A SHOW

ALL ABOUT PACE ARTS

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The Upper School’s fourth annual Winter Showcase took theatregoers throughout the Fine Arts Center and around campus as Pace performing artists presented scenes from productions including Proof, Hamilton and Machinal, as well as an adaptation of Oh, Hello On Broadway, now streaming on Netflix. Created in partnership with Serenbe Playhouse Director of Education Cory Phelps, the theatrical event also featured three original plays, written and directed by students. A total of 44 Pace students participated in the showcase.


ALL ABOUT PACE ARTS

Celebrating Studio Art Seventh- and eighth-grade students in Middle School studio art classes exhibited work representing a variety of mediums for parents, teachers and friends. They celebrated the exhibit’s opening with a special reception, coordinated by studio art teachers KATY COWLES and ANNA MURPHY.

Practicing What They Preach Talented artists in their own right, members of the visual arts faculty in the Lower, Middle and Upper Schools displayed their work in the annual Art Faculty Exhibit, which ran through February and early March. Featured artists included DONICE BLOODWORTH, KATY COWLES, FRANCE DORMAN, SUSAN EDWARDS, MARK KNOTT and ANNA MURPHY.

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ALL ABOUT PACE ARTS

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KnightTimes | Spring 2019

Children of the 1980s were in for a treat as Rock of Ages: Middle School Edition took the Fine Arts Center stage. The musical, set in 1987, featured more hair metal than a Def Leppard tribute band could ever cover. Songs like We're Not Gonna Take It, Every Rose Has Its Thorn and Don’t Stop Believin’ brought to life the story of the music scene on Los Angeles’ legendary Sunset Strip, where groupies line up at the Dupree Room to turn their rock-and-roll dreams into reality. Directed by Middle School Drama Director PATRICK CAMPBELL, the production included more than 50 students—on stage and behind the scenes—as well as a totally tubular set and fresh costumes.


ALL ABOUT PACE ARTS

Freshman JAYLA WIDEMAN recaps Upper School theatre students’ trip to the Big Apple.

BROAD WAY

In April, Pace students went on a trip to New York City with Upper School Theatre Director SEAN BRYAN. The group included freshmen, juniors and seniors. We spent a whirlwind four days in the heart of the city, watching Broadway and Off Broadway shows. Our first stop was Serendipity 3, a restaurant renowned for its large portions of stellar ice cream. We were seated at around 10:30 p.m., and the experience of eating in New York City so late at night, surrounded by the gorgeous lights, was a perfect way to start our adventure. The next day, we toured Radio City Music Hall—my favorite part of the trip. We learned the history of Radio City’s architecture and art, past performances and the building itself. Not only did we tour the building’s back rooms and stage, but we also met an actual Rockette! She was very kind, and we had a great time speaking with her about her experiences. Next, we saw Avenue Q! and met actress Lacretta Nicole, who played Gary Coleman and answered all of our questions about acting on Broadway. On day three of our trip, we got up early for breakfast at the famous Stardust Diner, where the servers sang throughout our meal. Later, we went on The Ride, a bus tour through the city with entertaining commentary from the guide. The second show we saw, The Band’s Visit, has won 10 Tony Awards. I was excited to see it but was ultimately disappointed; however, many of my fellow students enjoyed it immensely. I loved the third show on our itinerary, My Fair Lady, based on the play Pygmalion. The actors grabbed the audience’s attention and held it throughout the show. We toured NBC Studios—including The Tonight Show and Saturday Night Live studios—on the final day of the trip before seeing The Play That Goes Wrong, an absolutely hilarious comedy. The final show we saw, Mean Girls, was my personal favorite. The set was perfect for the intricacies of the scene changes, and much of the original cast was still in the production, which was a delight. The actor who plays Damian even signed our playbills! All in all, it was one of the best trips I have ever been on. I’m really glad I went, and I hope that the trip will be put on again next year!

A MEETING OF THE THEATRICAL MINDS Twenty members of the Upper School theatre department, under the leadership of Fine Arts Department Chair SEAN BRYAN, participated in the 2019 Georgia Thespian Conference in Columbus, Ga., in February. More than 5,000 students from across the state attended the event, which included theatre productions, workshops led by theatre professionals, individual performance and tech events, and opportunities to meet with college representatives. Each participating school was permitted to compete in a limited number of events, and when all was said and done, Pace students earned rankings of Good (1), Excellent (4) and Overall Superior (1). Junior LAUREN O’SULLIVAN (shown above) brought home Pace’s top prize for her costume design for A Midsummer Night’s Dream.

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IGHLIGH T

VA R S I T Y G I R L S BASKETBALL

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Coached by TROY BAKER, BOBBI BOYER, KABEYA KABONGO and STEPHANIE SOSEBEE Varsity girls basketball seniors PAIGE FLEMING, MADELINE JANKI, ANN RAFEEDIE, KAYLA ROSS and JOELLE ZELONY wrapped up their Pace careers with a runner-up finish in the region tournament and a trip to the GHSA Class AAA Sweet 16. The team members had their work cut out for them. They entered the season with one of the most competitive non-region schedules in the state and held their own against several state-playoff contenders from larger classifications, including North Forsyth (7A), Archer (7A), Starr's Mill (5A), St. Pius X (4A), Marist (4A) and The Bolles School out of Florida. The Knights entered regiontournament play ranked No. 1 and defeated Redan High School to advance to the final against rival Lovett, where they fell to the Lions 48–42. A first-round win over East Jackson High School sent the team to the Sweet 16, where the Knights’ stateplayoff run came to an end with a loss to Sonoraville High School. The Knights concluded the season with an overall record of 18–9. Zelony, Ross and Rafeedie were named First Team All-Region; Zelony also received GACA AAA All-State honors and an Atlanta Journal-Constitution All-Metro Honorable Mention.


VA R S I T Y BASKETBALL CHEERLEADING Coached by LORI BAKER and CAMERON RUSS ’17

VA R S I T Y B OY S BASKETBALL

This year’s varsity basketball cheerleading squad motivated players and fans throughout the regular season and into the region tournament and state playoffs—cheering on the varsity boys and girls basketball teams at nearly 50 games. Next season, the team will miss seniors ALEX ALLEN and KENDALL WILLIS.

Coached by SHARMAN WHITE, GREG BLYTHE, DEMETRIUS SMITH, MASON AMBLER and JONATHAN ROBINSON Under the leadership of new head coach SHARMAN WHITE, a young varsity boys basketball team started the season with high hopes and an eye on a return to the GHSA Class AAA state tournament. The team gained momentum throughout the season and breezed through the first two rounds of the region tournament before falling to Cedar Grove High School by 2 points in the region final. In the first round of the state playoffs, the Knights put up a fight against a tough team from Hart County High School, but lost the back-and-forth game 54–50. The team concluded the season with a 20–9 record, then went 9–3 in the region. The Knights ended the season ranked 68th in the state. HoopSeen recognized freshman JOSH REED as the Class AAA All-State Freshman of the Year, while the Georgia Athletic Coaches Association named junior REIGN WATKINS to its AAA All-State team. Sophomore MADISON DURR, Reed and Watkins received All-Region recognition. Next year, the team will miss the leadership of its lone senior, MYLES TODD.

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VA R S I T Y G I R L S SWIMMING AND DIVING

WINTER SPORTS

A LE X

Z Y L I Z

C H A R L I E

Coached by JOHN AGUE, JIM EBERT, GEORGE SOKOLSKY, LYNN WILMOTH and MELODY WALTER

RECOR D S E T T I NG S I BLI NGS

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There’s little doubt that the Kaye siblings— ALEX KAYE ’17, senior CHARLIE KAYE and sophomore LIZZY KAYE—hold the Pace Academy record for the most records shared in a single family. As members of the varsity swimming and diving teams, each sibling has proven his or her prowess in the pool time and time again, and this past season, the family added three more state titles to its list of accolades. Alex holds school records as a member of the medley and 400 freestyle relays, and the pool record for the 400 free relay. Charlie concludes his senior year as the most decorated swimmer in school history with 20 school, pool and meet records. The All-American holds three state titles: two in the 100 backstroke and one in the 100 freestyle. He has represented the Knights on three All-State teams, earned All-American Consideration twice and is a four-time winner of the Iron Knight Award, which recognizes swimmers who earn state-qualifying times in all possible events. Not to be outdone by her older brothers, this year Lizzy became the first Pace studentathlete to qualify for the state championship in both diving and an individual swimming event. An All-American and a state champion as a freshman, she finished her sophomore year undefeated, with All-American Consideration, every Pace Middle and Upper School diving record and the overall state record.

