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Oxford

ACCESS

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1

A Field of Dreams A League of Our Own hits a home run in Oxford! - Pg. 10

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WELCOME TO OXFORD A LETTER FROM MAYOR LEON SMITH On behalf of the City Council and myself, it gives me great pleasure to welcome you to the City of Oxford. Whether you are a resident of Oxford or just visiting for a while, we hope that you enjoy all that we have to offer. Oxford is a growing City. Our residents are active in all that’s happening in our town and are quick to help neighbors and guests. There is hardly a time when Oxford residents go out – whether it is to a public park or one of our many shopping or dining establishments – and don’t see someone they know. I am positive that you will see our residents waving to each other – you may even see them striking up a conversation – wherever you go in the city. As Mayor of Oxford, it has been an honor to have played a part in growing our city from a quiet town to a bustling enterprise. It is especially exciting for me to see that we are still evolving and making improvements to our city, which is why I am happy to introduce the Access Magazine. This magazine will give you access to Oxford like you have never had before, and will keep residents and visitors “in the loop” on what is happening in Oxford. Along with that, Oxford Access is giving you a master calendar of all city-sponsored events and activities from each department, and we hope that you will use that calendar to stay up-to-date. There are also some interesting articles in the magazine, so please take time to read and find out more about Oxford and its residents. I have been honored to serve the citizens of Oxford as Mayor for over three decades, and I am looking forward to seeing what is in store for us. Our great city has big ideas, big arts, big events, and now, big technology, which is what truly makes Oxford the “Crossroads of the Future.” Welcome to Oxford Access!

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CONTENTS

VOLUME 1, ISSUE 1 Oxford Access

EDITORS Joshua Craft Amy Henderson Emil Loeken John Longshore GRAPHIC DESIGNERS Emil Loeken John Longshore ADVISOR John Childs Oxford Access Magazine is published by the City of Oxford Marketing and Public Communications Department: P.O. Box 3383, Oxford, AL, 36203.

10 A FIELD OF DREAMS 18 A NEW PARK IN OXFORD 24 A HOME RUN 44 EVENT CALENDARS 18

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phone: (256) 241-6668 email: emil@oxfordal.us web: oxfordaccess.com

48 ON THE RANGE WITH DOUG 55 EARLY OXFORD HISTORY 58 SUCCESS STORY 63 SOFTBALL REGISTRATION 55

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athletics, and most importantly – a comprehensive calendar letting you know about the many programs and events offered in the city. Our ultimate goal is for the city and its leadership to grow closer to the people we serve. We want to get to know you and vice versa. In most magazine issues, you will be introduced to some of the employees striving to make this community the first-rate place you want it to be.

Greetings from the all new Marketing and Public Communications Department! It is an exciting time here in the City of Oxford and I am honored to welcome you to the very first issue of the Oxford Access Magazine! I couldn’t be more thrilled about getting to this point – with you holding this 64-page publication in your hands. Putting together the Oxford Access Magazine, or simply “Oxford Access,” has been a joint effort of dedicated city employees, our elected officials, and proud Oxford residents. The final product is something the city is confident will help create dialogue and improve the way we, as a municipal government, communicate with our residents and other key audiences. Oxford Access is a free quarterly publication. You do not have to subscribe to it; just look for it in your mailbox quarterly. We will write about a wide range of topics, doing our best to provide relevant content for people of all ages and interests. We wish to give the readers a great experience, whether that is through human interest stories, quarterly updates from key city officials, safety tips, event reports, picture galleries, student highlights,

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The Marketing and Public Communications Department is also launching a fully mobile-optimized website (www.oxfordaccess.com) to go along with the magazine. The website will serve as a news hub where you can find all news and press releases, feature articles, human interest stories, entertaining video and picture galleries, interactive city-wide event calendars, city resources, and more. The site is multifunctional and will serve many different purposes. We are especially excited about inviting you to complete various online surveys. Your feedback is important to us and we will continuously look for ways to incorporate your ideas and suggestions. Throughout the year, you will also see various other city websites redesigned. Our goal is for all of our communication outlets be user-friendly, interactive, and quality resources for you to obtain the information you need. We encourage you to use this as a tool and to access the various services provided by the city. Your city strives to serve you in the best way possible, and the Oxford Access Magazine is one way to do that. Sincerely,

Emil Loeken Director of Marketing & Public Communications


CONTACT INFO Oxford City Hall houses the mayor’s office, finance department, building department, city clerk’s office, and the council chambers. Here you can pay for your business licenses, get building permits, attend council meetings, and even obtain voter registration forms.

MAYOR’S OFFICE: 256-831-7510 FINANCE DEPARTMENT: 256-832-1561 BUILDING DEPARTMENT: 256-835-6146 CITY CLERK: 256-835-6100 CITY ENGINEER: 256-835-6132

Hours of operation for the city hall are Monday-Friday 8:00-4:30. Stop in and see what our city has to offer at Oxford City Hall!

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INTRODUCING THE

OXFORD CITY COUNCIL PHOTOGRAPHY BY NATHAN GOBER

PICTURED FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: STEVEN WAITS, MIKE HENDERSON, CHARLOTTE HUBBARD, CHRIS SPURLIN, PHIL GARDNER PLACE 1 : PHIL GARDNER

Phil has served on the city council since 2008. He is employed by Southern Pipe and Supply, where he is the manager. He has served actively in his community, volunteering as a football and baseball coach, is a member of the Oxford Quarterback Club, and is a member of Lakeview Baptist Church. PLACE 2 : CHARLOTTE HUBBARD

Charlotte has served on the city council since 2012. She is a retired teacher and principal from the Oxford School System and is now owner of Hubbard’s Off Main, a restaurant in downtown Oxford. Councilwoman Hubbard is actively involved in the Oxford Main Street Project, Quest Club, and a longtime member of First Baptist Church of Oxford. PLACE 3 : MIKE HENDERSON

Mike was elected to the council in 2000, 2004, and 2012. He was the first president of the Oxford City Council, and is also the city president of Farmers and Merchants Bank. He is a member of the Oxford Kiwanis Club, Oxford Quarterback Club, and is active at Lakeview Baptist Church. PLACE 4 : CHRIS SPURLIN

Chris has served on the city council since 2008, and was council president from 2008-2012. A former Oxford Police Officer, Spurlin is now the associate pastor and youth minister at Lakeview Baptist Church, is a chaplain for the Oxford Fire Department, and has served on the Calhoun Baptist Youth Ministers’ Committee. PLACE 5 : STEVEN WAITS

Steven has served on the city council since 2004, and is currently the council president. He is the Chief Clinical Officer for Alacare Home Health and Hospice. Councilman Waits has volunteered as youth sports coach, and has served on the board for Oxford EMS. He is a member of Edgewood Church. 6 : OXFORD ACCESS


GET A BUSINESS LICENSE

GET A BUILDING SERVICES DEPARTMENT PERMIT

Anyone engaging in business in the City of Oxford must purchase a business license. Business owners may pick up a business license application at Oxford City Hall, or they may print an application from the City website, www.oxfordalabama.org. For information regarding license fees and requirements, please contact the Finance Department at 256-831-3183.

Before you have any work done at your property, check with the building services department to see if a permit is required. Before doing business with any contractor, HVAC, Builder, Plumber, Electrician, Roofer etc., make sure they have a State License and a City of Oxford Business license and insurance before doing business with them. If you are not sure as to what licensing to look for, feel free to contact us at 256-831-9685.

GET A LIBRARY CARD To get a library card at the Oxford Public Library, you will need the following: A valid Driver’s License or up-to-date picture ID; a local phone number; proof of residence (a current utility bill or recent postmarked mail); name and local phone number of a reference (someone to leave a message with); until age 16, a parent must accompany and sign for the child.

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NEW LIFE

FOR DOWNTOWN OXFORD WORDS BY JOHN LONGSHORE PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMIL LOEKEN

The Downtown Oxford area is set to be transformed into a walkable district with a strong focus on arts & culture, history, local food, and unique shopping under a recently approved plan. The city’s vision for an engaging downtown area centers around the intersection of Main Street and Choccolocco Street and radiates out about a block in each direction.
 Last year, Oxford became a part of the Main Street Alabama project. With the guidance provided by Main Street Alabama, Oxford is pursuing renewed life for its downtown. The city’s path ahead is directed at building momentum for entrepreneurial opportunity, attracting new merchants and residents, and developing a draw for visitors. Charlotte Hubbard, Oxford councilwoman and downtown business owner, said “There needs to be new life in the heart of the city. We want a special atmosphere that makes the historic core of Oxford unique in comparison to what other cities and towns offer.” During the early planning phases, a series of focus group sessions were held. Those sessions, administered by Main Street Alabama, brought to the surface a number of ideas and concerns about what downtown is today and where it is headed. For example, the group discussed the installation of custom-designed wayfinding signage. The signage, now a key part of the project, will be placed downtown to direct visitors to the various attractions in the district such as the Performing Arts Center, Simmons Park, and the historic Oxford Train Depot. To get the work underway, the Oxford City Council contracted with the architectural firm of Goodwyn, Mills, and Cawood to begin the extensive design process. Keith Strickland, a designer with the firm, is excited to be a part of transforming the downtown. “We are working on plans for new concrete sidewalks with brick accents, decorative pedestrian lighting, decorative traffic signals with mast arms and beautiful landscaping. This project will give a totally new and dynamic feel to the area,” said Strickland. The first phase will include work designed to hide the web of utility lines and power poles that city leaders and business owners say hinder their plans to transform the area into an arts and small business hub for the region. Utility companies, including Alabama Power, AT&T, Cable One, and Alagasco have already started the relocation coordination. The relocation process of moving decades-old poles on Main and Choccolocco Streets to the alleyways behind the businesses should take place throughout 2016. The more extensive second phase will involve replacing sidewalks, installing lighting, placing new street furnishings, and creating streetscapes with new landscaping. Councilman Mike Henderson said, “Downtown will soon become another area in our city of which Oxford citizens can be proud. In addition to our new and improved city parks, Performing Arts Center, and retail attractions, a renewed downtown will further enhance Oxford as the major destination for commerce, recreation, shopping, and entertainment in the region.”

