2018 BEST OF OXFORD!

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BEST NEW BITES • OXONIANS TO FOLLOW • COMMUNITY PILLARS

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Thank you for your support, Oxford! Congratulations to Dr. Harper and Dr. Mize on their second and third place nominations in this year's Best of Oxford.

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CO N T R I B U TO R S

Erin Austen Abbott, originally from Oxford, has shown her photography in galleries around the world. She has published writing and photography in dozens of blogs and printed publications and released her first book in 2017.

Julia Forrester was a philanthropic event planner in Washington, D.C. and Boston before relocating to Oxford, Mississippi. She is on a mission to create one source for Oxford events.

Deja Samuel is a freelance photographer for Oxford Magazine. A native of Hattiesburg, Mississippi, she is currently in her last year at the University of Mississippi, where she studies Art and Theatre.

Christina Steube is a communications specialist at the University of Mississippi School of Law and an instructor at UM’s Meek School of Journalism and New Media. She is a native of the Mississippi Gulf Coast. (Photo by Kevin Bain/Ole Miss Communications)

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Bill DeJournett is a freelance writer and musician based in Oxford. He holds a Master’s degree in Journalism from the Meek School of Journalism and New Media at the University of Mississippi.

Rhes Low lives in Oxford, Mississippi with his wife and kids and is an aspiring bay rat. Follow him on Instagram @rhesvlow and at exploringlife0to20.com.


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Cover Illustration by Jake Thrasher

Best of Oxford The best of everything that Oxford has to offer, with nearly 200 winners in five categories. COMPILED BY RHES LOW, TODD MALONE, JENNA MASON, CHRISTINA STEUBE PHOTOS BY DEJA SAMUEL AND OXFORD MAGAZINE STAFF

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38 ARTS & CULTURE 18

MUSIC Kudzu Kings Come of Age

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BOOKS Lisa Patton David Joy Book Chat with Tom Santopietro 5 Not-to-Miss in August

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FOOD & DRINK

THE REST

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EDITOR’S LETTER Jenna Mason

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THE 662 Julia Blair

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FACES OF OXFORD David Guyton

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OUT AND ABOUT

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SAID AND DONE Jim Dees

EAT YOUR LOCALS Retreat to the Ravine

HOME & STYLE 38

TOUR Restoration (Hard Work)

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OXFORD NEWSMEDIA

Delia Childers, Associate Publisher

Thank you Oxford for voting us Best Bank! We appreciate your business!

GENERAL MANAGER Katie Krouse

MANAGING EDITOR Jenna Mason

CONTRIBUTING EDITORS Jim Dees Alec Harvey

ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Rhes Lowe Delia Childers

LAYOUT/DESIGN Todd Malone STAFF PHOTOGRAPHER Bruce Newman

CONTRIBUTORS Erin Austen Abbott, Julia Forrester, Bill DeJournett, Rhes Low, Deja Samuel, Christina Steube

FNBOXFORD.COM • (662) 234-2821 Thank you for voting us Oxford’s Best Dentists! It’s a privilege to serve our community and keep you smiling!

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Proverbs 3:5-6 10 ox fo r d m a g . co m

Oxford Magazine is published 12 times annually by Oxford Newsmedia LLC. All material is this publication is protected by copyright. We are located at 4 Private Road 2050 Oxford, MS 38655. Our annual subscription rate is $40 per year in the United States and $60 a year in Canada, Mexico and other foreign countries. Our website is oxfordmag.com. We can be reached by telephone at 662-234-4331. Letters, story ideas and postal changes should be addressed to Oxford Magazine, 4 Private Road 2050, Oxford, MS 38655.

Jake Thrasher, this month’s cover artist, is an award-winning editorial cartoonist and illustrator from Birmingham, Alabama. He is a graduate of the University of Mississippi and is pursuing a Ph.D. at Yale University.


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EDITOR’S NOTE

Good, Better, Best.

