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january 09 international issue

back to black


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IN this issue

10 editorial 12 unforgettable 14 happy birthnight 22 digitaria 26 romina karamanea28custodalmau30marykatrantzou32 primetimers rioting 42 ioannis dimitrousis 43 cph vision 44 the young & the banging 45 superheadz 46 hoody on 47 wajeed 48 jonnie craig 56 the teenagers 57 institubes 58 karl heinz mĂœller 60 lust for life 70 the callas 71 david cernĂ? 72 rrripp!!! 74 NGUYEN YOU 76 ? 82 john bock 83 ilovefake 84 mike sheridan 86 you know i'm not good 94 i'll go back to black 108 beauty 110 plus

ozon id OZON: January 2009/INTERNATIONAL issue monthly free publication-ATHENS, Editor in Chief: Yorgos Kelefis Chief Editor: Theodora Malamou Creative Director: YIORGOS MAVROPOULOS ART Director: DIMITRIS KOURKOUTIS Advertising Director: Efi Lymperopoulou (ad@ozonweb.com) Marketing & PR Director: Eva Papadaki (sales@ ozonweb.com) Direct Market: Simos Michalopoulos (simos@ozonweb.com) Finance Manager: Vasilis Sourtis Fashion Editor: DAphne iliaki BEAUTY EDITOR: MARIA PAPADOPOULOU Publishing Consultants: Spyros Vlachos, Maria Vlachou Contributors: Manolis Kranakis, Maria Antelman, Katerina Karali, Black Athena, Maria Papadopoulou, Manos Nomikos, Artville , Natasha Papachristou Photographers: Yiorgos Mavropoulos, Yiannis Papadopoulos, Thanos Tsakonas, HELEN ELEFTHERIOU, Coke Bartrina Navarro, Jolijn Snijders, mikkel bache Distribution Manager: Simos Michalopoulos English Adaptation: Costis Nikiforakis Contempo Publications-Yorgos Kelefis/ Address: 50-52 Valtetsiou St., 10681 Athens, Gr, T: 0030210 3634009 F: 0030210 3634008, E: info@ozonweb.com www. ozonweb.com, www.ozonmagazine.blogspot.com, www.myspace.com/ozonmagazine This magazine cannot be republished or reproduced without the permission of the publisher. COVER PHOTO YIORGOS MAVROPOULOS styling maria papadopoulou model olesya (d models)


P. KOURBELAS & CO Head Office : 86 Alimountos str., Argiroupoli 164 51 - ΑTHENS T +30 210 99 42 731 E info@kourbelaioanna.gr U www.kourbelaioanna.gr

Exclusive Retail Store : 109 Adrianou str. & 12 Hatzimihali str., Plaka 105 58 - ATHENS T +30 210 32 24 591


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ozon for propaganda / photography yiannis papadopoulos


editorial In a video I watched recently in Barcelona, a young girl who was born blind was saying that she doesn’t know what the color black is like, she has never seen it and that being blind doesn’t mean that everything looks black. Even if everything was black, you wouldn’t even know it because the color black has not been in anyway defined to you. During those days the streets of Athens were populated by black flags, smashed up shop windows covered in black nylon while the burned down banks were still smoking. How ironic I thought, at a time when the city is burning and at the peak of the credit crunch that fashion magazines are talking about going back to black. Maybe it’s better this way; the end of an era dressed in black, just like the

profile pictures of thousands of our friends on Facebook as a comment on what happened and what we don’t want to happen again. Maybe this destruction will lead to a new beginning, like an artist’s canvas but black instead of white. Maybe through this darkness we will discover new real colors, those of hope that will help us draw up life the way we’ve always dreamt. It’s a rainy afternoon here in Barcelona, my friends back in Athens are telling me that it’s about to snow there; I feel that it’s raining all over the world and spring is about to arrive. back to black by amy winehouse from the album "back to black", released 4 October 2006 He left no time to regret Kept his dick wet With his same old safe bet Me and my head high And my tears dry Get on without my guy You went back to what you knew So far removed from all that we went through And I tread a troubled track My odds are stacked I'll go back to black We only said good-bye with words I died a hundred times You go back to her And I go back to... I go back to us I love you much It's not enough You love blow and I love puff And life is like a pipe And I'm a tiny penny rolling up the walls inside We only said goodbye with words I died a hundred times You go back to her And I go back to Black, black, black, black, black, black, black, I go back to I go back to We only said good-bye with words I died a hundred times You go back to her And I go back to We only said good-bye with words I died a hundred times You go back to her And I go back to black


unforgettable

back to black

WHEN SHE FIRST APPEARED ON THE MUSIC SCENE PEOPLE WERE LEFT TO WONDER HOW IT WAS POSSIBLE TO HAVE SUCH A BEAUTIFUL VOICE AT SUCH A TENDER AGE; BY THE TIME HER SECOND ALBUM WAS RELEASED THE SAME PEOPLE WERE NOW WONDERING HOW A GIRL FROM NORTH LONDON COULD DELIVER CLASSIC AMERICAN SOUL IN SUCH A BRILLIANT WAY. TODAY EVERYONE’S WONDERING HOW SHE’S MANAGING TO STAY ALIVE.

Amy Winehouse is still alive and kicking, giving a new breath of life to music by bands such as The Ronettes and The Supremes. Some were first introduced to her through her album “Frank”, while myself and many more found out about her through “Back to Black” which came out in 2007. Two things sprung to mind on hearing her voice, one was Aretha Franklin and the other a traditional American song “Black is the color of my true love’s hair”, the Twilight Singers version. The tiny brunette pin – up, an alternative retro version of Dita Von Teese, would soon become my new “love”; one that can move you through autobiographical lyrics such as those on the melodramatic “Back to Black”. He’s gone back to his ex, leaving her sobbing and pondering on the past; raw, descriptive and real; a depiction of how it is to be left broken hearted in its darkest and most hair raising interpretation. 8 OzOn

The saddest part is, however, the thought that Amy Winehouse is actually experiencing what she sings about. In 2008 only she won five Grammy awards: “Record of the Year”, “Song of the Year” and “Best Female Vocal Performance” for her single “Rehab” as well as “Best New Artist” and “Best Pop Vocal Album” for the album “Back To Black”. 2009 will be her year again, as everybody will still wonder what is wrong with Amy Winehouse, but hopefully with no tears this time…

Text: Natasha Papachristou


Photography Yiorgos Mavropoulos Styling Maria Papadopoulou (with vintage clothes) Make-up and hair Maria Papadopoulou with Shu Uemura products Model Olesya (D ModeLs)

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Scarf Pleats PLease, Issey Miyake


Dress Junya Watannabe/COmme Des GarÇons 12 OzOn


Top Helmut Lang


Top Helmut Lang


Scarf Pleats Please, Issey Miyake


Shirt Comme Des GarÇons Leather boots Costume National 16 OzOn


Dress Junya Watannabe/Comme Des GarÇons


DIGITARIA www.digitariaworld.com, info@digitariaworld.com

Digitaria is a wholesale and retail fashion label that has been recently established in Athens, Greece and is now expanding in Europe and plans to open its next shop in London. Digitaria is all about quality menswear and womenswear, introducing a diffusion range of t-shirts with print designs by established London artists. London based Warboy has recently designed a range of Fashion Kills prints. Digitaria is more than clothes. Digitaria is a way of expressing yourself through design, arts and thinking. If you want information about our Digitaria world please contact us. Athens, T: 0030 6936115077 / London, T: 0044 7515970410 18 OzOn


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romina karamanea

HER NAME WAS INCLUDED IN LAST YEAR’S SPECIAL EDITION OF “100 NEW DESIGNERS” WHILE HER 2009 SPRING COLLECTION GOT GOOD FEEDBACK AT THE LAST LONDON FASHION WEEK. ROMINA KARAMANEA IS STEADILY BUILDING UP A FUTURE IN FASHION AND WE WOULD CERTAINLY BET ON HER.

summer 09 preview www.rominakaramanea.com

Romina Karamanea’s debut at London fashion week in 2006 was only the beginning; since then top fashion magazines around the world have written about this talent or have included clothes from her collections in their editorial. Romina Karamanea, at just the age of 30, has managed to create her own style, something difficult for any new designer to achieve. One easily distinguishable feature in her collections is a love of architecture, anatomy of the body and geometric shapes. The new collection for spring-summer 2009, which was presented as part of London Fashion week is inspired by two art movements, 22 OzOn

cubism and Bauhaus. The lines of Karamanea’s collection remain severe, geometric and structured without lacking in femininity and movement. Photographs from her previous défilé and the backstage show are a proof of that.

