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C A T A L O G


2 0 1 1 - 2 0 1 3 C A T A L O G

MAIL:

1111 North Main Street Joplin, Missouri 64801 PHONE:

417.626.1234 RESIDENCE HALLS:

417.626.0200 FAX:

417.624.0090 WEB:

www.OCC.edu

TABLE OF CONTENTS From the President

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General Information

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Student Life

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Financial Information

17

Admissions Information

31

Academic Policies

43

Degree and Certificate Programs

57

Courses of Instruction

117

Directory of Personnel

177

Communication and Visitor Information

185

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FROM THE PRESIDENT This may be a divine appointment. Perhaps you are a prospective student. Maybe you are a parent, church leader or guidance counselor who will advise prospective students. Whatever your circumstance, your choice to open this catalog may be providential. What you hold in your hand is not simply a few ounces of paper, ink and printer’s glue. It may be the start of a whole new life. As a graduate of the college, I can give personal testimony. While I enjoyed my studies at the state university I first attended, my education at Ozark was truly life-changing. The classes I took, the relationships I built, the professors who mentored me—the Lord used these to shape me in significant ways. The knowledge, commitments and skills I gained here equipped me for a fruitful life and ministry. Maybe God has the same in store for you. Only you can discern if the Lord is leading you here, so I invite you to give us a careful and prayerful look. Whether you’re preparing for full-time Christian service or simply looking for a stronger biblical foundation for your faith, your experience at Ozark will be marked by: n Excellent Bible teaching. We really believe that “all Scripture is God-breathed and useful for teaching . . . so that the man of God may be thoroughly equipped for every good work” (2 Tim 3:16-17). Our curriculum backs our commitment—every graduate takes a strong core of top-notch Bible classes. n Practical ministry training. Here at Ozark, you can take classes on how to preach, teach, counsel, grow a youth ministry, lead worship, organize a team of volunteers, lead someone to Christ, or enter a new culture as a missionary. You’ll learn the skills necessary for ministry in the twenty-first century. n Caring campus community. Our students consistently mention the family atmosphere on campus as one of our greatest strengths. Professors know your name. Fellow students care. Residence hall directors become like a second mom and dad. You’ll form relationships here that you’ll carry with you for life. n A sense of mission. A theme verse for our college is Mark 10:45—“not to be served, but to serve.” You’ll catch here a greater vision for reaching out to others with the love and truth of Christ, and you’ll leave with a clearer sense of life purpose. Choosing a college is one of the biggest decisions anyone can make, so read closely, check out our Web site, and feel free to contact us with any questions. Let me especially encourage you to come to campus soon for a visit. Sit in on a class, attend one of our inspiring chapel services, meet a few of our professors, and talk with some of the students who come to us from over 30 states and 15 foreign countries. I look forward to a more personal meeting in the days ahead. Let us know how we can help. Who knows what God has in mind? This catalog could be the start of a whole new life. Matt Proctor

President 2


A Brief History The Mission Objectives Doctrinal Statement Core Values Certification 3


2011-2013 CATALOG

A BRIEF HISTORY OF OZARK CHRISTIAN COLLEGE Ozark Bible College was established in Bentonville, Arkansas, on June 12, 1942, committed to training men and women for Christian service by teaching the Word of Christ in the Spirit of Christ. An earlier Ozark Christian College was established in St. Joe, Arkansas, in 1938. It moved to Harrison, Arkansas, in 1939, and then to Bentonville in 1940. This school was to provide both occupational training and Bible teaching. Ozark Bible College was founded to be a Bible college training full-time and parttime Christian workers. Workers were prepared to be ministers, missionaries, Christian musicians, church secretaries, educational directors and assistant ministers, as well as elders, deacons and volunteer workers in the local church. The trustees elected F. W. Strong as President and Seth Wilson as Dean, positions they held in the former college. Many churches in the four-state area of Missouri, Kansas, Arkansas and Oklahoma were closed and hundreds were without preachers. Ozark Bible College desired to provide biblical preachers whose preaching would revive the churches. In October of 1944, Ozark Bible College moved to Joplin, Missouri. A large house located at 516 N. Wall Street became the new home for the college. Joplin was chosen because it was easily reached by car, bus, train or plane. Many churches surrounded Joplin, which provided opportunities for student ministries. Joplin also had job opportunities for students. In 1946, Edwin B. Strong succeeded his father as President of Ozark Bible College. The college grew from sixteen students in 1942 to 123 students in the fall of 1949. An addition to the building in 1948 provided a dining room, a small chapel and two classrooms. At this time most of the full-time faculty preached every weekend. Area ministers assisted as part-time instructors. Students were involved in service in the churches on weekends. The curriculum has always stressed knowledge of the Bible gained through a direct study of the biblical text, with every degree carrying a major in Bible. Strong emphasis has been placed on apologetics (knowing why we believe in God, Christ and the Bible) and hermeneutics (principles and methods for understanding the Bible). Skills for ministry were also taught. In 1952, Don Earl Boatman became the third President of Ozark Bible College, a post he held for 27 years. The college had a vision and desire to grow. A 1953 addition to the college building provided a large chapel, a library and additional classrooms. This enabled the college to accommodate the 176 students who enrolled in the fall of 1954. In 1955, Ozark faculty, staff and students served seventy-five churches. Soon the college reached the maximum capacity in the 516 N. Wall building. In 1959, forty acres were purchased on North Main Street, a mile north of

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GENERAL INFORMATION

downtown Joplin and less than a mile from the Wall Street location. The Missions Building and Alumni Hall were completed in 1963 providing classrooms and a dormitory for women. This enabled the college to move to the new campus to welcome 309 students in the fall of 1963. The Administration Building was completed a few weeks after the fall semester started. Under the direction of Walter Goodman thirteen buildings were constructed on the new campus during its first two decades. Every year during the 1960’s enrollment increased, reaching its peak of 803 in the fall of 1974. New faculty and programs expanded the outreach of the college. The college was known for its emphasis on evangelism and missions. In 1979, new leaders assumed responsibilities at Ozark Bible College. Ken Idleman became President and Wallace Wartick was named Academic Dean. Lynn Gardner became Academic Dean in 1981. In the same year, Ozark began the process of accreditation and received it from the Accrediting Association of Bible Colleges (now called The Association for Biblical Higher Education) in 1988. On July 1, 1985, Midwest Christian College of Oklahoma City, Oklahoma, consolidated with Ozark Bible College on the Joplin campus under the name of Ozark Christian College. The college grew numerically from the mid 1980’s until the present. A new record enrollment was set in the fall of 2005 of 849. Mark Scott became Academic Dean in 1998. Doug Aldridge became the Interim Academic Dean in 2011. In 2005, Matt Proctor was announced as the fifth President of OCC. He served for one year as the President Elect. On July 1, 2006 Matt Proctor officially became President of OCC with Ken Idleman serving as Chancellor until 2007. In the fall of 2011, OCC began her 70th year. The college is now administered by three senior administrators: Matt Proctor, President, Greg Hafer, Executive Vice President; and Doug Aldridge, Interim Academic Dean. These men work with the executive directors (David McMillin, Campus Operations; Doug Miller, Effectiveness, General Counsel; Troy Nelson, Admissions; Monte Shoemake, Student Development; David Duncan, Development; and Dru Ashwell, College Advancement) to form the Administrative Council. Today the attractive campus includes the Chapel, Missions Building, Seth Wilson Library Building, Casteel Administration Building, Christian Service and Internship Building, Dining Hall, Multi-Purpose Building, Mabee Student Center, Missionary-onCampus Residence and Hospitality House, Maintenance Building and six Residence Halls. A strong faculty consists of twenty-seven full-time teachers and forty parttime teachers. The current student enrollment is between 600 and 700. The college today continues to prepare men and women for vocational and volunteer Christian service. The college reaffirms its historic purpose by teaching the Word of God to men and women who will be equipped to teach others also (2 Timothy 2:2).

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THE MISSION OF OZARK CHRISTIAN COLLEGE The ultimate mission of Ozark Christian College is to glorify God by evangelizing the lost and edifying Christians worldwide. The immediate mission of Ozark Christian College is to train men and women for Christian service through an undergraduate Bible college education. Emphasis is given to vocational preparation for preaching ministers, missionaries, student ministers, family ministers, adult discipleship ministers, child care ministers, children’s ministers, women’s ministers, church plant ministers, campus ministers, ministers of music and worship, administrative ministers and ministers to the deaf. Biblical and practical training is also provided for those who will serve in the church in non-vocational roles such as elders, deacons, Bible School teachers and youth sponsors. Ozark Christian College seeks to glorify God by doing His will. This entails entrusting God’s truth “to faithful men, who will be able to teach others also” (2 Timothy 2:2), declaring the wisdom of God (Ephesians 3:7-12), equipping “the saints for the work of service, to the building up of the body of Christ; until we all attain to the unity of the faith, and of the knowledge of the Son of God, to a mature man, to the measure of the stature which belongs to the fullness of Christ... and speaking the truth in love, we are to grow up in all aspects into Him, who is the head, even Christ” (Ephesians 4:12, 13, 15). The Apostle Paul stated how this purpose of God is accomplished, “God willed to make known what are the riches of the glory of this mystery among the Gentiles, which is Christ in you, the hope of glory. And we proclaim Him, admonishing every man and teaching every man with all wisdom, that we may present every man complete in Christ. And for this purpose also I labor, striving according to His power, which mightily works within me” (Colossians 1:27-29). “The goal of our instruction is love from a pure heart and a good conscience and a sincere faith” (1 Timothy 1:5). The academic mission of Ozark Christian College is to educate and equip students to become like Christ and serve Christ in leadership ministry.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

OBJECTIVES OF OZARK CHRISTIAN COLLEGE Ozark Christian College seeks to develop students who: 1. Know sound doctrine from the Word of God (Biblical Doctrine). 2. Understand evidences for the basis of faith in Christ and the Bible (Apologetics). 3. Interpret the Bible to understand the author’s intended meaning (Hermeneutics). 4. Demonstrate an intellectual development for critical thinking and lifelong learning (Intellect). 5. Communicate effectively in written and oral forms (Communication). 6. Display a personal growth in Christian character and fellowship with Christ (Devotion). 7. Apply a variety of skills for leading others to Christ, helping them mature in Christ and equipping them to serve Christ (Evangelism and Discipleship). Ozark Christian College wants to achieve all seven objectives in the life of every student. The faculty and staff of Ozark are committed to providing a foundation and environment where men and women can learn and “grow in the grace and knowledge of our Lord and Savior Jesus Christ’’ (2 Peter 3:18) as they prepare for leadership in Christian service.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

DOCTRINAL STATEMENT Every director (trustee), officer and teacher of Ozark Christian College shall be an undenominational Christian, and must believe in the full and final inspiration of the Bible to the extent that it is to him or her the infallible Word of God, and therefore the all-sufficient rule of faith and life; in the deity and supreme authority of Jesus Christ and in the divine origin and character of the Church and the necessity for the restoration of its unity on the New Testament basis. Every director, officer and teacher shall, before being elected or employed, and at such subsequent times as the board of directors may request, affirm his/her unqualified acceptance of the foregoing statement of faith and, to avoid any possible misunderstanding or misinterpretation, such statement of faith shall include the unqualified acceptance of the virgin birth of Christ, the bodily resurrection and the reality of final judgment and heaven and hell as taught in the Bible. Any director, officer or teacher who refuses his/her unqualified acceptance of the foregoing statement of faith shall be immediately removed from office or employment by the college. Further, to perpetuate sound doctrine and non-sectarian teaching, the Bible shall be taught as a textbook, and all work and study shall be conducted in harmony with the spirit and letter of the Word of God.

I’ve learned that to be balanced in ministry one must depend on the Holy Spirit and knowledge— without exalting one and neglecting the other.

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GENERAL INFORMATION

CORE VALUES OF OZARK CHRISTIAN COLLEGE Ozark Christian College is not merely an institution of higher education. It is a spiritual family of brothers and sisters in Christ. The college seeks to follow the best in educational method, but the highest priority is to honor the Lordship of Christ. The college intends to influence the spirit of the student as well as inform the mind and develop the skill. Ozark Christian College’s philosophy of education is based on the New Testament teaching and example. The following core values express the heart of Ozark Christian College: The Word of Christ Taught in the Spirit of Christ (Colossians 1:28) We believe the Bible is the true and authoritative Word of God and our final rule of faith and practice. We want to teach God’s Word faithfully, in harmony with God’s Spirit. Not to Be Served But to Serve (Mark 10:45) We are a servant of the church, training vocational and volunteer servant leaders for the worldwide work of ministry. It is the commitment of teachers, staff and students that we will love and serve others. Speaking the Truth in Love (Ephesians 4:15) We want to honor God by fulfilling our personal responsibility to be honest and caring with one another. Trusting in the Power of God and Seeking the Glory of God (1 Corinthians 4:20; Isaiah 42:8) We are absolutely and utterly dependent upon God. The work is too great for human resources. We pursue excellence, knowing all glory is God’s and any accomplishment is of Him. 9


2011-2013 CATALOG

Atmosphere of Grace, Trust and Freedom (Romans 15:7; 1 Peter 4:10) We accept one another as imperfect people saved by the grace of God. Mutual trust, based on our commitment to the Lord guides our relationships. We desire each person to have freedom to develop God-given gifts. Restoring Biblical Christianity (John 17:21) We are committed to teaching and practicing biblical Christianity, believing it is central to unity among believers for evangelization of the world. Worship in Spirit and Truth (John 4:23-24) We want to foster spiritual health through genuine worship, both personal and public. Worship is for God’s glory, exhortation from His Word and edification of the community of faith.

CERTIFICATION 1. Ozark Christian College was granted accreditation by the American Association of Bible Colleges (now ABHE) in 1988, reaffirmed for ten years in 1999, and again in 2009. The Association for Biblical Higher Education is the nationally recognized agency for accrediting Bible colleges. It is located at 5850 T.G. Lee Blvd., Suite 130, Orlando, FL, 32822. Their phone number is 407.207.0808. Their Web site is www.abhe.org. 2. Ozark Christian College is recognized and listed in the 2011 Higher Education Directory, (p. 276); in the Transfer Credit Practices of AACRAO (online), and in the Member Guide, American Association of Collegiate Registrars and Admission Officers (online). 3. Ozark Christian College is approved for Federal Students Financial Aid under the Higher Education Act of 1965 (as amended) and 20 U.S.C. 1085, 1141. 4. Ozark Christian College is approved for: a. Training of veterans under section 3675, Title 38, U.S. Code and Title 5, Code of State Regulations 60-900.050. b. Training of non-immigrant foreign students under Section 101(a) (15), (F) (i), of the Immigration and Nationality Act (see pages 35-37 of this catalog for admission requirements for foreign students). 5. Ozark Christian College has been a member of the Evangelical Council on Financial Accountability since December 1988.

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MEMBER


Ozark Christian College is alive with activities that supplement a student’s educational experience. There are many opportunities for students to apply the Christian principles learned in and out of the classroom. Christian service opportunities help students develop their own spiritual lives and provide valuable leadership experiences in Christian-based activities.

Living Facilities Social Life Spiritual Life and Christian Service Library Academic Computing Lab (ACL) Musical/Drama Opportunities Special Activities Athletics Questions About Student Life 11


2011-2013 CATALOG

LIVING FACILITIES OCC has three women’s and three men’s residence halls that help to provide spiritual fellowship and Christian friendship. Freshmen are assigned roommates and upperclassmen may request single rooms if space is available. All single, full-time students less than 23 years of age or with less than 90 credit hours are required to live on campus. Each residence hall has its own full-time, live-in, adult directors (commonly called “dorm moms and dads”). Residence Hall rooms are air-conditioned and have two closets, two single beds, and two built-in study desks. Unless students have a local cell number they supply their own telephones and are assigned personal identification numbers (PINs) for voicemail usage. OCC subscribes to a very affordable Internet provider with a filtering system which blocks objectionable content. All on-campus students are required to subscribe to OCC’s Internet service. More details are included in the Student Life Handbook.

SOCIAL LIFE Ozark Christian College promotes a values-based, Christian social life in which every person can grow in his/her daily Christian walk. OCC cares about the way its students dress modestly, how they act, and how they get along with others. A wide variety of social activities allow students to get to know each other and to build lasting friendships. The Dining Hall provides a casual environment for students to enjoy meals. The Mabee Student Center, offering games, foosball tables, pool tables, wireless Internet, large screen TVs and the Ozark Coffee Company, is a favorite meeting place for students to interact socially. The residence hall lobbies provide other places to meet. Chapel services, mentoring groups, concerts, conventions, youth events, and intramural and intercollegiate sports are other social activities in which students participate.

SPIRITUAL LIFE AND CHRISTIAN SERVICE The spiritual growth of OCC students is of utmost concern to our administrators, faculty and constituents. Under the leadership of the Campus Minister (office

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STUDENT LIFE

is located in the north wing of the Administration Building), students participate in small group meetings (Life Groups) for mentoring, devotions, prayer, and accountability as well as weekly “Devos” in each residence hall on Thursday nights at 10:00 PM. Chapel services are held each Tuesday at 10:00 AM and are a source of the spiritual enrichment that is vital to Christian growth. Outstanding speakers at Chapel services include OCC faculty members and administrators, fifth year BTh candidates, preachers from across America, and missionaries from all over the world. Students are encouraged to get involved in area churches. Many Ozark Christian College students have weekend-ministry positions in area churches, and the college maintains a list of ministry positions and needs of these churches. Each August, Ozark hosts an annual Community Volunteer Expo at which more than fifty local organizations recruit students to Christian service opportunities. Participation in some form of Christian service is required of all Ozark Christian College students. These opportunities include organizations such as churches, nursing homes, daycares, hospitals, Christ In Youth (CIY), and LifeChoices (crisis pregnancy center). Students may also join such service groups as mission teams and neighborhood canvas teams. The Student Advisory Council provides opportunities for selected student representatives to meet with the Administrators to communicate suggestions regarding student life. At Ozark Christian College, students not only study about servanthood, they live it. Numerous and varied opportunities exist for Christian service.

LIBRARY The Seth Wilson Library building was constructed in 1976 and the Library has over 29,000 square feet on two floors. It is named for OCC’s first Academic Dean, Seth Wilson (1914-2006). The Library offers almost 100,000 books and audiovisual materials for research, including the Seth Wilson Bible Collection. Access is 24/7 via phone (417.626.1234, ext 2700), e-mail (reflib@occ.edu), and the Internet (http://occ.edu/ campuscommunity/ occ. library.aspx) for renewing items, placing holds on requested materials or asking questions. During the school year the Library is open Monday through Saturday and provides research assistance during regular hours. Five major databases assist patrons in finding electronic periodicals or access to full-text articles. Some books and articles are available through inter-library loan. The Library offers audio-visual equipment for rental or use in the Library. The Seth Wilson Library also houses The Learning Center, The Computer Lab, The Don DeWelt Preaching Lab, and several professors’ offices.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

ACADEMIC COMPUTING LAB (ACL) The Academic Computing Lab, located in room L-11 of the Seth Wilson Library Building, is equipped with 19 Windows-based computers. Microsoft Office software, as well as cutting edge Bible study software is available in the lab. Students may use the Internet, and print documents on a laser printer which is located in the ACL (10 cents per page). It is recommended that students use USB flash drives to save files.

MUSICAL/DRAMA OPPORTUNITIES Students with talent in music and/or drama find many enjoyable ways to use their abilities at Ozark. The college has many on-campus performing opportunities in the areas of instrumental and vocal music, and drama. Students wishing to develop fine arts abilities will find opportunities for those expressions.

SPECIAL ACTIVITIES The school year is dotted with special events. Many of them enhance the student’s educational experience: n Welcome Week in August begins the fall semester. It includes College Orientation, Enrollment, Convocation Banquet and Service, the Community Volunteer Expo, and other activities. n Get-A-Way in September invites 7th, 8th and 9th grade students to the campus for a fall youth rally. n Faith Forum in September invites expert speakers who combine scriptural truth with scientific knowledge. n Fall Celebration in October provides the opportunity for adults (55+) to visit the OCC campus. They hear messages, attend seminars, enjoy inspirational worship and meet new friends. n “The Event” in November brings hundreds of high schoolers (9th-12th grade) to OCC where they are challenged to serve Jesus. n The Living Christmas Tree each December welcomes thousands of people to the campus to enjoy the timeless message of Jesus Christ in music and drama. n International Focus Week in February heralds the need for evangelizing the world. During this event, many of our students are challenged to join the Lord in the mission field.

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n Preaching-Teaching Convention in February features strong Bible preaching, excellent workshops, inspiring music, alumni reunions and Christian fellowship. n Week of Evangelism in March involves the faculty and students in outreach and missions trips around the world. n Deeper Life in April is a major outreach to and rally for high school students. n Women’s Conference at Ozark in April attracts women from all over the United States and offers messages and workshops for Christian women. n Branson Conferences in June offer two separate weeks of instruction and inspiration to adults (55+) in Branson, MO. n Highest Praise in June brings high school musicians to OCC for several days of rehearsal followed by a tour as a choir to present programs to churches. n Ambassador Basketball Camps in June combine instruction in basketball skills with opportunity for spiritual growth for elementary, junior and senior high school students. n Girls Volleyball Camp in June combines instruction in volleyball skills with opportunity for spiritual growth for 6th-8th grade students.

ATHLETICS Ozark Christian College competes in the National Christian College Athletic Association (NCCAA) in women’s volleyball, men’s baseball, and men and women’s basketball. The venue of athletics presents the opportunity of Christian witness to the Ambassadors and Lady Ambassadors. Historically, OCC has competed at the highest regional and national levels and is nationally recognized as one of the premier NCCAA programs.

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QUESTIONS ABOUT STUDENT LIFE Answers to specific questions regarding other aspects of student life such as vehicles, dress codes, meal plans, residence halls policies, campus health services, campus security, etc., may be found in the Student Life Handbook, www.OCC.edu/ handbook published by the Student Development Office.

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Counting the Cost at Ozark Christian College College Costs Financial Aid Philosophy Federal Student Financial Aid Ozark Christian College Financial Aid Satisfactory Academic Progress for Financial Aid Recipients Employment Opportunities 17


2011-2013 CATALOG

COUNTING THE COST AT OZARK CHRISTIAN COLLEGE It is the desire of Ozark Christian College to see that each prospective student seeking a Bible college education is given the opportunity. Ozark Christian College will work with the student in planning financial needs and will assist in securing financial aid. Ozark seeks to maintain a high quality of education at the lowest possible cost and, thanks to a number of contributors who support OCC, the student pays only a part of the total cost of education. The charges listed below are in effect for the 2011-2012 school year. It is very important that the College teach students wise principles for personal money management. We encourage our students to keep their lives as free as possible from the burden of debt (see Romans 13:8 and 2 Thessalonians 3:7-15). It is also important and right that the College not waste its resources, so sacrificially provided by God’s people, by a policy of carelessness in collecting the tuition and fee assessments. Therefore, fees and tuition charges are due and payable on the day of enrollment. Financial arrangements are businesslike and the College insists that students keep all accounts paid up-to-date.

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION

COLLEGE COSTS The following list itemizes the fee schedule, which is in effect for the 2011-2012 school year. BASIC FEES PER SEMESTER Late Enrollment fee $ 60.00 Meal ticket 18 meals per week 1095.00 12 meals per week 930.00 7 meals per week 755.00 Room (includes phone service & Internet access) Double occupancy 1090.00 Single occupancy 1490.00 (subject to change)

Parking fee 20.00 Room Maintenance Deposit 75.00 Enrollment/Student Services fee* Over 8 hours 250.00 5-8 hours (or students with 180.00 4 hours or less and living in the dorm.) 4 hours or less (library & parking included) 50.00

*Included in Student Services fee: Use of medical office services, use of Multi-Purpose Building facilities, most OCC sponsored events, use of library, admittance to athletic events, use of learning center & facilities, use of academic computing lab, weekly Ozark Update, The Directory, I.D. card and intramural sports.

TUITION AND COURSE FEES PER SEMESTER Tuition per credit hour $300.00 Music fees Audit fee per credit hour 150.00 Beg Piano Class $ 70.00 Senior Citizen tuition Organ 120.00 (60 or above) 150.00 Private Piano 100.00 Other fees: Piano Proficiency 70.00 Application fee Private Instrument 100.00 (One time only) 30.00 Private Guitar 100.00 Late test fee 5.00 Private Voice 100.00 Graduation fee 45.00 Voice Class 70.00 Second degree, same year 12.00 Guitar Class 70.00 Late application fee Senior Private Voice 180.00 for graduation 20.00 Senior Private Piano 180.00 Change of course fee 10.00 Senior Private Guitar 180.00 Electronic Music 20.00 Senior Worship/Music Prc 180.00 NOTE: Some other courses have fees attached to them. They are not listed here, as they are dependent on several factors (changing circumstances, guest speakers, special materials, field trips, etc.).

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2011-2013 CATALOG

COLLEGE COSTS (cont.) Below is an estimate of the costs for a student at Ozark Christian College based on the assumption that the student will be taking 15 semester hours of classroom study. SINGLE STUDENT IN RESIDENCE HALL PER SEMESTER: Tuition at $300.00 per semester hour (15 hours) Meal Ticket (12 meals per week) Room (double occupancy) Parking fee Enrollment/Student Services fee Residence Hall Maintenance fee (refundable at the end of semester if room is in proper order) Books and Supplies (estimated) MARRIED STUDENT PER SEMESTER: Tuition at $300.00 per semester hour (15 hours) Parking fee Enrollment/Student Services fee Books and Supplies (estimated)

$4500.00 930.00 1090.00 20.00 250.00 75.00 $6865.00 + 400.00 $7265.00 $4500.00 20.00 250.00 $4770.00 + 400.00 $5170.00

Although the cost of education is due by the first day of school, part of the cost may be paid in installments. Each student’s account shall be less than $1500.00 at the end of five weeks of classes. At the end of ten weeks, each student’s account shall be less than $750.00. The remaining balance may be paid in installments during the remainder of the semester. There is an administrative service fee of one (1%) percent per month on the outstanding balance applied on the 20th of each month the account is open.

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION

TUITION REFUND ADJUSTMENT OCC REFUND POLICY Refunds of tuition and certain fees may be made upon official withdrawal of any student according to the table below. Date of withdrawal will be determined by the date the official drop slip was completed. To receive a refund adjustment for any classes dropped, the student should report to the office of the Registrar and complete a drop slip. Tuition refunds are based on the official withdrawal date and are determined as follows:

Ozark is a solid academic institution that impacts more than just a student’s grades— it influences every aspect of our lives.

REGULAR CLASSES: Prior to first day of class First week of class Second week of class Third or fourth week of class Fifth or sixth week of class After sixth week of class

100% refund 90% refund 75% refund 50% refund 25% refund 0% refund

ONE-WEEKEND SEMINARS: Day of enrollment One or more weeks prior to first day of seminar One - six days prior to first day of seminar First day of seminar After last day of seminar

100% refund 90% refund 75% refund 50% refund 0% refund

TWO-WEEKEND SEMINARS AND CLASSES MEETING 2-5 TIMES/SEM: Day of enrollment 100% refund One or more weeks prior to first day of seminar 90% refund One - six days prior to first day of seminar 75% refund First day of seminar 50% refund Between first and last day of seminar 25% refund After last day of seminar 0% refund If withdrawal is after the first day of the seminar, then a WP or F will be issued.

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TUITION REFUND ADJUSTMENT (cont.) ONLINE CLASSES: (Summer Online Classes, same as Summer School classes) Day of enrollment 100 % refund First two weeks of class 90% refund Third week of class 75% refund Fourth – fifth week of class 50% refund Sixth – seventh week of class 25% refund After seventh week of class 0% refund A WP or F is the same as for regular classes.

SUMMER SCHOOL CLASSES: Morning of enrollment Afternoon of first day Morning of second day Afternoon of second day Morning of third day After morning of third day

100% refund 90% refund 75% refund 50% refund 25% refund 0% refund

A WP or F will be given if withdrawal is after the morning of the second day of class.

Drop/add and late fees will not be refunded. Parking and student activity fees are refunded per the above schedule as determined by the withdrawal date. Room and meals will be refunded on a pro-rated basis as determined by the date of vacating the residence hall. Refunds will be credited to the student’s account. A disbursement will be made to the student when the account has a credit balance. For students receiving federal student aid (FSA) who withdraw before completing the enrollment period for which they were charged, federal regulations require that a school calculate a Return of Title IV Funds using the formula set by the Department of Education.

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RETURN OF TITLE IV FUNDS

The law specifies how your school must determine the amount of FSA program assistance that you earn if you withdraw before completing at least 60% of the semester. The amount of assistance that you have earned is determined on a pro-rated basis. For example, a student who withdraws at the end of the fourth week of a semester will have “earned� approximately 25% of their aid (completed 4 weeks of a 16 week semester). The remaining 75% must be repaid. If you received (or your school received on your behalf) less assistance than the amount that you earned, you will be eligible to receive those additional funds If you received excess funds that must be returned, your school must return a portion of the excess equal to the lesser of: n the amount of Title IV funds that the student does not earn, or n your institutional charges multiplied by the unearned percentage of your funds. If there are FSA funds to be returned by the school, they must be returned in the following order until the return amount is exhausted. 1. Unsubsidized Direct Stafford loans 2. Subsidized Direct Stafford loans 3. Direct PLUS loans 4. Federal Pell Grants 5. Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (FSEOG) If your school is not required to return all of the excess funds, you must return the remaining amount. Any loan funds that you must return, you (or your parent for a PLUS Loan) repay in accordance with the terms of the promissory note. That is, you make scheduled payments to the holder of the loan over a period of time. If you are responsible for returning grant funds, you do not have to return the full amount. Regulations limit the amount a student must repay to the amount by which the overpayment amount exceeds 50% of the total grant funds disbursed or could have been disbursed. Any amount that you do have to return is a grant overpayment, and you must make arrangements with the Department of Education to return the funds. Eligibility for additional aid is dependent upon the student repaying the grant(s) in full or abiding by a repayment plan. If a student does not officially withdraw and fails to earn a passing grade in at least one enrolled course during the semester, the Financial Aid Office will verify if the

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2011-2013 CATALOG

failing grades were earned or were the result of non-attendance. If non-attendance is determined, the “unearned” calculation will be applied based on the last date of a documented academically related activity or the mid-point of the semester. For more information on withdrawal procedures, see Withdrawal From College on page 45.

FINANCIAL AID PHILOSOPHY The fundamental purpose of the financial aid program at Ozark Christian College is to make it possible for students who would normally be deprived because of inadequate funds to attend OCC. Based on the belief that higher education should not be a privilege reserved only for those who can afford to purchase it, and that educational opportunities should not be limited by the financial resources of the student and his/her family, the financial aid office of Ozark Christian College will seek out funds and make them available to prospective and current students so as to meet their demonstrated financial need, without regard to race, creed, national origin, sex, color, handicap or age. The financial aid office will make every effort to meet the demonstrated needs of all students in an ethical manner, to the extent funding will permit. We recognize that the primary responsibility for financing post-secondary education rests with the student and his or her family. Financial assistance from Ozark Christian College and other sources is intended only as supplementary to the family contribution. The confidentiality of student records will be respected. Information will be released only on the written consent of the student and/or his/her family, and all policies and procedures will protect the student’s right of privacy. All students should complete the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA). The FAFSA is the beginning step in generating any financial aid at OCC.

FEDERAL STUDENT FINANCIAL AID Ozark Christian College receives no federal monies given directly to the college for use in general funds; however, students at Ozark Christian College are eligible to apply for federal financial assistance. Students who are in default on a federal student loan or have a grant repayment outstanding will not be eligible for federal financial aid. Federal aid will not be applied to a student’s account until enrollment eligibility and satisfactory academic progress (explained later in this section) have been verified. FEDERAL PELL GRANTS Federal Pell Grant is an aid program designed to provide financial assistance 24


FINANCIAL INFORMATION

to those undergraduates who have a demonstrated financial need (as determined from the FAFSA). These grants are intended to be the “floor plan” of financial assistance and may be combined with other aid programs to meet the full cost of education. Each student must fill out the FAFSA to determine eligibility for federal and institutional grants, loans or Federal Work Study programs. The FAFSA may be completed online at www.FAFSA.ed.gov. After processing the FAFSA, the Central Processing Service will email to the student the Student Aid Report (SAR) and send an Institutional Student Information Record (ISIR) electronically to all colleges the student has selected on the FAFSA. The college will be able to determine the amount of Pell for which the student is eligible and will notify the student of the amount. Students eligible for Pell will receive part of their eligible amount each semester based on their enrollment status. If students attend only one semester, they will receive only that semester’s portion of the Pell award. FEDERAL SUPPLEMENTAL EDUCATIONAL OPPORTUNITY GRANT The Federal SEOG is an award to help students with extreme financial need pay for their college education. SEOG is a campus-based award, meaning each school receives an allocation of money and determines its own policy for awarding it within the confines of Federal regulations. The FAFSA is the form that needs to be completed for SEOG. STUDENT LOAN PROGRAMS Loans are to help students meet their financial need in order to obtain a college education after exploring all scholarships, grants, church assistance and job possibilities. Borrowing is much easier than repayment! Borrow wisely! Dependent students are eligible for the subsidized and/or unsubsidized Stafford Loans and PLUS (Parents’ Loan for Undergraduate Students) Loans. Independent students are eligible for the subsidized and/or unsubsidized Stafford Loans and an unsubsidized Independent Loan. On subsidized loans, the interest is paid by the government while the student is in school. On unsubsidized loans, the student is responsible for the interest and can choose to pay it immediately or defer the interest payments. Whether the loan is subsidized or unsubsidized depends on the financial need of the student combined with other scholarships or grants received and the college cost of attendance. Borrow Wisely! Individuals that have loans in default are not eligible for federal jobs or programs, may have tax refunds withheld to pay for loan payments, may damage their credit ratings, may have wages garnished, etc. FEDERAL WORK STUDY This program provides students an opportunity to earn money to help pay educational expenses. The FWS award depends on the need of the student, amount of money in the program, amount of aid received by the students from 25


2011-2013 CATALOG

other programs and the number of hours the student is able to work. Because OCC receives very limited FWS funds, there are many students employed on campus that do not have a FWS Award. In order to utilize this award students are responsible for obtaining a job on campus. See on-campus employment (page 30) for information on how to apply. VETERANS’ EDUCATION BENEFITS Veterans under the Montgomery G.I. Bill and war orphans are entitled to educational benefits, which include subsistence payments from the government. For proper application procedures contact the Director of Financial Aid. VOCATIONAL REHABILITATION BENEFITS Students who have a physical disability may qualify for vocational rehabilitation benefits. Questions concerning eligibility should be directed to the Office of Vocational Rehabilitation in the student’s home state.

