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Oxford

ACCESS

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2

COLLEGIATE SOFTBALL Coming to the City of Oxford - Pg. 2

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WELCOME TO OXFORD A LETTER FROM MAYOR LEON SMITH On behalf of the City Council and myself, it gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the City of Oxford. We are excited to bring you the next edition of Oxford Access and hope you enjoy looking through the magazine and reading the articles. To the citizens of Oxford, I want you to know that we appreciate each and every one of you. We are so thankful that you have chosen Oxford to live and raise your families, and we will strive every day to keep improving our City for you. Oxford continues to prosper, and it is wonderful to offer so many opportunities for our citizens and visitors. We offer a wide variety of hotels, many excellent restaurants, and beautiful parks for family outings. Our Performing Arts Center has brought us outstanding entertainment and art exhibits. If you have not taken the opportunity to attend one of the performances I hope you can do so soon. We are all anticipating the opening of Choccolocco Park, and we invite you to come out and see this beautiful new complex when it opens. I encourage you to take advantage of all that Oxford has to offer. I am so proud to call Oxford my home, and honored to serve each of you as your Mayor. I encourage you to call on our staff if you have any questions, or if there is any way in which we can help you. Thank you all for helping to make Oxford great! Sincerely, Mayor Leon Smith

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CONTENTS

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 2 Oxford Access

EDITORS Joshua Craft Amy Henderson Emil Loeken John Longshore

2 12 MY DREAM IS TO BE A FIREMAN 16 FOUNDING FAMILIES OF OXFORD 28 FROM THE GROUND UP 44 KNITTING FOR SURVIVORS 28

12

44

46 STUDENT GOVERNMENT DAY 48 UNFORGETTABLE MEMORIES 50 A LETTER FROM CHIEF PARTRIDGE 54 CALENDAR 48

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Emil Loeken John Longshore CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHER Joey D’Anna ON THE COVER Jacksonville State University softball team ©JSU/Matt Reynolds

The Oxford Access magazine is published by the City of Oxford Marketing & Public Communications Department: P.O. Box 3383, Oxford, AL, 36203. phone: (256) 241-6668 email: emil@oxfordal.us web: oxfordaccess.com

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Collegiate Softball Coming to the City of Oxford WORDS BY DENNY BAILEY PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY JSU, EKU, EIU, MSU, SIUE, UTM, AND BELMONT “The British are coming! The British are coming!” Oh, wait a minute…No. It’s not the British… it’s the Ohio Valley Conference… coming to Oxford! It may not have as much national impact as the British coming had on the original colonies, but the OVC coming will have a major impact on Oxford, as the OVC Collegiate Softball Championship will take place at Choccolocco Park in May, the first of many high-profile tournaments to come to our community. The conference awarded the tournament to Oxford for 2017 as well. In May, the top eight finishing teams in the conference will converge in Oxford to have a showdown on the Signature Softball Field at Choccolocco Park, Oxford’s state-of-theart sports complex. This will determine the conference’s representative to the NCAA Tournament. These eight ladies’ teams will play a double-elimination tournament beginning Tuesday, May 11 (with four games beginning at 10:00 a.m.), and ending on Saturday, May 14 with the championship game at 12:30 p.m. The Ohio Valley Conference is in its 68th year and is the nation’s eighth-oldest NCAA Division I conference. The league has 12 member schools, the most it has had at one time in its illustrious history. Current member schools of the OVC include charter members Eastern Kentucky University, Morehead State University, and Murray State University. Other member

schools are Austin Peay State University, Belmont University, Eastern Illinois University, Jacksonville State University, Southeast Missouri State University, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Tennessee State University, Tennessee Technological University, and the University of Tennessee at Martin. The OVC sponsors sports in baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, tennis, and track for men, and basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, track, and volleyball for women. In addition, the OVC also sponsors the combined men’s and women’s sport of rifle.

of Oxford,” said OVC Commissioner Beth DeBauche. Oxford Parks and Recreation Director Don Hudson returned the compliment to the OVC, saying “We are proud of the fact that we are going to have an opportunity to host the OVC Softball Championships. It will be the first tournament hosted at the new sports complex. We are very excited about hosting this tournament and look forward to having a lot of spectators as well as creating a lot of interest in fast pitch softball. We have an outstanding working relationship with JSU and the OVC.”

In mid-March, representatives from the OVC, including Assistant Commissioner for Championships Scott Krapf, toured Choccolocco Park and called the facility “a first-rate venue.” This will mark the first time the tournament has not been held at the campus of the league’s regular season champion. Krapf said, “We are excited for the first time in our proud 23-year history of playing softball in the OVC to host the championships at a neutral site at a facility that is clearly first-rate. We are confident it will be a great experience for our student-athletes.” Krapf hopes the community will get involved, and, with the fans traveling from the schools, provide “a really big draw” for the tournament.

The OVC and Oxford have a mutually beneficial relationship, strengthened by the addition of Choccolocco Park. Greg Seitz, Athletic Director at JSU, said, “It was clear to the league’s softball coaches and athletic directors that what the City of Oxford is offering is the best for our league. The OVC and JSU already have a great relationship with the City of Oxford.”

“We are delighted to host our softball championship at a first-class venue and are grateful for the support of the city leaders

City Council President Steven Waits thinks it is great to see the park come to life after many years of planning and construction. Waits said, “Starting it off with a tournament of this magnitude makes it even more special. While we expect the grand opening for the full park to be some time in August, this will give our citizens an early glimpse off what an incredible addition this park will be to our community.”

Pictured on next page: Casey Akenberger by ©JSU/Steve Latham

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Collegiate Softball Coming to the City of Oxford WORDS BY DENNY BAILEY PHOTOGRAPHY PROVIDED BY JSU, EKU, EIU, MSU, SIUE, UTM, AND BELMONT “The British are coming! The British are coming!” Oh, wait a minute…No. It’s not the British… it’s the Ohio Valley Conference… coming to Oxford! It may not have as much national impact as the British coming had on the original colonies, but the OVC coming will have a major impact on Oxford, as the OVC Collegiate Softball Championship will take place at Choccolocco Park in May, the first of many high-profile tournaments to come to our community. The conference awarded the tournament to Oxford for 2017 as well. In May, the top eight finishing teams in the conference will converge in Oxford to have a showdown on the Signature Softball Field at Choccolocco Park, Oxford’s state-of-theart sports complex. This will determine the conference’s representative to the NCAA Tournament. These eight ladies’ teams will play a double-elimination tournament beginning Tuesday, May 11 (with four games beginning at 10:00 a.m.), and ending on Saturday, May 14 with the championship game at 12:30 p.m. The Ohio Valley Conference is in its 68th year and is the nation’s eighth-oldest NCAA Division I conference. The league has 12 member schools, the most it has had at one time in its illustrious history. Current member schools of the OVC include charter members Eastern Kentucky University, Morehead State University, and Murray State University. Other member

schools are Austin Peay State University, Belmont University, Eastern Illinois University, Jacksonville State University, Southeast Missouri State University, Southern Illinois University Edwardsville, Tennessee State University, Tennessee Technological University, and the University of Tennessee at Martin. The OVC sponsors sports in baseball, basketball, cross country, football, golf, tennis, and track for men, and basketball, cross country, golf, soccer, softball, tennis, track, and volleyball for women. In addition, the OVC also sponsors the combined men’s and women’s sport of rifle.

of Oxford,” said OVC Commissioner Beth DeBauche. Oxford Parks and Recreation Director Don Hudson returned the compliment to the OVC, saying “We are proud of the fact that we are going to have an opportunity to host the OVC Softball Championships. It will be the first tournament hosted at the new sports complex. We are very excited about hosting this tournament and look forward to having a lot of spectators as well as creating a lot of interest in fast pitch softball. We have an outstanding working relationship with JSU and the OVC.”

In mid-March, representatives from the OVC, including Assistant Commissioner for Championships Scott Krapf, toured Choccolocco Park and called the facility “a first-rate venue.” This will mark the first time the tournament has not been held at the campus of the league’s regular season champion. Krapf said, “We are excited for the first time in our proud 23-year history of playing softball in the OVC to host the championships at a neutral site at a facility that is clearly first-rate. We are confident it will be a great experience for our student-athletes.” Krapf hopes the community will get involved, and, with the fans traveling from the schools, provide “a really big draw” for the tournament.

The OVC and Oxford have a mutually beneficial relationship, strengthened by the addition of Choccolocco Park. Greg Seitz, Athletic Director at JSU, said, “It was clear to the league’s softball coaches and athletic directors that what the City of Oxford is offering is the best for our league. The OVC and JSU already have a great relationship with the City of Oxford.”

“We are delighted to host our softball championship at a first-class venue and are grateful for the support of the city leaders

City Council President Steven Waits thinks it is great to see the park come to life after many years of planning and construction. Waits said, “Starting it off with a tournament of this magnitude makes it even more special. While we expect the grand opening for the full park to be some time in August, this will give our citizens an early glimpse off what an incredible addition this park will be to our community.”

Pictured on next page: Casey Akenberger by ©JSU/Steve Latham

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Pictured on top: University of Tennessee at Martin junior pitcher Brooke Kennedy by ©UT Martin Pictured in middle: Southern Illinois University Edwardsville player by ©SIUE/Eric Hess Pictured on bottom: Eastern Kentucky University senior pitcher Hayley Flynn by ©EKU

Pictured above: Savannah Sloan by ©JSU/Matt Reynolds

The Oxford City Council is hoping that the public will show support for the tournament, making this a point of pride for the community. Councilman Mike Henderson said, “I am really excited about hosting the OVC Softball Tournament at Choccolocco Park. I think this will be a great event for our community. I encourage everyone to come out and support the tournament. I think our citizens will be proud of this new facility and its potential. Hopefully, this tournament will just be the beginning of great things to follow.” Councilwoman Charlotte Hubbard is looking forward to welcoming this prestigious tournament as our major opening event at Choccolocco Park. “The opportunity to showcase this unique sports complex and our entire city is a time in which all citizens can take great pride.” Councilman Phil Gardner is happy to see big-name tournaments and leagues using the complex. “It is both promising and impressive to have these great Division I schools come to our city and Choccolocco Park to compete. I can only imagine what type of events we will 4 : OXFORD ACCESS

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be hosting in the future.” Economically, the OVC Softball Championship has already had a positive impact on the City of Oxford. City Finance Director, Alton Craft, said “The tournament is serving two very important purposes for the city: it is bringing in tax revenue to Oxford—I believe that we will surpass expectations for that week—and it’s letting citizens from our state and surrounding states know that the Oxford Sports Complex, along with the City of Oxford, is open for business.” Craft also said he is proud of the city employees involved with this event, “I commend PARD Director Don Hudson and his outstanding staff, as well as the OVC officials, on the hard work that they have done to get this tournament to Oxford and to make it a successful one.” While Choccolocco Park is still under construction, the 130-acre sports complex has its signature softball and baseball fields finished. They are now being used as home fields by Oxford High School’s softball and baseball teams.

QUICK FACTS What: Ohio Valley Conference Softball Championship Who: Top eight regular season teams Why: To compete for the OVC championship title and trip to the NCAA tournament When: May 11-14, 2016 Where: Choccolocco Park in Oxford, Alabama Address: 954 Leon Smith Parkway, Oxford, AL 36203 Tickets: Purchase at the Oxford Civic Center or at Choccolocco Park during the event

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Pictured on top: University of Tennessee at Martin junior pitcher Brooke Kennedy by ©UT Martin Pictured in middle: Southern Illinois University Edwardsville player by ©SIUE/Eric Hess Pictured on bottom: Eastern Kentucky University senior pitcher Hayley Flynn by ©EKU

Pictured above: Savannah Sloan by ©JSU/Matt Reynolds

The Oxford City Council is hoping that the public will show support for the tournament, making this a point of pride for the community. Councilman Mike Henderson said, “I am really excited about hosting the OVC Softball Tournament at Choccolocco Park. I think this will be a great event for our community. I encourage everyone to come out and support the tournament. I think our citizens will be proud of this new facility and its potential. Hopefully, this tournament will just be the beginning of great things to follow.” Councilwoman Charlotte Hubbard is looking forward to welcoming this prestigious tournament as our major opening event at Choccolocco Park. “The opportunity to showcase this unique sports complex and our entire city is a time in which all citizens can take great pride.” Councilman Phil Gardner is happy to see big-name tournaments and leagues using the complex. “It is both promising and impressive to have these great Division I schools come to our city and Choccolocco Park to compete. I can only imagine what type of events we will 4 : OXFORD ACCESS

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be hosting in the future.” Economically, the OVC Softball Championship has already had a positive impact on the City of Oxford. City Finance Director, Alton Craft, said “The tournament is serving two very important purposes for the city: it is bringing in tax revenue to Oxford—I believe that we will surpass expectations for that week—and it’s letting citizens from our state and surrounding states know that the Oxford Sports Complex, along with the City of Oxford, is open for business.” Craft also said he is proud of the city employees involved with this event, “I commend PARD Director Don Hudson and his outstanding staff, as well as the OVC officials, on the hard work that they have done to get this tournament to Oxford and to make it a successful one.” While Choccolocco Park is still under construction, the 130-acre sports complex has its signature softball and baseball fields finished. They are now being used as home fields by Oxford High School’s softball and baseball teams.

QUICK FACTS What: Ohio Valley Conference Softball Championship Who: Top eight regular season teams Why: To compete for the OVC championship title and trip to the NCAA tournament When: May 11-14, 2016 Where: Choccolocco Park in Oxford, Alabama Address: 954 Leon Smith Parkway, Oxford, AL 36203 Tickets: Purchase at the Oxford Civic Center or at Choccolocco Park during the event

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Work continues on the 5-field softball clover and 4-field baseball complex, the NCAA- and AHSAA-standard track and field, the soccer fields, the 3-plus mile walking track, the 30-acre lake, the playgrounds, and other amenities that make this park a state-of-the-art, one-of-akind facility. Located on Leon Smith Parkway, the park’s close proximity to Interstate 20, near the Oxford Exchange, adds to its attractiveness to college conferences and tournament directors across the southeast. Determining the success of this tournament, however, will hinge on community support of the event. Fans to fill the seats and volunteers to help ensure a smooth tournament are both needed. OVC and City of Oxford officials are encouraging the east Alabama area to come out and see great fast pitch softball, enjoy all the amenities that the Oxford area has to offer, and get a glimpse of the awesome facility that is to be Choccolocco Park. City leaders not only believe the fans will be impressed and entertained by the tournament and facility, but will also enjoy the restaurants, shopping, and accommodations Oxford has to offer. Adult tickets for the tournament are $10 per day and can be purchased at Oxford Civic Center beginning in May. Fans interested in volunteering for the tournament can also contact the Civic Center. Greg Bagley, Athletic Director for Oxford Park and Recreation, has begun an initiative to allow area high school softball teams to attend at least one day of the tournament to see the quality and level of collegiate fast pitch softball the OVC offers. He is offering a block of tickets ($5 per ticket) to “sponsors” to purchase in multiples of $50 for a local softball team, allowing them to come watch a day of this exciting sport. The tickets can be given to the team or left at “Will Call” for teams to arrive together. Athletic Booster Clubs, businesses with a close relationship with a particular school, parents of high school players, community benefactors, and anyone with an interest in an area high school softball team can purchase these blocks of tickets. There is a flurry of activity going on at Choccolocco Park these days. Heavy earth-moving

equipment, construction workers, hard-hats, and a cloud of dust can be seen at any given time. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a rider on horseback riding through the park shouting “The OVC’s coming! The OVC’s coming!” Come and see for yourself!

Pictured on top: JSU softball team by ©JSU/Steve Latham Pictured on bottom: Jessica Twaddle by ©MSU/Patti Twaddle

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Work continues on the 5-field softball clover and 4-field baseball complex, the NCAA- and AHSAA-standard track and field, the soccer fields, the 3-plus mile walking track, the 30-acre lake, the playgrounds, and other amenities that make this park a state-of-the-art, one-of-akind facility. Located on Leon Smith Parkway, the park’s close proximity to Interstate 20, near the Oxford Exchange, adds to its attractiveness to college conferences and tournament directors across the southeast. Determining the success of this tournament, however, will hinge on community support of the event. Fans to fill the seats and volunteers to help ensure a smooth tournament are both needed. OVC and City of Oxford officials are encouraging the east Alabama area to come out and see great fast pitch softball, enjoy all the amenities that the Oxford area has to offer, and get a glimpse of the awesome facility that is to be Choccolocco Park. City leaders not only believe the fans will be impressed and entertained by the tournament and facility, but will also enjoy the restaurants, shopping, and accommodations Oxford has to offer. Adult tickets for the tournament are $10 per day and can be purchased at Oxford Civic Center beginning in May. Fans interested in volunteering for the tournament can also contact the Civic Center. Greg Bagley, Athletic Director for Oxford Park and Recreation, has begun an initiative to allow area high school softball teams to attend at least one day of the tournament to see the quality and level of collegiate fast pitch softball the OVC offers. He is offering a block of tickets ($5 per ticket) to “sponsors” to purchase in multiples of $50 for a local softball team, allowing them to come watch a day of this exciting sport. The tickets can be given to the team or left at “Will Call” for teams to arrive together. Athletic Booster Clubs, businesses with a close relationship with a particular school, parents of high school players, community benefactors, and anyone with an interest in an area high school softball team can purchase these blocks of tickets. There is a flurry of activity going on at Choccolocco Park these days. Heavy earth-moving

equipment, construction workers, hard-hats, and a cloud of dust can be seen at any given time. In fact, I wouldn’t be surprised to see a rider on horseback riding through the park shouting “The OVC’s coming! The OVC’s coming!” Come and see for yourself!

Pictured on top: JSU softball team by ©JSU/Steve Latham Pictured on bottom: Jessica Twaddle by ©MSU/Patti Twaddle

6 : OXFORD ACCESS

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COME PLAY!

A Letter from Cider Ridge & Doug Wert Welcome to the 2016 Golf Season at Cider Ridge Golf Club! We would like to welcome you to the 2016 season at Cider Ridge Golf Club. The grass at Cider Ridge is finally turning green and the course is looking great for the start of the golf season. I would like remind you that we have introduced the Oxford Resident Rates for the 2016 golfing season. These rates include 18 holes, 9 holes and twilight golf all seven days of the week. They are available all day Monday through Thursday, and after 10:00 am on Friday through Sunday. Please see the announcement page in the magazine for specific rates for 2016. We have already seen some residents take advantage of this wonderful benefit. We look forward to seeing more of you!

Highland Park Golf Club, Lagoon Golf Club, and Cherokee Ridge Golf Club. You can purchase the card for a twosome or a foursome. We have our Annual Pass Memberships available as well. Give us a call to get more information on the different ways you can enjoy the facility. Are you ready for the spring golf swing tune up? We now have two PGA Members on site to help you with your game. Give us a call to learn more about our private and group instruction programs. We also have programs offered will include junior golf camps, junior golf one day clinics, Get Golf Ready for adults, and special instruction programs for ladies. For more information make sure you like our Facebook page for announcements of all events at the facility.

