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Afritiliar No. 66.

1915.

DECEMBER. CONTENTS.

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O.S.U.H.C. 0.S.L.C. 0.S.L.T.C. WAR AND PEACE SOCIETY

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THE past year has been a crucial one for the As a result of the steadily decreasing number of contributions, and of the low standard of those submitted, an inter-collegiate meeting was called in the summer of 1914 to decide whether it was desirable to continue the magazine. The meeting agreed that if a renewed effort were made by each College it would be possible to carry on the Fritillary: Under the new regime great prominence was given to the literary sections of the magazine, and the last year's experience has proved that the literary interest is the vital one. Congratulations are undoubtedly to be offered to the past year's Editor, who took up her duties in the face of grave disadvantages, and who, helped by the sustained enthusiasm of the Committee, has placed the inter-collegiate magazine on a sound basis. Interest has revived to a remarkable extent and the Fritillary is no longer looked upon as a joke, and a poor one at that. One of the great factors of its successful continuance has been the serious appreciation of its readers, whereas in former years it has met with little more than destructive criticism. This year will be the one to test the foundation laid in the past year if interest in competition wanes, and if the number of contributions of high standard decreases, the good work done in the past year will be of little avail. The number of general contributions have been very encouraging :

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X CLUB

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INTER-COLLEGIATE LIBRARY OF MODERN LITERATURE OXFORD UNIVERSITY SOCIALIST SOCIETY UNIVERSITY MISSION TO CENTRAL AFRICA HALL NOTICES: LADY MARGARET HALL SOMERVILLE COLLEGE ST. HUGH'S COLLEGE ST. HILDA'S HALL OXFORD HOME STUDENTS

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Ebttortal. Fritillary.

REPORTS (continued)— THE HUNDRED MOOT IRISH CLUB

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EDITORIAL ... THE MITHRAIST IN ROME REVIEW-RUPERT BROOKE MATTER OF BRITTANY ... PROCLAMATION ... FULFILD OF FAYERYE REVIEW OF ' THESE TWAIN' EXAMINATION RESUL'T' S REPORTSO. S. D.S.

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this Term, although the general level was not perhaps as high as might be desired ; on the other hand there were few entries for the competitions, where again the standard of much submitted was unsatisfactory. The continuance of the Fritillary depends on whether the tradition of a high literary standard can be made strong enough to be binding upon future years. COMPETITIONS.

Division I. A prize was awarded to Miss Haldane; Society of Oxford Home Students, for a narrative poem entitled The Mithraist at Rome ; only one other contribution was received for this division. Miss Haldane seems to have realised the essentials of good modern narrative ; in the whole conduct of the plot there is a suggestion of sustained movement, and the well-managed metre is admirably suited to narrative. There is a good use made of description, which enhances the clearly-conceived idea and does not stop the progress of the action. The other contribution, by Rhymster,' was decidedly unoriginal, and the Scotch dialect wasbadly and inconsistently managed. '

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Division II. There were only two entries for the poem in the metre of `Hertha,' and no prize was awarded in this section. It was hoped that contributors would attempt this poem, the metre being such


THE FRITILLARY.

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as demanded much care in construction, and a true conception of what matter was fitted to be so presented. The author of Dream Fear' has neither chosen a subject suited to the verse nor fully grasped the metre. Cor Cordium was the better of the two poems received, having for its subject one which shows that the author has an adequate idea of suiting matter to manner, although a lavish use of words has obscured much of the idea. '

Division III. There were two entries for the review of modern poetry ; both took for their subject the work of Rupert Brook, 1914 and Other Poems.' A prize was awarded to Miss Byrne, Somerville College, for a review which fulfills. the primary function of such an article by creating desire to read the book. The writer very deliberately distinguishes between the man and the artist, in order to demonstrate the intrinsic literary value of the poems. The style is careful but not laboured, and the phrasing judicious. The other entry was not equally interpretative and presupposed a knowledge of the poems, instead of endeavouring to excite curiosity as to the nature of the volume. It is, however, genuinely appreciative, although it over-emphasises the personal element. Division IV. We feared May Morning It was with eyes open to such a risk that a prize was offered for a piece of Poetic Prose it was hoped, however, that an entirely new subject might discover new contributors. As a test of the general conception of Poetic Prose the entries are very disappointing. They show that none of the contributors have really grasped the essentials we would hesitate to say that the contributors have no ear, but they certainly fail to convey any satisfactory sense of rhythm. A superabundance of adjectives constitutes The Fool's idea of Poetic Prose similarly, a most inappropriate use of phraseology borrowed from the literature of the eighth century, and the prevalence of the verbal ending eth,' dominates Primrose's composition to the exclusion of both rhythm and sense alike. Christopher,' determined to avoid extravagance, entirely neglects the actual form and, in consequence, the really attractive underlying idea is expressed with a decided lack of imagination. The use of dialect in On Shotover is disturbing and unnecessary, though its use is consistent and correct. The writer was evidently obsessed by theories to the detriment of its poetic nature. This, however, is not so disastrous as the prevalence of manner over matter, which distinguishes the two compositions on May Morning,' and which was indeed what we most dreaded in setting such a subject for competition. '

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Three prizes of to/- each will be offered for the following contributions :I. A Nursery Rhyme. II. A Review of Modern Drama. III. A Fantasy (prose). The Editor reserves the right to withdraw any or all of the prizes if the contributions do not reach a sufficiently high standard. We acknowledge with thanks the receipt of our contemporaries, the Girton College Magazine and . S. Leonard's School Gazette.

1Lbe fibitbraist in 'Rome. took me and they sold me like a beast In their hot market. Captain, chief and priest, All, all my people fled or slain or sold, Mother and wife and child. Too rash, too bold ; How could we know ? But Him I trusted in— lie could have saved, but none believed but I. Without His help how could we hope to win? Unto what vain gods yet the nations cry So I will turn and praise His name a space, Surely 1Ie saved me in the market-place.

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I served, as is the custom, for some years In the first orders of the Mysteries Where one believes, but neither feels nor sees, And afterwards, with many hopes and fears, Became a priest and knew, oh Bulislayer Then, being branded soldier, quicklier I rose, and, when my nation clashed with Rome, Was made a Persian in the Temple there. (Oh, little Temple-court, my home, my home !) !

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I had a friend, who loved a maiden, fair As silver lilies on a dusky mere ; Her he had wooed for all one passionate year, And they were married on a summer day, And he was happier than he could say, Nor did their love in anywise abate, But then it seemed that he must, go away To fight the Romans, whom he did not hate. God knows how much they hated, he and she, Fast bound in that fierce market presently Oh, then I prayed, aye, many times and more I prayed and wept, who had not wept before, So at the last one came to purchase me, Branded and stript of all my sanctity, And alsd bought the girl, my friend's young wife ; But he was sick of his deep wounds unhealed (It needed that before they made him yield), And then I knew he had no chance of life ; He was worth little, being like to die; Some greasy baker bought him to grind corn, Who was a captain once, and nobly born,— Poor things, they never even said good-bye. * * * !


THE FRITILLARY. So we were that man's household slaves in Rome, Both from the little Asian city come, Where Rome's wave laps the shores of half the world, I and my friend's wife; she as rose uncurled, Put out fresh beauties on those alien shores And, in the strange house with the painted floors, Grew, although weeping, always lovelier ; And then I saw what he would do with her— That brute who looked at her loose-mouthed, fouleyed ; And by-and-bye we heard my friend had died. * * One day there came, it seemed from underground, A faintly heard not unfamiliar sound All hot and cold—oh, of good days not least !Seeking I found (the one thing most well done, That time I served as novice and as priest) A little shrine to the Unconquered Sun. How well it scattered doubt and fear and pain To see the veils, the masks, the cloaks again, And hear the deep responses, grave and slow, The old Nama, Nama, Sebesio.' :

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At the first service I was clothed once more In robes I had put off so long before, And black-fringed, Phrygian, Perses cap, to find I held, in all the household which was there, The highest rank of all the priests that were ; And he was Miles—oh, my God most great !Then, as they clasped my tunic, knelt to bind My sandals on, I pondered in my mind His Ways and Works, which, mostly, men call Fate As thus : my master held, as Miles, place In our Mithraic heaven, below mine. He was three steps behind me in the race, And neither broke the Bread nor drank the Wine In the Sun's Feast, as I do. And the wife Of my dead friend was in his evil power. Could I, to save her honour, and her life, For she would kill herself, most sacrilegeously, All unregarding of the sacred hour, During the service, when he knelt to me As the chief priest, force him to vow and swear By the Bull's Blood that he would set her free Untouched? Surely a good deed that would be But due to my dear dead friend's memory. (Still unforgot the day when she, Most Fair, Took him, Most Brave, for husband ; I, the Friend, Promising both that while I yet should live I would help either with the blood's last beat.) Yet was not this worse than my life to give? A deadly sin I could not see to the end Right in that prayer, while he knelt at my feet . If I could think—had time—it must be now That Brand-mark burning, burning, on my brow ! :

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Blind and unhearing, so my heart was full, I held the Sun's Feast, prayed above the Bull.

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I will praise thee with songs of battle, With many praises and a song ; Take me in thine arms, Bullslayer, For I am tired and thou art strong ! '

His turn next to kneel and I Oh, Miles Must do this now, or the one chance slip by. Then break my vows All for a woman He knelt and I was calm and strong again. .

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I made him swear he, kneeling at my feet, He dared not move I felt quick pulses beat Through heart and temples ; so at last he rose, Trembling with rage and hatred and dull red, All pent-up vengeance from the quivering head To shaking foot, and passed like flame through those Who had seen. And there was silence for a space. I felt the sweat drip slowly from my face Onto the marble steps. They, too, went out, Those others. And all gone, I turned about To pray, and fell and fainted on the floor Of the still temple. When I woke once more I found one bending over me, who said : He has freed the girl, given her, too, much gold In fear of the oath, and she is safely sped. Say, did you love her much? You were too bold.' That, at least, is well. I love her? Never One's love is dearer than one's life to sell.' He will leave you here How will he kill me? With the door barred ; he would not kill a priest, I do not fear you know.' But if you die A death like this, and in His temple least. Good-bye.' He went away, and a deep peace Fell on me, and has wrapped me without cease Since then. That was, I think, four days ago; I judge it by the Lamp-lighting, and slow Ebb of the flame to almost total dusk, Then Light again, and the faint scent of musk. Once I was thirsty but all that has passed, And I am filled with happiness at last. I am most joyul, armed, for when I die, With the Fifth Password for the Perses Gate, And until then I have not long to wait. :

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An hour ago, as the flame flickered high Upon the shadowed marble, where He stands Striding the Bull, those two uplifted Hands Grasping the Knife, it seemed to me there grew In the carved Eyes a Light, and a voice came That filled the smoky vault of hollow blue, Saying, Oh, Perses, hither and a Name. !