OZARK CHRISTIAN COLLEGE FINANCIAL AID ACADEMIC SCHOLARSHIPS The President’s and the Richardson’s Dean’s scholarships are awarded to new students and awarded for their four or five-year degrees at OCC. They are based on the following: (1) Christian character, (2) Christian service, (3) academic merit and (4) future plans. The application deadline is February 15th. The scholarship committee evaluates the applications and awards 40 of these scholarships per academic year. To continue receiving these after the initial semester, the student must maintain a semester GPA of 3.00 and be enrolled in at least 14 credit hours per semester*. Contact the admissions office for applications and more information. The college also offers the Trustees’ Scholarship which is based on one of the following criteria for an incoming student: a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least a 2.50 through the first semester of your senior year (or most recently completed semester for transfer student), a score of 18 or better on the ACT Test, or placement in the top 50% of your high school graduating class.. To receive this scholarship, the student must enroll in at least 12 hours per semester*. Current students are also eligible for the Trustees’ scholarship, which is based upon their prior semester grade point average according to the following schedule (amounts subject to change): 2.5-2.999 = $300.00; 3.0-3.699 = $600.00; 3.7-4.0 = $900.00 A student may receive only one academic scholarship at a time. * If the student is in an approved co-op program with Missouri Southern State University, the credit hours at MSSU that apply toward an OCC degree will count

26


FINANCIAL INFORMATION

towards total enrolled credit hours, but aid will be paid only for the tuition on the credit hours taken at OCC. OCC scholarships are not cash awards and are not transferable. Students taking classes at both OCC and MSSU must contact the Financial Aid Office each semester for required assistance to insure that financial aid is paid appropriately. ADMISSIONS SCHOLARSHIPS The college also offers scholarships to those who have excelled in Bible Bowl Contests, Ambassador Scholarship (preaching/public speaking contests), etc. Students who are awarded one of these scholarships must be enrolled in at least 12 hours and maintain a semester GPA of 2.00 to receive it. If a student does not receive the scholarship one semester, it will not be lost. Once the criteria are again met, the student will be eligible to receive the scholarship. Information on these scholarships is available from the admissions office. OCC INSTITUTIONAL & MEMORIAL GRANTS These grants are funded by individuals and churches. An application form, which explains the special requirements and disbursement eligibility for each grant, is available online. The financial aid grant committee evaluates the applications and awards the grants according to required guidelines established by each benefactor. TUITION DISCOUNTS Spouses of full-time students are eligible for up to four hours of free tuition if their spouse maintains a paid ministry on a regular basis. Adults (60 and over) will receive a 50% reduction in tuition. Application may be made at the business office to have them apply this to one’s account. These discounts do not apply to other college costs. AID TO MISSIONARY INTERNS Students who are regularly enrolled in Ozark Christian College during the semester preceding their summer missionary internship service, meet internship requirements, and have been approved by the selection committee, will qualify for limited funds through the special missions fund. For more information, please contact the college mission’s office. STUDENT ASSISTANCE LOAN FUND This fund was established by individuals who desire to provide loans at a low fee. Students may borrow between $200 and $500 per semester (limited by federal financial aid limitations). Repayment begins four months after the student is no longer enrolled in classes at OCC. Interest will accrue at .3333% per month (approximately 4% per year) on the unpaid balance. Applications may be obtained in the financial aid office. OCC diplomas will be held until the loan is repaid and 27


2011-2013 CATALOG

transcripts will not be sent for any students who are not current on their loan payments. DISBURSEMENT OF FINANCIAL AID Federal financial aid will not be disbursed until after the add period is over. No award may be disbursed until all requested student data is on file in the financial aid office and/or admissions office. NOTE: The awarding of all financial aid is contingent upon the college’s receipt of funds from its various sources. In order to be the recipient of these funds, a student must maintain satisfactory academic progress as defined below. All financial aid programs are subject to review each year by the college and the federal government.

OUTSIDE SCHOLARSHIPS There are various outside scholarships available to OCC students. We suggest students check any clubs and civic organizations you might be associated with, employers, school organizations, etc., to investigate possible scholarships for which you could apply. The OCC financial aid office does maintain a limited list of known outside scholarships for which you may be eligible to apply. CHURCH ASSISTANCE Many of our students receive assistance from their churches for attending a Bible college. We recommend that you check with your church to find out if they offer church assistance.

SATISFACTORY ACADEMIC PROGRESS FOR FINANCIAL AID RECIPIENTS All students receiving federal financial aid must maintain Satisfactory Academic Progress. Satisfactory Academic Progress means meeting the qualitative and quantitative requirements set by the government, being enrolled in an eligible program and completing a program within an established time frame. To meet the qualitative requirement, a student with less than 60 credit hours must have a cumulative grade point average (GPA) of at least 1.670. A student with 60 or more credit hours must maintain a cumulative GPA of a least 2.000. To meet the quantitative requirement, a student must have completed 75% of the credit hours attempted. For example, if after the third semester the student has attempted 48 credit hours and has completed only 34 credit hours, the quantitative completion rate is 71%, and the student would be placed on probation even though the student may have had a cum GPA of 2.320. Also under the quantitative requirement, aid will be paid according to the number of the program’s credit hours multiplied by 1.5%. If the student changes degrees, only the hours that apply to

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FINANCIAL INFORMATION

the new degree will be used in the calculation for this portion of SAP. Example: the 4CM degree requires 131 credit hours; therefore, the student could receive federal grant money for up to 196 college credit hours. Students’ academic progress will be checked at the end of each semester. If a student does not maintain the above standards at the end of each semester, the following will apply: 1. The student will be placed on Financial Aid Warning. Warning means the student will be eligible to receive financial aid, but it also means the student must complete the required percentage of hours with the required GPA by the end of the semester on warning. If not, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension the following semester. 2. Financial Aid Suspension means that the student will not be able to receive any financial aid until the student again meets the required credit hour and GPA standards as outlined above. A copy of the Satisfactory Academic Progress Policy for OCC will be sent to each student’s OCC mailbox once each semester and can be found on the OCC Web site at http://OCC.edu/SAP. REPEATED COURSES The first time a student repeats a course, the new grade replaces the previous grade and the hours attempted. Each subsequent attempt of a course does not replace the previous attempts, but is counted toward both the GPA and the completion rate. APPEAL PROCEDURE At the time a student is placed on financial aid suspension, the student may appeal the condition in writing to the Director of Financial Aid. Appeals must be based on unusual circumstances such as long-term illness, death or illness of a family member, etc. The Financial Aid Appeal Committee will review the student’s file, and the student will be notified of the decision. If an appeal is granted, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Probation. Financial Aid Probation means that the student will be able to receive financial aid for the probationary semester. The student MUST meet the SAP standards by the end of the semester of probation or be following an approved academic plan. If not, the student will be placed on Financial Aid Suspension the following semester. Letters of appeal must be submitted to the financial aid office by the date printed on the Suspension Notification Letter, along with any and all appropriate documentation. TRANSFER STUDENTS Academic transcripts from all other colleges attended will be included when

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2011-2013 CATALOG

evaluating satisfactory academic progress. The student will be placed on financial aid satisfactory progress or probation based upon the review. If a student’s progress is not satisfactory, the student will be notified. NOTE: For Academic Probation and Suspension see page 51.

EMPLOYMENT OPPORTUNITIES Qualifying students may make application for our on-campus employment in one of the many areas of on-campus service. To apply for employment on campus, you may request an employment application from the business office or go to the OCC website and print one. Submit completed application to the supervisor of the department(s) of interest. Available jobs are taken quickly, so do not delay. Your schedule of classes will govern the time and number of hours you will be available to work. OFF-CAMPUS EMPLOYMENT We assist our students in what ways we can, but we do not offer a job-placement service. Known jobs are usually posted in the Mabee Student Center and on the bulletin board in the library lobby. WEEKEND MINISTRIES Many students have found weekend ministries giving them an opportunity to serve the Lord in local churches and providing them with an income that enables them to meet their financial need.

30


Enrollment Planning Campus Visit Requirements for a Student to be Fully Accepted for Enrollment Admission of Freshman Students Admission of Home-Schooled Students Admission of Transfer Students Admission of International Students Admission of Students Seeking Dual Credit at OCC Admission of Students with Disabilities Admission of Non-Degree Seeking Students Admission of Those Having Criminal Charges Against Them or Having a Prison Record Housing Examinations 31


2011-2013 CATALOG

ENROLLMENT PLANNING When you decide that you want to enroll in the Ozark Christian College family, you will have many questions regarding admission qualifications, procedure, requirements and financial considerations. Plans should be made well in advance of the start of the semester. We hope the material in the following pages will help answer your questions. Should you need more information or questions answered, feel free to call us at 1.800.299.4622 or e-mail us at admissions@OCC.edu. All admissions policies and forms are also available online at www.OCC.edu.

CAMPUS VISIT Many prospective students have found it very helpful to visit the campus (preferably on a class day) before making their application for admission. We encourage such visits and welcome interviews with interested students. Please let us know two weeks ahead of time, and we will do our best to design your visit with your interests in mind. Please make your campus visit arrangements by calling 1.800.299.4622 or e-mail us at campusvisit@OCC.edu.

REQUIREMENTS FOR A STUDENT TO BE FULLY ACCEPTED FOR ENROLLMENT 1. Submit a complete application. 2. Submit a $30.00 non-refundable application fee. 3. Provide High School Transcripts (or equivalent). 4. Provide official College Transcripts if a transfer student, or if dual credit hours earned in high school. 5. Provide ACT/SAT score report. 6. Provide Transfer Applicant Evaluation form from all prior colleges or universities attended for transfer students. 7. Provide two references: Employer/Teacher and Minister/Church Leader. 8. Meet the character standards or other related issues according to normal OCC policy as stated in the catalog and/or Student Life Handbook. Application deadlines are as follows: Fall semester: August 5; Spring semester: January 5 40 32


ADMISSIONS INFORMATION

Only students who have been fully accepted can enroll, attend classes and/or live in the residence halls. The admissions personnel will do everything possible to assist prospective students in completing their files and moving them to full acceptance status. When all necessary application materials have been received and approved by the admission’s office, a letter of your acceptance as a student at OCC will be mailed. Please do not consider yourself accepted and admitted to Ozark Christian College until you receive such notification from the admission’s office. Ozark Christian College admits students (who otherwise meet admission requirements) of any race, color, national and ethnic origin to all the rights, privileges, programs and activities generally accorded or made available to students at the college. It does not discriminate on the basis of race, color, disability, national and ethnic origin in administration of its educational policies, admissions policies, scholarships and loan programs, and athletic or other school-administered programs. There are occasions when high school dual credit students and transfer students may be delayed in obtaining final college transcripts because classes are still “in progress.” Such a student may be considered for conditional acceptance if all other admission requirements are met. “Conditional acceptance” means that Ozark Christian College has made the determination that the student is academically admissible based on the student’s available academic record(s) and all other required admissions documents. Once the final college transcripts and/or Transfer Applicant Evaluations (TAE) are received the status of “conditional acceptance” will be changed to “accepted,” making the student eligible to be housed, enroll for classes and to receive both institutional and federal financial aid. No student will be permitted to enter any course for credit more than one week after the beginning of the course. Actual enrollment must be in person. Advisors are appointed to counsel students in selection and arrangement of their courses.

ADMISSION OF FRESHMAN STUDENTS Admissions requirements are subject to change without notice. The application procedure is outlined as follows: 1. Secure and complete an application form from the admissions office, or submit the application via www.OCC.edu/freshman by August 5th for the fall semester and January 5th for the spring semester. 2. Send the application fee of $30.00 with the application. 3. Reference forms provided by the college must be received in the admissions office from your employer/teacher and minister/church leader. People not related to the applicant are to complete the reference forms.

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4. Included in the entrance requirements are the scores from the American College Testing program (ACT). This test is given six times per year in all parts of the US and some foreign countries. Registration information for the test may be obtained from your high school guidance counselor or directly from ACT (www.actstudent.org). A fee is required with each test application, which must be submitted in advance of the test date. Test results are sent to the college designated on the test registration. Our college code number is 2279. SAT test scores are also accepted (provided the “reasoning” test is taken). 5. The College requires an official high school transcript (public, private, or home schooled), because what students take in high school is often the best predictor of how they will do in college. Students should meet their respective state’s high school graduation requirements. For example, Missouri high schools typically require at least 4 units of English, 3 units each in math, science and social studies, 1 unit each in fine arts, practical arts and physical education, a half-unit course in “personal finance,” a half-unit course in health education, and 7 units of electives. So Missouri high school students are required to take 24 total units to graduate. Applicants for admission should have been granted a diploma from an accredited high school or have passed the General Educational Development (GED) test. Instruct your high school officials to forward your grade and credit transcript to Ozark Christian College. Though a high school student may be accepted for admission with a transcript of grades through the first half of your senior year in high school, a final high school transcript with the date of graduation must be submitted by August 5th for the fall semester and January 5th for the spring semester. (A copy of a GED certificate may be accepted in lieu of a high school transcript.) 6. Students earning college credit in high school (dual credit) must provide an official transcript from that college or university.  7. Student files will be evaluated for admission. Some students may be accepted for admission, but with limitations to help them adapt to college academics. A student meeting two of the following criteria will be permitted to take a maximum of 13 semester hours, which includes the Study Skills class: 1) ACT composite of 17 or below; 2) ACT English score of 17 or below; or 3) cumulative GPA of 2.5 or below.

ADMISSION OF HOME-SCHOOLED STUDENTS Home-schooled students must meet the same requirements for admission. Authentic documentation of credits taken and grades received through the twelfth 34


ADMISSIONS INFORMATION

grade must be provided. This can come from their state Department of Education, home-school organization showing satisfactory completion, a notarized original of the student’s transcript of grades signed by the parent(s) of that student, or a GED certificate. In addition, the home-schooled student is required to complete a “Home-school self-certification form.” This can be found at OCC.edu/freshman.

ADMISSION OF TRANSFER STUDENTS Students who have completed work above the high school level will follow essentially the same procedure for “Admission of Freshman Students,” with these additional requirements: 1. Academic transcripts from all previous colleges must be in the registrar’s office for evaluation by August 5th in the fall and January 5th in the spring. Courses must have a grade of at least 2.000 to be accepted for transfer. Transcripts must be mailed directly to us by the college(s) and/or university(ies) previously attended (including any dual credit courses), and they must be official, authentic, signed and affixed with the school seal. 2. Transcripts may be sent by fax to the college; however, they will be considered working documents only, pending our receipt of official, authenticated confirming documents. Our fax number is 417.624.0090. 3. Students whose transcripts have not been received as requested will not be accepted for enrollment. 4. Students who have completed 13 hours or more of transferable college credit with a grade point average of 2.5 or higher will be exempt from the requirement of an ACT score. 5. Transfer students whose cumulative grade point average at the last college attended is below 1.670 will be accepted on academic probation. (See page 51 for probation information). I am thankful for 6. Students transferring from another college the sacrifices will not be accepted until Ozark Christian that the College receives a Transfer Applicant professors Evaluation Form (download at OCC.edu/ make in transfer) showing their progress and conduct order to teach and from their former school(s). minister 7. Transfer students who have outstanding to the bills at other colleges, and/or are ineligible to student body. continue/return to their previous college will not be accepted at Ozark Christian College.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

ADMISSION OF INTERNATIONAL STUDENTS The US Immigration and Customs Enforcement (USICE) demands the following rigid requirements for acceptance of foreign (non-immigrant) students in F-1 status: 1. Applicants must provide, in writing, official evidence of complete financial support for their annual educational costs at OCC as shown on the following “Cost of Education” information. A “Declaration and Certification of Finances” form and other forms can be accessed at OCC.edu/international. 2011-2012 Cost of Education for International Students (in US Dollars) LIVING ON CAMPUS: Costs Tuition, Fees, Books and Supplies $10,950.00 Food and Room 4,110.00 One Year Health Insurance (estimated) 1,000.00 Cost per Academic Year $16,060.00 An additional cost to consider is living expenses for summer and holidays of about

$3,185.00

Note: All students must live on campus unless they are 1. Married and living together. 2. Living locally with a relative (non-student). 3. 23 years of age or older.

UNMARRIED, LIVING OFF CAMPUS: Tuition, Fees, Books and Supplies Living Expenses for One Academic Year (9 months) One Year Health Insurance (estimated) Total Cost per Academic Year

$10,950.00 10,220.00 1,000.00 $22,170.00

An additional cost to consider is living expenses for summer and holidays of about

$3,185.00

MARRIED, LIVING OFF CAMPUS, NO CHILDREN: Tuition, Fees Books and Supplies Living Expenses for One School Year (9 months) One Year Health Insurance (estimated) Total Cost per Year

$10,950.00 11,500.00 1,000.00 $23,450.00

If both spouses enroll, add per year

$10,950.00

An additional cost to consider is living expenses for summer and holidays of about

$3,185.00

If bringing children, add per child per year for living expenses

$2,050.00

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ADMISSIONS INFORMATION

Add for children’s health insurance (one charge covers all children)

To Be Determined

In addition to the above costs, you must have on deposit enough US currency for travel fare to return to your homeland. NOTE: Ozark Christian College provides neither on-campus nor off-campus housing for married students, nor off-campus housing for unmarried students. On-campus housing for unmarried students is in double-occupancy rooms in residence halls.

ALL COSTS ARE SUBJECT TO CHANGE WITHOUT NOTICE. INTERNATIONAL STUDENT GRANT: A grant valued at $9,600.00 (US) per year is available for qualified, new, fulltime, degree-seeking international students entering the US on an F-1 student visa seeking to prepare for involvement in Christian ministry, and who are committed to returning to their home country upon completing their study in the USA. 1. Applicants must request and complete the Student Information for International Student Grant Form and comply with all enrollment application requirements in order to be considered by the grant committee. You will not receive this grant unless the grant committee notifies you in writing that you have been awarded the grant. 2. Applicants must submit a deposit of $2,000.00 US to OCC before being issued an I-20. If plans on attending Ozark Christian College change, or there is an inability to obtain a visa, upon written request Ozark will refund the deposit in full. 3. Before applying for an F-1 student visa at the American Consulate or Embassy, the Department of Homeland Security requires international students to pay SEVIS I-901 fee of $200. Upon receipt of the I-20, go to http://www.fmjfee. com. Read the instructions carefully. With the I-20 and a valid credit card, go to the bottom of the web page and begin the payment process. The applicant cannot be issued an F-1 visa without the payment of this fee. 4. If English is not the official language of the applicant’s country of origin, he/ she must present evidence that he/she has sufficient knowledge of the English language to pursue a full course of studies at Ozark Christian College. Test of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) requires a score of at least 550 on the “written exam,” 213 on the “computer based exam,” or 79-80 on the “Internetbased test.” Our TOEFL registration number is 6542. 5. Applicants must maintain a full course of studies each semester, make passing grades, and finish studies in the time so determined by the college. 6. Applicants must understand that they are not permitted to obtain off-campus employment in the US. The college may not endorse attempts by applicants to

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do so except in extreme cases of unforeseen circumstances arising subsequent to entry. 7. Applicants need to know that the USICE does permit them to be employed in available jobs on the college campus upon enrollment as full-time students; however, the college does not guarantee that jobs will be available. If you are interested in attending Ozark Christian College you can go to OCC.edu/ international/ to complete online form or download forms. As soon as we receive all the necessary items and you are accepted for enrollment, we will immediately send the completed I-20 form and your letter of acceptance so that you can apply to the American Consulate or Embassy for your F-l student visa. For helpful information on preparing for your Embassy visit, please go to OCC.edu/international/.

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS SEEKING DUAL CREDIT AT OCC

Dual credit courses enable high school juniors and seniors to receive, simultaneously, both high school and college-level course credit. They provide highperforming high school students an opportunity to experience high-quality collegelevel courses. Dual Credit students must have a minimum grade average of “B” on all prior high school course work and be recommended for participation by signature of the high school principal and the student’s parent or official guardian. The “B” average is I wouldn’t trade the last five years for anything. reflected by a grade point average of at The men and least 3.0 on a 4.0 scale. Students pursuwomen who ing Dual Credit status must also have an work at and ACT composite score of 21 or higher (or attend Ozark equivalent: SAT score) if they are a junior mean more or senior. Juniors and seniors who have to me than I not taken one of these standardized tests ever could have may be considered on an individual basis. imagined! The following Ozark classes are eligible for dual credit status: n Christ and the Bible (3) n Christian Life (2) n Speech (3) n English Comp 1 (3) 38


ADMISSIONS INFORMATION

n English Comp 2 (3) n Lifetime Wellness (1) n Acts (4) n History of Ancient Israel 1 (4) n History of Ancient Israel 2 (4) n Deaf Communications 1 (3) n Deaf Communications 2 (3) Dual credit students must meet the same requirements for admission as a freshman. Due to government requirements, dual credit students are not eligible for federal financial aid, nor will they be considered for institutional scholarships. A dual credit student will be accepted once Admission requirements are met.

ADMISSION OF STUDENTS WITH DISABILITIES Ozark Christian College seeks to comply with Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and with the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 by providing reasonable accommodations to qualified students with disabilities. 1. The student contacts the Executive Director of Admissions to request accommodations and/or services a minimum of eight (8) weeks before the start of a semester. Depending on the nature of the disability more time may be necessary to satisfy the reasonable accommodation. 2. The student provides documentation of his/her disability: a. Diagnosis b. Statement of severity c. List of accommodations that will be needed by the student in order to benefit from the services. The documentation provided by the student may require further support and/or additional evaluation. Since Ozark Christian College does not provide assessment services to document disabilities, any costs incurred are the responsibility of the student. 3. The Executive Director of Admissions and the Director of the Learning Center 39


2011-2013 CATALOG

will review the documentation to determine whether it demonstrates the existence of a disability and the possible need for reasonable accommodations. 4. The reasonable accommodations necessary for participation in the classroom will be arranged before classes begin. A letter stating the approved accommodations will be provided to the student and the professors he/she will have for the upcoming semester. 5. If accommodations relating to other areas such as Student Life or Registration are needed, the Executive Director of Admissions and the student will develop a plan to make sure the accommodations are put in place.

ADMISSION OF NON-DEGREE SEEKING STUDENTS A student who is taking classes for personal improvement, to get a degree from another institution, or taking a course for audit is considered “non-degree seeking.” Non-degree seeking students will be accepted when the following requirements are met: 1. Short Form Submitted 2. Financial Agreement signed 3. $10.00 Application fee Due to government requirements, “non-degree seeking students” are not eligible for federal financial aid assistance, nor will they be considered for institutional scholarships until all admissions requirements have been met. Opportunities are provided for people of the community–especially elders, deacons, and Bible school teachers–to participate in classes, along with day students that elect to do so, on Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Consult the published schedule at the beginning of each semester for such evening class offerings.

ADMISSION OF THOSE HAVING CRIMINAL CHARGES AGAINST THEM OR HAVING A PRISON RECORD All requirements apply. In addition, those with criminal charges against them cannot be admitted until those charges are fully cleared. Those who have a prison record must have been released from prison (not out on bail) for at least one year in order to demonstrate recovery, during which time they must have been actively involved in their church directly under the oversight of the elders and the minister(s) of that church. 40


ADMISSIONS INFORMATION

HOUSING In general, single students enrolled in eight or more credit hours are required to live in the residence halls. Exceptions to this policy are usually granted to students: 1. When a student will be living with his/her immediate family that provides a guardian relationship 2. Who are 23 or older 3. Who are getting married shortly and securing housing 4. Who have already lived in the residence halls for seven semesters 5. Who have completed 90 hours (Senior status) Permission must be granted by the student development office. Students enrolled in fewer than eight credit hours must live off campus unless they are in the co-op program between Missouri Southern State University and OCC (4 hours).

EXAMINATIONS New and transfer students will be subject to the following screening examinations: A. Biblical Knowledge Examination This is merely an information exam. It is not used as either an entrance or placement test. The Bible Knowledge Examination is also given to seniors. B. Student Relationship Assessment C. Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis Test D. Retention Management Survey (part of College Life and Orientation)

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NOTES

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General Policies Grading Policies Attendance and Assignment Policies 43


2011-2013 CATALOG

GENERAL POLICIES SEMESTER HOURS Credit is in semester hours. In general, the semester credit hour is the amount of credit given for one 50-minute classroom session. CLASSIFICATION Full-time students are those who are enrolled for at least twelve credit hours. Part-time students are those enrolled in less than twelve credit hours. Freshmen are those who have earned less than 30 credit hours. Sophomores are those who have earned 30-59 hours. Juniors are those who have earned 60-89 hours. Seniors are those who have earned at least 90 hours. LIMITATIONS OF CREDIT (Applied toward a degree) Vocal or instrumental music (private lessons) Physical education courses Study Skills Field Experience Courses

9 hours (Music majors excepted) 2 hours 2 hours 2 hours

Ozark Christian College reserves the right to change or cease offering any curricular program at any time. The school will make a reasonable effort to help students thus affected to complete their education in a comparable program if at all possible. CORRESPONDENCE WORK AND ONLINE COURSES A maximum of 16 hours of correspondence or online learning credit may be transferred into a degree program. A minimum 2.000 GPA is required to be considered. There is no limit of the number of these types of courses if they are taken at OCC or through the Christian College Consortium. Students may not enroll in correspondence or online courses during their final semester at OCC. Approval for transfer of these credits or to request enrollment in these courses during the final semester must be made through the Academic Dean. SCHEDULE CHANGES To add or drop a course the student must go to the Registrar’s office and officially request the schedule change. In addition, students receiving financial aid must also talk with the financial aid office to determine whether adding or dropping creates a change in financial aid status. A student may add a course during the first week of the semester. A student may not add a course to his/her schedule after the start of the second week of school. Sometimes exceptions are made in the case of weekend seminars, but those must be approved by the Academic Dean. If a student enrolls late in a class, he/she is still responsible for the work missed and classes missed will count as absences in the attendance record for the class. 44


ACADEMIC POLICIES

Any regular semester course dropped during the first six weeks of a semester is not recorded on the student’s transcript. Any student who wishes to drop a class must do the following: Go to the Registrar’s office and formally request to be dropped from the class. Until this is done the student is officially enrolled in the class whether or not he/she attends. The student is responsible for appropriate charges and course work until he/ she has officially dropped a course through the Registrar’s office. All courses dropped after the first six weeks will be recorded on grade sheets and transcripts either as “WP” (withdrawal passing) or “F’’ (failing). A “WP” grade is not computed in the student’s GPA. A failing grade is computed in the student’s GPA. No course can be dropped after ten weeks of class. The only exception is for reasons approved by the Academic Dean and Executive Director of Student Development. WITHDRAWAL FROM COLLEGE To officially withdraw from the college a student must obtain permission from the Student Development Office. If the withdrawal is within the first ten weeks of the semester, the student must then officially drop his or her classes through the registrar’s office. The student is expected to meet all obligations involving his instructors, fellow students, deans, resident hall directors, executive director of campus operations and librarian. Students who leave college without officially withdrawing through the registrar’s office will receive a failing grade in each course. APPLICATION FOR DEGREE OR CERTIFICATE Students expecting to graduate at the end of the academic year must make application for the degree or certificate by November 1 of that school year. Students who apply after November 1 but by February 1 will be charged a $20 late application fee. No one may apply for graduation after February 1. Students who plan to complete their degree or certificate at the end of the fall semester must notify the registrar’s office in writing by April 1 of the previous semester. Their transcript will be checked prior to pre-enrollment for their final semester. The graduation fee is $45. An additional $12 charge is made for the second degree in the same year. This fee applies even if the student is not participating in the graduation exercises. All course work must be up-to-date by May 1 of the year of graduation, and all financial arrangements must be satisfactory to the executive director of campus operations by April 1. No diploma or certificate will be granted until all course work is completed and financial obligations to the college are satisfied. RELEASE AND MAILING OF ACADEMIC TRANSCRIPTS The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 prohibits release of 45


2011-2013 CATALOG

student academic transcripts (and other student data) without the student’s written consent. Ozark Christian College policy is to not copy transcripts and other personal data from high schools and other colleges for anyone. Official transcripts from Ozark Christian College, Ozark Bible College, and Midwest Christian College, may be requested in person, by mail or by fax at 417.624.0090. Because the student’s signature is required for release of transcripts, requests made by telephone or by e-mail cannot be honored. All requests should include: the student’s full name (including maiden name, if applicable), address, birth date, social security number, dates of attendance, and name and address of the person to whom the transcripts should be sent. Transcript fees are part of the Student Services fee; however, a charge of $10 is assessed for faxing a transcript. Academic transcripts will not be released for current and former students whose financial accounts with the college are not paid in full. Transcript requests should be addressed to the Registrar. OCC STUDENT E-MAIL ADDRESS All Ozark Christian College students must use the official e-mail address provided by the college (lastname.firstname@my.occ.edu) to receive communication from the faculty and staff. The OCC student e-mail address may be forwarded to another e-mail service (e.g., yahoo.com or hotmail.com). LEARNING CENTER The Learning Center (LC) exists to help all OCC students succeed academically by providing supplementary academic assistance, resources and special needs accommodation. Peer tutoring for all OCC courses and proofreading services are free of charge. The LC also staffs the Testing Center where students can make up tests, quizzes and memory work. Hours of operation are posted outside the LC office in the lower level of the Library (L12). Contact the LC (ext. 2725 or learningcenter@ occ.edu) for upcoming workshops or to schedule a session with a tutor. ACADEMIC INTEGRITY Due to the commitment of training men and women for Christian service and of educational excellence, academic integrity is our natural expectation. Compelling evidence of academic dishonesty (e.g., cheating or plagiarism) will be reported to the Academic Dean’s office and the student development office. Penalties could range from failure of an assignment to suspension from college. Students should avoid dishonesty and irresponsibility at all costs. Instructors have permission to state additional requirements and definitions in their syllabi as they deem appropriate. ACADEMIC HONESTY Statement of Policy – Academic dishonesty includes, but is not limited to: altering

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

or misusing documents; impersonating, misrepresenting or knowingly providing false information as to one’s identity; providing false information regarding completion of course assignments, professional history, or accomplishments; plagiarism, cheating on examinations, attempting to gain advance information on examination questions from any source, or collaborating with others for that purpose; and sharing or selling information about examination questions. Procedure – Staff, faculty or students who believe that a student has not adhered to the Academic Honesty Policy will bring the matter to the attention of the Academic Dean. In cases where the authenticity of documents submitted by a student is in question, an investigation will be conducted by the Registrar’s office and/or Admissions Office. Should the documents submitted by a student be determined to be fraudulent (such as a transcript, diploma, certification, references, etc.) the student will be notified in writing by the Registrar of the violation and the proposed disciplinary action. In response to alleged violations of the Academic Honesty Policy, Ozark Christian College reserves the right to take any or all of the following actions: n Bar the student from enrolling in the college, registering for courses and taking examinations. n Assign a failing grade for an examination or course. n Suspend or dismiss the student. If the student is dismissed, the college reserves the right to revoke all credits. If the student has withdrawn or graduated, any credits and/or degrees and certificates/diplomas previously awarded may be revoked and the student will be asked to return the certificate or diploma. n Suspend or terminate all college services previously available to the student. n Retain all tuition and fees paid by the student. n Withhold course grade(s) and/or examination score(s) and official Ozark Christian College transcripts. n Permanently annotate a student’s record to reflect action(s) taken by the college in response to the student’s violation of the Academic Honesty Policy. n Notify educational institutions, licensing or certification boards, employers or others, who have previously received a transcript or similar certification of any action taken by the college. n Prohibit reenrollment in Ozark Christian College except by appeal. n Take other action as appropriate. When there is evidence of academic dishonesty, the college will give the student or send a written notice to the student’s last known address of the alleged violation and the action, if any, the college proposes to take. Right to Appeal – A student has the right to appeal disciplinary action taken by

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2011-2013 CATALOG

the college. A student has 45 days from the date the notice is given or mailed to file an appeal of the discipline. The appeal must be in writing and respond to every detail of the alleged violation. If the student chooses to appeal, the appeal will be considered by the college administrators and the student will be notified in writing of the final decision. If the student does not appeal the disciplinary action within the required time frame, the action will be final. Petition for Reinstatement – A student who has been denied services or has been dismissed because of a violation of the Academic Honesty Policy may petition for reinstatement no sooner than two years from the date of the final decision. The petition must be in writing, must present a rationale for reinstatement and shall be addressed to the Academic Dean, Ozark Christian College, 1111 North Main Street, Joplin, MO 64801. Students who are subsequently reinstated will be governed by the academic policies in effect at the time of reinstatement. Certificates or degrees previously revoked will not necessarily be reinstated. TRANSFER OF CREDITS FROM OCC TO OTHER INSTITUTIONS OF HIGHER LEARNING: n According to established practice in American higher education, receipt of credit is neither automatic nor obligatory; the receiving institution has the exclusive right to accept or reject credits earned at another college or university. Ozark Christian College accepts credits earned at other institutions subject to specifications published in the college catalog page ??? under the heading “Admission of Transfer Students.” Although these policies are typical, other schools’ policies should always be consulted before students attempt to transfer credits or degrees from OCC. n Transfer of credits for individual courses between any two institutions is subject to generally accepted standards including minimum grade (usually “C”) and whether those courses meet the requirements of a specific program at the receiving school. n Established practice provides for the routine transfer of credits between institutions affiliated with the same or similar accrediting associations. Ozark Christian College is accredited by the Association for Biblical Higher Education (ABHE) with offices in Orlando, FL. They are recognized by the US Department of Education to accredit Bible colleges. This national accrediting body is recognized by the Council for Higher Education Accreditation (CHEA) and by the International Council for Evangelical Theological Education (affiliate of the World Evangelical Alliance). n Students hoping to transfer course credits or degrees earned at OCC to another institution should understand that some schools do not recognize ABHE accreditation. In some cases the institution is unaware of ABHE standards (which 48


ACADEMIC POLICIES

are equivalent to those of the regional associations) or of ABHE’s recognition by CHEA. In other cases it is the institution’s blanket policy to refuse receipt of credit from any institution that is not accredited by a regional accrediting association. Students are urged to contact the receiving school prior to enrollment to learn how the policies of that school affect receipt of OCC credits and degrees. n Special “articulation” agreements established between individual institutions generally provide recognition of credits or degrees earned at other schools. Ozark Christian College has three of these agreements (Missouri Southern State University, Pittsburg State University and Fort Hays State University). n On occasion the “track record” of student performance established by students who transfer from one school to another may make it easier for a receiving institution to feel comfortable accepting credits from another school. n The following is a partial list of institutions at which Ozark Christian College bachelor graduates have been recently accepted into graduate programs: All Restoration Movement Seminaries or Graduate Programs (Cincinnati Christian University, Lincoln Christian University, Emmanuel Christian Seminary, Kentucky Christian University, Johnson University, Hope International University, Pepperdine University, Abilene Christian University). Other seminaries (Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, Denver Seminary, Talbot School of Theology, Fuller Theological Seminary, Columbia International University, Yale Divinity School, Harvard Divinity School). OCC credits have also been accepted at the following institutions (not a complete list): University of Oklahoma, Oklahoma State University, University of Kansas, Kansas State University, John Brown University, Pittsburg State University, Missouri Southern State University, Missouri State University, Fort Hays State University, Millikin University, Greenville College, Milligan College, University of Illinois, Webster University (Louisville, Kentucky). n If after a routine evaluation of the student’s transcript receipt of credit is denied, then the student may find it helpful to request a review of this “Statement” by the Registrar, Dean or Department Head in the receiving school. Also, in many graduate schools, an entering student may enroll as a “post-baccalaureate” and earn up to nine (9) hours of graduate credit before applying officially for admission to a degree program. Academic performance at a sufficiently high level during post-baccalaureate coursework may enable the student to meet admission requirements in spite of a prior refusal to accept his or her degree. n The receiving institution decides how courses will appear on the transcript and how grades will be figured into the student’s GPA. n The receiving institution may require course descriptions, course syllabi and professor’s credentials before granting credit from OCC.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

GRADING POLICIES MARKING SYSTEM OF GRADES The following symbols, together with plus (+) or minus (-) variations, indicate the student’s proficiency each nine weeks. MEANING

LETTER GRADE

Excellent Good Average Poor Failing Withdraw Passing Withdraw Without Credit

A A- B+ B B- C+ C C- D+ D D- F WP

NUMBER GRADE

GRADE POINT

100-95 94-93 92-91 90-87 86-85 84-83 82-79 78-77 76-75 74-72 71-70 69-0 100-70

4.00 3.67 3.33 3.00 2.67 2.33 2.00 1.67 1.33 1.00 0.67 0.00

(Neither grade nor hours are computed in the grade point average.)