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AARON SEXTON

Revenue Analyst and Grants Manager, City of Oxford Aaron Sexton, a lifelong resident of Oxford, has been working at the city hall since 2006. From counting houses in the city limits, going to hotels to check lodging taxes, keeping track of businesses that are opening and closing in Oxford, and corresponding with the High Speed Rail Commission, Aaron has become a “jack-of-all-trades� for the finance department. Born with arthrogryposis multiplex congenita micrognathia scoliosis (a musculoskeletal disorder), he has exceeded all expectations in his life. A 1998 graduate of Oxford High School, he enrolled in college and grad10 : OXFORD ACCESS

uated from Jacksonville State University in 2005. He has been married for 12 years to Holly, and they have a boy, Radley, age 12, and a girl, Raydin, age 2. Aaron enjoys working for the city, and especially loves to be able to contribute to the community. He enjoys learning new things at work, and is always excited to find new ways to complete his daily routine. When not at work, Sexton enjoys spending time with his family, and watching Alabama football and the Atlanta Braves.


MEET MARC WEBB

RISK MANAGER, CITY OF OXFORD Marc Webb enjoys his job. “I like the people that I’m working with and around. I feel like I am giving a good service to the city,” he says. He has served the city as the Risk Manager since June of 2014. This position works with departments to develop policies that prevent situations that cause accidents or injuries. If an accident does happen, he handles insurance claims for the city. He is also involved in helping the city create a wellness plan for city employees and their dependents. Webb has two grown children: Tucker, 26, and Madison, 24. His face lights up when he talks about them. Running is his favorite hobby. He and his daugh-

ter are preparing to run a half-marathon in Virginia Beach soon. Oxford is his home; he lives here now, and he graduated from OHS in 1981. He has previously worked in the private sector; this is his first foray into government work. Thankfully, the city has put in place many policies to prevent or reduce accidents. “Most of the time,” Webb comments, “it’s a matter of using common sense. By using common sense and following guidelines set by departments with both employees and citizens in mind, the city can minimize accidents.” www.oxfordaccess.com : 11


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FIELD OF DREAMS

SOME CALL IT A BLESSING. OTHERS CALL IT A MIRACLE. GINGER MUNROE CALLS IT A LEAGUE OF OUR OWN, A FIELD WHERE DREAMS COME TRUE RIGHT HERE IN THE CITY OF OXFORD. WORDS BY EMIL LOEKEN PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF JOEY D’ANNA

A League of Our Own was designed to enrich the community by providing leadership, facilities, and administration for a baseball program for children with physical and/or mental disabilities in a manner consistent with cooperation and community values – every player hits, every player gets on base, every player scores, and every player wins. It was designed to give special needs children the opportunity to do what all children should have a chance to do – play baseball. Ginger Munroe, who serves as the president of the league, shares that the idea was inspired by her niece who has autism. There was little for her to do locally. Munroe found this to be unfair. “These kids deserve a chance to know what it is like to be part of a team in a sports-related activity,” Munroe said. “They deserve a chance to play on their own terms without worrying about being laughed at or someone getting mad.” After researching several sports-related avenues, Munroe found the idea of A League of Our Own to be one that could encompass all types of special needs children. In the Fall of 2011, she reached out to the City of Oxford and met with Alton Craft, Finance Director, and Don Hudson, Parks and Recreation Department Director. The duo shared Munroe’s vision and found it to be an excellent opportunity for the kids. “It is incredible seeing the excitement in these kids’ faces when they put on their uniforms,” Hudson said. “The smiles and the happiness you see out of these kids are worth every bit of effort put into this program.”

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Soon after – with civic pride, collective ambition, and Munroe spearheading the efforts – the miracle was born. With the support of the city and donations from local businesses, her vision became reality. On April 7, 2012, A League of Our Own played its first game on the Babe Ruth Field. The game consisted of two teams, 18 players, two innings and a designated “able-bodied buddy” for each participant. The excitement, joy, and heartwarming stories from the league spread like wildfire. In a few seasons, the organization had more than quadrupled in size. Now, these amazing children needed their own field – and a field was built. With a rubberized surface, concession stand, fully equipped press box, dugouts built to accommodate wheelchairs, covered bleachers, and adult changing tables, a state-of-theart baseball complex was fulfilling our community’s dream. The field was unveiled during a city-wide celebration and used by over 109 participants ages 4-21. Munroe believes the organization’s growth directly reflects what the need is in this community for things to do for 14 : OXFORD ACCESS

these children. “This could not have been possible without the support of the parents, community, and city,” Munroe said. “You all showed such an overwhelming response and support for the children in this amazing program.” According to Steven Waits, President of the Oxford City Council, it is important to the council and the city as a whole to make sure everyone is included and that all children have an opportunity to be part of a team. “This gives our special needs children a chance they have not had before,” Waits said. “It is really important to us and it really excites us to be able to see how the league has pulled the community together and how so many people are cheering for these kids to play ball, have fun, socialize, and build self-esteem. It shows what kind of community Oxford is and how we unitedly are doing something really really special.” RaDonna and Justin Ridner-Thurman have enjoyed watching their son play for two seasons. “Our son has moderate to severe autism and a hard time being around other people – particularly during group activities,” they said.


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“We were very hesitant and unsure about how he would do in this program. However, after talking to a friend who had volunteered for the league, we enrolled him. Still even the night before his first game, we were skeptical about how he would do. The next morning, he blew us away. He had the best time! The volunteers have been wonderful, and it has been a great experience being part of this as well as getting to know everyone involved. Our son absolutely loves it!” From seeing how the children, parents, and volunteers thrive on the field, City Councilwoman Charlotte Hubbard believes Munroe has created the “happiest place in our city.” Hubbard said that “A League of Our Own is not only a place for kids to play ball on a beautiful field, but a place for families and volunteers to gather and socialize.” City Councilman Mike Henderson is proud of the facility. “Providing special needs children the opportunity to experience the game of baseball is very gratifying,” Henderson said. “I really appreciate all the volunteers and supporters who make this such a successful program. To see the smiles and excitement on the children’s faces is priceless.” 16 : OXFORD ACCESS

Munroe is thankful and amazed about the impact the league has had on the lives of everyone involved and how the community has embraced the children in such a loving way. “The City of Oxford is our biggest cheerleader. It would not have been possible to be where we are today had it not been for the Mayor, the council, and the support of the people of this community,” Munroe said. “Thanks to all of you, we have a place to take our children. A place where everyone is ‘normal’ and no one is judged. Watching these kids on Saturdays being able to do something that they otherwise would not have a chance to do, and knowing that I had a small part in making that happen, makes me very proud.” A League of Our Own, all participants, parents, volunteers, and our community are looking forward to seeing what the upcoming season has in store. We can’t wait to follow the league’s journey and share its story in this magazine. A special thanks to Ginger Munroe for enabling this community to grow closer as a people and to Joey D’Anna for letting us share the loving moments you captured last season through your photography.


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A MESSAGE FROM THE LIBRARY DIRECTOR Every library should strive to serve and reflect its community. Librarianship is very special in this way; every public library is different because every community is different. Oxford is an exceptional community that deserves an exceptional library. OPL relishes this charge. We endeavor to provide our community with materials, services, and events that our patrons find useful and interesting. We live in an interesting age in regards to information retrieval. The library can give our users tools to decipher what information is accurate and useful. Also, the library can provide reliable resources that make finding accurate information easier without having to filter out flawed or 18 : OXFORD ACCESS

useless information. The age of electronic information is upon us in many forms, including books. OPL subscribes to Camellianet, which offers over 25,000 e-books and e-audiobooks to check out. I frequently get told how libraries will soon be a thing of the past because nobody reads paper books anymore. Statistics say otherwise! Our numbers are higher than ever. An average of 240 people use the library every day to use our many different services. OPL works with volunteers in the community to provide classes and events for our patrons. We offer weekly classes in knitting, crocheting, quilting, computers, and adult literacy, as well as other regular

events such as Welcome to Adulthood (for teens teaching basics of survival when they go out on their own), Storytime (for preschoolers), Kid Time (for grade-schoolers), Book Club, Book Art (creating art out of books), TED Talks, and many other special events to inform and entertain. Some people only think of books when they think of a library, but OPL offers much, much more! OPL strives to serve our community in the best ways possible; please take advantage of this wonderful resource available for free to you! I hope to see you soon!

Amy Henderson


PRESERVING OXFORD HISTORY In the Oxford Room

The Oxford Room in the Oxford Public Library contains many items that document the city’s history. Many local families’ and buildings’ histories are recorded as well. There is a wealth of local information available. The City of Oxford has a rich history, and these materials document that history from the time when Oxford was originally called Lick Skillet in the early 1800s. These materials include pictures, documents, newspaper articles, records detailing the history of local houses and other buildings, documents and artifacts from the Oxford High School and its predecessor, Oxford College, records of city actions throughout its history, information about and pictures of city landmarks, such as Oxford Lake, and their construction, among many other useful and interesting items. These materials’ historical value to Oxford’s

background is immeasurable. Unfortunately, the Oxford Room has never been properly cataloged, so citizens looking for information about their history have to sift through a large amount of unrelated material to find their target. This sifting will sometimes discourage a citizen’s resolve to use this valuable resource due to the additional time and effort required. Oxford Public Library’s staff, while always willing to help, often has to invest time that is not always available in a busy public library. In order to remedy this growing problem, the Oxford Library is about to embark on a landmark project— to catalog and organize the Oxford Room! This project would involve several helpful facets that will build a more successful repository. Acid-free

materials will aid in proper storage and preservation of the existing materials. Those materials will need to be inventoried and organized for easy use and digitized for use of those interested in Oxford’s history that cannot come to the Oxford Room for various reasons. Digitization will also keep those delicate materials from being unnecessarily handled. For those who love history, and for those that love Oxford, this project presents a unique volunteer opportunity. This is a daunting task that will need help from the community. Anyone who is interested in helping the library complete this task is welcome and needed. Please contact Amy Henderson, Library Director at (256)831-1750x8 or oxfordlibrary@ cableone.net.