P

@ J E N N A LY N M A S O N @ J E N N A LY N M A S O N

utting together this Best of Oxford issue gives me a deeper appreciation for small(ish) town life. Sure, most of us will keep calling for a Target for years to come, but a person really can find everything she needs right here in the velvet ditch. Our charming Southern town garners increasing attention from the culinary world with top-notch chefs and ambitious restaurateurs. Our writers publish so many worthy reads that it’s near impossible to keep up. We’ve even got (or draw) enough big names for fairly regular celebrity sightings. Even better than praise from the outside world, though, there’s a distinct pride that comes from seeing your own family doctor or your favorite bartender or your first grader’s teacher receive hard-earned recognition from their fellow Oxonians. And that’s what this issue really demonstrates. These Best of Oxford winners have invested time, money and dreams to the success of our town. But the very best of Oxford are the Oxonians who make it a point to support them and voice their appreciation. Here’s to our winners, and to our voters. Cheers!

JENNA MASON Managing Editor jenna.mason@oxfordmag.com

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AUGUST 23 DAVID JOY WITH THE LINE THAT HELD US LOCATION: OFF SQUARE BOOKS 5:00 PM ________________________ AUGUST 27 ALL THE DIFFERENCE SCREENING BY OXFORD FILM FESTIVAL LOCATION: BURNS BELFRY MUSEUM AND MULTICULTURAL CENTER 6:30 P.M. – 8:30 P.M.

The 662 NOT-TO-MISS HAPPENINGS IN AUGUST AUGUST 3 YOUR SPECIAL DAY - A COLLECTION OF OXFORDS FINEST WEDDING VENDORS LOCATION: POWERHOUSE 6:30PM - 8:30PM Unlike traditional expos, there will be no booths, no pushy sales gimmicks, no over-the-top presentations. Instead, the hosts and a collection of their finest colleagues will showcase their best abilities as a real-deal wedding reception. Chat table linens, décor and lighting with Magnolia Rental, taste Taylor Grocery Special Events Catering, see The Powerhouse dressed to the nines. Sample Sweet-T’s Bakery cakes and Oxsicles sweet treats. Danny K Photography will show examples of his work. Oxford Photobomb will bring their new inflatable photo-booth and traditional photo-trailer.

________________________ AUGUST 7 & 21 WORLD FILM NIGHT LOCATION: LAFAYETTE COUNTY & OXFORD PUBLIC LIBRARY 7:00 PM 8/7: IMITATION OF LIFE (1959), DIR. BY DOUGLAS SIRK. COMMENTARY BY DR. VERNON CHADWICK. REFRESHMENTS SERVED. 8/21: WINGS OF DESIRE (1987), DIR. BY WIM WENDERS. COMMENTARY BY DR. VERNON CHADWICK. REFRESHMENTS SERVED. CONTACT LAURA BETH WALKER 662-234-5751 ________________________ AUGUST 9

MANCHESTER ORCHESTRA WITH (SANDY) ALEX G AND KEVIN DEVINE LOCATION: THE LYRIC

DOORS: 7:00 P.M. / SHOW: 8:00 P.M. $22.00 - $26.00, NO REFUNDS All minors (17 AND under) must be accompanied by a parent or guardian over 21. $3 fee for attendees under 21.

The largely invisible and often crushing struggles of young African-American men come vividly — and heroically — to life in All the Difference, which traces the paths of two teens from the South Side of Chicago who dream of graduating from college.

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5TH ANNUAL ART-ER LIMITS FRINGE FESTIVAL LOCATION: POWERHOUSE

Daytime events are free; Events after ~5 pm require a ticket. 3 Day Pass: $40 for members, $35 for non-members Thursday: $20 for members, $25 for non-members Friday & Saturday: $15 for members, $20 for non-members Sunday: Free admission (food & drink sales support the charities)

HIGHLIGHTS: THURSDAY, AUGUST 9 IRON BARTENDER COMPETITION LOCATION: POWERHOUSE 7:00 P.M. – 9:00 P.M. FRIDAY, AUGUST 10 OXFORD FILM FESTIVAL FRINGE SCREENING: LITTLE SHOP OF HORRORS LOCATION: POWERHOUSE 10:00 P.M. – 11:55 P.M. SECRET SHOW LOCATION: BUY A TICKET TO FIND OUT!