WX

(Credit is denied by faculty committee due to excessive absences. Not computed in the grade point average. The WX grade is given only in extreme circumstances.)

P = Passing

F = Fail

X = Exempt

DEAN’S LIST Excellence in academic achievement is recognized by the Dean’s List. To qualify for the Dean’s List in a given semester, a student must complete at least 12 hours and have a minimum 3.67 grade point average for that semester. WAIVER OF CLASSES OCC will allow English Composition 1 and/or US History 1492-1877 to be waived from a student’s degree requirements if the following two conditions are satisfied. The student must have earned honors-level ACT scores (27 or above) in the corresponding area of the ACT exam (English Composite score for English Composition 1; ACT Composite score for US History). The student must also successfully pass an OCC proficiency exam.  Credit hours for waived courses become open elective hours.  These exams may be attempted only once.

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

CREDIT FOR PRIOR LEARNING Students with significant previous ministry experience or unaccredited training may be able to receive credit toward degree requirements through Credit for Prior Learning (CPL). Credits are earned by demonstrating that college-level learning has occurred in one of a variety of settings: workshops, seminars, self-study, non-credit classes, training programs, work-related learning and life experience. Students must successfully complete the Perspectives on Prior Learning (SD 310) course and meet all CPL portfolio requirements. Portfolios are evaluated by a faculty member who will determine the amount of and level of credit to be awarded. Please note: credit is awarded based on the information that was learned, not for the experience itself. A maximum of 16 hours may be awarded through CPL. ACADEMIC WARNING Students who have two or more grades below “C” level during any semester will be notified in writing by the Registrar’s office. ACADEMIC PROBATION To remain in good academic standing, a student must make a grade average of at least 1.67 (C-) in each semester, while achieving the first 60 hours. After 60 earned hours the student must achieve a 2.00 GPA each semester or be placed on academic probation. In addition, after 90 earned hours the cumulative GPA must be at least a 2.00 or the student will be placed on academic probation. During the semester on academic probation, the student will lose scholarships and will be limited to a maximum class load of 12 semester hours in addition to Study Skills. It is recommended that the student not engage in more than 24 hours of employment per week. In the semester on academic probation the student must enroll for Study Skills and receive academic assistance through the Learning Center. During the period of probation, either academic or disciplinary, the student shall not participate in any extracurricular activities, including inter-collegiate athletics, college-sponsored music groups or outreach teams. Students taking four credit hours or less and are non-degree seeking are not put on academic probation or suspension for low GPA. ACADEMIC SUSPENSION During the probationary semester a student not meeting the following minimum GPA (0-59 hours – 1.67 semester GPA; 60 + hours – 2.00 semester GPA; in addition after 90+ hours – 2.00 cumulative GPA) will be suspended for one semester. ACADEMIC RE-ADMITTANCE After having been academically suspended for a semester, if the student wishes to be readmitted on probation, a written application must be made to the executive director of admissions and/or a committee of the faculty. Upon approval to be

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2011-2013 CATALOG

readmitted on probation, the student will be permitted to take a maximum class load of 12 semester hours, in addition to Study Skills. DISCIPLINARY SUSPENSION If a student is suspended for disciplinary reasons, the student will be withdrawn from school with a WP or F (which ever the student was earning at the time of suspension). However, after the tenth week of school the grade will be an “F.”

ATTENDANCE AND ASSIGNMENT POLICIES ATTENDANCE Attendance is taken seriously because Christian leaders must be self-disciplined. The student receives a benefit from the discussion, interaction, and emphasis of a class session, which can be appreciated in no other way, even by additional makeup work. When the student is absent from class, a loss is experienced which may not show up on examinations but is nevertheless real. The student is expected to attend each meeting of the class in which he/she is enrolled. Roll will be taken in each class. Faculty members may make some specific requirements regarding attendance stated in their course syllabi that students will need to meet, but general attendance regulations apply to all classes. The equivalent of two weeks of absences plus one additional absence in a class will result in the student receiving an “F” for the course. In cases of extenuating circumstances (such as an extended illness) beyond the student’s control, appeal for credit may be made to the faculty committee. This appeal must be in writing, state reasons for the absences, and must be presented to the Assistant Academic Dean before final exams begin for the semester in question. Petition forms are available from the administrative assistant to the Academic Dean. TARDIES Tardy students will be counted absent for the period unless they inform the professor of their presence at the conclusion of the class period. Four tardies constitute an absence. Any tardiness over fifteen minutes constitutes an absence. Faculty are free to establish their own reporting procedures. ASSIGNMENTS Students will be held responsible for all classroom lectures and assignments. If absent from class, the student is personally responsible to learn the assignments made and to obtain the data for notes of the missed lecture. Normally, in all college classes, assignments of study, exercises, papers,

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

research, etc., are to be accomplished outside of the class period. Ozark Christian College expects an average of two hours study time for each hour in class and students should plan their schedule accordingly. The regular sixteen-hour college course will demand a schedule of forty-eight hours a week “on the job” in study and classes. Therefore, the normal course load should not be exceeded without special permission from faculty advisors. Outside work should be considered when enrolling in classes. EXAMINATIONS Final examinations or equivalent work will be given in all courses. A fee of $5.00 will be charged students who take any scheduled tests or examinations at a special time, apart from the class, except that the fee will be $25.00 for a final exam in a four-hour class, $20.00 in a three-hour class, $15.00 in a two-hour class, $10.00 in a one-hour class. This privilege is subject to the approval of the teacher in the class. The procedure for a make-up examination is to first secure approval from the teacher, secure a receipt for such from the business office and then present this receipt to personnel in the Testing Center. Teachers can designate other requirements in their syllabi. INCOMPLETE WORK Incomplete assignments or make-up work must be turned in during the semester, according to each individual faculty member’s stated requirements; however, no make-up work can be accepted for any semester after the last class day of that semester. FAMILY EDUCATION RIGHTS AND PRIVACY ACT The Family Education Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA) affords students certain rights for their educational records. FERPA gives students the following rights with respect to their educational records: 1. The right to inspect and review their education records within 45 days of the day the college receives a request for access. Students should submit to the Registrar written requests that identify the record(s) they wish to inspect. The staff of the office will make arrangements for access and notify the student of the time and place where the records may be inspected. If the requested records are not maintained in the Registrar’s office, the student will be notified of the current official to whom the request should be addressed. 2. The right to request the amendment of the student’s education records that the student believes are inaccurate or misleading. Students may ask the college to amend a record that they believe is inaccurate or misleading. They should write the Registrar’s office clearly identifying the part of the record they want changed, and specify why it is inaccurate or misleading.

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If the college decides not to amend the record as requested by the student, the college will notify the student of the decision and advise the student of his or her right to a hearing regarding the request for amendment. Additional information regarding the hearing procedures will be provided to the student when notified of the right to a hearing. 3. The right to consent to disclosures of personally identifiable information contained in the student’s education records, except to the extent that FERPA authorizes disclosure without consent. One exception permits disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the college in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the college has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an educational record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. 4. The right to file a complaint with the US Department of Education concerning alleged failures by the college to comply with the requirements of FERPA. The name and address of the Office that administers FERPA is:

Family Policy Compliance Office US Department of Education 400 Maryland Avenue, SW Washington, DC 20202-4605

The college has designated certain information contained in the education records of its students as directory information for purposes of the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act (FERPA): student name, e-mail address, parent’s name, local address and telephone number, permanent address and telephone number, hometown, degree or certificate program, class standing (senior, junior, sophomore, freshman), participation in officially recognized activities and sports, Christian service activities, dates of attendance (current enrollment status, full time or part time), degrees and awards received, most recent previous school attended, photograph, class schedule and class roster. Directory information may be disclosed by the college for any purpose in its discretion, without the consent of a student.  Students have the right, however, to refuse to permit the designation of any or all of the above information as directory information.  In that case, this information will not be disclosed except with the consent of a student, or as otherwise allowed by FERPA. Any student refusing to have any or all of the designated directory information

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ACADEMIC POLICIES

disclosed must file written notification to this effect with the college during regular business hours.  Forms for this purpose are available in the office of the Registrar.   The written notification does not apply retroactively to previous releases of directory information (e.g., once the Campus Directory has been published, the directory information contained therein will remain). To prevent the release of directory information written notification must be filed no later than the second week of classes of the fall semester. In the event a refusal is not filed, the College assumes that a student does not object to the release of the directory information designated.  Further information about education records and the process of obtaining access to records may be obtained from the office of the Registrar. RELEASE OF INFORMATION Records are maintained in the following offices: Academics-Registrar; Admissions-Executive Director of Admissions; Housing and Discipline-Executive Director of Student Development; Financial-Executive Director of Campus Operations and Director of Financial Aid.

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NOTES

56


Degrees and Certificates Offered General Requirements for Graduation Bachelor Degrees Advanced Associate Degrees Associate Degrees Certificates 57


2011-2013 CATALOG

DEGREES AND CERTIFICATES OFFERED Ozark Christian College offers six bachelor degrees, advanced associate degrees in six areas, three associate degrees, two certificates and a TESOL Certification Program. There are choices of major and minor emphases available within some degrees. The last thirty-two hours of work for any degree must be taken in residence unless approved by the academic dean and the director of internships. BACHELOR DEGREES Bachelor of Theology Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry (double majors available in this degree) Bachelor of Music Ministry Bachelor of Music and Worship Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Ministry Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Intercultural Studies ADVANCED ASSOCIATE OF ARTS IN BI-VOCATIONAL MINISTRY DEGREES Bible and Education (Elementary, Middle School, Secondary) Bible and Nursing Bible and Business and Administration Bible in Intercultural Studies ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREES Associate of Arts in Christian Ministry Associate of Arts in Deaf Ministry Associate of Arts in Church Music CERTIFICATES Certificate of Bible Knowledge Certificate of Christian Service CERTIFICATION PROGRAM TESOL – Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages One’s education is a life-long process involving both classroom instruction and hands-on experience. Each of the bachelor degrees is designed to provide preparation for leadership in Christian service. In this sense each degree is terminal. Some programs are designed to be preparatory to further study. The Advanced Associate of Arts in Bi-Vocational Ministry is designed to prepare one to complete a BS in Education, Nursing, Business or Intercultural Studies. Even though all degree programs are designed to prepare persons for Christian ministry and therefore viewed as terminal, the degree programs may also serve as 58


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

a basis for graduate study. Many Ozark graduates have continued their education in graduate school. All academic programs are intended to develop spiritual maturity, intellectual understanding and vocational skill. The college reserves the right to change or revoke unilaterally any part of this catalog at any time without notice.

GENERAL REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION This entire catalog is prepared as a comprehensive statement of the requirements for attendance and graduation at Ozark Christian College. Students must meet all of the requirements covered in this catalog to qualify for graduation. The following list is intended as a summary only: 1. A student must first complete all requirements for full acceptance and admission to Ozark Christian College. 2. A student must satisfy the academic requirements of the chosen degree, associate degree or certificate as listed in the Ozark Christian College Catalog. 3. A student may graduate under the requirements listed in the catalog in effect at the time of initial enrollment. If one does not graduate within one year after the normal time frame for the degree, associate degree or certificate one must meet the graduation requirements published in the first year of the time frame when one does graduate. The student’s advisor and the Academic Dean must both approve any substitutions or waiver of requirements. 4. No distance learning work outside of the OCC system is to be taken during the spring semester of the year of graduation unless approved by the Academic Dean and only if the student’s cumulative GPA is at least 2.5. 5. Students must have a passing grade in all required courses and in acceptable electives in order to be a candidate for graduation. An F grade is not acceptable in any course counted toward graduation requirements. A 2.00 cumulative grade point average must be maintained after 90 hours. 6. The candidate must make satisfactory arrangements with the executive director of campus operations for all financial obligations with the college. No diplomas will be awarded nor transcripts released for students owing money to the college.

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7. Maintain to the satisfaction of the administration and faculty a high level of biblical, moral and spiritual integrity. After the deadline for application for graduation the faculty will review the names of the candidates. If the faculty decides that a person has serious character deficiencies, they may direct counseling or even deny the application for graduation. 8. Candidates for graduation will have been involved in documented Christian service. Christian service is recorded as a pass/fail grade on the college transcript. 9. Application for graduation must be made to the registrar by November 1 prior to the semester of anticipated graduation. Students who apply after November 1, but by February 1, will be charged a $20 late application fee. No one may apply for graduation after February 1. 10. Attend the baccalaureate and commencement programs unless prior notification is given to the Registrar or the alumni administrative assistant. 11. No student will be permitted to participate in graduation ceremonies nor will the academic diploma be granted prior to the completion of all work applied thereto. 12. All degree graduates [except Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry (Psychology and Counseling Specialization) and Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Ministry] will be required to have an internship or directed field experience of at least 2 hours of credit. (How the internship hours are recorded is evident in degree checksheets). 13. At least 32 hours must be taken from Ozark Christian College for bachelor degree graduates unless approved by the Academic Dean.

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DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

BACHELOR DEGREES Bachelor of Theology The Bachelor of Theology degree involves a five-year program designed to prepare the student to serve the church in a specialized leadership capacity. A major can be earned. Two years of Greek are required. OBJECTIVES In addition to the five objectives of the BA in Christian Ministry degree on pages 69-70 the student who successfully completes this degree should be able to: 1. Read and translate NT Greek. 2. Write and defend a theological paper. 3. Demonstrate a competency in a chosen major through an acceptable integrated project.

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BASIC REQUIREMENTS for BTh

All students working for the Bachelor of Theology degree are required to complete the studies listed below. Biblical Studies Old Testament (12) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 OT Poetry Elective OT Prophets Elective New Testament (22) Acts Hebrews Life of Christ Romans Timothy and Titus General Bible (11) Critical Background Elective Issues in Biblical Interpretation OT Introduction Doctrine (15) Biblical Seminars Christ and the Bible Christian Life Spiritual Formation Retreat Theological Integration/Ministry Worship

60

General Studies Apologetics Church History College Life and Orientation Creation and Science Greek Language Lifetime Wellness Philosophy or Logic Principles of Interpretation Psychology Restoration History Speech

50 4 4 1 2 14 1 3 3 3 3 3

62

8 2 2 4 3 8 4 3 4 3 4 4 3 2 2 2 2

Strategies for Teaching World Geography, or Bible Lands and Lifeways, or History Elective Writing and Research

3 3 3

Professional Studies Christian Service Foundations for Missions Foundations of Christian Education Leadership in Ministry Pastoral Counseling Personal Evangelism Men: Preaching (8) Expository Preaching Homiletics Practical Ministry for Men Women: Teaching (8) Biblical Communication for Women Expository Teaching Practical Ministry for Women

20 0 3 2 2 2 3 8

Major Field

30

Totals Biblical Studies General Studies Professional Studies Major Field Total Required

60 50 20 30 160

Note: At the beginning of the third year the student must declare a major and commence courses required in the major field.


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for BTh FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Foundations for Christian Education Christ and the Bible Christian Life SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester Christian Service Life of Christ1 Principles of Interpretation Greek 1 (A) Psychology Lifetime Wellness Major Course JUNIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Greek 2 (A) Hebrews Church History Philosophy or Logic Men-Expository Preaching or Women-Expository Teaching MIDDLER YEAR First Semester Christian Service OT Prophets Elective3 Critical Background Elective4 Pastoral Counseling Major Courses

0 1 4 4 2 3 2 16

0 4 3 4 3 1 1 16

0 3 3 4 3 3 16

0 2 4 2 8 16

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Personal Evangelism Foundations for Missions Speech Writing and Research

0 4 3 3 3 3 16

Second Semester Christian Service Life of Christ1 Issues in Biblical Interpretation Greek 1(B) Men-Homiletics or Biblical Communication for Women Worship

2 16

Second Semester Christian Service Greek 2 (B) OT Poetry Elective2 Strategies for Teaching Timothy and Titus Apologetics Major Course

0 3 2 3 3 4 1 16

0 4 3 4 3

Second Semester Christian Service Restoration History Creation and Science World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways or History Elective5 Major Courses

0 3 2 3 8 16

(continued on next page)

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(continued) SENIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Romans Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women Leadership in Ministry Biblical Seminar Major Courses

0 4 2 2 2 6 16

Second Semester Christian Service Spiritual Formation Retreat OT Introduction Theological Integration/Ministry Biblical Seminar Major Courses

0 2 4 2 2 6 16

1. A 4-hour Gospel study may be elected for one semester of Life of Christ. 2. Acceptable OT Poetry Electives: Psalms, Proverbs/Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs, or Job and Lamentations. 3. Acceptable OT Prophets Electives: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Daniel and Ezekiel, Minor Prophets or Messianic Prophecy. 4. Acceptable Critical Background Electives: NT Introduction, Introduction to Biblical Archaeology, Introduction to the Gospels. 5. Acceptable History Electives: US History, 1492-1877, History of Western Civilization or History of Christian Worship.

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DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

REQUIREMENTS for BTh Majors

In order to receive the Bachelor of Theology degree, each student must choose one of the major fields below and complete all requirements. In the event any required subject duplicates one taken to fulfill basic Bachelor of Theology requirements, such course is not to be repeated, but the same number of hours must be chosen from recommended electives in that same major field. NON SPECIALIZED 30 hours Non-Specialized Internship or Field Experience (IN, FE) Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) General Electives

OLD TESTAMENT 30 hours 2 8 4 16

NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

NEW TESTAMENT 30 hours Non-Specialized Internship or Field Experience (IN, FE) Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Major Electives (To be guided by department chair and/or academic advisor

2 8 4 16

NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

Non-Specialized Internship or Field Experience (IN, FE) Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Major Electives (To be guided by department chair and/or academic advisor

2 8 4 16

NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

PREACHING MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in preaching and church leadership. Preaching Ministry Internship or Preaching Ministry Field Experience (IN, FE) 2 Theological Electives 8 (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives 4 (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Advanced Biblical Communication 3 Preaching Seminar Electives: 4 (see list in Preaching Specialization in BA) Major Electives 9 (see list in Preaching Specialization in BA) NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

STUDENT MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in leadership of junior high through college youth..

CHILDREN’S MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in leadership of and education of K-6th grade children.

Youth Ministry Internship or Youth Ministry Field Experience (IN, FE) Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Foundations for Youth Ministry or Youth Ministry Dynamics Practical Youth Ministry Counseling Youth Major Electives: See list in Student Ministry Specialization in BA

Children’s Ministry Internship or Children’s Ministry Field Experience (IN, FE) 2 Theological Electives 8 (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives 4 (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Children’s Ministry 3 Teaching the Developing Student 4 Educational Psychology 2 Curriculum Planning 2 Major Electives: 5 See List in Children’s Ministry Specialization in BA

2 8 4 3 2 2 9

NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

FAMILY MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in leadership of and support of families.

CHILD CARE ADMINISTRATION 32 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in developing and administrating a state-licensed Child Care program.

Family Ministry Internship or Family Ministry Field Experience (IN, FE) Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Family Ministry Teaching the Developing Student Educational Psychology Principles of Family Living Major Electives See List in Family Ministry Specialization in BA

Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Child Care Administration Teaching the Developing Student Educational Psychology Early Childhood Curriculum Child Care Field Experience Major Electives: See List in Child Care Adm. Specialization in BA

2 8 4 3 4 2 2 5

NOTE: Internship is limited to 6 hours. For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives.

66

8 4 3 4 2 4 2 3

NOTE: No internship required. The field experience in this msjor is two hours of work at a Child Care Facility. Leadership in Ministry is not required for this major.


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

BIBLICAL COMMUNICATION FOR WOMEN 30 hours This specialization prepares women for ministry in communication of God’s Word within the ministries of the church. Biblical Communication for Women Internship or Biblical Comm. for Women Field Experience (IN, FE) Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Women’s Ministry Ministering to Women in Crisis or substituted counseling elective Advanced Biblical Communication Seminar Electives: See List in Biblical Comm./ Women Specialization in BA Major Electives: See List in Preaching Specialization in BA

ADULT DISCIPLESHIP MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in leadership of and education of young adults through seniors.

3 2

Adult Discipleship Ministry Internship or Adult Discipleship Ministry Field Experience (IN, FE) Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Adult Ministry Teaching the Developing Student Educational Psychology Major Electives: See List in Adult Discipleship Ministry Specialization in BA

6

NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

2 8 4 3 2

NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

2 8 4 3 4 2 7

TESOL MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in teaching English to Speakers of other languages. Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Introduction to Linguistics Theories/Principles/Eng. Lang. Teaching Methods/Materials for Eng. Lang. Teach. Anthropology Phonetics TESOL - Practicum General Elective

8 4 3 3 3 3 2 3 1

NOTE: No internship required. Practicum is limited to 3 hours. The TESOL certification program may be elected without being located in the BTH degree.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

CHURCH PLANTING MINISTRY 32 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in new church planting.

INTERCULTURAL STUDIES 30 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in a cross-cultural ministry.

Church Planting Internship Additional Church Planting Internship Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Foundations for Church Planting Strategies/Church Health/Growth Leadership/Team Building/People Dev. Church Planting Assessment Funding Your Vision and Ministry Major Electives: See List in Church Planting Ministry Specialization in BA

Missions Internship Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) World Religions Anthropology Missions Ministry in the Church Preparation for Cross-Cultural Ministry Principles of Mission Life Principles of Mission Work Major Electives: See List in Double Major in BA

2 2 8 4 3 2 2 2 1 6

NOTE: Internship is limited to 6 hours. Additional 2 hours of internship hours come from the Professional Electives. Leadership in Ministry is not required for this major.

CAMPUS MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students for ministry in campus ministry. Campus Ministry Internship Additional Campus Ministry Internship Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Campus Ministry Additional Critical Background Elective Major Electives: See List in Campus Ministry Specialization in BA NOTE: Internship is limited to 4 hours.

2 2 8 4 3 4 7

4 3 3 2 2 2 2 2

NOTE: For additional hours of internship–Next 4 hours come from the Professional Electives; final 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/ Women.

PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELING MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students for a counseling ministry in the local church with the possibility of pursuing graduate study to become a licensed counselor. Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Abnormal Psychology Developmental Psychology Introduction to Counseling Major Electives: See List in Psych. and Counseling Ministry Specialization in BA NOTE: No internship is required.

68

2 8

8 4 3 3 3 9


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

ADMINISTRATIVE MINISTRY 30 hours This specialization prepares students who have giftedness and desire to serve in administrative capacity within a local church or parachurch organization. Administrative Ministry Internship or Administrative Ministry Field Experience (IN, FE) Theological Electives (LA, OT, NT, DO, GB, or AP) Professional Electives (MN, PC, MI, MU, or CE) Professional Development Fundamentals/Admin. Finance Personal Finance Legal Issues in Ministry Program Development/Implementation Building Teams

2 8 4 3 3 2 2 3 3

NOTE: Internship is limited to 2 hours. Seminar in Business Leadership and Seminar in Ministry Leadership may be taken in place of Leadership in Ministry in the core.

Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry The Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry degree is a four-year program of study that equips students in a particular area for vocational leadership ministry. Its primary content is the study of the Bible, but a core of general studies and practical studies is also taken. A student can elect general preparation for ministry with electives if no specialization is chosen. A double major may be chosen in deaf ministry and intercultural studies. Objectives The student who successfully completes the Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry degree should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the Bible. 2. Demonstrate competencies in exegesis and communication skills in the production of sermons, lessons and papers. 3. Articulate a presentation of the gospel to lead someone to Christ.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

4. Express a Christian worldview that interfaces with contemporary cultural issues. 5. Demonstrate leadership and equipping skills for the church.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Biblical Studies Old Testament (12) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 OT Poetry Elective OT Prophets Elective New Testament (22) Acts Life of Christ Hebrews Timothy and Titus Romans Bible Exegesis Elective or Worship (2) General Bible (7) Issues in Biblical Interpretation Critical Background Elective Doctrine (9) Christian Life Christ and the Bible Spiritual Formation Retreat Theological Integration/Min.

52

General Studies Analytical Grammar English Composition 1 & 2 Speech Creation and Science Principles of Interpretation Psychology

46 4 6 3 2 3 3

8 2 2 4 8 3 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 2 2

Philosophy or Logic History Elective Church History Restoration History World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Apologetics Lifetime Wellness Strategies for Teaching College Life and Orientation Professional Studies Christian Service Personal Evangelism Foundations for Missions Foundations for Christian Education Homiletics (Men) or Biblical Communication for Women Leadership in Ministry1 Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women Specialization (includes internship) Totals Biblical Studies General Studies Professional Studies Total Required

1. This course is not required for Child Care Administration or Church Planting specializations.

70

3 3 4 3 3 4 1 3 1 33 0 3 3 2 3 2 2 18

52 46 33 131


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts English Composition 1 Christ and the Bible SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester Christian Service Life of Christ1 Principles of Interpretation Foundations for Christian Education Philosophy or Logic Analytical Grammar2 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service OT Prophets Elective3 OT Poetry Elective4 Creation and Science Apologetics Hebrews Strategies for Teaching Specialization

0 1 4 4 3 3 15

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Christian Life English Composition 2 Speech 1 Personal Evangelism Lifetime Wellness

0 4 3 2 3 4 16

Second Semester Christian Service Life of Christ1 Issues in Biblical Interpretation Foundations for Missions Men: Homiletics or Women: Biblical Comm/Women Psychology

0 2 2 2 4 3 3 2 18

0 4 2 3 3 3 1 16

0 4 3 3 3 3 16

Second Semester Christian Service Timothy and Titus World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Church History Bible Exegesis Elective5 or Worship (unless required in specialization) Spiritual Formation Retreat Specialization

0 3 3 4 2

2 3 17

71


2011-2013 CATALOG SENIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Romans Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women History Elective6 Leadership in Ministry7 Specialization

0 4 2 3 2 6 17

Second Semester Christian Service Restoration History Critical Background Elective8 Theological Integration/Min. Specialization

0 3 4 2 7 16

1. A 4-hour Gospel study may be elected for one semester of Life of Christ. 2. Students who have an ACT composite score of at least 19 have the option of taking two semesters of NT Greek for the Analytical Grammar requirement. 3. Acceptable OT Prophets Electives: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Daniel and Ezekiel, Minor Prophets or Messianic Prophecy. 4. Acceptable OT Poetry Electives: Psalms, Proverbs/Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs, or Job and Lamentations. 5. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO. 6. Acceptable History Electives: US History 1492 to 1877, History of Western Civilization or History of Christian Worship. 7. Not required for the following specializations: Child Care Administration and Church Planting. 8. Acceptable Critical Background Electives: OT Introduction, NT Introduction, Introduction to Biblical Archaeology or Introduction to the Gospels.

72


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

SPECIALIZATIONS

When students have more than one specialization, they must meet the core required in each specialization and take at least nine additional hours in the second area of specialization. NON-SPECIALIZED 18 hours Non-Specialized Internship or Field Experience Electives Worship Pastoral Counseling Expository Preaching or Teaching

2 9 2 2 3

NOTE: Additional internship hours come from the Electives. Greek 1 (A & B) may be added by eliminating Analytical Grammar (4), English Composition 2 (3), and Electives (1).

PREACHING MINISTRY 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in preaching and church leadership.) Expository Preaching Advanced Biblical Communication Worship Pastoral Counseling Preaching Ministry Internship or Preaching Ministry Field Experience Preaching Seminar Electives (1 hr each) Preaching to Youth Audience Analysis Inductive Preaching Preaching and Self-Disclosure Preaching and Storytelling Practical Issues in Preaching Preaching and Humor Preaching and the New Church

3 3 2 2 2 2

Preaching and Leadership Preaching and Creativity Funding Your Vision and Ministry Multi-Ethnic Ministry Church Planting/Western Heritage Festival of Young Preachers

Electives Foundations for Church Planting Building Teams Exegeting the City Small Group Leadership Ministry through Small Groups Legal Issues in Ministry Creative Writing Ministry to the Disabled Ministry Leadership Suicide Intervention Ministering to the Grieving Ministry in the Funeral Global Poverty/Biblical Justice Multi-Ethnic Ministry Spiritual Discipline of Reading OT Prophets Elective Counseling Elective (limit of 2 hours)

4

NOTE: Additional internship hours come from the Preaching Seminars and Electives. Greek 1 (A & B) may be added by eliminating Analytical Grammar (4), English Composition 2 (3) and Preaching Seminars (1). Greek 2 (A & B) may be added by eliminating the Electives (4) and Bible Exegesis Elective (2 hours). If the Greek 1 track is chosen, the internship is limited to two hours of internship.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

STUDENT MINISTRY 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in leadership of junior high through college youth.) Foundations for Youth Ministry or Youth Ministry Dynamics Practical Youth Ministry Counseling Youth Expository Preaching or Expository Teaching Youth Ministry Internship or Youth Ministry Field Experience Electives: Seminar in Youth Ministry (Could be taken twice for credit) Pastoral Counseling Pre-Marital Counseling Crisis Counseling Healthy Relationships Principles of Family Living

3 2 2 3 2 6

Exegeting the City Children’s Ministry Ministry through Small Groups Advanced Biblical Communication Preaching to Youth Ministry to the Disabled Poverty 101 Suicide Intervention Children and Worship Leading a Child to Christ Prepare and Enrich Ministering to the Grieving Current Trends in Children’s Ministry Creative Writing Global Poverty and Biblical Justice Multi-Ethnic Ministry Schooling Alternatives Parenting Skills Special Programming/Children’s Ministry Ministering to Children in Crisis Small Group Leadership

NOTES: Additional internship hours come from Electives. Greek 1 (A & B) may be added by eliminating Analytical Grammar (4), English Composition 2 (3), and elective (1). Greek 2 (A & B) are not an option for this specialization. If the Greek 1 track is chosen, the internship is limited to 2 hours.

74


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

FAMILY MINISTRY 16 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in leadership of and support of families.)

CHILDREN’S MINISTRY 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in leadership of and education of K-6th grade children.)

Family Ministry Teaching the Developing Student Educational Psychology Expository Preaching or Expository Teaching Family Ministry Internship or Family Ministry Field Experience Electives Introduction to Counseling Pastoral Counseling Crisis Counseling Counseling Youth Pre-Marital Counseling Healthy Relationships Seminar in Parenting Skills Marriage and Family Life Ministry through Small Groups Systems in Family/ Congregational Life Prepare and Enrich Leading a Child to Christ Ministry Leadership Suicide Intervention Ministry to the Disabled Ministry in the Funeral Ministering to the Grieving Current Practices in CE Multi-Ethnic Ministry Spiritual Discipline of Reading C.S. Lewis Legacy Becoming a Compelling Leader Small Group Leadership

Children’s Ministry Teaching the Developing Student Educational Psychology Curriculum Planning Children’s Ministry Internship or Children’s Ministry Field Experience Electives Healthy Relationships Special Programming for Children’s Ministry Small Groups for Children Ministry to Children in Crisis Current Trends in Children’s Ministry Seminar in Children’s Ministry Children and Worship Principles of Family Living Ministry to the Disabled Preaching to Youth Suicide Intervention Leading a Child to Christ Music for Children Current Practices in CE Preaching and Storytelling C.S. Lewis Legacy Parenting Skills Small Group Leadership

3 4 2 3 2 2

3 4 2 2 2 5

NOTE: Additional internship hours come from Curriculum Planning and Electives.

NOTE: Internship is limited to 6 hours. Additional internship hours come from Electives and Expository Preaching or Expository Teaching.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

CHILD CARE ADMINISTRATION MINISTRY 20 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in developing and administering a state-licensed Child Care program. Leadership in Ministry is not required in this specialization.) Child Care Administration Teaching the Developing Student Educational Psychology Early Childhood Curriculum Child Care Field Experience Electives Exceptional Child Music for Children Healthy Relationships Small Groups for Children Ministry to Children in Crisis Nursing Basics Children’s Literature Principles of Family Living Parenting Skills Children and Worship Ministry to the Disabled CE and the Sunday School Current Practices in CE Schooling Alternatives Special Programming for Children’s Ministry Small Group Leadership

3 4 2 4 2 5

NOTES: No internship required. The field experience in this specialization is two hours at a Child Care Facility.

BIBLICAL COMMUNICATION FOR WOMEN 18 hours (This specialization would prepare women for ministry in communication of God’s Word within the ministries of the church). Women’s Ministry Expository Preaching or Expository Teaching Ministering to Women in Crisis or substituted counseling elective Advanced Biblical Communication Biblical Communication for Women Internship or Biblical Comm. for Women Field Experience Seminar Electives Preaching to Youth Audience Analysis Inductive Preaching Preaching and Self-Disclosure Preaching and Storytelling Practical Issues in Preaching Preaching and Humor Preaching and the New Church Preaching and Leadership Preaching and Creativity Funding Your Vision and Ministry Multi-Ethnic Ministry Church Planting/Western Heritage Festival of Young Preachers Electives Women in Missions Preparation for Cross-Cultural Ministry Parenting Skills Family Ministry Ministry to Older Adults Ministry Through Small Groups Suicide Intervention Ministering to the Grieving Exegeting the City Small Group Leadership Counseling Elective (Limit of 2 hours)

3 3 2 3

2 2

3

NOTE: Additional internship hours come from the seminars and electives, although there would be a one-hour difference.

76


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

ADULT DISCIPLESHIP MINISTRY 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in leadership of and education of young adults through seniors.) Adult Ministry Teaching the Developing Student Educational Psychology Expository Preaching or Expository Teaching Adult Discipleship Ministry Internship or Adult Discipleship Ministry Field Experience Electives Christian Education and the Sunday School Introduction to Counseling Crisis Counseling Pastoral Counseling Family Ministry Women’s Ministry Healthy Relationships Ministry to Older Adults Ministry though Small Groups Funding Your Vision and Ministry Ministry Leadership Suicide Intervention Prepare and Enrich Ministry to the Disabled Ministry in the Funeral Ministering to the Grieving Current Practices in CE Global Poverty and Biblical Justice Schooling Alternatives Becoming a Compelling Leader Small Group Leadership

3 4 2 3

2 4

TESOL MINISTRY 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in teaching English to speakers of other languages. Leadership in Ministry would not be required in this specialization.) Introduction to Linguistics Theories and Principles of English Lang. Teaching Methods and Materials of English Lang. Teaching Anthropology Phonetics TESOL Practicum General Elective

3 3 3 3 2 3 1

NOTES: No internship required. Practicum is limited to 3 hours. The TESOL certification program may be elected without being located in the BA degree.