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A NEW PARK IN OXFORD

WORDS BY DENNY BAILEY AND JOSHUA CRAFT PHOTOGRAPHY BY EMIL LOEKEN

There’s a new park coming to Town! The city of Oxford is set for a major expansion and economic windfall with the creation of a state-of-the-art sports complex located near I-20 along the Eastern Bypass. The 370-acre complex, dubbed Choccolocco Park, is scheduled to open this summer and will play host to collegiate and interscholastic team competitions, amateur athletic events, tournaments, camps, clinics, and other sporting events for athletic teams and organizations of all levels and sizes. The new complex will not only be an enormous venue for baseball, softball, soccer, and track and field events, but should attract outdoor enthusiasts as well. With the abundant water and other natural resources of the area, the complex includes a 29-acre lake with pavilions surrounded by a three-plus mile walking trail. It has a creek suitable for canoe and kayak float trips, and offers multiple recreational areas. The park boasts a signature baseball field and has four additional baseball fields in a four-leaf clover design. It also features a signature softball field and five additional softball fields arranged in a “star” pattern. Batting cages, large scoreboards, and locker rooms are located at the signature baseball and softball fields. Both signature fields have red brick walls comprising ticket booths, concession stands, locker and restroom facilities, covered bleachers, and outfield boundaries. These premier baseball and softball fields will serve as home fields for the Oxford High School Baseball and Softball Programs. Choccolocco Park features four lighted soccer fields. The soccer field area will serve as the venue for all Oxford Park and Recreation soccer leagues, and will also be used to host club soccer tournaments and high school regional events. The full-scale track venue will include all interscholastic and collegiate track and field events, and conform to standards for both AHSAA and NCAA competitions. Included are the college-only event stations such as Hammer Throw and 22 : OXFORD ACCESS

Steeplechase. Dual javelin, pole vault, and long-jump lanes will face each other to downplay wind effects on participants. An 8-lane rubberized track will encircle most of the field event stations. Locker rooms, grandstands, restrooms, and storage facilities will surround the track. Plans are underway for Jacksonville State University to host Ohio Valley Conference track meets at Choccolocco Park. Oxford High School will utilize the track for home meets, and AHSAA sectional and state track meets could be held at the facility as well. The Senior Games, a track competition across the southeast, has also expressed interest in the track facility. In addition to team sports, Choccolocco Park will provide outdoor recreational opportunities for locals as well as visitors to the area. Plans are underway to create a canoe/kayak trail along Choccolocco Creek, beginning at the famed Cider Ridge Golf Course and ending – after a projected float trip of up to four hours – at the southwest end of the park. The Canoe/Kayak Trail Project will be in partnership with the Callhoun Soil and Water Office and the Choccolocco Creek Watershed Conservancy, promoting ecotourism and environmental education for the area. The complex will feature two playgrounds, including a state-of-the-art, fully-accessible “Boundless Playground,” designed especially to meet the needs of individuals with disabilities, particularly physical limitations. It will serve as a tool to increase community and cognitive skills, because the playground has the capacity for handicapped and non-handicapped individuals alike to play together. The Boundless Playground will feature double-wide ramps, allowing the use of multiple wheelchairs, and swings modified to accommodate those with or without physical limitations. The City is making sure that safety of participants, spectators, and all who utilize any of the park’s myriad recreational opportunities is a top priority as well. Officials have appropriated funds to ensure that the Oxford Police Department has a consistent presence at Choccolocco Park,


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adding park patrol units and state-of-the-art technology that will monitor all aspects of the facility 24 hours a day. Thousands of visitors are projected to utilize this facility and its opportunities each year. Each event will bring visitors to the area to restaurants, hotels, and shopping in Oxford and the surrounding area. City leaders are certain the complex will have a significant economic impact on the region. The economic impact of the complex is already being felt through the area, as most of the suppliers and jobs are local. Mike Henderson, Oxford councilman, is excited about the facility’s potential. “Choccolocco Park will be the premier sports complex in East Central Alabama. The city is already getting interest from many local high schools, colleges, universities, and travel ball teams,” Henderson said. “I feel this facility has the ability to be a tremendous draw for our community in terms of outside participants and visitors and will provide a significant economic boost for many of our businesses.” Don Hudson, Oxford Parks and Recreation Director, is 24 : OXFORD ACCESS

eagerly awaiting the completion of the project, saying “Weather has put a damper on progress, and we’ve made some changes that have all been for the best, but I’m looking forward to it being opened this summer.” He also gives credit to the committee he formed to ensure that Choccolocco Park fields and equipment meet all high school and NCAA regulations. Hudson says “We have an outstanding committee. They’re planning, programming, promoting, and meeting with folks to make sure that we’re doing what we need to do.” He has also brought on two advisors to the committee. Jacksonville State Track and Field coach Steve Ray advises on track and field, and North Alabama Fusion F.C. Director of Coaches Jeremiah Massa advises on soccer. City officials, citizens, and athletes from near and far anxiously await the completion of Choccolocco Park so players, fans, spectators, and workers can come together to enjoy this special place. To stay updated on the latest news and keep up with the park’s construction process, please follow Oxford Parks and Recreation on Facebook (www.facebook. com/oxfordpard).


PLACE YOUR ADVERTISEMENT

HERE

Please contact Emil Loeken at the Marketing & Public Communications Department for more information. Emil can be reached at 256-241-6668 or emil@oxfordal.us

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A HOME RUN IN OXFORD City to host 2017 Dixie Youth Baseball World Series Words by Joshua Craft

Don Hudson, Oxford Parks & Recreation Director, said, “We are extremely proud to be hosting the 2017 Dixie Youth World Series. We look forward to welcoming all the players and their families, Dixie Youth representatives, umpires, vendors, media, and all other fans and spectators. We are working hard for this to be another successful event for the City.”

One of the most important and widely recognized youth baseball tournament is coming to Oxford in 2017. Dixie Youth Baseball awarded the 2017 World Series in three age divisions to the City on August 10, 2015. Oxford Fire Chief Gary Sparks, who was also one of the presenters to the selection committee, is excited about the city’s opportunity. “It’s the crown jewel of youth baseball that we brought in,” Sparks says. “The guests and participants will see what Oxford has to offer–not only in recreation, but in shopping, dining, and places of interest. We get a chance to show Oxford off to them, and hopefully that will make them want to come back to our city.” Four representatives made the pre26 : OXFORD ACCESS

sentation to the selection committee: Gary Sparks, Oxford Fire Chief; Emil Loeken, Oxford Marketing Director; Michelle Mayfield, Oxford Baseball for Youth Director; and Sparks’ son, Robert Sparks. The presentation was held in Lexington, SC, the site of the 2015 event. Chris Cox, principal of Oxford High School, is excited about the event. “From an economic standpoint, this will impact our school by bringing in more tax revenue, and I think it will expose the city and all the development going on,” Cox states. “Not being from Oxford, I see the growth of the city and am proud to live here and see what Oxford can do. It will have positive effects for our city, and it will be a great time to showcase our high school and the entire Oxford School System to the country.”

Wes Brooks, head baseball coach for Oxford High School and coach of the 2012 6A state champion team, shares the same sentiments. “The tournament coming to Oxford will give our kids – the kids in our town – a chance to play on that big of a stage, in front of the best teams in the country,” Brooks said. “It also is a chance for Oxford to show ourselves to the nation. It’s a win-win for our students, our residents, our government, and the teams that are coming to play in the World Series.” Coach Brooks is also committed to supporting it, stating that the Oxford Schools baseball teams will fully support Dixie Youth World Series in a volunteer capacity. Teams from 11 states will come to play the World Series in the 9-10 year old AAA Division, the 11-12 year old Major Division, and the 11-12 year old O-Zone Division. Oxford will have three host teams–one for each division–competing in the tournament. It will be held during the first week of August 2017. Dixie Youth World Series will be held at Oxford’s new sports complex, Choccolocco Park, which is expected to be completed this summer.


MAYOR LEON SMITH EARNS PRESTIGIOUS CERTIFIED MUNICIPAL OFFICIAL EMERITUS DESIGNATION WORDS BY ALABAMA LEAGUE OF MUNICIPALITIES PREPARED BY JANET STEPHENS Mayor’s Secretary

Mayor Leon Smith has earned the prestigious professional designation of Certified Municipal Official (CMO) Emeritus, a highly regarded honor awarded to officials who have excelled beyond the requirements of the Basic and Advanced CMO Programs. To achieve this third level of the Alabama League of Municipalities’ CMO training program, a municipal official must earn the designation of Certified Municipal Official by completing 40 training credit hours conducted or endorsed by the League followed by an additional 40 training hours to receive an advanced certification. Attaining CMO Emeritus entails a minimum of 120 credit hours of Continuing CMO Education plus 15 points. Points can be earned by serving on and attending meetings for a League Policy Committee; attending the League’s Annual Convention, Municipal Legislative Advocacy Session and the Municipal Leadership Institute; and by attending the Congress of Cities and the Congressional City Conference for the National League of Cities. Mayor Smith is a member of the inaugural graduating class of the CMO

Emeritus level and was recognized for his accomplishments during graduation ceremonies held in Montgomery on December 9, 2015. The certified training program for elected municipal officials was created in 1994 by the Alabama League of Municipalities, under the direction of its Executive Committee, to provide a specific curriculum cycle for municipal officials. Until that time, no formal training had been offered for elected officials. The Executive Committee instituted a series of one-day continuing education programs designed for mayors and councilmembers who voluntarily wished to receive formal training in municipal government. Because of his attendance at statewide and regional educational conferences, Mayor Smith has received formal classroom training in subjects such as council meeting procedures, parliamentary procedure, the Open Meetings Act, public records, ordinance drafting, conflicts of interest, the State Ethics Law, duties of the mayor and council, tort liability, the competitive bid law, zoning and planning, annexation, municipal regulatory powers,

municipal revenues and expenditures, personnel actions and leadership development. “Graduates of all CMO levels spend many hours over several years attending day-long workshops and lectures on the finer points of municipal government,” said Ken Smith, Executive Director of the League of Municipalities. “Earning the CMO Emeritus designation is the epitome of this journey and a significant achievement. I commend our graduates for their dedication and motivation to become better informed, more effective municipal officials.” Through the years, the Alabama League of Municipalities has steadily grown and now serves more than 440 municipalities. This voluntary membership program brings officials of cities and towns together in fellowship of public service – which strengthens and guides local government in a progressive, responsible fashion. The primary purpose of the League is to promote understanding of municipal government and administration in Alabama and thereby advance the welfare of the people of this state. www.oxfordaccess.com : 27