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All that is well. And the girl too is free Fair is the morning, fairer yet is she.

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But He is brighter than the Sun at noon, Lighter than Light. And I shall see him soon. N. M. HALDANE (Oxford Home Students).


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TFIE FRITILLARY.

46 'Review.

POEMS and 1914 AND OTHER POEMS.' By Rupert Brooke. The poetry of youth, we are told, is, as a rule, more or less of an indiscretion : and the task of its would-be critic is a somewhat thankless one in most cases, for posterity is apt to take a malicious, if justifiable, glee in reversing contemporary judgment. In the present instance;however, the chief difficulty is for the critic to approach the poems of Rupert Brooke in anything like an impartial critical frame of mind ; writing in 1915 it is hardly possible to forget the man when dealing with his work. But his poetry, let it be said at once, was emphatically not a youthful indiscretion, and so it is of the utmost importance, if justice is to be done, that it should be approached solely from the point of view of its value as poetry. Probably the first thought that will occur to any reader of Georgian Poetry who has just been introduced to the re-published Poems ' of 1911 will be surprised at the omission of The Old Vicarage—Grantchester.' The vogue of local poetry is nowadays, perhaps, not what it was in the 18th century, but it would be hard to find anywhere a more delightful example of the type than this. Those who know Cambridgeshire, '

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and it is good to put the book down with that mood prevailing. The unpractised hand of youth is revealed now and again in little lapses, such as The One before the Last ' ; nevertheless, youth calls no man master. Rupert Brooke has a vivid originality and immense energy of thought ; these find vent in the first Sonnet •of the Poems,' in Dust,' with its exquisite lyric note, and in Dining Room Tea,' to cite but a few of the more striking examples. These three poems, indeed, tempt the critic to take refuge in that remarkably useful line—' What oft was thought but ne'er so well expressed ; while Pine Trees and the Sky— Evening brings a sense of fulfilment that is rarely captured by this type of poem. Very distinctive is the recurrent apprehension of the second best that runs through so much of his verse and along side of this undertone of the good hours that are over' is an intense doubt of self. One would hesitate before asserting these to be unusual to youth, but they are much rarer in youthful poetry ; it is neither the almost proverbial world-weariness, nor yet cynicism ; it is simply the state of those wanderers in the middle mist, Who cry for shadows, clutch, and cannot tell Whether they love at all, or, loving, whom.' And poets who can catch the lyric exuberance of the Song on page 42 do not, as a rule, foresee with such uncompromising vigour the time when love has changed to kindliness.' It is always interesting to note the use a new writer will make of the sonnet '—that trap for the unwary. Rupert Brooke's skill is as evident here as elsewhere. With regard to the sonnet sequence entitled 1914,' The Times' enthusiastic verdict will be remembered It is impossible to shred up this beauty for the purpose of criticism. These sonnets are personal—never were sonnets more personal since Sidney died—and yet the very blood and youth of England seem to find expression in them.' It will not be for the first time that it is here claimed for The Soldier' that it is the finest poem this war has evoked. Nobody who has read it can ever forget its splendid simplicity and the everlasting triumph of the sacrifice If I should die, think only this of me That there's some corner of a foreign field That is forever England Rupert Brooke would not be a true child of his age if realism did not find a place in his poetry. Most people have their own definitions of this much-abused word, so often expounded, and equally seldom explained, but leaving its ambiguity aside for the• moment, it is interesting, in the present case, to try to discover the reason of it, and its ultimate and intrinsic value. We cannot doubt that it is sincere : all his poetry is that ; but we cannot say that 'A Chan'

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The shire for men who understand,' will appreciate the entire truth of the picture while those who do not will add that shire, and particularly the lovely hamlet, Grantchester,' to their intimate little lists of private El Dorados. There is, in all his verse, a peculiarly distinctive touch it is impossible to define its essence : a subtle turn of phrasing, the quaint use of an epithet, a trick of melody—these are a part, and nowhere are they more apparent than in Grantchester.' It is the man with decidedly original byeways in his imagination, that, instead of A faun a'peeping thro' the green,' sees spectral dance, before the dawn, A hundred Vicars down the lawn, Curates, long dust, who come and go On lissom, clerical, printless toe.' The new reader, turning to the second volume, however, will at once feel how entirely appropriate it was to close the record with this particular poem. Apart from the obvious reason of date which places it in this book, one instinctively recognises that this is the right note to end upon ; the dash of bitterness in The Beginning is a little too pronounced ; the Funeral of Youth shows that the extravagance of that period had not been entirely outlived ; but ;

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THE FRITILLARY. nel Passage,' for example, has the one excuse and breath of art—charm.' The intense feeling, however, for bravely sensuous beauty, elsewhere manifested, shows that there must be a counterbalancing intensity of feeling for the ugly side of things ; we expect it of the writer of Dust ' and of Grantchester.' And it is just this extremely vivid perception that produced that unpleasant sonnet—the vision is too narrowly focussed to get the breadth of outline which alone makes this sort of thing possible ; as it is, it can give no species of satisfaction to anyone. In the writer's mind, however, there doubtless was a justification charm may be the breath of Stevenson's art—it is enough for the poet of today that he see and feel with understanding. L'ecrivain n'est qu'un miroir . . . qui n'a rien a se faire pardonner si ses empreintes sort exactes. si son reflet est fidele,' wrote George Sand in 1832, with more of prophetic insight than she was aware. So long as the writer is honest his sordid realism is justified of itself. Its ultimate value is, naturally, not great but as evidence of a period of transition it is of relative importance ; it is important, too, as a reflex of the state of much modern poetry—a state with which the literary history of the future will have to reckon. There is another side of this movement, however, that is of immediate and enduring artistic worth. Between this passionate realism, which is the stuff of the finest love poetry, and the lyric idealism in which most poets are fain to express sentiment and emotion, his poems alternate curiously. It would seem as if the chants of sheer beauty he now and again pours forth are to be explained on the same principle as we would explain the singing of a bird ; but that a certain faultless poetic instinct he possessed, and to which he undoubtedly listened as a rule, is to• be held accountable for the former, with all its little commonplace details—details such as those who have really lived remember to the end of their days :

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This is the day of the apotheosis of the in-ignificant,' and the tendency is to be traced in many of these poems :

I watched the quivering lamplight fall On plate and flowers and falling tea And cup and cloth. . . In the desperate cry in Ambarvalia '

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With snuffle and sniff and handkerchief, And dim and decorous mirth, With ham and sherry, they'll meet to bury The lordliest lass of earth.'

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and in the last few lines of Home I lay and watched the lonely gloom And watched the moonlight creep From wall to basin, round the room. All night I could not sleep.' '

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It would be unfair to omit a mention of the technique of these poems, for they show a spirit of conscientious workmanship, and are remarkably free from the carelessness, and the metrical peccadilloes that one has come so largely to associate with most youthful verse. Time would undoubtedly have proved him a master of rhythm as it is, his command of it is very noticeable, and his few licences are all judicious. It is impossible to enter into an account of the many details that delight us in both volumes noteworthy is his quaintly humorous love of fish, in their cool curving world ;' and technically, a certain trick of repetition, very effectively used. His epithets are fresh and original apt, explicit, and communicative ' Great Hopes, gold-armoured, jester Fantasies, And pilgrim Dreams, and little beggar Sighs,

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; . .. and the grave, jewelled courtier Memories the sharp black heads of the pines ; his most individual and bewildering ghost ; the thin gnatvoices of the stars ; swift hair ; the rough male kiss of blankets ; the brave sting ' of the rain,—space forbids their enumeration at length, but these, though by no means exhaustive, are typical. Biographical criticism of any sort has been deliberately avoided ; the poems in themselves deserved in 1911 the reputation they are now acquiring—works do not, like wine, mature by keeping, and evolve into masterpieces after the lapse of a certain number of years. His death has only brought his poetry within the knowledge of some thousands of new readers—it has not altered the value of his genius. In leaving out all the personal element, however, we have been compelled to disregard one of the greatest appeals of Rupert Brooke's poetry behind it we realise all the time an eager, varied, and brave personality ; an eager truth-seeker, with a saving sense of humour. It is the most difficult task of all to criticise contemporary literature ; at present opinion in high places is divided as to how far these two small volumes represent achievement, or only promise ; let us, therefore, not rush in where angels fear to tread, and generalize rashly as to their enduring quality, but confidently recommend Rupert Brooke, poet, to the judgment of a posterity permitted by time to be enthusiastically appreciative, if it will, and in its unanimity more entitled than we to withhold or confer the laurel. '

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THE FRITILLARY. !Batter of Erittany. Draw to the fire, and let us weave a web Of songs and splendours intertwined— Of warriors riding two by two, In silken surcoats stitched with blue, To seek and strive the whole world through For a scarlet fruit with silver rind ; Of unsteered ships that drift for miles on miles, Amid the creeks of myriad magic isles, Over enchanted seas, that leave at ebb A beach of glittering gold behind. Hark ! How the rain is rippling over the roofs And knocking hard on the window pane ! It rattles down the gutter-spout And beats the laurel-leaves about ; So let us tell of a kempy stout With bells upon his bridle-reinHow, as he rode beneath the chattering boughs, He clashed the iron visor over his brows, Hearing upon his heel the hurried hoofs Of Breunor, Breuse or Agravaine. Of names like dusky jewels wedged in gold The tale shall cherish goodly store, Of Lionel and Lamorak And of Sir Lancelot du Lak And him that bore upon his back Arms for the Lady Lyonor ; Persant, Perimones and Pertolepe, And Arthur laid in Avalon asleep, Dinas and Dinadan and Bors the bold, And many a mighty warrior more. .

And, grimly crouched in every woodland way, A dragon with his emerald eyes Shall sit and blink on passing knights ; In the deep dells old eremites, Victors once of a thousand fights, Shall sing their masses at sunrise ; And weary men shall stumble unaware On damsels dancing in a garden fair, And there, like Merangis of Portlesguez, Dance, cheated of their memories. To towns where we shall feast at PentecostCarlion or Kynke KenadonEach day shall come a faery dame, Or else a giant with eyes of flame Shall bid to the beheading game Knights that the king sets store upon ; And some shall find, at hour of day's decline, The house beside the fountain and the pine, And, learning much of marvel from their host, Shall hasten greatly to begone. Some, by the help of charmed steeds, shall just Leap through the whirling barriers

That guard about the pleasant bower Where every moment is an hour, And with an elfin paramour Drowse and dream for a hundred years, But setting foot again on Middle Earth, Or tasting wheaten bread in hour of dearth, Shall crumble to a little cloud of dust Blown by the wind across the furze. Or sometimes through the arches of the wood The sad Good Friday bells will ring Loud in the ear of Percivale, Through many a year of ban and bale Yet questing after the Sangraal For comfort of the Fisher King; And suddenly, across a vault of stars Shall drive a network of enchanted spars, And Lancelot and Galahad the good Behold the ship of hallowing. And first of all I'll tell the tale to you, And you shall tell the next to me : How gentle Enid made complaint While riding with her lord Geraint, Or how the merry Irish Saint Went ever westward oversea ; While your dim shadow, moving on the wall, Might be Sir Tristram's, as he harped in hall Before Iseult of Ireland, always true, Or white Iseult of Brittany. DOROTHY L. SAYERS.

