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OZON INTERNATIONAL | SUMMER 2010

ISSN 17923085

r e s a te

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9 77 1792 308001 EUR 7€ , GBP 5£ , USD 12$ , CAD 11$ , AUD 9$, NZ 11$ , JPN 1050¥

THE CREATIVE CHAOS ISSUE


INDEX EDITORIAL...6/ BACKSTAGE...8/ UNFORGETTABLE...10/ OOPS, I DID IT AGAIN...11/ QUADRON...12/ THE MIXTAPE CLUB...13/ FREY MUDD...14/ ALEX OLSON...15/ Alexandra VerschuereN...16/ Apichatpong Weerasethakul...18/ NEW ART SCENE...20/ CHAOS...22/ It might seem like a crUsh...24/ Aurel Schmidt...34/ Linder Sterling...36/ Bucharest Biennale...40/ Berlin Biennale...42/ Robb Young...44/ Felder Felder...46/ Katie Eary...48/ Steed Lord...50/ FILEP MOTWARY...52/ OOPS, I DID IT AGAIN...54/ GOT LOST IN THE GAME...64/ I AM NOT THAT INNOCENT...74/ ORDER IS THE NEW CHAOS...82/ NEW ART FOR THE PEOPLE...90/ YATZER...92/ AGGELIKI PAPOULIA...94/ DIGITARIA...96/ CACAO ROCKS...98/ BEAUTY...100/ NEW SEASON PREVIEWS...102/ P.L.US...104 OZON International Issue biannual publication Publisher Yorgos Kelefis Editor in Chief Danai Dragonea | info@ozonweb.com Creative Art Director Panos Papanagiotou | art@ozonweb.com Advertising Director Efi Lymperopoulou | sales@ozonweb.com Marketing Director & Communications Kika Kyriakakou | ad@ozonweb.com Direct Market Simos Michalopoulos | simos@ozonweb.com Finance Manager Vasilis Sourtis

Digital Director Aris Karatarakis | web@ozonweb.com International Coordinator Janosch Boesche | international@ozonweb.com Fashion Department Marianthi Chatzikidi | fashion@ozonweb.com Beauty Editor Maria Papadopoulou, London OZONWEB Content Manager Vania Micha Editorial Intern Kiriaki - Domenika Chandra Fashion Interns Eftihia Kourousi / Eleni Malami Editorial Consultant Spyros Vlachos

Cover CreditS Photography Jolijn Snijders | Model Cole Mohr

Contributors Manolis Kranakis, Natasha Papachristou, Dafni Anesti, Maria Antelman, Manos Nomikos, Artville, Vagelis Kamarakis,Yorgos Stamkopoulos, Alexandra Petsetakis, Spilios Gianakopoulos, Janosch Boesche, Oliver Arlt, Matthew Zorpas, George Nikas, Andreas Dimopoulos, Helena Papadopoulos, Melisanthi Spei, Panayiotis Fetsis, Lindsay West Photographers Jolijn Snijders, Costas Avgoulis, Cristina Capucci Nikolas Ventourakis, Marios Kalamaris, Anouk Morgan, Quentin de Briey, Ascari Luca, Jovanka Savic, Krzysiek Kozanowski, Nuria Rius, Jolijn Snijders, Yiorgos Kaplanidis, Vicky Churchill English Adaptation Pandora Giamalidou

Distribution Simos Michalopoulos | distribution@ozonweb.com Address Contempo Publications, 50-52 Valtetsiou St., 10681 Athens, Greece T: +30 210 3634009, F: +30 210 3634008, E: info@ozonweb.com, www.ozonweb.com twitter.com/ozonmagazine myspace.com/ozonmagazine facebook.com/ozonmag ISSN: 17923085 This magazine cannot be republished or reproduced without the permission of the publisher.


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CHAOS A USER’S GUIDE by Lindsay West

It’s 00.17am. This article is due in nine hours time. Seven, if you take into account the UK-Greece time divide. Seven hours. Seven hours, leveling out at about four hundred and twenty minutes of prime writing time. Less, if you also take into account the seventeen minutes I’m rounding up, and that the article is due at nine, not nine seventeen. Less too, if you factor in sleep. Four hundred and twenty nine minutes, and all I have is a whole heap of scribbled nothing, assembled on a white board and a flurry of Post- It notes in a variety of neon shades. And now it’s 00.23. This is the game.


