Oxford Access Vol. 5-3

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Oxford

ACCESS

SUMMER 2021

SUMMER READING OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY

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OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | 2021

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DR. BARRY BENTON AND TEDDY Dogs in the workplace are proving joy and comfort to people in need - Story on page 50

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4 MESSAGE FROM THE MAYOR 7 MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD POLICE CHIEF 10 RETHINK YOUR DRINK 12 PHOTO SPOTLIGHT: PARKS & RECREATION 20 PICKLEBALL IN OXFORD 22 OXFORD TABLE TENNIS CLUB 26 COMMUNITY CENTERS AND PARKS 30 MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 47 MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT 50 DOGS: CHANGING THE WORK ENVIRONMENT 59 YARD SALE PERMITS 60 EMA UPDATE 62 SPOTLIGHT: EDC AND SCHOOL PARTNERSHIP 71 OXFORD PUBLIC WORKS UPDATE 72 WELCOME NEW BUSINESSES 74 HISTORIC MAIN STREET UPDATE 78 IMAGES OF AMERICA: OXFORD 84 LAST OUNCE OF COURAGE 88 MESSAGE FROM OPAC 96 A BRIEF HISTORY: FREEDOM FESTIVAL 98 WHY I TEACH: KAREN JINKS 102 OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS UPDATE 110 2020 WATER & SEWER UPDATE

2021 VOL 5. ISSUE 3

CONTENTS

Community conversations are important and we encourage residents to engage directly with city staff—this is your city and your mayor and council are here for you. Don’t hesitate to reach out and let us know how we can help. Big or small, we’re happy and honored to listen. City of Oxford Mayor Alton Craft Oxford City Council Phil Gardner Mike Henderson Charlotte Hubbard Chris Spurlin Steven Waits If you are a citizen living within the Oxford city limits and are not receiving an Oxford Access magazine and would like to receive them, let us know! We want all of our citizens to be able to have access to the Access. You can pick-up a free copy at the Oxford Public Library, Oxford Civic Center, Bynum Community Center, Friendship Community Center, and Oxford City Hall. OXFORD ACCESS P. O. BOX 3383 OXFORD, AL 36203 WWW.OXFORDACCESS.COM

Follow us on Facebook, Twitter, and Instagram for highlights of community news, city events, and special moments as they happen in our beautiful city.

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Message from the

Oxford Mayor Dear citizens: We are off to a great start in 2021, and I hope you are as excited as I am about many of the events we are hosting in the spring and summer months. As we reopen our great city, I am confident that we will continue to do our part to make Oxford an even better destination for visitors and home for our residents. Firstly, I would like to express my sincere condolences to the Oxford Police Department and the family of Officer Tim Pitts, who passed away suddenly in April. On behalf of the city council and myself, we have lost a great friend to all citizens and visitors, and he will be missed. While our police, fire, and emergency medical services continue to serve our city with some of the most advanced technologies in the nation, we have stark reminders that they especially need our thoughts and prayers as they keep our city and region safe. If you see one of our first responders, I encourage you to thank them for putting their lives on the line for us daily. Speaking of responders, I am proud to say that we have been working diligently for the past year to fight the COVID-19 pandemic in our area. While we still have miles to go, we have reopened most of our facilities at full capacity as the mask ordinance has ended. Our vaccination clinics have been very successful. It is exciting to see many of our patrons attending events and using our library, recreation facilities, restaurants, and other businesses at full capacity. Our COVID-19 Response Team is still hard at work monitoring the situation and keeping our city safe and sanitized, so please continue to be patient with us as we navigate through what we all hope is the final leg of the global pandemic. We have so much going at Choccolocco Park in May, June, and July. Starting on the first week of May, we will host the Gulf South Conference Softball and Baseball Tournaments, the Ohio Valley Conference Softball Tournament, and–for the first time ever–will host the Alabama High School Athletic Association’s Softball State Finals and the National Junior College Athletic Association’s Softball Championships. When we get to June, we will host the Dixie Youth Baseball District Finals and State Finals, we will have our annual East Coast Pro Showcase for Major League Baseball, and we have track and field meets scheduled every weekend during that month. Then we move to July, where we will have the USA Track and Field Region 6 Championships over four days. We will have over 1,000 athletes from the southeast participating in this meet, so I am sure that we will continue to break records at Choccolocco Park in 2021. In closing, it has been my privilege to serve as your mayor as we continue to reach new heights in Oxford. Be on the lookout for more events going on, especially at Oxford Performing Arts Center and the Oxford Public Library, as we reopen all of our facilities. Do not forget to call our 311 non-emergency helpline during regular business hours if you have any questions or need assistance from our departments. Thank you all for being the most vital part of Oxford. Kindest regards, Mayor Alton Craft

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Alton Craft Mayor

Phil Gardner Council

Mike Henderson Council

Charlotte Hubbard Council

Chris Spurlin Council

Steven Waits Council

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Oxford Police Department

Message

600 Stanley Merrill Drive, Oxford, AL 36203

from the

Oxford Police Chief

As we approach the summer months, it is with great emphasis that I express how difficult this first quarter has been. The Oxford Police Department, along with other surrounding communities, have experienced a great deal of recent tragedy. Our department responded to the devastating tornado that recently affected so many in the Ohatchee area. Families were destroyed, and many homes were lost. The Oxford Police Department members were able to assist those in the community and were available to other local and state agencies. Our thoughts and prayers continue to go out to those affected as we experienced firsthand the devastation caused. More personally, our members were significantly affected by the recent loss of our coworker and friend, Officer Tim Pitts. Officer Pitts passed suddenly on the evening of April 1st, 2021. He was a compassionate officer and spent his career ensuring those in his community were safe. The news of his passing is a call no one ever wants to receive. Our officers and support personnel are more than coworkers. They are family. Officer Pitts will be missed, and his passing will forever affect those who loved him. I ask that you all understand that our department’s men and women sacrifice daily to ensure your safety. I also ask that you continue to support the members of the Oxford Police Department. The city of Oxford is like none other in this regard, and we are grateful to have a community like ours.

Respectfully,

Chief Bill Partridge

INVESTIGATIONS 256-835-6136 • ANIMAL CONTROL 256-591-4103 • GENERAL (NON-EMERGENCY) 256-831-3121

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COMMUNITY CENTER VACCINE CLINICS Oxford Health Systems held drive-through COVID vaccine clinics at Bynum and Friendship Community Centers. 8

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RETHINK YOUR DRINK BY TAMMY HALL

Are you pouring on the pounds? When you are feeling thirsty, do you reach for a sugary beverage? Sugary beverages increase the risk of obesity, diabetes, cancer, and hypertension. If you want to get the most of your drink, reach for water. Drinking water can prevent dehydration, mood change, body overheating, constipation, and kidney stones. By the time you feel thirsty, your body has lost more than 1% of its total water. Water helps your body: • Keep a normal temperature • Lubricate and cushion joints • Protect your spinal cord and other sensitive tissues • Get rid of wastes through urination, perspiration, and bowel movements Your body needs more water when you are: • In hot climates • More physically active • Running a fever • Having diarrhea or vomiting Tricks to Rethink Your Drink: • Need more flavor? Add berries or slices of lime, lemon, or cucumber to water to freshen the taste. • Missing fizzy drinks? Add a splash of 100% juice to plain sparkling water for a refreshing, low-calorie drink. • On the go? Carry a reusable water bottle with you and refill it throughout the day. Most of us eat and drink too many sugars, which can lead to significant health problems. Sugary drinks are the leading source of sugars in the American diet. For example, a 20-ounce bottle of soda typically has 14 teaspoons of added sugar. Research also shows that people who often drink sugary drinks are more likely to face health problems, such as obesity, type 2 diabetes, heart disease, kidney diseases, nonalcoholic liver disease, tooth decay and cavities, and gout. Choosing water over sugary drinks can help you be a role model to your friends and family and help everybody live a longer and healthy life.

For more information, visit LiveWellAlabama.com or on Facebook, Twitter, and Pinterest at Live Well Alabama.

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Mardi Gras 5K held at Choccolocco Park March 13, 2021

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Community Easter Egg Hunt held at Friendship Community Center April 3, 2021

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BILL BECK TENNIS COMPLEX


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OXFORD HIGH SCHOOL TENNIS TEAM

SENIORS: Dev Patel, Blake Ramsey, Shiv Patel 18

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SENIORS: Channing Gallahar, Cade Hilbun, Josh Whaley, Jay Patel OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | 2021

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OXFORD PARKS & RECREATION PICKLEBALL IN OXFORD Pickleball: the name of a sport that is sure to catch your attention. Created in the 1960’s, pickleball has gained traction over the years and doubled in growth in the last decade. In 2020 alone, the sport grew by over 20 percent. So, what is pickleball, why is it becoming so popular, and why should you play it? Pickleball is a sport that consists of two to four players playing on a hard court surface, a paddle made of wood or composite materials, and a perforated polymer ball, much like a wiffle ball. It is a game that can be casually played among friends, competitively on the national stage, or anywhere in-between. The competitive and fun nature of pickleball is enough to keep you coming back, but that is not all it offers. Pickleball also provides many physical benefits for people of all ages. A recent study in the International Journal of Research in Exercise Physiology found that middle-aged and older adults who played one hour of pickleball three days a week for six weeks improved their blood pressure, cholesterol, and cardiorespiratory fitness levels. Playing just one hour of casual pickleball can burn double the number of calories as walking at an average pace for that same amount of time. Aside from the physical health benefits, pickleball also can improve your mental health. The endorphins released while playing pickleball can reduce anxiety and depression while also improving cognitive function. Also worth mentioning, is that the socialization among players and the friendships that are formed through pickleball will have a positive emotional impact on everyone who plays. There are many ways to begin playing today and many locations in the area. Oxford Lake has six lighted outdoor courts; Bynum Community Center and Friendship Community Center have indoor courts currently set up for play. Playing times and contact information can be found by going to the group page of Oxford Alabama Pickleball on Facebook.