NOTE: This internship would be limited to six hours. Additional internship hours come from the electives.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

CHURCH PLANTING MINISTRY 20 hours This specialization would prepare students for ministry in new church planting.)

CAMPUS MINISTRY 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in campus ministry.)

Foundations for Church Planting Strategies for Church Health and Growth Leadership, Team Building and People Development Expository Preaching or Expository Teaching Church Planting Assessment Funding Your Vision and Ministry Church Planting Internship Additional Church Planting Internship Electives Exegeting the City Worship Pastoral Counseling Ministry through Small Groups Church Planting/Western Heritage Multi-Ethnic Ministry Suicide Intervention Ministering to the Grieving Ministry to the Disabled Becoming a Compelling Leader Poverty 101 Prepare and Enrich Ministry Leadership Small Group Leadership Global Poverty and Biblical Justice Any MI course Preaching Seminar Church Planting Seminar

Campus Ministry Expository Preaching or Expository Teaching Additional Critical Background Elective Campus Ministry Internship Additional Campus Ministry Internship Electives Ethics World Religions Introduction to Counseling Crisis Counseling Pastoral Counseling Principles of Family Living Healthy Relationships Pre-Marital Counseling International Campus Ministry Western Culture, Postmodernism and Missions Cults Christianity and Culture (readings) Funding Your Vision and Ministry Ministry through Small Groups Advanced Biblical Communication Ministry to the Disabled Suicide Intervention Ministry Leadership Poverty 101 Global Poverty/Biblical Justice Multi-Ethnic Ministry Spiritual Discipline of Reading C.S. Lewis Legacy Prepare and Enrich Small Group Leadership

3 2 2 3 2 1 2 2 3

NOTE: Internship is limited to six hours. Additional internship hours come from the electives. Leadership in Ministry is not required for this specialization.

3 3 4 2 2 4

NOTES: Internship is limited to four hours. Greek 1 (A & B) may be added by eliminating Analytical Grammar (4), English Composition II (3), Elective (1). Greek 2 (A & B) are not an option for this specialization. If the Greek 1 track is chosen, the internship is limited to 2 hours.

78


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

CROSS-CULTURAL MINISTRY 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students for ministry in a domestically based, cross-cultural ministry.) World Religions Anthropology Missions Ministry in the Church Preparation for Cross-Cultural Ministry Principles of Mission Life Principles of Mission Work Missions Internship Electives Exegeting the City Healthy Relationships Funding Your Vision and Ministry Poverty 101 Global Poverty/Biblical Justice Multi-Ethnic Ministry Small Group Leadership MI Course Church Planting Course

3 3 2 2 2 2 2 2

NOTE: Additional internship hours come from electives. Internship must include a cross-cultural experience.

PSYCHOLOGY AND COUNSELING 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students for a counseling ministry in the local church with the possibility of pursuing graduate study to become a licensed counselor.) Abnormal Psychology Developmental Psychology Introduction to Counseling Electives Crisis Counseling Pastoral Counseling Counseling Youth Premarital Counseling Educational Psychology Parenting Skills Ministering to Women in Crisis Ministering to the Grieving Principles of Family Living Marriage and Family Life People Helping Skills Healthy Relationships Systems in Family and Congregational Life Seminar in Christian Counseling (AACC) Suicide Intervention Prepare and Enrich Strategic Lay Counseling Ministry to the Disabled Ministering to Children in Crisis Small Group Leadership NOTE: No internship is required.

79

3 3 3 9


2011-2013 CATALOG

ADMINISTRATIVE MINISTRY 18 hours (This specialization would prepare students to serve in an administrative capacity within a local church or parachurch organization.) Professional Development Fundamentals of Administrative Finance Personal Finance Legal Issues in Ministry Program Development and Implementation Building Teams Administrative Ministry Internship or Administrative Ministry Field Experience

3 3 2 2 3 3 2

NOTE: Internship is limited to 2 hours. Seminar in Business Leadership and Seminar in Ministry Leadership may be taken in place of Leadership in Ministry in the core.

80


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Double Major – Bible and Deaf Ministry

In addition to the objectives listed for the BA in Christian Ministry, the student who successfully completes this program of study should demonstrate biblical leadership in deaf ministry. Biblical Studies Old Testament (12) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 OT Poetry Elective OT Prophets Elective New Testament (22) Acts Life of Christ Hebrews Timothy and Titus Romans Bible Exegesis Elective or Worship (2) General Bible (7) Issues in Biblical Interpretation Critical Background Elective Doctrine (9) Christian Life Christ and the Bible Spiritual Formation Retreat Theological Integration for Ministry

52

General Studies Analytical Grammar Writing and Research Speech Principles of Interpretation Psychology History Elective Church History Restoration History World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Creation and Science Apologetics Strategies for Teaching

40 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3

8 2 2 4 8 3 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 2 2

2 4 3

Lifetime Wellness College Life and Orientation

1 1

Deaf Studies Deaf Communications 1 Deaf Communications 2 Deaf Communications 3 Deaf Communications 4 Deaf Electives: Seminar/Introduction to Interpreting Seminar/Interpreting Scripture and Worship Songs Voice Interpreting Introduction to Linguistics Seminar/Deaf Ministry Specialized Signing Deaf Missions Extension Deaf Ministry Internship

32 3 3 2 2 4

Professional Studies Personal Evangelism Foundations for Missions Foundations for Christian Education Homiletics (men) or Biblical Communication for Women Leadership in Ministry Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women Total Biblical Studies General Studies Deaf Studies Professional Studies Total Required

15 3 3 2 3

16 2

2 2

52 40 32 15 139

81


2011-2013 CATALOG

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Double Major – Bible and Deaf Ministry FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Foundations for Christian Education Deaf Communications Christian Life Lifetime Wellness SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester Christian Service Life of Christ2 Principles of Interpretation Analytical Grammar3 Men-Homiletics or Women-Biblical Communication for Women Deaf Communications 3 Deaf Elective1 JUNIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Leadership in Ministry OT Poetry Elective5 Creation and Science Apologetics World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Strategies for Teaching

82

0 1 4 4 2 1 2 1 17

0 4 3 4 3

2 1 17

0 2 2 2 4 3 3 16

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Personal Evangelism Writing and Research Deaf Communications 2 Christ and the Bible Deaf Elective1

0 4 3 3 3 3 1 17

Second Semester Christian Service Life of Christ2 Issues in Biblical Interpretation Hebrews Speech Foundations for Missions History Elective4

0 4 3 3 3 3 3 19

Second Semester Christian Service Deaf Missions Extension6

0 16 16


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

SENIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Romans Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women Church History OT Prophets Elective7 Deaf Ministry Internship8 Deaf Communications 4 Deaf Elective1

0 4 2 4 2 2 2 2 18

Second Semester Christian Service Spiritual Formation Retreat Restoration History Timothy and Titus Psychology Bible Exegesis Elective9 or Worship Critical Background Elective10 Theological Integration for Ministry

0 2 3 3 3 2 4 2 19

1. Acceptable Deaf Electives: Seminar in Introduction to Interpretation, Seminar in Interpreting Scripture and Worship Songs, Voice Interpreting, Introduction to Linguistics, Seminar in Deaf Ministry, Specialized Signing. 2. A 4-hour Gospel study may be selected for one semester of Life of Christ. 3. Students who have an ACT composite score of at least 19 have the option of taking two semesters of NT Greek for the Analytical Grammar requirement. 4. Acceptable History Electives: US History 1492 to 1877, History of Western Civilization or History of Christian Worship. 5. Acceptable OT Poetry Electives: Psalms, Proverbs/Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs or Job and Lamentations. 6. A one-semester program conducted at the facilities of Deaf Missions in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The program includes classroom lectures on various phases of teaching the deaf, visitation and observation of classes at Iowa State School for the Deaf, lesson preparation, practice teaching, preparation of visuals and writing for the deaf. 7. Acceptable OT Prophets Electives: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Daniel and Ezekiel, Minor Prophets or Messianic Prophecy. 8. This degree is limited to 4 hours of internship. First 2 hours designated. Next 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/Women. 9. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO. 10. Acceptable Critical Background Electives: OT Introduction, NT Introduction, Introduction to Biblical Archaeology or Introduction to the Gospels.

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2011-2013 CATALOG

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Double Major – Bible and Intercultural Studies

In addition to the objectives listed for the BA in Christian Ministry, the student who successfully completes this program of study should demonstrate biblical leadership in a cross-cultural setting. Biblical Studies Old Testament (12) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 OT Poetry Elective OT Prophets Elective New Testament (22) Acts Life of Christ Hebrews Timothy and Titus Romans Bible Exegesis Elective or Worship (2) General Bible (7) Issues in Biblical Interpretation Critical Background Elective Doctrine (9) Christian Life Christ and the Bible Spiritual Formation Retreat Theological Integration for Ministry

52

General Studies Analytical Grammar Writing and Research Speech Principles of Interpretation Psychology History Elective Church History Restoration History World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Creation and Science Apologetics Counseling Elective

42 4 3 3 3 3 3 4 3 3

84

8 2 2 4 8 3 3 4 2 3 4 2 3 2 2

2 4 2

Strategies for Teaching Lifetime Wellness College Life and Orientation

3 1 1

Professional Studies Christian Service Personal Evangelism Foundations for Christian Education Men: Homiletics or Women: Biblical Communication for Women Leadership in Ministry Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women

12 0 3 2 3

Intercultural Studies Missions (19) Foundations for Missions Historical Perspectives in Missions Anthropology World Religions Preparation for CC Ministry Principles of Mission Life Missions Ministry in the Church Internship* Electives (14)** Missions Technology Missions in Restoration Movement Missions Area Study Women in Missions Physical and Spiritual Health for Missionaries Cross-Cultural Strategy Dev. Cross-Cultural Youth Ministry Healthy Relationships

33

2 2

3 2 3 3 2 2 2 2


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

Phonetics Introduction to Buddhism Introduction to Hinduism Introduction to Islam International Campus Ministry Nursing Basics Totals Biblical Studies General Studies Professional Studies Intercultural Studies Total Required

Urban Ministry Foundations for Church Planting Missionary Re-entry Crucial Issues in Missions (Urbana) Language Courses (Max of 5 hrs)– Other language study may be substituted with prior approval Spanish 1 Spanish 2 Theories/Principles of Eng. Lang. Methods/Materials for Eng. Lang. Introduction to Linguistics

52 42 12 33 139

*Up to 8 hours of internship may be earned i n this degree (see degree checksheet). **Other Missions electives could be substituted.

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Bachelor of Arts in Christian Ministry Double Major – Bible and Intercultural Studies FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Foundations for Christian Education Christ and the Bible Christian Life Lifetime Wellness SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester Christian Service Life of Christ2 Principles of Interpretation World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Analytical Grammar3 Missions Ministry in the Church Missions Elective1

0 1 4 4 2 3 2 1 17

0 4 3 3 4 2 2 18

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Personal Evangelism Writing and Research Speech Foundations for Missions Missions Elective1

0 4 3 3 3 3 2 18

Second Semester Christian Service Life of Christ2 Issues in Biblical Interpretation Men-Homiletics or Women-Biblical Communication for Women Psychology Anthropology Missions Elective1

0 4 3 3

3 3 2 18 85


2011-2013 CATALOG

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Leadership in Ministry OT Poetry Elective4 Apologetics Hebrews Creation and Science Missions Elective1 SENIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Romans Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women OT Prophets Elective6 History Elective7 Principles of Mission Life Missions Elective1

0 2 2 4 3 2 4 17

0 4 2 2 3 2 4 17

Second Semester Christian Service Timothy and Titus Church History Strategies for Teaching Historical Perspectives in Missions Preparation for CC Ministry Bible Exegesis Elective5 or Worship

0 3 4 3 2 2 2 16

Second Semester Christian Service Spiritual Formation Retreat Restoration History Critical Background Elective8 Counseling Elective9 World Religions Theological Integration for Ministry Missions Internship10

0 2 3 4 2 3 2 2 18

1. Acceptable Missions Electives: Any MI course not required somewhere else in the degree, Healthy Relationships, Exegeting the City, Foundations for Church Planting, Theories and Principles of English Language, Methods and Materials of English Language, Phonetics, Nursing Basics and language courses. 2. A 4-hour Gospel study may be elected for one semester of Life of Christ. 3. BA students achieving an acceptable score on the English Proficiency Exam may substitute one year of Greek (8 hrs.) instead of Analytical Grammar. 4. Acceptable OT Poetry Electives: Psalms, Proverbs/Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs or Job and Lamentations. 5. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO. 6. Acceptable OT Prophets Electives: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Daniel and Ezekiel, Minor Prophets or Messianic Prophecy. 7. Acceptable History Electives: US History 1492 to 1877, History of Western Civilization or History of Christian Worship. 8. Acceptable Critical Background Electives: OT Introduction, NT Introduction, Introduction to Biblical Archaeology or Introduction to the Gospels. 9. Acceptable Counseling Electives: Pastoral Counseling, Principles of Family Living, Counseling Youth, Crisis Counseling, Intro to Counseling, Pre-Marital Counseling, Healthy Relationships, Seminar in Marriage and Family, Ministering to Women in Crisis, Systems in Family and Congregational Life or Seminar in Parenting Skills. 10. First 2 hours designated. Next 2-4 hours come from Missions Electives. Last 2 hours come from Practical Ministry for Men/Women.

86


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

Bachelor of Music Ministry The purpose of the music program at Ozark Christian College is to provide every student with the opportunity to see the value of music in the life of the Christian and the church. It allows for involvement in many organized music experiences. The Bachelor of Music Ministry degree is designed for the student who demonstrates an aptitude for advanced musical study and desires to serve in full or part-time music ministry (including worship, adult and graded choirs, pageants, private instruction, handbells, etc.) in the local church. OBJECTIVES In addition to the objectives listed for the BA in Christian Ministry, the student who successfully completes this program of study should be able to: 1. Demonstrate competence in the following areas: leading an effective and balanced music program in the church and growing in the skills of music and worship. 2. Articulate the value and role of music as art and ministry. GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 1. Entrance Audition. The music faculty must audition all prospective music majors before the student begins his/her degree program. All candidates are on probationary status from one to four semesters or are accepted as full candidates for the degree. 2. Entrance Interview. The music faculty must interview all music majors during their first semester. This interview will assess the student’s goals. 3. Music Theory Placement Test. This test is required of all prospective music majors. Failure to pass will result in enrollment in Basics of Music Theory as a prerequisite to Music Theory I. 4. Piano Proficiency Exam. Students with little or no piano background may enroll in Piano Proficiency Class to achieve required proficiency levels. 5. Voice Proficiency Exam. Students must pass this exam with a keyboard concentration at the end of four semesters in the program. 6. Large Ensemble Participation. Every BMM student must participate in six semesters of choir. 7. Recitals. All BMM students are required to participate in a recital each semester they are enrolled in private lessons. 8. Recital Attendance. All BMM students are required to enroll in Recital Attendance each semester of primary applied lessons. Grading is pass/fail. 87


2011-2013 CATALOG

9. Juries. All BMM students are required to perform before the music faculty at the end of each semester of primary applied lessons. 10. Faculty Review. After completion of four semesters towards the BMM degree, each student will meet with the music faculty in a program review. The music faculty reserves the right to recommend a change of major or concentration at this time. 11. Senior Recital. Students choosing the Recital Track will present a full-length recital in their chosen concentration. It will be at least 50 minutes of music, consisting of senior-level literature. A preliminary recital must be passed two weeks prior to the recital date. 12. Senior Recital/Practicum. Students choosing this track may present a junior recital in their chosen concentration consisting of 20 minutes of music. The student will complete a senior level practicum chosen with the aid of his advisor and the music faculty. The emphasis may be in conducting, accompanying, electronic music, children’s music or other areas of interest and skills. 13. Music Ministry Internship or Field Experience. A semester internship will be granted 4 hours of credit.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Bachelor of Music Ministry Biblical Studies Old Testament (10) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 OT Psalms New Testament (22) Acts Life of Christ Hebrews Timothy and Titus Romans Bible Exegesis Elective (2) General Bible (3) Issues in Biblical Interpretation Doctrine (11) Christian Life Christ and the Bible Worship Spiritual Formation Retreat Theological Integration for Ministry

88

48 8 2 4 8 3 3 4 2 3 2 3 2 2 2

General Studies Analytical Grammar Writing and Research Speech Music History: Antiquity to Baroque Music History: Classical to Present Philosophy Principles of Interpretation Restoration History Apologetics Psychology Strategies for Teaching Lifetime Wellness Counseling Elective College Life and Orientation

37 4 3 3 2 2 3 3 3 4 3 3 1 2 1

Professional Studies Christian Service General (8)

63 0


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

Personal Evangelism Foundations for Missions Minister of Music Music (35) Music Theory 1-3 Music Skills 1-3 Choral Conducting 1 & 2 Music for Children Vocal and Inst Arranging Music in Worship Lit. Worship Team Leadership Electronic Music Handbells Choir Internship* Recital Attendance (8 semesters) Recital Track or Practicum Track (20) Recital Track Primary Applied Secondary Applied Pedagogy (in field of concentration)

3 3 2 8 3 4 2 2 2 2 2 2 6 2 0

10 4 2

Senior Recital Track Electives: Worship Technology Worship Accompanying Drama in Music and Education Pedagogy (other than in field of concentration) Applied Lesson Seminar in Music Ministry (NCMC) Practicum Track Primary Applied Secondary Applied Pedagogy (in field of concentration) Practicum Track Electives: (as above)

Totals Biblical Studies General Studies Professional Studies Total Required

0 4

8 4 2 2 4

48 37 63 148

*Up to 4 hours of internship can be earned with Music Coordinator’s approval.

89


2011-2013 CATALOG

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Bachelor of Music Ministry FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Writing and Research Choir Recital Attendance Primary Applied Secondary Applied Christian Life

0 1 4 4 3 1 0 1 1 2 17

SOHOMORE YEAR First Semester Christian Service Life of Christ1 Music Theory 2 Music Skills 2 Worship Electronic Music Handbells Recital Attendance Primary Applied Secondary Applied

0 4 3 1 2 2 1 0 1 1 15

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Analytical Grammar2 Principles of Interpretation Choral Conducting 1 Music History: Antiquity to Baroque Vocal and Instrumental Arranging Recital Attendance Primary Applied Choir Lifetime Wellness

0 4 3 2 2 2 0 1 1 1 16

90

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Personal Evangelism Music Theory 1 Music Skills 1 Choir Recital Attendance Primary Applied Secondary Applied Christ and the Bible

0 4 3 3 1 1 0 1 1 3 17

Second Semester Christian Service Life of Christ1 Hebrews Music Theory 3 Music Skills 3 Speech Worship Team Leadership Handbells Recital Attendance Primary Applied Secondary Applied

0 4 3 2 1 3 2 1 0 1 1 18

Second Semester Christian Service Philosophy Issues in Biblical Interpretation Psalms Choral Conducting 2 Music History: Classical to Present Music in Worship Lit Primary Applied Choir

0 3 3 2 2 2 2 1 1 16


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

MIDDLER YEAR First Semester Christian Service Timothy and Titus Apologetics Minister of Music Choir Primary Applied Psychology Track Electives3 Recital Attendance

0 3 4 2 1 1 3 2 0 16

SENIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Restoration History Strategies for Teaching Music for Children Theological Integration for Ministry Bible Exegesis Elective4 Counseling Elective5 Senior Recital or Practicum

0 3 3 2 2 2 2 2 16

Second Semester Christian Service Romans Foundations for Missions Pedagogy Choir Primary Applied Recital Attendance Spiritual Formation Retreat Track Electives3

0 4 3 2 1 1 0 2 2 15

Second Semester Internship6

2

1. A 4-hour Gospel study may be elected for one semester of Life of Christ. 2. Students who have an ACT composite score of at least 19 have the option of taking two semesters of NT Greek for the Analytical Grammar requirement. 3. Acceptable Track Electives: Worship Technology, Worship Accompanying, Drama in Ministry and Education, Pedagogy (other than field of concentration), Private Lessons, Seminar in Music Ministry. 4. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO. 5. Acceptable Counseling Electives: Pastoral Counseling, Principles of Family Living, Counseling Youth, Crisis Counseling, Intro to Counseling, Pre-Marital Counseling, Healthy Relationships, Seminar in Marriage and Family, Ministering to Women in Crisis, Systems in Family and Congregational Life or Seminar in Parenting Skills. 6. Up to 4 hours of internship may be earned. First 2 hours designated. Next 2 hours must have department head approval.

91


2011-2013 CATALOG

Bachelor of Music and Worship This degree focuses primarily on preparing worship leaders for the church. It also provides training in additional areas of ministry in the total program of the church. OBJECTIVES In addition to the objectives listed for the BA in Christian Ministry, the student who successfully completes this program of study should be able to: 1. Articulate a biblical philosophy of worship that is biblical and sensitive to changing styles and valued traditions. 2. Demonstrate competence in planning and leading worship services, assisting in a broad range of ministry in the church, and giving evidence of adequate skill in a chosen instrument (voice, keyboard or guitar). GENERAL REQUIREMENTS 1. Entrance Audition. The music faculty must audition all prospective majors before the student begins his degree program. All candidates are on probationary status from one to four semesters or are accepted as full candidates for the degree. 2. Entrance Interview. The music faculty must interview all music majors during their first semester. This interview will assess the student’s goals. 3. Music Theory Placement Test. This test is required of all prospective music majors. Failure to pass will result in enrollment in Basics of Music Theory as a prerequisite to Music Theory I. 4. Piano Proficiency Exam. Students with little or no piano background may enroll in Piano Proficiency Class to achieve required proficiency levels. 5. Voice Proficiency Exam. 6. Guitar Proficiency Exam. Students with a voice or piano concentration must pass this exam at the end of four semesters in the program. 7. Large Ensemble Participation. All BMW students are required to participate in at least four semesters of choir. 8. Recitals. All BMW students are required to participate in a recital each semester they are enrolled in private lessons. 9. Recital Attendance. All BMW students are required to enroll in Recital Attendance each semester of primary applied lessons. Grading is pass/fail. 10. Juries. All BMW students are required to perform before the music faculty at the end of each semester or primary applied lessons. 92


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

11. Faculty Review. After completion of four semesters towards the BMW degree, each student will meet with the music faculty in a program review. The music faculty reserves the right to recommend a change of major or concentration at this time. 12. Music Ministry Internship or Field Experience. A semester internship will be granted 4 hours of credit.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Bachelor of Music and Worship Biblical Studies Old Testament (10) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 OT Psalms New Testament (22) Acts Life of Christ Romans Hebrews Timothy and Titus Bible Exegesis Elective (2) General Bible (3) Issues in Biblical Interpretation Doctrine (11) Christian Life Christ and the Bible Worship Spiritual Formation Retreat Theological Integration for Ministry

48

General Studies World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Analytical Grammar Writing and Research Speech Creation and Science Principles of Interpretation Restoration History Apologetics Psychology

37 3

8 2 4 8 4 3 3 2 3 2 3 2 2 2

4 3 3 2 3 3 4 3

Music History: Classical to Present Strategies for Teaching Counseling Elective Lifetime Wellness College Life and Orientation

2 3 2 1 1

Professional Studies Christian Service General (13) Personal Evangelism Foundations for Missions Foundations for Christian Education Minister of Music Men: Homiletics or Women: Biblical Communication For Women Music/Worship (39) Music Theory 1 & 2 Music Skills 1 & 2 Choral Conducting 1 Music in Worship Literature Worship Team Leadership Electronic Music Vocal/Instrumental Arranging Choir Primary Applied Secondary Applied Third Applied Recital Attendance (6 semesters) Electives Music for Children

54 0

93

3 3 2 2 3

6 2 2 2 2 2 2 4 6 4 2 0 5


2011-2013 CATALOG

Music History: Antiquity to Baroque Worship Accompanying Internship (2)

Worship Technology Drama in Ministry and Education Private Lessons (up to 2 hours) Additional Internship Music Theory 3 Music Skills 3 Seminar in Sound System Design Pedagogy–vocal, piano or guitar Choral Conducting 2

Totals Biblical Studies General Studies Professional Studies Total Required

2

48 37 54 139

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Bachelor of Music and Worship FRESHMAN YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Writing and Research Christian Life Foundations for Christian Education Choir Recital Attendance Primary Applied Secondary Applied

0 1 4 4 3 2 2 1 0 1 1 19

SOPHOMORE YEAR First Semester Christian Service Analytical Grammar1 Principles of Interpretation Music Theory 2 Music Skills 2 Worship Primary Applied Secondary Applied Choir Recital Attendance Electronic Music

0 4 3 3 1 2 1 1 1 0 2 18

94

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Personal Evangelism Christ and the Bible Music Theory 1 Music Skills 1 Choir Recital Attendance Primary Applied Secondary Applied

0 4 3 3 3 1 1 0 1 1 17

Second Semester Christian Service Life of Christ2 Issues in Biblical Interpretation Speech Psalms Music Elective3 Primary Applied Secondary Applied Recital Attendance Choir

0 4 3 3 2 2 1 1 0 1 17


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

JUNIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Life of Christ2 Third Applied Foundations for Missions Vocal/Instrumental Arranging Choral Conducting 1 Music History: Classical to Present Recital Attendance Primary Applied Lifetime Wellness SENIOR YEAR First Semester Christian Service Timothy and Titus Psychology Apologetics Men: Homiletics or Women: Biblical Communication for Women Bible Exegesis Elective4 Worship Team Leadership

0 4 1 3 2 2 2 0 1 1 16

0 3 3 4 3

2 2 17

Second Semester Christian Service Hebrews Minister of Music Creation and Science World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Strategies for Teaching Music Elective3 Music in Worship Literature Primary Applied Recital Attendance

3 2 2 1 0 18

Second Semester Christian Service Restoration History Romans Spiritual Formation Retreat Theological Integration for Ministry Third Applied Counseling Elective5 Music Elective3 Internship6

0 3 4 2 2 1 2 1 2 17

0 3 2 2 3

1. Students who have an ACT composite score of at least 19 have the option of taking two semesters of NT Greek for the Analytical Grammar requirement. 2. A 4-hour Gospel study may be elected for one semester of Life of Christ. 3. Acceptable Music Electives: Music For Children, Worship Technology, Drama in Ministry and Education, Private Lessons (limited to 2 hours), Music Theory 3, Music Skills 3, Seminar in Sound System Design, Pedagogy (Vocal, Piano, or Guitar), Choral Conducting 2, Music History (Antiquity to Baroque), Worship Accompanying, Additional Internship (limited to 2 hours). 4. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO. 5. Acceptable Counseling Electives: Pastoral Counseling, Principles of Family Living, Counseling Youth, Crisis Counseling, Intro to Counseling, Pre-Marital Counseling, Healthy Relationships, Seminar in Marriage and Family, Ministering to Women in Crisis, Systems in Family and Congregational Life or Seminar in Parenting Skills. 6. This degree is limited to 4 hours of internship. First 2 hours designated. Next 2 hours come from track electives.

95


2011-2013 CATALOG

Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Ministry This degree is especially designed for those who have already completed an acceptable Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Arts degree (acceptable means the degree is sufficient in general education courses and the hours from the other institution do not include previous OCC credits) but now want to prepare for ministry in the church. Such persons who want to make a career change can be prepared for spiritual leadership. OBJECTIVES The student who successfully completes this degree should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a comprehensive knowledge of the Bible. 2. Demonstrate competencies in exegesis and communication skills in the production of sermons, lessons and papers. 3. Articulate a presentation of the gospel to lead someone to Christ. 4. Express a Christian worldview that interfaces with contemporary cultural issues. 5. Demonstrate leadership and equipping skills for the church.

96


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Ministry Biblical Studies Old Testament (10) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 OT Poetry or Prophet Elective New Testament (19) Acts Life of Christ Hebrews Romans Doctrine (7) Spiritual Formation Retreat Christ and the Bible Theological Integration for Ministry General Studies Principles of Interpretation Restoration History Apologetics College Life and Orientation

36 8 2 4 8 3 4 2 3 2 11 3 3 4 1

Professional Studies Personal Evangelism Foundations for Missions Leadership in Ministry Foundations for Christian Education Men: Homiletics or Women: Biblical Communication for Women Expository Preaching or Expository Teaching Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women or Healthy Relationships Electives

18 3 3 2 2 3

3 2

2

Totals Biblical Studies General Studies Professional Studies Electives Total Required

36 11 18 2 67

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Ministry FIRST YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Men: Homiletics or Women: Biblical Communication for Women Christ and the Bible Foundations for Missions

0 1 4 4 3

3 3 18

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Life of Christ1 Personal Evangelism Men: Expository Preaching or Women: Expository Teaching Foundations for Christian Education Elective

0 4 4 3 3 2 1 17

97


2011-2013 CATALOG SECOND YEAR First Semester Christian Service Life of Christ1 Hebrews OT Prophets2 or Poetry3 Elective Principles of Interpretation Restoration History Elective

0 4 3 2 3 3 1 16

Second Semester Christian Service Theological Integration for Ministry Romans Apologetics Spiritual Formation Retreat Leadership in Ministry Practical Ministry for Men or Practical Ministry for Women or Healthy Relationships

0 2 4 4 2 2 2

16

1. A 4-hour Gospel study may be elected for one semester of Life of Christ. 2. Acceptable OT Prophets Electives: Isaiah, Jeremiah, Daniel and Ezekiel, Minor Prophets or Messianic Prophecy. 3. Acceptable OT Poetry Electives: Psalms, Proverbs/Ecclesiastes/Song of Songs or Job and Lamentations.

98


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Intercultural Studies This degree is specially designed for those who have already completed an acceptable Bachelor of Science or a Bachelor of Arts degree (acceptable means the degree is sufficient in general education courses and the hours from the other institution do not include previous OCC credits) but now want to prepare for ministry in the church or on the mission field. Such persons who want to make a career change can, with two years of intensive study, be prepared for spiritual leadership. OBJECTIVES In addition to the objectives listed for the BA in Christian Ministry, the student who successfully completes this program of study should demonstrate leadership and equipping skills for the church in a cross-cultural setting.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Intercultural Studies Biblical Studies 32 Old Testament (8) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 8 New Testament (17) Acts 4 Life of Christ 8 Hebrews 3 Galatians/Philippians 2 Doctrine (7) Spiritual Formation Retreat 2 Christ and the Bible 3 Theological Integration for Ministry 2 Missions Studies 18 Foundations for Missions 3 Historical Perspectives in Missions 2 Anthropology 3 Internship 2 Prep for CC Ministry 2 Principles of Mission Life 2 Missions Ministry in the Church 2 Missions in the Restoration Movement 2

General Studies Principles of Interpretation Apologetics College Life and Orientation

8 3 4 1

Elective

1

Professional Studies Men: Homiletics or Women: Biblical Communication for Women Personal Evangelism Leadership in Ministry

8 3

3 2

Totals Biblical Studies Missions Studies General Studies Elective Professional Studies Total Required

32 18 8 1 8 67

99


2011-2013 CATALOG

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Bachelor of Arts in Bible and Intercultural Studies FIRST YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Men: Homiletics or Women: Biblical Communication for Women Christ and the Bible Foundations for Missions

0 1 4 4 3

3 3 18

SECOND YEAR First Semester Christian Service 0 Life of Christ1 4 Hebrews 3 Principles of Interpretation 3 Anthropology 3 Missions in the Restoration Movement 2 Prep for CC Ministry 2 17

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Missions Ministry in the Church Personal Evangelism Leadership in Ministry Historical Perspectives in Missions Principles of Mission Life Elective

0 4 2 3 2 2 2 1 16

Second Semester Christian Service Life of Christ1 Apologetics Missions Internship2 Spiritual Formation Retreat Galatians/Philippians Theological Integration for Ministry

0 4 4 2 2 2 2 16

1. A 4-hour Gospel study may be elected for one semester of Life of Christ. 2. Internship is limited to 2 hours.

100


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS BACHELOR DEGREES

ADVANCED ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREES Advanced Associate of Arts in Bi-Vocational Ministry Degrees A three-year program is offered for those who wish to combine biblical training with preparation for teaching, nursing, business administration and intercultural studies. In a cooperative agreement between Ozark Christian College and Missouri Southern State University this three-year associate degree forms the basis for two additional years of study at MSSU. This will complete the requirements for a BS degree from MSSU in Education with Missouri state teacher certification, in Nursing, Business Administration and Intercultural Studies. The five-year program involves two and one-half years of study at OCC and two and one-half years of study at MSSU. It is possible to stay in OCC residence halls during all five years by taking some classes at MSSU earlier and extending the Advanced Associate Degree at OCC to four years instead of three. OBJECTIVES The student who has successfully completed the Education (Elementary, Middle School, Secondary) emphasis should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the Bible. 2. Express a Christian worldview as a professional educator that interfaces with contemporary cultural issues. 3. Demonstrate basic proficiency in exegesis and communication skills. 4. Complete a Bachelor’s degree in education. The student who has successfully completed the Nursing emphasis should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the Bible. 2. Express a Christian worldview as a professional nurse that interfaces with contemporary cultural issues. 3. Demonstrate basic abilities in various people-helping skills. 4. Complete a Bachelor’s degree in nursing.

101


2011-2013 CATALOG

The student who has successfully completed the Business Administration emphasis should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the Bible. 2. Defend the Christian worldview as a professional business person. 3. Communicate effectively through the spoken and written word. 4. Complete the Bachelor of Science degree in business. The student who has successfully completed the Intercultural Studies emphasis should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the Bible. 2. Express a Christian worldview as a professional that interfaces with crosscultural issues. 3. Demonstrate biblical leadership in a cross-cultural setting 4. Complete a declared Bachelor’s degree.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Advanced Associate of Arts in Bi-vocational Christian Ministry Biblical Studies Old Testament (8) History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 New Testament (10) Acts Bible Exegesis Elective or Worship Gospel Doctrine (5) Christ and the Bible Christian Life

23

General Studies Philosophy or British Literature College Life and Orientation Creation and Science English Composition 1 & 2 Principles of Interpretation Psychology Speech

27 3 1 2 6 3 3 3

102

8 4 2 4 3 2

US History 1492 to 1877 World Geography, or Anthropology, Spanish 1, History of Western Civilization, World Religions

3 3

Professional Studies Christian Service Foundations for Missions

3 0 3

MSSU/Vocational Studies

43

Totals Biblical Studies General Studies Professional Studies MSSU/Vocational Studies

23 27 3 43

Total Required

96


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ADVANCED ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREES

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Advanced Associate of Arts in Bi-vocational Christian Ministry FIRST YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts English Composition 1 Christ and the Bible Christian Life SECOND YEAR First Semester Christian Service Gospel Principles of Interpretation Psychology World Geography or Anthropology, Spanish 1, History of Western Civilization, World Religions US History 1492 to 1877 THIRD YEAR First Semester Christian Service Emphases

0 1 4 4 3 3 2 17

0 4 3 3 3

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Philosophy or British Literature English Composition 2 Speech Foundations for Missions

0 4 3 3 3 3 16

Second Semester Christian Service Bible Exegesis Elective1 or Worship Creation and Science Emphases

0 2 2 12 16

Second Semester Christian Service Emphases

0 16 16

3 16

0 15 15

1. Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO.