When you come to play make sure you tell the staff to sign you up for the TROON REWARDS program. This is a free This year we will be offering a number of ways to enjoy golf at loyalty program that provides point for dollars you spend on Cider Ridge Golf Club. We are pleased to announce the Cider your golf fees and merchandise purchases. Points earned lead Ridge VIP Card. The card will cost $10 and will provide $5 to FREE rounds of golf at Cider Ridge Golf Club and other off the full green fee for five rounds. Once you play the fifth participating daily fee Troon facilities. round your sixth round is FREE! You will also receive a FREE round of golf on your birthday. To eligible you must live in We thank you for the support of Cider Ridge Golf Club. We Calhoun, Etowah, Cleburne, Cherokee, St. Clair, Talladega, do appreciate your participation and look forward to providor Clay Counties. ing an exceptional experience for you and your friends. It is now time to get out and Play More Golf! We are also offering the Alabama Honours Card. This card provides discounted rounds at Cider Ridge Golf Club, - Doug Wert, PGA

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COME PLAY!

A Letter from Cider Ridge & Doug Wert Welcome to the 2016 Golf Season at Cider Ridge Golf Club! We would like to welcome you to the 2016 season at Cider Ridge Golf Club. The grass at Cider Ridge is finally turning green and the course is looking great for the start of the golf season. I would like remind you that we have introduced the Oxford Resident Rates for the 2016 golfing season. These rates include 18 holes, 9 holes and twilight golf all seven days of the week. They are available all day Monday through Thursday, and after 10:00 am on Friday through Sunday. Please see the announcement page in the magazine for specific rates for 2016. We have already seen some residents take advantage of this wonderful benefit. We look forward to seeing more of you!

Highland Park Golf Club, Lagoon Golf Club, and Cherokee Ridge Golf Club. You can purchase the card for a twosome or a foursome. We have our Annual Pass Memberships available as well. Give us a call to get more information on the different ways you can enjoy the facility. Are you ready for the spring golf swing tune up? We now have two PGA Members on site to help you with your game. Give us a call to learn more about our private and group instruction programs. We also have programs offered will include junior golf camps, junior golf one day clinics, Get Golf Ready for adults, and special instruction programs for ladies. For more information make sure you like our Facebook page for announcements of all events at the facility.

When you come to play make sure you tell the staff to sign you up for the TROON REWARDS program. This is a free This year we will be offering a number of ways to enjoy golf at loyalty program that provides point for dollars you spend on Cider Ridge Golf Club. We are pleased to announce the Cider your golf fees and merchandise purchases. Points earned lead Ridge VIP Card. The card will cost $10 and will provide $5 to FREE rounds of golf at Cider Ridge Golf Club and other off the full green fee for five rounds. Once you play the fifth participating daily fee Troon facilities. round your sixth round is FREE! You will also receive a FREE round of golf on your birthday. To eligible you must live in We thank you for the support of Cider Ridge Golf Club. We Calhoun, Etowah, Cleburne, Cherokee, St. Clair, Talladega, do appreciate your participation and look forward to providor Clay Counties. ing an exceptional experience for you and your friends. It is now time to get out and Play More Golf! We are also offering the Alabama Honours Card. This card provides discounted rounds at Cider Ridge Golf Club, - Doug Wert, PGA

8 : OXFORD ACCESS

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AMBER SPRAYBERRY CITY OF OXFORD EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT

Amber Sprayberry has worked at the Oxford Library for four years. Amber feels like she gained another family when she became the Children’s Librarian. “All of those kids that come in are my kids,” she says. Amber dances, reads, and crafts with preschoolers on Thursday mornings for Story Time. The Tooty-Ta dance has become a ritual during Story Time; the children sometimes request her to play it repeatedly! Amber also conducts activities for older kids. She designed Kid Time for grade-school kids; they might have a murder mystery, a scavenger hunt, or some other fun activity. Amber welcomes teens into the library as well. Teens may, of course, come in to use library materials, but they may also come to programs or take advantage of volunteer opportunities that look good on scholarship and job applications. Amber is especially excited about the Summer Reading Program this year. The theme

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will feature toys from several decades, which will inspire nostalgia for adults and teens, and invite younger kids to have fun in the library. The program will kick off May 23rd and will continue through July 29th, which is the longest Summer Reading Program to date. Amber is planning activities for every day during the program, and kids will have lots of fun reading! Amber has been married to Jason Sprayberry for twelve years; they have two girls: Hannah, 11, and Haley, 9. She says being a mom is the best thing in her life. She enjoys anything outdoors, particularly camping and going to the beach. Family is everything to Amber; she was a stay-athome mom when her girls were small, and she is now very active in their school lives and education. Amber enjoys encouraging reading, both with her own children and with the children at the library.

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AMBER SPRAYBERRY CITY OF OXFORD EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT

Amber Sprayberry has worked at the Oxford Library for four years. Amber feels like she gained another family when she became the Children’s Librarian. “All of those kids that come in are my kids,” she says. Amber dances, reads, and crafts with preschoolers on Thursday mornings for Story Time. The Tooty-Ta dance has become a ritual during Story Time; the children sometimes request her to play it repeatedly! Amber also conducts activities for older kids. She designed Kid Time for grade-school kids; they might have a murder mystery, a scavenger hunt, or some other fun activity. Amber welcomes teens into the library as well. Teens may, of course, come in to use library materials, but they may also come to programs or take advantage of volunteer opportunities that look good on scholarship and job applications. Amber is especially excited about the Summer Reading Program this year. The theme

10 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 10-11

will feature toys from several decades, which will inspire nostalgia for adults and teens, and invite younger kids to have fun in the library. The program will kick off May 23rd and will continue through July 29th, which is the longest Summer Reading Program to date. Amber is planning activities for every day during the program, and kids will have lots of fun reading! Amber has been married to Jason Sprayberry for twelve years; they have two girls: Hannah, 11, and Haley, 9. She says being a mom is the best thing in her life. She enjoys anything outdoors, particularly camping and going to the beach. Family is everything to Amber; she was a stay-athome mom when her girls were small, and she is now very active in their school lives and education. Amber enjoys encouraging reading, both with her own children and with the children at the library.

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MY DREAM IS TO BE A FIREMAN WORDS BY THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT

“When a man becomes a fireman his greatest act of bravery has been accomplished. What he does after that is all in the line of work.” - Edward F. Croker, Chief of Department, FDNY (1899-1911) 12 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 12-13

It is easy to generalize by saying that all kids want to be firefighters while growing up. Who would not want to be a strong, brave, and heroic fireman wearing 60 pounds of protective gear, sliding down the 20-foot fireman’s pole, riding in the pumper truck, rescuing humans and animals, and playing with the famous Dalmatian mascot when returning to the fire station? Besides the fulfilling childhood dreams of breaking through walls on fire, carrying heavy hoses, climbing up burning buildings, and

helping those in need, students at Oxford High School now have the opportunity to learn the important responsibilities that come with firefighting. Through a partnership with the Oxford Fire Department, junior and senior students can apply for the two-year fire science program. The program allows students to explore a career in emergency services emphasizing on developing the required fundamental skills in the fire and emergency medical fields. According to Captain Kyle McCoy, who has been a paramedic, firefighter, Lieutenant, and Captain in the City of Oxford since the mid 1990s, students are taught skills in decision-making, team building, and problem www.oxfordaccess.com : 13

4/28/16 5:45 PM


MY DREAM IS TO BE A FIREMAN WORDS BY THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT

“When a man becomes a fireman his greatest act of bravery has been accomplished. What he does after that is all in the line of work.” - Edward F. Croker, Chief of Department, FDNY (1899-1911) 12 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 12-13

It is easy to generalize by saying that all kids want to be firefighters while growing up. Who would not want to be a strong, brave, and heroic fireman wearing 60 pounds of protective gear, sliding down the 20-foot fireman’s pole, riding in the pumper truck, rescuing humans and animals, and playing with the famous Dalmatian mascot when returning to the fire station? Besides the fulfilling childhood dreams of breaking through walls on fire, carrying heavy hoses, climbing up burning buildings, and

helping those in need, students at Oxford High School now have the opportunity to learn the important responsibilities that come with firefighting. Through a partnership with the Oxford Fire Department, junior and senior students can apply for the two-year fire science program. The program allows students to explore a career in emergency services emphasizing on developing the required fundamental skills in the fire and emergency medical fields. According to Captain Kyle McCoy, who has been a paramedic, firefighter, Lieutenant, and Captain in the City of Oxford since the mid 1990s, students are taught skills in decision-making, team building, and problem www.oxfordaccess.com : 13

4/28/16 5:45 PM


solving along with the science of fire and fire behavior, firefighter safety, public safety telecommunication, and emergency medicine. “Students participate in training fires and are given instruction in emergency medical responder/CPR,” Captain McCoy said. “The training is provided in cooperation with the Alabama Fire College and is accredited by the Pro Board Fire Service Professional Qualifications System and the International Fire Service Accreditation Congress.” It all started last year when the school system wanted to continue broadening the students’ opportunities in exploring career areas. As a result, the Oxford Fire Department tailor made a program in conjunction with the Alabama Fire College that would fit the needs of the school. The program was first introduced to the 2016 graduating class. On May 17, seven talented young men will walk across the football field, not only with a high school diploma in their hands, but also a State Certified Volunteer Firefighter certificate in their name. The students completing the fire science program are eligible to enter what Captain McCoy refers to as rookie school or a “Bridge Program” where they can earn their Firefighter I and Firefighter II certification in five weeks of training. Successful completion of the Bridge Program will allow students to immediately enter the workforce as fully certified State of Alabama Firefighter.

ADEM Burning Bans To assist in meeting regional air quality standards the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) implements summer open burning bans from May 1st thru October 31st in twelve Alabama counties: Baldwin, DeKalb, Etowah, Jefferson, Lawrence, Madison, Mobile, Montgomery, Morgan, Shelby, Russell and Talladega Counties.

The students do not necessarily have to work as what one would refer to as “traditional firefighters.” According to Captain McCoy, the graduates will have ample career opportunities – both in the public and private sector. Fire brigade personnel works in a wide variety of industries.

If you have any questions concerning a burn permit please contact us at Fire Station #1 at 256-831-3208. Also, this magazine features our Fire Academy that is a joint effort between Oxford Fire

Most of the training is done at the new Lynn Elliott Training Center – also known as the fire tower. Here, the students get to train in a controlled environment. “You do not want to take a brand new recruit and put him in a house and light it on fire,” Captain McCoy said. “That is realistic, but very unsafe. With the Lynn Elliott Training Center, we can introduce the students to various no-heat scenarios. For instance, we have a smoke machine that can completely blacken the four-floor building in five minutes. We also have different burn rooms where we can add controlled flames and heat elements.” We are thankful to the Oxford Fire Department and now our new State Certified Volunteer Firefighters for keeping us safe.

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 14-15

A MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD FIRE CHIEF Spring is here and with it comes exciting things such as baseball, blooming flowers, green grass, planting gardens, and so forth. Spring is the time of year when everyone wants to do a little spring cleaning, and with that brings the question of open burning. The City of Oxford has a Burn Permit ordinance that requires anyone wanting to burn in the City of Oxford or the Fire Jurisdiction to call us and acquire a burn permit over the phone. We issue burn permits over the phone only on the day that you plan to burn. You can only burn natural vegetation and untreated lumber. The ordinance gives the fire department the authority to restrict burning if conditions are unfavorable for open burning. Also, there are even tighter restrictions if you are in Talladega County. The Alabama Department of Environmental Management places the following restrictions on open burning for Talladega County.

Captain McCoy made it clear that the program is not for everyone. “We teach them in a structured environment. They have to be accountable and committed to the program. During the application process, we look at the students’ discipline, GPA, and attendance record. It is important to us that they are successful at the high school before they join us.”

14 : OXFORD ACCESS

OXFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT

Department and Oxford City Schools. Captain Kyle Macoy heads this program and is doing an excellent job with the program in its first year. We hope that the program will expand and that it will help developing young firefighters for the future. As always, if I or anyone at Oxford Fire Department can be of assistance to you please don’t hesitate to give us a call. - Chief Gary Sparks

We want to highlight “Electrical Fire Safety” in this issue of Oxford Access. The following are some electrical safety tips to help keep your home fire-safe.

• Never force a three-pronged cord into a two-slot outlet. • Install tamper-resistant electrical outlets if you have young children.

Appliances: • Always plug major appliances, like refrigerators, stoves, washers and dryers, directly into wall outlet. • Never use an extension cord with a major appliance – it can easily overheat and start a fire. • Always plug small appliances into a wall outlet. • Unplug small appliances when you are not using them. • Keep lamps, light fixtures, and light bulbs away from anything that can burn. • Use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the lamp or fixture. • Check electrical cords on appliances often. Replace cracked, damaged and loose electrical cords. Outlets: • Do not overload wall outlets. • Insert plugs fully into sockets.

Extension Cords, Power Strips and Surge Protectors: • Replace worn, old or damaged extension cords rights away. • Use extension cords for temporary purposes only. • Avoid putting cords where they can be damaged or pinched, like under a carpet or rug. • Do not overload power strips • Use power strips that have internal overload protection. Make sure all electrical work in your home is done by a qualified electrician! The content above came from the U. S. Fire Administration: www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach For more information: Contact the Oxford Fire Department at 256-831-3208 or check out the Turn Your Attention to Fire Prevention website at turnyourattention.com. www.oxfordaccess.com : 15

4/28/16 5:45 PM


solving along with the science of fire and fire behavior, firefighter safety, public safety telecommunication, and emergency medicine. “Students participate in training fires and are given instruction in emergency medical responder/CPR,” Captain McCoy said. “The training is provided in cooperation with the Alabama Fire College and is accredited by the Pro Board Fire Service Professional Qualifications System and the International Fire Service Accreditation Congress.” It all started last year when the school system wanted to continue broadening the students’ opportunities in exploring career areas. As a result, the Oxford Fire Department tailor made a program in conjunction with the Alabama Fire College that would fit the needs of the school. The program was first introduced to the 2016 graduating class. On May 17, seven talented young men will walk across the football field, not only with a high school diploma in their hands, but also a State Certified Volunteer Firefighter certificate in their name. The students completing the fire science program are eligible to enter what Captain McCoy refers to as rookie school or a “Bridge Program” where they can earn their Firefighter I and Firefighter II certification in five weeks of training. Successful completion of the Bridge Program will allow students to immediately enter the workforce as fully certified State of Alabama Firefighter.

ADEM Burning Bans To assist in meeting regional air quality standards the Alabama Department of Environmental Management (ADEM) implements summer open burning bans from May 1st thru October 31st in twelve Alabama counties: Baldwin, DeKalb, Etowah, Jefferson, Lawrence, Madison, Mobile, Montgomery, Morgan, Shelby, Russell and Talladega Counties.

The students do not necessarily have to work as what one would refer to as “traditional firefighters.” According to Captain McCoy, the graduates will have ample career opportunities – both in the public and private sector. Fire brigade personnel works in a wide variety of industries.

If you have any questions concerning a burn permit please contact us at Fire Station #1 at 256-831-3208. Also, this magazine features our Fire Academy that is a joint effort between Oxford Fire

Most of the training is done at the new Lynn Elliott Training Center – also known as the fire tower. Here, the students get to train in a controlled environment. “You do not want to take a brand new recruit and put him in a house and light it on fire,” Captain McCoy said. “That is realistic, but very unsafe. With the Lynn Elliott Training Center, we can introduce the students to various no-heat scenarios. For instance, we have a smoke machine that can completely blacken the four-floor building in five minutes. We also have different burn rooms where we can add controlled flames and heat elements.” We are thankful to the Oxford Fire Department and now our new State Certified Volunteer Firefighters for keeping us safe.

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 14-15

A MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD FIRE CHIEF Spring is here and with it comes exciting things such as baseball, blooming flowers, green grass, planting gardens, and so forth. Spring is the time of year when everyone wants to do a little spring cleaning, and with that brings the question of open burning. The City of Oxford has a Burn Permit ordinance that requires anyone wanting to burn in the City of Oxford or the Fire Jurisdiction to call us and acquire a burn permit over the phone. We issue burn permits over the phone only on the day that you plan to burn. You can only burn natural vegetation and untreated lumber. The ordinance gives the fire department the authority to restrict burning if conditions are unfavorable for open burning. Also, there are even tighter restrictions if you are in Talladega County. The Alabama Department of Environmental Management places the following restrictions on open burning for Talladega County.

Captain McCoy made it clear that the program is not for everyone. “We teach them in a structured environment. They have to be accountable and committed to the program. During the application process, we look at the students’ discipline, GPA, and attendance record. It is important to us that they are successful at the high school before they join us.”

14 : OXFORD ACCESS

OXFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT

Department and Oxford City Schools. Captain Kyle Macoy heads this program and is doing an excellent job with the program in its first year. We hope that the program will expand and that it will help developing young firefighters for the future. As always, if I or anyone at Oxford Fire Department can be of assistance to you please don’t hesitate to give us a call. - Chief Gary Sparks

We want to highlight “Electrical Fire Safety” in this issue of Oxford Access. The following are some electrical safety tips to help keep your home fire-safe.

• Never force a three-pronged cord into a two-slot outlet. • Install tamper-resistant electrical outlets if you have young children.

Appliances: • Always plug major appliances, like refrigerators, stoves, washers and dryers, directly into wall outlet. • Never use an extension cord with a major appliance – it can easily overheat and start a fire. • Always plug small appliances into a wall outlet. • Unplug small appliances when you are not using them. • Keep lamps, light fixtures, and light bulbs away from anything that can burn. • Use light bulbs that match the recommended wattage on the lamp or fixture. • Check electrical cords on appliances often. Replace cracked, damaged and loose electrical cords. Outlets: • Do not overload wall outlets. • Insert plugs fully into sockets.