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Millions before me have rolled these loaded dice and an infinite number after, in every field of innovation, composition, and creation, will pull up a chair at this same untidy table and put all their cash on the promise of a brand new number coming up. Musicians, artists, writers, inventors; the makers of things. These are the people who know that the quest to build something out of nothing is a journey not for the faint of heart or the short of patience. It can be a lonely path to tread, when all you have is your weapon of choice – a blinking cursor, a lump of clay, a set of paints – and a whole universe stretching out before you, filled with nothing but possibility and potential, for both success and failure. Yes, for the creative person, the starting line is a place where all the words, subjects, brushstrokes, melodies, and answers in the world sit on the bench, primed and ready, just waiting to be picked for the team. But who to choose? Which idea is the medal winner, the one that will take off and fly as soon as the starting pistol fires; and which is the out-of-shape also-ran, the one that will run out of steam in the first lap? For, when they’re sitting on the sidelines together, untested and static, with every one of their relations (they rarely travel alone); the sight of all of your creative ideas assembled can be a little overwhelming. With this sort of agony seemingly in-built as standard, it’s little wonder therefore, that the creative person has, over the years, developed something of a reputation for chaos as an immovable personality trait. The hapless artist who can’t clear their desk, or pay their taxes on time, but who can channel an idea and make a canvas sing: this is the picture postcard of the chaotic creative. And even if you’re allergic to oil paints and without the propensity for rampant alcoholism; anyone who has ever sat in front of a blank sheet of paper, charged with the task of filling it up with something that does not yet exist, has surely caught a glimpse of it. This is the creator’s conundrum: somewhere amid the din is the symphony, but the challenge lies in quietening down the clamour long enough to hear it. Which leads me to the below: some words of comfort for those who seek to trawl through the creative mess, foraging for that hidden treasure. You see, my friends, when it comes to creativity, chaos is not so much a given as a necessity in the quest for the new; it’s just a matter of knowing how to use it.

THE FIRST RULE OF CHAOS THEORY IS: THERE IS NO CHAOS

Time to break out the first of our big name guests: on the subject of creating his masterpieces, Michaelangelo is quoted as observing that, beneath every block of stone, lies a sculpture. The sculptor’s task is merely to free it – to prune back the unneeded layers, and reveal something new. That is to say, that song you can’t write, that flash of inspiration, and the breakthrough you’re looking for? It’s all there, underneath the chaos, the research, the distractions and the procrastination, just waiting to get out. Physicists working with chaos theory maintain that perspective is the key to perceiving order, that there’s eventual order within apparent randomness, and that chaos always moves towards pattern in the end. I’d like to posit this as proof that although, to the untrained eye, the debris on your desktop, the dishes in your sink, and the screwed up paper in the bin might look like a grand old mess, it’s all process. A period of storm before the calm that will follow once the damn thing’s done…

REPEAT THE CHORUS AND THE VERSE WILL COME

Literature and art abounds with tales of gloriously well-trained practitioners who kept punishing, productive schedules and created great things. Reports of Vladimir Nabokov plotting out his novels on catalogued index cards before beginning are widespread, but such precision is not exactly the norm in terms of creative experience. But chaos theory is also about repetition leading eventually to a shift, so an element of ritual has a habit of creeping in to the process. Meaning both that those seven cups of coffee bought from the same store before 9am, and those carefully mapped out index cards, may just be working towards the same end. The theory goes that if you go with the flow and follow your own process, in whatever form it takes, and when you’ve repeated the chorus enough, a verse with brand new lyrics will appear.

THE STARTING STARTS BEFORE THE STARTING

All those notes, all those staring-at-the-wall hours, and all those YouTube procrastination trips? No, they didn’t amount to much in the way of finished product, but if you’re in the throws of creative chaos, your brain is logging all the information as it goes. With the recon done, it’s now time for…

TIPPING OUT THE LEGO BOX

Radiohead, in discussing their newest, as yet unreleased album, told a newspaper that, in searching for their new sound, they metaphorically “got the big Lego box out…tipped it out on the floor, and…were thinking, what next?” Once the pre-starting is through, and it’s time to start the real starting, tipping out the mental Lego box of all its findings is the next step. It’s imperative to look the chaos in the eye, survey your properties on Post-Its, and swim through the mental toffee, in order to find something new. Leave nothing out, look at it every thought you have in whatever form it comes, and the path will appear.

IT’S TORTURE.

Ever tried to make your own mosaic from scratch? It begins with smashing up a bunch of tiles – lovely, neat, intact tiles that were perfectly happy being square. But the creative hand that wields the hammer is the one that says there’s another picture to be seen; if you can just stand the noise and the mess it takes to get to it. Order is a maintaining force, chaos is innovative, and as old man Picasso said, the first step towards creation is destruction; and most often, destruction ain’t pretty. Destruction is discomfort, and it only begins to feel better once the birth is over. Popular culture is littered with examples of creative people for whom the chaos of creation is quite simply torture. Dame Judi Dench has legendary, agonizing stagefright, and Nick Cave has cited songwriting as “the most difficult thing I have to do,” and his creative, professional life as “the place I’m the most frightened.” The real pros are the people who have made their peace with the fact that birth is a violent process, and breeding ideas is bound to hurt. So why do it? Quite simply, as well as being torture…