SATURDAY, AUGUST 11 MUSIC, DANCE AND THEATRE – KID FRIENDLY LOCATION: POWERHOUSE TIME TBD SUNDAY, AUGUST 12 FOOD TRUCK FIGHT LOCATION: OLD ARMORY PAVILION 5 – 8 P.M. Free admission, concession sales benefit participating charities. Live music and games for kids and adults. FOR MORE INFORMATION AND A FULL SCHEDULE OF EVENTS, VISIT WWW.OXFORDARTS.COM. oxfordma g . co m 13


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FAC ES OF OX FORD

OUB’s David Guyton leading growth BY DAVID MAGEE / PHOTO BY BRUCE NEWMAN

O

xford University Bank President and CEO David Guyton learned to bank the hard way. Growing up in Tupelo, he was the son of a banker in charge of six to eight branches in the community. They needed the grass mowed, and grounds maintained, and Guyton got the job as a high school student, literally learning the business from the ground up. “It was hot in the summer,” Guyton says. “I would get the work done and then go into the banks. I got to know the people, and they all seemed happy and fulfilled like my father, so banking seemed like a good business.” As a student at Ole Miss in the mid-1980s, Guyton majored in banking and finance, mentored by Dr. Don Moak. He took a job out of college with Trustmark as a management trainee, ending up in commercial loans working the casino business as it expanded in Mississippi in the 1990s. “That was quite an experience,” Guyton recalls. “We were a conservative bank but wanted to do business in the casino industry since it had come to the state. Our first client was Splash Casino in Tunica. We were traveling to Las Vegas and taking a $20 million request to loan committee to buy slot machines.” Guyton knew, however, that while the experience was good for a young banker, his heart was in community banking, like he had observed in Tupelo. He worked in Columbus before moving to Oxford in 2003 as president of the Bancorp South office here. Guyton also worked at FNB before hearing about the opportunity to lead OUB in 2010. “We belonged in Oxford,” Guyton says. “I always knew we would end up here. But I thought it might not happen until retirement. To get the opportunity to lead a hometown bank in Oxford was a dream. “I was ready to take responsibility for making decisions that would affect the business and its customers,” he

says. “But we didn’t want to leave Oxford. It worked out perfectly.” The Guyton’s have two children – Matthew and Mary Arden – and the Oxford schools, combined with the city’s growth and amenities, have made this the perfect professional and personal home. “Oxford was just starting to take off when I got back here,” Guyton says. “You could see it happening. As a banker, you feel fortunate to be working in a community on the move.” OUB’s business has grown since Guyton took over in 2010. He attributes that to local knowledge since board members include people like long-time real estate professional Dick Marchbanks and businessman Dave Fair. “When we go to loan committees, we have local people who make the decisions, and that does matter because they understand the market with years of experience,” Guyton says. Guyton knows a thing or two about business in the community as well since he’s in the midst of serving as president of the Oxford-Lafayette County Chamber of Commerce. “The community is growing, no doubt about that,” Guyton says. “I average seven new business ribbon cuttings a month. It’s a lot of fun to see what’s happening.” OUB has been a part of that growth and Guyton is leading a new capital offering to pave the way for expansion in the future as Oxford and Lafayette County continue to mature. The bank is offering new shares at $16.50 each in April as long as they are available, in hopes of raising $5 million. “We have grown, and we are growing to the point that we are having a stock offering and the chance to buy additional stock. There is so much demand. Our loan growth was crazy last year, and to continue meeting our growth plan we want to raise more capital.”

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arts & culture AU G U S T 2 0 1 8

MUSIC

Oldie But A Goodie The Kudzu Kings keep on kickin’ it PHOTO BY ERIN AUSTIN ABBOTT

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ARTS & CULTURE

MUSIC

The Kudzu Kings Come of Age Mississippi’s quintessential jam band stands the test of time BY BILL DEJOURNETT/ PHOTOS BY BRUCE NEWMAN

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ormed in 1994 in Oxford, the Kudzu Kings have been entertaining audiences throughout the Southeast and beyond for almost 24 years. Their eclectic style is a veritable gumbo of influences- blues, country, rock, Dixieland, funk, and classical, with a bit of reggae thrown in. Known for their laid-back attitude and clever on-stage banter, the Kudzu Kings crashed on the regional music scene at a time when dense, dark-themed bands such as Nirvana and Soundgarden dominated the national soundscape. Often compared to bands such as the Allman Brothers and Lynrd Sky-