Text: Yorgos Kelefis


fred butler

“PROPS” ARE SMALL OBJECTS THAT CAN BE WORN OR USED TO DECORATE, OR ACCOMPANY THE PHOTOSHOOTS OF FASHION EDITORIALS. FRED BUTLER IS ONE OF BRITAIN'S MOST FAMOUS PROPS DESIGNERS.

The props specialist www.fredbutlerstyle.com

Immediately after finishing her fashion studies, Fred Butler worked as an intern with the famous team of designers ThreeAsFOUR. Being part of their team she learned a great deal about styling and realized that she could handle the design of accessories as well as props. Today she successfully designs her own sets of accessories and has worked with magazines such as Dazed & Confused, i-D, Qvest and even the American and Greek Vogue for the design and construction of props. We asked her about inspiration, trends and the people that drive fashion.

Are you inspired by what you see on the streets? Yes, for two reasons; Random people on the street who actually have no idea of their own bizarre style. Quite often I see someone who has clearly no fashion awareness but their own quirk in the way the outfit has been put together is fascinating. I find charming and intriguing the way individuals choose items to go together. For example I saw a young guy going to work with a football shirt, knitted scarf and leopard print cowboy hat! But I also like to see strange and accidental constructions and patterns in everyday situations. For example I saw a cargo truck that had knotted its ties in beautifully shaped bows. What is the most recent trend in fashion, as you see it? I think there is a blurring of men and women’s style. The two genders are getting closer again like the androgyny of the 1990’s. I think there is a general 90’s revival with fashion going grunge in one direction and r’n’b in the other. I hated the 90’s at the time so I’m not excited about the come back!

Who do you admire the most in the fashion world? True innovators with passion! Diane Pernet for pioneering fashion reportage through blogging. Nick Knight for shifting fashion off the pages into moving film on SHOWstudio. Anna Piaggi for her conviction in wearing insane clothes quite naturally. Peter Phillips for being an artist, incidentally with make up. Soren Back for turning his hair styling into Millinery. Simon Foxton for breaking the mould with styling and casting menswear. ThreeAsFOUR for their genius in pattern cutting and approach to being “designers”. What magazines do you read? Every single magazine I can get my hands on! I am addicted to finding a new issue and seeing who has done what! Each magazine is so different; you have to look at them all. But I am a loyal buyer of i-D. It was my first style bible and I can’t break the routine. Interview: Yorgos Kelefis


CUSTO DALMAU

Within only a few years he has managed to transform a brand of colorful printed t-shirts into a world famous label that produces fashion! Custo Dalmau was our host at the Custo Barcelona

El Se単or Custo of Barcelona photography Coke Bartrina Navarro

www.custo-barcelona.com

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27 years after the first printed t-shirts by Custo Barcelona what do you think is the secret of your brand’s success? I think the secret is being faithful to our original philosophy when designing every collection and not worrying about trends.

elections. It was really moving, the reaction of people all over the country and the world.

Every season must be a new challenge for you and your design team. Have you ever found yourself worrying about alienating your new product from what we call the identity of Custo Barcelona? This is a concern that is always on my mind when we start working on a new collection. But as I said, we have a very clear philosophy and we work very hard on keeping it.

Could you describe your typical 24hours? I never have a day like the previous one. I travel a lot so I hardly have any routines. I can work with my cell phone no matter where I am.

Is Barcelona still your favorite city to live? It's one of them, yes. I could see myself living somewhere else though, like Rio de Janeiro.

Fashion Weeks, trade shows, celebrity social events. How, when and where does Custo Dalmau relax? I am lucky because I can just switch off as soon as I Will graphics, prints and colors be in the focus of the leave the office. I also love doing sports and in Aubrand in the forthcoming collections, even if mini- gust I always spend at least a couple of weeks enjoying my family and kite surfing in Fuerteventura, in the mal aesthetics hit the catwalks globally again? The combination of prints, color and fabrics is really in Canary Islands. our DNA so we always create all the collections from this base. We don't care much about trends; we‘d rath- Before starting your Custo Barcelona adventure er focus on what we want to propose for the season. you had a two - year trip around the world on your There definitely are other brands for minimal lovers. bike. Do you ever miss taking a similar trip again, away from business plans, deadlines and new colCould you describe us briefly your perception and lections? attitude towards the financial crisis around the I haven't given up yet… I hope I can repeat it someworld? day! Crisis of course exists but I think that one way of fighting is not giving it more power than it already has. What is the next big step for Custo Barcelona? We are quite satisfied with 2008: we have opened stores in new markets such as Hong Kong, Kuwait or Venezuela; we have launched an eyewear collection, watches collection and our first fragrance. For 2009 we will be focusing in opening more flagship stores in Middle East, Asia, Latin America and the US. What has impressed you the most recently? Is there something really striking, like a breathtak- Interview: Yorgos Kelefis ing design, a new film, some band that you have listened to recently? Custo Barcelona is represented in Greece I was touched by the victory of Obama in the American by Shop & Trade S.A.


mary katrantzou

THE GEOMETRICAL SHAPES, VIVID COLORS AND THE BULKY JEWELRY THAT ACCOMPANY HER DESIGNS WERE ENOUGH TO IMPRESS THE TOUGHEST OF ENGLISH JUDGES. MARY KATRANTZOU HAS RECENTLY GRADUATED FROM CENTRAL SAINT MARTIN’S COLLEGE AND SHE IS A DEFINITE CONTENDER FOR THE TITLE OF FASHION’S NEWEST RISING STAR.

FASHION GEOMETRY www.marykatrantzou.com


Are you inspired by what you see on the streets? How much have your expectations changed after your promising introduction into the fashion world? I am lucky to have been approached by important people in the field who were willing to help me out. After the release of my AW 08 collection, starting my own label was only a natural progression and it is very different when you get people that believe in you and who are willing to put time aside to help you out, than to just struggle on your own. I wanted to sustain the initial interest in my work, thus my next collection is similar in style, but more complete.

What’s the importance of the city in which a new designer resides? Depending on where you live you feel that, as a new designer, you are part of all that’s happening. I’ve mainly lived in London and feel that through my work I filter the city’s energy. I think my clothes combine the energy of designers living in London with some classic Greek references.

What are your influences? What’s the importance of symmetry in your designs? I’m rarely influenced by particular things; it’s usually a combination of things. This collection is inspired by the 70s and the plasticity of Michael English’s posters. I wanted to create trompe l’oeil prints of jewelry that couldn’t possibly be worn as real ones, because of their weight. This gave me the idea to design real jewelry made out of bronze and wood that would replicate the prints. My designs could be called symmetrical because the photographic aesthetics of my prints refer to the female body and its proportions.

Would you go as far as stating that fashion icons are dead? Jackie Kennedy, Jane Birkin and Twiggy were all icons because of their lives and the myths that surrounded them. Fashion icons still exist but the term does not have the same significance, as it tends to describe fashion conscious women of a strong presence.

London, New York, Paris or Milan? Which city defines the course of fashion, in your opinion? Each city has its own dynamic, which comes across through their fashion production. In Milan designers focus mainly on quality and detail, in New York it’s more about minimal lines, whereas in Paris the catwalk tends to be rather theatrical. In London new ideas seem to be pushed constantly, that’s the reason I think it qualifies as the ideal city for a new designer. I would generally say that fashion isn’t so much about cities as it is about designers who have the power to create new trends and know what women want today.

Who do you consider to be the best representatives of Greek fashion? Sofia Kokosalaki, Giannis Tseklenis, Giannis Eleftheriadis and Mi-ro.

What’s been the most important moment in your career so far? Would it be working with Sofia Kokosalaki or selling your designs to Bill Blass’ legendary fashion house? I learned a lot from both; maybe working with Sofia was more important though, as I got to witness first hand the way that she creates a collection, from its inception through to its final presentation at the Paris fashion week. What are your future plans? A full course; I want to be able to present my work on schedule at the London fashion week and to establish my personal design style. I also hope that there will continue to be people that want to wear my clothes - that’s what I design them for!