A sixth-place finish in the 1A–3A division at the GHSA State Championship meet capped a successful season for the varsity girls swimming and diving team. Defending state-champion diver sophomore LIZZY KAYE kicked off the state competition for the AquaKnights. Undefeated all season, Kaye continued her winning ways and brought home a second state title while earning All-American Consideration. She finished more than 95 points ahead of her closest competitor in the 1A–5A meet and captured the 1A–7A state record. In the state swimming competition, junior ERIN HOOD earned a spot on the podium with a third-place finish in the 200 individual medley and placed fifth in the 100 breaststroke. The team of Kaye, Hood, junior MEGHAN MCMILLIN and sophomore AMALIE LITTLE finished fourth in the medley relay and fifth in the 200 freestyle relay, setting a new Pace record. McMillin joined seniors LUISA WHITNEY and SOPHIA LOCHAN and sophomore ISABEL BATTISTA on the 400 freestyle relay team, which finished 10th in the state. The AquaKnights will miss Lochan and Whitney’s leadership next year. Photography by Ashford Little


VA R S I T Y B OY S SWIMMING AND DIVING Coached by JOHN AGUE, JIM EBERT, GEORGE SOKOLSKY, LYNN WILMOTH and MELODY WALTER The varsity boys swimming and diving team concluded its season at the GHSA 1A–5A State Championship meet, where the AquaKnights finished 12th out of 56 schools in the 1A–3A divisions. At the state competition, the team of senior CHARLIE KAYE and juniors JOHN O’BRIEN, JASON ROSENBLOUM and DILLON CARROLL finished in ninth place in the 200 freestyle relay and 10th in the medley relay. The state meet cemented Kaye’s position as the most celebrated swimmer in Pace history. He set three school records, achieved an All-American time, two AllAmerican Consideration times, a state title in the 100 freestyle and a repeat gold in the 100 backstroke.

In addition to Kaye, the AquaKnights bid a fond farewell to seniors MAX APPEL, COLE CAMPBELL, CARTER FROOMAN, TASE KARAMANOLIS, AARON PASCANER and COOPER SELIG. Photography by Ashford Little

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EQUESTRIAN CLUB Coached by JOLIE CUNNINGHAM Pace’s Middle and Upper School equestrian club teams put together an outstanding season. Over the course of five shows, the equestriennes earned countless individual ribbons and consistently placed among the top teams. Following regular-season competition, junior LAUREN STEBBINS and eighth-grader ANNA NUCKOLS advanced as individuals to the region finals. Nuckols placed fourth at the regional competition, while Stebbins was named the High Point Rider of the show season and finished first overall, earning a spot in the zones competition, held in late March in Pensacola, Fla.

VA R S I T Y W R E S T L I N G Coached by GUS WHYTE and GRADY STEVENS

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It was a record-setting season for several members of the varsity wrestling team. Freshman GEORGE BLAHA set a record for wins in a freshman season with 40, while senior CHARLIE WARREN joined an elite group of Pace wrestlers in notching more than 100 career wins. He wrapped up his time on the mat with 116 total victories. In post-season competition, Blaha, Warren and junior CONNOR HUSK advanced from the area tournament to sectionals, where Blaha and Warren finished in third and fourth place, respectively, and moved on to state. Next year, the squad will miss the leadership of seniors AHSAN HENNINGS, CHILTON TOLLIVER and Warren.


WINTER SPORTS

A PAC E RAC E WITH A ON SATURDAY, APRIL 13, more than 1,100 runners, walkers and supporters gathered in Pace Academy’s back parking lot for the 37th running of the Booster Club’s Pace Race. Chaired by Pace parents CARTER MONROE and MARY HOLMES, the 1-mile fun run and 5K race supports Booster Club initiatives in the Lower, Middle and Upper Schools. This year, the event also raised awareness and funds for the Kyle Pease Foundation, an organization that strives to improve the lives of disabled individuals through sports. In the days before the race, Pease Foundation co-founders Kyle and Brent Pease—the first push-assisted team of brothers and second duo to finish the IRONMAN World Championship in Kona, Hawaii—shared their inspiring story with all students. The brothers and other push-assisted athletes associated with the Pease Foundation then participated in the Pace Race. The Pace community celebrated the completion of the event with a post-race party, which included a donut truck, a DJ and surprises for students. Photography by True Speed Photo

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ICGL

THE YEAR OF

ENERGY IN ACTION

From field trips and power plants to sustainability experts and a schoolwide show of energy aptitude, here’s how the we continued to fuel discussion around this year’s Isdell Center for Global Leadership (ICGL) annual theme.

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SHOWCASING ENERGY [THIS PAGE] On a sunny afternoon in late March, the Pace Academy community gathered in the Arthur M. Blank Family Upper School and the Gardens for the ICGL Energy Showcase. The annual event highlighted the learning progression that occurs from Pre-First to 12th grade as students become global leaders and thinkers. Students facilitated conversations about their energy-related projects, and the Showcase’s museum-like format allowed attendees to visit classrooms featuring projects from multiple grade levels, all focused on Energy. Guests learned about volcanic explosions and geothermal energy from Pre-First students; heard about fourth graders’ creative solutions to combat drought; checked out Middle Schoolers’ water wheels, power grids and solar-powered fountains; discussed the Upper School ICGL Student Advisory Council’s initiatives; listened to elevator pitches from Social Entrepreneurship Challenge participants—and more. Following the student showcase, Upper School performers presented a short, energyrelated theatrical piece written and directed by senior ANNABELLE CRITZ. Then, local vendors showcased their energy-efficient products; the Kennesaw State University Electric Vehicle Team displayed its EVGrand Prix Go-Kart; and Honeysuckle Gelato and Pero’s Pizza provided dinner and dessert.


ICGL

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CONFRONTING CLIMATE REALITIES [1]

Upper School science department chair JOHN PEARSON, junior SANDY LUM and freshman ALLISON SILVERBOARD represented Pace at the Climate Reality Leadership Corp training this spring. The event, a project of The Climate Reality Project, brings together individuals from all walks of life who strive to create a sustainable future for the earth. Participants learned more about the science of climate change and its impact on the daily lives of people around the world; discussed available solutions; engaged in publicspeaking training; and heard about best practices in grassroots organizing and activism.

TALKING SUSTAINABILITY [2]

In the last in a series of energy-themed assemblies, Upper School students heard from John R. Seydel, director of sustainability for the City of Atlanta Mayor’s Office of Resilience. Seydel discussed how the Office of Sustainability works with the Office of Resilience to move Atlanta toward its Clean Energy Plan, which aims to power all city government facilities with 100% renewable energies by 2035—and all of Atlanta by 2050.

EXPLORING ENERGY AT PLANT VOGTLE [3] Students in ALLISON TARVIN’S AP Chemistry class and the 2018–2019 cohort of Isdell Global Leaders visited Georgia Power's Plant Vogtle in Waynesboro, Ga. Plant Vogtle runs two pressurized-water nuclear reactors, which allowed students to witness the application of basic chemistry principles as elemental isotopes released energy to become more stable.

PACE&PRECE

A POWERFUL PARTNERSHIP

IN MARCH, Pace Academy students, faculty and administrators hosted 11 students and teachers from Ceará, Brazil. The visitors represented PRECE, an educational program working to combat poverty through cooperative learning, and a Pace partner through the Isdell Center of Global Leadership (ICGL). While in the U.S., the PRECE group immersed itself in cultural activities—and the English language—with the goal of learning more about Pace and education in U.S. schools. Many Pace families opened their homes and classrooms to the guests, and the group participated in activities in all three divisions—shadowing students, giving presentations, attending sporting events and joining in day-to-day life at Pace. “To live with American host families, educators and students of Pace Academy for 10 days was an experience that deeply influenced my personal and professional life,” says teacher Rennan Luz Lopes. “An example of this was to understand that even though our cities and our schools have different infrastructures, we are similar in purpose, mission, heart, solidarity and social responsibility.” The group also visited Pace partner organizations like the Center for Civil and Human Rights and took part in First Presbyterian Church of Atlanta's Sunday prayer breakfast for homeless individuals. Lower and Upper School counselor KACY BRUBAKER, who once worked with PRECE in Brazil, coordinated the exchange. Brubaker led a 2018 ICGL study tour to Brazil, and Upper School students returned to Brazil in partnership with PRECE in May of 2019 (look for coverage in our fall issue). “Being part of the Pace family for two weeks gave our students and teachers the opportunity to live in an extremely different environment, which provided them with a once-in-a-lifetime experience,” says teacher Rildo Reis. “We are thankful.”