We can not wait to see you there and playing the fastest growing sport in America!

BY ADDISON BUTLER AND MICHAEL HARRIS

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COME OUT AND PLAY PICKLEBALL Friendship Community Center Tu & Th: Noon to 5:00pm Oxford Civic Center Sunday: 4:00 to 7:00pm Bynum Community Center Mon, Tu, Th: Noon to 7:00pm

Bynum Community Center and Friendship Community Center have indoor courts currently set up for play.

Oxford Lake has six lighted outdoor courts. OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | 2021

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OXFORD PARKS & RECREATION OXFORD TABLE TENNIS CLUB A new sport has landed on the steps of the Oxford Civic Center. With the purchase of a couple of Joola brand table tennis tables, a steady flow of players from several cities in Alabama–and some neighboring states–have come to play in the weekly league on Thursday and Saturday evenings. Table tennis players are always looking for the perfect bounce when it comes to tables. The Joola brand tables at the Oxford Civic Center are some of the best equipment in Alabama. Like many of us, we may have grown up with a table tennis table in the basement at home or our local youth group. If you are curious about how your game’s skill compares to other players, come out to our weekly practice sessions. We have some club members that will help you select a blade and rubber that is suited for your level of play. They will also work with you on an individual basis as a beginner or intermediate player to bring your skill to the next level. Table tennis is a sport of competitiveness and a sport that can be aimed at weight loss and burning calories. A 150-pound person can burn an estimated 272 calories by playing table tennis for an hour. Because the sport is entertaining and addictive, it can be fun and easy to get in shape. Table tennis offers a great way to bond with other people while you are exercising. Because young and old alike can play the game, it will help improve communication and build relationships, irrespective of age. Whether you are playing doubles or singles, table tennis is a fast-paced competitive sport. The sport stimulates many areas of the brain simultaneously and offers a vast range of mental benefits, even for people who may have dementia. The more people we get to realize the advantages of the sport, the more people we can get to play. Since table tennis is played indoors, it is considered a twelve-month sport. A lot of our club members compete at tournaments all year long throughout the United States. In the planning stages over the next couple of months, Oxford will be the host of some local tournaments geared to bring awareness of this sport and how competitive the players are in the general area. Please contact the Oxford Civic Center and ask about playing times on Thursday and Saturday evenings.

BY MICHAEL HARRIS

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COME OUT AND PLAY TABLE TENNIS Oxford Civic Center Thursday: 5:00 to 8:30pm Questions on table tennis or pickleball? Call Kip Chappell 256-343-8017

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We are your spring fun headquarters where a friendly smile will greet you at the door and our salespeople will help you find any item and answer any questions!

Shop OXFORD LUMBER for all your building & remodeling supplies (256) 831-0540 | 1400 Barry St, Oxford AL | info@oxfordlumber.com | www.oxfordlumber.com OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | 2021

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COMMUNITY CENTERS & PARKS The City of Oxford values the wellbeing of our visitors, staff, and community. We continually assess current conditions regarding COVID-19 and engage with federal, state, and local public health officials when deciding whether to postpone, cancel, or reduce the number of attendees (if possible) for gatherings. Please call 256-831-2660 for the most up-to-date schedule.

BYNUM COMMUNITY CENTER 200 Victory Dr, Eastaboga, AL 36260 (256) 241-2716

CHOCCOLOCCO PARK 954 Leon Smith Parkway, Oxford, AL 36203 (256) 342-0174

OXFORD CIVIC CENTER AND OXFORD LAKE 401 McCullars Lane, Oxford, AL 36203 (256) 831-2660

FRIENDSHIP COMMUNITY CENTER 2930 Friendship Rd, Oxford, AL 36203 (256) 831-2679

SENIOR CITIZEN CENTER 424 Main Street, Oxford, AL 36203 (256) 831-5900

C I T Y

O F

O X F O R D

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OXFORD PARKS & RECREATION Senior Dances Oxford Civic Center May 14 June 25 July — August 20 September 17 October 15 November 19 December 3

duo sonix Sundance no dance duo sonix Ryan Robertson Sundance duo sonix Ryan Robertson

7:00 - 10:00pm 6:30 - 9:30pm 6:30 - 9:30pm 6:30 - 9:30pm 6:30 - 9:30pm 6:30 - 9:30pm 6:30 - 9:30pm

Senior Aerobics

Oxford Civic Center Monday, Wednesday, Friday. Free class for senior citizens from 10:00 - 11:00am

Senior Aerobics

Bynum Community Center Tuesday and Thursday 3:15pm

Senior Volleyball

Friendship Community Center Tuesday and Thursday 9:00am to 11:00am

Bluegrass Jam Session

More classes are returning and new events are being planned. Please call your local community center for the most up-to-date schedule.

Friendship Community Center Tuesday 4:00pm to 7:30pm

Yoga

Friendship Community Center Tuesday and Thursday 9:30am to 10:30am

Karate

Friendship Community Center Monday and Wednesday 6:00pm to 8:00pm

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UPDATE OXFORD LIBRARY SUMMER READING PROGRAM

June 1 – July 23

The Oxford Public Library looks forward to the summer each year. The Summer Reading Program is a highlight of our year every year, and this one will be particularly special because we get to see you in person again for summer reading fun. Last year, we had to move all of our programming and logging online very quickly. We learned a lot last year about how to keep our patrons safely reading through a pandemic. Because we are not entirely out of the woods yet, we will keep in place safety precautions in the building and in our program participation. This year’s program will be the most versatile yet. For those who are comfortable coming to in-person programming, we will have programs in the library. For those who are not yet, we will have online programs. Book logging will be completed through a fun and easy-to-use app called Beanstack. To make logging fairer across age groups, we are logging minutes spent reading instead of the number of books read. Participants will earn badges for minutes read, programs attended, and other activities. The fun doesn’t stop when the Summer Reading Program ends, though! From July 26-30, we will be celebrating Harry Potter’s birthday with a week of activities so that muggles can experience a little bit of Hogwarts fun.

MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 TO 5 • SATURDAY 9 TO 1 • SUNDAY 1 TO 5 • (256) 831-1750 • 110 East 6th Street, Oxford 30

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Preventing the Summer Slide The phenomenon known as the “summer slide” is well-documented and has been researched for many years. The “summer slide” is created when school is out for the summer. Classroom instruction is not taking place during the summer, and virtually all children see a decline in academic outcomes during the months that school is out. In other words, much of the material learned during the school year, when not reinforced during the months off, is forgotten, or student retainment is reduced. This happens with all subjects, but it is mostly seen with reading comprehension! Also, while this happens to virtually all children, socioeconomic status greatly affects the children’s academic outcomes, which is not necessarily true during the school year. All children generally reduce math skills during the summer, but children of low socioeconomic status see a more significant decline in reading comprehension. A 3-month gap in reading scores between middle- and low-income children is created during the summer vacation every year. This gap compounds each year; by the end of elementary school, summer learning loss among children with low socioeconomic status is nearly three grades behind their peers. The Oxford Public Library is here to help! The Summer Reading Program encourages kids to keep reading over the summer, reducing the summer slide gap. The library welcomes all readers, regardless of socioeconomic status or age, to participate in the program. The old saying is true: If you don’t use it, you lose it. Use your reading skills over the summer at the Oxford Public Library!

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TAILS AND TALES

Children’s Summer Reading Program

June 1 - July 23, 2021

Mondays

Food Video

Family oriented video series to show how to make animal inspired snacks!

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June 7

Unicorn Tail

June 14

Sweet Stingers

June 21

Puppy Treats

June 28

Savory Tiger Tails

July 12

Cotton-Tail Cupcakes

July 19

Firefly Lights

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TAILS AND TALES June 1 - July 23, 2021

Children’s Summer Reading Program

Tuesdays Take Home Craft Paint with Zy Crafts: Individual take home kits* Painting with Zy: Video and in-person options* June 8

Take Home Craft Clothespin Caterpillar or Paper Butterfly Garland

June 15

Painting With Zy

June 22

Take Home Craft Wooden Puzzle Animals

June 29 July 6

Painting with Zy Take Home Craft Wooden Picture Frames

July 13 Painting With Zy July 20 Take Home Craft Wooden Snakes

* Registration is required. Quantities are limited.

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Wednesdays

Movies

Double Feature Wednesdays

June 9

10:00am

June 16

and

June 23

1:30pm

June 30 July 7 July 14

July 21

Thursdays

Story Time

TIMES: 9:00, 10:00, 11:00, and 2:30

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Songs, books, crafts, and puppets!