What would you say currently describes best “haute couture” and “street fashion”? Is there common ground between the two? Many designers find inspiration in street style, because it relates to choices made by social groups that have their finger on the pulse of the times. However, I believe that haute couture is influenced more by the street styles of previous decades because they can be easier to absorb. Street style dominates the ready to wear catwalks, where the “Balkanization” of fashion is a strong common element, in a positive manner. There is more freedom on the catwalks and trends aren’t as restrictive as they used to be. People seem to be more experimental regarding style and as a result street styles have become more personal. Interview: Natasha Papachristou


PRIMETIMERS

rioting

Started in Greece 1999 with the motto “We Love Jeans, We Love Sneakers, We Love Music” Prime Timers have managed to stay young at heart, mind and soul throughout time. Nowadays we feel and act according to the signs of the times. We live and work in a provocative, innovative, groundbreaking way. We take the streets, we demonstrate our love for what we do, we collaborate with the most avant-garde forces in fashion and music. That is why Prime Timers is one of the most dynamic distributors in Greece and Cyprus for selected and cutting edge international brands and also maintains a retail chain of 40 stores all over Greece and Cyprus. You feel like joining our riot? PHOTOGRAPHY yiorgos MAVROPOULOS STYLING DAPHNE ILIAKI MODEL ISMINI PAPAVLASOPOULOU (ace)


t-shirt Sixpack France hoody Bench


t-shirt Sixpack France jacket Elvis Jesus skinny jean WeSC shirt WeSC 30 OzOn


long sleeve top HOOCH leggings bjorkvin parka Bench


t-shirt Sixpack France shorts bjorkvin belt Playboy 32 OzOn


t-shirt AlternAtive jean WeSC


t-shirt Alternative trousers, hat & bag WeSC


t-shirt Sixpack France


WE LOVE JEANS WE LOVE SNEAKERS WE LOVE MUSIC

PRIME - TIMERS S.A. distribution

6 Lamias & Peireos str. 17778 Athens-Greece tel.: 0030 210 5765920 e-mail: info@prime-timers.gr www.prime-timers.gr


ioannis dimitrousis

BROWN CASSETTE TAPE HANGING FROM EYELIDS, GIRLS COVERED IN PINK AND GOLD AND WOODEN BEADS FROM THE 70S MAKING UP THE MALE “ARMOUR”; WELCOME TO IOANNIS DIMITROUSIS’ DREAM.

Golden Rust for Spring www.ioannisdimitrousis.com

We have spoken to him in the past, Ioannis Dimitrousis is one of a select group of Greek fashion designers, living and working in London with great success. At the previous fashion week in London, he exhibited his latest Spring Summer 2009 collection entitled “Golden Rust”. Models wearing crocheted beige and orange dresses, beady tops, Bermuda shorts and trousers with golden details appeared behind a brown curtain made of cassette tape. The bulky jewelry was inspired by the Greek folklore and somehow nostalgic tradition of plate smash38 OzOn

ing, while the aesthetic was a tribute to the 70s and 80s accompanied by a palette of safari related colors! Ioannis’ third participation in the London Fashion Week, confirmed the quality of his work; we hope to indulge in one of his shows some time soon in our own backyard! Text: Yorgos Kelefis


CPH VISION

AFTER TEN SUCCESFUL YEARS THE POPULAR CPH VISION EXHIBITION OPENS ITS DOORS ONCE AGAIN FROM THE 5TH TO THE 8TH OF FEBRUARY 2009; WITH A REAL DRIVE FOR RENEWAL IN TERMS OF VENUE AND PHILOSOPHY, THE EXHIBITION IS ESTABLISHING ITSELF AS A EUROPEAN POINT OF REFERENCE FOR FASHION AND DESIGN.

COPENHAGEN IS STYLE www.cphvision.dk

In its early incarnation the event boasted 60 exhibitors; today, the international exhibition hosts each year more than 300 exhibitors, 600 labels and a long waiting list. This development along with factors such as the growth of the Copenhagen fashion week and a rise in the demand for Danish brands across the globe has put Copenhagen right in the centre of European fashion. In this framework CPH Vision is growing and restructuring, presenting new additions to the already existing exhibition space. The designerwear section is renamed Terminal 1, still situated in the familiar 5000 square meter Øksnehallen building. The urban and streetwear sectors have been moved to Terminal 2, a 9000 square meter space, used in the past as a steam engine depot. Terminal 2 is in close proximity to the Øksnehallen and the town centre which should prove a real convenience to visitors. Unlike other more established and traditional European exhibitions, CPH Vi-

sion offers to visitors the chance to get a taste of the latest and most groundbreaking products from the fields of fashion and accessories. The exhibition’s concept is to tie up inspiration and the latest trends with the needs of the market. The exhibition’s division in two separate terminals was decided in an attempt to strengthen each section’s unique profile. Terminal 1 will regain the eclectic qualities that made it popular during the first editions of the exhibition, while Terminal 2 will fully cover the areas of denim and streetwear, featuring a striking mixture of labels as well as shows and live performances. Ozon takes part in the latest installment of the exhibition and thus is CPH Vision’s first ever Greek entry!

Text: Theodora Malamou


young & banging

WHAT HAPPENS WHEN THE CLASSIC AMERICAN YEARBOOK IS TRANSFORMED TO INCLUDE, INSTEAD OF GRADUATES, YOUNG UP AND COMING CREATIVE NEW YORKERS? THIS IS THE STORY OF A SUCCESFUL IDEA THAT FOLLOWED THE FOOTSTEPS OF THE AMERICAN DREAM: THE YOUNG AND THE BANGING.

FOREVER YOUNG www.youngandbanging.com

Behind the idea is Heron Preston, a graduate of the Parsons School of Design and "creative problem solver" within the Naked Communications ad agency in New York. For many years he has been experimenting with writing, photography and video through his blog, which records the lifestyle culture of the "Big Apple". When the blog began to grow, one of the readers, a publishing house owner, proposed a co-operation. The result was “The Young and The Banging”, a book in a form similar to that of an American high school yearbook, where the formal photographs of students who had just graduated have been replaced by those of young creative people from New York, the kind of people who characterize the city’s downtown community. As Preston himself remarks, often the life of this community is reminiscent of school, but for older “children”. The goal was for this edition to serve as a platform to display young people and their ideas, giving the impetus for creative collaborations. Initially Preston asked fifteen friends to choose from ten people each, and then photograph them in a style corresponding to a yearbook. The mood, style and environment of each shooting were down to the participants, with the only restriction being that they had to use a Polaroid camera. What began as a small project around a circle of friends and acquaint40 OzOn

ances quickly grew and attracted the interest of companies such as Nike, which popularised the issue by offering a gallery exhibition. In terms of future plans for Heron Preston there’s the creation of a whole range of relevant books that will record different and interesting communities from around the world, for which he is already preparing to visit cities like London, Berlin, Amsterdam, Paris and Tokyo. If your city is not on the list, just bare in mind that Heron Preston is open to proposals and ideas that will lead to another trip! Text: Theodora Malamou


superheadz!

A SERIES OF PLASTIC CAMERAS SERVES AS THE CENTRAL INSPIRATION FOR A JAPANESE GROUP WHOSE ACTIVITIES INCLUDE PUBLISHING BOOKS, ORGANIZING EXHIBITIONS AND PRODUCING CDS AMONGST OTHER THINGS. SUPERHEADZ IS ONE OF THE HOTTEST NAMES IN JAPAN, NOT FOR BEING HI TECH BUT FOR REINTRODUCING RETRO AESTHETICS.