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DON HUDSON

Director, Oxford Parks and Recreation Department On behalf of our staff and employees at the Oxford Parks & how you can get involved and encourage you to visit our Recreation Department, it is a great honor to welcome each website at www.oxfordpard.com. one of you to our facilities. If you are interested in one of our many programs, events, Our goal and our mission is to enrich the lives of the resior rent any of our facilities, please call 256-831-2660. dents of Oxford by providing modern recreational facilities for people of all ages, abilities, and interests. We seek to We are proud of our facilities and our staff. We will continue to work hard to give you the best experience possible. enhance the quality of life in our city by attracting people to participate in our programs and we want to provide a diverse array of activities. I hope that you find this magazine helpful as you navigate through and learn more about some of the many things For many decades, the City of Oxford has been a hub of that happen at our facilities and around the City of Oxford. recreational activities and we are the home of the beautiful Sincerely, Oxford Lake and its scenic walking track. We host a wide variety of programs and events throughout the year. We would love for you to please learn more about

Don Hudson www.oxfordaccess.com : 29


GREETINGS FROM THE CHIEF’S OFFICE CHIEF BILL PARTRIDGE

Law enforcement has greatly evolved over the years, and as a result, the City of Oxford’s Police Department has had to adapt. We have placed an emphasis on properly equipping our officers with the newest technologies and training needed to stay ahead of the criminal element which threatens our city. Over the past ten years, we have slowly integrated many pieces of equipment in the department. To add, we are the only department in the State, and in some cases the Nation, which has implemented certain technologies. For example: We are the only municipal agency in the country who has applied the use of the VAMPIRE Latent Fingerprint Scanner, to name one. This device allows our crime scene investigators to analyze fingerprints at the crime scene. In effect, this allows our department to accurately identify suspects and rule our potential offenders in a matter of minutes. Recently, law enforcement agencies and their officers have been shed in a negative light. The members of the Oxford Police Department, however, have maintained strong community support as we diligently strive to provide the best law enforcement services possible for our visitors and citizens. It is important for our citizens to understand that we are working effectively for them. It is best placed in context by explaining that the first duty of government is to protect its citizens. Without your public safety agencies and police department, the city of Oxford may very well waive its ability to provide a comfortable place to live, work, and play. Please understand that though respectful and professional, we are diligent in maintaining the safety of our city. We are your first line of defense and intend fully to provide you with exceptional law enforcement services and keep you safe. Chief Bill Partridge

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The Oxford Police Department has been serving the residents and visitors of Oxford since 1852. We employ over 75 sworn and support staff from the surrounding area who are properly equipped to handle any situation which may jeopardize the safety of our communities. The department is comprised of three divisions: the Uniformed Division, the Investigations Division, and the Administrative Division. From these divisions, the department’s general operations and special operations units are found. From the department’s Emergency Services Unit to our Aviation Support Unit, we are able to place an emphasis on the protection of everyone in our city.

With over thirty-two square miles of incorporated city limits, more than 22,000 residents, and well over 50,000 visitors each day, we take great pride in ensuring everyone is comfortable. Our employees are personally invested in the well-being of Oxford, and in no way will they allow our home to become ridden with crime or any element thereof. The City of Oxford belongs to those who want to enjoy its offerings, and the Oxford Police Department will make sure no one takes that from you. If you have any questions for us, please call or visit our website to learn more. www.OxfordPD.org www.oxfordaccess.com : 31


HAPPY NEW YEAR From Cider Ridge Golf Club

The team and I are very excited about 2016 and what it has in store for Cider Ridge and those that play here. We want to thank all of you that have supported the facility in the past. We have been blessed, thanks to our Golf Course Maintenance Team, with some wonderful golf course conditions over the past several years. We are looking forward to providing this same experience for 2016. I would like to announce a wonderful change for 2016 for all residents of the City of Oxford. We are pleased to introduce the Oxford Resident Rates for the 2016 golfing season. These rates include 18 holes, 9 holes and twilight golf all seven days of the week. They are available all day Monday through Thursday, and after 10:00 am on Friday

through Sunday. Please see the announcement page in the magazine for specific rates for 2016. We look forward to having you take advantage of this new program. We are pleased to announce the Sunbelt Senior Professional Tour will once again visit Cider Ridge and the City of Oxford. The Oxford Senior Open is scheduled for May 23rd – 26th. The event will host a Pro-Am on the 23rd and competition rounds on the 24th – 26th. Please be watching for information on playing in the Pro Am, sponsorship opportunities, and opportunities to watch some great golf. This year we will be offering a number of instruction programs for junior golfers and adults. Programs offered will include junior golf camps, junior golf one day clinics, Get Golf Ready for adults, and special instruction programs for ladies. For more information, make sure you like our Facebook page for announcements of all events at the facility. With recent capital improvements to our parking lot and clubhouse, we are ready to host your next food and beverage event. Please consider us for weddings, birthday parties, graduation parties, reunions, retirement parties, and more. We have a beautiful setting that is perfect for your event. Once again I would like to thank those that have supported Cider Ridge. We do appreciate the support and participation and look forward to providing an exceptional experience for you and your friends. We look forward to seeing you here this year. Sincerely, Doug Wert, PGA Director of Golf

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www.oxfordaccess.com : 33


OXFORD COLLEGE

AT THE CROSSROADS OF HISTORY WORDS BY HUNTER C. GENTRY PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF PUBLIC LIBRARY ANNISTON CALHOUN COUNTY RUSSELL BROTHERS COLLECTION AND OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY

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www.oxfordaccess.com : 35


AT THE CROSSROADS OF HISTORY In the spring of 1867, a meeting was held by J.M. Woodruff at Oxford Presbyterian Church for discussion about establishing a higher education institution at Oxford. Professor John L. Dodson, also at the meeting, spoke out with great concern and urgency for education in Oxford. A building committee was then appointed to develop plans for the construction of a college in the community, and plans were drawn up by William J. Borden. On August 17, 1867, Dodson and Borden entered a contract for the construction of Oxford College, which was to be located atop a large hill southeast of downtown on ten acres. The site of the school was popular for the beauty of the area, but also for the large oak that General John T. Morgan gathered soldiers around and established the 51st Alabama Infantry, also known as the “Dudley Snow Rangers” in 1862. The tree became known as the “Morgan Oak,” and was also the site where Elizabeth Todd Edwards presented General Morgan the Confederate Battle Flag. In October 1932, someone set fire to the tree, destroying it. 36 : OXFORD ACCESS


Doors for the college opened in July 1868. Professor Dodson was head of Ancient Languages and Literature, and Borden was professor of Mathematics, Moral and Metal Sciences. They both held the position of principal. Teaching alongside them were F.M. Hodges, teacher of Vocal and Instrumental Music, and Bettie Pendleton, Principal Instructress in the Female Department. Lower Primary and Intermediate students learned Orthography, Reading, Geography, Mental Arithmetic, English Grammar, and Spencerian

Writing. The Collegiate level courses were strictly classical: four years of Greek, Latin Spelling, Physics, Mathematics, English and French History, German and French. Music and Art classes were taught privately in a tworoom wooden frame building on the grounds of the Oxford College. Students were urged to join in one of the three literary societies that met before classes every day. Oxford College had a strict segregation of genders, with two societies for male students and one for female students. The institution educated many distinguished people, including Dr. John W. Abercrombie and

Harry C. Gunnels, who later became state superintendents of education. Professor Dodson cared for his students as if they were his own children. It was said that he would frequently walk the grounds and check on his students. In August 1872, became President and sole owner of the college. Education excelled and enrollment increased until the 1880s, when private and public institutions began to open throughout the southeast. Enrollment then began to decline, and Oxford College closed its doors in 1899. www.oxfordaccess.com : 37


JOHN LONGSHORE OXFORD PERFORMING ARTS DIRECTOR INTERVIEWED BY EMIL LOEKEN

Q: Knowing there is really no such thing, what is a typical workday life for you?

Q: How do you decide which shows to bring to the Performing Arts Center stage?

In the time I have had the pleasure of serving as the OPAC Director, no two days have been alike. Each event brings us new production challenges, guests with differing and unique needs, and a variety of bizarre logistical issues to solve. From the middle of September until perhaps early June, our schedule is packed with multiple events each week. During a typical work day, I do everything from assisting patrons, to designing newspaper ads, to even focusing lighting for a show. Much of my job involves desk work, but I find myself fortunate to be able to enjoy a range of hands-on production and customer service work. Although the events slow down a bit in the summer, we use that time to plan for shows to take place in the next season. Compared with my friends, I often believe that I have the highest level of job satisfaction of any of them. Sometimes I can’t believe that this is my REAL job!

Our patrons truly direct what direction to go in when deciding which artists to present. We recently completed a comprehensive patron survey that will serve as our guide in picking shows for the next season. Once we select the artist, then comes the negotiation with their agent. That process involves negotiating not only the artist fee, but the production and hospitality requirements.

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Q: How are ticket prices for events determined? We work very hard to keep our ticket prices affordable respective to the quality of entertainment and the artist. Almost always, the price of a ticket for a show at OPAC is below that of the same show at other venues in the Southeast. For example, our Broadway series tickets are significantly less expensive than those found in similar venues around the country, especially

when purchased in a season package. That fact, combined with free parking and low concession pricing, makes OPAC an affordable destination for live entertainment. In addition to ticketed performances, last year we presented well over a dozen free shows to the community. We want to ensure that the performing arts are accessible to everyone regardless of their financial situation. Q: What have you learned about Oxford since beginning to work at the Performing Arts Center? Oxford is a unique city in several very good ways. Oxford has amenities that cities many times our size can only dream of. Oxford has a service-minded police force that is practically adored by the citizens in an age where many communities do not support their law enforcement officers. Our city has invested in education, recreation, and economic development in a number of very successful projects that ensure we have a bright future as a community. I love my new home!