June 3

Desert Animals

June 10

African Animals

June 17

Arctic Animals

June 24

Pets

July 1

Jungle Animals

July 8

Farm Animals

July 15

Woodland Animals

July 22

Bugs


TAILS AND TALES

Children’s Summer Reading Program

June 1 - July 23, 2021

Fridays

Programs

Registration required for in-person programs: June 4

Anniston Museum of Natural History 10:00 and 2:00

June 11

Online : Butterfly Puddlers

June 18

Pour Painting 9:30, 10:30, 11:30

June 25

Online : Bird Feeders

July 9 Anime/Manga Drawing 10:00, 2:00 July 16

Pour Painting 9:30, 10:30, 11:30

July 23

Yarborough Reptile Show and Ending Party 10:00 and 2:00

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ADULT PROGRAMS OXFORD LIBRARY BOOK ART – in person 2nd Tuesday of each month — June 8 and July 6 WALKING OUR TAILS OFF • Log steps weekly • Earn a ticket when they log • Meet virtually every Monday • Different health topic every week STRING ART — June 17 and July 16 (videos for string art at home) OPL will provide pattern FINGER KNITTING (video for at home) — June 10 and July 8 WRITER’S EXPO • July 14 1:00pm-4:00pm • Local authors will present and talk about their books. • Community Room

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BOOK CLUB

with a visit by the author

TAPESTRY BY BETH DUKE WEDNESDAY, JULY 21 — 3:00 ​ Twenty-one-year-old Skye Willis lives in Eufaula, Alabama, a tourist mecca of stately homes and world-class bass fishing. Her childhood friends are either stuck at dead ends or have moved on to accomplish big things. Skye’s grandmother, Verna, insists on being called “Sparrow” because she suspects her ancestors were Muscogee Creek. She dresses in faux deerskin and experiments with ancient Native American recipes, offering a myth or legend to anyone who will listen. Skye has no idea what to do with her life. She’s smart as hell, but she has no faith or knowledge there’s something out there she was “born to do.” Nor does she know much of anything about her father, who died in Afghanistan when she was a toddler. He and his family are a mystery her mother won’t discuss. But when Sparrow sets out to confirm her Creek ancestry through genetic testing, Skye joins in. The results hit like a DNA bomb, launching them both on a path filled with surprises and life-changing events. Skye learns a harder truth than she ever expected. Alternating chapters between Skye’s Alabama life and an intertwining tale of greed, deceit, and control in Texas, this story offers proof that all life is a woven tapestry of past, present, and future.

Beth Duke lives in the mountains of her native Alabama with her husband, one real dog, one ornamental dog, and a flock of fluffy pet chickens.

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LIBRARY RESOURCES FOR BUSINESSES IN OXFORD Opening or running a business is hard! Don’t let unanswered questions or inadequate plans dash your dreams. The library is here to help! Your library has made a resource page at www.oxfordpl.org/business to help you plan, create, and manage your business in Oxford. One of the resources available on this page is the Gale Business Plan Builder. This highly intuitive online planning resource brings together the information and tools needed to move through the entire business development lifecycle. It has tools and resources for three focused groups: NEW ENTREPRENEURS: Explore your interests and determine your best opportunities. Take your business idea and walk it through the steps of getting it funded. EXPERIENCED BUSINESS OWNERS: Eighty percent of small businesses make it through their first year, but only 55 percent make it to five. Get the planning resources you need to join the long-term successes. NONPROFITS: Learn the elements you need to write bylaws, secure funding, and build your organization. Check out this resource and much more on the library’s website.

MONDAY - FRIDAY 9 TO 5 • SATURDAY 9 TO 1 • SUNDAY 1 TO 5 • (256) 831-1750 • 110 East 6th Street, Oxford 40

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www.oxfordpl.org/business

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LEGAL HELP AT OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY In times of uncertainty in our lives, we look for solutions to problems. Of course, we all have legal protections and processes in place to help us navigate through many of life’s problems, but many times, we don’t know where to turn to find out what those processes are. Many legal processes require forms, but where do you find them? Google, as always, will give lots of guidance, but much of it is not admissible in court or flat-out wrong, which could make your problems even worse! As always, your library is here to help. If you visit www.oxfordpl.org/legal, there are many resources available to use as you solve the legal problems in your life. Of course, there will not be legal advice on the page, as legal advice is always best from an attorney. Still, these resources can help you find an appropriate attorney, find out what the laws actually say, and find legitimate forms to help you along the way. One of the resources on this page is really remarkable! Residents can now access Gale LegalForms, a robust online collection of legal forms for free through the Oxford Public Library. With access to authentic “attorney forms,” residents can better understand common legal procedures and the involved documents. Unlike other online legal products–which frequently include generic, do-it-yourself materials that an attorney may not have drafted–Gale LegalForms offers a well-organized collection of forms used in legal practices and allows users to edit the forms as they need.

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Pictured left to right: FF. Max Cupp, Lieutenant Clint Cochran, Captain Jonathan Roberts, Battalion Chief Curtis Cupp, Battalion Chief Donnie Adams, Chief Gary Sparks, Assistant Chief Ben Stewart, Battalion Chief Kyle Macoy, Battalion Chief Stephen Muncher, Captain Brandon Slick, Lieutenant Rodney Ball, FF. Ethan Brochard

Oxford Fire Department

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CITY OF OXFORD | FIRE DEPARTMENT

Message from the Oxford Fire Department Spring is here, and summer is just around the corner. It is so good to see people getting out and enjoying this beautiful weather we are having. As we open back up, please use common sense because COVID is still with us. This is a busy time of year for the Oxford Fire Department. We are currently conducting inspection and pre-fire plans of each business in town. We will also be conducting annual fire hydrant testing and fire hose testing. Oxford Fire Department will also be busy at Choccolocco Park. Several high-profile ball tournaments are scheduled for the park during May, and OFD will be giving EMS support. I am looking forward to our July 4th celebration this year, especially since we had to cancel last year. This year’s celebration will be on July 3rd due to July 4th being on a Sunday. As usual, the Oxford PARD will have many fun activities, and then we will end with the largest fireworks show we have ever had. Remember, personal fireworks are PROHIBITED in the park during the celebration. I also encourage each of you to get out and shop local. Your city departments depend on the funding we get from sales taxes to provide our citizens with the best city services. The City of Oxford only receives a small portion of the online sales tax compared to the sales tax we receive from our local stores. I hope everyone has a beautiful start to summer, be safe, and as always, if you ever need anything from your Oxford Fire Department, please give us a call.

Chief Gary Sparks

FIRE CHIEF • ASSISTANT FIRE CHIEF • FIRE MARSHAL • 256-278-3290

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DOGS CHANGING THE WORK ENVIRONMENT They roam the halls, loving on staff and greeting clients at several Oxford businesses. Their gentle nature and extensive training allow them to be calm and obedient in any situation. They appear on websites, social media, t-shirts, and hats. They are the fourlegged coworkers. Dogs in the workplace are providing joy and comfort to people in need.

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Sophie Justice gets a warm welcome from Teddy during her appointment at Designer Smiles

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DESIGNER SMILES – BRACES BY BENTON Affectionate, loving companions, more and more often, dogs are being used to calm people and alleviate anxieties. Dr. Barry Benton has witnessed much success with their therapy dog, Teddy. “I always wanted a therapy dog in the office. A lot of my colleges in dentistry have had great success with therapy dogs in their offices with patients,” Dr. Barry said. Two years ago, he started by looking for a hypoallergenic dog breed that was suitable for a health care setting. Also, he was looking for a breed that was friendly and easy to train. A Goldendoodle puppy they named Teddy was found to be the perfect match. Teddy goes to the office every day. He wonders through the clinic looking for a head scratch or slips away for a nap in a back office. When needed, he is there to help patients young and old with anxiety reduction and pain distraction. Research has shown that heart rate and blood pressure go down when you are petting an animal. If someone is nervous about getting their braces on or off, Teddy will sit by their chair during the procedure. Dr. Barry and his staff see each day that there is something very soothing about Teddy’s presence. “Teddy just changes the atmosphere. When we have patients that have a lot of dental anxiety or a past bad experience, Teddy can step in and change the feel of the appointment,” Dr. Barry shared.

TEDDY Owner: Barry and Brittain Workplace: Designer Smiles – Braces By Benton Breed: Goldendoodle Job Title: Therapy Dog Age: 2 years old

"We have many patients that will request Teddy at their appointment, and we make notes in their charts. Teddy can be with them the entirety of their time here.”

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MILLER FUNERAL HOME Patrick and Shelley Miller have had Bella as a comfort dog for many years at Miller Monument and recently added a new dog, Louis, as the comfort dog for Miller Funeral Home. Helping clients handle the stress and unease from the loss of a loved one is the staff’s priority at Miller Funeral Home, and Louis is part of that experience if needed. “From when you first walk in, we want people to know we are a family business, not a corporation,” Shelley said. Louis is often nearby, waiting to greet the families. “They see his sweet demeanor and mellow personality,” Shelley shared. “He has an expressive face and the prettiest eyelashes. He looks like he is smiling at you.” Having Louis there can help clients relax and open up about their own pets. Louis can help start conversations and help the staff and family connect in a personal way. Comfort dogs can also help the healing process from the loss of a loved one. Recently, a client who lost her husband shared that Louie made such an impression that she is now considering getting a dog for a pet and companionship. “Anything we can do to make people feel more comfortable, more at ease, that’s what we’re all about,” Shelley shared.

LOUIS Owner: Patrick and Shelley Workplace: Miller Funeral Home Breed: Goldendoodle Job Title: Comfort Dog Age: 1 year old

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SOUTHERN GIRL COFFEE “I saw your dog on Instagram, and I wanted to come to meet her” is a phrase Brad and Leah Cleghorn love to hear. When they first brought their puppy, Bella Anne, to work with them at Southern Girl Coffee, the goal was to socialize her. Five years later, Bella is living out a dog’s dream. A German shorthaired pointer, she is a bird dog and highly intelligent. Bella understands a large vocabulary of words and commands. Leah explains she’s also good at reading body language. “A customer was here with a small group, and while she was talking, she became a little emotional. Bella goes over to her and starts to snuggle her. She’s very compassionate,” Leah shared. “People love having Bella around and it brings down their stress levels.” Leah and all the staff enjoy having Bella at the shop and watching how she interacts with customers. Her gentle nature makes children comfortable around her. “It’s cool to see how much people love her and love on her,” said Leah. Beyond playing host at the shop, Bella also does her part in marketing the business. She is a willing model for Facebook and Instagram posts and appears on company apparel. “We have her image on hats and stickers. Bella is recognized when we take her hiking up on Cheaha,” Leah said.