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nrd, the Kudzu Kings are Mississippi’s quintessential “Jam Band.” Consisting of guitarist Tate Moore, bassist Dave Woolworth, keyboardist Robert Chaffe, guitarist George McConnell, guitarist Max Williams, drummer Ted Gainey, and numerous others over the years, the band has altered their schedule from their early touring days due to time and lifestyle changes. Their creativity and joy in making music, however, are as strong as ever. The origins of the band were somewhat haphazard according to Bassist Dave Woolworth. “The short of it is that I met Tate (Moore) at the theatre program at Ole


Miss. We got to talking and hit it off, and met at a party and said ‘let’s get a band together,’” Woolworth said. “In ’94, when the band started, we started playing a whole lot,” Moore added. “At school, they said as long as I did one show a semester and showed up for class, they would be cool about me missing Thursdays, Fridays and Saturdays. By my junior and senior years, I think we were playing a hundred dates per year. We just took off from there. When I graduated in ’96, I thought we were going to be rock stars. We were playing Mud Island, we were playing Memphis in May, it was really happening,” said Moore. Keyboardist Robert Chaffe recalled, “Tate and Dave were the originators of the band. They were playing together in various incarnations before I came onboard. I was in a band in the nineties called the Mosquito Brothers, that consisted of myself, Max Williams, and Chuck Sigler. We were doing New Orleans-type music, my freshman and sophomore years at Ole Miss. I just fell into it. It was great. The next thing you know, the band leader went to Cornell to get his Master’s, the band kind of fell apart. Max started jamming with Tate and Dave on their weekly gig. I think it was around that time, whatever band Tate and Dave had put together had dissolved, and they were looking for other people to

play with. Max says, ‘I know a band.’ Enter Chuck and myself, and the five of us started playing what was Tate and Dave’s regular Tuesday night gig, and that’s what turned into the band. George McConnell was coming back from his adventures in Europe, and he started sitting in, and not long after, we were complete,” Chaffe said. To hear the band members describe it, they were all a natural fit. But the musical influences each member cites betray the serendipitous nature of their union. “I was from rural Ohio,” said guitarist Tate Moore. “I knew about Merle Haggard and Waylon Jennings and David Allen Coe and Willy (Nelson). But I didn’t even know that New Orleans existed,” said Moore. “We got together and started playing country music,” said bassist Woolworth. “A lot of us are rock players, and a friend of mine, a fellow musician and recording engineer said, ‘No, no! Kudzu Kings are a rock band!’ What you might take away from that is that the Kudzu Kings come from a wide variety of influences. Everybody has a different background, and some of it overlaps. Some of us listen to a lot of singer/songwriter stuff. Some people listen to heavy metal or the Dead or progressive rock. We all grew up listening to country music at some point. The guys from the Mosquito Brothers, Max, Chuck and

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ARTS & CULTURE

MUSIC

Robert, all played in a funk band in New Orleans. I had been playing in a Reggae band in upstate New York for years. It comes back together with a little bit of all these different things, which gives the audience a lot of interesting things to pick up on. I often consider it the Disney of all the bands I’ve played in, because it has all these elements, a little bit for everybody. We don’t take ourselves so seriously, so we try to make it fun. All those things come together to make an enjoyable experience,” said Woolworth. On their performances and memories from the band’s early days on the road, Chaffe said, “Certainly the pinnacle was the Red Rocks performance where we opened for Widespread Panic in 2000. That’s probably my biggest memory right there. That was real satisfaction that you have climbed a ladder to a certain point. You’ve reached a certain level of success. Those are great memories.” After years of touring heavily, in the 2000s, the band slowed its pace. Band members came and went and returned over the years, and marriages, children, and non-musical careers became the norm. “Nowadays, everybody has a day job,” said Woolworth. “We’re all playing a lot, but not a very aggressive schedule like it