Extension Cords, Power Strips and Surge Protectors: • Replace worn, old or damaged extension cords rights away. • Use extension cords for temporary purposes only. • Avoid putting cords where they can be damaged or pinched, like under a carpet or rug. • Do not overload power strips • Use power strips that have internal overload protection. Make sure all electrical work in your home is done by a qualified electrician! The content above came from the U. S. Fire Administration: www.usfa.fema.gov/prevention/outreach For more information: Contact the Oxford Fire Department at 256-831-3208 or check out the Turn Your Attention to Fire Prevention website at turnyourattention.com. www.oxfordaccess.com : 15

4/28/16 5:45 PM


FOUNDING FAMILIES OF OXFORD PART I THE COOPER FAMILY

WORDS BY HUNTER GENTRY The Cooper Family Dynasty that once possessed much of present-day Anniston and Oxford are descended from Charles Cooper and Harriett Johnston Cooper. Many of their descendants continue to live in the area—Brock, Reid, Burton, Howle, Allen, McCraw, Bentley, Wigley, and many others. Charles Jefferson Cooper was born to Reuben Cooper and Elizabeth Ann Williams Cooper in Edgefield District, South Carolina on November 16, 1816. Charlie moved to Benton County, Alabama (present day Calhoun County) in the early years, but traveled back and forth to his families’ home in South Carolina. His maternal side, the Williamses, had ties with the Johnstons and Borders of the Choccolocco Valley. On February 21, 1843, Charlie married Harriett Ann Rachael Johnston, daughter of William Johnston and Elizabeth Ann Terrell. William Johnston was a pioneering citizen to Choccolocco in the 1830s, where he built a home, which still can be seen on Choccolocco Road in DeArmanville. Charlie and Harriett Cooper had nine children: Mary Elizabeth Cooper (1843 – 1923) Martha Amanda Cooper (1846 – 1919) Laura Zenobia Cooper (1848 – 1957) Sarah Frances Cooper (1851 – 1891) Patrick Reuben Cooper (1853 – 1857) Oliver Winston Cooper (1856 – 1919) Florilla “Flora” Caroline Cooper (1859 – 1922) Roberta Eugenia Cooper (1863 – 1887) Davis Clay Cooper (1866 – 1943)

Pictured on right: Davis Clay Cooper 16 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 16-17

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FOUNDING FAMILIES OF OXFORD PART I THE COOPER FAMILY

WORDS BY HUNTER GENTRY The Cooper Family Dynasty that once possessed much of present-day Anniston and Oxford are descended from Charles Cooper and Harriett Johnston Cooper. Many of their descendants continue to live in the area—Brock, Reid, Burton, Howle, Allen, McCraw, Bentley, Wigley, and many others. Charles Jefferson Cooper was born to Reuben Cooper and Elizabeth Ann Williams Cooper in Edgefield District, South Carolina on November 16, 1816. Charlie moved to Benton County, Alabama (present day Calhoun County) in the early years, but traveled back and forth to his families’ home in South Carolina. His maternal side, the Williamses, had ties with the Johnstons and Borders of the Choccolocco Valley. On February 21, 1843, Charlie married Harriett Ann Rachael Johnston, daughter of William Johnston and Elizabeth Ann Terrell. William Johnston was a pioneering citizen to Choccolocco in the 1830s, where he built a home, which still can be seen on Choccolocco Road in DeArmanville. Charlie and Harriett Cooper had nine children: Mary Elizabeth Cooper (1843 – 1923) Martha Amanda Cooper (1846 – 1919) Laura Zenobia Cooper (1848 – 1957) Sarah Frances Cooper (1851 – 1891) Patrick Reuben Cooper (1853 – 1857) Oliver Winston Cooper (1856 – 1919) Florilla “Flora” Caroline Cooper (1859 – 1922) Roberta Eugenia Cooper (1863 – 1887) Davis Clay Cooper (1866 – 1943)

Pictured on right: Davis Clay Cooper 16 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 16-17

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OLIVER W. COOPER & FAMILY

During the 1850 U.S. Federal Census it was recorded that Cooper and his family lived in District 28, Benton County, Alabama. Sometime around 1860, the Cooper family moved to Chambers County, Alabama. In the late 1860s and early 1870s, Cooper owned several hundred acres of land around what is currently 17th and Pine Streets in Anniston. Cooper’s land extended from that area southward to Cooper’s Crossing. In 1872, when Anniston began as a private town, feelings toward Cooper and the Noble and Tyler families turned sour in regards to ore and timber ownership. In 1879, the Woodstock Iron Company applied to obtain a charter for the city of Anniston. Although Cooper wanted his land to be outside Anniston city limits, the charter was granted. Charlie Cooper owned the first wholesale grocery store in Oxford. The building that he built between 1874 and 1883 currently stands on Main Street facing east. It is currently undergoing renovations. It has also survived many fires, including the one that destroyed the Oxford House Hotel. Aside from the mercantile business, Cooper was associated with a private banking firm that was run by his sons, Oliver and Davis. In 1888, on the ground where C.J. Cooper and Sons stood, the Bank of Oxford was founded after consolidating with the Drapers. The bank was renamed the First National Bank of Oxford in 1903, which presently stands at the corner of Main and Choccolocco Streets. Charlie Cooper passed away on March 17, 1886 at his home on Main Street. He was laid to rest at the Oxford Memorial Gardens Cemetery in the family plot.

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Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 18-19

WORDS BY: PAM HARRIS

The Oxford Parks and Recreation Department is very excited about the many programs, recreational activities, and sporting events offered in our growing city. With everything going on, we need volunteers at several venues throughout the community. Beginning May 11, the city is hosting the Ohio Valley Conference Softball Championship at Choccolocco Park. We will need volunteers to help with ticketing, greeting spectators and teams, parking, and giving directions to visitors at the complex. We also need new volunteers at the Oxford Civic Center where we host several senior citizen events. We host Senior Adult Day, a free event to all who attend, every February and September. For the event, we prepare lunch for everyone and would love your help both packing and serving it. The half-day events feature some great entertainment that you get to enjoy as well. We also have a senior citizen dance each month. The entertainment always includes a live band and we serve a meal – all of this for only $5.00. We occasionally need volunteers to help us with ticketing and serving food at these dances. If you are interested in volunteering with the senior citizen dance or would like to attend the event, the 2016 schedule is available at the Oxford Civic Center.

The Parks and Recreation Department hosts many special events geared towards children. We host the Easter egg hunt, Freedom Festival, and the Halloween Carnival among others. We always welcome volunteers for these events as well as sponsors for the goodie bags we give out during the fun-filled activities. I would like to thank the 2016 Easter egg hunt volunteers and sponsors, including McDonald’s, Chick-Fil-A, Cricket Wireless, Rosa Reed, Sarrell Dental, Complete Cash, and Target for their time and donations. We had such a great event this year! Our next children’s event is the annual Freedom Festival. The event features lots of morning activities and then a spectacular fireworks display at 9:00 p.m. This year’s festival is on Monday, July 4th. Please let me know if you would like any more information on any of these volunteer or sponsorship opportunities. I would love to talk to you! You can reach me at the Oxford Civic Center at 256831-2660. Pamela Harris Program Director, Oxford PARD www.oxfordaccess.com : 19

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OLIVER W. COOPER & FAMILY

During the 1850 U.S. Federal Census it was recorded that Cooper and his family lived in District 28, Benton County, Alabama. Sometime around 1860, the Cooper family moved to Chambers County, Alabama. In the late 1860s and early 1870s, Cooper owned several hundred acres of land around what is currently 17th and Pine Streets in Anniston. Cooper’s land extended from that area southward to Cooper’s Crossing. In 1872, when Anniston began as a private town, feelings toward Cooper and the Noble and Tyler families turned sour in regards to ore and timber ownership. In 1879, the Woodstock Iron Company applied to obtain a charter for the city of Anniston. Although Cooper wanted his land to be outside Anniston city limits, the charter was granted. Charlie Cooper owned the first wholesale grocery store in Oxford. The building that he built between 1874 and 1883 currently stands on Main Street facing east. It is currently undergoing renovations. It has also survived many fires, including the one that destroyed the Oxford House Hotel. Aside from the mercantile business, Cooper was associated with a private banking firm that was run by his sons, Oliver and Davis. In 1888, on the ground where C.J. Cooper and Sons stood, the Bank of Oxford was founded after consolidating with the Drapers. The bank was renamed the First National Bank of Oxford in 1903, which presently stands at the corner of Main and Choccolocco Streets. Charlie Cooper passed away on March 17, 1886 at his home on Main Street. He was laid to rest at the Oxford Memorial Gardens Cemetery in the family plot.

18 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 18-19

WORDS BY: PAM HARRIS

The Oxford Parks and Recreation Department is very excited about the many programs, recreational activities, and sporting events offered in our growing city. With everything going on, we need volunteers at several venues throughout the community. Beginning May 11, the city is hosting the Ohio Valley Conference Softball Championship at Choccolocco Park. We will need volunteers to help with ticketing, greeting spectators and teams, parking, and giving directions to visitors at the complex. We also need new volunteers at the Oxford Civic Center where we host several senior citizen events. We host Senior Adult Day, a free event to all who attend, every February and September. For the event, we prepare lunch for everyone and would love your help both packing and serving it. The half-day events feature some great entertainment that you get to enjoy as well. We also have a senior citizen dance each month. The entertainment always includes a live band and we serve a meal – all of this for only $5.00. We occasionally need volunteers to help us with ticketing and serving food at these dances. If you are interested in volunteering with the senior citizen dance or would like to attend the event, the 2016 schedule is available at the Oxford Civic Center.

The Parks and Recreation Department hosts many special events geared towards children. We host the Easter egg hunt, Freedom Festival, and the Halloween Carnival among others. We always welcome volunteers for these events as well as sponsors for the goodie bags we give out during the fun-filled activities. I would like to thank the 2016 Easter egg hunt volunteers and sponsors, including McDonald’s, Chick-Fil-A, Cricket Wireless, Rosa Reed, Sarrell Dental, Complete Cash, and Target for their time and donations. We had such a great event this year! Our next children’s event is the annual Freedom Festival. The event features lots of morning activities and then a spectacular fireworks display at 9:00 p.m. This year’s festival is on Monday, July 4th. Please let me know if you would like any more information on any of these volunteer or sponsorship opportunities. I would love to talk to you! You can reach me at the Oxford Civic Center at 256831-2660. Pamela Harris Program Director, Oxford PARD www.oxfordaccess.com : 19

4/28/16 5:45 PM


THE OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS EDUCATION FOUNDATION TOP LEFT: OHS MIDDLE LEFT: OHS ROBOT ON TOP: 6TH GRADE STUDENTS AT C.E. HANNA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ON BOTTOM LEFT: OXFORD MIDDLE SCHOOL STEM PROGRAM STUDENTS

BOTTOM LEFT: OMS TOP RIGHT: OHS BOTTOM RIGHT: C.E. HANNA

ON BOTTOM RIGHT: OXFORD HIGH SCHOOL ROBOTICS STUDENTS

The Oxford City Schools Education Foundation was formed in 2008 by a group of Oxford citizens desiring to form an organization which would provide a mechanism for increasing community involvement in the support of the Oxford City Schools. The organizers realized that in spite of the many economic blessings of Oxford, state funding rules and regulations would never cover all of the expenses that 20 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 20-21

would allow Oxford students to reach their maximum potential. The original steering committee who structured the Oxford City Schools Education Foundation (OCSEF) and achieved 501(c)(3) not for profit status was led by Cristy Humphries, Executive Director, and included directors Jane Batey, Ken Deal, Mitch Key, Stan Nelson, Bruce Rice, and Superintendent Dr. Jeff Goodwin. The foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and all contributions are tax deductible. Following the OCSEF organization and

the election of 15 dedicated Directors, a mission statement and logo were determined in order to communicate the purposes of the foundation. The mission statement of the OCSEF is, “Our mission is to assist the Oxford School System in continuing a strong tradition of educational excellence and outstanding student achievement by providing supplemental resources and strengthening community engagement.” The tag line for OCSEF is, “Where Tradition Never Graduates.” The logo of the OCSEF is based on the emblem for Oxford High School as pictured in

the 1968 OHS YELLOW JACKET and designed by Bill B. Cassidy, OHS Principal, and the first Superintendent of the Oxford City Schools in 1970. The logo is a crest designed to portray educational excellence and topped by the revered OHS Yellow Jacket. It is a constant reminder of Oxford tradition, while honoring today’s student achievement. OCSEF has been able to provide supplemental resources to enhance learning for all of the schools. The foundation has been able to invest in students through providing supplemental funding for technology, teacher instructional resources, outdoor classrooms, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), robotics, student instructional support, a piano lab, and cameras for the yearbook staff.

In this issue of the Oxford Access, the robotics program at C. E. Hanna Elementary School, Oxford Middle School, and Oxford High School will be emphasized. The Oxford City Schools Education Foundation is pleased to have been a part of assisting financially with this program. The 2015-16 school year was the first year for competitive robotics at C.E. Hanna Elementary School. In their first year, they had three robotics teams made up of 6th grade students. This was an extra-curricular activity in which students stayed after school three days a week to design, build, and program their robots. This year they competed in four competitions including the VEX IQ State Competition at JSU. VEX IQ robotics is for grades 3-8 and utilizes snap together pieces along with

motors, gears, and controllers. Each year VEX IQ introduces a new game for the competitions. This year’s game was called Bank Shot. Students have one minute to score as many points as possible with their robot in alliance with another team. The awards won were 1st Place at the McAdory Middle School State Qualifier and 6th Place overall at JSU State Competition. Congratulations to these C. E. Hanna students. Michael Maniscalco, principal of Oxford Middle School writes concerning the robotics program at his school: “Oxford Middle School advances education by offering programs designed to teach students about STEM. These programs strengthen college and career readiness by encouraging relevant and dynamic www.oxfordaccess.com : 21

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THE OXFORD CITY SCHOOLS EDUCATION FOUNDATION TOP LEFT: OHS MIDDLE LEFT: OHS ROBOT ON TOP: 6TH GRADE STUDENTS AT C.E. HANNA ELEMENTARY SCHOOL ON BOTTOM LEFT: OXFORD MIDDLE SCHOOL STEM PROGRAM STUDENTS

BOTTOM LEFT: OMS TOP RIGHT: OHS BOTTOM RIGHT: C.E. HANNA

ON BOTTOM RIGHT: OXFORD HIGH SCHOOL ROBOTICS STUDENTS

The Oxford City Schools Education Foundation was formed in 2008 by a group of Oxford citizens desiring to form an organization which would provide a mechanism for increasing community involvement in the support of the Oxford City Schools. The organizers realized that in spite of the many economic blessings of Oxford, state funding rules and regulations would never cover all of the expenses that 20 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 20-21

would allow Oxford students to reach their maximum potential. The original steering committee who structured the Oxford City Schools Education Foundation (OCSEF) and achieved 501(c)(3) not for profit status was led by Cristy Humphries, Executive Director, and included directors Jane Batey, Ken Deal, Mitch Key, Stan Nelson, Bruce Rice, and Superintendent Dr. Jeff Goodwin. The foundation is a 501(c)(3) charitable organization and all contributions are tax deductible. Following the OCSEF organization and

the election of 15 dedicated Directors, a mission statement and logo were determined in order to communicate the purposes of the foundation. The mission statement of the OCSEF is, “Our mission is to assist the Oxford School System in continuing a strong tradition of educational excellence and outstanding student achievement by providing supplemental resources and strengthening community engagement.” The tag line for OCSEF is, “Where Tradition Never Graduates.” The logo of the OCSEF is based on the emblem for Oxford High School as pictured in

the 1968 OHS YELLOW JACKET and designed by Bill B. Cassidy, OHS Principal, and the first Superintendent of the Oxford City Schools in 1970. The logo is a crest designed to portray educational excellence and topped by the revered OHS Yellow Jacket. It is a constant reminder of Oxford tradition, while honoring today’s student achievement. OCSEF has been able to provide supplemental resources to enhance learning for all of the schools. The foundation has been able to invest in students through providing supplemental funding for technology, teacher instructional resources, outdoor classrooms, STEM (Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math), robotics, student instructional support, a piano lab, and cameras for the yearbook staff.

In this issue of the Oxford Access, the robotics program at C. E. Hanna Elementary School, Oxford Middle School, and Oxford High School will be emphasized. The Oxford City Schools Education Foundation is pleased to have been a part of assisting financially with this program. The 2015-16 school year was the first year for competitive robotics at C.E. Hanna Elementary School. In their first year, they had three robotics teams made up of 6th grade students. This was an extra-curricular activity in which students stayed after school three days a week to design, build, and program their robots. This year they competed in four competitions including the VEX IQ State Competition at JSU. VEX IQ robotics is for grades 3-8 and utilizes snap together pieces along with

motors, gears, and controllers. Each year VEX IQ introduces a new game for the competitions. This year’s game was called Bank Shot. Students have one minute to score as many points as possible with their robot in alliance with another team. The awards won were 1st Place at the McAdory Middle School State Qualifier and 6th Place overall at JSU State Competition. Congratulations to these C. E. Hanna students. Michael Maniscalco, principal of Oxford Middle School writes concerning the robotics program at his school: “Oxford Middle School advances education by offering programs designed to teach students about STEM. These programs strengthen college and career readiness by encouraging relevant and dynamic www.oxfordaccess.com : 21

4/28/16 5:45 PM


problem solving as well as collaboration among students. This year Oxford Middle School offered a new STEM program where students are part of an electric car challenge. In this program, students design and build a single seat electric powered racecar to compete in a timed race. The challenge is designed to demonstrate the importance of engineering to solve the problems faced by societies today particularly in the areas of sustainable energy.” Oxford High School has two separate classes of robotics: Introduction to Robotics and Robotic Application. These two groups, along with engineering students, compete in robotic competitions. Each type of robotics creates a new game each year which requires students to design a robot that they believe will be best suitable to win the competition. The BEST robotics competition involves several aspects, which include building and competing with the robot, marketing the robot and the team, and presenting information about the robot and the team. Students performed exceptional at the competition this year. Their awards ranged from best marketing display, most robust robot, and third place overall. The Oxford City Schools Education Foundation is led by executive director Cindy Williams and a 15-member volunteer board of directors. These directors are chosen to serve a three-year term. All the directors have connections with the Oxford City School System. These hard working profes-

sionals are either graduates of Oxford or have children in the Oxford system and all are involved in many community events. Each director supports every event sponsored by the foundation. The board is guided by President Ken Howell. Ken is a graduate of Oxford High School and Jacksonville State University. He is president, CEO, and CFO of Auto Custom Carpets, Inc. and recently was awarded the Jacksonville State University Alumnus of the Year in 2014 and ARMO (Automotive Restoration Market Organization) Person of the Year in 2015. Ken is extensively active in numerous community activities and is an asset to every endeavor he is involved in. His leadership and generosity has led the Oxford City Schools Education Foundation to fulfil its mission statement of providing supplemental resources and strengthening community engagement. The foundation board of directors meet monthly in the annex building of Oxford High School. This building was the original high school and later Oxford Elementary School. The foundation directors stood recently on the old rock football stadium located at the end of College Street. They looked at pictures in a 1949 yearbook in which all the student group pictures and graduating class pictures were taken standing or sitting on the rock stadium. Directors who attended Oxford Elementary School reminisced about playing every day on the red dirt football field which was then called the playground.