BELLA ANNE Owner: Brad and Leah Workplace: Southern Girl Coffee Breed: German shorthaired pointer Job Title: Company mascot Age: 5

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Moving, downsizing, or cleaning out? Before you have a yard sale, make sure you comply with City Ordinance No. 2017-13 regulating these sales.

The Oxford City Council passed an ordinance on June 13, 2017 regulating yard sales within the city with Ordinance No. 2017-13 (Article XII, Section 26-301 through 26-305). The intent was to minimize the disruption to neighborhoods and to keep individuals from turning yard sales into a sideline business.

Get Your Permit. It’s Free. Obtain a permit from the City by calling 311, or (256) 241-4311, or you may click on the Oxford 311 icon on the City’s website www.oxfordal.gov. You will be given an ID number which is your permit number. There is no cost for a yard sale permit. What You Need To Know: When requesting your permit, please state the date(s) and location of the yard sale.

Signs and the-right-of-way: • Yard sale signs are permitted on private property only. • No signs are permitted on stop signs or utility poles. • No signs are permitted in the public right-of-way. Generally, this is the area between the sidewalk and the curb, but can range from 10ft, to 50ft, to 125ft depending on the location in Oxford. PUBLIC RIGHT OF WAY

You may hold one yard sale every 30 days, not to exceed six (6) per year. Each yard sale may last a maximum of four (4) days. If you do not own the property where you are having the yard sale, you must have written permission from the owner.

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UPDATE CALHOUN COUNTY EMERGENCY MANAGEMENT AGENCY

On March 25, 2021, Calhoun County experienced an EF-3 tornado which caused over 25 miles of damage, including destroyed homes and businesses. When a disaster of this nature happens, the immediate response’s success is based on all the county’s preparation and efforts. There were over 30 law enforcement, fire service, emergency medical services, and electric companies that responded to the tornado immediately following the event and into the following day. Preparation is key to successfully responding to a disaster. Before the event, the Emergency Operations Center (EOC) was staffed at the EMA, and task forces were formed and on standby. The task forces closely monitored the storm and checked in with the EOC as the storms moved closer. When the storm reached the county, sirens began to sound, and the task forces mobilized. Once the tornado moved out of the county, the task forces had set up a command post in the impacted area less than 30 minutes following the events. Search and rescue began almost immediately. While people lost their lives that day, many were saved due to the immediate boots on the ground following the tornado. The immediate response was incredible, and it could not have been done without the many municipalities and volunteer organizations that dedicated their personnel and resources to help the community. Oxford Fire Department, Police Department, and Emergency Medical Services were a few of the many organizations that supported the rescue efforts. Many thanks go out to these organizations for their time, efforts, and equipment. For up-to-date information following the March 25 tornado, please consider checking www.calhounema.org/help or follow us on Facebook, Instagram, and YouTube. Best, Tiffany DeBoer Public Information Officer Calhoun County Emergency Management Agency

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SPOTLIGHT HOW THE CALHOUN COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL AND OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS PARTNER TOGETHER

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Teachers spend almost their entire lives in classrooms. They spend their childhoods in a classroom, go to college, learn in classrooms, and go straight to work in classrooms. How can we expect our educators to talk to their students about all of the vast career opportunities right here in our manufacturing facilities in Calhoun County if they’ve never been? We can’t. Enter the beginning of a significant relationship between the Calhoun County EDC and Oxford City Schools. In July 2018, Oxford City Schools began a journey into our local manufacturing sector by participating in the county’s first round of industrial tours for local educators with the Calhoun County EDC, the Calhoun County Chamber of Commerce, and East Alabama Works. The same journey continues today, more vital than ever, to work raising awareness for all students and parents to be informed about the career opportunities that are located right here in our community. I sat down with OCS Career Tech Director Marty Livingston and let him talk about how the relationship between the EDC and OCS has helped open the eyes and change the mindset of educators about a world that hasn’t always been talked about in schools. Talk about the relationship between the EDC and Oxford City Schools and why is it so important: The thing that you all have allowed us to do is to educate ourselves. I came out of the industry, but most of our educators have never worked in the industry. That makes it hard for them to guide students down the correct career path as effectively as possible. Teachers can’t teach their students something that they don't know exists. We all are familiar with what a police officer, doctor, people in fields that we come in contact with do….but it is hard for them to talk about a career as an electrician, HVAC specialist, industrial maintenance technician, machinist, applied manufacturing engineer. The EDC has brought us into the industries. We’ve brought our counselors, administrators, board of education, superintendent, and teachers on tours. We would’ve probably gotten all of our teachers in if COVID hadn’t stopped everything. It’s allowed them to see what manufacturing looks like, hear about the shortage of a skilled workforce, and learn about the high demand for skilled labor. It has allowed them to learn what kind of money is out there waiting to be made by students going into these fields. That led to a counselor boot camp providing a tour at Gadsden State and letting them learn from East Alabama Works about workforce grants that will pay their dual enrollment tuition while they are in high school if they meet certain qualifications that pursue those high demand fields. It’s allowed our teachers to see opportunities they hadn’t seen before and enable our

BY LORIE DENTON, LIFELONG OXFORD RESIDENT AND DIRECTOR OF BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT FOR THE CALHOUN COUNTY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT COUNCIL

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Marty Livingston visits with former student and Bridgewater employee.

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students to start preparing while they are in high school. Now, we know what the high-demand fields are, we know where they are needed, and we can describe manufacturing better. Our counselors need to understand because they are the ones helping our students make these choices. It has also allowed us to be more effective while talking to parents about careers. Most parents aren’t aware of the training opportunities while their children are in high school, the career paths we offer and where those career paths lead, and the shortage of these types of jobs right here in Calhoun County. Our students can get the training right here in high school, at Gadsden State, and at JSU and stay in Calhoun County to establish their career and their own family. The EDC has allowed us to build our relationships with the industry by linking the two constantly. You guys have strong and unique relationships with both of us (schools and manufacturers), and when you saw the gap, you made sure those connections began to happen. Personally, how has everything you have learned through these tours had an impact on your own family? The thing that opened my eyes was when our son was getting ready to attend high school. I told him you are going to Gadsden State. He wanted to know why, and I explained it would be funded; we will look at the high-demand programs, and if any of them interest you, then you pursue that. If you like it, you keep going. If you don’t, you can still do other things, but all of it will count towards high school graduation. My wife April, who is the guidance counselor for Oxford Elementary School, heard me telling him all this. She said to me, “You know I’ve been working at the school for 20 plus years, and I didn’t know all of that existed at the high school.” She didn’t know about the career paths, the opportunities at Gadsden State while they are in high school-that the legislature had set aside money to fund tuition for those fields, and she didn’t realize how those skills were in such high demand right here in Calhoun County. She looked at me and said, “I am right here working with the kids. What about the parents who aren’t working in a school system. They

know even less.” As soon as she said that, I told her, “I’m calling Lorie. We need to get our counselors into these industries on tours.” I made the phone call, you set it up, and you made it as easy as I think it could’ve been. As we began to take more and more of your counselors and administrators on these tours, what were some things that you began to see, letting you know how crucial it was that we keep this going? When we took the counselors to Bridgewater Interiors, at the time, Bridgewater had a job posting for an electrician up on their board. I had already been one time, so I knew the answer to this, but I wanted the counselors to hear. So I asked the presenter, “How much does that electrician job pay?” He answered me, and so I said, “and that’s just coming out of technical school?” and he said yes. The starting pay, at the time, was equal to or greater than a teacher salary with a 4 year degree. All those educators just looked at me, and their jaws dropped and they looked at me like, “Really?!?” That truly aided us as a school district to help our students better, and at the end of the day, that’s what it all comes down to. Without you and Don [Hopper] at the EDC, this would’ve never happened. You all opened these doors for us and got us into the industries, and let them talk to us. You make sure the doors stay open. The EDC is the link that we had been missing. This has also allowed us the opportunity to get some of our industries into our classrooms to talk to the students. When we first started the tours, the disconnect jumped out at me. It wasn’t intentional, but we didn’t know what they needed, and they didn’t know why we weren’t giving them what they needed. It wasn’t anyone’s fault. It was just a huge communication gap. The industries didn’t know that we didn’t know. There had never been someone with the ability to say, “Let’s marry these two sectors.” You guys didn’t just say it, but you followed through to make sure it happened and that it is still happening. I do not doubt that if we communicate what we need to these industries, they will do whatever they can to help. The EDC has gone above and beyond for our school system.

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Don Hopper described it to us this way, “We are an industry, and our products are our students. The industries consume our product. This allows us to put out a better product suited to meet the needs of our local employers.” Our counselors have changed so much about how they present their career lessons. Previously, they might have only mentioned a nurse or lawyer or fireman–which all are very important. But it limited our children to other options. Now, the counselors can talk with them about jobs in the manufacturing sector. They can describe what some of these jobs look like, and it opened up these students’ eyes to a future they had never been able to consider. That is a product of the tours. The more we educate the educators, the more they can guide students to make a more informed decision. The goal of doing this so young is that by the time they get to high school, they know what their career path is looking like and get a much more solid education geared toward their future. Before, they might never hear the word machinist until they got to the 9th or 10th grade. We want our students to be exposed to the vast field of career options to help them make informed decisions. Can you talk about the things OCS is currently working on with the EDC? Thankfully, Don Hopper (Executive Director for the Calhoun County EDC) volunteered to be the guest speaker at this year’s career tech banquet in May at the Oxford Civic Center. We are bringing him in to talk to the kids and make sure they know the opportunities here in the local industry. They are coming straight out of high school, so if they are entering the workforce, you guys will be there to talk about all of the local opportunities. If they want to continue their career tech training at Gadsden State or enter the FAME program, you will explain that. Suppose they want to continue their career tech education and seek a 4-year degree. In that case, you guys will talk to them about the applied engineering department at JSU and the different manufacturing degree options they offer. All the fields our career tech students are studying; they can stay right here while they do all of it.