'Proclamation. (To be read to His Majesty's loyal subjects about the Hour of Bedtime.) Oyez, Oyez! Good folk, give ear, Of every age and station. Silence awhile, that ye may hear Our Liege's Proclamation Against a spy who lurks abroad With fell intention to defraud The burghers of this nation,— A most notorious, smooth-faced wight, A rogue, a cheat, a hypocrite, Called Cavaliero Candle-light ! II That ye may know his heinous crimes, Deceits and tricks degrading :He bath been met with sundry times About the court parading ; Or, wrapt with flame in lieu of cloak, Trailing a silvery plume of smoke In ballrooms masquerading. The ladies vow, where'er they go, He dazzles and distracts them so They often answer Yes ' for No ' !


THE FRITILLARY. III He hath been noted, now and then, When midnight fires are sinking, Seated in some poor scholar's den With mirth malicious winking ; And when his master—(vainly wise)— Strains o!er the book his wearied eyes Splutters to see him blinking. At times his portly form appears Mourning above funereal biers And smugly dropping fat wax tears.

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appeared upon the table. I can call to mind the taste of that jam and the delicious smell of peat. I remember that the settle was high and our legs dangled in the warmth of the fire. Before the mist cleared, we had heard more stories than I can tell again we had seen the silver shoe buckles ' no bigger 'n a crumb o' corn that gran'feyther brought home from the scene of a piskie-dance. He was crossing the moor by the light of the harvest moon, just the time when piskies are about and had been lured by them into one of the but circles which lie scattered about on that side of the moor. No sooner had he passed the granite posteses that mark the entrance, than the small people were about him, like a swarm o' bees' they gave him pins and needles in every limb : they danced round him in a ring, till he was vair mazed.' Pixies laughed at him from the crevices of the loose stone wall a hundred eyes peeped at him out of the heather. At last, when he had given up all hope of escape, he remembered to turn his coat and put it on inside out. The charm worked vitty ' the pixies vanished like a mist under the' moon, and, stooping to make sure that none were left, he found the shoebuckles, and carried them home to his wife. Delighted, we told the farmer that we had found the pixies' cave we had crawled into it that very day on our hands and knees it was too low for any mortal to stand upright in. He made us describe it for there were many hollows among the rocks ; but only wan piskiecave.' Zure 'nuff we were right, for we had taken the crooked thorn for a land-mark, and followed the pixie track. But, heart alive! we had forgotten to take a bent pin as an offering and so far as wishes were concerned, we might so well never a' gone.' Mother,' who saw disappointment in our faces, here began to tell us how the small people had been seen inside their cave, the men smoking pipes and the women spinning, and how, sometimes, parents had recognised lost children among them. She had heard tell of a fair that the small people held wan time, down along in the village.' They brought with them all manner o' merchandise the prettiest sight in the world,' and the boys and maidens were tempted to buy ; but when they woke up next morning, the fairings had disappeared. The piskies had been in the night and carried them off The farmer himself, when a boy, had placed bread and milk on the door-step, for a pixie who did help his mother and t' maidens,' and in the morning, cure 'nuff, it had disappeared. He couldn't call to mind that he had seen this pixie himself, but his sister had peeped through a chink in the barn door, and was quite sure she had seen him perched on one of the rafters. He was for all the world, she said, like a little brown owl. :

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IV Wherefore, for these his proved misdeeds Against our subjects' reason We find, whate'er the rascal pleads, He's guilty of High Treason,— Condemning him by this decree An outlaw from our realm to be, That any man may seize on. Whoso shall find him hereabout We thus empower, without a doubt, (Oyez, Oyez!) to blow him out ! D. H. R.

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In the West Country there is a farm house that stands at the foot of a for : it is empty now and the yellow lichen is spreading on its walls but my cousin and I took shelter once, when we were children, under its hospitable roof. A mist had come down upon the tor, on the cairn of which we had perched ourselves, and we scrambled down and through a bog, and so into the rickyard. If my memory serves me, one of us had lost a shoe. The farmer was thatching a rick corrugated iron had not then made its appearance on the moor. He looked down at us with amused indulgence : his chuckle was good to hear. Zure 'nuff quoth he, you've a been piskieled (he pronounced it laid) and in the day time too 'Twad'n as if 'twas in the dimpsey !* You did ought tu've turn' yer stockins inside out Iss fay, you did !' He led us into the spacious kitchen a peat fire glowed upon the hearth the chimney was wide and generous, like himself. Hullo, mawther where be'ee my else-ur?' he cried, and his wife entered from another room, the only possible mistress for such a house. "ere be to childer, my lover,' said the farmer, pushing us towards her pinkie led they've a bin and starvin' wi' the cold !' We were instantly placed in the settle our muddy stockings disappeared as if by magic. A feast of bread and cream and whortleberry jam :

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I-le is a spirit of ancient lineage, this Dartmoor Puck he has chosen the but circles of the oldest dwellers on the moor for his merry makings, and many a rock bears the print of his dancing feet. Time was when no village was without its pixie ; most of the old people could tell you pixie tales, and the children were not above listening to them then. All the small people go by the name of piskies on the moor yet among them are distinctions and degrees. Some of the more delicate spirits ride in the wind, laugh at you out of the eddies of a stream, or charm you with music, like the song of birds.' Others live underground and have command of hidden treasures. I cannot remember where it was that I heard the story of Wistman Grig.' It was certainly not our farmer who told us that but there is not a single knavish sprite of them all but is connected in my mind with that farm house. When I want to find a particular elf, I begin by picturing the farmer and his wife. No sooner are they in their accustomed place, than the small people are about, none of them higher'n your shoe string ! ' and I find my piskie lurking in the smoke of the master's pipe, or clinging to his wife's half finished sock. But let me tell you about Wistman Grig A shepherd, who dwelt in the valley of the Dart, was sitting in his cottage on a stormy night, when suddenly his dog began to growl. At the same moment there came a knock upon the door and a shrill voice cried : Let me in Let me in ! I am Wistman Grig !' The dog continued his growling but the shepherd bade him lie down, and unlatched the door. On the doorstep stood a little fellow about the height of a four years' child, but fully grown. His clothes were torn as if by brambles, and he was wet through. The shepherd placed food before him and he ate ravenously. Then he lay down in front of the fire and fell asleep. The shepherd rose at daybreak, but his guest had already lighted the fire and set the table for breakfast. You have done me a service,' said he, when they had finished their meal and you shall find I am not ungrateful. Follow me, for your dog can look after the sheep.' So he led him down to the river, and then upstream till they came to the wood of dwarf oaks, between Two Bridges and Longaford Tor, which is known as Wistman's Wood. It is a mass of great rocks underfoot, and between them are deep holes and crevices and the trees are the oldest upon the moor. As they entered the wood, out of the bright sun, the grey branches twisted themselves into fantastic shapes and the trees bowed as if in mirth. :

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Where are you? Where are you, Wistman Grig?' cried the shepherd, for he had lost sight of his guide. Here I am,' said a voice, which sounded as if it came from the root of a tree. The shepherd was just going to plant his foot upon a rock, when it disappeared, and he fell into a hole, dark and wide as the mouth of a well. The next moment he found himself in an underground cavern, and saw that its walls were ablaze with precious stones. Gold, emeralds and rubies, thicker than autumn leaves, lay scattered at his feet. Diamonds hung from the roof like crystals through an opening he could see innumerable caves, arch beyond arch of pearl and amethyst. The shepherd stood still, half blinded by the light. Where are you?' he whispered—' where are you, Whistman Grig?' Here I am,' said the voice of the pixie at his side, but if you are afraid, you had better go home again !' Afraid? cried the shepherd ; but at the sound of his voice the cave grew black as a bat's wing. Where are you, where are you, Wistman Grig?' cried the shepherd, and knew that he was afraid. Then, suddenly, he felt a cool wind blowing in his face the darkness parted like a mist, and he found himself standing on the side of a for from the rocks at his feet a stream ran, gathering speed, till it spread like a sheet of silver into the valley, and on either side of it were orchards and rich grain. At the foot of the for stood a fair dwelling, sheltered by trees, and around it sheep were grazing, the finest the shepherd had ever seen. The pixie stood watching him from the shadow of a rock. Now,' said he, you are to have your choice be master of this valley, with all its gifts, or gather as much treasure from the cavern as you think you can carry home !' The shepherd looked down at the valley. The corn was certainly brighter than gold in the sun ! But the jewels ! He would be a rich man with his riches he could buy many such lands and flocks. Give me the treasure !' he cried, and instantly the scene before him faded like a dream. He was back in the cavern, and the pixie was holding open a sack for him to fill. The shepherd bent down eagerly, and gathered up handfuls of gems and gold. As soon as one sack was full, the pixie had another ready for him. One, however, was as much as he could carry, and shouldering this, he turned to thank his benefactor : but the pixie had vanished and from under his feet came the sound of a mocking laugh. He turned homewards, staggering under his heavy load. The sun was just rising above the tors, and he trembled to think that he must have spent a whole night underground. '

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THE FRITILLARY. At last, from a bend in the road, he could see his flock. They were grazing quietly, as he had left them, and as he approached, his dog came bounding to meet him. Never did I dream of such riches ! Such riches !' muttered the shepherd, and the dog slunk behind him unnoticed. His master entered the cottage, set down his burden and barred the door. Then he untied the mouth of the sack and shook it, so that its cons tents rolled out on the floor. Was he bewitched ? Where was the treasure ? This was nothing but a heap of earth But of course The pixie had put earth in the sack to protect the jewels. He fell on his knees and turned it over wildly with both hands. Ah here at last was the gold But no it was only a handful of yellow leaves. That surely must be an emerald It was a bit of glow worm moss, such as boys find in caves in the light it had lost its gleam. Rubies He grasped them eagerly. They were soft and damp. In his hand lay some fragments of the red lichen that grows on the moor. The shepherd sank down on his hearth. He looked grey and old. Outside, the dog was scratching at the door. F. V. B. !