TOP LEFT: FLASHDANCE THE MUSICAL TOP RIGHT: THE OAK RIDGE BOYS BOTTOM LEFT: THE SOLID SOUL TOUR BOTTOM RIGHT: CHRISTMAS WITH THE ATLANTA POPS ORCHESTRA www.oxfordaccess.com : 39


KANSAS - 40TH ANNIVERSARY TOUR MARCH 5 AT 7:30 P.M. - TICKETS FROM $30-$55 KANSAS has spent more than four decades as a part of the soundtrack of the lives of generations of music lovers. The band’s first public statement appeared on their self-titled album in 1974. “From the beginning, we considered ourselves and our music different and we hope we will always remain so.” Little did this legendary rock group realize that back in the early 1970’s, what seemed to be ‘different,’ was actually ahead of its time. This ‘garage band’ from Topeka released their debut album in 1974 after being discovered by Wally Gold, who worked for Don Kirshner. The band has produced eight gold albums, three sextuple-Platinum albums (Leftoverture, Point of Know Return, Best of KANSAS), one platinum live album (Two for the Show), and a million-selling gold single, ‘Dust in the Wind.’ KANSAS appeared on the Billboard charts for over 200 weeks throughout the ‘70’s and ‘80’s and played to sold-out arenas and stadiums throughout 40 : OXFORD ACCESS

North America, Europe and Japan. ‘Carry On Wayward Son’ was the #2 most played track on classic rock radio in 1995 and went to #1 in 1997. Coinciding with the celebration of their 40th anniversary, the band KANSAS was inducted into both the Kansas Hall of Fame and the Georgia Music Hall of Fame as recognition for their achievements from both their native state and adopted home state. The band, which is currently comprised of original drummer Phil Ehart, bassist/vocalist Billy Greer, keyboardist David Manion, vocalist/keyboardist Ronnie Platt, violinist/ guitarist David Ragsdale, and original guitarist Richard Williams, continues to perform in front of large and enthusiastic audiences around the world.

Oxford Performing Arts Center

Tickets: 256-241-3322 or oxfordpac.org


SATURDAY NIGHT FEVER MARCH 11 AT 7:30 P.M. - TICKETS FROM $29-$49 Broadway is coming back to OPAC! When John Travolta walked on to the dance floor in the smash hit film Saturday Night Fever, it changed the way we dance forever. The date is 1979 and in Brooklyn, New York, Tony Manero, a young man with a dead-end job and an extraordinary ability to dance, has only one ambition in life – to become the disco king. When he meets Stephanie, who also dreams of a world beyond Brooklyn, and they decide to train together for a dance competition, their lives begin to change forever. This brand new production of Saturday Night Fever, one of the most loved dance stories of all time, is packed with legendary hits from the Bee Gees including the classics Stayin’ Alive, Night Fever, Jive Talking, You Should Be Dancing and How Deep is Your Love? A large and hugely talented cast of actor-musicians play instruments, dance and sing in this spectacular new musical production.

BUY TICKETS ONLINE @ WWW.OXFORDPAC.ORG

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LOOKING FOR SOMETHING

TO DO?

BY PAM HARRIS PROGRAM DIRECTOR, OXFORD PARD

What and amazing time to live in the City of Oxford as a senior citizen! Whether retired or looking for recreational activities to do on in your spare time, Oxford is the place for you. The city, through its Parks and Recreation Department, strives to take care of its senior population – whether through the nutrition program at the Senior Center, free entertaining events at the Civic Center, or the many other inexpensive programs and classes throughout the city. Every February and September, the Senior Adult Day is hosted at the Oxford Civic Center. We decorate for the season, provide free entertainment, give away door prizes, and feed everyone in attendance. We are very excited about this program. Where else can one go to meet their friends, make new ones, eat, and be entertained – without paying a penny? Oxford! That’s where! So please join us in our Valentine’s Day celebration on Monday, February 8th at the Oxford Civic Center. This year, the entertainment includes the JSU Gospel Choir and praise dancers! We will also crown a new king and queen. Registration begins at 8:00 a.m. so bring a group, bring a friend, and help spread the word about this wonderful morning of fun, food, and fellowship! Another of the fun activities the Oxford Parks and Recreation Department offers is the monthly senior citizen dance. The dance is at the Oxford Civic Center from 7-10 p.m. and costs $5.00 per person, including a full meal and drinks. The meal is served at 7:30 p.m. and there is always a live band performing, alternating between the Ryan Robertson Band, Duo Sonix, and the Sundance Band. Have fun learning how to line dance and do the waltz. Or you can simply enjoy the live music and watch others dance. You do not have to live in 42 : OXFORD ACCESS

Oxford to join in on this fun filled evening. We have plenty of food so be sure to check the monthly calendar when you get the magazine and come join us for the next dance! Oxford PARD also hosts a variety of instructional classes and programs at the Civic Center, Bynum Community Center, and Friendship Community Center. We have classes and/or programs and events for people of all ages including our annual Freedom Festival, cheernastics for children, yoga, Zumba, senior aerobics, and Easter egg hunt, Halloween carnival, art lessons, and much more. At Friendship Community Center, we offer an amazing and inexpensive pre-school for children program. The program is geared towards 3, 4, and 5 year olds, getting ready to start kindergarten. If you would like to meet the instructor and see the classroom, you are more than welcome to drop on by. Be sure to have your Easter baskets ready before Saturday, March 26. Our annual Easter egg hunt will be held at Friendship Community Center at 9:00 a.m. sharp! Children ages 0-12 will hunt eggs in the grass field behind the gymnasium. The event is free—just bring your own basket! There will be candy, plastic eggs filled with goodies, prize eggs, and many other exciting surprises for our young crowd. We strive to have new, updated, and exciting programs, classes, and events for our citizens. Please call me if you have any questions or need additional information. I can be reached at the Oxford Civic Center at 256-831-2660. - Pam Harris


PARKS AND RECREATION

FACILITIES

Oxford Civic Center: The Oxford Civic Center, located at 401 McCullars Lane, is a recently renovated multipurpose facility with a large gymnasium and an abundance of meeting spaces equipped with Wi-Fi, AV, and projectors. The center offers a public swimming pool, five baseball fields, four softball fields, a lighted tennis complex, the beautiful Oxford Lake, two walking tracks, 10 covered picnic pavilions, a fishier pier, and a fully equipped children’s playground. HOURS OF OPERATION: Monday-Thursday 8:00 AM - 9:00 PM, Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Saturday 10:00 AM - 4:00 PM, closed on Sunday. If you would like more information about our room rentals, please call the Civic Center at 256831-2660.

Bynum Community Center: The Bynum Community Center, located at 200 Victory Drive. in Eastaboga, is a family-oriented facility. It is a great spot for having fun, playing your favorite sports, meeting new friends, or hosting your birthday party, baby shower, or next family reunion. The center features a multipurpose gymnasium and a variety of meeting rooms. You will also find a children’s playground, ping-pong table, weight room, outside walking track, concession stand, and more. HOURS OF OPERATION: Monday, Tuesday, and Thursday 8:00 AM - 9:00 PM, Wednesday 8:00 a.m. – 12:00 p.m., Friday 8:00 AM - 5:00 PM, Saturday 10:00 AM 4:00 PM, closed on Sunday. If you would like more information, please call 256-241-2716.

Senior Center: The Oxford Senior Center, located on 424 Main Street, is a place where senior adults age 60 and over, who live in the city limits of Oxford, can come and participate in a variety of activities. Some of the activities offered by the center include walking and arthritis exercises, singing at the local nursing homes, going to the Farmer’s Market, dominos, cards, puzzles, bingo, seasonal crafts, and special activities such as western day, oldies dress up day, Halloween dress up, and Christmas caroling. We help senior adults find information resources, have speakers who share topics of interest, and help them with nutritional education. Lunch is served Monday through Friday. The cost of the meal is $3.20, but only a donation is suggested. Meals are planned at 11:00 a.m. and provided by the Alabama Department of Senior Services. We would like to have you join us for activities and fun.

Friendship Community Center: Friendship Community Center, located at the intersection of Friendship Road and Leon Smith Parkway, is a multi-use facility operated by Oxford PARD. The facility is a great place to exercise, host an event, or jam during the Tuesday night Bluegrass sessions. They also have a yoga class every Monday and Thursday night, Tumble Time Cheerleading practice, and much more! Friendship Community Center features a multipurpose gym, an abundance of meeting rooms, a children’s playground, a fully equipped kitchen, a pre-school classroom, and lots of green space. HOURS OF OPERATION: Monday-Thursday 7:30 AM - 8:00 PM, Friday 7:30 AM - 3:00 PM, Saturday 9:00 AM - 4:00 PM, closed on Sunday. After March 1st, gym is open for free play basketball from 12:30 PM - 3:00 PM Monday-Thursday. www.oxfordaccess.com : 43


WHY WE WEAR THE BADGE

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ACCESS

THE WORLD AT

OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY The internet is a source for information and entertainment that is unparalleled elsewhere. Many people, in our area and elsewhere, do not have access to the internet. This is an essential way the library can help! The library offers 41 public access computers with access to the internet, useful software, and a printer. These computers are used by the public to do many things, including applying for jobs, learning new skills for current jobs, writing business letters, creating resumes, and completing school assignments. We have had patrons complete their entire college degree using only the computers housed in our library!

LET US HELP YOU CONNECT OPL also offers the use of one public access computer enclosed in a study room that has internet access. This computer is designed for use with Skype, particularly for local families that have a loved one overseas in the military. It is also used for proctoring online tests, learning another language (Rosetta Stone is installed on this computer), and taking webinars or courses. Using computers is becoming mandatory in many ways of life, though some people do not feel comfortable using this technology. OPL offers classes from the basics to high-interest topics to help those that would like to learn more. The classes are on Wednesdays at 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m. A different topic will be discussed each week.

COMPUTER CLASS SCHEDULE

SPECIAL EVENTS

Classes are Wednesdays at 10:00 a.m. and 4:00 p.m.

For weekly OPL programs, please see calendar.

February 3: Internet Searching February 10: Intro to Mac February 17: Photo Editing February 24: iTunes March 2: Turn It On, Part I March 9: Turn It On, Part II March 16: Basic Internet March 23: Internet Searching March 30: Alabama Virtual Library April 6: Microsoft Word April 13: Letters/Mailing

February 2: Welcome to Adulthood (5 p.m. - 6 p.m.) February 9: Book Art (11 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.) February 16: Kid Time (5 p.m. - 6 p.m.) March 1: Welcome to Adulthood (5 p.m. - 6 p.m.) March 8: Book Art (11 a.m. - 12:00 p.m.) March 15: Kid Time (5 p.m. - 6 p.m.) March 18: Health Fair (Starts at 1:00 p.m.) March 24: Easter Egg Hunt April 5: Welcome to Adulthood (5 p.m. - 6 p.m.) www.oxfordaccess.com : 45


FEBRUARY EVENTS Senior Adult Day Monday, February 8 - 7:00 p.m. Oxford Civic Center

1

MONDAY

• • • • • • • • • • • •

2

TUESDAY

5

FRIDAY

• • • • • • • • • •

9

TUESDAY

• • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

• • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

11

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

12 FRIDAY

• • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Biscuit Social - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Walking Exercise - Senior Center - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. The Booth Brothers in Concert - Oxford Performing Arts Center - 7:00 p.m.

• • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Biscuit Social - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Walking Exercise - Senior Center - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Valentine's Party - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Senior Dance - Oxford Civic Center - 7:00 p.m. A Rockin' Tribute To The King Starring Scot Bruce - Oxford Performing Arts Center - 7:30 p.m.

13 SATURDAY

Valentine's with Diamond Rio - Oxford Performing Arts Center - 7:30 p.m.

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Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Community Center - 3:15 p.m. Welcome to Adulthood - Oxford Public Library - 5:00 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

THURSDAY

• • • • •

Preschool - Friendship Community Center - 8:00 a.m. Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Senior Adult Day - Oxford Civic Center - 9:15 a.m. Crocheting - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. TED Talks - Oxford Public Library - 1:00 p.m. Bring Your Own Device Class - Oxford Public Library 4:00 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Class - 6:00 p.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

10 WEDNESDAY

WEDNESDAY • •

THURSDAY

MONDAY

• • •

• • • •

• • •

4

8

Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Book Art - Oxford Public Library - 11:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Community Center - 3:15 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

3

Preschool - Friendship Community Center - 8:00 a.m. Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Crocheting - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Community Center 10:00 a.m. TED Talks - Oxford Public Library - 1:00 p.m. Bring Your Own Device Class - Oxford Public Library 4:00 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Class - 6:00 p.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

A Rockin' Valentine's Tribute To The King - Starring Scot Bruce Friday, February 12 - 7:30 p.m. Oxford Performing Arts Center


FEBRUARY EVENTS Valentine's with Diamond Rio Saturday, February 13 - 7:00 p.m. Oxford Performing Arts Center

15 MONDAY

• • • • • • • • • • • •

16 TUESDAY

• • • •

Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Community Center - 3:15 p.m. Kid Time - Oxford Public Library - 5:00 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

17 WEDNESDAY

• • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

18

THURSDAY

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

19

FRIDAY

• • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Biscuit Social - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Walking Exercise - Senior Center - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Bingo! - Senior Center - 10:00 a.m. Masters of Soul Concert - Oxford Performing Arts Center - 7:30 p.m.

20 SATURDAY

• • • •

Preschool - Friendship Community Center - 8:00 a.m. Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Crocheting - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Community Center 10:00 a.m. TED Talks - Oxford Public Library - 1:00 p.m. Bring Your Own Device Class - Oxford Public Library 4:00 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Class - 6:00 p.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

The Masters of Soul Friday, February 20 - 7:30 p.m. Oxford Performing Arts Center

22 MONDAY

• • • • • • • • • • • •

23 TUESDAY

• • • •

Preschool - Friendship Community Center - 8:00 a.m. Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Crocheting - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Community Center 10:00 a.m. TED Talks - Oxford Public Library - 1:00 p.m. Bring Your Own Device Class - Oxford Public Library 4:00 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Class - 6:00 p.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

• • •

Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Community Center - 3:15 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

24 WEDNESDAY

• • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

25 THURSDAY

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

26 FRIDAY

• • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Biscuit Social - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Walking Exercise - Senior Center - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m.

www.oxfordaccess.com : 47


MARCH EVENTS Saturday Night Fever - The Hit Broadway Musical Friday, March 11- 7:30 p.m. Oxford Performing Arts Center

Kansas - 40th Anniversary Tour Saturday, March 5 - 7:30 p.m. Oxford Performing Arts Center

1

TUESDAY

• • • • • • • •

Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Welcome to Adulthood - Oxford Pub. Library - 5:00 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

2

WEDNESDAY

• • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

3

THURSDAY

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

4

FRIDAY

• • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Biscuit Social - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Walking Exercise - Senior Center - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m.

5

SATURDAY

Kansas - The Legendary Band's 40th Anniversary Tour Oxford Performing Arts Center - 7:30 p.m.

7

MONDAY

• • • • • • • • •

Preschool - Friendship Community Center - 8:00 a.m. Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Crocheting - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. TED Talks - Oxford Public Library - 1:00 p.m. Bring Your Own Device - Oxford Pub. Library - 4:00 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Class - 6:00 p.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

8

TUESDAY

• • • • • •

Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Book Art - Oxford Public Library - 11:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

48 : OXFORD ACCESS

9

WEDNESDAY • • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

10 THURSDAY

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

11 FRIDAY

• • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Biscuit Social - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Walking Exercise - Senior Center - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Saturday Night Fever - The Hit Broadway Musical Oxford Performing Arts Center - 7:30 p.m.

14 MONDAY

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Preschool - Friendship Community Center - 8:00 a.m. Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Crocheting - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. TED Talks - Oxford Public Library - 1:00 p.m. Bring Your Own Device - Oxford Pub. Library - 4:00 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Class - 6:00 p.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

15 TUESDAY

• • • • • • • •

Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Kid Time - Oxford Public Library - 5:00 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.


MARCH EVENTS Senior Health Fair Friday, March 18 - 1:00 p.m. Oxford Public Library

Oxford Easter Egg Hunt Saturday, March 26 - 9:00 a.m. Friendship Community Center and Thursday, March 24 at OPL

16 WEDNESDAY

• • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

17 THURSDAY

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

18 FRIDAY

• • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Biscuit Social - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Walking Exercise - Senior Center - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Senior Dance - Oxford Civic Center - 7:00 p.m.

21 MONDAY

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Preschool - Friendship Community Center - 8:00 a.m. Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Crocheting - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. TED Talks - Oxford Public Library - 1:00 p.m. Bring Your Own Device - Oxford Pub. Library - 4:00 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Class - 6:00 p.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

• • • • • • •

Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

• • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

22 TUESDAY 23 WEDNESDAY

24 THURSDAY

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

25 FRIDAY

Good Friday - City Offices & Facilities are closed.

28 MONDAY

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Preschool - Friendship Community Center - 8:00 a.m. Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Crocheting - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. TED Talks - Oxford Public Library - 1:00 p.m. Bring Your Own Device - Oxford Pub. Library - 4:00 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Class - 6:00 p.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Civic Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

29 TUESDAY

• • • • • • •

Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. City Council Meeting - Oxford City Hall - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

30 WEDNESDAY

• • • • • • •

Pound Class - Oxford Civic Center - 8:30 a.m. Games & Activities - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Mall Walkers - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Quilting - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Senior Aerobics - Oxford Civic Center - 10:00 a.m. Arthritis Exercise - Senior Center - 10:30 a.m. Yoshukai Karate - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

31 THURSDAY

• • • • • • • •

Center Sing - Senior Center - 9:00 a.m. Knitting Class - Oxford Public Library - 9:30 a.m. Senior Volleyball - Friendship Comm. Ctr. - 10:00 a.m. Storytime - Oxford Public Library - 10:00 a.m. Low Impact Aerobics - Bynum Comm. Center - 3:15 p.m. Yoga - Friendship Community Center - 6:00 p.m. Zumba - Bynum Community Center - 6:30 p.m. Zumba - Oxford Civic Center - 6:30 p.m.

www.oxfordaccess.com : 49


ON THE RANGE WITH DOUG Use the BLT method for better chipping

Every golfer is looking to improve their score when they play golf, but many people spend too much time hitting balls at the driving range, reading books to help their swing, or buying countless swing aids. The easiest way to improve your score is to improve your short game. 50 : OXFORD ACCESS


The short game in golf includes anything inside of 100 yards to the green. Chipping is probably one of the most important elements of golf and is also one of the most overlooked parts. A chip shot is a shot that is taken from the rough, fairway, or fringe around the green where you want the ball to pop up into the air and then roll the majority of the way to the hole – hopefully close enough for you to make the next shot. There is a simple acronym that will help most people improve their chipping stroke. The acronym is BLT–not Bacon Lettuce Tomato sandwiches (although they are quite tasty)–but Back, Lean, Tilt. This shot can be taken with almost any club in the bag – from a hybrid to a 60-degree wedge. The amount of green you have to work with and how much rough, fairway, or fringe you have to carry will directly dictate which club you use for a chip shot. For example, if your ball is sitting on the fringe and you have a lot of green to work with you can chip with a 7 iron, which will fly in the air just a little and roll the majority of the way. On the other hand, if you are in the rough and have only about 15 feet of green to work with, wedge would be a proper choice. Always remember to assess the shot you have before selecting a club to chip with. B – Ball in the (B)ack of the stance: After figuring out your aiming point, gather your stance

over the ball and make sure that the golf ball is placed off of the back foot. Placing the ball off of your back foot will ensure that the club takes a downward path approaching the ball at impact. L – (L)ean forward to your front foot (left foot for RH players, right foot for LH players): After positioning the ball off of the back foot position 90% of your weight on the foot closest to the target and leave it there (no weight shift during a chip shot). Putting your weight on your forward foot creates a stable position over the ball that allows us to stay consistent through the shot. T – (T)ilt the shaft toward your target: We tilt the shaft toward the target to take some of the loft off of the face of the club; this allows you to hit the ball in the air for a short period of time before the ball will roll out the rest of the way. After you have reached your BLT setup you are now ready to hit the chip shot. A chip shot motion is closest to that of a putt (no wrist break, and backswing distance = follow though distance). Remember that if we are about to chip the ball to the target that your next shot needs to be a putt. Use this method for chipping and work hard to improve your short game to lower your score. Contact me if you would like to work on your game at Cider Ridge Golf Club!

www.oxfordaccess.com : 51


OXFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT

A MESSAGE FROM THE OXFORD FIRE CHIEF The Oxford Fire Department has a long and proud history protecting the citizens of Oxford. The department was organized on May 18, 1884. Chief W. A. Orr was the first Firefighter and Fire Chief. The first fire apparatus was a horse drawn wagon named the “Katie G” and was pulled by a big gray horse named “George.” The department was an all-volunteer force until the late 1980’s when the city hired Fire Chief Dewey Webb to work full-time. Chief Webb was instrumental in starting the modernization of the department and built the first sub-station in the Friendship area. The department continued to grow during the 1990’s to early 2000’s under the leadership of Chief Kenneth 52 : OXFORD ACCESS