PHOTOGRAPHY RULEZ www.superheadz.com, www.powershovel.co.jp

SuperheadzINaBabylon, commercially known as PowerShovel, is one of the most groundbreaking creative teams in Tokyo. It was founded in 2000 by Hideki Ohmori who wanted to make his two main interests, music and photography, his profession. It all began when the first Russian style cameras hit the Japanese market; small, low cost, plastic cameras that became known as “toy cameras”. According to Ohmori to start with he wasn’t really thinking about the business side, he mainly wanted to promote the use of cameras as a type of notebook that adds a little bit of magic to everyday moments and records “little optimistic lies”. Very soon the company began producing other models such as the Golden Half and more recently the Blackbird Fly (BBF), while broaching other areas including publishing and music through offshoot labels such as PowerShovelBooks and PowerShovelAudiο respectively. Photography, however, remains at the epicenter of their activity; whether it’s photographer Moriyama Daido’s book,

bundled up with a CD of music inspired by his work, the exclusive distribution of Agfa films, or an exhibition that includes ten million pictures! The impact they’ve had on the Japanese market has become quite apparent with the younger generations and the art circle embracing the toy cameras, and with financial paper Nikkei tipping them for future investment. When it comes to the company’s future, Superheadz don’t want to plan too far ahead, they prefer to simply look forward to the next creative collaboration.

Text: Theodora Malamou


hoodY on

THREE SPORTS MEN, THREE HOODIES ANDA LOMO CAMERA. NIKE INTRODUCE THEIR LATEST AW 77 HOODy IN A RATHER PHOTOGRAPHIC AND CAPTURING WAY.

FASHION MOMENTS WITH THE HOOD ON www.nike.com

This month Nike had a surprise in store for us; instead of featuring models in boring studios for their latest AW 77 campaign, they opted for three famous sportsmen captured by a Lomo camera. Manchester United’s Rio Ferdinand, Inter Milan’s Marco Materazzi and French rugby international Vincent Clerc, posed in Nike’s new sweater. They put their hood on and took the streets and parks to have their photo taken by the popular plastic cameras. The results were published in a catalogue, with the athletes looking real with no hints of styling. The AW 77 sweater has been designed to be long lasting, using fabric produced in a traditional way by Loopwheeler. Based in Japan, Loopwheeler are responsible 42 OzOn

for one of the world’s highest quality fleece. The sweaters are weaved in 80 year old machines only capable of producing 12 meters per day (which would make 8 sweaters only). The slow operation of the weaving machines assures less pressure during production, which produces softer but more hardwearing fabrics; those used for the AW 77!

Text: Yorgos Kelefis


waajeed

WHEN “TRIPLE P” HIT THREE YEARS AGO, JUST MONTHS BEFORE DILLA’S UNTIMELY DEPARTURE, HEADS NOT ONLY TUNED IN - THEY TOOK NOTES. NOW WITH THE SOPHOMORE RELEASE (“ABUNDANCE”) WAAJEED & SAADIQ HAVE TAKEN IT TO THE NEXT LEVEL; BLACK ATHENA FOUND OUT MORE DURING THEIR DEBUT APPEREANCE ON GREEK SHORES.

DETROIT FEVER www.black-athena.com

The new album’s taken a different direction to your debut; what’s the concept? To keep it fresh and moving; the core of PPP is the producers, so our goal is to always do something new, that’s also why we rotate the cast with new members in every album - basically the sound, the idea and the goal are all bigger.

be fresh, be on their toes, but I also want people that are consistent and can perform.

you want inspiration… When I came up, but even now, as far as hip hop’s concerned he’s that dude.

What inspired you while recording? My biggest influence was life, being a student of the world; it’s impossible to dictate one influence, but if I had to, it’s music from Detroit: funk, techno, house, gospel... Detroit’s an original place, full of hard There’s also been a name change… times and inspiration, pressure either busts pipes or Yeah, we’ve slimmed things down; Platinum Pied makes diamonds and Detroit is one of those places; Pipers was a tongue twister for lots of people (in- it’ll make you or break you. cluding my mom!), so we wanted to trim it down, trim the fat. Pete Rock recently talked about some Isaac Hayes records that formed the way he listens to You’ve discovered artists that are starting to get music and understands production - is there anattention (Tiombe Lockhart, Invincible etc.); how yone that did that for you? did you find these people? Yeah, Pete Rock was that person for me! He taught These days everyone’s a singer or writer, so the us not to think about limitations, just how far you can problem isn’t meeting people, it’s cutting through the push it, that you can say less with more. Pete Rock’s fat to find the ones that fit my mould! I want them to the producer’s producer; he’s the go-to guy when

You’re touring Europe with the new album - what can people expect? A celebration: of life, new ideas, an “abundance” of anything good; that’s what the album and the performance are about – coming to have a good time, to take a journey into “Abundance”. Almost every song on the album’s an affirmation, something you say to yourself when you brush your teeth in the mirror and expect to have a good day!

Interview: Black Athena Listen to Black Athena live every Saturday & Sunday, 1-3pm on Athens International Radio 104.4FM or via: www.athina984fm.gr.


jonnie craig

HE’S DONE PHOTOSHOOTS FOR BIG BRANDS SUCH AS DIESEL, LEVI’S AND NIKE, HE CURRENTLY WORKS FOR VICE MAGAZINE AND HE IS JUST ABOUT TO PUBLISH HIS FIRST BOOK. JONNIE CRAIG FROM LONDON IS JUST 20 YEARS OLD AND WE CAN’T HELP WONDER WHAT WILL HE ACHIEVE IN THE NEXT 20 YEARS OF HIS LIFE.

talented jonnie www.jonniecraig.com

Why is photography significant for you? I'm not really sure; it's a mixture of different things. I like making pictures and I like to record things that are going on with my friends. I grew up with a dad who was obsessed with gadgets and cameras, so I guess some of my interest has come from there. I guess the main reason it is significant is that it's a way for me to make private jokes with myself about what things mean in pictures and what I see in them that other people might not.

Is London the right place for a young photographer? I think anywhere is the right place for a young photographer. It completely depends on what you want to do and where you want to go. If you want to work with magazines and do professional work then London could be the place for you. If you want to take pictures, anywhere is the place for you.

Do you follow trends in contemporary photography? If so do you feel that your work is part of What is more important for you when you take any current trend? photos? The right moment or the idea - con- I guess you could say I follow trends, but it isn't somecept? thing I do consciously. Everybody follows something I don't think either of those is particularly more or less whether they mean to or not. It depends on how you important. I think it's important to have a balance of look at photography. them both to make a great picture. I think it’s great to have a good concept to your pictures but that side Do you deal yourself with big clients such as Dieof things also slightly ruins the whole thing for me. I sel, Levi's or Nike? Is it hard? don't like that photography has become too easy to It can be quite hard. There are certain pressures and categorize. compromises that you have to be willing to make in some cases. Diesel was easy, Levi's was a nightWho do you admire most in photography or in mare and Nike was easy. Sometimes they love it, and the arts in general? sometimes they hate it, and if they hate it you have to I don't really admire too many artists. I tend to like a do it again. It's fun though. couple of things an artist has done and then hate the rest. I sometimes think an artist is a genius, then the Do you draw a line between commercial work next week I will think he or she is an idiot. It depends and artistic work when you take pictures? on my mood. Definitely, most of what I would consider to be my

personal “artistic” work hasn't really been seen by anyone. Most of the stuff I have had in magazines is stuff that people have commissioned me to do. Though they are still my ideas, there are certain compromises creatively that have to be made. You are 20 years old. How do you see yourself in 10 years? Is there a dream? There are a million dreams. Too many dreams. My girlfriend gets worried that I dream of too much and won't carry through what I have to do right now, which would be the dream I had a few months ago, like to be in a magazine or to have done something else. I think the dream in 10 years is to be able to support myself and just be doing what I am doing now but 100000 times more busy. I like to be busy. Any shows, publications, touring in the near future? Yes, I am doing a show at the advertising agency Fallon in London. I also have a book coming out with Morel books which is being launched with Claire De Rouen bookstore in London with a month long solo show (it will also be available online through www. morelbooks.com). Later in the year I will be doing a show in Sweden in conjunction with Vice at Fargfabriken. There are loads of other things planned which I need to pin down and make happen too! Interview: Yorgos Kelefis


aLL PHOTOS BY JONNIE CRAIG


the teenagers

WAY BEFORE RELEASING THEIR DEBUT LP, THEY WERE MAKING HEADLINES WITH REMIXES FOR AIR, CHROMEO, BLACK GHOSTS, GOLDFRAPP AND SIMIAN MOBILE DISCO, WHILE THEIR CONTROVERCIAL LYRICS GENERATED HUDREDS OF THOUSANDS OF HITS ON THEIR WEBSITE. MEET THE TEENAGERS!