IT’S MAGIC

The moment where the vague, far-away blur slowly floats or suddenly screeches into view and a shape appears; the point at which the night sky becomes a mass of constellations? That’s the magic. Chaos theory tells us that just as being lost is a relative thing – as easily solved as simply turning the right corner – there’s shapes to be seen if you treat the creative process like a Magic Eye poster: relax, give it time, stare into the mess, and the sailboat will appear. This is why we do it: this is the privilege. Making something out of nothing, something new, something that didn’t exist when you started. Like newborn babies, when it’s sitting there in front of you – all perfect, new, and complete – if you’re lucky, you’ll figure it’s worth the agony.


A chaotic afternoon in Paris some days before the menswear shows‌ BY Jolijn Snijders Featuring Cole MohR


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Aurel Schmidt WHAT RHYMES WITH CHAOS? Interview Danai Alaska · Photography Mat Moravec { aurelschmidt.com }

aurel schmidt master of the universe flexmaster 3000

aurel schmidt self portrait with various adDictions and Fears of ageing

Aurel Schmidt is a 28-year-old self-taught artist who moved to New York from Canada in 2005 and made her break through when two of her pieces were acquired by collector Dakis Ioannou. Since then she insists in translating into art all those things that in the surface make us feel bad but in reality it’s hard to do without: cigarette butts stained with red lipstick, beer bottle caps, condoms, donuts covered in colourful icing, oversized smiley male genitalia. Overdose will tear us apart, in an endless battlefield where everything seems about to explode. Her participation in 2010 Whitney Biennial was with Master of the Universe: FlexMaster 3000, a portrait of the Minotaur beautifully deconstructed with empty beer cans, modern electronic devices and cigarettes running through its veins. Every time I look at this piece I hold myself from screaming: “Hey you punks, get out of this nice body!”, but then again maybe Aurel’s work is not supposed to put us safely into bed making us feel at ease and maybe that is exactly what we like about it.


I am

me

Others are

them

When I was a teenager

I was the same as now At 27 I feel

the best I have ever felt My work is

about me Right now I am inspired by

John Updike I live out of

an apartment I am in the middle of

a room

I trust people who are

like me

love mistakes mostly because

you don’t usually make them more than three or four times I’m in awe every time

I look at the sky I find beauty in

everything A book from my childhood I read again and again is

the Berenstain Bears Learn About Strangers I always wear

the same glasses I find the human condition

beautiful

To be female is

all I know The art of the moment is

in the moment

The phrase “creative chaos” reminds me of

new age hippies

New York is the place that

I love

I am currently working on

lobster drawings During summer I plan to

eat lobster


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Felder Felder FOLIE A DEUX Interview Eleni Malami · Photography Nikolas Ventourakis { felderfelder.com }

FELDER FELDER are an inseparable duet. The twin sisters from Germany moved to London eight years ago with an aim: to create something successful. And so they quickly did; even before graduating from Central Saint Martins they started visioning their own fascinating label and soon after, their name was one of the most promising in London Fashion Week. Collaborations with Selfridges and Nobu followed, demonstrating their value and recognition. Having had the experience of professional modelling, they effortlessly accomplished an ultra feminine figure with desirable clothing for the modern girl; leather, frills, fur and outstanding details for a superb outfit. The girls have decided to present their first pre-collection this July, while we observe their constant evolution and await their shows on every season.

How was the transition from modelling to designing? Did this experience help you in becoming quickly incorporated? Through modeling we had the chance to work with some amazing people - Mario Testino shot us for Italian Vogue , we modeled for Diesel and Robert Cary-Williams to name but a few. At the same time we had the chance to get an inside view into the industry, which certainly gave us a clearer view of what to expect from it. Is it easy working together complementing each other or do you prefer separate tasks? We do enjoy both, actually. We always work together on research and collection planning for example, but divide tasks when it comes to technical and production aspects.  How important is London for your personal and professional evolution? London is a really important part of both, our professional and personal evolution. We love the creative energy in London and all these amazing talented people who are never tired of collaborating and working on projects, which is quite special in London! We are still working with people we went to Central St. Martins with, as well. You managed to create a distinctive fashion vision which was rapidly established in the London scene. What is this special “something” that makes a FELDER FELDER girl unique? It is her ability to show a variety of personality, as our clothes always mix contrasts (which maybe stems from us being twins).  The Felder Felder girl can show her strong, self-confident side without loosing her girly and feminine side either, which is quite unique. You create a very strong and feminine figure while retaining a girly hint. Who or what is your muse? Our mother is a big muse, as she captures all aspects of our Felder Felder girl/woman - strong, fearless, elegant, glamorous, funny and girly… super woman to cut it short - for the collections we mostly combine two stories and merge them into one, to keep the contrasting spirit alive. Your winter collection was mainly black with leather elements; embellished with detailed frilling. Where did you get your inspiration from and what was the story behind? The A/W10 collection was inspired by dark story tellers like Bram Stoker and Tim Burton and their genius vision to bring something very romantic into a very dark scenario... Corset based figures and elaborated details of frilling and leather appear to be permanent in your collections. Why do you think that a woman would go for such garments? Try it on and you will know better, we prefer to let the clothes speak for themselves.