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SPRING-BREAK STUDY TOURS COVERED EVERYTHING FROM CONSERVATION AND ENERGY TO OUTDOOR ADVENTURE AND COMMUNITY

1

C H I N A & TA I W A N

ENGAGEMENT.

Culture and conservation were the focus for the 19 Middle School students who traveled through China and Taiwan with faculty advisers KATE ECKHARDT, KAYLAN HAIZLIP, KAREN SOMMERVILLE and ZACH SLANEY. The group explored the environmental consequences of development and its impact on local communities, individuals and animals. From the Great Wall and hot springs to a school exchange, students experienced the past, present and future of China—a nation evolving faster than ever before.

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CUBA

6 [4–6]

As an island nation, Cuba faces unique environmental challenges—issues 15 Upper School students and advisers RYANN SMITH and KEVIN JOHNSON endeavored to understand during their time abroad. Students worked alongside local farmers and conservation specialists, participated in a coastal restoration project, explored the history of the sugarcane and tobacco industries, and took in the culture of Trinidad and Havana. Time in national parks and nature preserves exposed students to Cuba’s rich and diverse ecosystems, while visits to museums and historic sites revealed the country’s complicated past.

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[1–3]

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ICGL MOROCCO

[7–9]

Fourteen Middle School students

and faculty members EDNA-MAY

HERMOSILLO, ANDREW HEACOCK

and MARK SOMMERVILLE took a deep

dive into the rich culture of Morocco—a

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majority-Muslim nation at the crossroads

of Africa, the Middle East and Europe.

In partnership with ImprintEd Abroad,

the group toured Moroccan cities, visited

homes and engaged in conversations with local people in an attempt to challenge

stereotypes and build cross-cultural

connections. Along the way, students haggled in colorful markets, learned about local industries, discovered traditional

music and art, and hopped on a caravan

of camels to take in the coastal city of 9

Essaouira.

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FAST FACTS

I C E LAN D

11 [10–11]

The Isdell Center for Global Leadership’s (ICGL) Year of Energy came to life for the 14 Middle School students who— with faculty members KELLY COLQUITT, LIZ MASON and SCOTT SHUPE—explored Iceland, where more than 85% of the country’s energy comes from renewable sources. From their home base in Reykjavík, students toured innovative energy production sites, sampled foods cooked by the heat of the Earth and enjoyed the volcanoes, waterfalls and geysers along Iceland’s Golden Circle. Puffins, dolphins and humpback and minke whales were among the many species of wildlife the group encountered.

OVER SPRING BREAK, 102 MIDDLE AND UPPER SCHOOL STUDENTS AND 23 FACULTY MEMBERS TRAVELED ON EIGHT ICGL STUDY TOURS.

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ICGL

“In Iceland, we learned about energy, culture and history—all in one day!” EIGHTH-GRADER JAMES ROMIG

“After going to a village [in Morocco] where argan oil is made, I have a new appreciation for the dedication and hard work of the women who make the product. One would think that their jobs are tedious and not fun, but they continue to love what they do, and one must appreciate their love for their profession.”

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MEXICO

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The quiet beachside city of La Paz on Mexico’s Baja California Peninsula hosted 12 Middle School students and faculty advisers KIM THOMSON, LUCAS MORENO and ALICE HALL as they studied sea turtles, whale sharks and other species native to Magdalena Bay and the island of Espíritu Santo. While exploring the area’s arid terrain, students participated in conservation efforts with scientists, camped among the dunes, interacted with local children, discovered ancient cultures and snorkeled with sea lions.

EIGHTH-GRADER BARRETT HIGHT

“Seeing the Northern Lights was so magical because none of us will likely ever see them again. It was so hard to even consider that we just saw one of Earth’s most incredible natural beauties.”

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EIGHTH-GRADER BENJAMIN SCHRAGER

PA R A G U A Y

“We learned about the daily lives of the families living in [a rural village in] Morocco and the challenges they face. The people were very hospitable. Several of them invited us into their homes, where they showed us their beautiful handmade rugs. We walked to the primary school and discussed the challenges that prevent kids from receiving a good education.”

“I don’t know why I chose to go to Patagonia, because we hiked an average of six hours a day, and I don’t really do hiking. But I went, and it was the best week of my life. I realized that I like to do so much more than I thought I did.” SENIOR AHSAN HENNINGS

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[4–7]

Eight Upper School students, faculty advisers REBECCA RHODES and GUS WHYTE, and Pace parent and Habitat for Humanity International CEO JONATHAN RECKFORD spent spring break in Paraguay, where they constructed a home for a local family. This service-focused study tour marked Pace’s eighth trip in partnership with Habitat for Humanity International and coincided with the 20th anniversary of the organization’s presence in Paraguay. Before the build, the group toured the capital city of Asunción, while Ciudad del Este and the breathtaking Iguazu Falls provided a bit of respite following five days of construction.

EIGHTH-GRADER HALEY HIROKAWA

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[1–3]

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SOUTH AFRICA

[8–9]

For the third consecutive year, Upper School students traveled to South Africa to study conservation on land and sea. Led by faculty members JONATHAN FERRELL, SHUNTÁ JORDAN and NIKKI MCCRARY,

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12 budding scientists partnered with Oceans Research, a program dedicated to marine conservation, to participate in hands-on research and data collection related to the dolphins and great white sharks of Mossel Bay. Students’ research continued on solid ground as they explored ongoing efforts to protect the rhino, elephant, Cape buffalo, lion and giraffe populations in the region. The group also spent time in Cape Town, where Robben Island, Table Mountain and the Alfred and Victoria Waterfront were among its destinations.

THANK YOU!

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FOLLOW US! FOLLOW STUDENTS’ TRAVELS ON INSTAGRAM VIA @PACEABROAD.

THANK YOU to the sponsors, runners, volunteers and

spectators who made the 37th running of the Pace Race the

most successful ever. With over 1,000 registered runners for the 1-mile and

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PATA G O N I A

12 [10–12]

The 20 Upper School students who traveled to Patagonia with faculty members KACY BRUBAKER, GRADY STEVENS and LAURA AGRONT-HOBBS began their adventures in the Argentinian capital of Buenos Aires before lacing up their boots and trekking through the mountains and glaciers of South America’s southern tip. The group spent four days exploring the area near Monte Fitz Roy, the highest peak in the mountainous region on the border between Argentina and Chile. From there, it was off to Los Glaciares National Park, where the Perito Moreno Glacier provided opportunities for hiking and rafting amid the ice.

5K-races, the Pace community came together for a morning of fitness and FUN! The Pace Race is the Booster Club's primary fundraiser each year, and all proceeds directly benefit Pace Athletics and programming in all divisions —the Lower, Middle and Upper Schools. Save the date for SATURDAY, APRIL 18, 2020, next year's Pace Race.


GLOBAL LEADERS

1

A PACE FAMILY PROJECT 2

1) From left to right: Bethany Chern, Dr. Ailene KimChern, Dr. Krishna Mukkamala, Shriya Mukkamala, Dr. Shivani Mukkamala, Dr. David Chin Yee, Dr. Joshua Chern, Benjamin Chern 2) From left to right: Benjamin Chern, Bethany Chern, Shriya Mukkamala. The students pose in front of the visual acuity chart. 3) Benjamin Chern with a Welch Allyn Spot Vision Screener

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In February, several Pace Academy families provided breakfast and eye screenings for the residents of My Sister’s House, an overnight homeless shelter for women and children. Freshman BENJAMIN CHERN reflects on the experience. I had the pleasure of serving at My Sister's House, a homeless shelter for women and children. My family and friends partnered with the Lighthouse Foundation to offer eye exams and glasses. Five eye doctors, including three Pace parents—DR. AILENE KIM-CHERN, DR. DAVID CHIN YEE and DR. KRISHNA MUKKAMALA—worked alongside a team of volunteers, including several Pace students and parents DR. JOSHUA CHERN and DR. SHIVANI MUKKAMALA. I was responsible for the Welch Allyn Spot Vision Screener, which looks like a camera. I would point it towards someone’s eyes, and it printed out an estimated glasses prescription. Fellow Pace students, fifth-grader BETHANY CHERN and first-grader SHRIYA MUKKAMALA, measured the visual acuity of each patient. We screened over 80 residents. If the screening process determined that the resident needed additional testing, Dr. Kim-Chern and Dr. Mukkamala checked their eye glasses prescriptions and examined the health of their eyes. This opportunity allowed me to engage with the homeless here in our city. I was touched when I saw that the residents were smiling, though they were going through tough times. I am thankful for the opportunity to serve these women and children. The service we provided will positively impact their lives by helping them see better at work and school. I look forward to continuing this service in the future. — by BENJAMIN CHERN ’22