Towering behind the old rock stadium is the college building which is a replica of the old Oxford College. What a perfect place for a photograph! What a perfect place to symbolize the foundations tagline…WHERE TRADITION NEVER GRADUATES! Community volunteers are welcome at any foundation event. A great source of pride is experienced in giving back to the community. To be a part of any event please contact Cindy Williams at 256-591-0932. The following fundraising events hosted by OCSEF are planned for the 2016-2017 school year. •

Golf Tournament at Cider Ridge Golf Course – August 6, 2016

Golf Ball Drop- October 28, 2016

Breakfast with Santa- December 3, 2016

Dancing through the Decades- January 31, 2017 and February 2, 2017

Edible Evening for Education- March 16, 2017

As a 501(c)(3) organization, the foundation accepts various methods of giving. Among these are cash, matching gifts, and memorial gifts. For further information, contact Cindy Williams or go to our web site: www.oxfordedufoundation.org “WHERE TRADITION NEVER GRADUATES”

OCSEF Board of Directors (bottom to top, left to right) Bottom Row: Brad Williams, Breanna Walker, Cindy Williams (Executive Director), Jane Batey (secretary), Ken Howell (President) Middle Row: Terry Womack, Tim Wilson (Vice-President), Doug Wert, Keith McCullough (Treasurer), Shannon Page Top Row: Adam Maniscalco, Chief Gary Sparks, Kendall Pool, Mickey Shadrix, Michael Magouyrk, not pictured Larry Young

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problem solving as well as collaboration among students. This year Oxford Middle School offered a new STEM program where students are part of an electric car challenge. In this program, students design and build a single seat electric powered racecar to compete in a timed race. The challenge is designed to demonstrate the importance of engineering to solve the problems faced by societies today particularly in the areas of sustainable energy.” Oxford High School has two separate classes of robotics: Introduction to Robotics and Robotic Application. These two groups, along with engineering students, compete in robotic competitions. Each type of robotics creates a new game each year which requires students to design a robot that they believe will be best suitable to win the competition. The BEST robotics competition involves several aspects, which include building and competing with the robot, marketing the robot and the team, and presenting information about the robot and the team. Students performed exceptional at the competition this year. Their awards ranged from best marketing display, most robust robot, and third place overall. The Oxford City Schools Education Foundation is led by executive director Cindy Williams and a 15-member volunteer board of directors. These directors are chosen to serve a three-year term. All the directors have connections with the Oxford City School System. These hard working profes-

sionals are either graduates of Oxford or have children in the Oxford system and all are involved in many community events. Each director supports every event sponsored by the foundation. The board is guided by President Ken Howell. Ken is a graduate of Oxford High School and Jacksonville State University. He is president, CEO, and CFO of Auto Custom Carpets, Inc. and recently was awarded the Jacksonville State University Alumnus of the Year in 2014 and ARMO (Automotive Restoration Market Organization) Person of the Year in 2015. Ken is extensively active in numerous community activities and is an asset to every endeavor he is involved in. His leadership and generosity has led the Oxford City Schools Education Foundation to fulfil its mission statement of providing supplemental resources and strengthening community engagement. The foundation board of directors meet monthly in the annex building of Oxford High School. This building was the original high school and later Oxford Elementary School. The foundation directors stood recently on the old rock football stadium located at the end of College Street. They looked at pictures in a 1949 yearbook in which all the student group pictures and graduating class pictures were taken standing or sitting on the rock stadium. Directors who attended Oxford Elementary School reminisced about playing every day on the red dirt football field which was then called the playground.

Towering behind the old rock stadium is the college building which is a replica of the old Oxford College. What a perfect place for a photograph! What a perfect place to symbolize the foundations tagline…WHERE TRADITION NEVER GRADUATES! Community volunteers are welcome at any foundation event. A great source of pride is experienced in giving back to the community. To be a part of any event please contact Cindy Williams at 256-591-0932. The following fundraising events hosted by OCSEF are planned for the 2016-2017 school year. •

Golf Tournament at Cider Ridge Golf Course – August 6, 2016

Golf Ball Drop- October 28, 2016

Breakfast with Santa- December 3, 2016

Dancing through the Decades- January 31, 2017 and February 2, 2017

Edible Evening for Education- March 16, 2017

As a 501(c)(3) organization, the foundation accepts various methods of giving. Among these are cash, matching gifts, and memorial gifts. For further information, contact Cindy Williams or go to our web site: www.oxfordedufoundation.org “WHERE TRADITION NEVER GRADUATES”

OCSEF Board of Directors (bottom to top, left to right) Bottom Row: Brad Williams, Breanna Walker, Cindy Williams (Executive Director), Jane Batey (secretary), Ken Howell (President) Middle Row: Terry Womack, Tim Wilson (Vice-President), Doug Wert, Keith McCullough (Treasurer), Shannon Page Top Row: Adam Maniscalco, Chief Gary Sparks, Kendall Pool, Mickey Shadrix, Michael Magouyrk, not pictured Larry Young

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“WHERE TRADITION NEVER GRADUATES” The new Oxford High School was opened in 2010. Along the beautifully columned entrance is a black marble monument with OHS engraved on it. Surrounding the mon-

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ument is the “Walk of Champions” made of engraved brick pavers. These engraved brick pavers are a source of pride for Yellow Jacket fans everywhere. Students, families, former graduates and entire graduating classes have purchased bricks. Bricks can be purchased in memory of a family member or classmates

or in honor of someone. An engraved brick is the perfect gift for graduates from kindergarten through high school. If interested in purchasing a brick for yourself or a loved one, please visit our web site: www.oxfordedufoundation.org or call Cindy Williams at 256-591-0932.

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“WHERE TRADITION NEVER GRADUATES” The new Oxford High School was opened in 2010. Along the beautifully columned entrance is a black marble monument with OHS engraved on it. Surrounding the mon-

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ument is the “Walk of Champions” made of engraved brick pavers. These engraved brick pavers are a source of pride for Yellow Jacket fans everywhere. Students, families, former graduates and entire graduating classes have purchased bricks. Bricks can be purchased in memory of a family member or classmates

or in honor of someone. An engraved brick is the perfect gift for graduates from kindergarten through high school. If interested in purchasing a brick for yourself or a loved one, please visit our web site: www.oxfordedufoundation.org or call Cindy Williams at 256-591-0932.

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ON CRUZ CONTROL

... And Going Places In many w ays, Cruz Skinner is like most fourteen-year-olds. He goes to school and spends his afternoons doing homew ork, attending ball games, spending time w ith his grandparents, and playing on-line video games w ith friends. (His "video game" is a little different - a racing simulator complete w ith cockpit, chassis, triple monitors, and on-line capabilities that lets him race virtually anyone in the w orld.)

WORDS BY: DENNY BAILEY This is where Cruz’s world begins to differ from that of many youngsters his age. Instead of hanging out at friends’ houses or the mall on weekends, he spends most of his weekends hanging out at tracks… race tracks, like the Dirt Track in Talladega, Magnolia Motor Speedway in Columbus, Mississippi, or Boyd Speedway in Ringgold, Georgia. Cruz drives race cars, and does so very successfully. Cruz has over 340 wins, including go-carts (which he began racing at age 5), “Hot Shots” (6-cylinder street cars with a roll cage added), and “Crate Late Models” (based on size of the engine and sheet metal body). Cruz was introduced to racing at an early age, tagging along with his dad Greg and granddad G.T. Skinner to watch races at Green Valley and Talladega Speedways and other tracks. He said that almost from his introduction to the track, strategy played a part in his observations. He began to watch how different tracks handled, how different drivers handled those tracks, and where passing points were on each track. Cruz began to race full-size cars at age ten.

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of wearing seat belts and answering racing questions. He laughs at the most frequently asked question: “Do you race with Danica Patrick?” Cruz is very much at ease interacting with adults. Although there are other young race car drivers, Cruz still must interact in the mostly adult world of auto racing. He regularly talks to or texts other drivers, like dirt track Hall of Famer Ronnie Johnson, who took Cruz “under his wing.” One of the aspects of racing that Cruz loves is the “family” relationships that exist among drivers in the sport. Drivers help each other out.

Cruz shows a maturity beyond his years. He speaks of school as his number one Because he was so small, he had to have the priority, balancing homework, work at his dad’s shop, and racing most weekends. He driver’s seat moved all the way forward in uses the word “honored” when describing order to reach the pedals. Consequently, there was not enough room to enter the car his selection as “Click it or Ticket” spokesthrough the side window like other drivers, person. He says he realizes he is “very fortunate” to have racing legends like Johnson so young Cruz had to crawl through the serve as his mentor. He tries to return the front windshield opening in order to get favor, helping other drivers when the opporinto the cockpit. At age 11, he won his tunity arises. His heroes include Johnson first race on an asphalt half-mile track; (dirt tracks) and Jeff Gordon (NASCAR), according to the rules, he had to start the who, Cruz says, does a great job with his next race in the rear of the field. He won “on and off the track conduct.” Cruz that race also. praises his crew chief, U.B. McFadden, who In an incredible irony, this young man races “gives up a lot of his life to work on my car and be there for me on the weekends,” and at high speeds in a dangerous sport, but volunteer supporters like Doug McKenzie. can’t drive on the street because he is too young for a driver’s license. Cruz served Cruz speaks of goals as only a mature young as the Alabama Department of Safety’s man can do. His ultimate goal is to race Spokesperson for the “Click it or Ticket” campaign for 2015, appearing on billboards in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. For now, he says, he wants to continue on dirt and in commercials statewide. As spokestracks, gaining valuable experience that will person, he has appeared on billboards help him realize his goal. At a time when and in commercials statewide, promoting few teens know what they want to do with the use of seat belts. On the billboard, their life, much less how to get there, Cruz Cruz says “I may not have my license yet, Skinner is in control! He has his priorities but I have learned lesson #1…BUCKLE in order and is focused on his goals. He is UP!” He spoke at all of the elementary schools in Oxford, touting the importance going places, and he’s on “Cruz control!”

PELL CITY ● OXFORD ● HEFLIN ● CENTRE ● ROANOKE

MORE THAN CONCRETE... LUMBER

HARDWARE

FLOORING

WINDOWS

DOORS

INSULATION

ROOFING

SIDING

SHUTTERS

STAIR PARTS

PAINT

COLUMNS

BLOCK

SAND

AND MORE!

(800) 600-2195

www.oxfordaccess.com : 27 WWW.WEBBCONCRETE.COM 4/28/16 5:45 PM


ON CRUZ CONTROL

... And Going Places In many w ays, Cruz Skinner is like most fourteen-year-olds. He goes to school and spends his afternoons doing homew ork, attending ball games, spending time w ith his grandparents, and playing on-line video games w ith friends. (His "video game" is a little different - a racing simulator complete w ith cockpit, chassis, triple monitors, and on-line capabilities that lets him race virtually anyone in the w orld.)

WORDS BY: DENNY BAILEY This is where Cruz’s world begins to differ from that of many youngsters his age. Instead of hanging out at friends’ houses or the mall on weekends, he spends most of his weekends hanging out at tracks… race tracks, like the Dirt Track in Talladega, Magnolia Motor Speedway in Columbus, Mississippi, or Boyd Speedway in Ringgold, Georgia. Cruz drives race cars, and does so very successfully. Cruz has over 340 wins, including go-carts (which he began racing at age 5), “Hot Shots” (6-cylinder street cars with a roll cage added), and “Crate Late Models” (based on size of the engine and sheet metal body). Cruz was introduced to racing at an early age, tagging along with his dad Greg and granddad G.T. Skinner to watch races at Green Valley and Talladega Speedways and other tracks. He said that almost from his introduction to the track, strategy played a part in his observations. He began to watch how different tracks handled, how different drivers handled those tracks, and where passing points were on each track. Cruz began to race full-size cars at age ten.

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of wearing seat belts and answering racing questions. He laughs at the most frequently asked question: “Do you race with Danica Patrick?” Cruz is very much at ease interacting with adults. Although there are other young race car drivers, Cruz still must interact in the mostly adult world of auto racing. He regularly talks to or texts other drivers, like dirt track Hall of Famer Ronnie Johnson, who took Cruz “under his wing.” One of the aspects of racing that Cruz loves is the “family” relationships that exist among drivers in the sport. Drivers help each other out.

Cruz shows a maturity beyond his years. He speaks of school as his number one Because he was so small, he had to have the priority, balancing homework, work at his dad’s shop, and racing most weekends. He driver’s seat moved all the way forward in uses the word “honored” when describing order to reach the pedals. Consequently, there was not enough room to enter the car his selection as “Click it or Ticket” spokesthrough the side window like other drivers, person. He says he realizes he is “very fortunate” to have racing legends like Johnson so young Cruz had to crawl through the serve as his mentor. He tries to return the front windshield opening in order to get favor, helping other drivers when the opporinto the cockpit. At age 11, he won his tunity arises. His heroes include Johnson first race on an asphalt half-mile track; (dirt tracks) and Jeff Gordon (NASCAR), according to the rules, he had to start the who, Cruz says, does a great job with his next race in the rear of the field. He won “on and off the track conduct.” Cruz that race also. praises his crew chief, U.B. McFadden, who In an incredible irony, this young man races “gives up a lot of his life to work on my car and be there for me on the weekends,” and at high speeds in a dangerous sport, but volunteer supporters like Doug McKenzie. can’t drive on the street because he is too young for a driver’s license. Cruz served Cruz speaks of goals as only a mature young as the Alabama Department of Safety’s man can do. His ultimate goal is to race Spokesperson for the “Click it or Ticket” campaign for 2015, appearing on billboards in the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series. For now, he says, he wants to continue on dirt and in commercials statewide. As spokestracks, gaining valuable experience that will person, he has appeared on billboards help him realize his goal. At a time when and in commercials statewide, promoting few teens know what they want to do with the use of seat belts. On the billboard, their life, much less how to get there, Cruz Cruz says “I may not have my license yet, Skinner is in control! He has his priorities but I have learned lesson #1…BUCKLE in order and is focused on his goals. He is UP!” He spoke at all of the elementary schools in Oxford, touting the importance going places, and he’s on “Cruz control!”

PELL CITY ● OXFORD ● HEFLIN ● CENTRE ● ROANOKE

MORE THAN CONCRETE... LUMBER

HARDWARE

FLOORING

WINDOWS

DOORS

INSULATION

ROOFING

SIDING

SHUTTERS

STAIR PARTS

PAINT

COLUMNS

BLOCK

SAND

AND MORE!

(800) 600-2195

www.oxfordaccess.com : 27 WWW.WEBBCONCRETE.COM 4/28/16 5:45 PM


Happy spring everyone. What an exciting time of the year! Time for spring cleaning, warm weather, The Masters, opening day of softball and baseball, dogwoods blooming, and birds chirping. We at Cider Ridge and Choccolocco Park are more excited than ever for this time of the year.

FROM THE GROUND UP WORDS BY CHAD ROBINSON

Allow me to introduce myself: my name is Chad Robinson and I am the director of grounds for Cider Ridge Golf Club and the new Choccolocco Park. I am employed by Honours Golf, a third party management company that has a proven success record in both golf and grounds management. I am directly responsible for the grounds at both facilities and have the pleasure of managing the grounds staff at Cider Ridge and Choccolocco Park. I must say that my job would be absolutely impossible without the incredibly passionate individuals I get to work alongside every day. The grounds staff at both facilities are top notch and are some of the best in our business. As many of you have seen the progress at Choccolocco Park, let me be the first to introduce you to the 300+ acres of pristine playing facility so graciously given to us by the City of Oxford. If you have not made your way to Choccolocco Park, I invite you to take a tour and check out our progress or attend a game within the next few weeks. Once completed, Choccolocco Park will be one of the premier athletic complexes in the southeast. With that being said, the responsibilities of grounds management requires countless hours and dedication from many very hardworking employees. From sunrise to sunset, our staff have many responsibilities to maintain. From establishing the turf from conception of the sports complex, to maintaining exceptional field conditions, to daily maintenance of the grounds, there is never a moment of silence at Choccolocco Park.

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For the past several weeks, we have been preparing our signature softball field for the Ohio Valley Conference Softball tournament and championship on May 11th – May 14th. Over the week of the OVC Championship, we expect to see up to four games per day. A combination of collegiate athletes, metal cleats and the desire to win is not great for maintaining a perfect field. This is why we must prepare for this sort of traffic several weeks in advance. Practices such as aeration, sand topdressing, and increased fertilization are key in the survival and recovery of weeks such as the OVC Championship. The grounds staff and myself are very much looking forward to this monumental week and hope to see you out at the ball park! As the weather begins to turn warmer at Cider Ridge Golf Club and more golfers come out to play, we are excited to begin mowing grass yet again. We completed several projects over the winter and are looking forward to seeing them come to fruition throughout the season. As we gear up for the season, we are looking forward to another great Sunbelt Senior Professional Golf Tour event this May. This is a great opportunity for some of the best players in the southeast to experience our facility. The entire Cider Ridge Gold Club staff and I would like to extend an invite to you and your fellow players to join us at Cider Ridge. We assure you, you will not be disappointed! Again, I would like to thank the incredible individuals that work alongside me on a daily basis. From the superintendents, assistant superintendence, mechanics, equipment operators, and custodial staff; all members at both facilities play a significant role in the experience of every guest that steps foot on the grounds at either property. Thank you all for your patronage and support to the City of Oxford. I hope to see you soon on the golf course or at the park! www.oxfordaccess.com : 29

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Happy spring everyone. What an exciting time of the year! Time for spring cleaning, warm weather, The Masters, opening day of softball and baseball, dogwoods blooming, and birds chirping. We at Cider Ridge and Choccolocco Park are more excited than ever for this time of the year.

FROM THE GROUND UP WORDS BY CHAD ROBINSON

Allow me to introduce myself: my name is Chad Robinson and I am the director of grounds for Cider Ridge Golf Club and the new Choccolocco Park. I am employed by Honours Golf, a third party management company that has a proven success record in both golf and grounds management. I am directly responsible for the grounds at both facilities and have the pleasure of managing the grounds staff at Cider Ridge and Choccolocco Park. I must say that my job would be absolutely impossible without the incredibly passionate individuals I get to work alongside every day. The grounds staff at both facilities are top notch and are some of the best in our business. As many of you have seen the progress at Choccolocco Park, let me be the first to introduce you to the 300+ acres of pristine playing facility so graciously given to us by the City of Oxford. If you have not made your way to Choccolocco Park, I invite you to take a tour and check out our progress or attend a game within the next few weeks. Once completed, Choccolocco Park will be one of the premier athletic complexes in the southeast. With that being said, the responsibilities of grounds management requires countless hours and dedication from many very hardworking employees. From sunrise to sunset, our staff have many responsibilities to maintain. From establishing the turf from conception of the sports complex, to maintaining exceptional field conditions, to daily maintenance of the grounds, there is never a moment of silence at Choccolocco Park.