ADULT GIGS myspace.com/theteenagers

The Teenagers started out as a joke in 2005, when French singer Quentin Delafon, guitarist and keyboardist Dorian Dumont and bassist Michael Szpiner set up a Myspace page for a fake band and used the comments that were posted as an inspiration for their songs. They soon made heads turn with tracks like “Homecoming” which flirted with misogyny and “Fuck Nicole”, a track referring to Nicole Richie. Labels such as Merok and Kitsune released their first EPs soon after, which were sold out and had to be re-issued, while their debut LP entitled “Reality check” was released in March 2008 on XL Recordings, the label behind White Stripes and M.I.A. Their music can be described as a mixture of rock, electro and indie, referencing Pulp, The Strokes and Serge Gainsbourg, while their stylistic approach is very East London. Their critics accuse them of being more interested in impressing people rather than the essence of what they do but their 52 OzON

fans argue that behind their silly and naïve chords you’ll find intelligent and self critical lyrics. The band themselves retain a sense of humor citing vodka, Swedish girls and sex as their main influences. One thing is for sure, The Teenagers manage to turn every gig they do into a hedonistic party, an experience not to be missed if they happen to visit your country!

Text: Theodora Malamou


institubes

Paris is burning! That’s what some of the most forward thinking labels in the world that are all based in the city of light have achieved. Ed Banger, Kitsune, Tigersushi and Institubes are the imprints that have created a mash up of electro, techno and hip pop especially tailored for the dance floor.

fabuleux destin www.institubes.com

It was however hip hop that brought together the minds behind Institubes (Teki Latex and Jean-Rene Etienne) and particularly their shared love of underground names such as Rawkus and Anticon. They both fell in love with the new R’n’B sound as served up by Timbaland and Destiny’s Child, something that became apparent from some of the label’s releases. The first release came back in 2003 with “Beat Down”, by French producer Para One, one of the label’s trump cards; an obscure hip hop track referencing retro videogames which became an instant hit. On the flip side “Turtle Trouble” is a bassy, synthesizer lead house track. That was only the beginning, since then the label has worked with many significant artists, breaking new ground musically and aesthetically. Each of the artists

is a unique persona and their imagery is graphically enhanced by Etienne and his impressive artwork that has elevated the scene as a whole: the baby faced Surkin and his mysterious house, Bombo on an electro-house tip, Orgasmic and his bastardised hip hop and Das Glow and his own take on techno… and if you happen to visit north Paris it’s worth paying a visit to “Arcade Mode”, the official Institubes shop.

Text: Manos Nomikos


karl heinz mÜller

THE DREAM THAT BECAME A REALITY: MÜLLER IS THE VISIONARY AND MAIN MAN BEHIND THE MOST IMPORTANT INTERNATIONAL EXHIBITION OF URBAN STREET FASHION AND IT IS NO COINCIDENCE THAT THE WHOLE WORLD TALKS ABOUT “BREAD & BUTTER" AND MEANS FASHION! MR. BREAD & BUTTER EXPLAINS WHY HIS DREAM NEEDS TO BE CONTINUED.

BREAD & BUTTER UNITED www.breadandbutter.com

54 OzOn


You have already experienced the great success of a unique, massive, international fashion event that you have perceived and created. What is the limit for Bread & Butter? The sky is the limit! No, seriously, we are quite happy with the healthy size the tradeshow has reached until now. This is why for the coming events we want to focus on our qualitative growth. An increasing number of our exhibitors are asking us for more and more individual presentations at BBBarcelona. The brands need their own “destinations”, just like GStar has been having theirs in the Luna Park for seasons now. This, of course, also includes the request for more space. Therefore, we will be further limiting the number of our exhibitors for the next season, just as we announced it in July. The financial crisis in the markets around the world is affecting the fashion industry in several ways. Do you worry about the impact that this might have on BREAD & BUTTER? There are always ups and downs in the markets – such is the nature of economy. But BREAD & BUTTER’s core segment consists of strong brands that are not that easily touched by eventual fluctuations. And generally speaking, BREAD & BUTTER has already faced multiple phases, where the textile sector was said to be standing on shaky ground, and still we have been growing and standing strong since the very beginning. And this, again, is very closely related to our strict brand selection and to the companies we work with.

How did you come up with this January’s concept of the United Nations of Bread & Butter? Is there a subliminal message that the industry should be united against something? Quite the opposite! The campaign underlines the connection between all our international exhibitors and visitors. During our July 2008 event, we welcomed 893 brands and around 90.000 visitors from 105 nations to our tradeshow for selected brands. It was the most international show in the history of BREAD & BUTTER. And that is exactly what the January 2009 edition focuses on: the union of all those numerous nationalities and markets in one place: the BREAD & BUTTER BARCELONA.

is all about quality and authenticity. That’s why people stay true to “their brand”. And that is also why this sector is constantly growing and evolving. This is also reflected at BREAD & BUTTER: our denim hall is our core segment, our mother ship so to say. The brands present here have stands that correspond to their strong position in the market. What is your opinion on the Greek fashion market? Until now we only had a few, selected Greek brands exhibiting at BREAD & BUTTER BARCELONA. However, our visitor numbers from Greece have been steadily on the rise. During our last BBBarcelona, almost 1300 Hellenic fashion professionals visited our tradeshow. You can see that there is an evolution in the Greek retail industry – the market is growing and it has a lot of potential. Barcelona has been an ideal setting for Bread & Butter. Are there any thoughts of moving again? What would your favorite candidate cities be? We feel very good in Barcelona and have everything we need here. The fairgrounds are great, the architecture and the surrounding grounds are suited for excellent logistics and individual presentations. Of course thoughts of expansion can never be ruled out. But such steps require careful planning, country-specific knowledge, competent representatives on the ground etc. So for now, we are staying in Barcelona!

The Bread & Butter passport sounds like a great idea. Have you already got yours? You have been collaborating with the biggest I hope I won’t need one! But I agree, it is a nice way fashion brands in the world. Could you name to underline the strength of our community. And the three most significant new tendencies in the BREAD & BUTTER BARCELONA is always worth fashion business? the travel! I think that authenticity, sustainability and eco-consciousness are three of the most relevant topics at the moment and for the future. People are looking for quality in the products they buy and pay more and more attention to where and how the products were manufactured. That is also why the brands increasingly point out which materials they use, where the garments were sewn, etc. At BREAD & BUTTER this awareness for the “origin of things” is directly implemented via THE SOURCE: here, fabric producers, laundry mills and suppliers are showcasing their newest trends. This again is very important for all B&B brands that, after all, are the customers of THE SOURCE brands. Is the denim sector going to continue growing? The denim sector is one of the healthiest, if not THE healthiest in the whole fashion industry. There are few products that really tie people to a brand: it’s the car you drive, the cigarette you smoke – and yes, the denim brand you wear. A jean is the most important branded product in the apparel sector. Denim Interview: Yorgos Kelefis


lust

for

life. Photography jolijn snijders Styling mATHIEU PABIOT Model CYPRIEN (SUCCESS)


Sleeveless black cotton jacket RAF SIMONS Grey cotton t-shirt JULIUS Black denim pant DIESEL


Sleeveless black cotton jacket BORIS BIDJAN SABERI T-shirt FILIPPA K (shop&trade) short BORIS BIDJAN SABERI


Black neopren jacket SONGZIO


Sleeveless black cotton jacket RAF SIMONS Grey cotton t-shirt JULIUS Black denim pants DIESEL


Black cotton long jacket SONGZIO


Black wrinkled leather vest JULIUS Black cotton t-shirt CHEAP MONDAY (shop&trade) Short BORIS BIDJAN SABERI


Black wrinkled leather vest JULIUS Black cotton t-shirt FILIPPA K (shop&trade) Short BORIS BIDJAN SABERI


Black neopren jacket SONGZIO Black fitted denim pants DIESEL


THE CALLAS

THEY ARE THE BRAINS BEHIND VELVET MAGAZINE, THE ARTISTS WHO PERFORM LIVE MUSIC DRESSED UP AS SUPERMAN, THE PUBLISHERS OF ATHENS ART MAP AND SO MUCH MORE; BROTHERS LAKIS AND ARIS IONAS, ALSO KNOWN AS THE CALLAS, PUT ASIDE THEIR BUSY SCHEDULES TO TALK A LITTLE ABOUT WHAT’S COMING UP.