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was. It frees us up now to take some more chances and be more creative, but also be a little more calculating, too, instead of plowing ahead all the time, to the next show, to the next show. Everybody has settled down now. People have joined the ‘American Breeding Association,’ they have one foot in what you might consider the ‘traditional lifestyle,’ which gives us a lot of material for writing and relating to other people. If your experiences are always like this alternate reality compared to everybody else, it’s hard to write about experiences that are relevant to other people. We’ve certainly stayed busy, playing often enough.” The band is looking forward, not backward, with plans for the future. “We just played a show the other day with the original lineup,” Woolworth said. “We’ve had a few drummers over time, we’ve had guitar players move around a little, we had seven guys in the band at one point. We generally hold around six, we have done shows with five in the past. I think having people who can stay together for that long is a feat in itself, and that tells you a little about the chemistry of the people.” Chaffe added, “We’re still looking forward to more shows. We’re excited for what’s ahead.” Bill DeJournett is a freelance writer and musician based in Oxford.


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ARTS & CULTURE

BOOKS AUTHOR SPOTLIGHT

Lisa Patton The Southern writer showcases sorority life in the South BY ALEC HARVEY/ PHOTOS COURTESY OF LISA PATTON

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L

isa Patton’s books have always been about the South. Her first, Whistlin’ Dixie in a Nor’Easter, based on her own story, is a fish-out-of-water tale of a Southern belle who moves with her family to run an inn in Vermont. That acclaimed debut has been followed by the bestsellers Yankee Doodle Dixie and Southern as a Second Language. Her fourth book, though the title may not scream it, is about as Southern as they come. Rush is set during sorority recruitment at the University of Mississippi, something Patton, a University of Alabama graduate, knows a little about. “My rush experience was great,” says Patton, who was a Kappa Delta at Alabama. “Today, you can’t think about going into it without the official recommendation and numerous other letters of recommendation, but back then, I never thought it wouldn’t be a great experience. I had been in all the high school sororities and clubs and done this and that and never thought it wouldn’t be easy.” The ins and outs of rush week are explored in Rush, but Patton calls her book “a different take on sorority life.” In it, young Cali Watkins wants to join a sorority at Ole Miss. She has it all – except family money and pedigree, and that may end her hopes, if the family secrets she’s harboring don’t do it first. Along the way, Cali and one of the rush week advisors, Wilda, discover something they didn’t know before. Miss Pearl, the longtime housekeeper at Alpha Delta Beta, like other workers at the sorority houses, doesn’t have health or retirement benefits. Cali, Wilda and others set out to change that. Patton only began writing books after a career in entertainment. She managed the Orpheum Theatre in her hometown of Memphis and worked in TV and radio promotion before moving to Vermont for three years to run an inn with her husband. After three years, Patton returned to Nashville, where she was assistant to performer Michael McDonald. He eventually moved to California, and Patton didn’t want to relocate, so she stayed and finished Whistlin’ Dixie in a Nor’Easter, which she had been working on piecemeal for several years. “The first book did well enough for me to quit my job, so I did,” she says. The second book was not as stress-free as the first. “What I didn’t anticipate was, one, it would be much harder to work on a deadline,” Patton says. “Two, I was diagnosed with breast cancer; three, my little sister died tragically; and four, my son’s best friend died tragically. All