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1Review, THESE TWAIN. By Arnold Bennett. In spite of flattering impatience and a caricature by Max Beerbohm, Mr. Bennett has kept his public waiting no little time. Patient, however, and stimulated by the enjoyment, for the nth time, of Clayhanger and Hilda Lessways,' the public has waited for its promised sequel. During the last year or two, it is true, we have grown accustomed to a new realism,' which gives us biographies of adolescence, but of adolescence spent in Kensington and Piccadilly, Magdalen and Balliol, and requiring infinitely fastidious style and phrasing to make it pleasant, jam to conceal the powder of cynicism and sensuality. A public which, desiring to be impartial, has not neglected Mr. Compton Mackenzie, will be glad to return to Bursley, but disappointed to find the type of building erected on foundations already familliar. Mr. Bennett alone has the courage to summon us to accompany his hero past the age of twenty-five or so to a mature but nominally uneventful period. He has not lost his skill, however, in indicating the progress of time, and even more skilful are the touches by which he constantly reminds us of century and decade—dress, furniture, ' The Bath of Psyche and Tarara-boomde-ay.' Certain phases and episodes in this last novel will be familiar to all who understand its predeces. sors. The passage of the attractive George Edwin '

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from childhood to slovenly schooldays, the shabby, Victorian deathbed of Auntie Hamps, and the chapter in which the mechanical side of Edwin's business is described with proud delight, are in a familiar strain. The one objection which tastes rendered exacting by Clayhanger might make, is that Mr. Bennett has over-indulged his taste for such passages as were formerly only represented in his best work by the execution scene in The Old Wives' Tale.' He has let too many passionate emotions intrude upon his real sanity, and this results in glimpses of deliberate sensationalism. Hilda's meeting with Cannon in the prison, the coincident deaths of Mr. and Mrs. Orgreave, the scandal of Johnnie and Mrs.Chris, the presence of the woman in Ingpen's room, these incidents following in such quick succession, apparently to prove that romance is still native to the Five Towns, only confuse and repel the reader who has learned to expect a more controlled use of grim possibilities. It may be that complex action was felt more necessary when an epoch has been reached where the development of the leading character may be regarded as temporarily complete. Edwin and Hilda are shown to us much as might be expected ; momentary doubts and delusions which creep into their minds after marriage, the rankling ideas produced by the cool scepticism of Ingpen (the only new character), humiliating disputes as to George's spectacles and furniture, are only experienced that broader views and more charitable judgments may finally prevail. Edwin especially, suffers from his old irresolution and perversely futile contradictions of his true feelings ; his shame mixes ridiculously with his love, and produces incomprehensibly harsh desire. He is still controlled, however, by his large general passion and the faculty of extracting from minute and instantaneous sights and words the maximum of delight and inspiration. When he sees Ingpen in hospital, The man is dying,' he thought, and the tragic sensation of the vigil of the nocturnal world almost overcame him.' Remarkable also, in contrast to the full-blooded, vigorous, married Hilda, is the pathetic figure of Janet Orgreave, still kind and gracious, but desolate and superseded by nieces. Apart from the fault of unnecessarily melodramatic crises, and a certain appearance of having been written merely to satisfy a lazy-minded public, These Twain has all the energy, precision and proportion which keep realistic narrative alive ; Mr. Bennett's work is still open to the objection that man is made ' master of his fate ' and captain of his soul,' though the latter factor in his being is never mentioned. Many will be indignant because Edwin spends a week-end on Dartmoor and feels nothing, unless a deep meaning can be read into the one sentence, Behind lay the moor, tonic and grim.' Many will scorn the provincial materialism and confined outlook, the deification of '

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humanity and the lack of a universal background but remembering the new infection of realism with decadence and morbid morality, we can safely claim for These Twain clean healthiness and a fascinating subtlety in dealing with the average, and making clear the romance which a man with any sensibility, though hampered by comparative illiteracy and the compulsion to make money, can find in life. D. N. D.

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vain. G. (L.M.H.), German *Nugent, M. V. (L. M. H.), French ; Purgold, I. M. (O. H. S.), French ; Smith, E. G. (0.H.S.), French. Class III: Henkel, H. (S.H.H.), German ; Murray, V.C. (S.H.C.), French; Oliver, E. T. M. (S.H.C.), French. * Denotes distinction in colloquial use of the language. ;

Diploma in Geography.—Gregory, I. J. (O.H.S.), with distinction ; Connaughten, M. J. (0.H.S.) ; Coster, F. G. H. (0.H.S.); Miles, B. E. (0.H.S.) Truman, V. H. (S.H.C.); Vaughan, A. W. (O. H. S.).

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Examination 1Resuits.

Certificate in General and Regional Geography.

EASTER AND TRINITY TERMS, 1915. SECOND PUBLIC EXAMINATION

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Honour School of Literce Humaniores.—Class

II: Griffith, F. R. (S.C.); Haythorne, W. S. (S.C.). Class III Fox, R. D. (0.H.S.). Honour School of Natural Science.—Class II Moss, D. (S.C.), Botany ; Organe, A. M. (S.C.), Botany. Class III: Buckley, M. B. (S.C.), Zoology ; Pease, E. A. (L.M.H.), Zoology. Honour School of Modern History.—Class I Clarke, M. V. (L. M. H.) ; Coate, M. (S.H.H.); Petrie, J. B. E. (S.C.). Class II Adams, C.W. S. (S.C.); Bryan Brown, S. G. (L.NI.H.); Chubb, M. A. (S.C.); Gardner, G. (S.H.C.) Godfrey, C. H. (S.C.); Graham, 0. (S.C.); Horne, D. K. (L.M.H.); Lewis, NI. A. (L.M.H.); Leys, M. D. R. (S.C.); Macrae, E. N. (S.H.H.); Martin, I. M. (L.M.H.); Petty, M. (S.C.); Thompson, A. D. (S.H.H.); Whitwill, M. W. (S.C.). Class III Davies, A. E. (0.H.S.); Giles, A. E. llips, D. (S.H.C.); Hall, M. M. J. (S.H.C.); Phi (S.C.); Phipps, E. (S.H.C.); Sheldon, C. M. (L. M. H.) ; Stacey, E. G. (L.M.H.); Thomson, J. A. (S.C.); Webb, S. M. R. (S.H.C.); Wodehouse, A. (L.M.H.). Class IV Baynton M. G. (L.M.H.); Kidner, R. E. (O.H.S.); E. M. (L.M.H.). Honour School of Theology.—Class III Hugo, M. H. C. (0.H.S.). :

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Honour School of English Language and Literature.—Class I Hudson, D. M. (S.C.) Potter, ;

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M. L. (S.H.C.). Class II Bartlett, E. M. (S.C.); Edmunds, U. M. (O.H.S.); Harford, M. I. (S.H.C.); Middlemore, A. T. (0.H.S.); Murray, M. G. A. (S.C.); Owen, E. E. (S.C.); Peet, E. M. (S.C.); Rose, B. M. (S.C.); Rowe, D. E. H. (S.C.). Class III: Brown, K. M. (S.H.C.); Jennings. H. (S.H.H.) Wilkinson, M. (S.H.H.). Class IV Clarke, A. F. (L.M.H.); Codd, M. F. (S.H.H.) Aegrotat Logic, H. M. (S.C.). :

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Honour School of Modern Languages.—Class

I: *Drought, D. M. (L.M.H.), French ; Sayers, D. L. (S:C.), French. Class II Bradshaw, E. M. R. (S.H.C.), French Evans, T. M. E. (S.H.C.), French Fox, H. (S.C.), German ; Mil:

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—Bagley, D. R. (0.H.S.); Chambers, M. H. (S.C.); Cross, E. (0.H.S.); Glenday, E. I. (S.H.C.); Heslop, M. K. (0.H.S.); Horne, V. C. (S.H.C.); Kcmpthorne, K. M. (S.H.H.). Diploma in Economics.—Battersby Harford, W. M. (O.H.S.). Pass School. — Group A (1) Bamber, M. (S. H. H.) ; Group B(2) : Armstrong, M. (S. H. H.) Bei:hon. L. E. (0.H.S.); James, Al A. (0.H.S.) Scott-Stokes, D. (S.C.); Webb, E. (S.C.). Theory of Education.—Dunch, L. K. E. (O. H. S), with distinction. Preliminary in Jurisprudence.—Price, P. Ni. (S. H. C.). History Previous.—Brockbank, G. Y. (S.H.C.) Buckle, P. (L.M.H.); Carr, K. (L.M.H.) ; Dacombe, M. R. (S.H.H.); Fry, J. (L.M.H.); Gauz, NI. (S.C.); *Gardiner, K. (S.C.) Grayfoot, D. (S.C.); Hughes, H. P. (S.H.H.); Jefferson, M. M. (S.H.H.); *Keble, D. (S.H.C.) *Lewis, G. (S.C.); Morgan, G. M. (S.H.H.) Oakley Hill, H. M. (0.H.S.) ; *Perham, M. (S.H.C.) Priestman, A. (S.C.); Spikes, F. (L. M. H. ) Upjohn, M. (L. NI. H. ) ; *Willey, E. (S. C.). *Indicates distinction. Science Preliminary.—Haldane, N. M. (0.H.S.), Zoology and Botany Smith, J. M. (S.H.C.), Chemistry. Certificate in French.—Berthon, L. E. (O.H. S.). :

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FIRST PUBLIC EXAMINATION

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Pass School.—Brittain, V. M. (S.C.); May, M. V. (0.H.S.); Friedeberg, R. A. (S.H.H.).

'Reports. O. S. D. S. President—Miss E. D. NI. WINTERS (S. C.). Secretary--Miss K. S. THOMAS (L.M.H.). Treasurer — Miss CARTER (S. H.C.).

The motion before the house on the first meeting was : That this house deplores the modern tendency toward specialisation in education.'