103


2011-2013 CATALOG

EMPHASES REQUIREMENTS EDUCATION (Elementary, Middle School, Secondary) 43 hours Foundations for Christian Education 2 Teaching the Developing Student 4 Introduction to Counseling 3 Educational Psychology 2 Music for Children (Elementary) or 2 MSSU Course (Middle & Secondary) Analytical Grammar (Elementary) or 4 MSSU Course (Middle & Secondary) Children’s Literature (Elementary) or 3 MSSU Course (Middle & Secondary) Lifetime Wellness (Middle & Secondary 1 or MSSU Course (Elementary) MSSU Courses 22 NOTE: Requirements listed as “MSSU Course” are courses taken at Missouri Southern State University. Acceptable courses are MSSU requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Education. This information is available at www. mssu.edu. Take C-Base Test before the third year.

1. Admission to teacher education program requires at least an enhanced ACT score of 20 or SAT (vm) score of 800. 2. Transfer hours must be C or higher. 3. Must have 55 hours completed before entering Junior Block. 4. Must pass C-Base exam (235) prior to the Junior Block of Education courses. All prerequisites must be fulfilled. 5. Full admission to teacher education must be filed during enrollment in Pedagogy Course (ED 329). 6. To enter and continue in the Elementary Education Program, the student must maintain a GPA of 2.75. 7. Must take a minimum of 40 hours in upper division courses. 8. No more than 12 hours of correspondence can be used.

104

9. At least 30 of the final 36 hours must be taken in residence at MSSU. 10. A general education and departmental exit exam must be passed in order to complete the degree requirements (Provis II Specialty Area Test). 11. Certification requirements are determined by the state and are therefore subject to change. Students are advised to maintain close contact with their advisor and the Education Department.

NURSING 43 hours Principles of Family Living or Crisis Counseling Lifetime Wellness MSSU Courses

2 1 40

NOTE: Requirements listed as “MSSU Course” are courses taken at Missouri Southern State University. Acceptable courses are MSSU requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Nursing. This information is available at www. mssu.edu.

BUSINESS ADMINISTRATION 43 hours Ethics 2 Personal Evangelism 3 Lifetime Wellness 1 Professional Development, Personal 2/3 Finance, or Building Teams MSSU Courses 35/34 NOTE: Requirements listed as “MSSU Course” are courses taken at Missouri Southern State University. Acceptable courses are MSSU requirements for the Bachelor of Science in Business Administration. This information is available at www.mssu.edu.


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ADVANCED ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREES

INTERCULTURAL STUDIES 43 hours Principles of Mission Life 2 Principles of Mission Work 2 Preparation for Cross-Cultural Ministry 2 Missions Ministry in the Church 2 Lifetime Wellness 1 MSSU Courses 34 NOTE: Requirements listed as “MSSU Course” are courses taken at Missouri Southern State University. Acceptable courses are MSSU requirements for a declared bachelor’s degree. This information is available at www.mssu.edu.

Additional professional study emphases can be created depending on major at MSSU and approval by the deans of both institutions.

COOPERATIVE EDUCATION PROGRAM

In cooperation with Fort Hays State University in Hays, Kansas, Ozark Christian College has arranged the following general program of study for students wishing to continue their studies in other areas. 1. FHSU will accept students transferring from Ozark Christian College who have selected the Cooperative Program, provided the student’s cumulative grade average is at least “C’’ or 2.0 on a 4.0 scale. 2. FHSU will not accept more than 64 semester hours of credit under the Cooperative Program from Ozark Christian College.

3. FHSU will accept not more than 15 semester hours of credit toward fulfillment of FHSU general education requirements for the bachelor’s degree from FHSU. The courses that may be taken at OCC are English Composition I and II 6 Speech 3 US History 1492 to 1877 3 Psychology 3 4. The remaining semester hours taken at OCC will be applied toward electives at FHSU. 5. FHSU will provide the necessary courses to complete the major that the student elects to pursue (normally requiring three additional years of study beyond the 64). 6. FHSU will confer the appropriate bachelor’s degree when the student has satisfactorily completed all requirements. All courses to complete degree requirements over and above the 64 hours accepted from OCC must be taken at FHSU. 7. Any student wishing to enter the Co-op Program with FHSU must make written application to do so with the OCC Registrar before the end of his/her third semester. 8. Further information concerning this program may be obtained at the OCC admissions office or by writing to: Coordinator of Christian College Programs Fort Hays State University Hays, Kansas 67601

ASSOCIATE OF ARTS

105


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DEGREES OCC offers three associate degrees. Those who take these associate degrees will most likely do additional schooling elsewhere to prepare for their careers. The subjects taken form a foundation to Christian faith and an understanding of the Bible. Many of these graduates will serve in volunteer capacities in the local church.

Associate of Arts in Christian Ministry This associate degree is offered for students desiring to unite biblical studies with an aspect of teaching ministry. OBJECTIVES The student who has successfully completed the Associate of Arts in Christian Ministry should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the Bible. 2. Articulate a Christian worldview. 3. Articulate a presentation of the gospel to lead someone to Christ.

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DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREES

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Associate of Arts in Christian Ministry Biblical Studies History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 Acts Gospel Christian Life Christ and the Bible Choose from the following: General Epistles 1 or 2 Corinthians Galatians/Philippians Ephesians/Colossians 1 and 2 Thessalonians Timothy and Titus Hebrews Genesis Exodus Deuteronomy

26 8 4 4 2 3 5

General Studies Speech English Comp. 1 or Writing/Research Psychology Philosophy Principles of Interpretation US History 1492 to 1877 or History of Western Civ.

22 3 3 3 3 3

College Life and Orientation Choose one of the following: English Comp. 2 British Literature World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Strategies for Teaching (required if Child Care emphasis is chosen) Children’s Literature Masterpieces of Western Lit. Analytical Grammar Intro to Linguistics (required if TESOL is chosen) Anthropology Church History

1 3

Professional Studies Foundations for Christian Ed. Foundations for Missions Personal Evangelism

8 2 3 3

Electives

9

Total Required

65

3

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Associate of Arts in Christian Ministry FIRST YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Speech English Comp. 1 or Writing/Research Christian Life

0 1 4 4 3 3 2 17

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Personal Evangelism Foundations for Missions Christ and the Bible Foundations of Christian Ed. Bible Exegesis Elective1

0 4 3 3 3 2 2 17

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2011-2013 CATALOG SECOND YEAR First Semester Christian Service Gospel US History 1492 to 1877 or History of Western Civ. Psychology Principles of Interpretation General Studies Elective2

0 4 3 3 3 3 16

Second Semester Christian Service Philosophy Bible Exegesis Elective1 Electives

0 3 3 9 15

1. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO. 2. Acceptable General Studies Electives: English Composition 2, British Literature, Strategies for Teaching, Children’s Literature, Masterpieces in Western Literature, Analytical Grammar, Introduction to Linguistics or Anthropology. NOTES: A. For Christian Foundation emphasis all electives hours are from General Studies. B. For Child Care emphasis all General Studies Electives and Electives are: Child Care Administration (3), Educational Psychology (2), Early Childhood Curriculum (4), Strategies for Teaching (3) and Children’s Literature (3). C. For Intercultural Studies emphasis all General Studies Electives and Electives are: Anthropology (3) or World Religions (3), Preparations for Cross-Cultural Ministry (2), Principles of Mission Life (2), Missions Ministry in the Church (2), Missions in the Restoration Movement (2) and Elective (1).

Associate of Arts in Deaf Ministry This associate degree provides basic biblical and general studies and a concentration in Deaf Ministry. OBJECTIVES The student who has successfully completed the Associate Degree in Deaf Ministry should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the Bible. 2. Communicate with those in the deaf community and pass the written portion of the state interpreter’s certification test. 3. Understand the fundamental principles of language.

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DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREES

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Associate of Arts in Deaf Ministry Biblical Studies History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 Acts Gospel Hebrews Christ and the Bible Christian Life Bible Exegesis Elective or Worship

26 8 4 4 3 3 2 2

General Studies Speech English Composition 1 Principles of Interpretation

15 3 3 3

World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways Foundations for Christian Ed. College Life and Orientation

3 2 1

Professional Studies Christian Service Deaf Communications 1 Deaf Communications 2 Deaf Communications 3 Deaf Ministry Extension

24 0 3 3 2 16

Total Required

65

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Associate of Arts in Deaf Ministry FIRST YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Deaf Communications 1 English Composition 1 Christian Life SECOND YEAR First Semester Christian Service Gospel Principles of Interpretation Hebrews Deaf Communications 3 World Geography or Bible Lands and Lifeways

0 1 4 4 3 3 2 17

0 4 3 3 2 3

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Foundations for Christian Ed. Deaf Communications 2 Christ and the Bible Speech Bible Exegesis Elective1 or Worship

0 4 2 3 3 3 2 17

Second Semester Christian Service Deaf Missions Extension2

0 16 16

1. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with 15 OT, NT or DO. 2. A one-semester program conducted at the facilities of Deaf Missions in Council Bluffs, Iowa. The program includes classroom lectures on various phases of teaching the deaf, visitation and observation of classes at Iowa State School for the Deaf, lesson preparation, practice teaching, preparation of visuals and writing for the deaf.

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Associate of Arts in Church Music This associate degree is offered for students desiring voluntary leadership in music ministry. OBJECTIVES The student who has successfully completed the Associate Degree in Church Music should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a foundational knowledge of the Bible. 2. Communicate effectively through the spoken and written word. 3. Demonstrate a foundation of skills suitable for volunteer ministry through music in the church.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Associate of Arts in Church Music Biblical Studies History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 Acts Gospel Worship Christian Life Christ and the Bible Bible Exegesis Elective

25 8 4 4 2 2 3 2

General Studies English Composition 1 Principles of Interpretation Psychology Music History: Classical to Present General Studies Electives Speech College Life and Orientation

18 3 3 3 2 3 3 1

Music Studies Christian Service

22 0

110

Music Theory 1 & 2 6 Music Skills 1 & 2 2 Choral Conducting 1 2 Music in Worship Literature 2 Choose from the following: 2 Music for Children Choral Conducting Music History: Antiquity to Baroque Vocal and Instrumental Arranging Worship Team Leadership Electronic Music Worship Accompanying Worship Technology Seminar in Music Ministry (NCMC) Private Lessons 4 Piano, Voice or Guitar (any combination) Choir 4 Total Required

65


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS ASSOCIATE OF ARTS DEGREES

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Associate of Arts in Church Music FIRST YEAR First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Christian Life English Composition 1 Choir Private Lessons

0 1 4 4 2 3 1 1 16

SECOND YEAR First Semester Christian Service Gospel Music Theory 2 Music Skills 2 Music In Worship Lit. Choral Conducting 1 Music Elective1 Choir Private Lessons

0 4 3 1 2 2 2 1 1 16

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Worship Christ and the Bible Music Theory 1 Music Skills 1 Choir Private Lessons Music History: Classical to Present

0 4 2 3 3 1 1 1 2 17

Second Semester Christian Service Principles of Interpretation General Studies Elective2 Bible Exegesis Elective3 Psychology Speech Choir Private Lessons

0 3 3 2 3 3 1 1 16

1. Acceptable Music Electives: Music For Children, Choral Conducting 2, Music History (Antiquity to Baroque), Vocal and Instrumental Arranging, Worship Team Leadership, Electronic Music, Worship Accompanying, Worship Technology, and Seminar in Music Ministry (NCMC). 2. Acceptable General Studies Electives: English Composition 2, British Literature, Strategies for Teaching, Children’s Literature, Masterpieces in Western Literature, Analytical Grammar, Introduction to Linguistics or Anthropology. 3. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO.

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CERTIFICATES Certificate of Bible Knowledge This certificate is offered for those who want to concentrate on Bible courses in a one-year program. OBJECTIVES The student who has successfully completed the Certificate of Bible Knowledge should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the Bible. 2. Articulate a presentation of the gospel to lead someone to Christ.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Certificate of Bible Knowledge Old Testament History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 New Testament Acts Gospel Bible Exegesis Electives or Worship

8 8 15 4 4 7

Doctrine Christian Life Christ and the Bible

5 2 3

Professional Christian Service Foundations for Missions or Personal Evangelism

3 0 3

General Studies College Life and Orientation

1 1

Total Required

112

32


DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Certificate of Bible Knowledge First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Bible Exegesis Elective1 or Worship Christian Life Select one of the following: Foundations for Missions or Personal Evangelism

0 1 4 4 2 2 3

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Bible Exegesis Elective1 or Worship Gospel Christ and the Bible

0 4 5 4 3 16

16

1. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO.

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Certificate of Christian Service This certificate is offered for those who want to combine biblical studies with some courses in the area of practical ministry. OBJECTIVES The student who has successfully completed the Certificate of Christian Service should be able to: 1. Demonstrate a basic knowledge of the Bible. 2. Articulate a presentation of the gospel to lead someone to Christ. 3. Demonstrate basic skills in a ministry area.

BASIC REQUIREMENTS for Certificate of Christian Service Biblical Studies History of Ancient Israel 1 & 2 Acts Christian Life Christ and the Bible Bible Exegesis Elective or Worship

19 8 4 2 3 2

General Studies Speech College Life and Orientation

4 3 1

Professional Studies Christian Service Foundations for Christian Ed.

9 0 2

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Ministry Elective (100 or 200) Choose 5 hours from the following: Strategies for Teaching Foundations for Youth Ministry Practical Youth Ministry Healthy Relationships Music for Children Worship Men-Homiletics or Women-Biblical Communication for Women Total Required

2 5

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DEGREE AND CERTIFICATE PROGRAMS CERTIFICATE

RECOMMENDED COURSE OF STUDY for Certificate of Christian Service First Semester Christian Service College Life and Orientation History of Ancient Israel 1 Acts Christian Life Bible Exegesis Elective1 or Worship Foundations for Christian Ed. Professional Studies Elective

0 1 4 4 2 2 2 2 17

Second Semester Christian Service History of Ancient Israel 2 Speech Christ and the Bible Ministry Elective3 (MN100 or 200) Professional Studies Elective2

0 4 3 3 2 3 15

1. Acceptable Bible Exegesis Electives: Any exegetical course counts if not required somewhere else in the degree. Background electives or survey courses do not count. Eligible courses include most courses identified with OT, NT or DO. 2. Acceptable Professional Studies Electives: Any MN, CE, DM, MI, or MU course not required elsewhere in the certificate. 3. Acceptable Ministry Electives: Any 100 or 200 level MN course.

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Certification Program

TESOL - Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages The Certification Program in TESOL consists of seventeen hours designed to prepare Christians to teach English to those whose primary language is not English. This preparation can be used in cross-cultural settings. This certification functions within the existing curriculum program. The TESOL certification will only be given to those completing at least a one-year certificate at OCC (or students approved by the Director of the TESOL program). OBJECTIVES A student acquiring the OCC TESOL certification should be able to: 1. Create and execute lesson plans in an English language learning environment. 2. Understand cultural issues related to teaching English. 3. Articulate the unique challenges and solutions for teaching English to non-native English speakers.

COURSES REQUIRED for Certification PRE-REQUISITE Analytical Grammar [EL 219] (or Greek I (A) [LA 211] or Greek I (B) [LA 212]). Intro to Linguistics 3 Theories/Principles Eng. Lang. Teach. 3 Methods/Materials for Eng. Lang. Teach. 3

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Anthropology (MI 420) Phonetics (LA 217) TESOL – Practicum (LA 373)

3 2 3 17


General Information Course Descriptions Area of Biblical Studies Area of General Studies Area of Professional Studies Internships Field Experience Christian Service Agreement with Focus on the Family 117


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GENERAL INFORMATION Each course number represents a semester course. The credit hours are expressed in terms of semester hours. The following two-letter prefixes used in the course number indicate the area or department of study: BIBLICAL STUDIES PAGE OT – Old Testament 119 NT – New Testament 122 GB – General Bible 126 DO – Doctrine 127 GENERAL STUDIES AP – Apologetics BE – Business Education CM – Communication Methods EL – English Language HI – History LA – Language PC – Psychology and Counseling PE – Physical Education PI – Philosophy and Interpretation SI – Science SD – Student Development

130 131 131 132 133 135 138 141 142 144 144

PROFESSIONAL STUDIES CE – Christian Education DM – Deaf Ministry MN – Ministry MI – Intercultural Studies MU – Music

145 148 150 158 164

The first digit of the three numbers in a course number indicates the year in one’s college career in which it is normally recommended that the particular course be taken. Courses unrelated to any particular year in the curriculum are numbered along with freshman courses with “1” as the first digit. When applicable, prerequisites are listed with course descriptions. The college reserves the right to cancel any course for which there is insufficient registration. Tentative schedules of classes for the next year are published each April. Final schedules are published immediately before each semester. Classes identified with a “D” or an “L” are online classes. Classes identified with an “R” are readings/independent study classes. Classes identified with an “S” are weekend seminars. 118


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

COURSE DESCRIPTIONS AREA OF BIBLICAL STUDIES

The student who successfully completes the required courses in this area should be able to: 1. Demonstrate knowledge of the history of the Old Testament and New Testament. 2. Document how the Old Testament Scriptures reveal God’s preparation for the coming of the Messiah. 3. Articulate basic Christian doctrine through exegetical study of the Scriptures. 4. Understand issues dealing with the origin, interpretation and application of the Bible. 5. Articulate a strong faith in Jesus as the Son of God and the Bible as the Word of God. 6. Apply biblical texts to life.

Old Testament OT 134 History of Ancient Israel 1 An exegetical study of the Old Testament historical books Genesis through Joshua focusing on chronological history. Includes summaries and introductions to the various books, questions over the text, and information about the redemptive plan of God to save the world. Students will learn the facts of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (4 hours) OT 141D Old Testament Survey Old Testament Survey is an intermediate level survey of the background, contents and theology of the 39 books of the Old Testament. Emphasis will be placed on understanding how the Old Testament is understood in its own context and yet speaks to our contemporary situations as Christians. Students will read the entire Old Testament and a Survey Textbook, answer essay questions based on their reading and on notes taken from watching the CD lectures, interact on a weekly basis online with the professor and fellow students, and complete proctored examinations. (3 hours) OT 234 History of Ancient Israel 2 An exegetical study of the Old Testament historical books of Judges through Esther, plus related readings from the Old Testament poetic and prophetic books.

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Includes summaries and introductions to the various books, questions over the text, and information about the redemptive plan of God to save the world. Students will learn the facts of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (4 hours) OT 330 Psalms A study of the characteristics of Hebrew poetry will be followed by an examination of the book of Psalms. Included will be a general introduction to the book of Psalms and a study of individual psalms that stresses the major themes of the book. Students will learn the themes of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. A devotional diary will also be kept. (2 hours) OT 331 Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs A study of the characteristics of Hebrew poetry will be followed by an examination of the books of Proverbs, Ecclesiastes and Song of Songs (or Solomon). A topical study will cover the major themes in the books. Students will learn the themes of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 332 Job and Lamentations A study of the characteristics of Hebrew poetry will be followed by an examination of the message of the books of Job and Lamentations. Special attention will be given to the nature of God and the problem of evil. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 441 Isaiah An exegetical study of the eighth-century prophet of Isaiah. Special emphasis will be placed on the Messianic texts, devotional material and preaching values. Critical issues such as date and authorship will also be analyzed. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 442 Jeremiah One of the most tragic periods of Hebrew history will be studied through the life and message of Jeremiah of Anathoth. The student will appreciate God’s call to repentance in the midst of suffering and upcoming judgment. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 443 Daniel and Ezekiel An exegetical study of the books of Daniel and Ezekiel, with a thorough analysis of the background, message and prophetic significance of the books. Emphasis will be given to prophecies of the Messiah and His Kingdom. Controversies regarding higher critical views as well as different millennial positions will be addressed. 120


COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 444 Minor Prophets A survey study of the twelve Minor Prophets. The backgrounds, messages, and prophets themselves will be considered. Messianic content will be emphasized. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 451 Genesis An exegetical survey emphasizing the Biblical teachings on creation and upon the line of promise beginning with Abraham. Modern critical views regarding date and authorship will also be examined and critiqued. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 452 Deuteronomy An overview of the elements of Old Testament law and theology will be accomplished through the exegesis of the fifth book of Moses. Attention will be paid to comparison with other Old Testament books and to New Testament applications. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 453 First and Second Chronicles This course surveys the major events and personalities recorded in the books of 1 and 2 Chronicles. Attention is paid to the special contribution these books make in the canon of the Old Testament. Important theological themes particularly prominent in these books will be emphasized. Students will learn the themes of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 454 Israel After Exile A study of the biblical books which cover the time of the exile, the return to Jerusalem, and the reconstruction of the city and the temple. A survey of the Intertestamental Period will also be made. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 455 Messianic Prophecy (Also available as an online course OT 455L) An exegesis of the Old Testament Messianic prophecies and the records of their fulfillment in the New Testament. Major themes covered include: the Messianic kingdom, the restoration of Israel, and the person and work of the Messiah. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, and assigned reading and projects. (2 hours)

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OT 456 Exodus An exegesis of Exodus with special attention to Egypt, the exodus of Israel, and the wilderness wanderings. Students will learn the message of the text through lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (2 hours) OT 531 Old Testament Guided Readings An elective and independent study course on selected topics/texts/issues of the Old Testament. The student will be assisted in this selection by the professor. Students will learn the message of the text through readings and written analysis. (1 hour) See also GB 562 Introduction to Biblical Archaeology and GB 564 Old Testament Introduction.

New Testament NT 141D New Testament Survey A survey of the text, canon, and historical background of the New Testament, including examination of the date, authorship, circumstances, and content of each New Testament book. (3 hours) NT 150 Acts An exegetical study of the book of Acts that considers the expansion of Christianity in the earliest days of the church from AD 30-60. Students will learn how the church understood its mission in Jewish and Greco-Roman settings, the doctrines related to Christian conversion, the Holy Spirit (and spiritual gifts), church polity, church challenges, and how the NT epistles fit into the framework of the missionary journeys. Students will develop a reliance on the Holy Spirit, love for the church, and be able to translate principles into ministry and missionary settings. Classes will be conducted primarily in lecture format. (4 hours) NT 240 Hebrews (Also available as an online course NT 240D)

An exegetical study of the letter to the Hebrews focusing on the superiority of Jesus and His covenant to all other religious persons and systems. Students will learn the contents of Hebrews, practice solid doctrinal thinking about its teachings, and experience the freeing impact of Jesus’ “once-for-all’’ atonement. Students will learn the message of the text through interactive lecture, discussions, assigned reading and projects. (3 hours) NT 241 - 244 Life of Christ An exegetical study of the Gospel accounts harmonized in chronological order

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covering four semesters. This study involves a serious attempt to understand Jesus--His person, His work and His teachings. The student will be equipped through interactive lecture, written assignments, memory work, and tests, to follow Jesus’ teachings, apply his principles of ministry, and raise up disciples who will further expand his kingdom. NT 241 Life of Christ (Semester 1) (Also available as an online course NT 241L; available as a 3 hour course, NT 241D)

Semester one covers the beginnings of the Gospel up through the first year of ministry. It concentrates on the birth narratives, early Judean ministry, and early Galilean ministry. Major sermons: Jesus’ deity and credentials (Jn. 5) and the Sermon on the Mount (Matt. 5-7). Students will concentrate on learning Jesus’ primary identity and proclamation of the kingdom. (4 hours) NT 242 Life of Christ (Semester 2) (Also available as an online course NT 242L; available as a 3 hour course, NT 242D)

Semester two covers the Later Galilean ministry including the feeding of the 5,000, Peter’s great confession and the transfiguration. This is classic Jesus, including many major miracles. Major sermons: Kingdom parables (Matt. 13), Bread of Life (Jn. 6) and the sending of the apostles (Matt. 10). Students will concentrate on learning Jesus’ miracles, parables, and claims to deity. (4 hours) NT 243 Life of Christ (Semester 3) (Also available as an online course NT 243L; available as a 3 hour course, NT 243D)

Semester three covers the Later Judean and Perean ministry up through Tuesday of the last week. It includes travel narrative (Lk. 9-19) and a number of major confrontations with Jewish leaders, culminating in the triumphal entry and the cleansing of the temple. Major sermons: Sermon on light and the Good Shepherd (Jn. 7, 10), and the debate in the temple (Matt. 21-23). Students will concentrate on learning the ethics of Jesus. (4 hours) NT 244 Life of Christ (Semester 4) (Also available as an online course NT 244L; available as a 3 hour course, NT 244D)

Semester four covers the passion through the ascension. It includes the last supper, arrest, crucifixion and resurrection. Major sermons: prediction of Jerusalem’s destruction (Matt. 24) and the farewell discourse (Jn. 13-17). Students will concentrate on understanding the meaning of Jesus’ death, resurrection and return. (4 hours) NT 247 Matthew An exegetical study of the Gospel of Matthew. Students will learn Matthew’s unique presentation of Jesus as the royal Messiah through the various narratives and the five major discourses. The text is exegeted verse by verse and is developed 123


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primarily through a lecture and commentary format. (4 hours) NT 248 Luke An exegetical study of the Gospel of Luke. Students will learn Luke’s unique presentation of Jesus as the Son of Man, His role as Savior and Lord, as well as several other themes. The text is exegeted verse by verse and is developed primarily through lecture, discussion and commentary research. (4 hours) NT 249 John An exegetical study of the Gospel of John giving attention to the claims and credentials of Jesus as God in flesh. Emphasis is also given to the teaching of Jesus recorded in John’s Gospel. Students will respond to lectures, learn chapter contents, memorize passages and produce written assignments. (4 hours) NT 250 Mark An exegetical study of the Gospel of Mark. Students will learn of Mark’s unique presentation of Jesus as the powerful servant of God. The text is exegeted verse by verse and is developed through lecture, discussion and commentary research. (4 hours) NT 340 First and Second Thessalonians An exegetical study of 1 and 2 Thessalonians that gives special attention to attitudes about the Lord’s return, elements of successful ministry, living in a manner pleasing to God and other themes essential to Christian re-socialization.The text is exegeted verse by verse and is developed through lecture, discussion and commentary research. (2 hours) NT 346 General Epistles An exegetical study of James, 1 and 2 Peter, 1, 2, and 3 John, and Jude. Students will learn the themes of these epistles, including: reliance upon divine wisdom, the necessity of following Christ in times of suffering, the joy of fellowship with God and the dangers of false teaching in the church. The course will consist of exposition of the text through lecture, class discussion regarding application of the text, and research. (3 hours) NT 348 Timothy and Titus An exegetical study of 1 and 2 Timothy and Titus. Students learn the letters’ themes, including the importance of godly conduct and the qualifications and duties of church leaders, for personal application and preaching/teaching purposes. Study of the Scripture is developed verse by verse through lecture, discussion and commentary research. (3 hours)

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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

NT 441 First Corinthians An exegetical study of 1 Corinthians. Students learn the content of the book in its historical setting, learn the letter’s major themes, and understand the key points of application for the modern church. The book is exegeted verse by verse and is developed through lecture, discussion and commentary research. (3 hours) NT 442 Second Corinthians An exegetical study of 2 Corinthians. Students learn the content of the book in its historical setting, as well as key points of application for the modern church. The course includes a study of Paul’s example in ministry, defense of his apostolic ministry and his instructions in Christian giving. The book is exegeted verse by verse and is developed through lecture, discussion and commentary research. (3 hours) NT 445 Romans (Also available as an online course NT 445L) Limited to students nearing graduation, this course probes the meaning of Paul’s letter to the Romans from an exegetical and theological perspective. Students will know the text, its meaning and its implications for the Christian life. The class lectures will be complemented by Power Point and/or other visual presentations. Lectures and class discussion are supplemented with selected memory work and special projects. (4 hours) NT 446 Galatians and Philippians The exegetical study of Galatians investigates the theological and practical implications of the Christian’s freedom from legalism. The exegesis of Philippians deals especially with the personal aspects of Paul, the apostolic prisoner. Lectures and class discussion are supplemented with selected memory work and special projects. (2 hours) NT 447 Ephesians and Colossians The exegetical study of Ephesians develops the doctrine of the church as the body of Christ. The exegesis of Colossians deals with Christ as the Head of the body, and gives special attention to the Colossian heresy. The course includes lecture, class discussion, memory work and writing projects. (2 hours) NT 542 Revelation An exegetical study of the book of Revelation, focusing on how John’s vision reveals the sovereignty of God over all human history: past, present and future. Students will learn and utilize the special principles for interpreting apocalyptic literature that will enable them to understand the book’s meaning for the firstcentury church and apply that meaning for the church today. The class will follow a lecture, discussion and research format. (3 hours)

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General Bible GB 216 Issues in Biblical Interpretation An examination of various approaches of biblical interpretation. The course begins with an historical survey and culminates with an array of contemporary approaches and current issues. Students learn to recognize, critique and implement these current hermeneutical practices. The class follows a lecture, discussion and research format. Prerequisite: PI 215 Principles of Interpretation. (3 hours) GB 430 Critical Perspectives/Acts 1 This class is designed to guide the student in advanced research issues and methodologies using the book of Acts. They will be introduced to advanced exegetical issues, historiography, sociology, source criticisms, literary analysis, archaeology, and textual criticism. This will allow upper level students to revisit a freshman book through critical perspectives as a mechanism for understanding and transitioning to graduate level biblical research. (2 hours) GB 431R Critical Perspectives/Acts 2 This course has the same requirements as GB430, only due via email. There is also additional reading. (2 hours) GB 460 Introduction to the Gospels (Also available as a readings/independent study GB 464R)

The course covers the historical background of the Gospels, historical critical issues concerning Christ and the Gospels, and special introduction to each of the Gospels. Students will learn about the history of the intertestamental period, the search for the historical Jesus, critical methodologies for studying the Gospels (including source criticism, form criticism, and redaction criticism), related issues such as the Gnostic gospels and critical background information for each of the Gospels. The class is conducted by lecture and class discussion. (4 hours) GB 464 New Testament Introduction This class focuses on New Testament criticism and introduction. Students will develop a deeper understanding of the nature, text and problems of the New Testament. Class time consists of instructor lectures and some student presentations accompanied by electronic presentations. (4 hours) GB 562 Introduction to Biblical Archaeology A study of the ancient biblical world through historical surveys, material culture and other related “background� issues. The primary purpose is to discover what ancient Near Eastern history, as told in the ruins and relics, reveals about biblical-historical Israel. This will be a visual learning experience, including lecture,

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COURSES OF INSTRUCTION

discussions and assigned readings. The learner will better understand the value of archaeology for biblical studies and other faith-related issues. (4 hours) GB 564 Old Testament Introduction A study of the reasons for believing the Old Testament. The course includes manuscript evidences, ancient translations, canonicity and evaluation of the Apocrypha and the Dead Sea Scrolls. Each OT book is studied to learn its date, authorship and teaching. Critical theories about authorship are investigated. The class follows a lecture, discussion and research format. (4 hours)

Doctrine DO 121 Christian Life A course designed to give a biblical understanding of Christian character and conduct. Students gain a scriptural view of themselves, their interpersonal relations and their relationship to God, with emphasis on the spiritual disciplines. A study of Scripture and devotional literature challenges the student to excellence in Christian living and service. The course will be taught through the practice of spiritual disciplines, interactive lecture, written projects, memory and tests. (2 hours) DO 125 Christ and the Bible (Also available as an online course DO 125L) An introductory study of the nature of the Bible and the primary claims of Jesus Christ. Students learn about the formation of the Bible as Canon, the nature of Jesus Christ and the fundamentals of personal Bible Study. The course will be taught through interactive lecture, written projects and tests. (3 hours) DO 210 Family in the Bible This course is a study of biblical passages that pertain to the family with specific application to the organization of the family, the relationship of family members to each other and the development of faith through family life. The class is conducted by lecture and class discussion. (2 hours) DO 224 Worship A study of the Bible’s teaching concerning worship and application of that teaching to both public and private expressions of worship. Attention is given to evaluation of current practices in the light of the Bible’s teaching, establishing one’s own private, personal worship, and the current issues of cultural relevance and evangelism. The role of music in worship is studied with attention given to the selection and direction of songs appropriate for worship. The course will be taught through interactive lecture, written projects and tests. (2 hours)

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DO 323 Ethics An introductory study of New Testament teaching about ethical standards and moral conduct. Students learn the development of moral thought and behavior according to the Bible, and compare philosophical ethics with biblical ethics. The course will be taught through interactive lecture, written projects and tests. (2 hours) DO 332 Spiritual Formation Retreat (DO 333 Wilderness Challenge may be substituted)

An advanced Christian Life Retreat where students evaluate their spiritual health, while being exposed and participating in the fundamental forms of prayer, meditation, contemplation and other spiritual disciplines rooted in the Christian tradition. The course will have biblical, historical, theological, pastoral components and exercises. (2 hours) DO 333 Wilderness Challenge Students will be challenged to grow spiritually, mentally and physically in the areas of self-awareness, confidence and team unity through the rigors of a ten-day wilderness experience and a weekend seminar. (2 hours) DO 440 Theological Integration for Ministry A capstone course to integrate a student’s study and development from a biblical or ministry perspective. Students will integrate their major or specialization through an e-portfolio project. Several testing measurements will be used. (2 hours) DO 513 Doctrine of Heaven and Hell A study of the doctrine of heaven and hell as revealed in Scripture. Each student will research a specific aspect of the topic and present a paper for class discussion. Class pedagogy will also include assigned readings, lecture and a critique of other students’ papers. (2 hours) DO 523 Doctrine of Christ A course designed to insure a working knowledge of the person and work of Jesus Christ. Students produce a seminar paper that synthesizes a specific aspect of Christ. The class is conducted in a research and seminar format. (2 hours) DO 524 Doctrine of the End Times A scriptural study of eschatology. Students produce a seminar paper that synthesizes a specific aspect of the doctrine of the end times. The class is conducted in a research and seminar format. (2 hours) DO 525 Christian Experience A study of the “mind of Christ’’ as it expresses itself in the life of the believer. An attempt to trace the course of personal Christianity so as to avoid the dangers 128


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of cold legalism or formalism on the one hand and the extremes of emotionalism on the other. The method will be directed research (reading and reports). Such subjects as conversion, Christian growth, the Holy Spirit in the life of the Christian, will be studied. (2 hours) DO 526 Doctrine of the Church A study of the doctrine of God’s Covenant Community, the Body and Bride of Christ from the Scriptures. In a seminar format students will produce a major doctrinal paper synthesizing biblical teachings about a specific aspect of the church. Class pedagogy consists of lectures, readings and critique of students’ papers. (2 hours) DO 527 Doctrine of the Holy Spirit A study of the doctrine of the Holy Spirit as revealed in the Bible, primarily the New Testament. In a seminar format each student will produce a paper dealing with some aspect of the Holy Spirit. Class pedagogy consists of readings, lecture and a critique of other students’ papers. (2 hours) DO 535 Doctrine of God A study of the doctrine of God as revealed in the Bible and Patristic sources. The “Classic” view of God will be presented and defended. Students will be exposed to contemporary theologies as well. The class will be conducted in a seminar format with each student producing a paper dealing with some characteristic of God. Class pedagogy consists of readings, lecture and a critique of other students’ papers. (2 hours)

AREA OF GENERAL STUDIES The student who successfully completes the required courses in this area should be able to: 1. Practice the principles of clear thinking and effective written and oral communication. 2. Demonstrate knowledge of the principles, methods and tools of interpretation that can be applied to the Bible and to any piece of literature. 3. Manifest knowledge of the relationship of Christianity to the history of western civilization. 4. Identify geographical locations important to an understanding of biblical history. 5. Understand key contemporary worldviews and be able to explain and defend the Christian worldview.