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Fundraising to

FIGHT CAN CER

Now in its fourth year, the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society (LLS) of Georgia’s Students of the Year (SOY ) competition challenges select high-school students to raise funds for LLS in honor of an “Honored Hero,” a child battling or in remission from a blood cancer. It was a mission Team CUREageous leaders juniors ALEXA LEVINE and JORDAN UPCHURCH could get behind. “After researching the organization, I discovered how much LLS does to help patients and their families,” Upchurch says. “I also discovered that LLS works to find cures not only for blood cancer but for all cancers. This motivated me even more to do my best to spread awareness and raise money for the cause.” Levine, Upchurch and their team of 13 completed the seven-week leadership-development and philanthropy program. With guidance from LLS staff, they recruited sponsors, solicited donations via letters and emails, coordinated proceeds nights with local restaurants, collected silent auction items and hosted events such as yoga sessions and cupcake sales. When all was said and done, Team CUREageous’ fundraising campaign generated $193,816 for LLS—more than $90,000 above its original goal—which placed the team atop 35 others to win the contest. Junior JEREMY LEVEN was named Team Member of the Year. “I learned that I do not give up when it comes to something that truly matters,” Levine says. “There were bumps in the road, but no matter what, I kept pushing myself, knowing I was truly making a difference.” With their win, Levine and Upchurch continue a tradition of fundraising excellence among SOY participants from Pace Academy. MORGAN KELLY ’16 and DARBY COCHRAN ’16 were runners-up in the 2016 competition; SOPHIE BLASBERG ’17 and MOLLY LEVINE ’17 won in 2017; and, in 2018, KHAKI LOUGHRAN ’18 and JORDAN SHOULBERG ’18 claimed the title, while seniors KYLIE BLANK and CHARLIE HIRSCH were runners-up.

Jordan Upchurch (left) and Alexa Levine (right) with LLS Student of the Year Honored Hero Loren Bass-Sanford.

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GLOBAL LEADERS

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he daughter of a Delta Air Lines pilot, JANIE ROWE understands the importance of creating global connections. After graduating from the University of Alabama and teaching at Eagles Landing Christian Academy, Rowe found Pace Academy’s Design Thinking and Isdell Center for Global Leadership (ICGL) programs intriguing. She credits her friend, Middle School history teacher KATE ECKHARDT, with introducing her to Pace and encouraging her to become involved in the school’s global-leadership opportunities. Rowe joined the Pace faculty as a second-grade lead teacher in 2016 and now serves as Lower School director of Design Thinking, a role that combines her love of project-based learning with her desire to teach with a global mindset. Through Design Thinking—a hands-on, human-centered approach to problem-solving—Rowe helps students tackle global issues by collaborating with teachers to create curriculum around the ICGL’s annual theme. Each unit requires daily communication with and between students, a critical component of Design Thinking, which also promotes the Noble Knights’ Pillars of Character traits of Empathy, Curiosity, Collaboration, Respect, Leadership and Perseverance. “It is crucial for students to receive a global education because the world is connected now more than ever due to advances in technology,” Rowe explains. “Students must learn how to empathize with, communicate with and collaborate with people who are from different backgrounds, cultures and countries.” ICGL trips to South Africa and China—countries she never dreamed of

F A C U L T Y

S P O T L I G H T

Janie Rowe visiting before arriving at Pace—have furthered Rowe’s commitment to global education. Chumming for great white sharks in Mossel Bay and observing pods of 100-plus dolphins at play connected Rowe to nature in ways she had never before experienced. “I realized the importance of empathy for all creatures, which made a significant impact on my worldview,” Rowe recalls. “Seeing the diversity and beauty of these countries helped me understand the vastness of the world and how I can make an impact despite my small place in it,” she says. As Rowe’s worldview has evolved, so have her teaching practices. In the classroom, she now focuses on promoting inclusivity and bringing awareness to injustices. This year, Rowe has emphasized these values while continuing to connect students to the 2018–2019 ICGL global theme of Energy. For example, second and third graders participated in the Smithsonian’s eighth annual Invent It Challenge, which requires students to create a new tool or technology to enhance the daily lives and activities of older adults—

and Rowe has thrown in an Energy component. Fourth graders explored Energy through project-based learning on sound, and fifth graders took on Energy-related “passion projects.” As she works to enhance the Design Thinking program, Rowe is also working toward a master’s degree in curriculum and instruction at Penn State University. Additionally, Rowe can be found working with the Mini and Juniorpreneur after-school clubs, coaching Middle School cross-country and volunteering with Girls on the Run. More than anything, Rowe makes sure her days are defined by small, purposeful acts to drive her success as a teacher and global leader. Her daily goals include communicating clearly, making an impact on individuals, fostering a growth mindset in her students and improving the Design Thinking experience. Through these goals, Rowe exemplifies to her students the best way to measure their successes: rather than focusing on awards and recognition, she hopes they will value the impact they make in their communities. — by HANNAH KELLY ’15

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Scholars in Service “I first encountered Covenant House when I attended the Pace Student Sleep Out last year,” says junior MAYA KAPLAN. The nonprofit organization opens doors of opportunity and hope to homeless and trafficked youth in Atlanta, and Pace Academy students, faculty and staff have raised nearly $60,000 to support its work over the past three years. “At the Sleep Out, we spent the night outside and heard stories from Covenant House residents,” Kaplan continues. “Those stories really inspired me to fight for this cause and learn how I could help and interact more with the people that Covenant House serves.” To that end, Kaplan, along with junior SPENCYR ARONSON, applied to participate in the Covenant House Scholars in Service program. Two of 30 high-school students selected, Kaplan and Aronson took part in philanthropy courses, service projects and roundtable discussions with Covenant House residents before partnering to raise $1,000 each. “We wanted to raise as much money as possible for the youth at Covenant House,” Aronson says. With Covenant House Development Coordinator Leigh Hall’s guidance, Kaplan and Aronson solicited friends and family via email and phone calls, and coordinated a fundraiser at the Impeccable Pig, a local clothing boutique where Kaplan works. “We surpassed our goal and collected over $50,000 dollars— the most ever raised by scholars in this program,” Kaplan reports. And while Kaplan and Aronson no doubt contributed to Covenant House’s life-changing work, they also gained new, lifechanging perspectives in the process. “I learned that it is so easy to look at homeless individuals and judge their circumstances,” Kaplan says. “However, homelessness is not something these kids brought upon themselves; it is a lifestyle that they were forced into. I think others need to become more educated about homelessness so that they think before they judge and are able to empathize instead.” Aronson agrees: “Life is extremely difficult for homeless teenagers in Atlanta,” she says. “But I learned that when teenagers are given a real chance in life through Covenant House, they are capable of turning their lives around.”

Maya Kaplan (left) and Spencyr Aronson (right)

Breathing Easy

Juniors INDIA BEHL and NIKKI RUBIN hope Clean Air Facial Wear protects others from air pollution.