SUPERMAN DIED YESTERDAY myspace.com/thecallas, www.velvetmagazine.gr, www.a-m-p.gr

You have just had your solo exhibition in AMP gallery; what did you show there? Knits, patch works, lights, sketches, pieces of wood, clothes, a seven-inch vinyl and much more… it was mad! You are also in the middle of recording your new album; could you tell us a bit more about it? It will be a record full of Callas style surprises! We’ve been recording in the Fab Liquid studio and the album is engineered by the “one and only” Nikos Aggloupas. We have already released a single entitled “Lipstic”, which coincided with the opening of our exhibition and was therefore included in the catalogue. Velvet magazine has had a revamp, what were the reasons behind that? We have to keep doing new stuff otherwise it would get boring… It’s also down to the people working with us who display so much passion for their work and achieve so much… How did The Callas occur and how did the current image develop with the superman outfits and the Callasettes? Go on, everybody should dress up like superman and save the world! (laughs) The three of us haven’t managed that yet though to be honest. The Callasettes appeared as an idea to present the clothes we were 66 OzOn

making and the whole thing evolved into something yourself field is myspace; in the sense that if I want to else. They now sing, play and generally have a good do something I’ll do it whatever the case, I’ll find the time with us during the rehearsals and the lives! way… The most important thing is to be persistent on what you’re doing. You have participated in exhibitions in Greece and abroad, while gigging around Greece along with Is there a field that you haven’t worked in that you other alternative Greek bands and opening for in- would like to in the future? ternational groups as well. Part of the audience is Far too many! We would like to learn gardening and therefore only aware of you as musicians, has this cooking, become footballers, learn all there is to know fact ever caused you to experience an identity cri- about tea and expensive drinks, buy all the seven – inch vinyls in the world, discover a cure for hangovers, to alsis of any sort? Whatever we get our hands on, whether that’s mu- ways have Botargo, Pistillate and Souvlaki by Kostas sic, art, publishing or fashion, we approach it with the / Talisker, whilst spending more time with T. Pynchon, same type of aesthetic. From time to time people get F.S. Fitzgerald, M. Antonioni, F. Fellini, E. Dickinson confused, but what can you do? and J. Losey. We also like to make people around us happy, to be with our friends and colleagues and to In April 2008 you went on a tour entitled “Velvet never get bored. Bus” along with another three bands, footage of which became the documentary that was screened Is there anything that you haven’t done together? during the Athens Film Festival. What was that like? One of us is an Olympiakos fan whilst the other supIs “Velvet Bus 2” in your immediate plans? ports Panathinaikos…! It was “horny” (as Boy said three times in the film)… Velvet Bus Vol.2 is on its way. Is there such a thing as a DIY scene in Greece? How do you see it developing? Almost everything in Greece is DIY, from my grandmother turning the oil tin into a flower pot, to a magazine like Velvet. The biggest development in the do it Interview: Theodora Malamou


david cernÝ

He rose to fame in 1991, by painting pink the soviet tank at the war memorial in Prague. Seventeen years later, the times he has stirred controversy are numerous. Unconditional, provocative and with a pointy sence of humour, David Cerný is certainly a man not interested in providing diplomatic answers.

art rebel photography yiorgos mavropoulos

www.davidcerny.cz

Since the very beginning your work has been characterized as provocative and controversial. Are these elements still of equal importance to you? Yes, I somehow like not to let people stay in their lethargy and Rage has always been a good source of inspiration for me. You are well known for expressing strong political and anti - communist views. How do you regard the situation in the Czech Republic today? Of course it is terrible, after the left wing won the election in the whole country. And since we can expect a crisis next year, everything will probably be pretty fucked and that means of course scoring for communist. Fuck them!

There is not one piece of my artwork that’s in the ownership of the city or installed by any officials. All of what you see is either from private collections or my ownership. And I refused a couple of times to sell anything to the Νational Gallery. In nowadays Prague is one of the most popular tourist destinations in Europe. How do you feel about that? Is your work of the two figures peeing a reference to the tourists who come to the city for cheap drinks? I thing that Prague is still far behind of other popular European tourist destinations. That piece (streams) was installed when we joined EU. You know what is the most well known sculpture in Brussels? Mannequin piss. So I intended to do something more!

How do you see the future of political art? Are there still things to protest about? Your work, despite its ironic and provocative nature, There are still things to talk about and pointing them out on also carries a strong feeling of violence and represall fronts. It doesn’t necessarilly need to be a protest. sion. Would you say that you have a rather pessimistic view on the world? Despite your strong opposition to President Václav Yes. Klaus (in an interview you called him an asshole and you have projected his picture inside a model of hu- What initiated the idea of the crawling babies instalman behind), there are lots of your artworks in public lation on the Zizkov television tower? display in Prague. Isn’t that a bit contradictory? The pessimistic view on the world.

A lot of your works received strong criticism when first presented; others were banned from exhibitions, while some commissions were cancelled due to being considered over the limit. How do you cope with such situations? Probably one tenth of all my projects has been realized, that is the truth. That’s life. You are chairman at the board of directors of the Meet Factory programme, one of the most dynamic artistic platforms in the country. What is your opinion on contemporary Czech art? Nothing special. I’m on the board of Meetfactory because it is my long term project, which finally opened last year. You have repeatedly mentioned in interviews that you don’t wanna be regarded as a famous artist. How do you see yourself? As the pilot of my Cessna 172!

Interview: Theodora Malamou


RRRIPP!!

AFTER STEALING THE SHOW IN ATHENS, “RRRIPP!! PAPER FASHION” EXHIBITION INVADED THE MUDAM MUSEUM IN LUXEMBURG AND WILL BE THERE UNTIL FEBRUARY THE 2ND, BEFORE SETTING OF TO CONTINUE ITS SUCCESSFUL TOUR TO THE MUSÉE DE LA MODE OF ANTWERP.

PAPER FASHION www.atopos.gr, www.mudam.lu, www.momu.be

“Ink Blot Test” Sandra Backlund, A/W 2007-2008, Stockholm “Βlank Page” Sandra Backlund, A/W 2005-2006 Stockholm ATOPOS “RRRIPP!! Paper Fashion”exhibition, Mudam,Luxembourg © Photo Andrés Lejona “Monster and Baby Monster”,2007. Bas Costers, ATOPOS Collection. Created for ATOPOS workshop at “RRRIPP!! Paper Fashion” exhibition and presented at Benaki Museum,Athens,2007 and at Mudam,Luxembourg,2008 © Photo Andrés Lejona

The significant exhibition was first presented under the title "Chraaats! Paper Fashion" at the beginning of 2007 in the Benaki Museum in Athens. The same exhibition successfully opened in October 2008 at the MUDAM museum of modern art in Luxembourg, the show’s first stop outside of Greece before moving on to the Musée de la Mode of Antwerp and the London Design Museum. The exhibition presents the historical context of the paper fashion phenomenon and documents the various uses for paper within today’s fashion industry through design, art, advertising, sound and video installations and fashion shows. Paper creations by famous designers and artists including Hiroaki Ohya, Hussein Chalayan and Issey Miyake (some of his paper dresses were featured in our October issue) make up the core of exhibits. According to Vasilis Zidianakis, the exhibition’s curator and artistic director of the ATOPOS cultural organisation, the idea of “RRRIPP!! Paper Fashion” 68 OzOn

occurred when, together with his team, they came across the 60s paper dresses. It was a discovery that got them so excited, that they ended up building the largest collection in the world as well as a whole exhibition. The first show’s success impressed many museums and institutions abroad, so it wasn’t long before it was being booked to go on tour. Transferring the exhibition from one place to another doesn’t necessarily mean presenting it in the exact same way. In Zidianakis’ words: “For each exhibition we change a few things and we collaborate with different people, it’s like building it from scratch each time”. The presentation in MUDAM features in addition works by Sandra Backlund and the latest video by Marcus Tomlinson about a suit by Gareth Pugh. There are also works borrowed by Jean-Charles de Castelbajac’s collection, Maurizio Galante’s dress made out of three recycled 60s paper dresses and Jean-Paul Lespagnard’s Tyvek dress for sale in a

limited edition of 100. One of the most impressive creations presented is that of Miyake’s nine paper dresses, a donation made by Issey Miyake and his team to ATOPOS. Their appearance is the result of combining the Japanese tradition with the Apoc (a piece of cloth) technique. Over the years there has been extensive debate on the relationship between fashion and art, but until recently it was considered to be single sided, as art influenced fashion. The exhibition “RRRIPP!! Paper Fashion” proves that nowadays this relationship has become interactive and the results are rather exciting!