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6. Develop proficiency in the use of biblical languages so he or she can gain the best possible understanding of the Word of God (provided the BTh program is elected).

Apologetics AP 364 Apologetics A defense of historical, supernatural Christianity examining historical and philosophical evidences upholding the truth of Christianity and responding to attacks against the Christian faith from philosophy, science, religion and culture. The student should be strengthened in his or her personal faith and be prepared to defend Christianity in response to attacks. The course includes lecture, readings, book reports, videos and discussion. Prerequisite: DO 125 Christ and the Bible. (4 hours) AP 365R Issues in Apologetics The course will acquaint the student with current issues and significant recent resources in apologetic literature published since AD 2000. This is a directed readings course with the student choosing sources from the given bibliography. (2 hours) AP 401R Christianity and Culture A directed readings course, helping students understand contemporary Western culture, and how the Christian faith intersects with the worldviews of modern and postmodern society. Students will learn basic approaches Christians have toward culture, and how culture shapes Christian mission and ecclesiology. In addition to directed readings, students will engage critically with products of contemporary culture, and give oral presentations. (2 hours) AP 402 Third Quest A study of the Historical Jesus, designed to help the student master the critical issues in determining who Jesus was from the historical and sociological data. Students produce a seminar paper that synthesizes a particular nuance of the subject. (2 hours) AP 404 Backgrounds for Biblical Studies A course on primary readings which shed light on the culture, history and theology of the biblical text. Students produce a commentary on a section of Scriptures from primary sources. (2 hours) AP 405R Backgrounds for Biblical Studies Additional readings beyond AP 404. (2 hours) 130


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Business Education BE 112 Introduction to Computers This course introduces the student to the computer. The student examines the computer and realizes the computer’s potential as a word processor, a database, a spreadsheet, and as a tool in education. (2 hours) BE 219 Personal Finance A course designed to introduce students to methods that will assist them in managing money. Students learn to budget income and expenses, to evaluate insurance needs, to assess investment and to use credit wisely. Students are also introduced to income tax regulations and forms, with emphasis given to special circumstances applicable to minis­ters. (2 hours) BE 220 Professional Development This course will teach the techniques and personal qualities needed to succeed as professionals in an administrative ministry setting. (3 hours) BE 255 Introduction to Library and Information This course offers practical help on the organization and management of personal and church libraries. It is also designed to introduce librarianship as a career option. Some attention is given to developing libraries in other cultures. Varied on-site experiences are provided through the college’s library. (2 hours) BE 320 Fundamentals of Administrative Finance An examination of accounting and financial reporting, principles for nonprofit organizations. Prerequisite: BE 219 Personal Finance. (3 hours) BE 415 Program Development and Implementation This course will train students to provide practical solutions to real world problems within a ministry setting. (3 hours) BE 425 Building Teams This course uses an experiential approach to learning the skills and attitudes necessary for building and leading effective teams. (3 hours)

Communications Methods CM 113 Speech 1 Speech 1 involves instruction and interaction concerning the formation and oral presentation of material. The student will be involved in research, writing and

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delivery of speeches, primarily in extemporaneous speaking with some exposure to impromptu and manuscript styles. The student will gain experience and increased confidence through a number of speaking opportunities in order to discover and develop speaking skills. (3 hours, one extra hour lab) CM 114 Speech 2 A study of psychological, logical and ethical persuasive appeals and methods. Both principles and practice are adapted primarily to public address and evangelistic appeals. The student will be involved in research, writing and delivery of speeches. The course includes some instruction and practice in debate and other especially difficult speaking situations. Prerequisite: at least one full year of high school speech. (3 hours, one extra hour lab) CM 118 Introduction to Radio Broadcasting A practical course for the student wanting instruction and experience in radio broadcasting. A combination of theory and hands-on learning. This course includes a study of writing, announcing, equipment operation and program formatting. (2 hours) CM 311S Seminar/Writing for Publication A seminar on learning how to write for publication. Students will be exposed to several models of writing and be required to submit an article for publication. Prerequisite: EL 118 English Comp 1. (1 hour)

English Language EL 118 English Composition 1 The first course in English Composition teaches fundamental skills necessary for competent writing. Students will read professional essays. Students will write several essays including Description, Narration and Division-Classification. (3 hours) EL 119 English Composition 2 The second course in English composition builds upon the fundamentals of writing acquired in Comp 1. In Comp 2 students move to more objective writing, using sources for their essays. Students will write several essays including a persuasion paper, a research paper and a literary analysis. Prerequisite: EL 118 English Composition 1. (3 hours) EL 210 Writing and Research This class is designed to prepare students for the variety of writing demands they will face in their pursuit of a college degree (or degrees) and in various careers. An assortment of content and mechanical skills will be practiced in a number of 132


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personal essays and then attention will be given to the particular requirements for writing persuasive and research papers. Limited to certain degrees only. (3 hours) EL 213 Children’s Literature A course designed to familiarize the potential elementary teacher with literature suited to children from kindergarten through the eighth grade. Emphasis is given to the techniques of presentation, dramatization, story telling, and the history and development of children’s books. (3 hours) EL 219 Analytical Grammar A hermeneutical tool that gives an overview of the relationships among words in various sentence patterns. Students will learn to diagram sentences and to identify key grammatical components in sentences. Course combines lecture with daily assignments from a workbook. (4 hours) EL 316 British Literature This course will acquaint students with major English authors from the sixteenth to the twentieth century. Readings include: William Shakespeare’s King Lear, John Milton’s Paradise Lost and selections from Blake, Wordsworth, Shelley, Hopkins, Browning, Tennyson, Joyce, Yeats and Eliot. (3 hours) EL 317 Masterpieces of Western Literature Students will read and discuss great works of literature from the sixteenth century to the twentieth Century. The course will acquaint students with the works of authors such as William Shakespeare, John Milton, Fyodor Dostoevsky, T.S. Eliot, W.B. Yeats and George Orwell. Additional reading selections will include Leo Tolstoy’s The Death of Ivan Ilych, Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s One Day in Life of Ivan Denisovich, Albert Camus’ The Stranger, and the short fiction of Flannery O’Connor. (3 hours)

History HI 221 History of Western Civilization An overview of western civilization from the Italian Renaissance to the present. This study of western culture emphasizes contributory intellectual developments and economic systems, as well as events of major historical significance. The course will consist primarily of lectures enhanced by handouts. (3 hours) HI 222 U.S. History 1492 to 1877 A survey of the history of America from Colonial times to 1877. Emphasis is given to the basic values safeguarded in our founding documents and to the role of

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religion in American life. The course will consist primarily of lectures enhanced by handouts. (3 hours) HI 224 World Geography (In some programs Bible Lands and Lifeways HI 226D can be substituted)

Systematic survey of the ancient biblical world, emphasizing the interrelationship between Bible geography and Bible history. Special attention is given to SyroPalestine. Based on the Great Commission, this course also surveys world regions and their impact for global missions. Visual learning, lecture, discussion and assigned readings will aid the learner in understanding the value of geography for biblical studies. (3 hours) HI 225 Geography of Israel Involves participation in a guided tour of Israel with selected readings. (2 hours) HI 226D Bible Lands and Lifeways This course presents a multimedia exploration of the geography and cultures of the Bible, and incorporates on-site videos, interactive maps, and a variety of learning tools to help students learn their way around the Holy Land. (3 hours) HI 321 Church History (Also available as a Readings/Independent Study HI 321R; also available as an online course in a 3-hour format HI321D)

Church history is a survey of the history of Christianity. Students will come to know the major personalities, events and lessons of church history. This is a lectureformat course complemented by handouts and electronic presentations. (4 hours) HI 322 Restoration History (Also available as a Readings/Independent Study HI 322R; also available as an online course, HI 322D)

This course is a survey of the history of the Restoration Movement. Students will come to know the major personalities, principles, philosophy and events of Restoration History. The course will consist primarily of lectures enhanced by handouts and electronic presentations. (3 hours) HI 325 Restoration Origins This course is designed as a travel-tour version of the on-campus course, Restoration History. Students enrolled in the course will visit several primary historical sites associated with the history of the Restoration Movement. Through assigned reading and presentation on the tour, the major personalities and principles of the Restoration Movement will be presented covering more than 200 years of church history. (3 hours)

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HI 331 History of Christian Worship (Also available as an online course HI 331D)

An overview of the history of Christian worship from the first century to present, focusing primarily on worship in the Western (Latin) and Protestant traditions. The course emphasizes the theology, architecture, practice (liturgy), art and music of corporate worship in the Roman world, Europe and the United States. The lecture format is used and complemented by electronic multi-media and group projects. (3 hours)

Language LA 111 Spanish 1 An introduction to the vocabulary and syntax of the Spanish language. (3 hours) LA 172 Theories and Principles of English Language Teaching This course serves as an introduction to theories and principles of English language teaching. Students will examine: ESL programs, first and secondlanguage acquisition, psychological and sociocultural factors that influence the language learner as well as error analysis and treatment. Current issues in SLA (second language acquisition) will also be addressed, as well as assessing the language learner’s English language proficiency. Students are expected to report on ESL classroom observations. (3 hours) LA 210 Spanish 2 A continuation of LA 111 Spanish 1. Prerequisite: LA 111 Spanish 1. (3 hours) LA 211 Greek 1 (A) New Testament Greek for beginners, with emphasis on noun declensions and indicative verbs. Basic translation principles are introduced through exposure to the Greek New Testament and textbook exercises. (4 hours) LA 212 Greek 1 (B) This course completes the coverage of the basic grammar and vocabulary of the New Testament. Special attention is given to the complete verb system of New Testament Greek. Prerequisite: LA 211 Greek 1 (A). (4 hours) LA 213 Introduction to Biblical Languages The student who has not studied Hebrew or Greek is introduced to the resources and methods that will enable him or her to learn the meaning of Bible words in the original languages. (2 hours)

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LA 216 Introduction to Linguistics The course provides an introduction to the scientific study of human language. Students will explore areas of study in the field of linguistics including Phonology (sounds and patterns), Morphology (words), Semantics (meaning), Syntax (structure), Pragmatics (language use), and first and second language acquisition theories. (3 hours) LA 217 Phonetics A study of the sounds used in language, with particular attention to the symbols, i.e., the International Phonetic Alphabet, and the production, transfer and reception of sounds across languages. Prerequisite: LA 216 Introduction to Linguistics. (2 hours) LA 273 Methods and Materials for English Language Teaching This course is to prepare students for actual teaching situations by making class observation and creating lessons. A variety of techniques for teaching English language will be introduced. Prerequisite: LA 172 Theories and Principles of English Language Teaching (Check with TESOL Instructor). (3 hours) LA 311 Greek 2 (A) Intermediate NT Greek, with continuing emphasis on syntax and vocabulary. A special area of concentration is the research and writing of Greek word studies. Prerequisite: LA 212 Greek 1 (B). (3 hours) LA 312 Greek 2 (B) This semester of intermediate Greek completes the instruction of special features of grammar in the Greek New Testament. Principles of exegesis are thoroughly discussed and applied. A working knowledge of the vocabulary of the Greek NT is finalized. Prerequisite: LA 311 Greek 2(A). (3 hours) LA 314 Hebrew 1 (A) Introduction to the study of biblical Hebrew. Students study a grammar textbook to learn Hebrew vocabulary and grammatical forms, and read simple sections from the Hebrew Scriptures. (4 hours) LA 315 Hebrew 1 (B) A continuation of LA 314, study of biblical Hebrew 1. Students continue study of a grammar textbook, expand vocabulary knowledge, and translate extensive sections of Hebrew Scripture, such as the Book of Ruth. Prerequisite: LA 314 Hebrew 1 (A). (4 hours) LA 373 TESOL Practicum Students will apply knowledge gained in previous course work during 70 hours 136


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of clinical teaching experience. They will develop and implement lesson and unit plans. Meeting with the instructor and peer coach will help students to identify methodologies and influences in their own teaching. They will also develop and use a practical teaching portfolio. Prerequisite: See TESOL Instructor. (3 hours) LA 411 Greek 3 (A) Advanced NT Greek, with extensive reading from the New Testament to develop facility in translation. Attention is given to the exegetical process, attempting to grasp the exact meaning of the author by examining the exact form of expression. Prerequisite: LA 312 Greek 2 (B). (2 hours) LA 412 Greek 3 (B) Advanced NT Greek, with careful reading of large sections of the New Testament not covered in LA 411 Advanced Greek I. With the application of computer technology, investigation is conducted to derive new grammatical insights. Prerequisite: LA 411 Greek 3 (A). (2 hours) LA 414 Hebrew Exegesis 1 An advanced study of the Hebrew language, accompanied by the reading of large sections of the Old Testament in Hebrew. Systematic vocabulary development continues. Prerequisite: LA 315 Hebrew 1 (B). (2 hours) LA 415 Hebrew Exegesis 2 A continuation of LA 414, advanced study of the Hebrew language. Advanced grammar study continues and extensive portions of Scripture are translated. An introduction to the paleo-Hebrew script is included. Prerequisite: LA 315 Hebrew 1 (B). (2 hours) LA 430 Biblical Aramaic Introduction to the study of biblical Aramaic. Students study a grammar textbook designed to cover much of the text in the Aramaic portions of Ezra and Daniel. A brief introduction to early Aramaic inscriptions is presented, including an examination of the early scripts. Prerequisites: LA 314 Hebrew 1 (A) and LA 315 Hebrew 1 (B). (2 hours) LA 440 Syriac An introduction to the Syriac (A Christian Aramaic) language. Students study a grammar textbook to learn Syriac vocabulary and grammatical forms. Selections from the Syriac Bible (Peshitta) and other texts will be examined as time permits. Prerequisite: One year of a Semitic language, e.g., Hebrew, or permission from the instructor. (LA 430 Biblical Aramaic is also recommended before taking.) (2 hours)

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LA 450 Ugaritic This is an introduction to the study of the Ugaritic language, an ancient Semitic language with close ties to Canaanite linguistics and culture. Students study a grammar textbook to learn Ugaritic vocabulary and grammatical forms. Prerequisite: One year of a Semitic language, e.g., Hebrew, or permission from the instructor. (LA 430 Biblical Aramaic is also recommended before taking.) (2 hours)

Psychology and Counseling PC 201 Healthy Relationships This course will cover the often overlooked fundamental, biblical principles of healthy relationships including such dynamics as family of origin, friendships, dating and working relationships. Students will learn to follow the lead of Christ as they relate to others with both confidence and gentleness, assertiveness and sacrifice, persuasiveness and humility. Pedagogical techniques will include lecture, in-class demonstrations, hands-on exercises and personal spiritual reflection. (2 hours) PC 216 Psychology A general survey of the interests and fields of psychology such as human development, perception, learning, personality and psychological disorders, and treatment theory. Current popular conceptions about the nature of man, health and healing are analyzed in light of psychological theory and discovery. Special emphasis is given to integrating modern psychology and theory in the light of scriptural principles, and the use of such insight in the work of the Christian minister. (3 hours) PC 218 Principles of Family Living God’s order for the family seen in the Bible, as a benefit to each family member, and as an essential basis for the strength of the church. (2 hours) PC 270S Seminar in Marriage and Family Life A study of the primary issues facing today’s marriages and families. Students will learn of the stresses that families face today and consider Christian remedies for those stresses. The class will consist of lecture and interactive role play, for class methodologies. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (1 hour) PC 281 Pastoral Counseling A basic counseling course for students training for vocational ministry. Students will learn how to do some appropriate levels of counseling as part of their ministry in the church and how and when to refer clients to professionals. Class will consist of lecture, group discussions, problem solving and role play. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (2 hours) 138


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PC 291S Seminar in Suicide Intervention This course consists of training in the QPR method of suicide intervention by a certified and licensed instructor and reading in the area of suicide prevention, intervention and pastoral care of survivors. Students will learn and be able to implement the three main steps of suicide intervention according to the QPR method of training. They will also be able to identify the specific behaviors that identify a person who is at risk as a possible suicide. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (1 hour) PC 310S Seminar in Administering and Interpreting the Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis This seminar provides special training so that the student will be qualified and certified to use the TJTA assessment test for use in individual, premarital and marital counseling. Students will learn how to correctly administer and interpret the TJTA testing instrument. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (1 hour) PC 317 Introduction to Counseling An introductory study of counseling methods, issues and application. Students learn a Christian counseling approach, survey various secular approaches, and work toward developing their own Christian counseling style through in-class activities and an analysis of specific counseling scenarios. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (3 hours) PC 318 Counseling Youth Counseling Youth is designed to offer insight and skills into the basic problems of adolescents. An overview of common adolescent problems, areas of family conflict and special crisis issues common to youth, is examined. Counseling Youth provides a Christian framework that will enable the student to minister directly to troubled teens and to assist the student in evaluating various counseling models and techniques when referring youth for professional counseling. Students will accomplish this through lecture, discussion, small groups, and case studies as well as observations outside of the classroom. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (2 hours) PC 319S Seminar in Parenting Skills An intensive seminar in advanced techniques of parenting, designed to prepare the student to be an effective parent and to be an effective minister to parents. Identification of problem areas and strategies for solutions are presented. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (1 hour) PC 321 Pre-Marital Counseling This course will be a survey of the principles and methods of counseling couples that are preparing for marriage. Important topic areas include: an understanding of biblical roles, marriage expectations, personality, communication, conflict resolution, finances, leisure activities, sexual expectations, parenting, fam139


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ily of origin and spiritual beliefs. Class participants will learn to enhance their own relationships as they learn to assist others in preparing for marriage. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (2 hours) PC 322 Ministering to Women in Crisis A course designed to examine the unique crises affecting women in our culture today. Issues such as crisis pregnancies, physical and sexual abuse, domestic violence, abortion, miscarriage, menopause and empty-nest syndrome will be discussed. Students will explore the nature of these crises as well as the ways to minister to these women through readings, lecture, discussion, and case studies. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (2 hours) PC 323S Seminar in Group Dynamics The study of how people act in groups. Students will learn the dynamics of group interaction through lecture and group interaction itself. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (1 hour) PC 340S Seminar/Prepare and Enrich This course provides special training for Christian leaders to use with premarital and married couples who want to get their marriage off to a good start or enrich their marriage. Students will learn how to access premarital or marital couples as being in one of five key relationship types. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (1 hour) PC350S Strategic Lay Counseling Strategic lay counseling provides the student with a philosophy of lay counseling, an understanding of the legal issues pertaining to lay counseling, and a specific plan on how to train lay leaders with the basic skills needed to provide spiritual counseling in the church. Students will learn how to train lay counselors to do intakes, evaluations, counseling and follow up. The course will be taught through lecture, PowerPoint, case studies, reading assignments, video, and role play. (1 hour) PC 412 Crisis Counseling A study of the nature, common causes and skills used to respond to personal crises in the local church or counseling ministry. The student will learn a biblical framework for understanding and responding to crises, as well as mastering fundamental counseling skills used in responding to these. The course will utilize readings, lecture, guided experiences and skill-centered projects. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (2 hours) PC 413 Systems in Family and Congregational Life A study of the general systems model as it relates to functional and dysfunctional behavior within the home, as well as within the church. The student will be able to demonstrate a mastery of the concepts of systems thinking and the ability to use 140


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these to assess and respond to struggles in the home and the local church. The course uses biblical examples, readings, lecture, guided assessment and directed projects to provide both a congregational framework and practical application of the principles. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (2 hours) PC 415S Seminar in Christian Counseling (AACC Convention) This course involves participation in the annual American Association of Christian Counselors convention. Major Christian counselors, counseling organizations, publishing houses and graduate training institutions are regular participants in the AACC convention. Main sessions and workshops afford a unique opportunity for students to learn from the most qualified Christian counselors and teachers on a wide variety of counseling issues. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (1 hour) PC 416 Abnormal Psychology This course will explore the major approaches to understanding what constitutes “abnormal behavior” including the physiological, behavioral, psychoanalytical, humanistic, cognitive and family system approaches. The students will learn how to evaluate abnormal behavior from childhood through adulthood as well as be familiar with the most common treatment methods and the associated legal and ethical issues that accompany the treatment of mentally ill patients from a Christian worldview. The course will be taught through lecture, PowerPoint, videos, case studies, research projects and presentations where student groups will be assigned opposing sides concerning some controversial aspect or treatment of mental illness. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (3 hours) PC 417 Developmental Psychology The tracing of the developing human psyche in the course of the normal life cycle. Students will learn the moral, emotional, physiological and psychological development of the human psyche in chronological format. The class will be conducted through lecture, case studies, group discussions and videos. Prerequisite: PC 216 Psychology. (3 hours)

Physical Education Our bodies are the temple of God and physical wellness can be a great benefit in one’s service to Christ. A maximum of two hours of PE will count toward degree requirements. PE 110 Lifetime Wellness This course presents information about the benefits of a healthy lifestyle.

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Attention is given to eating and exercise habits. Classroom work is supplemented by a prescribed regimen of exercise. (1 hour) PE 115 Varsity Basketball - Men Involves inter-collegiate participation in basketball. Class meets four times a week during the basketball season. (1 hour) PE 116 Varsity Basketball - Women Involves inter-collegiate participation in basketball. Class meets four times a week during the basketball season. (1 hour) PE 117 Varsity Volleyball - Women Involves inter-collegiate participation in volleyball. Class meets four times a week during the volleyball season. (1 hour) PE 120 Varsity Sport Activity Fee Any student who has already fulfilled their Lifetime Wellness requirement may be enrolled in any Varsity Sports programs under this course. (0 hour) PE 210 Nursing Basics This course is designed to help the student learn how to handle common health problems as well as be alert to health needs. (1 hour) PE 212 Varsity Soccer - Men (Fall 2012) Involves inter-collegiate participation in soccer. Class meets four times a week during soccer season. (1 hour) PE 214 Varsity Baseball - Men Involves inter-collegiate participation in baseball. Class meets four times a week during baseball season. (1 hour)

Philosophy and Interpretation PI 214S Seminar in the Spiritual Discipline of Reading (1 hour) PI 215 Principles of Interpretation An introductory course concerning the principles of interpreting language. Students learn both general and specific principles required to interpret and apply the Bible accurately. The course will be taught through interactive lecture, a major exegetical project and tests. Prerequisite DO 125 Christ and the Bible. (3 hours)

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PI 220 Philosophy An introduction to the history and the major problems of philosophy, showing their relationship to the divine truth revealed in the Scriptures, and their effect upon the thinking and attitudes of the people. The course will be taught through interactive lecture, written projects and tests. (3 hours) PI 316 Cults A comprehensive overview and examination of the major religious cults (Mormonism, Jehovah’s Witnesses, New Age and the Occult) and their theological positions in light of Scripture. The course will be taught through interactive lecture, written projects and tests. (2 hours) PI 317 C.S. Lewis Legacy This course will serve as a “primer” on the life and literary works of C.S. Lewis. His major writings will be briefly introduced with the goal of each student committing to a lifetime of further study. Directed readings, exposure to major works, lecture and assigned projects will focus this seminar. (1 hour)

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PI 318 Logic A study of the science of reasoning or how to think. A systematic examination of the methods by which we reach conclusions and produce convictions. A survey of formal deductive logic, showing its uses and limitations. (3 hours)

Science SI 361 Creation and Science This course is an introductory study of the relationship between Christian faith and science, with emphasis on biblical teaching and scientific evidences for creation, as well as an examination of the theory of evolution and scientific naturalism. Students will learn the scientific validity of the supernatural creation of Genesis and its foundational relationship to New Testament Christianity. The class is conducted by means of lecture, discussion, readings/research and videos. (2 hours)

Student Development SD 110 College Life and Orientation This course introduces students to life at OCC, campus resources, academic goals and planning, methods of improving study skills and solutions to problems frequently encountered by new students. Students will meet with special department representatives and faculty through large and small group encounters. (1 hour) SD 112 Study Skills 1 A course designed to equip and encourage students to be academically successful. Students acquire personal organization, note taking, test taking, research and paper writing skills. Positive study habits are developed through course lectures, brief writing assignments and weekly accountability. (1 hour) SD 212 Study Skills 2 A course designed to equip students with self-management skills. Students critically exam self-perceptions, values and decision making habits in order to improve motivation, personal responsibility, and organization skills. Productive selfmanagement habits are developed through course discussions, reading, writing assignments and weekly accountability. (1 hour) SD 310 Perspectives on Prior Learning This course reviews the process for developing a prior learning portfolio. Students gain an awareness of experiential learning theory and improve writing skills. A synthesis of prior learning experiences is created through a series of

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reflective and critical-thinking writing assignments leading up to the development of a Credit for Prior Learning Portfolio (SD 399). Portfolios may be submitted as a petition for credit for college-level experiential learning. (1 hour)

AREA OF PROFESSIONAL STUDIES The student who successfully completes the required courses in this area should be able to: 1. Serve more effectively as a leader and worker in the local church. 2. Lead a person to understand the plan of salvation taught in the New Testament. 3. Appreciate the need for evangelism and understand the methods for reaching the lost. 4. Communicate the truth of the word of God through preaching or teaching. 5. Demonstrate skills for Christian service in various ministry specializations.

Christian Education CE 155 Drama in Ministry and Education Philosophy, history, and use of drama and technical theater as a means of enriching the local church program of worship, education and evangelism. An overview of most technical aspects of producing a drama will be covered with hands-on experience in theater craft, lighting, makeup and costuming. Sketches and scripts will be selected and performed in class honing acting ability through improvisation and exercise. These techniques of preparation and presentation are applied in actual dramatic performance when possible. (2 hours) CE 157 Foundations for Christian Education An introduction to the educational ministry of the church. Students investigate biblical, historical, educational and leadership themes that form a theological foundation for the development of an effective disciple-making process. Educational administrative skills are gained through course lectures, contemporary readings and a ministry team planning project. (2 hours) CE 237S Seminar in Leading Children to Christ This course will help the student to understand and be able to articulate the biblical foundational issues related to children and their ability to have faith. (1 hour)

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CE 249S Seminar/Current Practices in CE (1 hour) CE 252 Strategies for Teaching A course designed to explore the strategies governing the teaching/learning process and the methods used to convey biblical truth in the lesson plan, the classroom setting and the teacher/student relationship. The student will demonstrate mastery of the process through involvement in readings, lecture, discussion and lessons taught inside and outside the classroom setting. Prerequisite: CE 157 Foundations for Christian Education. (3 hours, one extra lab hour) CE 256 Child Care Administration This course is designed to provide a student interested in the management and operation of a child-care facility. This would include the state and local regulations, financial needs and record keeping, staff and personnel responsibilities, facilities and curriculum requirements, and the safety and nutritional care of the children. This course is to give an overview of the ministry requirements to lead a child-care program, whether self-owned, church directed, or operated as a commercial or institutional business. (3 hours) CE 257 Teaching the Developing Student Examination of the five domains of human development across the lifespan (physical, social, emotional, mental and spiritual/moral). Class will involve lecture, small group discussion, curriculum development and problem solving. Upon completion of the course, students will know how human development impacts both the learner and the teacher as well as how they as teachers can use developmental knowledge to be effective teachers in the classroom. Prerequisite: CE 252 Strategies for Teachings. (4 hours) CE 259S Seminar in Schooling Alternatives An overview of the three most common schooling alternatives. Students examine the Christian school, home school and public school options available to many Christian families. (1 hour) CE 261D Creative Bible Teaching This course provides practical methods for teaching the Bible, including principles for teaching/learning and for lesson construction. Students are guided in the step-by-step development of lesson plans. Various teaching techniques are researched, discussed and presented in field experiences by the student. (3 hours) CE 271S Seminar in Special Programming/Children’s Ministry This course will help students create a philosophy for children’s ministry,

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analyze present-day children’s programming in the church, and design and execute an effective children’s ministry calendar. (1 hour) CE 272S Seminar in Service Projects for Youth (1 hour) CE 273S Seminar in Small Groups for Children (1 hour) CE 274S Seminar in Ministry to Children in Crisis (1 hour) CE 276S Seminar in Children and Worship This course will help students to analyze worship programs for children and create worship settings that will involve elements which will reach various learning styles of children. (1 hour) CE 318S Seminar in Educational Technology A survey of modem technology and information services useful for ministryrelated activities. (1 hour) CE 319S Seminar in CE and the Sunday School Specialized study in the latest tools and methods for use in the Sunday school ministry of the church. (1 hour) CE 320S Seminar in the Exceptional Child (1 hour) CE 321S Seminar in Children’s Ministry A field trip experience for students to a prominent children’s ministry in a local church. Students will be exposed to various active children’s ministers and their work in children’s ministry. Lecture, presentations and observation will be the key learning methods. (1 hour) CE 331 Curriculum Planning A course designed to survey the curriculum needs for the educational programming in the local church at every age level. Attention will be given to the development of a scope and sequence, writing lessons for publication and evaluating curriculum already in existence from various Christian publishing companies. Prerequisite: CE 252 Strategies for Teaching. (2 hours) CE 352 Early Childhood Curriculum 1 This course is designed to provide a study of curriculum planning for an early childhood program. Students examine the developmental stages of children (0-6) and their application to each curriculum area. Guidelines and methods for teaching are presented for curriculum design in the areas of art, dramatic play, large and

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small motor activities, music, sensory activities, math, science and language development. (3 hours) CE 353 Educational Psychology A study of the various theories of learning as they apply to the Christian worldview of the learners, their learning style and their personality development. Attention is given to the history and development of each theory, the various levels and patterns of learning, classroom management and climate, and the motivation and evaluation of the learners through lecture, observation, readings and lesson planning. Prerequisite: CE 257 Teaching the Developing Student. (3 hours) CE 354 Expository Teaching A course designed to provide instruction and practice in preparing and teaching expository lessons from Scripture. Students learn to develop these lessons with application and life response applicable to the needs of the learners. Prerequisite: PI 215 Principles of Interpretation and MN 252 Homiletics or MN 242 Biblical Communication for Women. (3 hours, one extra hour lab) CE 358 Early Childhood Curriculum 2 A continuation of Early Childhood Curriculum 1. Prerequisite: CE 352 Early Childhood Curriculum 1. (3 hours) CE 361S Seminar in Theories of Learning This seminar will cover a number of classical understandings of how people learn. The purpose of the seminar is for the Christian leader to be able to recognize how those in the family of God learn best and be able to adapt styles of learning that will enhance the growth and development of Christians. Readings, discussion and lecture will be the format of the class followed by a written report on your observation of a learning environment in the local church. (1 hour) See also EL 213 Children’s Literature and MU 278 Music for Children.

Deaf Ministry DM 110 Conversational American Sign Language This course focuses on conversational etiquette and skills for basic communication with members of the deaf community. Students will learn vocabulary in an interactive environment designed to develop receptive skills. This class is open to students with no sign language background, as well as students with experience in deaf communication courses. (2 hours)

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DM 112S Seminar in Deaf Ministry A survey of deaf ministry: what, how to and why. Students participating in this course are required to attend a major event for the Deaf. (1 hour) DM 115 Deaf Communications 1 This is the basic sign language to learn what the essentials of communication with deaf people are. (3 hours) DM 116 Deaf Communications 2 This emphasizes an increased vocabulary and improved facility in signing. Prerequisite: DM 115 Deaf Communications 1. (3 hours) DM 215 Deaf Communications 3 This teaches how to minister to the deaf, including the psychology and counseling of deaf people. This course addresses the need of manual language, and how to communicate biblical concepts. Prerequisite: DM 116 Deaf Communications 2. (2 hours) DM 216 Deaf Communications 4 An advanced course in sign language designed to develop the student’s vocabulary skills. This course is primarily American Sign Language, focusing on specialized termin­ology used in various settings. Prerequisite: DM 215 Deaf Communications 3. (2 hours, one extra hour lab) DM 217S Seminar in Introduction to Interpreting A course designed to teach the student roles, responsibilities and ethics of professional interpreting. A variety of interpreting environments is discussed. Prerequisite: DM 116 Deaf Communications 2. (1 hour) DM 218S Seminar in Interpreting Scripture and Worship Songs A course designed to develop the student’s ability to translate accurately English Bible passages into American Sign Language. The use of classifiers and spatial location is emphasized. Prerequisite: DM 116 Deaf Communications 2. (1 hour, with lab work) DM 219 Voice Interpreting An introductory course designed to teach students fundamental techniques required for voice interpreting. Projecting appropriate register including word selection is emphasized. Prerequisite: DM 215 Deaf Communications 3. (2 hours, with lab work) DM 232 Specialized Signing A sign language class concentrating on specialized signing and learning what 149


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the essentials of communication with deaf people are. Prerequisite: DM 215 Deaf Communications 3. (2 hours)

Ministry MN 153 Personal Evangelism (Also available as an online course, MN 153D) This course examines the biblical message of the evangelist, and the communication of that message. Methods and materials for leading others to discipleship are examined. Attitudes and philosophy of evangelism will be considered. Attention is given to developing evangelism as a personal lifestyle and as a church priority. Format will be lecture and discussion. (3 hours) MN 233S Seminar/ Multi-Ethnic Ministry A study of the growing trend toward intentional multi-ethnic church planting/ building and preaching. (1 hour) MN 242 Biblical Communication for Women A study of how to speak from the Bible and deliver that study in effective delivery. Students will learn the broad sweep of preparation to delivery and evaluation of messages from Scripture. Class will consist of lecture, models of good biblical communication and presentation in class. Prerequisite: CM 113 Speech 1 or CM 114 Speech 2. (3 hours, one extra lab hour) MN 243S Seminar/Church Planting/Western Heritage This seminar will require students to attend and participate in the American Fellowship of Cowboy Churches, School of Cowboy Church Planting. Students will be exposed to a missiology and methodology that seeks to plant churches in a “Western Heritage� context. This seminar will consist of lecture, discussion, group interaction and hands on training. (This course can be used as an elective in the Church Planting or Preaching specializations.) (1 hour) MN 251S Seminar in Youth Ministry This seminar is a field trip to a major youth ministry convention or event. Students will participate by their attendance in the convention and by reading and reporting on sessions and resource materials. (1 hour) MN 252 Homiletics An introductory study of the preaching task. Students learn the skills needed for sermon construction, delivery and evaluation. This class also includes sections on the history of preaching and the theology of preaching. Class will consist of lecture,

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models of good biblical communication and presentation in class. Prerequisite: CM 113 Speech 1 or CM 114 Speech 2. (3 hours, one extra hours lab) MN 253 Family Ministry This course studies the principles and methods of ministering to the modern family. Consideration is given to determining the appropriate roles within the family, the needs of children in dysfunctional homes, and the role of the church in assisting families. Prerequisite: PC 218 Principles of Family Living. (3 hours) MN 254 Foundations for Youth Ministry Students will receive instruction in creating an effective youth ministry in the local church. The course covers a history of youth ministry, development of a personal philosophy of youth ministry, models of youth ministry, characteristics and needs of today’s youth, effective teaching methods, the personal life of the youth minister, planning events and retreats, inter-staff relationships, recruiting and training of volunteers, student evangelism, and deepening students through discipleship and mentoring. Students learn through a combination of lecture, guest teachers, discussion, team work and practical projects. (3 hours) MN 255 Practical Youth Ministry This course is designed as a follow-up to Foundations for Youth Ministry (MN 254). Instruction will cover organization and administration, budgeting, planning, developing leaders, handling discipline issues, risk management and designing youth mission trips. Students will also examine the range of roles between the part-time youth minister with a small congregation and the role of youth ministry staff in the mega church. Students will learn through a combination of lecture, guest teachers, discussion, “hands on” involvement and team projects. Prerequisite: MN 254 Foundations for Youth Ministry or MN 256D Youth Ministry Dynamics. (2 hours) MN 256D Youth Ministry Dynamics The same basic content as MN 254 but available as an online course. (3 hours) MN 257 Campus Ministry A course dealing with the college and university ministry, methods, problems and possibilities. Students will learn of the unique ministry and challenges of working on a college campus. Class will consist of lecture, group discussion and field trips to area campus ministries. (3 hours) MN 258 Women’s Ministry A course designed to explore the organization and administration of a women’s ministry program in the church. Attention is given to the biblical role of women and the role of mentoring, discipleship, and programming to meet the needs of women in the areas of spiritual growth, family nurture and ministry development. 151


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Students will accomplish the objectives of this course through lecture, readings and discussion in class as well as through interviews and observations outside of class. (3 hours) MN 260 Children’s Ministry (Also available as an online course MN 260D Children’s Ministry)

This course examines the characteristics of children (0-12) and explores the methods of organization and administration of a children’s ministry program in the local church. Students develop a philosophy of children’s ministry and learn to design a balanced program for use in the church’s ministry to children and their families. Students will accomplish the objectives of this course through lecture, readings and discussion in class as well as through interviews and observations outside of class. (3 hours) MN 261 Current Trends in Children’s Ministry Exposure to some of the current movements today in children’s ministry. Students will learn the variety of programs and methods being used in the church today to reach children. Class will consist of lecture, group discussion and projects, problem solving, and some limited field trips. (2 hours) MN 262S Seminar in Children’s Ministry A field trip to Indiana to hear from some of the more prominent ministers in children’s ministry today. Students will observe first-hand principles and methods behind children’s ministry today. Directed readings and a significant project will help the student receive the most from the seminar. (1 hour) MN 272S Seminar in Practical Issues in Ministry Marriages (Women) This seminar deals with the practical side (marriage, family, church relationships, homemaking skills, organizational skills in home and church) of ministry as a husband/wife team. Students will come to grips with their personality makeup and spiritual giftedness and how that affects their marriages and ministries. This seminar is interactive with a variety of lecture, discussion, and audio and video supplements. (1 hour) MN 273 Youth Mission Trips 1 This course is the planning and developing side of preparing students for a short-term mission’s trip. Students will learn the content of what is necessary in achieving a successful mission’s trip with youth. (1 hour) MN 274 Youth Mission Trips 2 This course is the actual mission trip of MN 273. Prerequisite: MN 273 Youth Mission Trips 1. (1 hour)

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MN 280S Seminar/Changing the Culture of Your Church (1 hour) MN 291 Adult Ministry A study of adult ministry in the church today. Students will learn of the principles, methods and challenges that adult ministry faces. Class will consist of lecture, discussion, group interaction and problem solving. (3 hours) MN 301 Orientation to Church Planting This course introduces the student to urban church planting. The class will experience diverse church planting models and interact with planters from different church movements. (1 hour) NOTE: Any preaching seminar has MN 252 Homiletics (or MN 242 Biblical Communication for Women) as a prerequisite.