Last year, as sophomores, NIKKI RUBIN and I entered the Pace Academy Upper School Social Entrepreneurship Challenge, run by Isdell Center for Global Leadership (ICGL) Associate Director ZEENA LATTOUF ’12 and Pace parent and entrepreneur FARAZ ZUBAIRI. Under the 2017–2018 ICGL theme of Conservation, we were asked to consider environmental issues and ways to tackle them on a simple level. I had recently returned from New Delhi, where I lived for three years, and the growing problem of pollution jumped to my mind. Nikki is a long-time lacrosse player, and she immediately shared the breathing problems that players often face when outdoors for long periods of time. We connected on the idea of creating a better-than-is-currently-available pollution mask. We researched masks, gathered opinions from users—ourselves included—pinpointed areas for improvement and presented our thoughts to the judges. Our team won third place in the competition, and we were thrilled! With our monetary prize, we were able to move forward with our design. We worked with JOYCE JIANG, mother of SYDNIE JIANG ’18, who runs an alterations and tailoring store. Together, we discussed fabrics and stitching, and we created prototypes of our mask design. Our first order of Clean Air Facial Wear was for 25 masks, which we packed and sent on the Middle School’s spring-break study tour to China. Given its air-pollution levels, China was the perfect destination to get a sense of what works and what we need to refine in our design. After the students returned to Pace, we asked for feedback regarding the masks. Nikki and I are working now to make the changes necessary to improve the design. We are sure that we will go through many rounds of back-and-forth as we continue to strive toward better facial wear. We hope to launch our website and product soon. — by INDIA BEHL ’20

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Celebrating our studentartists and the teachers and traditions that inspire them

Striving for Excellence in the

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EXCELLENCE IN THE ARTS

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here’s something inherently dramatic about Pace Academy’s iconic Castle. The former Ogden family home, completed in 1931, evokes magnificence and mystery with its arched entryway, central turret and spiral staircase. In the boardroom, a mural depicting a fox hunt circles the ceiling, and visitors to the rotunda can’t help but look up and admire the beautiful woodwork and intricate paint pattern, reminiscent of a Renaissance masterpiece. The Castle’s magic was not lost on the school’s early leaders, including Pace’s first Headmaster, FRANK D. KALEY, who took inspiration from the structure’s medieval appearance to create the Pace Academy seal, Knight mascot and motto: To have the courage to strive for excellence. From the start, the Castle inspired creativity among the students and faculty who called it home, and within its walls, a tradition of excellence in the arts blossomed. Kaley, a firm believer in the importance of developing the whole child, selected music teacher OLIVE BELLE ROSCOE as one of his first full-time hires. In 1960, Pace’s second year, Roscoe set about the business of building an arts program that would grow to become one of the finest in the Southeast. “Undaunted by Pace’s lack of budget, lack of physical space and short supply of students, Mrs. Roscoe marched the school into the world of music and drama,” Suzi Zadeh wrote in An Unfinished History of Pace Academy—a world in which Pace, now in its 60th year, feels very much at home. Striving for excellence in the arts remains a pillar of the Pace experience, and every spring, the school community applauds its visual and performing artists during Spring Arts Festival. The weeklong celebration—the evolution of the May Day skits, concerts, dances and speeches that took place in Pace’s sprawling gardens during the school’s early decades—today includes workshops with visiting artists, studio art exhibits, the Georgia Photography Awards and Exhibition and special assemblies featuring outstanding student-artists. In the Lower School, students and teachers elect Knights of the Arts—students who exhibit excellence, dedication and passion in one or more mediums, including, but not limited to, dance, visual art, drama and music. In the Middle and Upper Schools, Arts Laureates are nominated by their classmates and teachers and selected by a committee of faculty members and past Arts Laureates. “Spring Arts Festival recognizes those students who go above and beyond in their artistic pursuits, as well as their commitment to the visual and performing arts at Pace,” says SEAN BRYAN, chair of the department. Those celebrated during Spring Arts Festival are just a few of the many exceptional and multi-talented student-artists who make Pace a special place to create, express and explore—all year long. Read on for some of their stories. è

2019 Knights of the Arts & Arts Laureates PRE-FIRST Emerson Newberg and Mason Gavric FIRST GRADE Trace Dexter and Nora Partin SECOND GRADE Millie Rodbell and Jack McDaid THIRD GRADE Finn Walsh and Estelle Levitt FOURTH GRADE Marin Smith and Seb Langford FIFTH GRADE Jake Haggman, Kate Leach, Doyle Rona, Dominic Hantula and Angelika Avdyeyeva SIXTH GRADE Kate Cunningham and Enrique Alvarez SEVENTH GRADE Jackson Allegra and Blaire Ichter EIGHTH GRADE Anna-Claire Cables, Belle Divine, Amartya Kallingal and Oliver Loree NINTH GRADE Eleanor DuPree and Olivia Healey 10TH GRADE Jack Brown and Kate Mallard 11TH GRADE Allie Appel, Anna Jordan, Lauren O'Sullivan and Matthew Quintana 12TH GRADE Siofra Casey, Conor Hartman, Grace Pottorff and Jack Thomson

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EXCELLENCE IN THE ARTS

Belle DIVINE Music makes eighth-grader BELLE DIVINE tick. “I’ve been playing the harp for eight years, and I love performing for others,” says Divine, who also sings in the Middle School chorus. “My favorite part about chorus is getting out of my comfort zone and expanding my vocal range. We don’t just sing songs assigned by [chorus teacher DONNA POTTORFF]; she involves us in the decisionmaking process, and that’s refreshing.” Divine will take her show on the road this summer as one of 10 finalists, ages 13–15, selected to participate in the American Harp Society’s 23rd National Competition in North Carolina. “I worked really hard on preparing the repertoire for the competition,” Divine says. “This experience has taught me to believe in myself more and that hard work really does pay off.”

Jack BROWN True to his name, sophomore JACK BROWN is a jack of all trades. “I spend a lot of time in the studio working on visual arts of different mediums,” he says. “I also am an active participant in the theatre department, a member of the literary magazine staff, and I write and self-publish poetry outside of school.” Brown credits Pace’s talented faculty for developing his artistic acumen. “My work in the studio with [visual arts teacher DONICE BLOODWORTH] is incredibly self-developmental in that I teach myself to manage my time and think creatively to understand different mediums. And [arts chair SEAN BRYAN] has taught me so much about character development and understanding the work that we do on stage.” Brown’s performance as a 2019 Arts Laureate tops his list of Pace Arts highlights thus far. “The poem I performed meant so much to me, and it received such positive feedback from faculty and students,” he says. “That moment was incredibly monumental in my career as an artist.”

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Jaran AMAR JARAN AMAR is all about baseball—but the fourth grader has also discovered a passion for visual art. “I like detail,” Amar says. “Last year, we did self portraits, and I found my exact eye color by mixing colors. Then, this year, we did a charcoal project that got me into black-and-white art and 3D shapes. Now we’re working with pen and ink, and I’m going to try out watercolor soon.” Amar credits Lower School art teacher SUSAN EDWARDS with inspiring his new-found fervor. “Mrs. Edwards has taught me how much art has contributed to our world,” he reports. “I notice things more now, and I think I’d like to continue doing art through high school.”

Tara HARRIS When strings teacher TARA HARRIS arrived at Pace in 2008, she had one directive: grow the program. A professional violinist with a Master of Music from the College-Conservatory of Music at the University of Cincinnati, Harris was up for the challenge. “I was given autonomy to facilitate that growth in the ways I felt were best,” she recalls. “So I tried—and continue to try—to meet students where they are with their interest in music and show them that we can play cool stuff, while emphasizing that they still have to know the basics. Surprisingly, making it challenging has helped the strings program thrive. Students see themselves progress, and the learning process becomes fun.” In the 11 years since Harris joined the Pace faculty, the strings program, offered to students in grades four through 12, has reached capacity. Lower School teacher NIRVANA SCOTT joined the team in 2015 to share the load. Bandmates in CoResonance, a boundary-breaking string quartet, Harris and Scott consistently strive to raise the bar—for themselves and their students. They plan tours, coordinate workshops with guest artists and arrange popular music for students to perform—everything from Taylor Swift to the theme from Harry Potter. And they love watching students evolve from beginners in the Lower School to accomplished Upper School musicians. “Some students have been with me for seven, eight, nine years,” Harris says. “That’s an extraordinary gift. I enjoy watching these bright and talented young people develop into accomplished men and women who appreciate music. Several have gone on to colleges where they continue playing. The skills students learn through music and the goals they set are applicable to everything. I want them to leave Pace and dream big.”

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EXCELLENCE IN THE ARTS

Lauren O’SULLIVAN A desire to create her own Halloween costume inspired junior LAUREN O’SULLIVAN, then in the sixth grade, to learn to sew. She honed her skills through classes and personal projects before asking Upper School Theatre Director Sean Bryan if she might help costume the 2017 one-act play. Since then, O’Sullivan and junior TYLER KELLY’S costumes have graced the Pace stage in productions including The Laramie Project, Almost Maine and The Brute, a show that required hours of research and sewing time. “We used original dress patterns from the 1880s that we had to scale up and then adjust to fit the actresses, and the final product was stunning,” O’Sullivan recalls. At the Georgia Thespian Conference this past spring, O’Sullivan’s design for a hypothetical production of A Midsummer Night’s Dream received a rating of “Superior,” the competition’s highest. “I was inspired by steampunk style, which stems from the Industrial Revolution in 19th-century England, so that’s when I decided to set the show,” O’Sullivan says. “Once I had the idea, it was all about research and fitting different characters into roles that fit the time period.” O’Sullivan will take her superior design work to Nebraska this summer to compete in the International Thespian Conference. “I plan to incorporate notes from the judges at Georgia ThesCon to improve my presentation, and I hope to represent Pace well,” she says.