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Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 28-29

For the past several weeks, we have been preparing our signature softball field for the Ohio Valley Conference Softball tournament and championship on May 11th – May 14th. Over the week of the OVC Championship, we expect to see up to four games per day. A combination of collegiate athletes, metal cleats and the desire to win is not great for maintaining a perfect field. This is why we must prepare for this sort of traffic several weeks in advance. Practices such as aeration, sand topdressing, and increased fertilization are key in the survival and recovery of weeks such as the OVC Championship. The grounds staff and myself are very much looking forward to this monumental week and hope to see you out at the ball park! As the weather begins to turn warmer at Cider Ridge Golf Club and more golfers come out to play, we are excited to begin mowing grass yet again. We completed several projects over the winter and are looking forward to seeing them come to fruition throughout the season. As we gear up for the season, we are looking forward to another great Sunbelt Senior Professional Golf Tour event this May. This is a great opportunity for some of the best players in the southeast to experience our facility. The entire Cider Ridge Gold Club staff and I would like to extend an invite to you and your fellow players to join us at Cider Ridge. We assure you, you will not be disappointed! Again, I would like to thank the incredible individuals that work alongside me on a daily basis. From the superintendents, assistant superintendence, mechanics, equipment operators, and custodial staff; all members at both facilities play a significant role in the experience of every guest that steps foot on the grounds at either property. Thank you all for your patronage and support to the City of Oxford. I hope to see you soon on the golf course or at the park! www.oxfordaccess.com : 29

4/28/16 5:45 PM


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grade levels to ensure that Advanced or Honors students are additionally prepared for the intensity of AP courses in their Junior and Senior year of high school. A student should take AP classes because they get to experience a college-level course without having the expense of DE courses and a possible disappointing grade that will be on their college transcript and cause GPA problems their first year in college. AP courses are like a college material experience in your high school with the opportunity to earn college credit at many universities.

OXFORD CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION

A MESSAGE FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION As another school year draws to a close, I am reminded how blessed we are to live in a city like ours where parental and community support for children is a priority. From the breathtaking Choccolocco Park, a world class facility that many of our spring extracurricular activities will now call home, to Student Government Day, a timeless Oxford tradition that allows high school seniors to participate in leadership experiences with Oxford’s elected and appointed officials, our students have a wide variety of opportunities to participate in both wonderful events and venues. During the course of the spring semester I had the pleasure of observing and participating in a new Oxford tradition, our family advisement program. This initiative involving parents, teachers, counselors, and students is a wonderful collaborative effort for students in grades 8-12. lt allows students to develop and give input on their future plans and the courses required to achieve their goals. lt has proven itself to be a vital connection between home, school, and beyond. lt is now an integral part of our partnership between home and school. I was also privileged this spring to attend a City Council meeting when the strong connection between our city and school district was put on display. ln August of 2015, Pat Wayne Shaddix, Professor Emeritus, began developing an Economic lmpact Study for the Oxford City School System. This study, measuring the economic impact the Oxford City School System has on the City of Oxford, calculates the actual monetary value the school district provides for our city. The results of the study conducted over several months demonstrated the close and beneficial relationship enjoyed by the city and school system. According to the document, the school district creates nearly 1,500 jobs outside of the 525 individuals employed by the system and generates 101 million dollars yearly for the City of Oxford. Finally, I would like to congratulate the Class of 2016 and wish all of our graduates success in their future endeavors. Sincerely, Jeff Goodwin, Ed.D.

AP AB Calculus Course Overview: AP Calculus AB is an algebraic/trigonometric based math course covering Limits, Derivatives, Integration, and extensive applications of those topics as found in real world problems. Much focus is given to modeling and justifying solutions in order to truly understand the underpinnings of calculus. This course is equivalent to all of College Calculus I and part of Calculus II. AP Calculus provides students the opportunity to not just learn but apply calculus concepts to real-world problems. AP Calculus prepares students for college-level math course such as College PreCalculus/Algebra, Calculus I, or Calculus 2 and for business, medical, or engineering paths that require applications of Calculus. Those students who score a qualifying AP score (3 or higher) receive Calculus 1 credit and DeeDee Henderson enter college prepared for Calculus II. AP English Literature/Language and Composition Course Overview: AP Literature and Composition is designed to challenge and prepare students in careful reading and critical analysis at a college or university level. This course is rigorous and will provide students with the intellectual challenges and workload consistent with a typical undergraduate university literature course. As a culmination to the course, students will take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. A score of ‘4’ or ‘5’ on this exam is considered equivalent to a 3.3-4.0 for comparable course at the college or university level. A student who earns a ‘3’ or above on the Holley Harmon Julia Hill Yvette Word exam will be granted college credit at most colleges and universities throughout the United States. AP Physics Course Overview: The AP Physics 1 course is designed to enable a student to develop the ability to reason about physical phenomena using important science process skills such as explaining causal relationships, applying and justifying the use of mathematical routines, designing experiments, analyzing data and making connections across multiple topics; such as, mechanics, dynamics, waves and electricity. The most important benefit of this class is to guide the student to become a critical thinker, apply knowledge in inquiry based labs, and analyze data which will enable the student successful in College Physics, which traditionally has a small percentage of students that pass the Lynne Hammond class the first time they take it. AP Biology

OHS STUDENTS PREPARE FOR COLLEGE IN AP PROGRAM WORDS BY LEIGHTON MCCRIMMON - LAYOUT ASSISTANCE BY CHRIS JARMON

OXFORD, AL - Advanced Placement(AP) classes are designed to challenge and prepare students with a course of study at a college or university level. These courses are rigorous and will provide students with the intellectual challenges and workload consistent with a typical undergraduate university course. Students must learn how to combine ideas from one AP class to another in order to excel in education. AP courses challenge students to work towards the next level of their education by not 40 : OXFORD ACCESS

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only honing their content knowledge but also their time management and study skills while developing critical thinking through challenging issues and problems. The College Board doesn’t have a specific set of criteria to become an AP teacher, but they do recommend that AP teachers take part in some form of professional development prior to teaching AP for the first time. Usually, this is the week-long AP Summer Institute (APSI) where teachers

not only become certified to teach AP courses but also learn how to develop a course syllabus that will ensure the school’s AP course will be accepted and accredited by The College Board. The College Board provides professional development classes for Pre-AP (Honors) teachers whose students will advance to AP courses each year as well. What makes the AP program effective is vertical alignment of curriculum and collaborations between

Kristie Mitchell

Course Overview: AP Biology is an introductory college level biology course that focuses on four big ideas: 1) The process of evolution explaining the diversity and unity of life. 2) Biological systems utilizing free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis. 3) Living systems showing they store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes. 4) Biological systems interact and their interactions possess complex properties. The obvious, of course, is you can receive college credit. However, that is not the only benefit. When colleges look at your transcripts and see AP classes, it makes them take notice that you didn’t just slide by in high school but challenged yourself. Another benefit to taking AP Biology is the type of learning you are challenging yourself with. It is extremely rigorous which helps set the foundation for what to expect in college. It is a great “stepping stone” to college.

AP Environmental Science Course Overview: The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.

Natalie Davis

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grade levels to ensure that Advanced or Honors students are additionally prepared for the intensity of AP courses in their Junior and Senior year of high school. A student should take AP classes because they get to experience a college-level course without having the expense of DE courses and a possible disappointing grade that will be on their college transcript and cause GPA problems their first year in college. AP courses are like a college material experience in your high school with the opportunity to earn college credit at many universities.

OXFORD CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION

A MESSAGE FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION As another school year draws to a close, I am reminded how blessed we are to live in a city like ours where parental and community support for children is a priority. From the breathtaking Choccolocco Park, a world class facility that many of our spring extracurricular activities will now call home, to Student Government Day, a timeless Oxford tradition that allows high school seniors to participate in leadership experiences with Oxford’s elected and appointed officials, our students have a wide variety of opportunities to participate in both wonderful events and venues. During the course of the spring semester I had the pleasure of observing and participating in a new Oxford tradition, our family advisement program. This initiative involving parents, teachers, counselors, and students is a wonderful collaborative effort for students in grades 8-12. lt allows students to develop and give input on their future plans and the courses required to achieve their goals. lt has proven itself to be a vital connection between home, school, and beyond. lt is now an integral part of our partnership between home and school. I was also privileged this spring to attend a City Council meeting when the strong connection between our city and school district was put on display. ln August of 2015, Pat Wayne Shaddix, Professor Emeritus, began developing an Economic lmpact Study for the Oxford City School System. This study, measuring the economic impact the Oxford City School System has on the City of Oxford, calculates the actual monetary value the school district provides for our city. The results of the study conducted over several months demonstrated the close and beneficial relationship enjoyed by the city and school system. According to the document, the school district creates nearly 1,500 jobs outside of the 525 individuals employed by the system and generates 101 million dollars yearly for the City of Oxford. Finally, I would like to congratulate the Class of 2016 and wish all of our graduates success in their future endeavors. Sincerely, Jeff Goodwin, Ed.D.

AP AB Calculus Course Overview: AP Calculus AB is an algebraic/trigonometric based math course covering Limits, Derivatives, Integration, and extensive applications of those topics as found in real world problems. Much focus is given to modeling and justifying solutions in order to truly understand the underpinnings of calculus. This course is equivalent to all of College Calculus I and part of Calculus II. AP Calculus provides students the opportunity to not just learn but apply calculus concepts to real-world problems. AP Calculus prepares students for college-level math course such as College PreCalculus/Algebra, Calculus I, or Calculus 2 and for business, medical, or engineering paths that require applications of Calculus. Those students who score a qualifying AP score (3 or higher) receive Calculus 1 credit and DeeDee Henderson enter college prepared for Calculus II. AP English Literature/Language and Composition Course Overview: AP Literature and Composition is designed to challenge and prepare students in careful reading and critical analysis at a college or university level. This course is rigorous and will provide students with the intellectual challenges and workload consistent with a typical undergraduate university literature course. As a culmination to the course, students will take the Advanced Placement Exam in May. A score of ‘4’ or ‘5’ on this exam is considered equivalent to a 3.3-4.0 for comparable course at the college or university level. A student who earns a ‘3’ or above on the Holley Harmon Julia Hill Yvette Word exam will be granted college credit at most colleges and universities throughout the United States. AP Physics Course Overview: The AP Physics 1 course is designed to enable a student to develop the ability to reason about physical phenomena using important science process skills such as explaining causal relationships, applying and justifying the use of mathematical routines, designing experiments, analyzing data and making connections across multiple topics; such as, mechanics, dynamics, waves and electricity. The most important benefit of this class is to guide the student to become a critical thinker, apply knowledge in inquiry based labs, and analyze data which will enable the student successful in College Physics, which traditionally has a small percentage of students that pass the Lynne Hammond class the first time they take it. AP Biology

OHS STUDENTS PREPARE FOR COLLEGE IN AP PROGRAM WORDS BY LEIGHTON MCCRIMMON - LAYOUT ASSISTANCE BY CHRIS JARMON

OXFORD, AL - Advanced Placement(AP) classes are designed to challenge and prepare students with a course of study at a college or university level. These courses are rigorous and will provide students with the intellectual challenges and workload consistent with a typical undergraduate university course. Students must learn how to combine ideas from one AP class to another in order to excel in education. AP courses challenge students to work towards the next level of their education by not 40 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 40-41

only honing their content knowledge but also their time management and study skills while developing critical thinking through challenging issues and problems. The College Board doesn’t have a specific set of criteria to become an AP teacher, but they do recommend that AP teachers take part in some form of professional development prior to teaching AP for the first time. Usually, this is the week-long AP Summer Institute (APSI) where teachers

not only become certified to teach AP courses but also learn how to develop a course syllabus that will ensure the school’s AP course will be accepted and accredited by The College Board. The College Board provides professional development classes for Pre-AP (Honors) teachers whose students will advance to AP courses each year as well. What makes the AP program effective is vertical alignment of curriculum and collaborations between

Kristie Mitchell

Course Overview: AP Biology is an introductory college level biology course that focuses on four big ideas: 1) The process of evolution explaining the diversity and unity of life. 2) Biological systems utilizing free energy and molecular building blocks to grow, to reproduce, and to maintain dynamic homeostasis. 3) Living systems showing they store, retrieve, transmit, and respond to information essential to life processes. 4) Biological systems interact and their interactions possess complex properties. The obvious, of course, is you can receive college credit. However, that is not the only benefit. When colleges look at your transcripts and see AP classes, it makes them take notice that you didn’t just slide by in high school but challenged yourself. Another benefit to taking AP Biology is the type of learning you are challenging yourself with. It is extremely rigorous which helps set the foundation for what to expect in college. It is a great “stepping stone” to college.

AP Environmental Science Course Overview: The goal of the AP Environmental Science course is to provide students with the scientific principles, concepts, and methodologies required to understand the interrelationships of the natural world, to identify and analyze environmental problems both natural and human-made, to evaluate the relative risks associated with these problems, and to examine alternative solutions for resolving or preventing them.

Natalie Davis

www.oxfordaccess.com : 41

4/28/16 5:45 PM


AP Chemistry Course Overview: Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry is a “hands-on” course using unique techniques to teach inorganic chemistry on a college level. Students will gain an understanding of matter and its changes, and an appreciation of the various ways chemistry affects our lives. Students will also gain skills in problem solving, investigating, interpreting data, communicating, predicting outcomes, chemical safety, and laboratory techniques.

Rachel Poe

AP Statistics Course Overview: The course is an introduction to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Four broad conceptual themes are covered: exploring data by observing patterns, planning a study, anticipating patterns through probability and simulation, and statistical inference. The course is designed to prepare the student to take the Advanced Placement Statistics Examination for college credit, so one may receive college credit if they pass the AP exam. Jennifer Singleton

AP Computer Science Course Overview: The AP Computer Science A course introduces students in computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies, data structures, algorithms, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes on object- oriented programming through the Java language. Students apply their knowledge in assessments and labs where they can connect their interests to their programs. The course is engaging and emphasizes the importance of communicating solutions in ways that are relevant to current societal needs. Krista Mintz

AP Government and Politics/MacroEconomics Course Overview: The benefits and goals of the courses are to produce a more informed and concerned citizen. The courses are designed to teach students about the various economic and political systems and how they function as a pluralistic system of various individual and group interests. Students will be able to display an understanding of economics and the processes of government that help shape public policies.

Thank you Mr. and Mrs. Potts

Julie Whisenant

WORDS BY KIM VIVANCO - DRAWING BY ISABELLA (4TH GRADE)

AP Psychology Course Overview:The central question in this course is: “How do psychologists think?”. The psychologist (and author of our textbook), David Myers, wrote that to think as a psychologist, one must learn to “restrain intuition with critical thinking, judgmentalism with compassion, and illusion with understanding.” (Sernberg, 1997). Whether students choose to pursue a career related to psychology or one in some entirely different field, this habit of mind will be of great value.

Not Pictured David Crunkilton

Caitilin House

Studio Art

Anne Carr

Course Overview: The AP Studio Art program makes it possible for highly motivated high school students to do college-level work. Students are required to submit a portfolio of work, consisting of 24 quality artworks for evaluation at the end of the year, (first week of May) by the College Board. Students entering the AP Art Studio program are expected to be dedicated and serious art students who are willing to invest the time and effort necessary to complete a strong portfolio. When completing the portfolio, student goals should include trying to earn the highest score of a 6, which will ensure them college credit. How much time and dedication the student is willing to invest will determine the final outcome. GROWTH as an artist is guaranteed.

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Oxford City Schools would like to extend deep gratitude to Greg and Cheryl Potts, co-founders of the Potts Children’s Theatre Series, for their generous donation, which provided many students in our school system an opportunity to attend world-class performances in the heart of our city. The Oxford Performing Arts Center hosted over 2880 students this year and the previous year for outstanding fine arts performances. This year our students in Kindergarten through second grade giggled and learned about teamwork while watching the Birmingham Children’s Theatre preform The Little Red Hen. The fall performance of The Reluctant Dragon, a whimsical and imaginative tale, enlightened students grades three through five that things aren’t always what they seem. Middle grade

students tapped their toes and danced in the aisles as The Birmingham Children’s Theater presented Tuxedo Junction, a musical based on the early life of legendary jazz musician, and Birmingham native, Erskine Hawkins. The performance season concluded with an all time favorite Jack in the Beanstalk. Pre-Kindergarten through first-grade students interacted with the characters as Jack confronted the giant to bring home fortune to his poor mother. The generosity of the Potts opened our students’ eyes to world of fine arts and performance. The partnership between the Potts Children’s Theater Series, Oxford Performing Arts Center, and Oxford City Schools is one example of what makes our community second to none. Thanks again Mr. and Mrs. Potts! www.oxfordaccess.com : 43

4/28/16 5:45 PM


AP Chemistry Course Overview: Advanced Placement (AP) Chemistry is a “hands-on” course using unique techniques to teach inorganic chemistry on a college level. Students will gain an understanding of matter and its changes, and an appreciation of the various ways chemistry affects our lives. Students will also gain skills in problem solving, investigating, interpreting data, communicating, predicting outcomes, chemical safety, and laboratory techniques.

Rachel Poe

AP Statistics Course Overview: The course is an introduction to the major concepts and tools for collecting, analyzing, and drawing conclusions from data. Four broad conceptual themes are covered: exploring data by observing patterns, planning a study, anticipating patterns through probability and simulation, and statistical inference. The course is designed to prepare the student to take the Advanced Placement Statistics Examination for college credit, so one may receive college credit if they pass the AP exam. Jennifer Singleton

AP Computer Science Course Overview: The AP Computer Science A course introduces students in computer science with fundamental topics that include problem solving, design strategies, data structures, algorithms, and the ethical and social implications of computing. The course emphasizes on object- oriented programming through the Java language. Students apply their knowledge in assessments and labs where they can connect their interests to their programs. The course is engaging and emphasizes the importance of communicating solutions in ways that are relevant to current societal needs. Krista Mintz

AP Government and Politics/MacroEconomics Course Overview: The benefits and goals of the courses are to produce a more informed and concerned citizen. The courses are designed to teach students about the various economic and political systems and how they function as a pluralistic system of various individual and group interests. Students will be able to display an understanding of economics and the processes of government that help shape public policies.

Thank you Mr. and Mrs. Potts

Julie Whisenant

WORDS BY KIM VIVANCO - DRAWING BY ISABELLA (4TH GRADE)

AP Psychology Course Overview:The central question in this course is: “How do psychologists think?”. The psychologist (and author of our textbook), David Myers, wrote that to think as a psychologist, one must learn to “restrain intuition with critical thinking, judgmentalism with compassion, and illusion with understanding.” (Sernberg, 1997). Whether students choose to pursue a career related to psychology or one in some entirely different field, this habit of mind will be of great value.

Not Pictured David Crunkilton

Caitilin House

Studio Art

Anne Carr

Course Overview: The AP Studio Art program makes it possible for highly motivated high school students to do college-level work. Students are required to submit a portfolio of work, consisting of 24 quality artworks for evaluation at the end of the year, (first week of May) by the College Board. Students entering the AP Art Studio program are expected to be dedicated and serious art students who are willing to invest the time and effort necessary to complete a strong portfolio. When completing the portfolio, student goals should include trying to earn the highest score of a 6, which will ensure them college credit. How much time and dedication the student is willing to invest will determine the final outcome. GROWTH as an artist is guaranteed.