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THE FRITILLARY. The Mover, MISS OAKLEY-HILL (O.H.S.), spoke with some force against an extreme degree of specialisation ; she made the usual arguments against narrowness of accomplishment and cited some curious illustrations. Her argument was that specialisation absolutely precluded any degree of general knowledge or aptitude. The speech was fairly well delivered. The Opposer, MISS WILLEY (S. C.), spoke soundly and well. She insisted strongly on the need for specialisation after a certain period in life. Including the University in her scheme of education, she argued that after the age of 16 there was need for concentration. She too, dealt with the general aspects of the case and inclined to the opinion that research was only possible in a society where men were encouraged to be experts in their own branches of knowledge. The speech was delivered easily and was obviously well thought out. The 3rd Speaker, Miss NICHOLLS (S.H.H.), made a most interesting speech. In view of the fact that it was impromptu, the effort was most creditable. The great argument was that man was in every way a highly specialised animal both physically and also ethnologically. The whole speech was highly amusing, but tended not to advance the argument very materially. Miss Nicholls speaks freely and pleasantly and is an acceptable debater. Miss DAMES-CoLLEv (S.H.C.), spoke easily and took up her opponents' arguments. She did not contribute much fresh argument to the debate, but elaborated rather well what had already been said. The debate was good from the point of view of delivery, but the speakers in the main agreed with each other. Public discussion was flippant and ineffectual. The speakers dealt with minor points and none really reached the heart of the matter. Miss Wadham (S.C.) at least realised the curious characters of the debate in that opposers and defenders were unconsciously supporting each other. Tuesday, Nov. 9th. The debate took the form of a trial of a German spy. The case was Rex v. Rotenburg before Mr. Justice LEVETT and a special jury, on a charge of espionage. The evidence for the prosecution was slight, but was utilised to its utmost advantage by the Counsel prosecuting (Miss Townshend, S.C.). She displayed considerable skill in cross-examination, and in her final charge to the jury combined rather weak arguments with flamboyant rhetoric—exposing to the best of her ability her enemy's position. The speech was, for its purpose, very effective. The counsel for the defence (Miss CAVE, L.M.H.), displayed even more power of crossexamination. Her arguments were well marshalled and tellingly put. She spoke with energy and conviction, and addressed the jury in the most accepted style of British forensic eloquence. The evidence was to the effect that the spy was by —

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name Karl Rotenburg—a denizen of Germany, a student in 1912-14 of Oriel College, of unsound mind and curious artistic tastes.' Having broken down, in body and mind as it seemed, the accused returned to Germany, but on the outbreak of the war came back to England and joined the Oxford Society of Home Students under the name of Guinevere Barclay Buggins. Later he disappeared from Oxford, and was discovered at Newcastle near the Eiswick Works drawing what a special constable considered a plan of the works, but what the artist affirmed to be a representation of ' the Inherent Gladness of Spring.' The defence worked along the lines of mental deficiency, and the prosecution attempted to dispel the plea ; but in vain. The witnesses were mainly very good. Specially to be recommended were Miss HAY (S.H.H.), whose evidence was wonderfully given ; and MISS BUCKLER (L.M.H.), whose impersonation of an American Rhodes Scholar was excellent. The prisoner was acquitted and discharged with a caution. The third debate of term was held on November 23rd, the motion being That fanaticism accomplishes more than reason.' The Mover, MISS ELLIS-FERMOR (S.C.), in a polished and well prepared speech made her points well. She insisted on the need of unity of purpose and single-mindedness for the accomplishment of great ends. Her argument was the reason implied dispassionate judgment which discouraged action. She dealt with two situations from the point of view of the fanatic and the dispassioned reasoner. The presentation of ideas was cogent and pleasing. MISS Pococx (S.H.H.) spoke with vigour, but slightly lacked argument. The case for reason was put strongly—with even a tinge of fanaticism. It was described as the great motive force of action and the unifier of purpose. Indeed, many of the characteristics ascribed to fanaticism by the first speaker were given to reason by the second. Fanaticism was identified with madness. The delivery was free and the style easy. The 3rd Speaker, Miss LEVIN (S.H.H.), made one or two good points, but on the whole her speech lacked the careful thought shown by the others. It was rather short and was rather corroborative of the openers' than supplementary. The 4th Speaker, Miss WATKINS (L. M. H.), supported the opposer with considerable vigour, but her argument was rather spoiled by an unfortunate reference to the influence of Mohammedanism. In short speeches it is well not to confound the main issue by unfortunate turns of thought. The discussion, though tending to degenerate finally in an altercation between the opposer and Miss Nicholls, was marked by some interesting speeches, and the general level of intelligence shown was above the average. The debate was constant, and, until the end, marked by its tendency to stick to the subject. Miss HORNE, MISS '


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CARTER, MISS SHUFELDT and Miss PARROTT all contributed to the argument, and Miss Nicholls' questions were most effective. E. D. M. WINTERS.

0. S. U. H. C. Captain—I. D. BRYAN (S.C.). Secretary—P. K. BOWES (L.M.H.).

MICHAELMAS TERM, 1915. The standard of play this Term is rather lower than usual. The forwards are weak, and have very little idea of combined play ; the halves must watch their forwards and try to play with them. Most of the players know the theory of the game, but fail to apply their knowledge.. They are, however, keen, and capable of improvement. We have not been able to arrange any matches for this Term, but we hope to play one or two clubs before the Cambridge match, next Term. 0. S. L. C. Captain—F. G. LUPTON (S.C.). Secretary—B. M. RUDD (L.M.H.). Treasurer—H. RYLAND (S.C.). The number of players this Term is about forty, many of whom are new members of the Club. The games have so far been quick and energetic, though perhaps not characterised by much skill. At present, indeed, the weakness of the catching and passing is preventing the standard of the play from improving as rapidly as might be hoped from the individual players. The team has not yet been finally decided, and has so far only been able to play two matches, owing to the difficulty of finding clubs who are still playing matches. The first it won 15—i, but against Priors Field lost 13-4. What was chiefly evident from these games was that the covering and intercepting of the defences left much to be desired, and the shooting. of the attacks was still not strong, while the combination, though fair, would have been much improved by quicker and more accurate catching and passing. 0. S. L. T. C. A Central Test was held at the beginning of Term. Miss Ottley (S.C.) was made a member ; Miss Lawrence (L.M.H.) and Miss Lyne (S.C.) asociates. The tennis of most of those who entered for the test was too gentle. More attention must be paid to hard hitting and placing. At a committee meeting of the College representatives, held in the first week of Term, Miss Fry (L.M.H.) was elected Secretary and Miss Oakley Hill (O.H.S.) Treasurer. D. BRYAN. WAR AND PEACE SOCIETY. During the Term a considerable number of new members joined the Society. One meeting was held, at which the President, Professor Gilbert

Murray, spoke. He explained the object of the Society, that it sought to help the cause of peace, not by advocating one solution for international difficulties, but by encouraging impartial study and thought upon the matter. He hoped that so it might render a real service, for any attempt to make war less frequent in the future must be supported by an intelligent interest amongst the people. He was very anxious that members should not be blind to existing national defects, but should try to remove them by friendly cooperation with the rest of the community rather than regard them as so many symbols of a national decadence. One or two speakers address the Society every Term on subjects connected with international questions, and Professor Murray has kindly agreed to help with study circles, if a sufficient number wish it. The subscription is 6d. a year, which goes to cover travelling expenses for speakers, if necessary, or to buy books. HUNDRED MOOT. Last Term a lecture was given to the Hundred Moot by Professor Rait on Mary Stuart and Elizabeth—the first Phase.' The lecturer dealt with his subject in detail, and threw much light on the personal character of the two Queens and their attitude towards one another. The following officers were elected for the academical year 1915-16 President—Miss Jamieson College Representatives—Lady Margaret Hall, Miss Buckle (Hon. Sec.); Somerville College, Miss Watson St. Hugh's College, Miss Perham ; St. Hilda's Hall, Miss Pocock Society of Oxford Home Students, Miss Oakley Hill. '

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IRISH CLUB. In 1913 this Club was formed of a few truly Irish members, with Miss M'Cutcheon as its President and instigator. It then consisted of some seven members, and met twice a Term to discuss the writings of modern Irish authors, Synge, Yeats, and Lady Gregory being among- those discussed. Only the truly Irish might belong, and membership consisted in a strict test of nationality. This Term the Club has been reorganised, and nationality is no longer the chief qualification. The Club will welcome as members all those who are sincerely interested in Ireland and the Irish Literary Movement. Some real knowledge of the works under discussion is necessary for ad. mittance to the meetings. The Secretary would be glad to hear of anyone caring to join on these terms. The next meeting will be held in Miss ColeBaker's room, Lady Margaret Hall, at 4.3o p.m., on January 3otti, 1916. James Stephens' poetry will be discussed, and it is hoped that the Irish Club will have gained some new members. 0. M. CRICHTON (Sec.).

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THE FRITILLARY. X CLUB. President—D. ARNING (S.C.). Secretary—F. PETERSEN (O. H. S.). Treasurer—M. RUDD (L. M. II.). Three meetings of the X Club have been held this Term, the first at L.M.H., on November 5th, at which Miss Peacey (S.H.C.) read an interesting paper on Ductless Glands.' The second meeting took place in the Balliol Laboratory, on November 17th, when Mr. Nagel spoke on ' X-rays and other new Rays.' He performed many interesting experiments, and his lecture was much appreciated by the Club. The last meeting was on December 3rd, at St. Mary Hall, when Miss Gibbins (S.C.) read a paper on Sex Determinants.' INTER-COLLEGIATE LIBRARY OF MODERN LITERATURE. This is the second Term of the existence of the above Library. There has been a great increase in the number of members from St. Hilda's, St. Hugh's, and from among the Home Students Lady Margaret Hall, however, have returned but one member. This diminution is due, it appears, partly to the war and partly to the fact that the books are kept in out-of-the-way Ship Street. It is hoped that these difficulties will be overcome, in view of the early stage of growth of the Library when a division of books among the Colleges would be very impracticable. The acquisition of a bookcase, kindly presented by Miss E. N. Macrae, of St. Hilda's, is a great asset to the Library. Miss Owen, of St. Hugh's, suggested that a book-plate should be printed, but it is thought inadvisable to carry out this idea until the number of members increases. G. F. BROCKBANN (Pres.). .

OXFORD UNIVERSITY SOCIALIST SOCIETY.

College Secretaries: D. J. COLLIER (0.H.S.). G. V. POCOCK (S. H.H.). K. W. SPIKES (L.M.H.). E. D. M. WINTERS (S.C.). There has been three meetings of the Women's Group of the above Society. November 6th, Mrs. Cooper spoke on The Girl of the Slums ' ; November 22nd, E. D. M. Winters on ' The Philosophic Basis of Socialism.' December 3rd, Miss J. 0. Ward (of the Fabian Research Department) on Factories Past and Present.' The Research Group has also been meeting regularly, and has been finishing the syllabus on ' The Principles of Socialism ' which it began last Term. The first meeting was held on October 18th in the J.C.R. of St. Mary Hall, when the whole Women's Group was invited to attend for the purposes of election of officers for the places of those gone down. Miss Pocock (S.H.H.) was elected as Secretary of the Research Group, and

Miss Winters (S.C.) as Secretary of the Women's Group. In public business, Miss Collier read a paper on The Labour Programme,' and discussion followed. On November 16th another meeting took place, Miss Snow reading a paper on Collectivism.' The final meeting took place on November 3oth, when Miss Webb read a paper on ' The Socialist State.' It is proposed next Term to discuss the position of women in the Socialist State, and any who feel drawn towards Socialism and would care to join are asked to see either their College Secretary or the General Women's Group Secretary. Members are most urgently needed, and those who, while Socialist in sympathy, are not sure of their ground, are asked to join as associates. E. D. M. WINTERS (Sec.). '

UNIVERSITIES MISSION TO CENTRAL AFRICA. OXFORD WOMEN STUDENTS' BRANCH. A meeting was held at St. Hilda's Hall on Thursday, November i8th, when the Rev. W. V. Lucas, from Masasi, gave a most inspiring address. The chair was taken by the Rev. G. H. Fendick, of Pusey House. Mr. Lucas gave a vivid description of a Sunday at Masasi, and hept his audience spellbound by anecdotes and problems of a growing Church. It is impossible for anyone who was at the meeting to forget the claim which this Mission has on us in Oxford. The Rev. G. H. Fendick, who has so often helped us, has kindly consented to become Chap lain of our Branch. J. M. KNIGHT (Pres.).

ball 114otices. LADY MARGARET HALL. Our new Toynbee ' wing is open this Term, and our numbers have increased, in spite of the fact that we are now in two buildings instead of four. Unfortunately Miss Deneke is obliged to be away this Term, but Miss Freire-Marreco has kindly spared time to come back to us temporarily as Librarian. We are very glad to have Miss Skipworth back as French Tutor. On All Hallows E'en the Second Year organised some strenuous but most successful games in the new Common Room. Our mental requirements, on the other hand, have been met by the Third Year, who gave a thrilling cinematograph performance, including dramas of the Wild West and of College life, in aid of the Scottish Women's Hospitals. Congratulations to Miss Clarke and Miss Drought on their Firsts in the History and French


THE FRITILLARY.