Hannah WHITE In Darcy’s Cinematic Life, this year’s Middle School fall play, seventh-grader HANNAH WHITE, as Darcy, only left the stage twice while narrating the 45-minute show. “Hannah memorized more lines, blocking and fight scenes, and gave more emotion than I have ever asked a Middle School student to do,” says Director PATRICK CAMPBELL. But the thrill of a starring role isn’t what continues to bring White back to the Fine Arts Center stage. “I most enjoy feeling like I am a part of something important, and I’ve learned how much of a team a cast is,” she says. “Mr. Campbell has shown me that I can do so much more than I ever thought I could.”

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Erin WEIZENECKER Fourth-grader ERIN WEIZENECKER is a quadruple threat—she sings, she acts, she dances and she’s a whiz in the Lower School art studio. “I want to be a dancer and actor when I grow up,” Weizenecker reports, and she’s well on her way, having appeared in multiple productions at MZStageworks, most recently The Little Mermaid. Weizenecker dreams of one day playing the title role in Matilda the Musical, but she knows that school comes first and loves that Pace provides a well-rounded arts education. “There are so many different types of art at Pace, not just one or two,” Weizenecker says. “I like that I can learn about many different mediums and try lots of things.”

Oliver LOREE “My mediums include a little bit of theatre, music, painting and pencil sketching,” says eighth-grader OLIVER LOREE who, when it comes to the visual and performing arts, does it all. “The most important thing for me about art is that everything is inclusive. There are no real barriers to keep you from trying, other than your drive to make it happen.” Loree has played memorable roles in multiple Middle School drama productions, most recently rock legend Stacee Jaxx in Rock of Ages, and he has found his artistic home in ANNA MURPHY’S studio art class. “Through the arts at Pace, I've learned that I have a lot of creative potential and that I have so many more ways to express it than I realized,” Loree says.

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GLOBAL EDUCATION BENCHMARK GROUP

WELCOMING THE WORLD TO PACE ACADEMY The Global Education Benchmark Group brings 300+ innovative educators to campus.

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GLOBAL EDUCATION BENCHMARK GROUP

“Pace not only has a special, forwardthinking group of leaders when it comes global education, but it is exemplary in terms of making the ideas and ideals of global education a reality for every student. Participants in the GEBG conference loved learning more about Pace's globaleducation work—from curriculum that includes global issues and perspectives in the Lower School to global experiences that challenge Upper School students to be active and engaged citizens in the world.” CLARE SISISKY EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR Global Education Benchmark Group

in

2014, Pace Academy launched the Isdell Center for Global Leadership (ICGL), a results-oriented program that furthers the school’s mission to “create prepared, confident citizens of the world.” The ICGL cultivates leadership and critical-thinking capabilities among students and faculty by exploring an annual global theme through curricular and co-curricular activities, community and global partnerships, a scholar-in-residence program, leadership fellowships, and domestic and international study tours. Since the ICGL’s inception, Pace has become a model for global-education programming on a national level, and the school was proud to host the 2019 Global Education Benchmark Group (GEBG) Global Educators Conference April 4–6. The GEBG Global Educators Conference, which aims to help globally minded schools move toward their institutional goals, brought together more than 300 K–12 school leaders to delve into best practices in the field of global education. “In an increasingly interconnected world, we at Pace believe that young people must understand multiple perspectives, embrace empathy and advocate for the common good,” says TRISH ANDERSON, director of the ICGL. “We were honored to welcome forward-thinking educators to our campus and our city to advance our shared goals.” Planning for the event began nearly a year in advance. Anderson and Associate ICGL Director ZEENA LATTOUF ’12 worked with GEBG representatives and members of the Pace Office of Advancement, the facilities team, and SAGE Dining Services to coordinate the innumerable logistical details the three-day event entailed. “I could not imagine pulling off a successful weekend without guidance and investment from these teams,” Lattouf says.

Pace Academy Life Trustee and former chairman and CEO of The Coca-Cola Company NEVILLE ISDELL, whose vision and philanthropy helped launch and continue to propel the ICGL forward, delivered the conference’s welcome address. Michael Greenstone, Milton Friedman Distinguished Service Professor in Economics and director of the Energy Policy Institute at the University of Chicago, served as the conference’s keynote speaker. Lina Sergie Attar, founder and CEO of Karam Foundation, also addressed attendees. Karam Foundation develops innovative education programs for Syrian refugee youth, distributes aid to Syrian families and funds sustainable development projects initiated by Syrians for Syrians. The Global Educators Conference offered six tracks: Diversity, Equity and Inclusion; Global Citizenship; Global Curriculum and Content; Professional Development; Technology; and Travel Program Development. Breakout sessions and panel discussions focused on topics such as Kindergarten Globetrotters, How to Have Conversations of Consequence, Making Global Travel a Reality for Every Student and Leveraging Journalistic Behaviors to Create Better Global Citizens. Fourteen members of the Pace faculty participated in the conference, including panelists and presenters Anderson, FRED ASSAF, JOANNE BROWN, Lattouf, REBECCA RHODES, KATIE SANDLIN, AMY UNDERWOOD and HEATHER WHITE. “I absolutely loved networking with other teachers that share a passion for global education,” says first-grade teacher TARA HOVAN. “Being able to learn from others and engage in meaningful discussions was rejuvenating and inspiring. The GEBG conference solidified the responsibility we have as educators to create engaged, global citizens through as much exposure and as many global experiences and connections as possible.”

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ABOUT THE

GEBG

The Global Education Benchmark Group (GEBG) is a leading non-profit organization of K–12 schools that researches and establishes best practices in the field of global education and supports member schools to prepare students to thrive in increasingly interconnected world systems. The GEBG supports schools through benefits including in-depth professional development, collaborative student and faculty travel, discounted travel assistance and insurance, curricular development, conferences, institutional evaluations and endorsement, a resource library, and a supportive network of member schools. These initiatives help schools establish structures and programs that enable students to develop the knowledge, skills and empathic orientation required of global citizens. Learn more at www.gebg.org.

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GLOBAL EDUCATION BENCHMARK GROUP

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NI M U L A ATE S D P U In a quest that took nearly 13 years, HEATHER HARDWICK TRAINOR ’92 has completed marathons in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. Heather ran her first 26.2-mile race in 2005 for the Leukemia and Lymphoma Society, a tribute to her late grandmother. “Somewhere through all the training, a love of distance running was born,” she writes. After years of running for fun, Heather decided to get serious; she began participating in 12 marathons per year to reach her goal. From the World Majors in Boston to small and eclectic events like A

Blister in the Sun Marathon in Cookeville, Tenn., Heather found races, made friends and learned a bit about each state along the way. She even encountered some familiar faces— she bumped into MARY REED GREENE DURKIN ’92 during the Birmingham Marathon and JAMES GLENN ’86 at the start of the New York City Marathon. Heather saved Hawaii for her final state and completed her journey in December 2018 with the Hawaii Bird Conservation Marathon. When not competing, Heather runs Orbital Endurance, a customized coaching company she founded, and oversees Big Peach Running Co.’s Amazon sales department.