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We are currently scheduling the next round of our industry tours for our educators, hopefully in June. We are actively looking at ways to prepare our students better to support the needs and demands of our local industries.

To maintain and grow the quality of life that we enjoy here in our community, we’ve got to provide these businesses with a skilled workforce. The work is here. You don’t have to leave. I think that’s exactly what y’all are doing. Y’all

are bringing these industries in for that very reason. It has a direct impact on the growth of our tax base.

— Marty Livingston

The EDC is helping us plan an upcoming counselor boot camp at JSU’s Department of Applied Engineering and the Center for Manufacturing Support at JSU. What's so great about this is that many of our students have an interest in engineering. The problem is, the type of engineering that these students really want to do is applied engineering. They don’t realize a difference in that and the engineering degrees some of our more significant 4-year universities offer. Sitting behind a desk drawing the plans versus hands-on out on the floor of a manufacturing facility are two different things. This is a great way to help get that message to our students. The job placement rate in the JSU’s applied engineering program is over 99 percent. Without you and the EDC connecting OCS and Dr. Dana Ingalsbe, the department head over that program, we wouldn’t be making these plans. It’s about the success of the children in our community, and the EDC is helping us to make them as successful as possible.


Oxford City School educators toured local Oxford industry, Aerospace Coatings

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UPDATE OXFORD PUBLIC WORKS Dear Citizen, I hope this letter finds you well. It’s an honor to come to you again with a quarterly update on Public Works projects in our great city! Construction activity in the city is in full swing. As many have probably noticed, the Alabama Department of Transportation has constructed turning lanes along Highway 78 and eliminated a few median crossovers in an attempt to improve traffic flow. Through a joint effort, we also have improved the intersection of Caffey Drive and Highway 78 to include turning lanes on Caffey Drive and upgraded traffic signals to help alleviate some congestion during school traffic hours. Upon completion of the infrastructure improvements along this corridor, ALDOT will begin a complete resurfacing project along Highway 78 that traverses throughout the city. Please expect traffic congestion and delays while improving a vital artery to our continued progress in our great city. You may have also noticed that the street lights throughout the city are continually upgraded from the standard incandescent lights to the highly efficient LED lights. This has been accomplished through ongoing partnerships and communication between the city of Oxford and Alabama Power Company. The plans to improve traffic flow along Leon Smith Parkway from the I-20 interchange southward to Choccolocco Park are complete. All necessary property acquisitions for additional rights-of-ways have been acquired. This is a significant step towards the beginning of construction. We will soon be receiving bids from contractors to complete the widening of the roadway and bridges and hope to be under construction before the end of the summer. Please be advised that all current traffic will continue to flow as it is today during construction. While we understand everyone’s time and schedules are important, there will undoubtedly be traffic congestion and, unfortunately, delays to be expected due to construction activities. We thank you in advance for your patience and understanding as we proceed with this extremely complex project.

The preliminary plans for turning lane additions and widening of the intersection at Barry Street and Highway 78 are moving along. We are currently in rights-of-way negotiations with a few adjacent property owners and hope to have that project progress soon. Please stay tuned for updates on these projects. With the weather warming up as spring progresses, people are out working in their yards. I want to shed some light on an issue that we are encountering. As most of you know, our department runs a weekly curbside pickup service for grass clippings, leaves, and tree/shrub trimmings. This service is not intended to be a full tree pickup service, and we have an ever-growing problem with entire trees being placed along the roadside for pickup. There are several reasons why we are prohibited from this. The main reason is that it is against our city ordinance. This ordinance may be found on our website www.oxfordal.gov under the Chapter 36 link of the municipal code section. Another reason is that the rubbish that we pick up is placed in our open-air incinerator and it simply cannot handle large tree trunks and stumps. Most large trees are too difficult and dangerous to be cut by homeowners and, therefore, result in a tree removal entity hiring. As a word of advice to the homeowner, we want to make sure that you know that the tree must be disposed of by the removing entity. We are more than happy to provide our curbside service. We just want to make everyone aware of this issue so that we can continue to maintain this service most effectively.

Sincerely,

Rusty V. Gann, P.E. Public Works Director/City Engineer

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BUFF CITY SOAP 110 Spring Branch Rd, Oxford, AL 36203 (256) 403-1455 www.buffcitysoap.com Monday - Thursday 10am - 7pm Friday & Saturday 10am - 8pm Sunday 12pm - 6pm Handcrafted plant-based soaps and products

WELCOME TO OXFORD: BUFF CITY SOAP & KATIEBUG BOUTIQUE

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KATIEBUG BOUTIQUE 209 Hamric Drive East Oxford, AL 36203 (770) 375-8053 katiebugboutique123. square.site Tuesday - Friday 10am - 3pm Saturday 9am - 3pm Women’s apparel and clothing

The Oxford Business League’s purpose and mission is to promote the growth, prosperity, and partnership among all businesses within the City of Oxford. The Oxford Business League is responsible for recruiting new businesses, assisting openings, ribbon cuttings, and groundbreakings, promoting available properties for business expansion, coordinating with City of Oxford Marketing Department, and catalyzing future partnerships among independent and franchise businesses. OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | 2021

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UPDATE HISTORIC MAIN STREET OXFORD Spring is here! Historic Main Street is excited to kick off our newly rebranded “Market on Main,” formerly titled “Main Street Market.” This year, our Market on Main will be each Saturday beginning in April through August 2021. The Market on Main will be Saturday mornings at Simmons Park from 8 AM-Noon. After much discussion, we have launched “Food Truck Friday on Main.” Food Truck Friday will be on the second Friday of the month from 11:00am-7:00pm featuring local food truck vendors. Please visit our Facebook page at Historic Main Street Oxford for a detailed listing of vendors to each event. We are actively looking to have more involvement from the community. If you wish to volunteer with Historic Main Street Oxford and assist with a committee, please visit our website and fill out a volunteer application. There are opportunities to get involved with planning our Market on Main, Food Truck Friday on Main, Trick-or-Treat on Main, and Christmas on Main events. Best Regards, Hunter C. Gentry, Director Historic Main Street Oxford & Oxford Business League Oxford, AL 36203 256-241-6667, 256-403-8052

THINK LOCAL. SHOP LOCAL. BUY LOCAL. EVENTS CALENDAR MAY 2021 • Market on Main - Saturdays, May 1, 8, 15, 22, 29 — 8:00am - Noon • Food Truck Friday on Main- Friday, April 9 — 11:00am - 7:00pm JUNE 2021 • Market on Main - Saturdays, June 5, 12, 19, 26 — 8:00am - Noon • June Palooza (Sponsored by Blackbird Emporium) - Saturday, June 5 — 8:00am - 2:00pm • Food Truck Friday on Main - Friday, June 11 — 11:00am - 7:00pm JULY 2021 • Market on Main - Saturdays, July 3, 10, 17, 24 — 8:00am - Noon • Food Truck Friday on Main - Friday, July 9 — 11:00am - 7:00pm • July Palooza (Sponsored by Blackbird Emporium) - Saturday, July 10 — 8:00am - 2:00pm AUGUST 2021 • Market on Main - Saturdays, August 7 & 14 — 8:00am - Noon • August Palooza (Sponsored by Blackbird Emporium) - Saturday, August 7 — 8:00am - 2:00pm • Food Truck Friday on Main - Friday, August 13 — 11:00am - 7:00pm • Farm to Fork on Main (Fundraiser) - Saturday, August 21, 2021 OXFORD ACCESS MAGAZINE | 2021

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HISTORIC MAIN STREET OXFORD

THIS PLACE MATTERS This Place Matters is an annual campaign promoted by the National Trust for Historic Preservation each May. This Place Matters is a social media campaign aimed to create awareness to celebrate meaningful places to them and their communities.

Blackbird Emporium 502 Main Street c. bet. 1885-1894

Randy Young opened Blackbird Emporium in the fall of 2020. Blackbird Emporium features art, handmade crafts, and goods from local artists and craftsmen. The building was constructed between 1885 and 1894 as a dry goods and clothing store. Over the years, the building has also served as a general store, buggy and harness shop, and drug store.

Cotton Antiques & Collectibles 518 Main Street c. bet. 1885-1894

Nancy Burnell owns and operates Cotton Antiques & Collectibles, featuring various antique dealers and vendors from the area. The building was constructed between 1885 and 1894. Over the years, the building has been home to Oxford City Hall, the fire department, a hardware store, and a general merchandise store.

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Matter of a Pinion 430 Main Street c. 1883

Heather Miller opened Matter of a Pinion in the fall of 2019. Matter of a Pinion features a wide variety of eclectic gifts for everyone of all ages and homemade macarons made fresh daily. The building was constructed in 1883 as the D.D. Draper & Sons Bank. In 1910, the building was extensively renovated as the First National Bank of Oxford.

Sarah Cavender Metalworks 500 Main Street c. 1887

Sarah Cavender owns and operates Sarah Cavender Metalworks. Sarah Cavender designs and produces several new seasonal collections specializing in metal mesh jewelry, belts, and handbags. Over the years, the building has been home to a grocery store, a dry goods store, and a drug store.

Stinson Howard Fine Jewelry 501 Main Street c. bet. 1910-1921

The Stinson family has owned and operated a business in downtown Oxford since 1962. Since the early 1990s, they have operated Stinson Howard Fine Jewelry from their current location. They specialize in buying gold, repairing watches and jewelry, creating jewelry, and selling diamonds for cost. Over the years, the building has been home to a post office, a barbershop, the Salvation Army, and a grocery store.