Henson and Chief Eugene Smallwood, Jr. Fire Stations were added in the Coldwater and Dearmanville communities during this time. On March 3, 2007, I was hired to replace the retiring Chief Smallwood with the mission to turn the Oxford Fire Department into a true combination department. On April 14, 2007, the first full-time, 24/7 firefighters were hired. Today the Oxford Fire Department consists of 28 full-time firefighters, 22 volunteer firefighters, six fire stations, a four-story training tower, seven engines, one ladder truck, one tanker truck, three rescue trucks, and five brush trucks. As of August 1, 2015 the fire protection class for the City of Oxford was

reduced to a Class 3-3X. This is a great accomplishment for our city and the fire department. The members of the Oxford Fire Department are active in our community providing support for other city departments and the Oxford City School System. In 2015, the department raised $10,795.00 for the Muscular Dystrophy Association and $2,366.00 for Pediatric Cancer Research at Children’s Hospital, as well as working the doors at Walmart during the Cerebral Palsy Telethon weekend. I’m proud to be the fire chief of this great city and to be able to be associated with such a great group of firefighters. - Chief Gary Sparks


OXFORD FIRE DEPARTMENT GIVING AWAY FREE SMOKE DETECTORS TO RAISE FIRE AWARENESS

FREE

SMOKE DETECTORS

In 2015, 90 Alabamians died in house fires. Most of the victims were in homes without working smoke alarms. In response to this dangerous absence of lifesaving devices, the Oxford Fire Department and Alabama’s Turn Your Attention to Fire Prevention campaign are raising awareness of how properly installed smoke alarms can drastically improve your chances of surviving a house fire. In addition, the Oxford Fire Department offers free smoke detectors citizens who are unable to purchase them. If you would like to receive this service, please contact Fire Station #1 at (256) 831-3208. Put smoke alarms on every floor of your home. This includes the basement. If you sleep with the bedroom door closed, install one inside the bedroom. Test smoke alarms each month. If a 9-volt battery powers it, replace the batteries at least yearly. If a 10-year lithium (long-life) batter powers it, replace the entire smoke alarm according to the manufacturer’s instructions. This is typically seven to eight years. www.oxfordaccess.com : 53


HEATING SAFETY

There is something about the winter months and curling up with a good book by the fireplace. But did you know that heating equipment is one of the leading causes of home fire deaths? With a few simple safety tips and precautions, you can prevent most heating fires from happening.

BE WARM AND SAFE THIS WINTER • Keep anything that can burn at least three-feet away from heating equipment, like the furnace, fireplace, wood stove, or portable space heaters. • Have a three-foot “kid-free zone” around open fires and space heaters • Never use your oven to heat your home. • Have a qualified professional install stationary space heating equipment according to the local codes and manufacturer’s instructions. • Have heating equipment and chimneys cleaned and inspected every year by a qualified professional. • Remember to turn portable heaters off when leaving the room or going to bed. • Always use the right kind of fuel, specified by the manufacturer, for fuel burning space heaters. • Make sure fireplace has a sturdy screen to stop sparks from flying into the room. Ashes should be cool before putting them in a metal container. Keep the container a safe distance away from your home. • Test smoke alarms monthly.

54 : OXFORD ACCESS


www.oxfordaccess.com : 55


TURN YOUR ATTENTION TO FIRE PREVENTION

“Turn Your Attention to Fire Prevention” is a joint effort between the Alabama Association of Fire Chiefs and the Alabama State Fire Marshall’s office to reduce fire fatalities within the State of Alabama. There were 94 fire fatalities in 2014, 90 in 2015 and so far we’ve had eight in 2016. This is unacceptable. Most of these were preventable if proper precautions had been taken. The “Turn Your Attention to Fire Prevention” Task Force comprised of Fire Chiefs from across the State of Alabama, State Fire Marshall Ed Paulk, and the Oxford Fire Department want to remind each citizen of the following fire safety tips: • Place smoke detectors in every bedroom, in the hallway outside the bedrooms, and on every level of the house. If your smoke detector is battery operated or has a battery back-up, replace the batteries at least twice a year. • Use only UL approved heaters. If you are using a space heater, make sure there is three feet of space in all directions around the heater. • Have your chimneys cleaned and checked annually. When empting the ashes from the fire place, use a metal bucket and set them outside away from the house. • NEVER leave candles or oil lamps burning when you go to bed or leave the house. • Don’t be distracted while cooking. Kitchen fires are the leading cause of home fires and most are because the cook becomes distracted with other things and forgets about what’s cooking. • NEVER smoke in bed and make sure that all smoking materials are out. • Don’t overload electrical circuits. For more information: Contact the Oxford Fire Department at 256-831-3208 or check out the Turn Your Attention to Fire Prevention website at www.turnyourattention.com. 56 : OXFORD ACCESS


A LOOK INTO THE

EARLY OXFORD HISTORY WORDS BY HUNTER C. GENTRY PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY OF: OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY Dudley Snow and Elisha Sylvannus Simmons were two of the most influential men that owned the land that later became known as Oxford. In the early days of the 1830s, the land was separated by a ditch, the north portion known as

tance from the male academy. The male academy, directed under the leadership of Wilson and Chambliss, was located atop the hill on Second Street, between Main and Luttrell Streets.

“Skace Grease” owned by Simmons, and the south portion known as “Lick Skillet” owned by Snow. This early legend of the naming comes from when an unknown passerby stopped on the area south of Snow Street and was denied food for they were “skace of grease.” The traveler moved further north of Choccolocco Street where the family was more hospitable in his request. As the early legend of folklore passed through generations says, he was advised to “lick the skillet” or “sop out the skillet.”

On February 21, 1860, due to the division and name changing of Benton to Calhoun County, Oxford had to charter again for a second incorporation. Through this second incorporation, Oxford was required to elect seven council members and redraw the limits from half a mile from the railroad culvert.

On February 7, 1852, the town of Oxford was incorporated with the stipulations of a certain number of council members and the limits appropriated within a certain dis-

With the construction of the railroad between the years of 1859 and 1862, Oxford saw an increase in population and the construction of the Oxford Iron Company. The furnace has been said to been constructed near Noble and Sixth Streets in present day Anniston. In April 1865 Union troops raided and destroyed the furnace. www.oxfordaccess.com : 57


After the devastation of the Civil War, Oxford boomed with a bustling economy of the cotton trade business. An article written in the Jacksonville Republican on December 13, 1879 stated, “Streets were crowded with cotton wagons from Cleburne, Clay, Randolph, Talladega and Calhoun Counties… we were shown cotton wagons that had come at least thirty miles to make the market…” With an increase of population and trade, Oxford became 58 : OXFORD ACCESS

the hub of the southern part of Calhoun County. Daniel P. Gunnells built the first brick building constructed downtown at the corner of Choccolocco and Main Streets in 1869. The Gunnells building was later razed and currently used as a parking lot. The Moseley Brothers built the second brick building in downtown on Choccolocco Street in 1874. The building is currently housing the Hubbard’s Off Main restaurant.


OXFORD CITY BOARD OF EDUCATION A MESSAGE FROM THE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION

On behalf of the Oxford City Board of Education and all of the employees of our district, I want to wish everyone a Happy and Prosperous New Year. 2016 promises to be another fantastic year for our schools and city and I for one am excited to see what the future holds for the Oxford City School District. It is truly a remarkable time in the history of our community. It is my belief that Oxford’s future is as bright as ever. The calendar year 2015 was a successful and productive year for our system as we opened a new Career Center with state-of-the-art career preparatory labs in medical care, engineering, business, television production and graphic design at Oxford High School, and a new district office in historic downtown Oxford. Both of these facilities will serve our students, staff, and citizens of our great city for years to come. Additionally, Oxford’s schools continue to be a leader in academics, scoring in the top 20 in the state in overall reading and math in grades 3-8 as measured by Alabama’s assessment system. At the high school level our system saw a record number of students participating in Advanced Placement Courses and ACT scores above the state average in all categories. Our school district’s reputation as a state leader in academics, extracurricular activities, and innovative programs is truly a team effort. Our civic leaders, Board of Education, community partners, parents, employees, and students all play a part in the success of our school system. Our success is measured not just in the test scores and academic rankings earned in the classroom or the extracurricular achievements earned in athletics, Fine Arts and other competitions, but in the impact our teachers have on the lives of each student attending our schools on a daily basis. I look forward to 2016 and the opportunities it presents for our students and city. Oxford is a truly special place where opportunity and education partner to affect the lives of children in a powerful way. Go Big “O”! Sincerely, Jeff Goodwin, Ed.D. www.oxfordaccess.com : 59


SUCCESS IS NOT A RANDOM ACT By Chris Jarmon, OHS Student

Malcolm Gladwell once said “Success is not a random act. It arises out of a predictable and powerful set of circumstances and opportunities.” As a senior at Oxford High School who has grown up in the school system, I am very honored to have been given opportunities and placed in circumstances that students at most other schools could not even dream of. Not only was I given a firm educational foundation from my beginnings at Oxford, but I was also presented with technology that truly planted the seed for electronics and engineering in my life. As I transitioned from elementary school to middle school I was involved with the Gifted program, which gave my peers and me the opportunity to focus on our skills and topics of interest that would not be as applicable in our core subjects. It was in these years that my classmates and I were first introduced to the ACTE Technology Fair, in which students from the region create projects in several categories of their choosing and compete against other students’ projects. It was a great learning experience for us all, and not to mention some of the most fun we had ever had from school. This quickly became an annual competition for our schools and a legacy of technological 60 : OXFORD ACCESS

success for our school system. One category at the technology fair that sparked the interest of my friends and me was the Hardware/Robotics category. After some research and wishes, I received a Lego Mindstorm for Christmas (Mindstorms are Lego’s modular robotics kits that combine Lego parts with motors, sensors, and programma-

and the potential for innovation and creative learning, the school system purchased 10 Lego Mindstorm kits to be used by students in years to come. Since then, the school system has purchased what has expanded into a fleet of Lego Mindstorms in all of the schools as well as starting a robotics class for young aspiring students.