What are your future plans? What shall we expect from you for next spring/summer? The mood is going to be a bit brighter. The Felder Felder spring summer girl likes to be exciting and glamorous without any effort, which has to translate in the collection. Furthermore, we are presenting our first pre-collection for S/S in July, which will include funky festival outfits and some cool party dresses - watch this space! How was the collaboration with Nobu? Was it challenging designing very simple garments - uniforms? Nobu is such an amazing and glamorous place, that it was a very exciting challenge. It didn’t feel like designing a uniform collection. Do you aim to open your own store or you believe is wiser stocking luxurious boutiques? Somewhere down the line it would be a dream to open a store. For now, we are happy selling to our fantastic stockists and we are launching our e-commerce site in the next couple of weeks, which we are very excited about. London, Paris, New York and Milan. Four fashion weeks in four cities. Why do you believe that you fit better in the London scene? London is unique in its support for new and upcoming brands. It would have been very hard to get where we are right now in any other city, I think. In the last decade fashion is evolving quickly. Every year new names appear making their own lines. Do you feel threatened or you enjoy the competition that keeps the level high? We love it, because that is what London is known for and keeps the interest of the international buyers and press. Furthermore, we are all so different that it doesn’t feel threatening at all. We are proud of the success of our other designer friends. Do you feel that fashion is chaotic? Can chaos lead to a creative explosion? It certainly can - as long as you can manage to turn it into a business at one point, it is absolutely fine as well.... What attitude would you suggest to this crisis that the world is going through? Do you think that the pace of fashion business is going to stay the same? Don’t get involved too much - crises come and go... important is that you stay true to yourself and only do what you enjoy and treat others the way that you would like to be treated.


TOP MARY WANTS A PURPLE DRESS (M.W.A.P.D) | PANTY STYLIST’S OWN

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PHOTOGRAPHY YIORGOS KAPLANIDIS STYLING MARIANTHI CHATZIKIDI MAKEUP MAIRY FAKINOU COORDIATION EFTIHIA KOUROUSI PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT ANGELOS TSAMPARDOUKAS MODEL JILLIAN KELLY (ACE MODELS)


PHOTOGRAPHY COSTAS AVGOULIS (D-TALES) STYLING MARIANTHI CHATZIKIDI HAIR & MAKEUP STELLA MAVRODI (D-TALES) PHOTOGRAPHER’S ASSISTANT DAMIANOS KARTAS (D-TALES) STYLIST’S ASSISTANT MELISSANTHI SPEI COORDINATION EFTIHIA KOUROUSI MODELS: NATALIA BONIFACCI (ACE MODELS), MIHAIL (VN MODELS), PAVEL (VN MODELS)

PAVEL WEARS TOP DIGITARIA | TOP WORN AS A HAT ADIDAS ORIGINALS BY JEREMY SCOTT


PHOTOGRAPHY NURIA RIUS STYLING CARLITOS TRUJILLO HAIR & MAKE UP JAMES HURUNUI DE KASTEEL + AGENT PARA MAC Y AVEDA (LE SALON) MODEL ANNA NEMETH (ELITE MODEL MANAGEMENT) PHOTOGRAPHY ASSISTANT GHERARDO NITRICI STYLIST ASSISTANT IVONA IVON

Shorts Cheap Monday (SHOP&TRADE) | Shirt Lee | Sunglasses Adrian Mustelin | Neckerchief Stylist’s Own


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PHOTOGRAPHY Nikolas Ventourakis HAIR & MAKE - UP Stella Mavrodi (D - TALES) Models Marleen De Kort (Action Management) 路 Ida Skeppar (Ace Models)


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NEW ART FOR THE PEOPLE


A design expert, an actress, a fashion designer and an artist. There is a new generation of creative people that is emerging in Athens. They are young, active and have something to say and, by all means, you’d better listen because these people are going through a crisis.

Interviews with: > YATZER > AGGELIKI PAPOULIA > DIGITARIA > CACAO ROCKS

PORTRAITS BY: > NIKOLAS VENTOURAKIS


THIS IS JUST A SMALL PREVIEW OF OUR INTERNATIONAL ISSUE. You can buy OZON INTERNATIONAL by VISITING OUR SUBSCRIPTION PAGE at www.ozonweb.com/en/subscribe


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