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IMAGES OF AMERICA: OXFORD Located primarily in the southernmost regions of Calhoun County with portions in Talladega and Cleburne Counties, Oxford was established on February 7, 1852, by an act of state legislation. Oxford, initially referred to as “Lick Skillet,” was settled in the 1830s by the Snow and Simmons families. The economy of Oxford for many decades was primarily based on self-sufficient agriculture and trade. During the post-Civil War era, Oxford boomed as a cotton training destination, which assisted in the economic prosperity of cotton production in the 1880s. In the 20th century, Oxford prospered as a cotton manufacturing town with the establishment of Blue Springs Cotton Mill. The business district thrived with numerous drug, dry goods, and mercantile stores. Oxford Lake was the hub of recreation for the county featuring a dance hall, bowling alley, trolley lines, and boat rides. The people of Oxford sincerely believed in family values, education, and their faith. Hunter C. Gentry and Amy E. Henderson have collaborated to create Images of America: Oxford from collections at the Oxford Public Library, Public Library of Anniston-Calhoun County, and private collections. Gentry and Henderson are both employed by the city of Oxford and are interested in the preservation and promotion of Oxford’s history. The Images of America series celebrates the history of neighborhoods, towns, and cities across the country. Using archival photographs, each title represents the distinctive stories from the past that shape the character of the community today. Arcadia Publishing is proud to play a part in the preservation of local heritage, making history available for all. Images of America: Oxford, will be available for purchase in Fall 2021.

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“LAST OUNCE OF COURAGE”

WITH THE SUDDEN POWER OUTAGE AT MY STUDIO, I REMEMBERED THE SEVERE THUNDERSTORM WARNINGS–WARNINGS WITH DAMAGING, STRAIGHT-LINE WINDS. THE RAIN CAME DOWN IN TORRENTS, ALMOST HORIZONTALLY, IN TRANSLUCENT SHEETS. I STEPPED TO THE EDGE OF THE FRONT PORCH AND DECIDED JUST TO STAND THERE AND MARVEL AT THE SURREAL LANDSCAPE DESPITE THE WIND AND SOAKING RAIN. THE TREES BENT IN UNISON, ALMOST TO THE TIPPING POINT, AND A DARK WALL OF RAIN METHODICALLY ENGULFED THE HORIZON, TRANSFORMING THE PEACEFUL COUNTRYSIDE INTO AN OMINOUS PANORAMA.

WRITTEN BY LARRY K. MARTIN

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Suddenly, a dark object materialized from my left, and out of nowhere I saw an eagle flying low, at eye level–maybe thirty feet away. At first, it seemed to be heading directly toward me, either intentionally or perhaps just in a desperate try for the shelter of the porch. But then it pivoted a few degrees, and it became apparent that this eagle was just attempting to fly past without hitting the building. “She’s on her way to find shelter around Harper’s Lake,” I thought, having seen an eagle perched there last spring. It took only a millisecond to identify this bird as a mature bald eagle, with the familiar white head and tail (more likely a female, as evidenced by her large size). We’ve all heard that time can seem to pass much more slowly, or even come to a halt, during an extraordinarily dramatic event, such as an imminent plane crash. And so, it seemed that all movement was freeze-framed, as the eagle slowed and almost stopped in mid-air. The massive body executed a desperate half-roll. An eagle’s head doesn’t rotate with its body when it rolls in flight; the head remains almost perfectly horizontal, allowing this bird of prey to stay visually riveted to its target during pursuit. The eagle’s glare was piercing, even while in motion, from an eye that seemed to stare at me as it swept past. At the risk of sounding overly anthropomorphic, her demeanor suggested determination rather than aggression or panic (on second thought, eagles always seem to wear a look of determination). It was really the strong headwind that held her in place, flying with all the effort she could muster–just as static as she would appear if in an aeronautical wind tunnel. This time-warp thing, or whatever you might call it, can be a very useful phenomenon. With it, we can absorb visual details that ordinarily would seem only a blur. The eagle was probably oblivious to the presence of this inconsequential human being; she was fighting for her very survival. It was the wind and the rustic building that posed a threat. In another second or two, another gust could slam her, mercilessly, against the heart-pine corner of the porch. The long, powerful wings which would ordinarily respond by forming huge scoops to grasp the air were now flailing in discordant motions as if disagreeing on which direction to take. “She’s going to crash-land any second now,” I thought–and braced for the sickening thud. One of her wings seemed to touch the ground, but the opposite wing managed to capture just enough air to check the fall, and she righted herself. I almost drew a breath of relief but then remembered the old wire fence at the edge of the yard and the tangle of briar vines and shrubs just beyond, and I gritted my teeth.

GALLERY: WREN’S NEST AT OXFORD PERFORMING ARTS CENTER 100 E. CHOCCOLOCCO STREET, OXFORD, AL 36203 256-238-0710 • 800-833-9736 • WWW.WRENSNESTOPAC.COM

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If there had been more time to think, I would have known better. She would not crash. A bald eagle is not a sparrow or even a crow. It is a powerful piece of avian machinery–built to withstand the harshest downdrafts and wind shear–a bird too great to fail. Then I noticed that the landing gear had not been lowered. She had no intention of crash landing or of landing at all. After another split-second lull of wind and rain, the magnificent, winged body responded. Another dramatic half-roll and the eagle found a seam–and she shot forward as though she’d found an invisible springboard. The narrow ribbon of stable air gave her a momentary boost in elevation. Finally, both left-wing and right-wing seemed to be on the same page. As soon as both of those tremendous wings were able to beat in sync, she rose like a phoenix and continued her climb–above the fence and beyond the scrub brush and trees. Next Spring, she’ll be nesting–perched at the top of the tallest tree near Harper’s Lake.

© LKM2021, All text and images are protected by copyright.

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UPDATE OXFORD PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

The Oxford Performing Arts Center is thrilled to be reopening to audiences soon. The future is undoubtedly bright for arts and entertainment in our region, and we cannot wait to welcome you back to great shows at OPAC. This summer, we’ll be celebrating… REOPENING We are eager to welcome audiences back to our venue as the situation surrounding COVID-19 improves. We have heard from the community and understand that folks are very excited to come back to OPAC for arts and entertainment experiences. Our reopening plan involves continuous evaluation of public health best practices as we work with artists to schedule dozens of exciting performances for the future. Visit oxfordpac.org/reopening to learn more. 2021 – 2022 SEASON REVEAL Our Season Reveal event has become a hot ticket event! We plan an exciting night of big announcements and fun as we celebrate being back together in person for live events. Visit oxfordpac.org/reveal to learn more. 100TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION The Oxford Performing Arts Center is located in the oldest public building in our city! This historic building has served as a school, city hall, fire station, police station, and even the city jail. This summer, we’ll celebrate that remarkable history with tours and special events, including a birthday party and free concerts. Visit oxfordpac.org/100 to learn more. SUMMER CAMPS Our Spotlight Summer Theatre Camp is back! Registration opens in May at oxfordpac.org. This year, the featured camp theme and show is Disney’s The Jungle Book, KIDS! We will also be launching our new Tech Theatre Camp for students going in ninth through twelfth grades. This week-long camp will feature training in lighting, sound, rigging, projection, and stage carpentry. Visit oxfordpac.org/camps to learn more.

OXFORD PERFORMING ARTS CENTER • 100 CHOCCOLOCCO STREET, OXFORD, AL 36203 256-241-3322 • OXFORDPAC.ORG

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SUMMER MOVIES We are working with our friends at Oxford Parks and Recreation to present a full slate of movies again this summer. Movies will be shown in several city parks on our giant projection screen. Visit oxfordmovies.com to learn more. FREEDOM WEEK We’ll be teaming up with the Oxford Arts Council, Oxford Parks and Recreation, and other city departments to present a week-long series of events leading up to Oxford’s signature fireworks show. Like the city of Oxford’s week-long fall festival, Halloweek, Freedom Week will feature patriotic programs suited for the entire family. Visit oxfordfreedomweek.com to learn more. ALABAMA CHILDREN’S MUSEUM ANNOUNCEMENTS Work is underway to select the site for the future Alabama Children’s Museum. The museum will feature a permanent children’s exploration, learning and play area, an exhibition hall, and a school for the arts. Renderings and much more will be shared with the public this summer. Visit alabamacm.org to learn more. With so many exciting events headed our way, this summer is one to look forward to. We are so grateful to our patrons, donors, sponsors, and the city of Oxford for their outstanding support during the last year. That support has allowed us to be uniquely positioned to reopen to the public in a big way. Our next season will bring dozens of top-quality performing arts and entertainment experiences for you to enjoy. We hope to see you soon at your Oxford Performing Arts Center.

Warmest regards, John Longshore Executive Director Oxford Performing Arts Center

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2019-2020 SEASON


OXFORD PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

2019-2020 SEASON

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100 Choccolocco Street Oxford, Alabama The Oxford Performing Arts Center is the region’s primary arts and entertainment venue located in the heart of downtown Oxford, Alabama. The venue is comprised of a 1,200 seat main theatre, a 200 seat Studio theatre, and two art galleries.

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OXFORD PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

2019-2020 SEASON

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1981

2021

OF OXFORD’S

FREEDOM FESTIVAL OXFORD PERFORMING ARTS CENTER WILL BE TEAMING UP WITH THE OXFORD ARTS COUNCIL, OXFORD PARKS AND RECREATION, AND OTHER CITY DEPARTMENTS TO PRESENT A WEEK-LONG SERIES OF EVENTS LEADING UP TO OXFORD’S SIGNATURE FIREWORKS SHOW.

FREEDOM WEEK WILL FEATURE PATRIOTIC PROGRAMS SUITED FOR THE ENTIRE FAMILY

OXFORDFREEDOMWEEK.COM DETAILS OF ALL THE EVENTS WILL BE POSTED ON THE WEBSITE THIS SUMMER

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OXFORD LAKE PARK & OXFORD CIVIC CENTER SATURDAY, JULY 3 AROUND THE LAKE RAMBLE * 8:00am For senior adults – walk and get a ribbon.