MN 310S Seminar in Preaching and Self-Disclosure A study of the vulnerability of the preacher’s first-person stories in the sermon. Students will learn how to disclose with discretion. The seminar will feature lecture and numerous examples of self-disclosure. (1 hour) MN 302 Multi-Site Church Students will learn principles and approaches to meeting as one church in different locations. Format will be lecture, discussion, and interaction with multisite churches. (1 hour) MN 311S Seminar in Practical Issues in Preaching A field trip to conventions, lectureships and workshops which addresses the subject of preaching today. Students will be exposed to some of the most popular communicators in the church today. Directed readings and a significant project will help students receive the most from this seminar. (1 hour) MN 316S Seminar in Preaching and Storytelling A study of the dynamics of storytelling as they relate to preaching. Students will be exposed to several models of storytelling and be challenged to find their own voice in that regard. Pre-seminar directed readings and a post-seminar assignment will focus the content of the seminar. (1 hour) MN 317S Seminar in Audience Analysis A study of the challenges related to having an accurate picture of the congregation or audience which receives the sermon and ministry. Students will be exposed to biblical principles that give insight into this issue as well as instruments that help achieve an accurate picture of an audience. Directed readings, lecture and a class project will focus this picture. (1 hour) 153


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MN 318S Seminar in Preaching and the Human Voice This seminar will examine the use and preservation of the voice including how God has created it, how to use it with good inflection, projection and utilizing it in conjunction with microphones. Students will learn how to use their voices in a healthy way that they may be able to preach with a healthy voice over the course of a lifetime. This will be accomplished via interactive exercises, lecture, practical application, professional and self-analysis. (1 hour) MN 319S Seminar in People-Helping Skills An intensive seminar in the current understanding of ways in which the spiritual and psychological needs of people can be met. Focus on development of personal skills and the ability to teach these skills to others. (1 hour) MN 320 Foundations for Church Planting This course examines the prenatal stage of a new church. Students will learn principles and methods that will encourage a healthy new church start. This course follows a lecture and discussion format. Prerequisites: NT 150 Acts. (3 hours) MN 321S Seminar in Associate Ministry An examination of the role and function of the associate minister. Students will learn how associate ministers complement and contribute to the teaching and pastoral ministry of the lead ministers. The seminar will consist of lecture, testimonies from area associate ministers, discussions and role playing. (1 hour) MN 322 Strategies for Church Health and Growth This course examines the life of a new church from birth to reproduction. Students will learn principles and strategies to encourage new church health and growth. This course follows a lecture and discussion format. (2 hours) MN 323S Seminar in Preaching and Leadership (1 hour) MN 324S Seminar in Effective Sermon Delivery (1 hour) MN 325S Seminar in Preaching and the New Church This seminar will examine the nuances of preaching in the new church plant. Through lecture, examples and sermon review students will learn the most effective sermon models for preaching in new churches. (1 hour) MN 327S Seminar in Preaching and Humor This seminar will examine the biblical roots and principles of humor as they relate to pulpit work. Students will learn through lecture, class examples and church experiences how to use humor effectively in preaching. (1 hour)

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MN 328S Seminar in the Story (History) of Preaching (1 hour) MN 329S Seminar in Preaching and Creativity (1 hour) MN 330S Seminar in Creative Writing The course addresses the growing need for ministry students to demonstrate proficiency with the written word. The main objective of this course is to aid the student in the discovery of his or her unique writing voice through a focus on the craft of writing, with practice and discussion of short stories, poetry and creative nonfiction (students will also be strongly encouraged to consider opportunities for the development of many other forms of creative writing). (1 hour) MN 331S Seminar in Funding Your Vision and Ministry This seminar will teach the principles and methods of funding vision and ministry in the church. The course is not new church plant specific. Students will learn of the challenges and joys of fund raising to accomplish the church purpose. Directed readings and class projects will focus this seminar. (1 hour) MN 332 Leadership/Team Building/People Development This course examines leadership, team building and people development issues. It will help both those going into church plants as well as existing churches. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MN 335D Principles of Leadership This course is designed to introduce the student to the successful model of servant/spiritual leadership in a Biblical context. Various principles and characteristics of servant/spiritual leadership are explored, including integrity, humility, vision, holiness, etc. (3 hours) MN 341 Legal Issues in Ministry This seminar will expose students to the unique challenges of the ministerial landscape today. Students will learn of legal issues for their own personal ministries as well as challenges faced by the church at large. Directed readings, lecture and group assignments will focus this seminar. (2 hours) MN 344S Poverty 101 Students will learn the key factors leading to generational poverty, as well as approaches to overcoming it. Format will be lecture, discussion, and interaction with ministries addressing poverty. (1 hour) MN 349 Small Group Leadership This course is designed for leaders of small groups whose purpose is maturing the participants spiritually and relationally. The course will cover types of small 155


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groups, small group leadership skills, mentoring, accountability, goals and practical methodology. (1 hour) MN 350S Seminar in Ministry to Older Adults Study is made of the physical, psychological and social needs of older adults. Attention is given to approaches being made in ministry to senior saints today. Students will be challenged to consider creative ministry to this untapped resource for the church today. Directed readings, lecture and group projects will focus this seminar. (1 hour) MN 351 Exegeting the City A course designed to present the need to evangelize cities and the methods for accomplishing the task. Students learn God’s role in cities ancient and modern. They go on field trips to observe successful urban ministries, volunteer at least two hours in urban ministries or agencies and present a written strategy for a proposed urban ministry. (2 hours) MN 352 Expository Preaching A course designed to aid in the construction and delivery of the expository sermon. Students learn how to craft a series of sermons from one Bible book. The class follows a lecture and student-preaching format. Prerequisite: MN 252 Homiletics and PI 215 Principles of Interpretation. (3 hours, one extra hour lab) MN 354 Introduction to Church Growth An introductory study of the factors influencing the growth or non-growth of the church. Emphasis is given to the application of the principles of church growth to local churches. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MN 355S Seminar in Ministry Through Small Groups A specialized study of group dynamics and the techniques that are being used successfully in small group in the local church. Directed readings, lecture and small-group interaction will focus this seminar. (1 hour) MN 370S Seminar in Inductive Preaching This seminar will explore indirect preaching as a distinct preaching style. Students will learn through class discussion, sermon review, and various examples of the values and skills of inductive preaching. (1 hour) MN 372S Seminar in Preaching to Youth This seminar examines the factors related to preaching to today’s middle school and high school student. Participants will learn how to package Scripture in culturally relevant ways to impact today’s youth. The seminar will follow a lecture and model format. (1 hour) 156


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MN 373S Seminar in Teaching Adults This seminar introduces a variety of topics related to the effective teaching of adults in the church. Through lecture and peer interaction, participants will discus pertinent biblical/theological themes, survey adult educational theories and consider teaching methods that adequately facilitate adult learning. Prerequisite: MN 291 Adult Ministry. (1 hour) MN 374S Seminar in Ministering to the Grieving This seminar will address the issue of grief and how to minister to those who are grieving. Some of the topics addressed include: what is grief, how people grieve differently, what is “recovery,” tools for recovery and grieving children. Students will learn through lecture and class discussions. (1 hour) MN 375S Seminar/Ministry in the Funeral This course will include discussion of normal grief and reactions to loss, and ways to help people who are grieving. (1 hour) MN 410 Leadership in Ministry A study of the dynamics of leadership and administration as they apply in the local church setting. Class meetings will involve lecture, small group discussion, problem solving and role play. During the course, each student will be led to discover his/her own leadership style and abilities while also honing personal organizational skills. (2 hours) MN 440 Practical Ministry for Men A gender-specific study of the nuts and bolts of ministry for men. The minister’s professional and personal lives will be examined. This course is interactive with a variety of lecture, discussion, guest lectures, case studies as well as observations, and projects. Prerequisite: MN 410 Leadership in Ministry. (2 hours) MN 441 Practical Ministry for Women A gender-specific study of the nuts and bolts of ministry for women. The minister’s professional and personal lives will be examined. This course is interactive with a variety of lecture, discussion, guest lectures, case studies as well as observations, and projects. Prerequisite: MN 410 Leadership in Ministry. (2 hours) MN 452 Advanced Biblical Communication An advanced preaching course that gives guidance and experience in preaching from the varied genre of the Old and New Testaments. In addition to crafting twelve sermons from various biblical genres, students learn how current thought impacts homiletic patterns. The class follows a lecture and student-preaching format. Prerequisite: MN 352 Expository Preaching or CE 354 Expository Teaching. (3 hours, one extra hour lab) 157


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MN 465S Church Planting Seminar This seminar will deal with specific issues faced by church planters. It will be a weekend seminar similar to other seminars. (1 hour) MN 472 Church Planting Assessment A special program that makes an assessment of future church planters. Various instruments will be used on the students. Guest presenters will also lecture. Prerequisite: check with Church Plant instructor. (2 hours)

Intercultural Studies MI 210 Foundations for Missions A study of fundamental areas of missions: a survey of world need, a tracing of the thread of missions throughout the entire Bible and an overview of the many roles of mission work around the world. Students develop a perspective on missions which is both broad and biblical. Format will be lecture and discussion. (3 hours) MI 211S Seminar in Missions This course involves participation in the annual National Missionary Convention missions conference and affords exposure to a wide range of programs, activities and information concerning present-day cross-cultural ministries. (1 hour) MI 213S Seminar in Missions and Music This course involves the practical ministry of worship on the field and provides an exploration of ethnomusicology and examples of its expression in various cultures around the world. (1 hour)

Area Studies These courses are a study of the culture and missionary activity in specific geographic areas. Classes are often taught by missionaries who are in residence through the “missionary-on-campus” program. (2 hours) MI 240 – Africa MI 245 – Latin America MI 241 – South & Central Asia MI 246 – USA & Canada MI 242 – East Asia MI 247 – Caribbean Region MI 243 – Western Europe MI 248 – Australia & Oceania MI 244 – Eastern Europe and Russia MI 250 – History of Christianity in India

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MI 251 Practical Issues in Missions Families This course will study the issues surrounding marriage in the cross-cultural context. The five major categories of study will include spiritual formation, personal growth, community living, cross-cultural integration and ministry skills. (1 hour) MI 260 Introduction to Islam (Also available as a 3 hour online course MI 260D)

An examination of the history, beliefs, practices and culture of Muslims with a view to helping Christians understand their Muslim neighbors. Special attention is given to themes of importance to Christian-Muslim relations. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 261 Introduction to Hinduism This course reviews the origins and development of the primary religion of India and more than 800 million people. Students will learn ways to bridge the cultural distance between Hindus and themselves with a focus on how to best communicate the gospel. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 271 Introduction to Buddhism This course reviews the origins and development of the primary religion of many parts of the world. Students will learn ways to bridge the theological and cultural distance between Buddhists and themselves with a focus on how to best communicate the gospel. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 272 Cross-Cultural Missions Trip This course provides instruction and hands-on experience in the area of shortterm missions trips. Topics include cultural awareness, raising support, and the nuts and bolts of going to the field. Students will actually go on a mission’s trip during the Week of Evangelism in the spring. (2 hours) MI 273 Practical Principles in Mission Outreach Practical principles of current and past missionaries will be examined to prepare one for service in missions. (2 hours) MI 281 Perspectives/World Christian Movement A biblical, historical and cultural analysis of the impact of the world Christian movement, with specific attention given to strategy and the imperative of bringing the gospel to groups that have yet to initially receive it. Format will be guest lecturers and discussion. (3 hours) MI 318D Cross-Cultural Communication This course provides a basic understanding of both communication and culture, and explores the process of cross-cultural communication with the aim of making 159


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our communication not only heard but also understood, no matter how different or diverse the other culture is. The course will always have as one of its main goals the developing of necessary skills to properly and meaningfully proclaim the Gospel across cultures and their respective societies. (3 hours) MI 321 Principles of Mission Life With a view of developing a philosophy of missions, this course looks at many of the fundamentals of mission work. Through lecture and discussion, the student studies and considers the critical issues at work in cross-cultural ministry. Prerequisite: MI 210 Foundations for Missions. (2 hours) MI 330 Historical Perspectives in Missions A study of the lives and ministries of men and women who have led in missions activities over the history of the church. Students gain a clear understanding of the people, issues and dynamics of the mission’s movement from the close of the New Testament through modern times. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 335 Missions in the Restoration Movement A study of the development of missions in the Restoration Movement from 1849 to the present. Students are introduced to the people, organizations and issues that make up the missionary thrust of Restoration history and work toward a personal philosophy of how Restoration principles fit into contemporary missions. Class lectures/discussions, student assignments and guest speakers will direct and inform the learning process. (2 hours) MI 342 Issues in Muslim Ministry In this course, we will study more about Islam itself, the lives and cultures of our Muslim friends and discuss how we can present Jesus as hope and truth. (2 hours) MI 351 Preparation for Cross-Cultural Ministry This course offers specific orientation for the missionary candidate as he/she readies for mission service. Very practical in nature, the studies range from raising support to visa and passport acquisition and everything that is needed to get to the field. Format will be lecture and discussion. Prerequisite: MI 210 Foundations for Missions. (2 hours) MI 352 Missions Technology An introductory course designed for missionaries, forwarding agents, members of missions committees and others who want to survey various modern technologies applicable to mission work. Students learn through research, demonstration, actual hands-on experiences and lectures given by experts involved in particular applications. (2 hours)

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MI 355 Crucial Issues in Missions (Urbana) This course involves a field trip to the Urbana Missions Conference, which occurs once every three years in Urbana, Illinois. (3 hours) MI 356S Seminar in Current Missions Issues (On Purpose – Christ In Youth) In cooperation with Christ In Youth, this course is composed of a field trip to the annual event, On Purpose, in combination with other course responsibilities. The student is responsible for the expense of the seminar and must register with CIY. On Purpose is a weekend missions-focused event, which occurs early in the fall semester. Students are required to attend a specified list of seminars. (1 hour) MI 358 Women in Missions This course will survey the interface between missions and women’s ministry. Students will be exposed to various models of how women are and can be involved in the missionary enterprise of the church. They will also be exposed to obstacles and opportunities that exist for the married and single woman on the mission field. The class will follow a lecture-discussion format. (2 hours) MI 360 World Religions (Also available as an online course, MI 360D Foundations for World Religions) An historical survey of the development and teachings of the major religions of the world. Students learn the impact these religions have globally. In addition to research, the course involves interviews conducted with adherents of these religions and visits to their places of worship. (3 hours) MI 365 Physical and Spiritual Health for Missionaries A course which presents the physical, spiritual and emotional challenges which are commonly seen in cross-cultural service. The stress and tension of the mission field is widely underestimated. Principles of wellness and ways to keep a balance are presented. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 367 Missionary Life and Care This course is designed to increase students’ awareness of opportunities and challenges related to care of missionaries and their families. A model for care across the missionary life (or career) cycle will be followed, with emphases on pre-field, onfield, furlough and re-entry care. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 369 Practical Ministry on the Mission Field This course is designed to provide practical insights for work on the foreign mission field. Students will not be learning theory but hands-on material to equip them to serve with effectiveness and joy. Class will consist of lecture, small group interaction, round-table discussion and role playing. (2 hours)

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MI 370 Missions and Translation Students will gain an overall picture of Bible Translation task, a solid introduction to how it is done and a vision of how they could be involved in the future. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 371 Missions and Literacy Students will gain an overall picture of literacy work in missions, introduction to how to do literacy work and a vision of how they could be involved in the future. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 381 Missions Ministry in the Church A course designed to equip leaders in local churches to set up an effective missionary program. Students learn the principles of the important church/ missionary partnership and how the “sending� process needs to function. Models of successful programs are examined. Format will be lecture, video presentations and discussion. (2 hours) MI 382 Cross-Cultural Youth Ministry This course of study is designed to equip the student in the area of longterm youth ministry in a foreign culture. Attention is given to the dynamics of international youth culture as well as a survey of what models of ministry have proven to be effective. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 383 International Campus Ministry Designed to offer principles for developing a successful campus ministry program in a foreign country. Campus ministry is a unique approach to missions and various models that have proven to be effective are examined. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 390 Trip to Pauline Cities A field trip to many of the cities to which Paul traveled in the book of Acts. Students will compose a missionary strategy that has continuity with that of the Apostle Paul. The course will consist of travel, reading and a post-course assignment. (2 hours) MI 391R Missions Readings An independent study in a specific area of missions. Guided readings help prepare the student for serving overseas in a specific field. (1 hour) MI 392R Guided Readings in Missions An independent study in a specific area of missions with specialized readings for students engaged in cross cultural study programs. (2 hours)

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MI 393S Seminar/Global Poverty and Biblical Justice This course will define the terms poverty and justice, as well as delve into both the OT and NT to examine what the Bible says about issues such as poverty, justice, economic disparity and the responsibility of God’s people with such questions. Students will examine a biblical perspective on social justice and the realities of global poverty and the current human rights field. (1 hour) MI 420 Anthropology Students are introduced to the general field of cultural anthropology. By readings and lectures they learn the principles and patterns by which culture operates. During the semester students become participant observers within their own sub-culture, keeping careful notes and observations of their experiences. (3 hours) MI 421 Western Culture, Postmodernism and Missions The impact of post modern thought on the international world, the perspective of western culture and how these things relate to the cross-cultural messenger are themes dealt with in this course. In order to minister effectively in other cultures, it is instructive to understand the influence and direction of one’s own culture. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 450R International Church Planting An independent study in a specific area of missions. Guided readings help prepare the student for serving in the field of international church planting. This course consists of specialized readings for students engaged in a cross cultural study program. (1 hour) MI 451S Seminar in Practical Issues on the Mission Field (1 hour) MI 452 Cross-Cultural Church Planting A course dealing with the principles and methods of establishing churches in cultural settings different from the church planter’s own background. Principles given have a wide application and are useful in many US settings as well. Format will be lecture and discussion. Prerequisite: MI 210 Foundations for Missions. (2 hours) MI 453 Leadership Training on the Mission Field This course outlines the principles of capacitating Christian leaders for the important task of guiding the churches where they serve. Conflict resolution, reproducing leaders, true spiritual leadership and many other related themes are dealt with. The important issues of leadership styles as related to culturally specific environments are also studied. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 454 Principles of Mission Work This course is designed to assist students who are on their way to a particular 163


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field. Discussion of various approaches and kinds of ministry along with fieldspecific preparation are essential elements of study and activity. Prerequisite: MI 210 Foundations for Missions (2 hours) MI 457 Missionary Reentry A study of the cross-cultural cycle of evangelism as well as the cycle of adaptation which the cross-cultural messenger passes through. Special emphasis is given to the transitional adjustments for the missionary who is returning home permanently. Format will be lecture and discussion. (2 hours) MI 461 Cross-Cultural Strategy Development This course is designed to assist students who are on their way to a particular field. Discussion of various approaches and kinds of ministry along with fieldspecific preparation are essential elements of study and activity. Prerequisites: MI 454 Principles of Mission Work. (1 hour) MI 520 Doctrine of Missions (2 hours)

Music MU 100 Recital Attendance This is required of all music students equal to the required number of semesters enrolled in private instruction within the primary applied area. The course is designed to broaden the musical experience of each student through attendance at music recitals both on and off campus. The course is pass/fail. Only applies to BTh Music, BMM and BMW degrees. (0 hours) MU 110 Basics of Music Theory A course specifically designed to help students with little or no previous musical training acquire the basic skills and concepts of musicianship. Students will learn to read, write and aurally apprehend musical structures that relate to time and sound. The course follows a lecture, discussion and student participation format. Prospective music majors must take this course upon failing the Music Theory Placement Test. Not credited toward music degrees. (1 hour) MU 120 Beginning Piano Class 1 A course for students with no previous keyboard experience. Students develop the skills necessary to play the piano and learn the basic principles of music, including note reading, simple rhythms and music theory. Students are taught in a classroom lab atmosphere. Course fee. (1 hour)

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MU 121 Beginning Piano Class 2 A continuation of MU 120 Beginning Piano Class I. A course for students with one semester of keyboard experience. Students develop skills necessary to play the piano and learn the basic principles of music; including note reading, simple rhythms and music theory. Students are taught in a classroom lab atmosphere. Course fee. (1 hour) MU 122 Voice Class (Permission only) The course deals with the basics of vocal technique, breathing, posture, diction, note reading, memory work and prepares the student for private study. Course fee and accompanist fee. (1 hour) MU 124 Beginner Guitar Class The beginning guitar class is designed for students with no previous guitar experience. The class will emphasize simple techniques necessary to build basic skills. The course is taught in a classroom lab atmosphere through instruction, demonstration and appropriate practice assignments. Course fee. (1 hour) MU 125 Private Guitar Lessons (Elector) This course is designed for the student with some previous guitar playing experience. Based upon the individual’s abilities and experience level, the instructor will develop a private instructional course. The individualized plan will further the student’s guitar proficiency through instruction, demonstration and appropriate practice assignments. Course fee. (1 hour repeatable) MU 126 Private Guitar Lessons (Permission Only) This course is designed for the Music Major student with previous guitar playing experience. Based upon the individual’s abilities and experience level, the instructor will develop a private instructional course. The individualized plan will further the student’s guitar proficiency through instruction, demonstration and appropriate practice assignments. Course fee. (1 hour repeatable) MU 127 Finger Style Guitar Class A continuation of Beginner Guitar Class. Course fee. (1 hour) MU 132 Private Voice (Elector) This course is open to all students and is taught to meet the individual needs of the student. Based upon the individual’s abilities and experience level, the instructor will develop a private instructional course. Course fee and accompanist fee. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 134 Private Piano (Elector) Private instruction for all students according to availability of faculty. Students 165


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learn piano repertoire and technique appropriate to their skill level. Instructor takes an individual approach with each student. Course fee. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 140 Intermediate Piano Class 1 (Elector) A course for electors with keyboard experience. Students will develop the skills necessary to implement the intermediate principles of music and of the piano. Emphasis will be given to improving proficiency. Students are taught in a classroom lab atmosphere. Course fee. (1 hour) MU 141 Intermediate Piano Class 2 (Elector) A course for electors with keyboard experience. Students will develop the skills necessary to implement the intermediate principles of music and of the piano. Emphasis will be given to improving musicianship. Students are taught in a classroom lab atmosphere. Course fee. (1 hour) MU 152 Private Voice (Music Major, Permission Only) Private instruction, open only to music majors. At enrollment students are taken at the level of proficiency they have attained. Course fee and accompanist fee. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 154 Private Piano (Music Major, Permission Only)) Private instruction for music majors only. Students learn piano repertoire and technique appropriate to their skill level. Instructor takes an individual approach with each student. Course fee. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 156 Private Organ Based upon the individual student’s abilities and experience level, the instructor will develop a private instructional course. Upon availability of faculty, this course is open to all students; however, music majors will be given priority. The individualized plan will further the student’s organ proficiency through instruction, demonstration and appropriate practice assignments. Course fee. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 158 Private Instruments Based upon the individual student’s abilities and experience level, the instructor will develop a private instructional course. Upon availability of faculty, this course is open to all students; however, music majors will be given priority. The individualized plan will further the student’s instrumental proficiency through instruction, demonstration and appropriate practice assignments. Course fee. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 160/261 Piano Proficiency 1-4 A succession of classes for voice majors who do not possess the necessary keyboard skill to pass the Piano Proficiency Exam. Students improve reading and 166


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technical skills and apply theory knowledge to piano playing. The class is taught in a group lab setting. Voice majors may substitute credits in this course for their requirements in Secondary Applied. Course fee. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 160 Piano Proficiency 1 MU 260 Piano Proficiency 3 MU 161 Piano Proficiency 2 MU 261 Piano Proficiency 4 MU 171 Music Theory 1 The first course in developing a broadly based musicianship. Includes the study of chords, four-part writing, melody writing and analysis. Attention is given to skills necessary to write and arrange music for worship. Prerequisite: MU 110 Basics of Music Theory or passing of Music Theory Placement Exam. (3 hours) MU 173 Music Skills 1 Drills in sight singing, ear training and dictation. Course is to be taken in conjunction with MU 171 Music Theory 1. Utilizes computer software exercises in addition to book exercises and lectures. (1 hour) MU 180 Handbells An ensemble of English handbell ringers. General musical ability and music reading skills are required. Through training, rehearsal and performing, students will increase their development in the art and skill of handbell ringing. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 181 Handbells See MU 180. (0 hour) MU 182 Choir A mixed choir open to all students, faculty and staff; providing a stimulated church choir experience for participants as well as an opportunity for student conductors and accompanists. Vocal skills will be enhanced through instruction, demonstration and proper rehearsal techniques. Performances include chapel services, on-campus events and public appearances. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 183 Choir See MU 182. (0 hour) MU 184 Concert Choir An auditioned mixed choir with preference for acceptance given to upperclassmen. Some extra rehearsals may be required. Vocal skills will be enhanced through instruction, demonstration and proper rehearsal techniques. Performances include chapel services, on-campus events, public appearances and may include trips. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 185 Concert Choir See MU 184. (0 hours) 167


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MU 188 Instrumental Ensemble An auditioned ensemble for instruments. Instrumental skills will be enhanced through instruction, demonstration and proper rehearsal techniques. Performances may include chapel services, on-campus events and public appearances. (1 hour, repeatable) MU 265S Seminar in Sound System Design This course is designed to provide a working knowledge and understanding of various aspects of sound system design and operation. (1 hour) MU 270 Music Theory 2 A continuation of Music Theory 1. Includes more advanced four-part writing and harmonies with particular attention given to the arranging of hymns and choruses. The course follows a lecture, discussion and student participation format. Prerequisite MU 171 Music Theory 1 (3 hours) MU 271 Music Skills 2 A continuation of Music Skills 1. Taken in conjunction with Music Theory 2. Prerequisite: MU 171 Music Theory 1 and MU 172 Music Skills 1. (1 hour) MU 272 Music Theory 3 A continuation of Music Theory 2. This course includes more advanced harmonies, as well as practical application of theory in music ministry. The course follows a lecture, discussion and student participation format. Prerequisite MU 270 Music Theory 2. (2 hours) MU 273 Music Skills 3 A continuation of Music Skills 2. Taken in conjunction with Music Theory 3. Prerequisite: MU 270 Music Theory 2 and MU 271 Music Skills 2. (1 hour) MU 276 Electronic Music Students will meet two times per week to learn to use MIDI (Musical Instrumental Digital Interface), notation and sequencing computer software. Students will prepare many projects that will help prepare them for advanced music writing and worship ministry. Class is taught in a computer lab setting. Prerequisite: MU 171 Music Theory 1 or instructor permission. Course fee. (2 hours) MU 278 Music for Children A study of the philosophy, methods, activities and materials for leading children in musical experiences. This course will equip students for leading effective children’s musical programs in the church. Typically a seminar course, achieved through lecture, discussion, demonstration and student participation. (2 hours)

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MU 279 Worship Accompanying This course provides practical experience for accompanying solos, ensembles, choirs and congregation at the keyboard, with special emphasis on service playing. Students learn hymn and chorus styles, chord charts and modulations. The class is taught in a lab setting. Restricted to students who have already developed piano skills beyond the elementary level. (2 hours) MU 281 Worship Technology Multi-staff course that teaches worship software, sound systems, recording techniques, video editing, lighting and innovations in worship services. Students will learn to apply the above elements into their ministries, as well as how to instruct others to do so. The course will be divided into topical segments, with a final project due in each segment. (1 hour) MU 360 Worship Team Leadership This course gives practical guidelines for the planning of worship services and creating a dynamic worship experience. The study will include the principles and methods involved in leading and rehearsing vocal teams and rhythm sections. This course will be especially helpful for students planning to lead “contemporary� worship ministries in the church. Prerequisites: DO 224 Worship, MU 270 Music Theory 2 and MU 271 Music Skills 2. (2 hours). MU 368 Music History: Antiquity Through Baroque A course in the development of music in the Western tradition from medieval times (pre-1600) to 1750. Students focus on composers and their works in the context of history and culture. Significant time is spent listening to recordings and examining musical literature. (2 hours) MU 369 Music History: Classical Through Modern A course in the development of music in the Western tradition from 1750 to the present (post-1900). Students focus on composers and their works in the context of history and culture. Significant time is spent listening to recordings and examining musical literature. (2 hours) MU 370 Choral Conducting 1 The theory and practice of leading and directing choral groups. The student will learn basic conducting techniques and rehearsal techniques through lecture, demonstration and modeling. The class meets three times per week to include conducting lab session. (2 hours) MU 371 Choral Conducting 2 The theory and practice of advanced choral conducting technique, rehearsal management and shaping of choral tone. The student will learn advanced 169


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techniques in these areas through lecture, demonstration, modeling and hands-on conducting experience with the OCC choir. Meets three hours per week to include conducting lab session. Prerequisite: MU 370 Choral Conducting 1. (2 hours) MU 373S Seminar in Music Ministry Credit will be given for student attendance at the National Church Music Conference held in April of each year. The student will gain many ideas and much practical experience in music ministry from a variety of presenters, worship services and music reading sessions. This will include attendance at specific sessions and additional written work. (1 hour) MU 379 The Minister of Music A study of qualifications, responsibilities and opportunities of the music minister. Students will gain knowledge of the role of music in church life, working within a multiple staff, general administration of the church music program, and effective ministry with a congregation, music committee, or church board. The course follows a lecture and discussion format. (2 hours) MU 464 Senior Private Voice Individual voice instruction for seniors only with recommendation of voice instructor. Designed to prepare student for Senior Recital. May be taken up to two semesters. Course fee. (2 hours) MU 466 Senior Private Piano Private piano instruction for seniors only with recommendation of piano instructor. Students learn senior recital repertoire. Individual attention is given to each student. May be taken up to two semesters. Course fee. (2 hours) MU 468 Senior Private Guitar Private guitar instruction for seniors only with recommendation of guitar instructor. Students learn senior recital repertoire. Individual attention is given to each student. May be taken up to two semesters. Course fee. (2 hours) MU 470 Vocal and Instrumental Arranging A study of skillful and useful techniques enabling the student to make vocal and/or instrumental arrangements suitable for use in the ministry of music of the churches. Prerequisite: MU 276 Electronic Music and MU 272 Music Theory 3. (2 hours) MU 471 Music in Worship Literature A study of music literature appropriate to church use. Students overview hymnology, contemporary praise music and music for choirs. Lecture format allows for discussion and singing. (2 hours)

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MU 472 Vocal Pedagogy A specific and detailed study of voice science and how it relates to teaching voice. Practical assignments are included which will enable each student to teach privately as well as apply their vocal knowledge to church applications. The course meets two days per week and includes a final teaching project. (2 hours) MU 473 Piano Pedagogy An introduction to the principles and methods of piano teaching. Students gain knowledge of pedagogical materials and curriculum, teaching styles, resources and how to use this information in their own teaching. Practical experience in and out of the classroom will supplement class discussions. (2 hours) MU 474 Guitar Pedagogy A course explaining ideas and methods of teaching guitar. Resources covered will include teaching materials, age graded teaching and continuing education for teachers. Students will teach one student during the course. (2 hours) MU 477 Senior Worship Practicum This course is an independent study designed for the BMW student. The student will develop a personal project in the area of worship. The student will work closely with a faculty advisor in order to completely fulfill the requirements of this course. (2 hours) MU 478 Senior Music Recital This course, designed for the BMM student, requires a full recital presentation. Students learn approximately 50 minutes of appropriate senior-level music in the area of applied study. (0 hours) MU 479 Senior Music Practicum This course is an independent study designed for the BMM student. The student will develop a personal project in an area that reflects personal interest and skills. Suggested topics are worship, children’s music, accompanying, electronic music and composition. The student will work closely with a faculty advisor in order to fulfill the requirements of this course. (2 hours)

INTERNSHIPS/FIELD EXPERIENCE True preparation for ministry cannot solely take place inside the classroom. With this in mind, most bachelor degree options include at least two hours in an internship or field experience (the BA/Psychology Specialization and BBM are the exceptions). The student who successfully completes the required courses in the

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Internship/Field Experiences area should have achieved these results: 1. Accelerated maturity and pastoral formation. 2. Discernment and confirmation of vocational ministry focus. 3. Learning from a seasoned veteran who is “in the field.” 4. Improved competency in ministry skills. 5. Personal growth and expression of faith. 6. Bridging of classroom learning with a real-world ministry experience. To be eligible for an internship, a student must have completed 60 hours of college credit (30 hours must have been taken at OCC). The student must receive approval from the host church, course teacher and Director of Internships before he/she can take an internship for credit. Up to 8 hours of credit may be earned in an internship setting (but only two separate internships may be taken for credit). One course would cover a full-time summer internship or a part-time semester internship (20-40 hrs/week). Those in full-time semester internships would take two courses concurrently.