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ROGER LUO ’03 participated in the 29th International Piano Competition for Outstanding Amateurs at Sorbonne University in Paris in March and received second prize, as well as the Press Award and the Audience Award. Roger is managing partner of Woodruff & Luo LLC, a litigation and immigration law firm in New York City. He received his J.D. from Brooklyn Law School and his Bachelor and Master of Music from The Juilliard School. In March, MICHAEL MELIA ’09 received a Ph.D. in anthropology from the University of Oxford in England, following a Master


ALUMNI

of Arts in social anthropology from the University of St Andrews in Scotland in 2013. His coursework with Oxford’s St Cross College included digital anthropology, data collection and management, with additional studies as a visiting researcher at the Saïd Business School in Oxford and at Paris Tech, École des Mines in France. Michael’s Ph.D. focused on communications, marketing, data and scalability in today’s startup businesses. His thesis, One Startup’s Dream, An Ethnography of a Vision, provided a qualitative study of a market-making French startup. While writing his thesis, he lived in Paris and worked as chief of communications with Parisian startup COPASS. COPASS provides a global membership for a network of collaborative co-working spaces in 80 countries. Currently, Michael lives in New York City where he works as marketing manager for Dashlane Inc., a French-American startup with offices in New York, Paris and Lisbon. He continues to love music and songwriting, and can be found playing guitar and keyboards for the rock band Genie in the New York City area. OLIVIA LEVINE ’14 (right) recently joined the Neiman Marcus corporate team as a merchandise coordinator for women’s apparel. She lives in Dallas. In his senior season at Miami University in Ohio, diver HARRISON MONCINO ’15 won the 1- and 3-meter competitions at the 2019 Mid-American Conference Men’s

Swimming & Diving Championship. In addition, Harrison was named Conference Diver of the Year, First Team MAC Conference and Miami University Diver of the Year. He helped the Miami RedHawks capture its first championship since 2006. Harrison will graduate with a degree in supply chain and operations and, after graduation, will travel to Europe with DUSTIN HADLEY ’15 and LAUREN HADLEY ’15. He plans to work for Bell Helicopter, a division of Textron, in Fort Worth, Texas, where his brother, OWEN MONCINO ’16, dives for Texas Christian University. COOPER PEERY ’15, a student at New York University’s Tisch School of the Arts, participated in Coca-Cola Regal Films, an annual, nationwide filmmaking competition that provides opportunities for student filmmakers from 25 eligible universities to showcase their talents. Cooper wrote and directed a 30-second branded short that was one of five films selected to receive funding. Cooper and his team worked with brand representatives from Coca-Cola and Regal Entertainment to bring their story to life. The final cut can be found on Regal's YouTube channel and at CocaColaRegalFilms.com, and will soon screen before feature films in Regal Theatres nationwide. ELIZABETH WILLIS ’15 and her team, The Gurley Girls, won the University of Georgia’s sixth annual Terry Digital Marketing

1. Cooper Peery 2. Heather Hardwick Trainor with supporters 3. Harrison Moncino 4. Michael Melia 5. Josie Cross 6. Elizabeth Willis (center) with The Gurley Girls 7. Roger Luo

Competition. The contest challenges student teams to create integrated marketing campaigns for client companies. The Gurley Girls, coached by an industry professional, worked with the College Football Hall of Fame and advanced through three elimination rounds before the team’s strategy, marketing plan and campaign brought home the gold. The College Football Hall of Fame will implement the plan. As part of its prize, The Gurley Girls traveled to San Francisco to network with program alumni and professionals at companies like Google, Dropbox, Facebook and Twitter. JOSIE CROSS ’17, a sophomore at the University of Alabama Honors College, is studying art with a concentration in graphic design and a minor in advertising. Earlier this year, she participated in her first professional art show alongside several renowned Atlanta artists and also was featured in VoyageATL magazine. “I’m so excited to see what else is in store for my art career,” Josie reports. “I am thankful for the support from Pace, my parents and all of my teachers, specifically [Upper School art instructors] MARK KNOTT and DONICE BLOODWORTH.

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ALUMNI

HAVE SOMETHING TO SHARE? email alumni@paceacademy.org

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ALUMNI

They taught me to challenge myself and are great mentors and friends. Pace will always hold a special place in my heart—it’s where I discovered my love for art, and it provided such an amazing overall experience. Pottery has sculpted who I am and taught me so much about myself. I am very proud to be where I am now.” When not studying pottery, Josie keeps up with her business and passion through the University of Alabama Clay Club. This summer, she plans to spend time in the art studio. Follow her on Instagram at @josiecross_art.

MARRIAGES SAMANTHA VIZZINI ’01 married Nicolas Ortiz on Feb. 24, 2019, at Lowndes Grove Plantation in Charleston. MEREDITH VIZZINI ’05 was the maid of honor. The couple met during their residencies at the University of Miami. Samantha is a pediatric cardiac anesthesiologist at the Medical University of South Carolina, and Nicolas is a urologist who recently completed his U.S. Army commitment at Fort Bragg. This summer, Nicolas will begin a fellowship in reconstructive urology at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center. Until then, the couple plans to enjoy some leisure time in Charleston.

BIRTHS MAGGIE ISLER KILLGORE ’96 and her husband, Will, had their fourth child, Elizabeth Hiers, on Dec. 18, 2018, at Piedmont Hospital. Elizabeth joins siblings William, 9, Forrest, 7, and Abby, 3. The family lives near Atlanta’s Chastain Park and can often be found on the playground or at NYO Sports. ERICA PETROSKY DELANEY ’01 and former Pace student EVAN DELANEY welcomed Daniel Adrian on March 11, 2019. He weighed 8 pounds, 4 ounces and was 21 inches. Daniel joins siblings Connor and Emily. The family lives in Brookhaven. Erica is an emergency medicine physician assistant at Saint Joseph’s Hospital and Evan owns a mobile app agency. Three of Daniel’s aunts are also Pace

Knights: COURTNEY DELANEY ’04, VANESSA PETROSKY ’05 and NICOLE PETROSKY ’19. STACEY COHEN WEITZNER ’01 and her husband, Jordan, welcomed Reid James on Jan. 11, 2019. Stacey is a general dentist in East Cobb, while Jordan is a pediatric gastroenterologist with Atlanta Gastroenterology Associates. Daughter Ivy loves her new role as a big sister! MEREDITH WERTHEIM BLECHMAN ’02 and her husband, Andy, welcomed Remy Madison on Jan. 21, 2019. She was 7 pounds, 2 ounces. MAUREEN SAUNDERS ECKARD ‘02 and her husband, Davis, welcomed daughter Alice Genara on March 16, 2019. Maureen works as project manager for Navicent Health Physicians Group, and Davis is director of business operations for ISM Connect. The family lives in Decatur. STEVE SHIRLEY ’03 and CAROLINE FAULKNER SHIRLEY ’04 had twins, Clara Wall and William Rhoades, on Nov. 1, 2018—just 3 minutes apart! “We were in love the second we met,” they report. The family lives in Brooklyn.

TWO PACE KNIGHTS PLAY ON TEAMS THAT COMPETED IN THIS YEAR’S

NCAA MEN’S BASKETBALL TOURNAMENT ISAIAH KELLY ’18, a freshman at Yale University, helped the Bulldogs win the Ivy League Championship to earn a spot in the NCAA tournament. The team fell to Louisiana State University in the first round of tournament play. Photograph courtesy of Yale University ELIJAH HOLIFIELD ’15 contributed to Prairie View A&M University’s 17–1

conference record and Southwest Athletic Conference championship. The Panthers then played an NCAA First Four game, falling to Fairleigh Dickinson University. A transfer to Prairie View from St. John’s University, Elijah will play his final year of eligibility as a graduate student at a yet-tobe-determined university. Photograph by Joe Robbins, Getty Images

MARISA LEVI '05 and her husband, Andrew Staines, welcomed son Joshua on Nov. 24, 2018. The family lives in New York City.

1. The Vizzini/Ortiz wedding 2. Elizabeth Hiers Killgore 3. Alice Genara Eckard 4. Twins Clara Wall Shirley and William Rhoades Shirley

KELLY

5. Daniel Adrian DeLaney with siblings Emily and Connor 6. Remy Madison Blechman 7. Joshua Staines 8. Reid James Weitzner with older sister Ivy

HOLIFIELD


SENDING LOVE TO COLLEGE FRESHMEN

CLASS OF 1973 WINS THE ALUMNI CHALLENGE

For the fifth year, the Pace Academy Alumni Board presented the Alumni Challenge, an opportunity for every class to show its school spirit through support of The Pace Alumni Fund. Contributions to the fund support needbased financial aid at Pace, providing new generations of students access to the opportunities and experiences Pace alumni enjoyed. Congratulations to the Class of 1973, Alumni Challenge winner for the second year with record-shattering 82% participation! If you have not yet made your gift to The Alumni Fund, there is still time! Donate online at www.paceacademy.org/alumni/support-thealumni-fund or mail a check to 966 W. Paces Ferry Road NW, Atlanta, GA 30327, Attn: Alumni Office.