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Schools respectively : also to Miss Levett on whining the Sidgwick Prize for Greek prose.

discussed That unhappy childhood is the true basis of an " experiencing nature."

BOAT CLUB.—The following members have qualified : Trinity Term.—Sculling E. Lancelot, G. Watkins, M. Chambers, K. Edwards (halfcaptain). Punting K. Carr, M. McCall, M. Swann, M. Baynton, J. Parsons, I. McColl, E. Cole-Baker, M. Huckett, M. Shepherd, 0. Moberley, E. Whitehead, E. Bousfield (half-captain), D. Smith (half-captain). Canoeing I. Martin, B. Turton, 0. Moberly, W. Brandt, K. Shepherd (half-captain), D. Penoyre (half-captain). Michaelmas Term.—Punting D. Smith, R. Hales. Canoeing : K. Shepherd, D. Penoyre, G. Webb, M. Chambers. I. McCoLL (Boat Secretary).

ESSAY CLUB.—On Wednesday, October 27th, Miss Ivelaw Chapman read a paper upon Fiona McLeod,' whom she defended against those critics who say that he was no more than a dreamer of beautiful dreams. His great aim was to bring the Celtic spirit into closer touch with the main trend of British thought, so that both might be better for the contact. On Wednesday, November i7th, Dr. A. J. Carlyle addressed the Club upon the subject of The Unity of European Literature.' He showed that from the days of the Niebelungenliede, Beowulf and the Chanson de Roland, through the great period of Drama in the 16th and 17th centuries down to the Romantic Poetry of the 19th century, no single nation could claim to have invented any form of literature, though one might attain to a higher degree of perfection than another. He insisted that the greatest literature goes far beyond the limitations of nationality, which are only felt in works of less inspiration. On December ist Miss FreireMarreco read a paper upon her research work among a tribe of American Indians, and on December 8th Miss M. Clarke will read a paper upon ' Oxford in the Seventeenth Century.' M. W. MARSHALL (Pres.).

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HOCKEY CLUB (Captain, K. M. THOMAS ; Secretary, J. FRY). —This Term we have had our usual practices with St. Hugh's College on Mondays and Wednesdays. We are playing few outside matches Saturday, November 6th, ist XI. v. Old Students (5-0 ; Wednesday, November Toth, 1st XI v. University College, Reading (3-2). The 2nd XI is not yet decided. The ist XI is, at present, as follows Goal, *Miss Bowes ; Backs, *Miss Parsons and *Cole-Baker ; Half-backs, Miss Marshall, *Upjohn, *Thomas ; Forwards, Miss *Flemming, Rowe, John, *Fry, and Lawrence. :

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TENNIS.—At Central Trials, Miss Lawrence was admitted as an Associate: There is a good deal of keenness this Term, especially among the 1st year, and the courts are in constant use. PARSONS ; DEBATING SOCIETY (President—J. Secretary—K. THOMAS ; Whips—P. BUCKLE and G. WATKINS).—A Sharp Practice debate was held on October igth in the new Common Room, Toynbee wing. The House discussed with much vivacity the question as to whether the bicycle is a sign of decadence, and decided it was not. It also wondered whether the L.M.H. flower garden should be planted with vegetables, and came to a negative conclusion. Two other meetings of this Society have been held. The first motion, That the scientist has done more than the artist for the progress of civilisation,' was lost by seven votes. The Long Vacation seemed to have had a deteriorating effect upon honourable members, for this debate was not characterised by that clear-headedness and enthusiasm which might have been hoped. At the second meeting, in discussing the motion that The Daily Press tends to stifle individual thought,' the House seemed to have gained assurance. After a spirited debate the motion was lost by twenty-seven to nine votes. The last meeting took place on Tuesday, November 3oth, when the following motion was '

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NEW STUDENTS.

B. Bagshaw, Rhodes University College, S. Africa. M. J. Bishop, High School, Edgbaston. M. C. Booth, St. Margaret's School, Polmont, Stirlingshire, N.B. H. M. Burrows. M. M. Carlyle. High School, Oxford. M. G. Carter, S. Winifred's, Eastbourne. E. M. Cubitt, Queen's Anne's School, Caversham. L. K. Edmonds, Queen Anne's School, Caversham. N. I. Edwards, St. George's School, Harpenden. A. B. Finch White, High School, Ipswich. L. P. Gibbon, St. Elphin's, Darley Dale. W. M. Gross, Wycombe High School. K. M. Harnett, Wycombe Abbey School. M. M. Hugh Smith, Church of England College, Edgbaston. H. G. L. John, St. Paul's Girls' School, Brook Green, Hammersmith. C. A. M. Laufs, High School, Surbiton. A. H. Laurence, Cheltenham Ladies' College. G. C. I. F. P. Mackenzie-Penny, Camposenea, Fleury Meudon, France. H. D. Matthews, Mortimer House, Clifton, Bristol. D. Mayor, High School, Kensington.

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THE FRITILLARY. B. J. H. Rowe, Bournemouth High School for Girls. E. J. Sanders, St. Agnes' College, Ealing. A. M. Stott, Berkhamsted School for Girls. A. de Sausmarez, St. Paul's Girls' School, Hammersmith. 0. L. Wallace, St. Paul's Girls' School, Hammersmith. M. F. T. Winckworth, Effingham House, Bexhillon-Sea. E. K. Wood, Addiscombe College, Hove. G, Woodward, Streatham Hill High School.

SOMERVILLE COLLEGE. As is to be expected, the Term has proved rather uneventful. Miss Hayes Robinson has left us for the time being in order to take up some War Office work for which she was specially fitted as a result of the work which she undertook in the vaction. Miss Pope has also left us for the remainder of the Term, as she will spend that time and the vacation relieving Miss Fry in reconstruction work in Belgium. We had the pleasure of listening to the lecture which Miss Czaplicka gave to the Archaeological Society on the tribes of the Yenesi among whom she has been researching. Dr. Cullis also came to give us a lecture on "fhe Need for Women Doctors.'

ARCHAEOLOGICAL SOCIETY.—The Society made its usual terminal expedition outside Oxford on Saturday, November 13th. The destination was Stanton Harcourt, which was reached after a fierce battle with the wind. The Vicar, the Rev. Symes Thompson, kindly showed us over the church, which was chiefly remarkable for its very old screen and the beautiful lancet windows at its east end. Though only a small church, it could show specimens of many styles of architecture, from Norman to Perpendicular, and was fortunate in the possession of some rare seventeenth century silver, in addition to a pre-Reformation alms chest. We were unfortunately not able to see the Manor House, but this was the only hitch in the proceedings ; and so, after upholding the traditions of the Ark by ' doing justice to a very welcome tea, we returned to Oxford, well pleased with our afternoon's outing.

PARLIAMENT (Speaker, Miss JEBB; Prime Minister S. McGREGoR; Leader of the Opposition, G. HILE).—Owing to the urgency of the European situation, it was decided to call in the assistance of the Opposition, and a National Ministry consisting of all parties was formed. The Coalition Government brought in a Bill for the Regulation of the Coal Mines in Great Britain. S. McGregor emphasized the necessity for some measure which would put an end to strikes as long as the war continued, whilst G. Hill lucidly explained the detailed workings of a measure outwardly somewhat arbitrary, being ably supHOCKEY CLUB (Captain, F. M. CAMPBELL ported by E. Willey. The Bill was opposed by Secretary, F. WHITE Treasurer, A. F. JoNEs ; D. Winters on the ground that a strike was the Vice-Captain, M. W. PHILP). The following only weapon of a workman against the injustice Etceteras I (draw, of an employer. D. Winters was ably supported matches have been played : 5-5) ; High School I (S.C. won 13 z;) Bedford by M. Hodgson and L. Davies, both of whom put P.T.C. (Bedford won II 2). The znd XI was forward the individualistic claims of the workbeaten by Etceteras, and beat the High School. man. Unfortunately there was no time for public Matches have been arranged with Reading I and discussion, and the result of the voting was 51 L.M.H. II. The forward line has good material, for the motion and 21 against it. The second Parliament took the form of a but lacks combination as awhole, and more attention should be paid by the team to marking private member's motion. D. Scott-Stokes Goal, Jones ; moved that ' In the opinion of this House, party individual opponents. 1st XI : backs, White and Campbell; half-backs, Philp, Government is a pernicious political and Bever and Hill; forwards, Field, Procter, Priest-, ought to be abolished.' The mover pointed out man, Bryan and Lyne. the obvious faults of the party system, and was ably supported by M. Campbell, whilst the opposition was led by G. Roberts, whose argument BOAT CLUB (President, G. HILL ;Secretary, F. that no better system has yet been evolved was WHITE ; Treasurer, M. BALL).—There has been a more fully worked out by the second speaker, F. considerable increase in the keenness of the Boat White. After public discussion the motion was Club this Term, and a consequent improvement put to the house and lost by 8 votes to 31. The in the sculling. The scant number of the cap- House then adjourned. tains has been supplemented by D. Wadham and U. Ellis-Fermor. The First Year have made a good beginning, but some have been handicapped TUB-THUMPERS. Three meetings of the Society by not having done their swimming test ; though have been arranged for this Term, held in the there is still plenty of scope for the energies of Common Room of St. Mary's Quadrangle. The individuals before they attain perfection, the first meeting was held on Wednesday, October 27th, when Miss White was speaker. At the general standard is higher. ;

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THE FRITILLARY.

second, held on November 17th, Miss Winters addressed the Society on 'The Balkans and the War—the Future of the Peninsula.' There was a decided improvement in the speaking generally in this debate, though there are still a few members who take little part in the discussion. The third debate .was opened by Miss Hill on December znd, on ' The Influence of the War for Good or Evil on the National Character and Spirit.' The whole idea of the Society is to improve the debating in the College, so as to encourage members to speak in Parliament and O.S.D.S. who otherwise have no opportunity of practice. In spite of the manifold difficulties of securing a good attendance at meetings, owing to the members of Somerville being so scattered at the present time, it is hoped that people will be willing to join next Term and take some pains to make the debates a real success. G. ROBERTS (Pres.). SUFFRAGE SOCIETY.—A meeting of this Society was held at the beginning of the Term, at which the President, Miss Pope, explained the objects and constitution of the Society to First Year Students, and also the work done since the war by the 0.W.S.S.W.S. For the rest the Society has continued its bandage-working activities in aid of the Scottish Women's Federation Hospital, and a collection has also been made for that object.