Text: Theodora Malamou


Miyake Paper Works Photography YIORGOS MAVROPOULOS Editor STAVROS KARELIS Model HOLLY (ace)


NGUYEN YOU

ON MEETING YOU NGUYEN, LEVI’S VICE PRESIDENT IN EUROPE, WE REALIZED TWO THINGS: THAT HE IS THE IDEAL VISIONARY FOR THE FUTURE OF DENIM AND THAT HIS PASSION FOR LEVI’S IS AS AUTHENTIC AS THE BRAND ITSELF!

LEVI’S VISIONARY www.501.com

What does Levi’s represent? Levi's® is the embodiment of timeless cool, rooted in classic American utilitarian design. To use a Greek metaphor, it could be described as the phoenix of youth fashion – a brand built on purity and simplicity of vision and expression that is reborn new and yet the same, season after season. How difficult is it to stay loyal to the tradition of Levi’s and at the same time follow fashion trends? We always try to anticipate trends, rather than follow them. And in this, our 135 year history of denim design and innovation is an extraordinary advantage – fashion evolves in a cyclical manner and I believe that when you know where you come from, it’s easier to choose the right way forward. The starting place for our creative process is always a visit to our Archives in San Francisco – one of the biggest fashion collections in the world, which includes Levi's® jeans from 1873 to date. From then on, the sensibility and curiosity of our young and talented design team ensure that all designs are contemporary and relevant for today’s urban lives. It is possible to marry tradition and innovation and come up with designs that are radically new yet familiar – just think about our LEVI'S® ENGINEERED JEANS®, as they are in essence our 501® jeans reinterpreted for the urban lives of a new generation. Their celebrated design is still amazingly avantgarde after 10 years! What is the biggest competitor of Levi’s? It really changes from country to country – there is no jeanswear brand that has a presence similar to ours, consistently strong across 110 countries! There are many interesting brands that may challenge us in one or a handful of markets, but are virtually unknown in others. This is why we have a focus on people, rather than companies - if we can design great clothing that appeal to young people and make sure it is sold where they shop, then we know we are on the right track! How do you build a brand? By knowing what you stand for and maintaining an honest dialogue with your consumers over a long time, choosing to do what’s right for all of us on the long 70 OzOn


run instead of what can generate short term benefits at the expense of our society. There are no shortcuts if you want to be in business for over 150 years, like we have been.

cessity that is also reflected in our industry - through design, styling and shopping experiences. For certain, biotechnology and nanotechnology allow us to create fabrics and colors that would have been unimaginable only a couple of years back. Modern technology also helps the environment, be it through the production of bio-fibers which perform as well as traditional fibers, or even through synthetic fibers that can paradoxically have a greatly beneficial impact on the environment. As far as silhouettes go, they are still polarizing back to extremes of feminine and masculine right now – hourglass shapes and straight - and volumes – slim to baggy. Which means there is a lot of exciting choices for consumers to make and greater possibilities to create a distinctive look.

What is the song that best describes the philosophy of Levi’s? That’s a great question! We had a debate at the office and had great fun trying to find one song that could really convey what we are all about! We couldn’t really find one but agreed that it would have to be a big rock anthem – the Stones’ “Satisfaction” maybe? We always try to create perfect jeans and we are never happy with anything less! That’s what keeps us young! Or perhaps “The Times They Are A’ Changing” by Bob Dylan, which captures the strength of youth through tumultuous times - the Levi's® brand has always been at What does it take to succeed in a fast the heart of youth movements through the ages. I think consuming fashion industry: experience, we’ll talk about this for weeks! hard work or vision? Quite simply, all of them! And I would add respect for What’s the relationship between talent and team work. fashion and music? Both are minor “arts” and the expression of their time Who/what do you consider to be the biggest – there is an intangible connection between the two success in the fashion industry at the moment? that goes a long way back. The link is especially strong The economic situation is particularly challenging, so between music and youth fashion - jeanswear in par- this question will be best answered in a few months’ ticular… Think of the iconic look of bands and singers time. This is a time when consumers will truly decide across the decade – looking the part is as important what brands will be around in the future or what others as sounding right for the success of an act.Rock music will not. Even painful times are part of progress. Five and its variations have traditionally been the soundtrack to ten years ago, the high street chains redefined the of Levi's® - from the songs that inspire our creative de- fashion world with cheaper versions of designer clothsign process, to the bands that choose Levi's® jeans ing, available at faster rates than ever before. Now I as their “uniform”, there is a very strong mutual admi- think there are some very interesting digital retailers ration. That’s one of the reasons why we chose musi- that have become veritable brands and are changing cians as the embodiment of our brand –Josh Beech, people’s relationship with clothing and fashion shopfrontman of alternative rock group Snish appears in ping possibly forever. our Levi's® 501® jeans campaign and the amazing I am particularly humbled and pleased to have recently Cat Power will be featured in our Women’s communi- discovered that WGSN - the leading global research cations next Spring. She told us she loved a particular and trend analysis service to the design and style instyle of Levi's® jeans so much that she bought 9 pairs dustries – elected Levi Strauss & Co. as one of the so that she would not run out! most successful company reinventions of the decade. It’s great to hear that all the passion, innovation and hard work we have been putting into the Levi's® brand What are the newest tendencies and is being recognized. trends in the denim industry? There is a big trend in society towards a greater respect of nature and creative self expression born out of ne- What is the first word that comes in mind when you

think of Levi’s? Jeans - it’s not only what comes to my mind, but what comes to everybody’s mind, I think. We invented jeans and are inextricably associated with them. What are your dreams for Levi’s? What are your personal aspirations? I wish the Levi's® brand the ability to continue touching people’s lives for many years to come – through jeans and clothes we hope you’ll have amazing experiences in, or maybe with the inspiration you may get discovering all the musicians and artists we are proud to be associated with and affectionately call our “Heroes”. There are quite a few Greek talents on www.501.com! My personal aspiration is quite simply to continue working with some of the best talents in the industry – designers, photographers, illustrators and many more. It’s the most enriching experience and a true privilege to witness the drive and creativity of so many young people. How would you judge the Greek consumers in comparison to other Europeans? Greek consumers are very Mediterranean on one side and almost Nordic on the other - it could be a reason for the fact that so many people in the Greek fashion and fashion publishing industry seem to have very close ties with the UK. There is a big part of you that is extremely progressive – just look at your own magazine, which could stand up to comparison with some of the best publications in the so called “big fashion markets”. We get it every month and it sits comfortably on our tables next to the big international titles!

Interview: Yorgos Kelefis/Natasha Papachristou


Shirt G-Star (attrattivo) Belt Playboy (Prime Timers) Trousers Ragwear (Prime Timers)


Photography Helen Eleftheriou Styling Daphne Iliaki Make-up George P. Kritikos Hair Nicolas Villiotis Model Theodor Termetzidis (ACE)


Jacket (Stylist’s own) Pants (Stylist’s own) Shoes Adidas


Jacket G-Star (attrattivo) Scarf worn as a belt (Stylist’s own) Pants Comme de Garçon for H & M


Jacket (Stylist’s own) Pants WeSC (Prime Timers) Hat (Stylist’s own) 76 OzOn


Cardigan worn as a scarf Moritz Pants (Stylist’s own)


john bock

GERMAN VISUAL ARTIST JOHN BOCK CAME TO ATHENS TO PRESENT AN ORIGINAL PERFORMANCE AND CHOSE TO HOLD IT ON A CITY BUS. WE DIDN’T MISS OUR CHANCE TO GET ONBOARD FOR A DIFFERENT KIND OF RIDE THROUGH THE CITY’S STREETS.