PARADE * 9:00am

8:30am - Registration and line-up in the baseball parking lot. *If raining-parade will be inside gym at Civic Center. Children dressed in patriotic costumes may walk or ride in non-motorized vehicles down McCullars Lane. All children must wear a helmet if riding.

OFFICIAL OPENING CEREMONIES * 9:15am PETTING ZOO * 9:30am

Located at the end of Civic Center building close to covered bridge.

TRICYCLE AND BICYCLE RACES * 9:30am Bring your own bike. Riders must wear a helmet.

PET SHOW * 9:30am

Located beside the swimming pool.

CARNIVAL * 9:45 to 11:30am

Free! Games and prizes for children. Located inside Civic Center.

SWIM RACES * 1:00pm

Oxford Lake Swimming Pool. Admission $2 Pool is open 11am to 4pm

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A BRIEF HISTORY

OXFORD FREEDOM FESTIVAL

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Norma Martin had a vision for the city of Oxford. She felt a need for a group of interested citizens to develop arts activities for the community. The idea was presented to her husband, Earl Martin, then mayor of Oxford, and to Don Hudson, Director of the Oxford Parks and Recreation Department. The Oxford Arts Council was then established as a branch of PARD on April 28, 1981, with the purpose to aid, encourage, advise, and correlate all the activities dedicated to the promotion of cultural arts in Oxford, and to integrate such activities into the life of the communities served by the council. The first event sponsored by the Oxford Arts Council (OAC) was the Freedom Festival on July 4, 1981. Events included a golf tournament, softball games, children’s parade, arts and crafts displays, field events, a water ballet, a concert by the 14th United States Army Band, and the traditional fireworks at 9:00 p.m. The Freedom Festival continues as an annual event.

BY JANE BATEY

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WHY I TEACH

Oxford City School System Teacher Spotlight — Karen Maxwell Jinks

THE CITY OF OXFORD IS PROUD TO HAVE SOME OF THE BEST EDUCATORS AND HIGHEST-RATED SCHOOL SYSTEMS IN THE STATE. RECENTLY, WE HAD THE OPPORTUNITY TO GET TO KNOW KAREN JINKS, WHO WAS AWARDED AND RECOGNIZED AS “EMPLOYEE OF THE MONTH” BY THE OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS EDUCATION FOUNDATION.

J

Jinks grew up in Ohatchee, where she attended K-12. She is married to her husband, Clark, who is an Alfa Insurance agent and a Childersburg High School graduate. Karen and Clark live in Oxford, and they have two children attending Oxford Elementary School–Jace, who is eight and in second grade, and Avery, who is six and in Kindergarten. After graduating from Ohatchee High School, Jinks attended Jacksonville State University. She earned a Bachelor of Science in Marketing, Master of Business Administration, and a Master of Science in Education (Special Education 6-12) in 2011. In 2018, Jinks continued her studies at the University of West Alabama, where she became an Educational Specialist in Special Education. Jinks has been an employee of Oxford City Schools for 12 years and currently works as a Special Education Teacher at Oxford Middle School. She is also the Chairperson of Special Education at the middle school, a member of the school’s Foundations Team, and a member of the Continuous Improvement Plan team. We invite you to join us in congratulating Jinks with the Employee of the Month recognition and hope you enjoy getting to know her better in the Q&A that follows:

What made you want to become a teacher? After I graduated from JSU with a Marketing degree, I worked for JSU as an Admissions Counselor for seven years. I loved traveling around and working with high school students. Even though it was sometimes exhausting, that pushed me to go back to school to get my teaching certificate. I have always loved helping others. What is the most satisfying thing about teaching? For me, it has always been after students leave me, and they come back and tell me I made a difference in their lives.

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Thank you

BECAUSE OF THE GENEROUS COMMUNITY SUPPORT OCSEF HAS BEEN ABLE TO INVEST OVER $540,000 IN THE FOLLOWING AREAS:

Advanced Placement Testing Archery Team Fine Arts Program Green Power Team National Championship Rings Outdoor Classroom Piano Lab

Robotics State Championship Football Rings STEM Student Instructional Support Teacher Instructional Support Technology VEX Robotics Kits

ANNUAL EVENTS BREAKFAST WITH SANTA DANCING THROUGH THE DECADES EDIBLE EVENING FOR EDUCATION LEVELS OF GIVING Diamond $10,000 • Platinum $5,000 Gold $2,000 • Silver $1,000 • Bronze $500

oxfordcityschoolseducationfoundation.org

Oxford City Schools Education Foundation partnering with Oxford City Schools and our community to enhance learning experiences for all students.

DIRECTORS KEN HOWELL, PRES.

ADAM MANISCALCO

BRAD WILLIAMS, V.P.

JIMMY NEWMAN

JANE HAMRIC BATEY, SEC.

DEBBIE NOTHDURFT

TIM WILSON, TRES.

SHANNON PAGE

WAYNE CALDWELL

TREY PILKINGTON

MELISSA CRAVEN

KENDALL POOL

256-282-9158

PATRICIA JACK

THOMAS PRATT

JUDYMUNCHEROCSEF@

JACKI LOWRY

EXECUTIVE DIRECTOR JUDY MUNCHER

GMAIL.COM

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Teacher Spotlight

What do you look forward to most at the beginning of each year? Seeing my old students and meeting the new ones. Building relationships with students is critical. I want them to know they can trust me. What’s the most challenging part of being a teacher? Getting the students to own their learning and realize it is important. I teach them that the habits they form now as middle schoolers will follow them up through high school. What grades do you teach, and have you taught other grades? I currently provide eighth-grade inclusion support for math. I worked at the high school for ten years before coming to Oxford Middle School last year, and there I also provided inclusion support for math in grades 9-12. While at Oxford High School, I also taught Pre-Vocational classes in the resource setting and was the job coach for five years. How do you want former students to remember you? I want my students to remember me as a teacher who truly cared about them. I want all of my students to leave me knowing they can do anything they want as long as they are willing to work hard for it What methods do you use each day to bring out the best in students? I speak to them individually and call them by name. I try to remember to ask them about their weekend and tell them to be safe when they leave each day. I always tell them, “make smart decisions!” What are your thoughts on receiving the teacher/employee of the month award? I was very honored to receive this award. As teachers, we sometimes feel like we aren’t doing anything right (especially this year due to COVID), but it’s nice to get recognized for your hard work. When you see former students who are now older, what’s one thing they typically say they remember about your classroom/team? That I always encouraged them and told them they could do it even when no one else (including themselves) thought they could. What extracurricular activities/groups are you part of? I am a member of Leatherwood Baptist Church. Do you have any hobbies? What do you like to do when not teaching? I enjoy exercising and running. My kids are just getting into after-school activities, so I don’t have a lot of free time.

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OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS

INTRODUCING COACH SAM ADAMS BY MARK FULLER

From his temporary office in one of two trailers set up in the southeast curve of the running track at Lamar Field, the new Oxford High School head football coach, Sam Adams, can look out of the small window and see big ideas coming into being. The field itself, a light-brown moonscape without its grass covering, awaits a new one in artificial turf. Beyond the field, backhoes churn up the hillside where a new multi-million dollar field house and athletic facility will be built. Fresh off of a recent football state championship, Oxford gives its athletic facilities a significant overhaul, and Adams, 41, a veteran of some of the most elite high school football programs in three states, does not mince words about what’s being built. “This will be the best high school athletic facility in the state, hands down,” he says. However, though he has studied the plans and met with architects on the new facilities, Adams knows that his work is a construction of a different kind. In the two weeks that he has been on the job (at the time of writing), meeting with players and coaches and overseeing morning workouts, he has been implementing what he calls a “culture playbook” with short daily meetings reminding players about “what we believe in.” Beyond that, he’s been talking to players a few at a time during the down time after workouts, getting to know them as people. “I want them to know that they are part of something bigger than a football team,” he says. From his days as a graduate assistant coach under Tommy Tuberville at Auburn University, where he earned his undergraduate degree, Adams has worked as an assistant for numerous successful football coaches, including Bobby Petrino at the University of Louisville, Bob Batey at Trinity Louisville High School, Bob Sphire at North Gwinnett (GA) High School, John Grass at Spain Park, and Josh Niblett at Hoover. “I’ve worked with a lot of legends and took the best I could from each one,” Adams says. As a head coach himself at Hillcrest Tuscaloosa, Adams compiled a 56-29 record in seven seasons and led the Patriots to the 6A state semifinals in 2017. But there is another kind of success that Adams has seen in the best of the programs he has worked in, and which he has tried to cultivate in his own. Tagged nowadays as “player development,” it has to do with forming players not just as athletes but as people and speaks to the heart of what it means to teach and coach. “Our overall mission,” Adams says, “is producing good sons, brothers, husbands, and fathers… we want players to have an experience that lasts a long time after they take their helmets off for the last time.”