The WOMEN'S UNIVERSITY SETTLEMENT. Somerville branch of the W.U.S. has voted that a Christmas treat should be given to Southwark schoolchildren as usual. This will take place in the second week of January. On November 13th, Miss Sharpley, Warden of the W.U.S., came down for the week-end. She addressed a meeting on recent work at the Settlement and defended its existence in war-time. During the rest of her stay Miss Sharpley met many of the students, and we are very grateful to her for her interesting'talk at those informal parties. D. SCOTT STOKES (Sec.). —

NEW MEMBERS. Abrahams, M.A., Queen's College, London. Allen, L. F., Tunbridge Wells Co. School. Bever, F. A., Bradford Girls' Grammar School. Clark, K. A., Bede Collegiate Girls' School, Sunderland. F.,St. Felix School, Southwold. Coney, M. H. F. Girls' School. Davies, J. K., de la Marc, K., Guernsey College. Entwistle, A. M., Monmouth High School. Field, C. M., Berkhampsted School for Girls. Forster, F., Swansea Grammar School. Foster, E. M., Bradford Girls' Grammar School.

Gibbs, A. R., Granville School, Leicester. Goulding, S. M., Bridlington High School. Greenleaves, W. M., Liverpool College, Huyton. Haigh, E., Manchester University. Hodgkinson, E., St. Elphin's, Matlock. Kennedy, M., Cheltenham College. Lyne, M. G., Worcester- High School. Maugham, A. H., Malvern College. McKay, A. II., St. Helen's, Northwood. McLeod, L. S., Aberdeen University. Mitchell, M., James Allen, Dulwich. Procter, E. S., Cheltenham College. Pybus, H. F. Roedean School. Raymont, C. F., ' Blackheath High School. Redfern, P., St. Paul's School. Robinson, J., St. Helen's, Blackheath. Rojaards, L. R., Bregiltenstraat, Utrecht. Rylands, M. E., Edgbaston High School. Scott, M. E., Belvedere School, Liverpool. Spencer, D., Manchester High School. Thornton, J. C., Godolphin and Latymer, Hammersmith. Turner, M., North London Collegiate. Wallis, V., Mount School, York. Webb, U. K., Roedean School. Whitham, E., Cheltenham College. Winser, G. L., May Datchelor, Camberwell.

ST. HUGH'S COLLEGE. We were all very sorry at the end of the vacation to hear that our new buildings would not be ready for us this Term. We have, nevertheless, spent a very exciting and amusing Term in Wycliffe Hall, though we have found its peculiar form of asceticism rather trying at times. Still, it has been very pleasant: to get so many of us in one building, and we are looking forward all the more to next Term, which we hope to spend in St. Hugh's College proper. People have been very much engaged with various good works for the War, and we are hoping to welcome all our friends at a bazaar on December 1st in aid of the French Unit of the Scottish Women's Hospital. We celebrated the Eve of St. Hugh's Day by an entertainment, to which the tutors and all old students in Oxford came. It was organised by the Second Year, and was a most amusing performance. Miss Moore was again inimitable as a charwoman in Mechanical Servants.' The whole entertainment was excellent. We have been practising Pergolesi's Stabat Mater every Sunday evening, and hope by the end of Term to have reached such a degree of excellence that it can be sung in chapel. The various societies have been very active, especially the Literary Society, which started on its career this Term. Our best thanks are due for some beautiful gifts which we have already received for the new buildings—a Queen Anne side-table, and a table '


THE FRITILLARY. of Jacobean design from Miss Gray Allen, and an oak gate-legged table from an anonymous giver. C. E. INGRAM (S.S.). BOAT CLUB (President, MISS THOMAS Captain. BOYRETT ; Secretary, Miss SAVORY).—The following were qualified in the Trinity Term :Sculling—Half-Captains, Misses Carter and Rountree; Captains, Misses Forrest and Savory. Canoeing—Miss Carter. Punting—Half - Captains, Misses Richards and Forrest ; Captains, Misses Farrow, Owen, Beames, Boykett, Spicer, Parrett and Holland. The following badges were awarded Sculling, Misses Lewis and Holland ; Canoeing, Misses Truman, Gardner and Farrow Punting, Misses Webb and Hall. We are glad to say that several members of the First Year have done their long swimming test but, unfortunately, they have not made so much use of the opportunities the weather has afforded as they might have done. Some of the Captains, too, also seem to have been rather afraid of the cold at the beginning of Term, and hence fewer boats have gone out than is usual this Term. ;

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HOCKEY CLUB (Captain, MISS NICHOLAS; ViceCaptain, MISS HOLLAND ; Secretary, MISS PERHAM).—This season the Hockey Club has increased in size, and several useful members have been added to the elevens. There has been considerable energy and enthusiasm, but more thought and combination are necessary. In all parts of the field the players need to be quicker on to the ball, and to place themselves more conveniently for taking or intercepting a pass. The forwards are beginning to work together, but there is still some thoughtless passing. The defence need more combination and greater care in passing. Miss Chappel, Miss Hurry, Miss Nicholas, Miss Rhys Davids and Miss Varley have played regularly in United practice; and Miss Holland and Miss Perham have played several times. The following members played in the ist XI Miss Cox, Miss Rhys Davids, Miss Chappel, *Miss Holland, *Miss Perham, Miss Hurry, *Miss Nicholas, Miss Varley, Miss Baker, Miss Price, Miss Davies-Colley. * Have gained their colours. Miss Savory was elected Captain and Miss Richards Vice-Captain of the znd XI. Results of matches October 23rd, v. The Laurels, Rugby (a victory for The Laurels (4-2). October 3oth, v. Oxford High School znd XI (a victory for the 2nd XI, 3—i). November 6th, College v. First Year (a victory for the First Year, 2-0. November loth, v. St. Hilda's Hall 1st XI (a victory for the ist XI, 5—i). November i3th, v. The Etceteras 1st XI (a victory for ist XI, 6-2). November zoth, v. Cherwell Hall (a victory for the 2nd XI, 4-2).

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DEBATING SOCIETY (President, J. EVANS ; Secretary, E. NICHOLAS Lrp-and-Down Girl, D. BooTHBO.—The four debates which have been held so far this Term have been well attended. At the first meeting there was a very philosophical debate on the motion, That the phrase " didactic poetry is a contradiction in terms,' ably proposed by Miss Beames and opposed by Miss Allen in an excellent maiden speech. At the second meeting the House, cheered by the presence of several old students, including an exPresident, devoted itself to frivolity and discussed the motion, That all mirrors should be abolished.' At the next meeting Miss Richards proposed That the machine which supersedes hand labour is a curse to society,' but her arguments were over-ruled by the eloquence of Miss Carter, who carried the House with her. At the last debate there was a somewhat conversational discussion of the motion That the practice of debating tends to obscure the truth.' An interesting debate is to be expected in the last week of Term, when the Vice-Principal has kindly consented to propose, and the Bursar to oppose, the motion That this House would welcome the formation of a triumvirate consisting of Lord Kitchener, Mr. Bonar LaW, and Mr. Lloyd George.' ;

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PHILOSOPHICAL SOCIETY (President, BEAMES ;Secretary. MISS ALLEN).—At its

MISS meetings this Term the Society has dealt with different aspects of Social Ethics. On November 17th we had the pleasure of a paper from Mr. Webb on The relation of Individual and Social Ethics,' and we are much looking forward to hearing Miss Freire Marecco on ' The Views of the Hopi Indians on Kingship at our next meeting. The number of members has greatly increased and the discussions have been well maintained. '

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LITERARY SOCIETY (President, MISS PARRETT ; Secretary, MISS SPICER).—This new Society was started in order to provide a common meeting ground for members of the various schools and to enable them to discuss together subjects of very general literary interest. Its existence seems to be justified by the fact that nearly every student has become a member. Miss Jourdain assured the success of the first meeting by reading a paper on Futurist Art.' The discussion that followed was both enlightening and amusing. At the next meeting Miss Lewis is to open a discussion on The Effect of a National Crisis on the Poetry of a Country ; and at the last meeting Miss Evans will speak on The Origins of Ornament.' ,

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always seemed to be arranged for the same night. Sardon's Patric !' is being read, a play which, in addition to the usual interest, has a special significance at this time. BROWNING SOCIETY.—The Browning Society has met every Sunday afternoon. There are thirty members. During the first three Sundays Pippa Passes ' was read and discussed, and then Strafford ' was begun. The First Year has shown great interest and come regularly.

SHAKESPEARE SOCIETY.—The meetings this Term have been very well attended. 'King Lear' was the play chosen to be read. We have had some admirable renderings of the parts, and have greatly enjoyed our gatherings.

SUFFRAGE SOCIETY.—The new Officers for 191516 are : President, M. G. Vaughan ; Secretary, E. Beames ; Treasurer, J. Smith. As all meetings were suspended last Term there is nothing to report. This Term St. Hugh's is contributing to the fund raised by the 0.W.S.S.W.S. for providing weekly parcels to a British prisoner in Germany.

NEW STUDENTS, MICHAELMAS TERM, 1915. V. B. C. F. Rhys-Davids (Clara Evelyn Mordan Scholar), Monmouth High School. E. M. Thomas (Scholar), Redland High School, Bristol. G. M. Chappel (Ottley Scholar), Alice Ottley School, Worcester. M. A. M. Laidlay (Exhibitioner), Clifton High School. F. M. Baker, Oxford High School. L. E. Bolton, Cherwell Hall. H. M. Burridge, St. Paul's Girls' School. S. J. Chapman, Cheltenham Ladies' College. P. M. Cox, Blackheath High School (G.P.D.S.T.) A. C. Dick, Oak Hill House, Hampstead. J. d'A. Findlay, St. Anne's Abbot's Bromley. G. B. Hurry, Cheltenham Ladies' College. M. Jones, University College, Bangor. M. H. Mackenzie, Church of England College, Birmingham. E. D. McLeod, Redland High School, Bristol. D. C. Moorhouse, Blackheath High School, (G. P. D. S. T. ). D. M. Parr, Sunderland High School. W. M. W. Paul, Wootton Lodge School, Hastings. I. I. Smith, Newcastle High School. E. M. Swallow, Church School for Girls, Peterborough. E. R. W. Unmack, Oxford Home Student. D. M. Wethered, Clifton High School. W. Woolley, Brighton and Hove High School.