42 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 42-43

Oxford City Schools would like to extend deep gratitude to Greg and Cheryl Potts, co-founders of the Potts Children’s Theatre Series, for their generous donation, which provided many students in our school system an opportunity to attend world-class performances in the heart of our city. The Oxford Performing Arts Center hosted over 2880 students this year and the previous year for outstanding fine arts performances. This year our students in Kindergarten through second grade giggled and learned about teamwork while watching the Birmingham Children’s Theatre preform The Little Red Hen. The fall performance of The Reluctant Dragon, a whimsical and imaginative tale, enlightened students grades three through five that things aren’t always what they seem. Middle grade

students tapped their toes and danced in the aisles as The Birmingham Children’s Theater presented Tuxedo Junction, a musical based on the early life of legendary jazz musician, and Birmingham native, Erskine Hawkins. The performance season concluded with an all time favorite Jack in the Beanstalk. Pre-Kindergarten through first-grade students interacted with the characters as Jack confronted the giant to bring home fortune to his poor mother. The generosity of the Potts opened our students’ eyes to world of fine arts and performance. The partnership between the Potts Children’s Theater Series, Oxford Performing Arts Center, and Oxford City Schools is one example of what makes our community second to none. Thanks again Mr. and Mrs. Potts! www.oxfordaccess.com : 43

4/28/16 5:45 PM


Knitted Knockers Support Foundation. Demorest’s goal was to provide free, accessible, and beautifully made knitted knockers to anyone in need, first in her home town/ county and now in the world. KnittedKnockers.org does this by inspiring and equipping volunteers to make them. The website has free patterns and videos on how to make the knitted knockers. The patterns have been downloaded more than 98,000 times from knitters across the world – including our very own knitting group at the Oxford Public Library.

KNITTING FOR SURVIVORS

WORDS BY: THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT “Sometimes even the smallest things can make the biggest difference”

Every Thursday morning at the Oxford Public Library, one can find a group of women making the lives of breast cancer patients and survivors a little easier. One can find a group that passionately dedicates its time and talent to help those in need. This is a group that cares about the comfort and well-being of perfect strangers. This is a group that makes us proud to be Oxford residents. We all will be exposed to breast cancer at some point in our lives. Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in our nation. At least one in every eight women will be diagnosed with it. You can be healthy all your life. Then, out of nowhere, you get the shocking news and are thrown for a loop. Some feel self conscious. Some feel embarrassed. Most feel scared. You may share the news with your nearest friends and loved ones, adding that you will be reconstructed immediately after your mastectomy. This, however, is not always the case. For Barbara Demorest, Washington resident and founder of KnittedKnockers.org, it was quite the opposite. Due to complications, she had to go with a backup plan which involved an implant and tissue expansion. She was at a loss and did not know what to wear to appear “normal” so that she could return to work. “I called the local cancer society and asked about acquiring a prosthesis,” Demorest said. “Then the woman replied, ‘Oh honey, you can’t put anything on that scar for at least six weeks.’ SIX WEEKS! What was I going to do for six weeks? I had work to get back to and a life to live. That was the first time I cried.” While flipping through a brochure listing various silicone prosthesis at her next medical visit, Demorest’s doctor told her that most women are not very happy with prosthesis solutions as they are hot, heavy, and expensive. “He asked me, ‘Do you knit?’ Well, yes I do. Then, he showed me a picture of a Knitted Knocker and gave me a link to a place where I could get the pattern,” Demorest said. “I took that home and immediately emailed it to my dear friend and super knitter, Phyllis. I told her I was not physically or emotionally able to knit it and asked if she would consider making me one. That same week, Phyllis delivered two beautiful knitted knockers to me. It was fabulous. It was light, pretty, soft, and fit in my own bra perfectly.”

Long-time Oxford resident Pat Yates was asked by the library to head up the knitting group in 2013 and has been there every Thursday since. According to Yates, the library has many great programs for people of all ages and interests. She said, “They have someone helping with crocheting on Mondays, quilting on Wednesdays, and we have about seven to ten women come to our knitting group on Thursdays.” When meeting with Yates and the other knitters, they enthusiastically shared how they first got started. Kristin Reimer, who joined the group to learn how to knit and also to meet some new people after moving here from out-of-state, said it all started last October after purchasing raffle tickets during a breast cancer awareness fundraiser. “In various magazines, I read about groups and organizations around the country making the product for women who have undergone mastectomies, lumpectomies, radiation, or reconstruction to the breast. The group seemed very excited about it and, after looking at patterns and learning more about the cause, decided to use our skills to help women in our local area.”

It did not take long before the group, as the first in Alabama, learned the different patterns and began making the polyester fiber filled knitted knockers. According to Yates and Reimer, there are over one hundred groups in 45 states and 9 countries registered with the Knitted Knockers Support Foundation. Reimer said, “All across the country, there are volunteer knitters and knitting groups shipping the knockers to Washington State. The foundation works with medical centers across the country to provide the product directly to their patients.” In order to help women in our own community, the knitting group got in touch with Steel Magnolias Inc., which is a breast cancer support group providing services and support to breast cancer patients in Calhoun and surrounding counties. The library knitting group provides Steel Magnolias and its Pinks Boutique with the knitted knockers. The boutique offers various items such as wigs, mastectomy bras, and prosthesis for free to breast cancer patients. “It was wonderful when we met with Steel Magnolias and talked to the women there who have undergone mastectomies,” Reimer said. “It warmed our hearts seeing how excited they were about trying out the knitted knockers.”

bringing comfort and dignity to the women of their own communities.” Yates and Demorest agree that no one group can provide for the great worldwide demand of knitted knockers, but that they can do their best to help one community at a time. “I don’t sit down and knit for eight hours straight,” Yates said. “I pick it up and put it down. I am hoping to make a commitment of knitting one pair per week. That would be 52 pairs per year.” According to Yates, everyone is welcome to help with the project. Knitters are invited to join the group on Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. if they would like to or help from home. The knitted knockers can be sent to the foundation or brought to the library. The group would like to thank Steel Magnolias for funding the project, the Oxford Public Library for giving them a space to work and for providing all of the printing, and Linda Boozer, owner of Yarns by HPF, for ordering and winding all of the yarn. If you have any questions about how you can help or if you would like to learn more about the many services and events offered at the Oxford Public Library, please feel free to contact the library staff at (256) 831-1750 or come by in person. The library is located at 110 E 6th Street.

The Knitted Knockers Support Foundation and Knittedknockers.org believe the Oxford knitting group deserves to be recognized for their great work. “We are thrilled to partner with the wonderful knitting group at the Oxford Public Library to provide knitted knockers to the women of Alabama,” Demorest said. “We get really excited when a group commits to

After trying the knitted knockers for the first time, Demorest knew right away that she wanted to make these available to other women going through the same situation. She contacted a young yarn shop owner from Maine who invented the original knitted knockers while battling breast cancer. The woman was no longer able to make them for others and excitedly gave Demorest her blessing to create the 44 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 44-45

www.oxfordaccess.com : 45

4/28/16 5:45 PM


Knitted Knockers Support Foundation. Demorest’s goal was to provide free, accessible, and beautifully made knitted knockers to anyone in need, first in her home town/ county and now in the world. KnittedKnockers.org does this by inspiring and equipping volunteers to make them. The website has free patterns and videos on how to make the knitted knockers. The patterns have been downloaded more than 98,000 times from knitters across the world – including our very own knitting group at the Oxford Public Library.

KNITTING FOR SURVIVORS

WORDS BY: THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT “Sometimes even the smallest things can make the biggest difference”

Every Thursday morning at the Oxford Public Library, one can find a group of women making the lives of breast cancer patients and survivors a little easier. One can find a group that passionately dedicates its time and talent to help those in need. This is a group that cares about the comfort and well-being of perfect strangers. This is a group that makes us proud to be Oxford residents. We all will be exposed to breast cancer at some point in our lives. Breast cancer is the second most common type of cancer in our nation. At least one in every eight women will be diagnosed with it. You can be healthy all your life. Then, out of nowhere, you get the shocking news and are thrown for a loop. Some feel self conscious. Some feel embarrassed. Most feel scared. You may share the news with your nearest friends and loved ones, adding that you will be reconstructed immediately after your mastectomy. This, however, is not always the case. For Barbara Demorest, Washington resident and founder of KnittedKnockers.org, it was quite the opposite. Due to complications, she had to go with a backup plan which involved an implant and tissue expansion. She was at a loss and did not know what to wear to appear “normal” so that she could return to work. “I called the local cancer society and asked about acquiring a prosthesis,” Demorest said. “Then the woman replied, ‘Oh honey, you can’t put anything on that scar for at least six weeks.’ SIX WEEKS! What was I going to do for six weeks? I had work to get back to and a life to live. That was the first time I cried.” While flipping through a brochure listing various silicone prosthesis at her next medical visit, Demorest’s doctor told her that most women are not very happy with prosthesis solutions as they are hot, heavy, and expensive. “He asked me, ‘Do you knit?’ Well, yes I do. Then, he showed me a picture of a Knitted Knocker and gave me a link to a place where I could get the pattern,” Demorest said. “I took that home and immediately emailed it to my dear friend and super knitter, Phyllis. I told her I was not physically or emotionally able to knit it and asked if she would consider making me one. That same week, Phyllis delivered two beautiful knitted knockers to me. It was fabulous. It was light, pretty, soft, and fit in my own bra perfectly.”

Long-time Oxford resident Pat Yates was asked by the library to head up the knitting group in 2013 and has been there every Thursday since. According to Yates, the library has many great programs for people of all ages and interests. She said, “They have someone helping with crocheting on Mondays, quilting on Wednesdays, and we have about seven to ten women come to our knitting group on Thursdays.” When meeting with Yates and the other knitters, they enthusiastically shared how they first got started. Kristin Reimer, who joined the group to learn how to knit and also to meet some new people after moving here from out-of-state, said it all started last October after purchasing raffle tickets during a breast cancer awareness fundraiser. “In various magazines, I read about groups and organizations around the country making the product for women who have undergone mastectomies, lumpectomies, radiation, or reconstruction to the breast. The group seemed very excited about it and, after looking at patterns and learning more about the cause, decided to use our skills to help women in our local area.”

It did not take long before the group, as the first in Alabama, learned the different patterns and began making the polyester fiber filled knitted knockers. According to Yates and Reimer, there are over one hundred groups in 45 states and 9 countries registered with the Knitted Knockers Support Foundation. Reimer said, “All across the country, there are volunteer knitters and knitting groups shipping the knockers to Washington State. The foundation works with medical centers across the country to provide the product directly to their patients.” In order to help women in our own community, the knitting group got in touch with Steel Magnolias Inc., which is a breast cancer support group providing services and support to breast cancer patients in Calhoun and surrounding counties. The library knitting group provides Steel Magnolias and its Pinks Boutique with the knitted knockers. The boutique offers various items such as wigs, mastectomy bras, and prosthesis for free to breast cancer patients. “It was wonderful when we met with Steel Magnolias and talked to the women there who have undergone mastectomies,” Reimer said. “It warmed our hearts seeing how excited they were about trying out the knitted knockers.”

bringing comfort and dignity to the women of their own communities.” Yates and Demorest agree that no one group can provide for the great worldwide demand of knitted knockers, but that they can do their best to help one community at a time. “I don’t sit down and knit for eight hours straight,” Yates said. “I pick it up and put it down. I am hoping to make a commitment of knitting one pair per week. That would be 52 pairs per year.” According to Yates, everyone is welcome to help with the project. Knitters are invited to join the group on Thursdays from 9:30 a.m. to 11:00 a.m. if they would like to or help from home. The knitted knockers can be sent to the foundation or brought to the library. The group would like to thank Steel Magnolias for funding the project, the Oxford Public Library for giving them a space to work and for providing all of the printing, and Linda Boozer, owner of Yarns by HPF, for ordering and winding all of the yarn. If you have any questions about how you can help or if you would like to learn more about the many services and events offered at the Oxford Public Library, please feel free to contact the library staff at (256) 831-1750 or come by in person. The library is located at 110 E 6th Street.

The Knitted Knockers Support Foundation and Knittedknockers.org believe the Oxford knitting group deserves to be recognized for their great work. “We are thrilled to partner with the wonderful knitting group at the Oxford Public Library to provide knitted knockers to the women of Alabama,” Demorest said. “We get really excited when a group commits to

After trying the knitted knockers for the first time, Demorest knew right away that she wanted to make these available to other women going through the same situation. She contacted a young yarn shop owner from Maine who invented the original knitted knockers while battling breast cancer. The woman was no longer able to make them for others and excitedly gave Demorest her blessing to create the 44 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 44-45

www.oxfordaccess.com : 45

4/28/16 5:45 PM


PLACE YOUR ADVERTISEMENT

HERE

CITY OF OXFORD HOSTS STUDENT GOVERNMENT DAY WORDS BY JANET STEPHENS

Please contact Emil Loeken at the Marketing & Public Communications Department for more information. Emil can be reached at 256-241-6668 or emil@oxfordal.us

On Wednesday, April 13, 2016, a group of Oxford High School seniors took over City Government for the day. Student Government Day is an Oxford tradition coordinated between Oxford High School and the City that has been an annual event since the 1960’s. The students participating in Student Government Day ran for the offices of Mayor, Councilmembers, City Department Heads, and school officials, and were elected by the student body. The students toured the new sports complex Choccolocco Park and the Oxford Performing Arts Center, held a Council Meeting, made an arrest, and held Municipal Court. The day ended with lunch hosted by the City of Oxford at Hubbard’s Off Main. The students that participated in this year’s event were: Lott Cates, Mattie Jackson, Chris Jarmon, Alison Chiramonti, Blaize Brimer, Jasmine Keeler, Lauren Findley, Nas Patton, Andrew Pratt, Daniel Lopez, Trey Hopper, Jeremiah Burns, Skyler Alexander, Grace Mitchell, Winter Taylor, Laura Davenport, Dylan Yates, Yari Policarpo, Ronny Issac, Jemesia Calloway, Tarkara Archie, Sara Connell, Ebony Kelley, Luiz Nieto, Chance Adams, Makalia Gidley, Karagan Timmons, Danielle Bentley, Laurel Goldman, Emily Robertson, Bailey McCormick, KJ Reed, Brooke Donaldson, Victoria Cochran, Andy Hammond, Jacob Baker, Riley Thomas, Dillen Miller, Breanna Nolan, Shakayla Alexander, Madison Mintz, Luke Thomas, Cecilia McGuffin, Zach Knighton, and Olivia Humphrey. 46 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 46-47

The goal of Student Government Day is to give Oxford High School students a better understanding of the City’s operations and to encourage them to become involved in local government. It is an event that City officials look forward to each year, and we try to make the day special and filled with wonderful memories for the participants. The students of the Oxford School System are the future leaders of our City. www.oxfordaccess.com : 47

4/28/16 5:46 PM


PLACE YOUR ADVERTISEMENT

HERE

CITY OF OXFORD HOSTS STUDENT GOVERNMENT DAY WORDS BY JANET STEPHENS

Please contact Emil Loeken at the Marketing & Public Communications Department for more information. Emil can be reached at 256-241-6668 or emil@oxfordal.us

On Wednesday, April 13, 2016, a group of Oxford High School seniors took over City Government for the day. Student Government Day is an Oxford tradition coordinated between Oxford High School and the City that has been an annual event since the 1960’s. The students participating in Student Government Day ran for the offices of Mayor, Councilmembers, City Department Heads, and school officials, and were elected by the student body. The students toured the new sports complex Choccolocco Park and the Oxford Performing Arts Center, held a Council Meeting, made an arrest, and held Municipal Court. The day ended with lunch hosted by the City of Oxford at Hubbard’s Off Main. The students that participated in this year’s event were: Lott Cates, Mattie Jackson, Chris Jarmon, Alison Chiramonti, Blaize Brimer, Jasmine Keeler, Lauren Findley, Nas Patton, Andrew Pratt, Daniel Lopez, Trey Hopper, Jeremiah Burns, Skyler Alexander, Grace Mitchell, Winter Taylor, Laura Davenport, Dylan Yates, Yari Policarpo, Ronny Issac, Jemesia Calloway, Tarkara Archie, Sara Connell, Ebony Kelley, Luiz Nieto, Chance Adams, Makalia Gidley, Karagan Timmons, Danielle Bentley, Laurel Goldman, Emily Robertson, Bailey McCormick, KJ Reed, Brooke Donaldson, Victoria Cochran, Andy Hammond, Jacob Baker, Riley Thomas, Dillen Miller, Breanna Nolan, Shakayla Alexander, Madison Mintz, Luke Thomas, Cecilia McGuffin, Zach Knighton, and Olivia Humphrey. 46 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 46-47

The goal of Student Government Day is to give Oxford High School students a better understanding of the City’s operations and to encourage them to become involved in local government. It is an event that City officials look forward to each year, and we try to make the day special and filled with wonderful memories for the participants. The students of the Oxford School System are the future leaders of our City. www.oxfordaccess.com : 47

4/28/16 5:46 PM


UNFORGETTABLE MEMORIES WORDS BY THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT

“If it is black and gold, it is Oxford”

Moving and changing schools can be a challenge to anyone – no matter who you are. Leaving the comfort of your home, community, friends, and fellow classmates seems like a daunting task. Maybe particularly when your new school with its majestic columns looks more like the Washington Congress building, Harvard University Library, or some grand community college. At least that was my expectations before meeting Grace Mitchell – a soon to be proud 2016 graduate of Oxford High School. Mitchell grew up in Dothan, Alabama, where she attended a private school with only 60 students in her grade. Her road to bleeding black & gold and representing the Yellow Jackets athletically and emotionally started a little over three years ago when her father told her they were relocating due to his new job. “When I first walked through the doors at OHS, I became one in a class of 278 students. This could be scary, right? But No! OHS has made me feel like I am somebody. The school system lets everyone feel like an individual and not just a number,” Mitchell shared. “When you look at the school from the outside, it is amazing. It looks beautiful. The people are awesome. The people are friendly. Everyone is so welcoming!” Mitchell recalls her first week being lost in the hallways, not knowing whether she was on the first, second, or third floor. Her new classmates would spot the confusion in her face from afar and ask if she needed help. Mitchell said, “Other students would walk me to my classes. They were really nice and friendly and made my transition moving here very easy.” Softball has always been a big part of Mitchell’s life. After

she moved to Oxford, being part of the school’s team gave her instant lifelong friends. “During season, we basically play tournaments every weekend and the team spends every waking moment together. Then when we get home, we immediately start texting each other,” Mitchell said. “The coaches (Mitchell plays basketball as well) do not just coach from the sidelines or bench or run practices. They care! They care about our academics and goals.” During Mitchell’s junior year, she took five Advanced Placement classes. Combined with this year’s course load, she has accumulated enough college hours to begin her college career as a sophomore. “Our Education Foundation paid for our testing. We are very blessed,” Mitchell said. “I do not know of any other school system in our state that has an education foundation that puts so much faith in its students. Thanks to our great teachers, administrators, staff, and foundation, I have a full tuition scholarship to the University of Alabama. When I first moved here, I was stuck on a lower ACT score, but after taking the ACT preparation class, it increased to 30.” When asked what she will miss the most when graduating on May 17 and moving to Tuscaloosa (where she will study chemical engineering), Mitchell’s face lit up. “I love how the entire city is supporting the school system and cheering on the students whether it is athletics, academic contests, or programs such as robotics,” Mitchell said. “It is awesome going to a football game on a Friday night when the stands are packed out. It is special! I felt the community’s support when we were at the county basketball tournament. As I was warming up on the court, I looked up and saw a huge and loud Oxford section. Go Big O!”