INTERNSHIPS IN 301-304 Adult Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: MN 271 Adult Ministry) (2-8 hours) IN 311-314 Campus Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: MN 257 Campus Ministry) (2-8 hours) IN 321-324 Children’s Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: MN 260 Children’s Ministry) (2-8 hours) IN 331-334 Church Planting Internship (Prerequisite: MN 322 Strategies for Church Health and Growth) (2-8 hours) IN 341-344 Deaf Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: CM 215 Deaf Communication 2) (2-8 hours) IN 351-354 Missions Internship (Prerequisite: MI 351 Preparation for Cross-Cultural Ministry) (2-8 hours) IN 361-364 Music Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: MU 379 The Minister of Music) (2-8 hours) 172


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IN 371-374 Preaching Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: MN 252 Homiletics) (2-8 hours) IN 381-384 Youth Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: MN 254 Foundations for Youth Ministry or MN 256 D Youth Ministry Dynamics) (2-8 hours) IN 391-394 Women’s Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: MN 258 Women’s Ministry) (2-8 hours) IN 401-404 Non-Specialized Internship (Prerequisite: Permission from course teacher) (at least 2 hours) Child Care Prerequisite: FE 322 Child Care Field Experience (2 times) (2 hours) TESOL Prerequisite: LA 373 TESOL Practicum (3 hrs) IN 411-414 Family Ministry Internship (Prerequisite: MN 253 Family Ministry) (2-8 hours) IN 421-424 Christian Education Internship (Prerequisite: Permission from course teacher) (2-8 hours) IN 431-434 Administrative Internship (Prerequisite: BE 220 Professional Development) (at least 2 hours) IN 441-444 Biblical Communication for Women Internship (Prerequisite: MN 242 Biblical Communication for Women)

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FIELD EXPERIENCE An alternative to the internship is the directed field experience. This applies to the student who has a weekly ministry. These courses will require one-on-one meetings with the course teacher and/or class discussion with those in a similar area of ministry. Additional projects may be assigned as well. Up to two semesters of Field Experience may be taken for credit. These courses provide a way for students to share the successes and frustrations of the ministry experiences. Weekly meetings consist of discussion, daily journals and a project related to the student’s particular ministry. (1 hour) FE 250 Family Nurture Field Experience FE 321 Children’s Ministry Field Experience FE 322 Child Care Field Experience FE 331 Youth Ministry Field Experience FE 341 Deaf Ministry Field Experience FE 355 Christian Education Field Experience FE 357 Women’s Ministry Field Experience FE 361 Music Ministry Field Experience FE 371 Preaching Ministry Field Experience FE 381 Technical Arts Ministry Field Experience FE 382 Media Ministry Field Experience

CHRISTIAN SERVICE CS 101 Christian Service This non-credit course will serve as a Christian service accountability for students during their first 60 hours. Students will record their Christian service and read a short devotional to help them reflect on their practice of Christian service for the semester. (0 hours) CS 201 Advanced Christian Service This non-credit course will serve as a Christian service accountability for students during their final 60 hours plus for their degrees. Students will record their Christian service and have meetings with the Christian Service Director and in small group settings concerning how their Christian service is focused in the area of their ministry preparation. (0 hours)

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AGREEMENT WITH FOCUS ON THE FAMILY Ozark Christian College is in a Liaison Agreement with Focus on the Family Institute of Colorado Springs, Colorado. The academic dean is the contact person for this relationship. This means that Ozark Christian College will accept classes taught by the Institute through a credit transfer from Colorado Christian University. Depending on a student’s degree program the following classes could be transferred to Ozark Christian College: “Christian Worldview Studies” (3 hours) for Issues in Biblical Interpretation “Family, Church, and Society Studies” (3 hours) for Family Ministry “Family Life Studies” (3 hours) for Family Ministry “Marriage Studies” (3 hours) for Principles of Family Living “Practicum” (3 hours) for Internship “Cultural Issues in Christian Perspective” (4 hours) for Philosophy “Family Issues in Christian Perspective” (4 hours) for Principles of Family Living or Family Ministry.

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NOTES

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Trustees Administration Full-Time Faculty and Administrators Part-Time Faculty 177


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TRUSTEES The faithfulness of the school to its original purpose is assured by these men, who in prayer and deep concern conduct their meetings with the will of the Lord uppermost in their minds. They serve at their own expense in travel, etc., and meet four times during the year to give direction to the college. Dr. Robert Arnce Joplin, Missouri

Doctor

B. A. Austin Joplin, Missouri

Minister

Dr. Orville Brill Pittsburg, Kansas

Educator

David Bycroft Tyro, Kansas

Minister

Vance Eubanks Prairie Grove, Arkansas

Minister

Jim Johnson Stillwater, Oklahoma

Minister

Doug Oakes Wabash, Indiana

Minister

Joe Simmons Bixby, Oklahoma

Businessman

Don Steen Eldon, Missouri

Businessman

Roger Storms Chandler, Arizona Jim Vasey Wichita, Kansas

Minister Businessman

Jon Weece Lexington, Kentucky

Minister

Clifford Wert Webb City, Missouri

Businessman

Matt Proctor Joplin, Missouri

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President of the College Elected annually by the Trustees. He serves as an ex officio member of the trustees.


DIRECTORY OF PERSONNEL

ADMINISTRATION Matt Proctor Greg Hafer Doug Aldridge David McMillin

President Executive Vice President Interim Academic Dean Executive Director of Campus Operations

Doug Miller

Executive Director of Effectiveness, General Counsel

Troy Nelson

Executive Director of Admissions

Monte Shoemake David Duncan Dru Ashwell

Executive Director of Student Development Executive Director of Development Executive Director of College Advancement

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FULL-TIME FACULTY AND ADMINISTRATORS The year following the name indicates when the person began his or her service on the faculty of Ozark Christian College. Doug Aldridge, 2003. Interim Academic Dean, Hermeneutics and Apologetics

MS Pepperdine University, 2000; BTh and BBL Ozark Christian College, 1997; Crafton Hills College Paramedic Program, 1988; California State University at Chico.

Dru Ashwell, 1996. Executive Director of College Advancement, Speech and Creative Writing MA Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1990; BBL Ozark Christian College, 1989; Oklahoma Christian University of Arts and Sciences; Lincoln Christian Seminary.

Kenny Boles, 1968-1970, 1972. Greek and New Testament

MA Biblical and Patristic Greek, Abilene Christian College, 1972; BTh Ozark Bible College, 1968; Missouri Southern State College; Abilene Christian University.

Terry Bowland, 1993. Ministry and New Testament

DMin Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1989; MA and MDiv Lincoln Christian Seminary, 1980 and 1982; BA and BTh Nebraska Christian College, 1976 and 1977.

Brian Brubaker, 1996. Ministry and New Testament

DMin Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1994; MDiv Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1985; BSL, BTh Ozark Bible College, 1981; Missouri Southern State College; Taylor University.

Peter Buckland, 1997. Christian Education and Family Ministry

AB, BTh Manhattan Christian College, 1988; Kansas State University.

Chris DeWelt, 1999. Director of Missions, New Testament

DMiss. in progress, Biola University, MA Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1995; BTh Ozark Bible College, 1976; Spanish Language Institute; Missouri Southern State College; Harding Graduate School of Religion.

Jay Engelbrecht, 2004. English and Physical Education

MS, Pittsburg State University; BA University of Missouri-Columbia, 1986.

David Fish, 1994. Director of Academic Computing, Old Testament and Language

PhD (candidate) University of Nebraska-Lincoln, MA Columbia Biblical Seminary, 1987; BSL Ozark Bible College, 1976; Pittsburg State University; University of Nebraska.

Mary Alice Gardner, 1999. Deaf Communications

MA Gallaudet University-Graduate School of Communications, 1999; BA Cincinnati Bible College, 1991; AAS Sinclair Community College, 1997.

Kevin Greer, 2007. Campus Minister, Student Ministry BSL Ozark Bible College, 1979.

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Gerald Griffin, 2001. Speech, Old and New Testament

MA Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 2003; BTh Ozark Bible College, 1980.

Greg Hafer, 1990. Executive Vice President, Speech

MA Southwest Missouri State University, 1994; BSL Ozark Bible College, 1974; Wayne State College.

Karla Handley, 2001. English and Music BS Manhattan Christian College, 1982.

Scott Handley, 2001. Director of Music Department

MA Butler University, 1996; BS Kansas State University, 1982; BS Manhattan Christian College, 1982; Ball State University, 2000; Indiana University/Purdue University at Indianapolis, 2000.

John Hunter, 2008. Associate Library Director and Reference Assistant

MLIS in progress, University of Oklahoma; MA Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1989; BSL, BTh Ozark Bible College, 1975; Clinical Pastoral Education, St. John’s Regional Health Center, Springfield MO, 2005.

Chris Lahm, 1999-2001, 2005. Athletic Director, Coach, Lifetime Wellness MS Kearney State College, 1982; BA Nebraska Christian College, 1981.

Linda Lawson, 2003. Christian Education, Women’s and Children’s Ministry

MA in Practical Ministries, Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1998; BCE and ASL Ozark Bible College, 1979; ADSS Stone School of Business, 1974; New York Christian Institute.

Tom Lawson, 2003. Worship, Old and New Testament

DMin Abilene Christian University, 1992; MA (Church History), Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 2002; MA (New Testament), Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1986; BTh Ozark Bible College, 1975.

Shawn Lindsay, 2006. Director of the Learning Center and Online Education, Christian Education MRE, Lincoln Christian University, 2010; BTh and BBL Ozark Christian College, 1999.

David McMillin, 1989. Executive Director of Campus Operations BS Ball State University, 1977.

Jennifer McMillin, 1992. Registrar

MAE Ball State University, 1985; BS Ball State University, 1981.

Doug Miller, 2002. Executive Director of Effectiveness, General Counsel

JD University of Missouri-Columbia, 1989; BA University of Missouri-Columbia, 1986.

Mark Moore, 1990. New Testament and Hermeneutics

PhD International Baptist Theological Seminary/University of Wales, 2008; MEd Incarnate Word College, 1990; MA Southwest Missouri State University, 2000; BTh Ozark Christian College, 1986; University of Arkansas; Assemblies of God Theological Seminary.

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Troy Nelson, 2002. Executive Director of Admissions, Christian Life

MA in progress, Lincoln Christian Seminary; BBL Ozark Christian College, 1996; University Wisconsin-LaCrosse.

Larry Pechawer, 1999. Old Testament and Hebrew

PhD Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion, 2003; MA Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1975; BA Cincinnati Bible College, 1973; Ohio State University.

Matt Proctor, 1996. President, New Testament and Preaching

MA Lincoln Christian Seminary, 1997; BTh Ozark Christian College, 1993; Southern Baptist Theological Seminary; University of Iowa.

Chad Ragsdale, 2005. New Testament and Hermeneutics

MDiv Lincoln Christian Seminary, 2004; BA Lincoln Christian College, 2000.

Jeff Snell, 1997-2005, 2011. New Testament and Preaching

D.Min. Southern Baptist Theological Seminary, 2002; M.Div., Lincoln Christian Seminary, 1997; M.A. Lincoln Christian Seminary, 1996; BTh, BBL, Ozark Christian College, 1989; Cincinnati Bible Seminary.

Monte Shoemake, 2001. Executive Director of Student Development, Christian Life, College Life and Orientation

MA Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1993; BTh Ozark Bible College, 1983; BBL Ozark Bible College, 1982.

Mark Sloneker, 1985. Readings

Associate Library Director, Cataloging Assistant and

MLS University of Missouri-Columbia, 2002; MA (Church History), Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1992; BBL Ozark Bible College, 1977.

David Smith, 2003. Church Planting and Ministry

MDiv Trinity Evangelical Divinity School, 1989; BA University of Michigan, 1981.

Damien Spikereit, 2005. Preaching and New Testament

MA Lincoln Christian Seminary, 2003; BBL Ozark Christian College, 1997.

Matt Stafford, 2004. Frontline Director, Worship and Campus Ministry MA Ball State University, 1997; BTh Ozark Christian College, 1988.

Doug Welch, 2004. Director of Christian Service and Internships, New Testament and Preaching

MDiv Lincoln Christian Seminary, 2003; MA Gordon-Conwell Theological Seminary, 2000; BTh Ozark Christian College, 1997.

Woody Wilkinson, 1993. Old and New Testament and Philosophy

DMin Assemblies of God Theological Seminary, 2007; MDiv Lincoln Christian Seminary, 1992; BSL Ozark Bible College, 1968; Cincinnati Bible Seminary.

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DIRECTORY OF PERSONNEL

Shane Wood, 2009. New Testament and Christian Life

PhD in progress, University of Edinburgh-Scotland; MDiv Lincoln Christian Seminary, 2008; MA Lincoln Christian Seminary, 2008; BBL, BTh Ozark Christian College, 2004.

Gary Zustiak, 1986-1999, 2006. Psychology, Counseling, and Old Testament

DMin Abilene Christian University, 1994; MDiv, MA Lincoln Christian Seminary, 1982 and 1981; BA Boise Bible College, 1976.

PART-TIME FACULTY Del Camp, 2004. Psychology

MS Pittsburg State University, 1996; BBL/PY Ozark Christian College, 1992; Indiana University; Purdue University in Indianapolis; Marion College; Missouri Southern State University.

Ryan Claborn, 2009. Business

MBA Oklahoma State University, 2002; BS, Oklahoma State University, 2000.

Donna Cole, 2008. Missions

MA Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1995; BS Cincinnati Christian University, 1990; Prince Georges Community College, Lincoln Christian College.

Sharon Engelbrecht, 2005. Student Development Office Counselor, Counseling MSW University of Missouri-Columbia, 1992; BSW William Woods College, 1991.

Mary Green, 1995. Drama

BTh Ozark Christian College, 1996.

Tab Hall, 2011. Coach

BA Kentucky Christian University, 1997

Trevor Headrick, 2006. Music

MA Illinois State University, 2003; BS Missouri Southern State College, 2001.

Wade Landers, 2004. Missions

BBL Ozark Christian College, 1995.

Jody Lindsay, 2008. Christian Education and English Composition BA Lincoln Christian College, 2004; BBL Ozark Christian College, 2000.

Jim Marcum, 1976. Distance Learning Facilitator

MA Cincinnati Christian Seminary, 1988; BTh Ozark Bible College, 1976; Butler University.

Cliff Murphy, 2003. Admissions, Director of Recruitment Services, Business

MS, John Brown University, 2010; BS, Missouri Southern State University, 2003; ASE, Ozark Christian College, 2001.

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Tammy Nelson, 2002. Music

BMM Ozark Christian College, 1998.

Rob Pommert, 1997. Music

BSL Ozark Bible College, 1981.

Robin Sigars, 2011. Coach

BSL, 1978 and ABS, 1977, Ozark Bible College.

Ron Skaggs, 1982. History, Creation and Science

MA Pittsburg State University, 1982; BSL Ozark Bible College, 1979.

Joy Stafford, 2006. TESOL

MA Ball State University, 1998; BS Missouri Southern State College, 1987.

Leonard Thompson, 2000. Missions

DMin Fuller Theological Seminary, 1995; BD Serampore College, 1991; MA Wheaton College, 1991; MA Cincinnati Bible Seminary, 1970; BSL Manila Bible Seminary, 1966.

Gordon Venturella, 2003. Exegeting the City

MA Houston Graduate School of Theology, 1992; BSL Ozark Bible College, 1977; Hope International University; Wheaton College Graduate School; Governor’s State University.

Karl Wendt, 1999. Counseling and Psychology PhD Saint Louis University, 1996; MEd N.E. Louisiana University, 1982; BA Harding University, 1980.

Shannon Wendt, 2007. Counseling

MA Northeast Louisiana University, 1983; BA Speech/ English Education, Harding University, 1980.

Lisa White, 1995-2003; 2005. Dean of Women, Business BS Missouri Southern State College, 1988.

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Activity Calendar Communication Directory Visitor Information Campus Map Index 185


2011-2013 CATALOG

ACTIVITY CALENDAR FALL 2011 Aug. 5, Fri. Admissions Application Deadline Aug. 16, Tue. 6:30-8:30 pm Faculty/Staff Dinner Aug. 17, Wed 8:00 am-3:00 pm Faculty Retreat Aug. 18, Thur. 8:30-1:00 pm Music Major auditions in lower level of the Chapel 9:00 am Residence Halls open for new students 2:00-3:45 pm College Life & Orientation 1 3:00-5:00 pm Parent Orientation Upstairs Dining Hall 3:45-4:15 pm Music Dept. Open House 4:15 pm Music Theory Placement Test 7:00-8:30 pm College Life & Orientation 2 8:30-10:00 pm Welcome Party/new students/life group leaders/RA’s/Parents Aug. 19, Fri., Enrollment for new students in MPB 9:00-10:30 am Fast Track Students 10:30 am-Noon M-Z Non-Fast Track Students 1:30 pm-3:00 pm A-L Non-Fast Track Students 3:00-4:30 pm College Life & Orientation 3 7:00-10:00 pm College Life & Orientation 4 Aug. 20, Sat. 9:00 am Residence Halls open for returning students 9:00-11:00 am College Life & Orientation 5 - Bible Knowledge Test/ Student Relationships Assessment 1:30 pm College Life & Orientation 6 2:30 pm Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis Test 7:00-8:30 pm Night at the park for new students, parents, OCC family Aug. 21, Sun. 10:00 am Worship Service in the Chapel 11:30 am-1:00 pm Complimentary lunch in Dining Hall for all students & families 1:30 pm-5:00 pm Frontline auditions in the Chapel 6:30 pm Praise Service 8:00 pm Dorm pizza parties Aug. 22, Mon. 8:00 am-Noon; 1:00-3:30 pm Enrollment for returning students in MPB 8:30 am-Noon; 1:30-5:00 pm Frontline auditions in the Chapel 10:30-11:30 am College Life & Orientation 7 1:00-2:30 pm College Life & Orientation 8 6:00 pm Convocation Banquet and service in the MPB Aug. 23, Tue. 7:00 am Classes begin 4:00-7:00 pm Community Volunteer Expo & meal, MPB Aug. 24, Wed. 6:30-9:00 pm College Life & Orientation 9 Sept. 16-17, Fri.-Sat. Get-A-Way 7-9th grades Sept. 20-21, Tue.-Wed. Faith Forum Sept. 24, Sat. Church Leadership Conference Team Building Oct. 17, Mon. 9:00 am Mid-term Grades Due Oct. 24, Mon. Fall Celebration Day for Adults 55+ Oct . 24-Nov. 14, Mon.-Mon. Pre-enrollment for spring semester Nov. 1, Tue. Institutional and Memorial Grant Application deadline for spring must also have FAFSA in to be considered for I & M Grant Nov. 4-5, Fri. & Sat. OCC Ambassadors present: “The Event” 9th-12th grades Nov. 17-20, Thur.-Sun. National Missionary Convention, Atlanta, GA Nov. 19-28, Sat.-Mon. Thanksgiving break Residence Halls close Fri., Nov. 18, 4:00 pm; re-open Sun. Nov. 27, 5:00 pm Dec. 1-Thur; 2-Fri.; 3-Sat.2; Living Christmas Tree Dec. 4-Sun.2; 5-Mon. Living Christmas Tree Dec. 12-15, Mon.-Thu. Semester Exams Dec. 15, Thur. 6:00 pm Faculty/Staff Christmas dinner Dec. 16, 2011-Jan. 16, 2012 Christmas mid-year break Residence Halls close Thur., Dec.15, 4:00 pm Dec. 20, Tue. 9:00 am Grades due

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COMMUNICATION AND VISITOR INFORMATION

ACTIVITY CALENDAR SPRING 2012 Jan. 5, Thur. Admissions Application Deadline Jan. 9-13, Mon.-Fri. Winter Session Jan. 13, Fri. 1:00 pm Residence Halls open for new students 7:00-9:00 pm College Life & Orientation 1 Jan. 14, Sat. 9:00-10:00 am College Life & Orientation 2/Bible Knowledge Test 10:30-Noon College Life & Orientation 3 1:30-4:00 pm College Life & Orientation 4 Jan. 15, Sun. 2:00 pm Residence Halls open for returning students Jan. 16, Mon. 8:00 a.m-Noon; 1:00-4:00 pm Second Semester Enrollment in MPB Jan. 17, Tue. Classes begin Jan. 31-Feb. 2, Tue.-Thur. International Focus Week Feb. 15, Wed. Deadline for President’s and Dean’s Scholarship Application Feb. 27-29, Mon.-Wed. Preaching-Teaching Convention Mar. 12, Mon. 9:00 am Mid-term grades due Mar. 16-25, Sat.-Mon Choir Tour Mar. 17-26, Sat.-Mon Week of Evangelism (Residence Halls close Fri., Mar. 16, 4:00 pm; re-open Sun., Mar. 25, 5:00 pm Mar. 30-31, Fri.-Sat. Missouri Christian Convention, Tan-Tar-A, Osage Beach. Apr. 2, Mon. Financial Aid deadline for FAFSA, Institutional and Memorial Grant Application Apr. 6, Fri. 12:15 pm Good Friday worship services Apr. 9-30, Mon.-Mon. Pre-enrollment for fall semester Apr. 13-14, Fri.-Sat. Deeper Life 9-12 grades Apr. 27-28, Fri.-Sat. Women’s Conference at Ozark May 15-18, Tue.-Fri. Final Exams May 18, Fri. 7:30 pm Baccalaureate Service Approximately 9:00 pm Graduates & Parents Reception May 19, Sat. 10:00 am Commencement 4:00 pm Residence Halls close May 29, Tue. 9:00 am Grades due June 4-7, Mon.-Thur. Branson Conference for Adults 55+ in Branson, MO June 4-15, Mon.-Fri. Summer School June 6-8, Wed.-Fri. Ambassadors’ Basketball Boys & Girls Day Camp 3rd-5th grades June 6-8, Wed.-Fri. Jr. High Volleyball Camp 6th-8th grades June 10-13, Sun.-Wed. Jr. High Girls Ambassadors’ Basketball Camp 6th-8th grades June 11-15, Mon.-Fri. Branson Conference for Adults 55+ in Branson, MO June 13-16, Wed.-Sat. Jr. High Boys Ambassadors’ Basketball Camp 6th-8th grades June 14-19, Thur.-Tue. Highest Praise Rehearsal Week June 15-16, Fri.-Sat. Freshmen Fast Track Pre-enrollment for fall, 2012 June 17-21, Sun.-Thur. Sr. High Girls Ambassadors’ Basketball Camp 9th-12th grades June 20-July 1, Wed.-Sun. Highest Praise Tour June 24-28, Sun.-Thur. Sr. High Boys Ambassadors’ Basketball Camp 9th-12th grades July 1, Sun. 7:00 pm Highest Praise Finale Concert in the OCC Chapel July 10-13, Tue.-Fri. North American Christian Convention, Orlando, FL July 10-13, Tue.-Fri. National Bible Bowl Tournament, Orlando, FL July 20-21, Fri.-Sat. Freshmen Fast Track Pre-enrollment for fall, 2012 Aug 1, Wed. 9:00 am Summer School Grades Due

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ACTIVITY CALENDAR FALL 2012 Aug. 5, Sun Admissions Application Deadline Aug. 14, Tue. 6:30-8:30 pm Faculty/Staff Dinner Aug. 15, Wed. 8:00 am-3:00 pm Faculty Retreat Aug. 16, Thur. 8:30-1:00 pm Music Major auditions in lower level of the Chapel 9:00 am Residence Halls open for new students 2:00-3:45 pm College Life & Orientation 1 3:00-5:00 pm Parent Orientation Upstairs Dining Hall 3:45-4:15 pm Music Dept. Open House 4:15 pm Music Theory Placement Test 7:00-8:30 pm College Life & Orientation 2 8:30-10:00 pm Welcome Party/new students/life group leaders/RA’s/Parents Aug. 17, Fri. Enrollment for new students in MPB 9:00-10:30 am Fast Track Students 10:30 am-Noon A-L Non-Fast Track Students 1:30 pm-3:00 pm M-Z Non-Fast Track Students 3:00-4:30 pm College Life & Orientation 3 7:00-10:00 pm College Life & Orientation 4 Aug. 18, Sat. 9:00 am Residence Halls open for returning students 9:00-11:00 am College Life & Orientation 5 - Bible Knowledge Test/ Student Relationships Assessment 1:30 pm College Life & Orientation 6 2:30 pm Taylor-Johnson Temperament Analysis Test 7:00-8:30 pm Night at the park for new students, parents, OCC family Aug. 19, Sun. 10:00 am Worship Service in the Chapel 11:30 am-1:00 pm Complimentary lunch in Dining Hall for all students & families 1:30 pm-5:00 pm Frontline auditions in the Chapel 6:30 pm Praise Service 8:00 pm Dorm pizza parties Aug. 20, Mon. 8:00 am-Noon; 1:00-3:30 pm Enrollment for returning students in MPB 8:30 am-Noon; 1:30-5:00 pm Frontline auditions in the Chapel 10:30-11:30 am College Life & Orientation 7 1:00-2:30 pm College Life & Orientation 8 6:00 pm Convocation Banquet and service in the MPB Aug. 21, Tue. 7:00 am Classes begin 4:00-7:00 pm Community Volunteer Expo & meal, MPB Aug. 22, Wed. 6:30-9:00 pm College Life & Orientation 9 Sept. 14-15, Fri.-Sat. Get-A-Way 7-9th grades Sept. 22, Saturday Church Leadership Conference Team Building Sept. 25-26, Tue.-Wed. Faith Forum Oct. 15, Mon. 9:00 am Mid-term Grades Due Oct. 15, Mon. Fall Celebration Day for Adults +55 Oct. 22-Nov. 12, Mon.-Mon. Pre-enrollment for spring semester Nov. 1, Thur. Institutional and Memorial Grant Application deadline for spring must also have FAFSA in to be considered for I & M Grant Nov. 2-3, Fri.-Sat. OCC Ambassadors present: “The Event” 9th-12th grades Nov. 15-18, Thur.-Sun. National Missionary Convention, Indianapolis, IN Nov. 17-26, Sat.-Mon. Thanksgiving break Residence Halls close Fri., Nov. 16, 4:00 pm; re-open Sun. Nov. 25, 5:00 pm Nov. 29-Thur.; Nov. 30-Fri.; Living Christmas Tree Dec. 1-Sat.2; 2-Sun.2; 3-Mon. Living Christmas Tree Dec. 10-13, Mon.-Thur. Semester Exams Dec. 13, Thur. 6:00 pm Faculty/Staff Christmas dinner Dec. 14, 2012-Jan. 14, 2013 Christmas mid-year break Residence Halls close Thur., Dec. 13, 4:00 pm Dec. 18, Tue. 9:00 am Grades due

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COMMUNICATION AND VISITOR INFORMATION

ACTIVITY CALENDAR SPRING 2013 Jan. 5, Sat. Admissions Application Deadline Jan. 7-11, Mon.-Fri. Winter Session Jan. 11, Fri. 1:00 pm Residence Halls open for new students 7:00-9:00 pm College Life & Orientation 1 Jan. 12, Sat. 9:00-10:00 am College Life & Orientation 2 - Bible Knowledge Test 10:30-Noon College Life & Orientation 3 1:30-4:00 pm College Life & Orientation 4 Jan. 13, Sun. 2:00 pm Residence Halls reopen for returning students Jan. 14, Mon. 8:00 am-Noon; 1:00-4:00 pm Second Semester Enrollment in MPB Jan. 15, Tue. Classes begin Feb. 15, Fri. Deadline for President’s and Dean’s Scholarship Application Feb. 5-7, Tue.-Thur. International Focus Week Feb. 25-27, Mon.-Wed. Preaching-Teaching Convention Mar. 11, Mon., 9:00 am Mid-term grades due Mar. 16-25, Sat.-Mon. Week of Evangelism Residence Halls close Fri., Mar. 15, 4:00 pm; re-open Sun., Mar. 24, 5:00 pm Mar. 22-23 Missouri Christian Convention, Tan-Tar-A, Osage Beach. Mar. 29, Fri. 12:15 pm Good Friday Worship Service Apr. 1, Mon. Financial Aid deadline for FAFSA, Institutional and Memorial Grant Application Apr. 1-22, Mon.-Mon. Pre-enrollment for fall semester Apr. 12-13, Fri.-Sat. Women’s Conference at Ozark Apr. 26-27, Fri.-Sat. Deeper Life 9-12 grades May 3-5, Fri.-Sun. Musical May 14-17, Tue.-Fri. Final Exams May 17, Fri., 7:30 pm Baccalaureate Service Approximately 9:00 pm Graduates & Parents Reception May 18, Sat. 10:00 am Commencement 4:00 pm Residence Halls close May 28, Tue. 9:00 am Grades due June 3-6, Mon.-Thur. Branson Conference for Adults 55+ in Branson, MO June 3-14, Mon.-Fri. Summer School June 5-7, Wed.-Fri. Ambassadors’ Basketball Boys & Girls Day Camp 3rd-5th grades June 5-7, Wed.-Fri. Jr. High Volleyball Camp 6th-8th grades June 7-12, Sun.-Wed. Jr. High Girls Ambassadors’ Basketball Camp 6th-8th grades June 10-14, Mon.-Fri. Branson Conference for Adults 55+ in Branson, MO June 12-15, Wed.-Sat. Jr. High Boys Ambassadors’ Basketball Camp 6th-8th grades June 13-18, Thur.-Tue. Highest Praise Rehearsal Week June 16-20, Sun.-Thur. Sr. High Girls Ambassadors’ Basketball Camp 9 th-12th grades June 19-30, Wed.-Sun. Highest Praise Tour June 21-22, Fri.-Sat. Freshmen Fast Track Pre-enrollment for Fall, 2013 June 23-27, Sun.-Thur. Sr. High Boys Ambassadors’ Basketball Camp 9th-12th grades June 30 Sun. 7:00 pm Highest Praise Finale Concert in the OCC Chapel July 9-12, Tue.-Fri. North American Christian Convention, Louisville, KY July 9-12, Tue.-Fri. National Bible Bowl Tournament, Louisville, KY July 19-20, Fri.-Sat. Freshmen Fast Track Pre-enrollment for Fall, 2013 Aug. 1, Thur. 9:00 am Summer School Grades Due

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2011-2013 CATALOG

COMMUNICATION DIRECTORY Inquiries to the college may be addressed to Ozark Christian College, 1111 North Main Street, Joplin, Missouri 64801, telephone number 417.626.1234, Fax 417.624.0090, www.OCC.edu. FOR INFORMATION CONCERNING CONTACT Matters of a general nature, pulpit supply President or Executive Vice President Faculty, Curriculum Academic Dean Admissions/Recruitment Executive Director of Admissions Transcripts Registrar Student Accounts, Finances Executive Director of Campus Operations Student Aid Director of Financial Aid Student Welfare, Residence matters Executive Director of Student Development Gifts, Estate planning Development Department Alumni Alumni Director Library Co-Director of Library Services Events Coordinator of Events and College Relations

VISITOR INFORMATION Visitors are welcome at any time. Our chapel services are open to all at 10:00 Am on Tuesdays while school is in session. Offices are open from 8 Am to 5 Pm, Monday through Friday.

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COMMUNICATION AND VISITOR INFORMATION

CAMPUS MAP

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2011-2013 CATALOG

INDEX Absences 52 Academic Computing Lab 14 Academic Integrity/Honesty 46-48 Academic Policies 43 Academic Probation 51 Academic Suspension 51 Academic Warning 51 Accreditation 10 Administrators 179 Admissions 32-41 Apologetics Courses 130 Application for Degree or Certificate 45 Bible Courses 119-127 Business Courses 131 Calendar of Activities 186-189 Campus Map 191 Certification (ABHE) 10 Chapel Services 13 Christian Education Courses 145-148 Christian Service 12-13 Christian Service Courses 174 Class Attendance 52 College Objectives 7 Communications Courses 131-132 Communication Directory 190 Cooperative Programs 101-105 Core Values 9-10 Correspondence Work/Online courses 44 Costs 18-22 Course Descriptions 119-175 Credit for Prior Learning 51 Day Care Courses 145-148 Deaf Ministry Courses 148-150 Degree Requirements 58-116 Deposit (Room Maintenance) 19 Disabilities 39-40 Doctrine Courses 127-129 Doctrinal Statement 8 Dual Credit Students 38-39 Employment Opportunities 30 English Courses 132-133 Entrance Examinations 41 Faculty 180-184 Field Experience Courses 174 Financial Aid 23-30

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General Bible Courses 126-127 General Studies 130-144 Grading Policies 50 Graduation Requirements 59-60 Grants 24-25 History Courses 133-135 History of the College 4-5 Housing 12, 41 International Students 36-38 Intercultural Studies 158-164 Internship Courses 172-173 Language Courses 135-138 Loans 25, 27-28 Learning Center 46 Library 13 Ministry Courses 150-158 Mission of the College 6 Music Courses 164-171 New Testament Courses 122-125 Office Hours 190 Old Testament Courses 119-122 Philosophy/Interpretation Courses 142-144 Physical Education Courses 141-142 Professional Studies 145-171 Psychology/Counseling Courses 138-141 Readmission 51-52 Refunds 21-22 Release of Information 53-55 Schedule Changes 44-45 Scholarships 26-28 Science Course 144 Special Activities 14-15 Special Students 39-40 Speech Courses 131-132 Student Development Courses 144-145 Student Life 11-16 Teacher Education 101-105 Transcripts 45-46 Transfer of Credit 34-35, 48-49 Trustees 178 Veterans 10, 26 Visitor Information 32, 190 Weekend Ministries 30 Withdrawal Procedure 45 Youth Ministry Courses 150-158


MAIL:

1111 North Main Street Joplin, Missouri 64801 PHONE:

417.626.1234 800.299.4622 WEB:

www.OCC.edu


OCC Academic Catalog 2011-2013