SAVE THESE DATES

FIRST PLACE

OCTOBER 4–5

H O ME CO MI N G & R E U NIO N WEEKEND

OCTOBER 26 PAC E PA REN TS C LU B FA LL FAI R

Parents of the Class of 2018 reunited on the Pace Academy campus to catch up and assemble Valentine’s Day care packages for their college freshmen. The newest members of the Alumni Association received an assortment of sweets and treats, as well as some Pace goodies.

CL A S S O F 1 9 7 3 W I T H 8 2 %

SECOND PLACE

CL A S S O F 2 0 0 5 W I T H 3 9 %

THIRD PLACE

CL A S S O F 1 9 6 4 W I T H 3 8 %

TOTAL PARTICIPATION 14%

Put your Georgia tax dollars to work for Pace Academy. DEADLINE

DECEMBER 15, 2 0 19

Through the Georgia Education Expense Tax Credit Program, Georgia's taxpayers have a unique opportunity to redirect a portion of their state tax liability to an independent school of their choice to be used for need-based financial aid. This program has provided thousands of Georgia's families with access to better educational opportunities for their children. It does not cost participants anything—it is simply a redirection of taxes already owed to the state. Pace is currently accepting tax credit applications for the 2020 tax year.

QUESTIONS? Please contact the Pace Academy Office of Advancement at 404-240-9103 or visit www.paceacademy.org/taxcredit to learn more and submit your form before the December 15, 2019, deadline.


ALUMNI

1

1) On a recent visit to New York City (see story on page 27), Upper School theatre students enjoyed dinner with comedian KAT BELINFANTE ’10 (pictured in denim jacket). 2) Pace alumni gathered at the home of EMILY HISHTA COHEN ’06 and JOEL COHEN ’06 in Winchester, Mass., to celebrate baby Rose Hishta Cohen, born on Nov. 23, 2018. Pictured left to right are Joel (holding baby Rose), Emily, LARA GOODRICH EZOR ’06, ANNA RHODES ’06 (with baby Bennett Pratt), ZACK EZOR ’06, LINDA OYESIKU ’06, MCKINSEY BOND ’06, Tyler Pratt and KELSEY JONES PRATT ’06. 3) Vassar College junior LINDSEY SAMPLE ’16 and her fellow singers from The Night Owls, the college’s a capella group, performed in March for Pace Upper School students during the group’s annual spring tour. Founded in 1942, The Night Owls performs classic jazz standards and modern tunes. “This visit was particularly special because I had the opportunity to perform for my sister [junior HAYDEN SAMPLE] and the seniors I had in my Peer Leadership group when they were freshmen,” Lindsey says. Lindsey is pursuing a double major in neuroscience and behavior/cognitive science, and a minor in economics and computer science. 4) In February, GORDON CORSETTI '06 returned to Pace to share with students his journey with depression, anxiety and suicidal thoughts. It was a powerful message of hope and a meaningful reminder of the importance of mental health. Gordon, manager of men’s officials development at US Lacrosse, published his story in the September 2018 issue of US Lacrosse Magazine and frequently speaks on mental illness.

ALUMNI OUT & ABOUT 2

3

4

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ALUMNI

a toast to Pace alumni 60

KnightTimes | Spring 2019

ON MARCH 15, more than 250 alumni, faculty and friends gathered at The Fairmont for the Pace Academy Alumni Association’s sixth annual Knight Cap. The primary alumni fundraiser of the year, the 2019 Knight Cap raised more than $32,000 for The Pace Alumni Fund, which benefits need-based financial aid. Pace's financial-aid resources enable students with financial need to participate fully in the Pace experience by assisting with the cost of everything from books and tuition to school-sponsored college tours and AP exam fees. Guests enjoyed scrumptious food from Carlyle's Catering, owned by WALT TORBERT '97, MARY TORBERT ATKINSON '99 and BEN TORBERT '05, entertainment by the Elegant Bachelors, and a silent auction that included bourbon, jewelry and art by alumni and faculty. BRITT JACKSON GRIFFIN ’00 and ANDREW GRIFFIN ’99 and NATALIE UNDERWOOD SHIRLEY ’01 and BLAKE SHIRLEY ’01 co-chaired the event, which was made possible by the 2019 Knight Cap committee and many generous event sponsors. All alumni are invited to join the Alumni Association for the 2020 Knight Cap on Friday, Feb. 21. If you are interested in helping plan or promote next year’s event, please email alumni@paceacademy.org.


ALUMNI

Need an old yearbook? Was yours lost, damaged or destroyed?

We can send you a new copy! Contact Pacesetter adviser Ryan Vihlen for availability. ryan.vihlen@paceacademy.org

Have you liked or joined us yet?

www.facebook.com/paceacademy alumniassociation www.linkedin.com/groups/160587


Leadership Pace 2019 MADELINE ENGLAND ’10

CHRISTOPHER HARDWICK ’96 SANDRA COHEN HENNESSY ’97 WHITNEY ALLSOPP JACKSON ’98 JANE SHIPPEN LEVINGS ’90 KATE HEYER MANDRELL ’08 SARA WORTH MULLALLY ’13 GRACE SOUTHWORTH NADEAU ’10 ANNIE RIDDELL ’12 ANDREW RILEY ’10 ELIZABETH MCNEILL SILBERT ’99 KELLY SMITH ’03 KAREN GREENBERG ST. AMAND ’81 ANDREW TEEGARDEN ’99 CORY WEISS ’94 62

KnightTimes | Spring 2019

PARTICIPANTS


ALUMNI

“Leadership Pace was an excellent opportunity for an inside look at the school and a springboard for developing ideas to continue to make Pace a fantastic school.” K A R E N G R E E N B E R G S T. A M A N D ’ 8 1 “Leadership Pace allowed me to reconnect with my alma mater and fellow alums. I learned so much about Pace's strategic priorities for both the school and alumni, and look forward to further engagement with the Pace community. Go Knights!” WHITNEY ALLSOPP JACKSON ’98

ALUMNI PLAN FOR PACE’S FUTURE “This place started as a family home,” Upper School English teacher BAILEY PLAYER told the 15 members of the Leadership Pace Class of 2019, “and it remains a family home today.” Player’s lesson in Pace Academy history set the stage for the two-day program, now in its fourth year, which brings together a new group of Pace alumni each spring for a look deep inside their alma mater. Led by moderators MARK JOHNSON ’94 and BETH ALLGOOD BLALOCK ’96, participants heard from speakers representing all facets of Pace life and discussed methods to further the Alumni Strategic Plan, created in 2018. Alumni Board President BRYAN CHITWOOD ’93 guided participants through the plan and highlighted its goals for the 2019–2020 school year. Subsequent panel discussions focused on topics such as alumni initiatives around the post-Pace

experience and the changing academic landscape, including the roles of STEAMbased teaching and the Isdell Center for Global Leadership in fulfilling the school’s mission. Other presenters addressed learning support through the Academic Resource Center, admissions and needbased financial aid, advancement, and diversity and inclusion. These discussions informed brainstorming activities where participants conceptualized new ways to connect alumni to current students and to one another, and to cultivate increased alumni volunteer and financial support. The highlight of the program for many participants was engaging with students, both in the classroom and during a panel discussion with student representatives from the Lower, Middle and Upper Schools. Students discussed academics, balancing schoolwork with other activities and why they love Pace.

Program participants discovered an evolved Pace—not a new Pace. While many facilities are new, the academic experience remains outstanding. Technology has changed learning and teaching, but Pace’s values remain the same. They departed Leadership Pace reflecting on Player’s closing remarks: “It’s a very different place from when you were here. And it’s exactly the same place as when you were here.” All alumni are encouraged to apply to participate in Leadership Pace. A committee of Leadership Pace graduates selects each Leadership Pace class through a process intended to create a group diverse in thought and perspectives. Interested alumni should contact the Alumni Office or look for the 2020 application announcement in Pace's alumni e-newsletters in the fall. l

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966 W. Paces Ferry Road NW Atlanta, Georgia 30327 www.paceacademy.org

RECEIVING MULTIPLE COPIES? If you have received multiple copies of this publication, please contact the Advancement Office at 404-240-9103 or advancement@paceacademy.org to update your information.

WE NEED YOU! Which area is most meaningful to you? Pace Academy is a vibrant community composed of many parts, and we treasure the diverse passions represented within our school family. To ensure that your Pace Fund gift aligns with your Pace priority, you may elect to support one of seven areas of need. In other words, uchoose. For more information or to make a gift, visit www.paceacademy.org/support/uknight-the-pace-fund.

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KnightTimes Spring 2019  

KnightTimes Spring 2019