Mitchell explains that if it is black and gold, then it is Oxford. “I didn’t fully understand this whole black and gold thing until the end of my first week here. No matter if you were a freshman or a senior, you proudly wore black and gold. The pride that comes with these two colors is something I will take with me forever.”

GRACE MITCHELL

The closer Mitchell gets to graduation, the easier it is answering why OHS is such a special place and not your typical high school. 48 : OXFORD ACCESS

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From taking discounted AP classes as a junior and senior to playing softball at Choccolocco Park and representing the school at Alabama Girls State, she believes she has understood the true meaning of pride. “It is Oxford! Through academics, athletics, the student body, and community, the black and gold will forever shine.” Congratulations to Grace Mitchell and all other 2016 Oxford High School graduates! www.oxfordaccess.com : 49

4/28/16 5:46 PM


UNFORGETTABLE MEMORIES WORDS BY THE MARKETING DEPARTMENT

“If it is black and gold, it is Oxford”

Moving and changing schools can be a challenge to anyone – no matter who you are. Leaving the comfort of your home, community, friends, and fellow classmates seems like a daunting task. Maybe particularly when your new school with its majestic columns looks more like the Washington Congress building, Harvard University Library, or some grand community college. At least that was my expectations before meeting Grace Mitchell – a soon to be proud 2016 graduate of Oxford High School. Mitchell grew up in Dothan, Alabama, where she attended a private school with only 60 students in her grade. Her road to bleeding black & gold and representing the Yellow Jackets athletically and emotionally started a little over three years ago when her father told her they were relocating due to his new job. “When I first walked through the doors at OHS, I became one in a class of 278 students. This could be scary, right? But No! OHS has made me feel like I am somebody. The school system lets everyone feel like an individual and not just a number,” Mitchell shared. “When you look at the school from the outside, it is amazing. It looks beautiful. The people are awesome. The people are friendly. Everyone is so welcoming!” Mitchell recalls her first week being lost in the hallways, not knowing whether she was on the first, second, or third floor. Her new classmates would spot the confusion in her face from afar and ask if she needed help. Mitchell said, “Other students would walk me to my classes. They were really nice and friendly and made my transition moving here very easy.” Softball has always been a big part of Mitchell’s life. After

she moved to Oxford, being part of the school’s team gave her instant lifelong friends. “During season, we basically play tournaments every weekend and the team spends every waking moment together. Then when we get home, we immediately start texting each other,” Mitchell said. “The coaches (Mitchell plays basketball as well) do not just coach from the sidelines or bench or run practices. They care! They care about our academics and goals.” During Mitchell’s junior year, she took five Advanced Placement classes. Combined with this year’s course load, she has accumulated enough college hours to begin her college career as a sophomore. “Our Education Foundation paid for our testing. We are very blessed,” Mitchell said. “I do not know of any other school system in our state that has an education foundation that puts so much faith in its students. Thanks to our great teachers, administrators, staff, and foundation, I have a full tuition scholarship to the University of Alabama. When I first moved here, I was stuck on a lower ACT score, but after taking the ACT preparation class, it increased to 30.” When asked what she will miss the most when graduating on May 17 and moving to Tuscaloosa (where she will study chemical engineering), Mitchell’s face lit up. “I love how the entire city is supporting the school system and cheering on the students whether it is athletics, academic contests, or programs such as robotics,” Mitchell said. “It is awesome going to a football game on a Friday night when the stands are packed out. It is special! I felt the community’s support when we were at the county basketball tournament. As I was warming up on the court, I looked up and saw a huge and loud Oxford section. Go Big O!”

Mitchell explains that if it is black and gold, then it is Oxford. “I didn’t fully understand this whole black and gold thing until the end of my first week here. No matter if you were a freshman or a senior, you proudly wore black and gold. The pride that comes with these two colors is something I will take with me forever.”

GRACE MITCHELL

The closer Mitchell gets to graduation, the easier it is answering why OHS is such a special place and not your typical high school. 48 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 48-49

From taking discounted AP classes as a junior and senior to playing softball at Choccolocco Park and representing the school at Alabama Girls State, she believes she has understood the true meaning of pride. “It is Oxford! Through academics, athletics, the student body, and community, the black and gold will forever shine.” Congratulations to Grace Mitchell and all other 2016 Oxford High School graduates! www.oxfordaccess.com : 49

4/28/16 5:46 PM


A MESSAGE FROM THE POLICE CHIEF In my last update I gave a brief overview of the progressive steps the Oxford Police Department is taking to enhance our capabilities. I’d like, once again, to reiterate how we are steadily moving the Oxford Police Department in the direction it needs to be. Fiscal year 2016 is an exciting time for our department and our city. We plan to implement new technologies and equipment that will expand our special operation’s capabilities thus enhancing the safety of our officers and our citizens. As we are all aware, the City of Oxford continues to grow at a rapid pace. As a law enforcement agency, we are tasked with ensuring that safety is a priority; not only for our citizens, but the city’s assets as well. As the city implements new features, such as Choccolocco Park, we too must plan accordingly and determine the best and most efficient ways to protect the patrons, equipment, and associated motorists. It is this growth that has spawned these new equipment and facility acquisitions. As we add new equipment to our department, I want to ensure everyone that we are also being good stewards with our appropriations. I realize that under the scrutiny of budgets, we must find ways to save. Many of our acquisitions have been obtained at no cost as we utilize resources which allow use to obtain refurbished, and often new, equipment. It goes without saying that our department must rely on tax dollars to function; however, we remain resourceful and frivolous spending is non-existent. In closing, I want to thank the citizens of Oxford for their continued support. Without it, your police department would not run as effectively as it does. If you have any concerns or questions, please feel free to contact my office at any time. - Chief Bill Partridge

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www.oxfordaccess.com : 51

4/28/16 5:46 PM


A MESSAGE FROM THE POLICE CHIEF In my last update I gave a brief overview of the progressive steps the Oxford Police Department is taking to enhance our capabilities. I’d like, once again, to reiterate how we are steadily moving the Oxford Police Department in the direction it needs to be. Fiscal year 2016 is an exciting time for our department and our city. We plan to implement new technologies and equipment that will expand our special operation’s capabilities thus enhancing the safety of our officers and our citizens. As we are all aware, the City of Oxford continues to grow at a rapid pace. As a law enforcement agency, we are tasked with ensuring that safety is a priority; not only for our citizens, but the city’s assets as well. As the city implements new features, such as Choccolocco Park, we too must plan accordingly and determine the best and most efficient ways to protect the patrons, equipment, and associated motorists. It is this growth that has spawned these new equipment and facility acquisitions. As we add new equipment to our department, I want to ensure everyone that we are also being good stewards with our appropriations. I realize that under the scrutiny of budgets, we must find ways to save. Many of our acquisitions have been obtained at no cost as we utilize resources which allow use to obtain refurbished, and often new, equipment. It goes without saying that our department must rely on tax dollars to function; however, we remain resourceful and frivolous spending is non-existent. In closing, I want to thank the citizens of Oxford for their continued support. Without it, your police department would not run as effectively as it does. If you have any concerns or questions, please feel free to contact my office at any time. - Chief Bill Partridge

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NEW HOME TO CITY DEPARTMENTS BY JOSHUA CRAFT

A new City of Oxford Street Department building and garage are in the final phases of completion. Located adjacent to the current street department and garage site, the new buildings will add a much-needed update to facilities that currently house the City of Oxford’s automotive and street services. The new street department building will house the street department, the building department (which is currently located at Oxford City Hall), and the city engineers. It will increase the number of lifts from two to seven, which includes two lifts that will be able hold the school buses and large trucks that are operated by the street 56 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 56-57

department crews. When asked about the construction, Councilman Mike Henderson said that it is something that has been needed for several years now. “We’ve outgrown the current facilities, especially now since we service the school buses. It will also free up space at the city hall for other departments that have needed more space.” Henderson, who has served on the city council during one of its busiest times of construction, believes that this should be one of the last capital projects the city has to take on for a while. Councilwoman Charlotte Hubbard is also excited about the project. “I am thrilled with the buildings and the environment

in which our employees will now work. Storage space for equipment will allow quick inventory and provide the ability to care for and find tools and materials needed for work.” Garage Foreman Bill Lawley is excited about the new garage as well. He says that since he became the foreman in 2000, Oxford has been in need of more space and equipment, and he is glad that it is finally happening. “We’ll be able to service the city vehicles, large trucks, and buses much quicker than we have been able to. The new garage will improve our turnaround time significantly.”

Architect Cal Munroe of Munroe + Jenkins Architects says that the construction crew has been slightly delayed because of the weather, but there have not been any major problems with the design and the timeline of the project. Munroe says that the buildings will be more functional than the old ones, and they will be covered and will have new gas pumps installed. He also stated that the old street department building will be demolished and paved for vehicle traffic, and the old garage will be refitted and reused for surplus storage.

facilities on Highway 78. Chief Building Inspector Mike Roberts says that he is always happy to see upgrades to city facilities and that the relocation will add value to the different city departments.

One of the substantial changes with the project is that the building department will be moved from the city hall to the new

The project is scheduled to be completed in June 2016.

Vann Hollingsworth, Oxford Street Superintendent, shares in the excitement of new facilities for street department workers. “I’m excited about it,” Hollingsworth says, “and can’t wait to move in and get started.” He says his employees are as excited as he is about the new facilities.

www.oxfordaccess.com : 57

4/28/16 5:46 PM


NEW HOME TO CITY DEPARTMENTS BY JOSHUA CRAFT

A new City of Oxford Street Department building and garage are in the final phases of completion. Located adjacent to the current street department and garage site, the new buildings will add a much-needed update to facilities that currently house the City of Oxford’s automotive and street services. The new street department building will house the street department, the building department (which is currently located at Oxford City Hall), and the city engineers. It will increase the number of lifts from two to seven, which includes two lifts that will be able hold the school buses and large trucks that are operated by the street 56 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 56-57

department crews. When asked about the construction, Councilman Mike Henderson said that it is something that has been needed for several years now. “We’ve outgrown the current facilities, especially now since we service the school buses. It will also free up space at the city hall for other departments that have needed more space.” Henderson, who has served on the city council during one of its busiest times of construction, believes that this should be one of the last capital projects the city has to take on for a while. Councilwoman Charlotte Hubbard is also excited about the project. “I am thrilled with the buildings and the environment

in which our employees will now work. Storage space for equipment will allow quick inventory and provide the ability to care for and find tools and materials needed for work.” Garage Foreman Bill Lawley is excited about the new garage as well. He says that since he became the foreman in 2000, Oxford has been in need of more space and equipment, and he is glad that it is finally happening. “We’ll be able to service the city vehicles, large trucks, and buses much quicker than we have been able to. The new garage will improve our turnaround time significantly.”

Architect Cal Munroe of Munroe + Jenkins Architects says that the construction crew has been slightly delayed because of the weather, but there have not been any major problems with the design and the timeline of the project. Munroe says that the buildings will be more functional than the old ones, and they will be covered and will have new gas pumps installed. He also stated that the old street department building will be demolished and paved for vehicle traffic, and the old garage will be refitted and reused for surplus storage.

facilities on Highway 78. Chief Building Inspector Mike Roberts says that he is always happy to see upgrades to city facilities and that the relocation will add value to the different city departments.

One of the substantial changes with the project is that the building department will be moved from the city hall to the new

The project is scheduled to be completed in June 2016.

Vann Hollingsworth, Oxford Street Superintendent, shares in the excitement of new facilities for street department workers. “I’m excited about it,” Hollingsworth says, “and can’t wait to move in and get started.” He says his employees are as excited as he is about the new facilities.

www.oxfordaccess.com : 57

4/28/16 5:46 PM


OXFORD POLICE DEPARTMENT

MEET

Jake Durham EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT Q&A

Question: What is your title, where did you grow up and go to school? Answer: I am the Executive Officer to the Chief. I have worked at the Oxford Police Department since 2005. I grew up in Cleburne County and attended Cleburne County Schools in Heflin, AL. Question: What made you want to go into law enforcement and how did you first get involved? Answer: Growing up, my father was the Sheriff in Cleburne County. I was easily acclimated into the profession and was always surrounded in the culture. Pubic safety was a way of life in my home. I was always surrounded by those willing to help at a moment’s notice. Fortunately, that lifestyle became so common place that I chose to continue once leaving home. It has been fulfilling to say the least. Question: What is your first memory of law enforcement and what is one of your first memories at OPD? Answer: Some of my first memories of law enforcement came as a child. When I was twelve-years-old, I remember my father having to leave late at nights often. I didn’t fully understand at the time, but always knew he was helping others. This became more apparent as I grew older, of course, but always knew his position and the position of all law enforcement officers was/is demanding. He sacrificed a lot for me and his county back then. It’s safe to say my first memories of law enforcement were of a great man. My first memories of the Oxford Police Department were being overwhelmed by the community’s support of their police 58 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 58-59

department. This facet of our town hasn’t changed, either. I have always been pleased with the people in Oxford as they are willing to stand behind you and help keep safe what we believe in. For the most part, we are all on the same page. Everyone understands our job and rallies around their public safety officials. That was one of the first things that stood out to me about Oxford. Question: What is a typical day like for you? Answer: Having been moved from the Uniformed Division into the Administrative Division, my days now are different than what I was always accustomed to. Nowadays, my schedule is filled with meetings, solving budgetary issues, handling personnel matters, and managing many of the special projects sent down from Chief Partridge. I can, without a doubt, say I love my job. I’ve never been this busy before, but I think my personality and work ethic thrives on the responsibility of ensuring things are taken care of. I’ve traded in my Taser for a city phone and my vest for PC workstation, so it took a little getting used to. Now, however, I have the opportunity to meet with both community and state leaders in hopes of bettering the department and our personnel. Question: How is being in law enforcement rewarding? Answer: Being in law enforcement brings a lot of rewards, and as cliché as this may sound, there is a satisfaction like none other when you sacrifice your well-being to ensure others are safe. When you experience that, when you see the look of another person you have helped, or see the despair of someone who needs you, you will always

need that ability to help someone. Question: What has surprised you the most about working at OPD? Answer: I’m surprised by how quickly the department’s administrators are willing to progress. As employees we rely on our department and city administrators to help lead us in the right direction. The Oxford Police Department is quickly becoming a stand-out agency in our State. I am, again, surprised by how quickly we have progressed to this status. Question: What do you find most challenging working in law enforcement? Answer: With each assignment in the department comes different challenges. An investigator may often handle child abuse cases, a uniformed officer often sees the struggle of a bettered mother, and an administrator has to struggle with knowing everyone is dependent upon them for their needs. The hardest part of this job is knowing you have a responsibility of ensuring those around you are taken care of. Whether a citizen or an employee, you must be willing to fight for the other person and make sure they are safe, well equipped, have the resources they need, or feel comfortable. It’s a huge responsibility of which failure isn’t an option.

organization with dedicated members. Question: What might people be surprised to learn about you? Answer: I have a spirited personality and often give the impression being a cut-up (so I’ve been told by my peers). I do, however, I have a very driven personality. For example, I recently won the Republican nomination for Commissioner in Cleburne County’s runoff election on April 12th, 2016, having obtained %78 of the vote; am passionate about aviation and am attending the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University where I am obtaining my degree in Professional Aeronautics; and am an avid musician having played the guitar and written my own material for many years. Question: What would you tell people who are interested in becoming a police officer? Answer: If you are interested in becoming a law enforcement officer, please understand that you will be required to sacrifice a lot of your time to your respective community. This isn’t a job which allows the benefit of just clocking in and out. You will be required to work long hours and deal with many stressors. You will, however, have one of the most fulfilling careers in the Country. Being a

law enforcement officer you will be held to a higher standard, not only within your professional life, within your personal life as well. You will have prestigious position within your community and your responsibility as representative of the people you serve should greatly outweigh your desire to live a sullied lifestyle. Question: If you weren’t in law enforcement, what would you be doing? Answer: If I wasn’t a peace officer I’d like to think I would be a pilot. I am very passionate about aviation and would enjoy flying helicopters on a daily basis. I think being a medivac pilot would suit me well. Question: What do you do when you are not working? Answer: I have three small children and I enjoy being with them. With three little one it’s hard to get out often, so we mainly play ball together or walk our property in Cleburne County. Question: What three words would you use to describe OPD? Answer: Professional; Loyal; Progressive Question: What is your wish list for the next 5-10 years? Answer: Within the next 5 or 10 years I would like to build upon the capabilities of the department’s Aviation Unit. Having this resource is great asset to the City of Oxford as well as East-Central Alabama. Our aircraft, a Bell 206B3, is very capable general observation platform. I would, however, like to build upon this and expand our capabilities and provide our citizens with a rescue and deployment platform as well. Question: Favorite movie, book, music, TV show, sport, holiday, tradition? Answer: My favorite movie is Shawshank Redemption. I’m very versatile in my music but anything acoustic is fine. My Favorite TV show is Modern Marvels. My favorite sport is Golf. My favorite holiday is Christmas.