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To that end, Adams implements a character development program on his team called the REAL Man Program, based on the Playbook for Manhood by Frank DiCocco. The REAL acronym stands for Respect all people, Especially women; Always do the right thing; Live a life that matters. The second focus for player development is to reinforce academics’ importance, and Adams says his program includes regular monitoring of players' academics and classroom behavior. The third focus for player development is a well-balanced physical training program that includes weight training, speed and mobility work – and nutrition. “We hand out protein snack after workouts,” Adams says, “and the players like that.” Over spring training May 3-14, Adams will get a firmer grasp of his players and their team positions. Adams, a former offensive coordinator, says Oxford's offense will continue to operate in the spread family of formations, with one running back, a tight end, and three wide receivers. Defensively, Adams says he will continue to trust current defensive coordinator Chad Cochran’s expertise. Though he played three sports at Corner (AL) High School, Adams says football was not his best one. His father had played baseball at Mississippi State 1959-62, and it was on a baseball scholarship that Adams attended Bevill State Community College before transferring to Auburn. Still a lover of baseball, he has attended several OHS games over the last few weeks. But even in high school, football had his heart. “I think it was the week’s preparation for the one night,” he says. “And there was such pageantry to football that involves so many people in the community.” But how did he become a coach? That took the influence of Danny Conner, the man who coached Adams’ basketball team at Bagley Junior High School. Uncertain at 17 what direction he wanted to take in life, Adams attended the appreciation dinner for Conner’s retirement, featuring story after story told by the players he had coached over the years. “I saw how much effect one man could have on a community just by doing his job with dedication and integrity,” Adams said. “That was the night I decided to be a coach.” More than 20 years later, that influence is coming to Oxford. With its economic strength, exemplary school system, and strong community spirit, Adams says he believes it is an excellent place for him and his wife, Kimberly, and 6-year-old son, Whit. However, the long drives back and forth to Northport bring home the importance of family commitments. Adams says he makes an effort to create schedules that enable his coaches to spend as much time as possible with their families. After all, he’s got 100 or more young men who need to see what that looks like. “We want to have a program that our families are invested in,” he says. “And we want our players to see us with our families.”

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“WHAT’S FOR SUPPER TONIGHT?” “Mr. Padgett, what’s for supper tonight?” is a question that Coldwater Elementary students on bus 16-02 can be heard asking each Wednesday as they exit the bus at their stop. It’s a question the driver, Terry Padgett, has been answering for over six years. Terry has been driving a school bus for Oxford City Schools since 2014, when he began filling in as a substitute. In August 2015, he was hired as a full-time bus driver, and he has been transporting children ever since. Before becoming a school bus driver, Terry worked as a truck driver for 42 years, where he logged over four million miles transporting goods across the country. During this time, he also participated in the bus ministry at his church, which he continues to be a part of today. Terry is a member of Meadowbrook Baptist Church in Oxford. Part of his bus ministry includes picking up children in the community and giving them a ride to Vacation Bible School. Six years ago, while picking up kids in the Coldwater and surrounding area to take to Vacation Bible School, Terry noticed that some of the children also rode his school bus to Coldwater Elementary each day.

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He reached out to the parents of these children and told them about the youth activities also offered at Meadowbrook every Wednesday evening. Terry also told the parents that the church bus could pick up their children and carry them to church. Of course, the parents trust him to transport their children to and from school each day safely, and they knew they could trust him to do the same in giving their child a ride to church each Wednesday. In addition to the planned youth activities each Wednesday night, the church offers a supper for five dollars. So when Paula Waits, principal of Coldwater Elementary, heard students on bus 16-02 asking the driver, “What’s for supper tonight?” as he dropped them off at their home, she soon learned about Mr. Padgett’s bus ministry. When Terry finishes dropping off his students at their homes each Wednesday afternoon, he parks his school bus and goes to the church to get another bus. From there, he returns to pick up many of the students that he has just taken home. Except now, he’s taking them to church, where they are served a meal before participating in planned youth activities. Hence, the question each Wednesday from these school bus riders: “Mr. Padgett, what’s for supper?” To which on this particular day, he answered, “Tonight we are having breakfast. I’ll see you in a little while.” Mrs. Waits said the evening she rode Terry’s bus, a preschool child standing in the yard yelled from a distance, “Mr. Padgett, I will see you tonight for church!” Mr. Padgett replied, “Yes, buddy, I will be back to pick you up in just a little while.” Mrs. Waits stated that Terry is one of the “humblest and kind men” she’s had the privilege to work with. “He has a servant’s heart.” The positive relationships built between students and staff of Oxford City Schools have a tremendous effect on student success. When those positive and supportive relationships are extended beyond the school day where students and staff are involved in the same outside groups, organizations, and activities, the benefit is immeasurable. In fact, Mr. Padgett would tell you that he benefits as much as the children. I think we all could agree! #GoBigO

DR. CHRISTY SHEPARD, STUDENT SUPPORT SERVICES COORDINATOR

CONTINUING TO EXCEL IN TECHNOLOGY Oxford City Schools has continued to ensure students are equipped with the knowledge and tools necessary for academic success and to become productive citizens. One of the many tools includes using technology, which consists of the district’s one-to-one initiative, where all students K-12 have access to a device for learning. These devices have shown to be a great asset during the pandemic. Learning and competition have continued even through virtual means. This is evident by students across the district who have participated

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in local and regional technology fairs and will compete at the state level. Even though these competitions are virtual, the students have continued to excel. The Alabama Consortium for Technology in Education, Inc. (ACTE) will host the 2021 ACTE Virtual Technology Fair in May. Just recently, ACTE hosted the “Team Programming Challenge 50,” which is a coding competition for students in grades 7-12 from across the state. Oxford Middle School had four teams to compete in the competition and two teams to place in the Level III competition. Those students were: 3rd Place - Kye McEwen and Aidan Connell Smith 4th Place - Katlyn Morrison, Isabelle Smith, and Cameron White The following OCS students won at the regional level and qualified for state, and will represent the district in the May state competition. OXFORD HIGH: Emily Byrne - Animation William Hamilton - Digital Game Design Ajay Surrett - Productivity Design

Kierra Charles - Video Production Jacob Anderson - Video Production Luke Gable - Video Production

DeArmanville Elementary:

Oxford Elementary:

Ben Tippets

Ada Weathers

Marlie Wright

Digital Game Design

Audio

Multimedia Applications

CE Hanna:

Jana Hamden Digital Photography

Kaylly Romero Perez

Joshua Stack

Skylar Brooks

HTML Website Design

Productivity Design

Audio Production

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2020 Water & Sewer Update In Water News The Oxford Water Works routinely monitors for constituents in your drinking water. We had tests performed for over 90 constituents, and only 15 were at detectable levels. All monitoring and testing were performed according to Federal and State Laws. Oxford Water Works & Sewer Board had no violations. We are proud that your drinking water meets or exceeds all Federal and State requirements. The most recent testing for lead and copper compliance within the distribution system was in 2019. This testing was done in accordance with applicable regulations. No lead or copper samples exceeded the action level. To see a detailed explanation of the testing that was performed, please read the latest Consumer Confidence Report. Copies of this report are mailed to customers in June. Additional copies are also available at the Water Board office and online at www.oxfordwater.com. Oxford Water Works & Sewer Board met or exceeded all Federal and State Standards for drinking water during the reporting period January 2020 through December 2020. In Wastewater News The Tull C. Allen WWTP sends a discharge monitoring report (DMR) to ADEM every month. This report accumulates all the lab data that is done in-house by a certified lab technician and what is sent to contract laboratories. These limits are dictated by ADEM and, based upon their data, determine an acceptable level of discharge as it would affect Choccolocco Creek. The parameters that are analyzed with the new WWTP permit, beginning in May 2020, are as follows: Turbidity, Oxygen (D.O.), pH, Suspended Solids (TSS), Ammonia (NH3), Nitrate+Nitrite (NO3+NO2), Total Kjeldahl Nitrogen (TKN), Phosphorus (P), Silver, Color, Flow, Total Residual Chlorine (TRC) (when using chlorine), E.coli, Cyanide (CN), Peracetic Acid, and Carbonaceous Biochemical Oxygen Demand (CBOD). Some of these have a minimum value, some have a maximum value, and some are just monitored with no specific limit. Some of the values are analyzed three times per week, where others are analyzed just once per month. In the calendar year of 2020, Tull C. Allen processed an average of 4.40 million gallons per day (MGD). We are proud to say that of the 1700 plus analysis performed, there was not a single exceedance of the effluent discharge into Choccolocco Creek. In November 2020, a non-compliance reporting violation occurred when multiple wastewater operators were out with COVID. Due to this and the Thanksgiving holidays, the toxicity testing was unable to be completed until the week of November 30, 2020, just outside acceptable dates. The DMRs of each month are available on the Oxford WWSB website. Also, on Oxford’s WWSB website, notifications of any non-compliances to the parameters that have been listed above are detailed with the reports. Sanitary Sewer Overflows occurred and were corrected/repaired in the following locations during 2020: February 10, 2020—Manhole on Highway 78 and Hale Street South due to excessive rains and flooding. February 20, 2020—Manhole in field near Oxford Lake due to excessive rains and flooding. April 1, 2020–Manhole on main trunk line in field off of Friendship Road was damaged. In Storm Water News The 2020 Annual Stormwater Report will be available on the city of Oxford’s website. If you observe any illegal dumping or observe pollutants within the waterways or storm sewers, please contact the City of Oxford’s Public Works Department or visit the Oxford 311 link on the city’s website www.oxfordal.gov/311 If you don’t want it in your water, keep it out of the storm drain! Oxford Water Works & Sewer Board 600 Barry Street, Post Office Box 3663 Oxford, Alabama 36203 Phone: 256-831-5618 Fax: 256-831-9063 Main Office Hours: 7:00 a.m. to 4:30 p.m. Monday — Friday

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KAYAK

KAYAK RENTAL FACILITY AND PARKING are located at 1506 Boiling Springs Road. Visitors will be transported by van to kayak put-in access point near Cider Ridge Golf Club.

Visitors will float the creek until they reach the take-out access point at kayak rental facility.

AGE REQUIREMENTS: Must be 18 years or older to rent kayaks.

COST: $25.00 for standard kayak (includes paddle, life jacket, and transportation)

Users 8-17 years old must be accompanied by an adult to float in standard kayak.

$50.00 for tandem kayak (includes paddles, life jackets, and transportation)

Children under 8 must float in tandem kayak accompanied by an adult.

$10.00 for own kayak (includes transportation)

FRIDAY-SATURDAY 9AM-5PM & SUNDAY 1PM-5PM

256-847-5191

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