ble microcontrollers). The following years at the technology fair, my group of friends and I had learned the basics of robotics and computer programming through the Lego Mindstorms platform. After seeing the success we had made with the Mindstorms

As the transition to the high school began, my class and I were very pleased to know that the torch had been passed on to the high school and they were experiencing the same boom in technology that we had been a part of. High school electives such as graphic arts (which utilizes a full lab of mac computers), engineering, robotics, and other STEM programs became available to us. It was amazing to see what we could do with simple motors and microcontrollers – real old-school hardware and robotics – based on our knowledge acquired through the Lego Mindstorms. A huge technological outbreak then occurred when the school system purchased an arsenal of MacBook Air computers; each student received their own personal laptop to be used throughout their years at the school. Classroom assignments quickly became more oriented with technology. Along with resurfacing education,


the new computers opened up new possibilities for projects in technology. The high school soon began to sweep the competition in many categories at the technology fair. Another category that sparked the interest of my peers and me was computer programming. After extensive research, trial and error, and watching YouTube tutorials, we learned the basics of programming in several coding languages. As technology has advanced, new classes have become available. It is in classes like Computer Science, Robotics, Engineering, Graphic Arts, and Yearbook that my friends and I have been able to expand our interests and skills through technology. I am proud to say that because of Oxford City schools I can write programs in multiple coding languages, design 3D objects and animations, develop video games, design pages and edit photos for yearbooks, 3D print CAD designs, and create circuitry for robotics. Malcolm Gladwell also said “Who we are cannot be separated from where we’re from.” I cannot imagine who I would be today if I had not grown up with such a great family and in such a wonderful school system. All that I am today and all the potential that the future holds would not be plausible if it weren’t for the City of Oxford. If it’s not apparent by now, I am very fond of Malcolm Gladwell and his words on success; not surprisingly, that is because of Oxford City Schools as well. These quotes are found in Gladwell’s book Outliers, a reading assignment that was given to us in eleventh grade English not because of curriculum, but because our helpful teacher hoped it would benefit our future and prepare us for success. I was lucky enough to learn from teachers – from kindergarten to senior year – who invest in their students’ futures and mold them into respectable young men and women prepared to take on the world when they put on that cap and gown. Teachers and staff like these are what make Oxford City Schools the peak of education that it has become.

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OXFORD MIDDLE SCHOOL MATH AND SCIENCE TEAM WORDS BY JANSEN HARMON 7th Grade Social Studies Teacher

Each year, after all the presents have been opened and college football crowns its champion, another competition is just ahead for the members of the Math and Science Team at Oxford Middle School – the State Science Bowl. Thirty teams from all across Alabama travel to our southern port and visit the Alabama School of Math and Science. Mobile, AL becomes the center of middle school academia for a mere twelve hours of competition. For the members of Oxford Middle School’s Math and Science Team, the journey is intense. “I have been studying for this year’s competition since last year’s ended. I want that Captain seat,” one member of the team remarks. Such is the life of academic team members all across Alabama, a full year of studying and hard work for a chance at victory.

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This effort almost paid off in 2015 when Oxford Middle School’s team placed third in the state, narrowly losing to the second place finisher by the last question of the match. The five students who were on that particular team were heartbroken. I remember seeing the disappointment on each of their faces as they turned and looked at me. We all knew they had what it took to win the competition and move on to compete at the national level in Washington D.C. Regardless, I could not be more proud. I had spent the better part of a year teaching and

coaching these students, hoping and praying for success. My students had spent countless hours of their young lives preparing for the competition, and it truly paid off. Out of our three teams that qualified for the state competition, two teams placed in the top ten! When competing against the best students and coaches from around Alabama, I deem that a great success. As we look forward to the 2016 competition, I am reminded of the drive in last year’s group of kids. I have a few veterans that have risen to be

leaders among their peers. They have encouraged their team to study, learn, and work together so that they can continue to improve. This is only our third year of competing at the state level, and we have already become a common name among the “teams-towatch-out-for” conversation. I am very proud of what we have accomplished over the past few years, and in the future I expect even greater accolades to be awarded to our students here at the middle school. If we expect greatness and endeavor diligently toward it, we truly have nothing to lose.

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FROM DIRT ROADS TO

HISTORIC MAIN STREET OXFORD

A Walk Through History by Rod Harris, Main Street Director Alabama was once filled with small towns connected by small dirt roads. Travel was limited. It was not uncommon for people to spend their entire lives close to their homes. The Oxford Echo was a newspaper that began publication some time in the late 1800’s and served the area until at least 1895. Of the eight pages included in each paper, much of a page was always dedicated to who was visiting and from where. Company coming from areas as close as Heflin was considered a big deal. Company from Charleston and other cities on the east coast were cause for a city-wide celebration. Within these towns, businesses of all kinds thrived along the main street. From the 1800’s until the 1920’s and 1930’s life was hard and work days were long; businesses reflected this. Blacksmiths, barber shops, dry goods, hardware, general stores and grocery stores could be found along most main streets. As they grew, the towns took on the character and workmanship of the residents they served. Materials and design used in construction were based more on functionality than personal style and aesthetics. Life became easier in the 1940’s and 1950’s through the contributions of science and industry. More time could be devoted to leisure activities. Along with the establishments dedicated to the necessities of life, theaters, soda fountains, and other leisure time establishments began to appear on main streets. A personal element began to appear in the design and décor of Main Streets. As a result, each town had its own look and feel. No two towns were alike. By the 1950’s, both roads and the means of transportation had improved. With these improvements came a sense of freedom and the willingness of residents to travel more often and greater distances. A common thread remained. The roads they traveled still ran through the heart of the towns that dotted them like so many pearls on a strand. On June 29th, 1956, Dwight D. Eisenhower signed the Federal Aid Highway Act. This act was ultimately created out of fear of a nuclear attack on a major city and in this

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event, the need for quick evacuation. It was the foundation of one of the greatest achievements in human history, and a death sentence for small town America. By the very argument for their creation they were to be a straight shot from one large city to the next. Many once-thriving small towns bypassed by the new roadway failed to compete with the ease of interstate travel. Without traffic and the business it brings, shops were closed and buildings were boarded. In some instances, towns were eliminated entirely. In the interest of expedient travel, cloverleaf structures were formed at exits to prevent the need for left turns across traffic. The interstate was not all bad for commerce in cities and towns. In many cases, municipalities lucky enough to be in close proximity to the newly constructed interstate flourished. Oxford is a prime example of the benefits of interstate commerce. In 1949, the Oxford city limits were a very rough circle, with the city center being the downtown train station, and only a diameter of about one mile. Presently, Oxford is approximately 20 miles from east to west and at its widest, 6 miles north to south. In 1949, the land the interstate now rests on was not part of Oxford. Now we bracket it entirely for the length of the city. Oxford is fortunate to experience the best of both worlds. The interstate has brought numerous opportunities in the way of big stores previously mostly available in larger cities. It has also brought interconnectedness and easy mobility. Oxford also has the charm found in the small towns of old times. The dirt roads have been paved, but the small town remains. The goal of Main Street Alabama, and by proxy, Historic Main Street Oxford, is to help to bring life and prosperity back to the place of our humble beginnings. From helping current business improve, to recruiting new businesses, to planning events, and helping with design elements, there is a lot to be done. Volunteers are a valuable resource, and are always welcome.


2016 OXFORD PARD GIRLS SOFTBALL FOR YOUTH Slow Pitch 5-6 & 7-8 Fast Pitch 9-10 & 11-12

$60 Registration Fee (NONREFUNDABLE)

January 18 - March 5 at the Oxford Civic Center PLAYERS MUST BE 5 AND NOT TURN 13 BEFORE JANUARY 1, 2016. Please complete all information and accompany registration with birth certificate and registration fee. Players Name: Date of Birth:

Age: Name of Parent or Guardian:

Mailing Address: Home Phone:

City: Work Phone:

Cell Phone:

Shirt Size (Circle): YS YM YL AS AM AL AXL AXXL Pants Size (Circle): YS YM YL AS AM AL AXL AXXL I hearby certify that the above information is true and correct, and I understand that any false information that I provide will jeopardize the eligibility of the registrant. Parent or Guardian Signature:

Date:

Are you or your spouse interested in coaching a team? YES NO www.oxfordaccess.com : 65


STATE OF ALABAMA * CALHOUN COUNTRY * This agreement entered into by and between the parent(s) or guardian(s) of below said minor child and the City of Oxford, Alabama, a municipal corporation, a.k.a. Parks and Recreation Department (PARD), hereinafter called the City, as follows: 1. The parent does hereby consent that the below named child be allowed to participate in the below said program which is being conducted by the City. 2. In the event said child is injured as a result of participating in said activity, the agents, servants and employers of the City shall be allowed to seek and render medical treatment for said child and they shall be allowed to make, in the absence of the parent or guardian, any necessary decision requested by the attending physician. 3. The City agrees to make every effort to notify the parent or emergency contact as soon as possible as to any injury received by said child as stated on registration form. 4. The parent does hereby notify the City that the child suffers from any and all disabilities and/or ailments as stated on said registration form. 5. The parent agrees that in the event the named minor child required medical services because of an injury or sickness, the parent shall be responsible for the medical costs incurred. 6. The parent is aware that the said child may incur injuries as a result of participation in the above named activity. The parent does hereby release the City from any damages that may be incurred due to any injury received by the child in participating in the above set out activity. The parent agrees to save harmless the City from any liability or claim that may result from an injury in participating in said activity/sport and further agrees to indemnify and save harmless the City against any claim for damages, compensation or otherwise on the part of said minor or his heirs, executors, administrators or personal representatives, and to reimburse or make good any loss or damages or costs that the City may have to pay if any litigation arises on account of any claims made by said minor or anyone on his behalf. Parent or Guardian Name: Minor Child’s Name: Program/Event in which participating: Date: STATE OF ALABAMA * CALHOUN COUNTRY * On the date of the execution of this release before me personally came (parent’s name) known to be the individual described in and who executed this release, and acknowledged that he or she fully understood its contents and meaning and duly executed the same as his or her free act and deed.

(Parent or Guardian) Sworn to and subscribed Before me, this day Of , 20

Notary Public 66 : OXFORD ACCESS

.


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