Question: What do you wish people knew about OPD? Answer: I hope people understand that we work hard, are professional, and give our best every day. The role of an Oxford Police Officer extends well beyond having a job. We are here for our community unequivocally with no hesitation to fight for this community’s safety. We are a professional www.oxfordaccess.com : 59

4/28/16 5:46 PM


OXFORD POLICE DEPARTMENT

MEET

Jake Durham EMPLOYEE SPOTLIGHT Q&A

Question: What is your title, where did you grow up and go to school? Answer: I am the Executive Officer to the Chief. I have worked at the Oxford Police Department since 2005. I grew up in Cleburne County and attended Cleburne County Schools in Heflin, AL. Question: What made you want to go into law enforcement and how did you first get involved? Answer: Growing up, my father was the Sheriff in Cleburne County. I was easily acclimated into the profession and was always surrounded in the culture. Pubic safety was a way of life in my home. I was always surrounded by those willing to help at a moment’s notice. Fortunately, that lifestyle became so common place that I chose to continue once leaving home. It has been fulfilling to say the least. Question: What is your first memory of law enforcement and what is one of your first memories at OPD? Answer: Some of my first memories of law enforcement came as a child. When I was twelve-years-old, I remember my father having to leave late at nights often. I didn’t fully understand at the time, but always knew he was helping others. This became more apparent as I grew older, of course, but always knew his position and the position of all law enforcement officers was/is demanding. He sacrificed a lot for me and his county back then. It’s safe to say my first memories of law enforcement were of a great man. My first memories of the Oxford Police Department were being overwhelmed by the community’s support of their police 58 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 58-59

department. This facet of our town hasn’t changed, either. I have always been pleased with the people in Oxford as they are willing to stand behind you and help keep safe what we believe in. For the most part, we are all on the same page. Everyone understands our job and rallies around their public safety officials. That was one of the first things that stood out to me about Oxford. Question: What is a typical day like for you? Answer: Having been moved from the Uniformed Division into the Administrative Division, my days now are different than what I was always accustomed to. Nowadays, my schedule is filled with meetings, solving budgetary issues, handling personnel matters, and managing many of the special projects sent down from Chief Partridge. I can, without a doubt, say I love my job. I’ve never been this busy before, but I think my personality and work ethic thrives on the responsibility of ensuring things are taken care of. I’ve traded in my Taser for a city phone and my vest for PC workstation, so it took a little getting used to. Now, however, I have the opportunity to meet with both community and state leaders in hopes of bettering the department and our personnel. Question: How is being in law enforcement rewarding? Answer: Being in law enforcement brings a lot of rewards, and as cliché as this may sound, there is a satisfaction like none other when you sacrifice your well-being to ensure others are safe. When you experience that, when you see the look of another person you have helped, or see the despair of someone who needs you, you will always

need that ability to help someone. Question: What has surprised you the most about working at OPD? Answer: I’m surprised by how quickly the department’s administrators are willing to progress. As employees we rely on our department and city administrators to help lead us in the right direction. The Oxford Police Department is quickly becoming a stand-out agency in our State. I am, again, surprised by how quickly we have progressed to this status. Question: What do you find most challenging working in law enforcement? Answer: With each assignment in the department comes different challenges. An investigator may often handle child abuse cases, a uniformed officer often sees the struggle of a bettered mother, and an administrator has to struggle with knowing everyone is dependent upon them for their needs. The hardest part of this job is knowing you have a responsibility of ensuring those around you are taken care of. Whether a citizen or an employee, you must be willing to fight for the other person and make sure they are safe, well equipped, have the resources they need, or feel comfortable. It’s a huge responsibility of which failure isn’t an option.

organization with dedicated members. Question: What might people be surprised to learn about you? Answer: I have a spirited personality and often give the impression being a cut-up (so I’ve been told by my peers). I do, however, I have a very driven personality. For example, I recently won the Republican nomination for Commissioner in Cleburne County’s runoff election on April 12th, 2016, having obtained %78 of the vote; am passionate about aviation and am attending the Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University where I am obtaining my degree in Professional Aeronautics; and am an avid musician having played the guitar and written my own material for many years. Question: What would you tell people who are interested in becoming a police officer? Answer: If you are interested in becoming a law enforcement officer, please understand that you will be required to sacrifice a lot of your time to your respective community. This isn’t a job which allows the benefit of just clocking in and out. You will be required to work long hours and deal with many stressors. You will, however, have one of the most fulfilling careers in the Country. Being a

law enforcement officer you will be held to a higher standard, not only within your professional life, within your personal life as well. You will have prestigious position within your community and your responsibility as representative of the people you serve should greatly outweigh your desire to live a sullied lifestyle. Question: If you weren’t in law enforcement, what would you be doing? Answer: If I wasn’t a peace officer I’d like to think I would be a pilot. I am very passionate about aviation and would enjoy flying helicopters on a daily basis. I think being a medivac pilot would suit me well. Question: What do you do when you are not working? Answer: I have three small children and I enjoy being with them. With three little one it’s hard to get out often, so we mainly play ball together or walk our property in Cleburne County. Question: What three words would you use to describe OPD? Answer: Professional; Loyal; Progressive Question: What is your wish list for the next 5-10 years? Answer: Within the next 5 or 10 years I would like to build upon the capabilities of the department’s Aviation Unit. Having this resource is great asset to the City of Oxford as well as East-Central Alabama. Our aircraft, a Bell 206B3, is very capable general observation platform. I would, however, like to build upon this and expand our capabilities and provide our citizens with a rescue and deployment platform as well. Question: Favorite movie, book, music, TV show, sport, holiday, tradition? Answer: My favorite movie is Shawshank Redemption. I’m very versatile in my music but anything acoustic is fine. My Favorite TV show is Modern Marvels. My favorite sport is Golf. My favorite holiday is Christmas.

Question: What do you wish people knew about OPD? Answer: I hope people understand that we work hard, are professional, and give our best every day. The role of an Oxford Police Officer extends well beyond having a job. We are here for our community unequivocally with no hesitation to fight for this community’s safety. We are a professional www.oxfordaccess.com : 59

4/28/16 5:46 PM


ON THE RANGE WITH DOUG Get Your Putting Ready for the 2016 Season We have all heard the saying “Drive for Show and Putt for Dough” when discussing the game of golf. I feel that too many players focus on how far they can hit the ball and then forget to work on the most important part of the game. Research has shown that over 66% of strokes counted on a scorecard are from 100 yards from the green, and on the green. In my years of experience teaching the game I have seen more people miss puts from 15 feet and in to the hole. This is what I call the “Go Zone.” The “Go Zone” is an area that all of us should feel confident in making the putt. It shouldn’t matter if the putt is straight or a breaking putt, we should all feel that the putt can be made. This confidence comes from one thing….PRACTICE! There are two drills that I have used in the past that have helped me develop a stronger confidence in my putting within fifteen feet of the hole. I call them The “All Around the World Drill” and “The Concentration Backbreaker Drill.” The All Around the World Drill With this drill you are going to practice puts from around the hole. I like to start with a distance of four feet from the hole. Get 10-12 balls and place them in a four foot circle around the hole. Place a tee in the ground next the ball where you decide to start. The object of the drill is to make it all around the world (The Golf Hole) without missing a putt. If you miss a putt along the way you must go back to the original spot and start over. Once you are done 60 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 60-61

with a four foot circle continue to move further from the hole to work on the longer putts. This does take time and discipline, but it will help you develop confidence in your shorter putts and help lower your scores. The Concentration Backbreaker Drill This is a very tough, demanding drill that can be very, very rewarding when mastered. Get fifteen golf balls and find a fairly flat putt. Place three golf balls at different lengths from the hole. (Try 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 feet.) Start at the three foot mark and make all three putts in a row. Once done move to the six foot mark and make all of those in a row. Continue this process until you have made all fifteen putts in a row. If you miss one at six feet you have to start over back at three feet and work your way out. The key to being successful with this drill is to take your time, go through your routine, and make each putt count. If you make all fifteen putts you will feel a huge sense of accomplishment and will be more confident in the putting aspect of your game. By the way, the word backbreaker is in the drill name due to the fact your back will be very tired when you are done. I hope that these two drills will help you perfect your putting game as we get going for the 2016 season. As always you can contact me to help with this or any part of your game. We look forward to seeing you at Cider Ridge Golf Club!

www.oxfordaccess.com : 61

4/28/16 5:46 PM


ON THE RANGE WITH DOUG Get Your Putting Ready for the 2016 Season We have all heard the saying “Drive for Show and Putt for Dough” when discussing the game of golf. I feel that too many players focus on how far they can hit the ball and then forget to work on the most important part of the game. Research has shown that over 66% of strokes counted on a scorecard are from 100 yards from the green, and on the green. In my years of experience teaching the game I have seen more people miss puts from 15 feet and in to the hole. This is what I call the “Go Zone.” The “Go Zone” is an area that all of us should feel confident in making the putt. It shouldn’t matter if the putt is straight or a breaking putt, we should all feel that the putt can be made. This confidence comes from one thing….PRACTICE! There are two drills that I have used in the past that have helped me develop a stronger confidence in my putting within fifteen feet of the hole. I call them The “All Around the World Drill” and “The Concentration Backbreaker Drill.” The All Around the World Drill With this drill you are going to practice puts from around the hole. I like to start with a distance of four feet from the hole. Get 10-12 balls and place them in a four foot circle around the hole. Place a tee in the ground next the ball where you decide to start. The object of the drill is to make it all around the world (The Golf Hole) without missing a putt. If you miss a putt along the way you must go back to the original spot and start over. Once you are done 60 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 60-61

with a four foot circle continue to move further from the hole to work on the longer putts. This does take time and discipline, but it will help you develop confidence in your shorter putts and help lower your scores. The Concentration Backbreaker Drill This is a very tough, demanding drill that can be very, very rewarding when mastered. Get fifteen golf balls and find a fairly flat putt. Place three golf balls at different lengths from the hole. (Try 3, 6, 9, 12 and 15 feet.) Start at the three foot mark and make all three putts in a row. Once done move to the six foot mark and make all of those in a row. Continue this process until you have made all fifteen putts in a row. If you miss one at six feet you have to start over back at three feet and work your way out. The key to being successful with this drill is to take your time, go through your routine, and make each putt count. If you make all fifteen putts you will feel a huge sense of accomplishment and will be more confident in the putting aspect of your game. By the way, the word backbreaker is in the drill name due to the fact your back will be very tired when you are done. I hope that these two drills will help you perfect your putting game as we get going for the 2016 season. As always you can contact me to help with this or any part of your game. We look forward to seeing you at Cider Ridge Golf Club!

www.oxfordaccess.com : 61

4/28/16 5:46 PM


UPDATE FROM THE LIBRARY DIRECTOR OPENING HOURS Monday 9:00 – 5:30 Tuesday 10:30 – 7:00 Wednesday 9:00 – 5:30 Thursday 9:00 – 5:30 Friday 8:00 – 4:30

I am proud to share three of the many services that the Oxford P ublic L ibrary is offering to our community. Knowledge is important and comes in many forms; w e hope to give you the opportunity to both expand and share your own knowledge.

WORDS BY AMY HENDERSON

62 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 62-63

TED Talks are short, web-based seminars that feature discussions on TED (Technology, Education, and Design) topics. The Oxford Library has partnered with TED to feature TED Talks at our library. Library patrons can come on Mondays at 1:00 to learn about a topic, and we will follow up with a lively discussion. This is a wonderful way to learn new things. The discussion leaders are heads of industries or sciences from around the world, and they are extraordinarily fascinating. Because TED Talks are designed to broaden our knowledge, different viewpoints are essential to its success. Join us to broaden your viewpoint and share your experiences. Would you or someone you know benefit from some training with Computer, Business, or Safety courses? OPL provides a way for our patrons to update their skills via online courses in those three areas. Knowledge City offers over 8,000 courses to boost your résumé or expand your comfort zone of knowledge. Each course provides a certificate upon completion. Ask anyone on the library’s staff about how to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity, or check out

our website. You may use Knowledge City on any computer with internet access, including the library’s computers if you don’t have one at home. There is never a charge for this service. I view it as a tremendous benefit to our community, and I hope you take full advantage of it! OPL will also offer ESL (English as a Second Language) classes at the library on Tuesdays at 5:45 from April 26th through May 17th. Cursos permitirán a los residentes que no son hablantes nativos de inglés a que tengan un recurso para aprender inglés mejor. Todos los martes a las 5:45pm del 26 de Abril hasta el 17 de Mayo. Por favor llame a la biblioteca para inscribirse en esta clase gratis. These offerings are new to our library, and I hope you find them useful and interesting. Your feedback is always welcome, as we base our services on your needs and requests. If you have a suggestion, question, or comment about our services, please feel free to let me know your opinion; it is always welcome!

CITY OF OXFORD ROADWAY PROJECTS WORDS BY RUSTY V. GANN, P.E. It is an honor to serve you as the City of Oxford’s first engineer! I want to provide you all a brief summary of some of our upcoming construction projects. As many of you have probably noticed, Boiling Springs Rd has been relocated to the North in order to line up with the Choccolocco Park entrance and create a 4-way intersection. A traffic signal has been installed at the new intersection. This was done in an effort to make the traffic flow around Choccolocco Park safer and more efficient. Our Main Street revitalization project will begin later this year. Utility relocation is already under construction. This project will give a new look to our downtown area as well as make the area safer. The addition of pedestrian lighting, new sidewalks, new traffic signals and street lighting will give downtown a welcoming atmosphere for our citizens and visitors to enjoy safely. Road construction work will soon begin in the Pinewood Subdivision. This work will be done in order to correct the subgrade

settlement over the sanitary sewer lines in this area. This will be a labor intensive project as well as a lengthy one. We thank you in advance for your understanding and cooperation. As with all roadway construction projects, there will be some inconvenience but the final product will be worth it. Above, you can see a map showing the location of this work. Later in the year, we hope to have construction underway along Snow Street. This project will consist of improving the storm drainage along Snow Street in order to alleviate localized flooding and repaving Snow Street. This letter is just a brief synopsis intended to keep our citizens up to speed with road projects in our city. For more real-time updates, road closures, job openings and other important information, please follow us on Facebook.com, search City of Oxford Department of Public Works. www.oxfordaccess.com : 63

4/28/16 5:46 PM


UPDATE FROM THE LIBRARY DIRECTOR OPENING HOURS Monday 9:00 – 5:30 Tuesday 10:30 – 7:00 Wednesday 9:00 – 5:30 Thursday 9:00 – 5:30 Friday 8:00 – 4:30

I am proud to share three of the many services that the Oxford P ublic L ibrary is offering to our community. Knowledge is important and comes in many forms; w e hope to give you the opportunity to both expand and share your own knowledge.

WORDS BY AMY HENDERSON

62 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford Access_vol1_issue2_pg1-64.indd 62-63

TED Talks are short, web-based seminars that feature discussions on TED (Technology, Education, and Design) topics. The Oxford Library has partnered with TED to feature TED Talks at our library. Library patrons can come on Mondays at 1:00 to learn about a topic, and we will follow up with a lively discussion. This is a wonderful way to learn new things. The discussion leaders are heads of industries or sciences from around the world, and they are extraordinarily fascinating. Because TED Talks are designed to broaden our knowledge, different viewpoints are essential to its success. Join us to broaden your viewpoint and share your experiences. Would you or someone you know benefit from some training with Computer, Business, or Safety courses? OPL provides a way for our patrons to update their skills via online courses in those three areas. Knowledge City offers over 8,000 courses to boost your résumé or expand your comfort zone of knowledge. Each course provides a certificate upon completion. Ask anyone on the library’s staff about how to take advantage of this wonderful opportunity, or check out

our website. You may use Knowledge City on any computer with internet access, including the library’s computers if you don’t have one at home. There is never a charge for this service. I view it as a tremendous benefit to our community, and I hope you take full advantage of it! OPL will also offer ESL (English as a Second Language) classes at the library on Tuesdays at 5:45 from April 26th through May 17th. Cursos permitirán a los residentes que no son hablantes nativos de inglés a que tengan un recurso para aprender inglés mejor. Todos los martes a las 5:45pm del 26 de Abril hasta el 17 de Mayo. Por favor llame a la biblioteca para inscribirse en esta clase gratis. These offerings are new to our library, and I hope you find them useful and interesting. Your feedback is always welcome, as we base our services on your needs and requests. If you have a suggestion, question, or comment about our services, please feel free to let me know your opinion; it is always welcome!

CITY OF OXFORD ROADWAY PROJECTS WORDS BY RUSTY V. GANN, P.E. It is an honor to serve you as the City of Oxford’s first engineer! I want to provide you all a brief summary of some of our upcoming construction projects. As many of you have probably noticed, Boiling Springs Rd has been relocated to the North in order to line up with the Choccolocco Park entrance and create a 4-way intersection. A traffic signal has been installed at the new intersection. This was done in an effort to make the traffic flow around Choccolocco Park safer and more efficient. Our Main Street revitalization project will begin later this year. Utility relocation is already under construction. This project will give a new look to our downtown area as well as make the area safer. The addition of pedestrian lighting, new sidewalks, new traffic signals and street lighting will give downtown a welcoming atmosphere for our citizens and visitors to enjoy safely. Road construction work will soon begin in the Pinewood Subdivision. This work will be done in order to correct the subgrade

settlement over the sanitary sewer lines in this area. This will be a labor intensive project as well as a lengthy one. We thank you in advance for your understanding and cooperation. As with all roadway construction projects, there will be some inconvenience but the final product will be worth it. Above, you can see a map showing the location of this work. Later in the year, we hope to have construction underway along Snow Street. This project will consist of improving the storm drainage along Snow Street in order to alleviate localized flooding and repaving Snow Street. This letter is just a brief synopsis intended to keep our citizens up to speed with road projects in our city. For more real-time updates, road closures, job openings and other important information, please follow us on Facebook.com, search City of Oxford Department of Public Works. www.oxfordaccess.com : 63

4/28/16 5:46 PM


BOOK REVIEW WORDS BY TINA ADAMS, OPL

One mark of a good book is that once you start it, you cannot put it down. It draws you in and consumes you. It makes you laugh and cry, and it stays with you once it is over. The book Me Before You by Jojo Moyes was one of those books. The book was brought to my attention at my monthly book club at Oxford Public Library. One of the lovely ladies there suggested this book. When I started this book, I was quickly drawn in. Meet Louisa, a young, quirky, free-spirited girl, but not without her own set of problems. After losing her job at the local café where she had worked for six years, she found herself looking for a job. She applied for a job as a companion to a man that was a quadriplegic. Enter Will, a successful lawyer from a rich family that lived life to the fullest globetrotting around the world. In a blink of an eye, a tragic accident changed his world entirely. I immediately fell in love with Louisa. She lives with her family who are quite close, noisy, and dysfunctional (I love stories with dysfunctional families; don’t we all have them?) When Louise and Will meet, he is stubborn, boorish, has a chip on his shoulder, and quite frankly, repugnant to be around. Louisa learns, though, that the real reason she is hired to become his companion, is because Will had already attempted suicide once. He made a deal with his parents that he would give them six more months to think about wanting to end his life. After the six months, if he still wanted to end his life, his parents would take him to Switzerland where they do legally assisted suicide. As Louise and Will spend countless hours together, they learn to know each other. Louise makes it her mission to show Will that his life is worth living despite his frailties. Through their hours together, they slowly grow closer and she is able to chip away at some of his anger and heartache. In return, Will is able to show Louisa just how special a person she is. A bond is formed and you find yourself rooting for them both. This book was one of my favorites that I read last year. It is still my go-to book when someone needs a book recommendation. My greatest joy is when my patrons come back to me and say, “Oh my gosh, best book EVER! It made me ugly-cry!” This is a book that will stay with you for days. Get your tissues ready—preferably a whole box.

Eerie Elementary by Jack Chabert and Sam Ricks I liked this series because a boy like me saved the day. A boy tries to save all of the students from being eaten by the school. He finds out what the school's secret is w ith his friends. The school gets very mad and tries to flush them down the drain. I like Sam because he is similar to me. He gets in trouble at school for the same things I do... talking when I am not supposed to in class. --Kenneth, age 7 64 : OXFORD ACCESS

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