ST. HILDA'S HALL. The Term has been a very busy one, for, besides the usual societies of the Hall, our activities in connection with war work have been somewhat increased. We still devote Saturday evenings to bandage making, and the acquisition of two rolling machines, very kindly given by Miss Burrows, has considerably improved both the neatness and the hardness of the wider bandages. Suffragists, Anti-Suffragists and neutrals have all combined in a common effort to provide funds for the Prisoners' of War scheme, in aid of which the znd and 1st Years produced a very amusing musical comedy entertainment a week or two ago. A silver collection resulted in a satisfactory sum, and we hope that the programme will be repeated next Term before a larger audience. It is also proposed to entertain some of the wounded soldiers here one afternoon at the end of the Term. Various schemes have been mooted for gardening as a war economy. We hoped (in vain), to be able to procure a garden of our own, and the majority of the would-be gardeners, with a cheery optimism all their own, spoke of a glorious future when we should be consuming the vegetables we ourselves had grown. This scheme, however, has come to nothing, owing to the difficulty of obtaining a garden, but Mr. Kempstead is very kindly allowing us to work in his garden, the produce of which is sent to the hospitals and charitable institutions. Parties go up to Headington three times a week, and a large number of people are interested. Various meetings have been held in the Hall, apart from those of our own Societies. In the third week of Term Mrs. Fawcett gave us a most interesting lecture, and, later the Women Students' Branch of the Socialist Society held a meeting at which Mrs. Cooper told us about life in the East End. Those of us who are not members of the Society were also invited. The U.M.C.A. met in the sixth week, and the Oxford Ladies' Folk Song Society held an afternoon meeting here at Half-Term. We were fortunate in hearing Mr. Greenwood, of the C.S.U., on the position of women in industry during wartime. We are very glad to welcome Mrs. Browne, who is now in command at the Hostel, and who was up here as a student a few years ago. We hope very much that she will be with us again next Term. HOCKEY CLUB (Captain, E. I. BISHOP ; ViceCaptain, E. 0. PARRY ; Secretary, M. VERINI).— Owing to the prevalence of illness and presumably the war, we have been unable to get full practices this Term, and the team, which at first was very promising, has not improved as it ought to have done. All efforts to get a coach have been in


THE FRITILLARY.

vain, and the standard of play does not seem to rise. We have played several matches this Term, sometimes with success, but our play has been somewhat erratic. Apparently people are unable to overcome their old faults, though everyone is rather quicker than of yore. We have not suc ceeded in getting a satisfactory goalkeeper so far. We have three promising players among the first year, one in each line. Team : ; Tutin, *Bishop ; *Howell, *Verini, Gibberd ; Hughes, *Parry, Jones, *Crook, *Pocock. Matches : v. Milham Ford School, won (5—o); v. Cherwell Hall, won (9-2); v. St. Hugh's College, lost (1-5); v. New College School II, won (5-2); v. Oxford Etceteras, lost (1-7). BOAT CLUB (President, Miss TODD ;

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first debate of this Term, held on October 23rd, the motion was ' That in the opinion of this House the Influence of the Press destroys Individual Thought.' This was proposed by Miss Armstrong, whose speech lacked enthusiasm, and who supported her views rather by gloomy assertions than by any clear argument. Miss Nichols, who opposed the motion, spoke with eloquence and humour, and stated her case lucidly. The second debate was held on November 16th, the motion being That in the opinion of this House, War tends to produce the subordination of the Practical to the Ideal.' The Proposer, Miss Dacombe, took a wide view of the subject, and brought forward examples from the Crusades, the animal world, and present times, but her speech might have been more convincing if she had worked out her points more fully and definitely. The opposer, Miss FitzGerald, appeared to take an interest in the motion, which, in spite of the efforts of the officers to stir the hearts of the Hall, is an unusual element in debates this Term, and was refreshing. But although she pointed out clearly the practical element in war, she hardly showed that war caused the subordination of the ideal. We were glad to hear several of the First Year speak in Public Discussion, but, as in the first debate, this discussion generally was of a poor order. '

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ART CLUB (President, E. M. GRANTHAM; Secretary, D. THORPE).—The subject for study this year is architecture, the club being most fortunate in having Miss Burrows to address it. The first meeting of Term was held in the second week, when the subject was The origins of architecture.' A few days later, an afternoon expedition was taken by Miss Burrows to study classical styles as seen in the imitations of Greek, and Roman in Oxford. The second meeting was held in the fifth week, when an address was given on ' The Romanesque, Saxon and Norman periods,' with local illustration. In the sixth week the second afternoon expedition was made to the Castle tower and crypt, to the Mound and its central well-chamber and to the crypt of S. Peter in the East. Here it was that we were fortunate in being shown the old silver belonging to the Church and some of the earliest manuscript copies of the Church Registers. The Club is extremely grateful to Miss Burrows for leading these interesting and significant expeditions ; also for the varied collection of illustrations, which add to the enjoyment of the evening meetings. The Club will discuss, at the next meeting of Term, The Norman, Transition and Early English periods of Architecture.' '

LITERARY SOCIETY (President, MISS HAY; Secretary, Miss LEYs). The Society has this Term been devoting its attention to Elizabethan Drama. At a business meeting it was arranged that the Society should study comedy and tragedy alternately, four plays in all being read and with this end in view Beaumont and Fletcher's Knight of the Burning Pestle was begun at the first meeton Thursday, October 21st. The play proved too long to be finished at one sitting, aid the following meeting was taken up with reading the second half. Websfer's Duchess of Malfi has been chosen by vote for the first tragedy to be read by the Society. --SUFFRAGE SOCIETY.--The Society is at present in a very flourishing condition, well over twothirds of the Hall being members. In the Summer Term we gave a dramatic representation of The Chesterton Girl Graduates,' by L. T. Meade, entitled The Trials of Tara.' As the result of two performances we were able to send over £, I2 to the Belgian Repatriation Fund. It is hoped that this, together with the appreciation shown by the audience, will have compensated the actors for the numerous rehearsals forcibly thrust upon them by the distracted representatives, at a time when boating and other summer activities offered greater attractions. The Terminal meeting of the 0.S.W.S.S. was held this Term in St. Hilda's Hall, when we were fortunate to have Mrs. Fawcett to speak to us. Saturday evenings are still reserved for rolling bandages for the Scottish Women's Hospitals in —

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THE FRITILLARY.

56

Serbia, and counterpanes for Serbian babies, of rainbow colouring, are. or should be, an irresist' ible attraction to all artistically-minded knitters. NEW STUDENTS. Adler, D. L., Roedean. Cowan, H. E., St. George's, Edinburgh. Faulkner, E. G., Tolmer's Park, Herts. Gibberd, K., Enfield County School. Harvey, M., Cheltenham Ladies' College. Jones, G., Wyggeston Grammar School, Leicester. Macy, S. B. B. T., Heathfield, Ascot. Rathbone, H. F., St. George's, Harpenden. Tutin, N., Stanmore House, Weston-super-Mare. OXFORD HOME STUDENTS. The Term has, as usual of late, passed quietly. There have been three socials at the Common Room, at the third of which Miss Crook gave us an extremely interesting account of the splendid work done by The Friends,' and others working with them, in the devastated villages behind the firing line in Champagne. The Society had prepared a scheme for the support of a prisoner of war in Germany, but we have now joined the inter-collegiate scheme for this purpose. On November 4th the Old Students held their annual meeting, though without the usual festivities. '

BOAT CLUB (President, MISS BUTLER ; Secretary, MISS JAMES ; Treasurer, MISS WEBSTER).It was decided that we should not have professional coachings in sculling this year, the money being devoted instead to the War Funds. Several of the First Year have joined the Club this Term, and some of them are very promising. Qualified this Term Sculling Captain—Miss D. C. Oakley Hill and Miss H. M. Oakley Hill ; HalfCaptain, Miss Webster. :

LITERARY SOCIETY. -The Home Students' Literary and Debating Society has continued to meet regularly three times aTerm. At the last meeting of the Summer Term the Society read Shaw's You Never Can Tell,' and this Term The Younger Generation,' by Stanley Houghton, and The Importance of being Earnest,' by Oscar Wilde, have been read. We intend at the

last meeting of this Term to read The Voysey Inheritarice.' '

HocKEv.—As so few Home Students play hockey, the Home Student Hockey Club has ceased to exist this Term. Any Home Students who wish to play hockey should join the Etceteras Ladies' Hockey Club, as before, but unless there is sufficient keenness to enable a team to be raised, it is useless to form a Home Student Club. NEW STUDENTS, MICHAELMAS TERM, 1915. Vera E. Blott, Oxford High School. Lilian L. Britten, B.A., University of the Cape of Good Hope (Rhodes University College). Catherine E. Clegg, B.A., Durham University (Gilchrist Student). Agnes M. Carroll, Convent of Notre Dame, Birkdale, Southport. Margaret D. David, Cambridge Training College. Gertrude M. Davies, Cheltenham Ladies College. Charlotte D'Evelyn, European Fellowship from Bryn Mawr College, U.S.A. Dora F. Ensor, Winchester High School. Winifred M. Gibson, S. Alban's High School. Augusta L. C. M. Green, Girton College. Constance M. Harris, Redland High School, Bristol. Madeleine E. Holland (Mrs), S. Andrew's College, Grahamstown. Dikka Kiaer, Frederikstadt High School, Norway. Julia M. Knight, Lady Margaret Hall. Margaret McCartan, Notre Dame Collegiate School, Everton Valley, Liverpool. Winifred Rochford, Convent of the Holy Child, Mayfield. Edith F. Peto, Cambridge Training College. Helen de G. Simpson, Convent of the Sacred Heart, Sydney, N.S.W. Edith F. Stubington, East London College, London University. Madeleine E. Twemlow, Liverpool University. Lilian M. M. Wanstall, Clergy Daughters, Bristol. Marjory S. West, B.A., London University (Bedford College). Cate Wilhelmsen, Jonsberg High School, Norway. Katharine S. Woods, Elvy Hall, Rhyl. Evelyn L. Worsley, (Sister Mary Josephine), Convent of the Holy Child, Cavendish Square, London.

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LIFE MEMBER RETURNED. Madeleine E. L. V. Platts (Mrs.).

PARKER AND CO., OXFORD


The Fritillary, December 1915  
The Fritillary, December 1915  
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