NEXT STOP: ART! photography THEODORA MALAMOU

www.xyzprojects.com

John Bock, one of the most significant figures of the contemporary German art scene, is known for his performances where the unique use of speech is combined with a homemade scenery made out of sculptures and everyday objects, so at noon on the 29th of October, inside the bus the artist’s indefinable constructions dominated the scene: balls filled with shaving foam, tourist statues, the head of Hippocrates with colorful stones riveted onto it and many tubes of toothpaste, as well as the tentacles of an "octopus" made of foil and plastic which were wrapped around the handrails. Bock then appeared with his face painted white and large black circles around his eyes. Taking on the role of a tour guide or a lecturer, he began explaining in serious tones the complex modes in which the organisms, represented by the sculptures, functioned. In English - and featuring a heavy German accent which was even more incomprehensible by using his own invented words – he defined the event by announcing the "five rules of nothing." For 45 minutes, while the bus continued its progress along the main streets of the city, Bock crossed the aisle numerous times, stood on the seats, jumped over the heads of viewers, climbed on the windows while reciting poetry, rubbed 78 OzOn

toothpaste on members of the audience’s feet and made them wear his creations in an interactive performance. The atmosphere was constantly shifting, from comical to uncomfortable, in what could be described as a well orchestrated game of rotating moods. At the final stage of the performance Bock put a punctured suitcase on his head as part of a peculiar puppet theatre inspired by the legend of Odysseus, the meeting with the sirens and the battle with the Cyclop. Escaping from the bus and returning to the familiar image of the chaotic city centre of Athens at noon, we realized that the - apparently absurd - experience of this short journey was perhaps not so very far from our modern day reality. John Bock’s performance took place after an invitation from XYZ, the Athens Biennial curatorial team.

Text: Theodora Malamou


i LOVE FAKE

I LOVE FAKE IS A NOTABLE NEW ONLINE MAGAZINE FEATURING FRESH PHOTOGRAPHS IN EVERY ISSUE. JOLIJN SNIDJERS, THE CURATOR OF THE MAGAZINE, EXPLAINS HOW SHE DISCOVERS THESE YOUNG AND TALENTED PHOTOGRAPHERS.

Fresh fashion photography www.ilovefakemagazine.com

Fall 2008 Issue 10

Summer 2008 Issue 08

K?<EF@I@JJL< 1

Jolijn was born in a small town in the southern Netherlands, 27 years ago. She initially intended to become a director, but decided instead to use her cinematic perspective for fashion photography. Her photographs are eye catching due to their immediacy and the beautiful faces featuring in it, which she discovers herself. “The clothes are not the most important thing; it’s more about the people wearing them and their distinctive personalities. It might sound strange coming from a fashion photographer, but even my stylist thinks in the same way. He is mainly trying to bring out the faces more than the clothes”, says Jolijn. She discovers photographers by spending hours on MySpace browsing profiles. Now that the magazine is doing the rounds she also receives e-mails on a daily basis regarding possible collaborations. “I like to present really young photographers, some of whom are under 18 and mix their work up with the work of internationally renowned photographers. Our magazine, unlike others of its kind, does not

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take things too seriously. Having fun while promoting whatever we feel is fresh is what counts.” she adds. Jolijn works with many cutting edge international magazines such as Blend and Glamcult (Holland), INDIE and Μaterial Girl (Austria) and Neo2 (Spain). As for Amsterdam she feels that it’s a good place to be, with good model agencies and P.R offices. “Amsterdam is a relaxed place with cool people, it’s hip & happening.” We couldn’t agree more!

Text: Yorgos Kelefis


mike sheridan

HE IS ONE OF THE MOST RENOWNED PERSONAS OF DENMARK’S ELECTRONIC MUSIC SCENE, HAVING REMIXED TRACKS, APPEARED AT FESTIVALS LIKE BARCELONA’S SONAR AND HAVING JUST RELEASED HIS FIRST ALBUM. MIKE SHERIDAN IS JUST 17 YEARS OLD AND WE TALK ABOUT EVERYTHING HE’S ACHIEVED SO FAR.

NEW ELECTRO GENERATION photography mikkel bache

myspace.com/mikeosheridan

80 OzOn


What is your first memory of attempting to make music? I remember getting my first piece of software. Originally I wanted a mixer, because I thought it would look cool, so when I got something virtual, naturally I was very disappointed. But I soon learned what I could do with the software, and started thinking about the way a track is build up. I must have been around 9 years old at the time. No one could relate to my new interest, so I just did it for my own satisfaction. What made you focus on electronic music? How did you end up getting professionally involved with it? I had been producing for a couple of years, trip hop, some really horrible attempts to make rock, and one day on a family vacation I asked my dad to turn on the radio. Out of the radio came some of the most wonderful music I'd ever heard - electronic music from Sonar festival. It was completely mind-blowing. So I started making this sound and got more and more into it. From there it was slowly building up to some of the first gigs, my first record deal was signed when I was 14 - and the past many months I have been making an album, and now it is released - it is all starting to turn into a carrier and that’s pretty cool! Could you name some of your influences? A friend introduced me to the German label “rasternorton” and I have been listening to a lot of Alva Noto, Ryoji Ikeda, R. Sakamoto and COH. I am very into the early Basic Channel stuff and rhythm and sound as well as just deep Detroit techno. Depth is very important for me, I find it exciting and a little bit scary. Also I am a big fan of Nick Drake, Devendra Banhart, Jon Brion, Cliff Martinez, Thomas Newman, Matthew Herbert, and many others.

size of it yet. Which do you consider to be the most important moment in your career so far? There are a lot of important moments all of the time so, instead of picking one - which is literally impossible for me - I would like to say that the last six months have been the most important. It feels like I have been following a specific series of events on this path that I’m walking on, and that all of this wouldn’t have happened exactly the way it has if it weren’t for the order of these events. How does it feel to have achieved so much in such a young age? It feels good. Lots of teenagers in Denmark don’t know what they want to do, and haven’t really set some clear goals for themselves. That had always provoked me towards doing something a little more creative and I'm just lucky that my parents have given me that freedom and support. Do you still have the time to be a teenager? Ha ha, nope. I’m working a lot. I don’t drink, I don’t like coming to parties, my mind is just set in work mode. But this is all very new for me, so I just need to learn how to balance things right now. How do you imagine your future? Whoa, big question! I don’t know. I will continue doing this for some time, and see where it all takes me. If I play my cards right I should be able to make a living out of this, and that wouldn’t be a bad thing to reach for a start!

Is there a certain “process” that you follow in order to concentrate and produce music? I make music for myself, so it is coming from inside. I just sit down, and something starts happening. After a certain amount of time I can judge whether I can use it or not. I write down some notes while producing, in order to keep my head clear while sitting in the studio. There are a lot of things happening in a 10000 sound / 120 track composition, so it is important for me to keep control. You have just released your debut album. What was the experience like? Α little weird, actually. When you are letting go of a project - now you can’t do any more about it. Ιt is just finished and is leaving your system, leaving you in a vacuum. The first two months I couldn’t really make anything new, and I was just making a lot of PR and playing a few dj jobs in Copenhagen. Now it feels like I have made an impact, I just haven’t realized the Interview: Theodora Malamou


you know i'm no good PHOTOGRAPHY YIORGOS MAVROPOULOS MODEL GWEN LOO (ACE)

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I'LL GO back TO black Photography Yiorgos Mavropoulos Styling Maria Papadopoulou (with vintage clothes) Make-up Maria Papadopoulou with Shu Uemura products Hair Manos Agrimakis with Bumble & Bumble Models Ismini, Sara (ACE) MASHA K (D MODELS) POST PRODUCTION YIANNIS PAPADOPOULOS


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Sara Jeans Staff JEANS & CO Leather gloves Miss Sixty (shop&trade) Leather boots Marc/Marc Jacobs (Kalogirou)


Photography Yiorgos Mavropoulos Still-life photographer Yiannis Papadopoulos Styling & make up Maria Papadopoulou Hair Manos Agrimakis (D-tales) Model Sara Kokkoni (Ace)

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PLUS/PEOPLE LIKE US


www.ozonweb.com www.myspace.com/ozonmagazine OZON is a freely distributed magazine of 40.000 issues monthly through 400 distribution points in Greece

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bench.co.uk 108 OzON

Bench.

ozon international jan 2009 | back to black  

ozon international issue for Bread & Butter Barcelona, CPH Vision Copenhagen, Jam Cologne | back to black

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