of this, and I was trying to write a comedic novel.” She persevered, and Yankee Doodle Dixie and Southern as a Second Language were the result. And when she returned to Alabama for the ribboncutting for the new Kappa Delta sorority house, she got her idea for her fourth novel. “I walked in, and the housekeeper caught my eye,” she recalls. “The collegians would go up to her and hug her and say, ‘I love you,’ and I was intrigued.” So she struck up a conversation and learned the woman was going to have to quit her job because of a lack of health insurance. “Her story never left me, so I started researching and found out this was the case most everywhere in the South,” Patton says. “A few sororities do offer health insurance, but the employees have to pay part of the premium, and it’s hard for them to do that. I dreamed this dream and thought, what if that was taken care of ? What if each girl was charged a little more and these people had health insurance and some retirement benefits?” With that mission in mind, Patton wrote Rush. “It was my way of doing a few things,” Patton says. “I was able to honor the women in my life who had lovingly raised me as a privileged white girl in Memphis, Tennessee. And it was also a way to honor these people who serve so well and lovingly in these houses.” Researching Rush, Patton interviewed sorority members, sorority housemothers and many others. “I even had a couple of college girls read the book to make sure it’s as accurate as possible,” the author says. “It’s fiction, but I wanted it to be as accurate as possible.” She chose Oxford and Ole Miss because she thought it was a “better backdrop” than Tuscaloosa. “There is more rich, local color in the town of Oxford than in Tuscaloosa,” she says. I just felt like Ole Miss was the place to set it.” Patton will be in Oxford for two book signings at Square Books. The first will be Sept 7 at 5 p.m., the second at 1 p.m. on Sept. 29, the day before sorority bid day at Ole Miss. Patton is hoping that Rush might shed light on a problem that can be solved. “I really in my heart think things can change with help inside the sorority houses,” she says. “That’s kind of what happens in my story. The students find out about it and insist on change.” She’s hopeful that can happen in real life, too. “Maybe things can change,” Patton says. “It’s my prayer.”

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ARTS & CULTURE

MUSIC BOOK

5 questions with David Joy BY ALEC HARVEY / PHOTO BY ASHLEY T. EVANS

David Joy started out his literary career with a bang, with his Where All Light Tends to Go being named as an Edgar finalist for best first novel. He is also author of the acclaimed The Weight of This World and the memoir Growing Gills: A Fly Fisherman’s Journey. The North Carolinian is back with a new novel, The Line That Held Us, about the cover-up and aftermath of an accidental death. He’ll be in conversation with Ace Atkins on Aug. 23 at 5 p.m. at Square Books.

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How would you describe The Line That Held Us for anyone who hasn’t read it? The novel starts with a man named Darl Moody sneaking onto private property to poach a deer he’s been stalking for years. While he’s in the tree stand, he sees what he believes to be a hog rooting around and he takes a shot. When he gets up to the body, he realizes it wasn’t a pig but rather a man crawling around on all fours digging ginseng. Worse yet, he recognizes that it’s Carol Brewer, a local man from a family notorious for violence. Darl calls his best friend Calvin Hooper to help cover it up and essentially the novel is the story of that death being uncovered by the victim’s brother, Dwayne Brewer. In a lot of ways it’s a book about what we’re willing to do for the people we love most. I think with Dwayne, I became really interested in trying to create an unforgettable villain. I was thinking about characters like Lester Ballard in McCarthy’s Child Of God, or Flannery O’Connor’s Misfit. I was thinking about Granville Sutter in William Gay’s Twilight. Dwayne is sort of my embodiment of all those characters. He moves like Granville and his voice is sensible, at times almost philosophical like The Misfit. In the end, The Line That Held Us is very much Dwayne Brewer’s story. I think this novel is very different from anything else I’ve done. You seem to mix essays and novels seamlessly. Is it seamless? Are short stories next? I can’t write a short story to save my life. I lack whatever gene it is that makes writers like George Singleton and Jill McCorkle, Mary Miller, Thomas Pierce or Lauren Groff able to do what they do. I think I can write a decent novel and I think have some sort of elementary grasp on the essay. I think what makes great nonfiction work is fearlessness; it’s this sort of unrelenting honesty and willingness to be absolutely vulnerable. I think a lot of writers are unwilling to put themselves out there like that. A lot of times when I read essays, writers pull back at the exact moment they need to be most forthright. Maybe that’s one thing I’m willing to do that some people aren’t. I don’t mind putting the cards on the table. I don’t mind that vulnerability. Really it’s that same thing that makes great fiction work—fearlessness, honesty, vulnerability—but maybe it’s a little easier with the novel in that you have separation. Maybe it’s a little easier for the writer to go to those places with fiction because, even if you wrote that book staring in the mirror, when you show it to the world you can tell them it’s not you. Do you consider yourself a mystery writer? Is that what you set out to be? My work lacks that element of discovery that I think makes great mystery so fun to read. There are turns, but not in that traditional plot twist sort of way that keeps readers guessing. With my work, you typically know who committed the crime. Mystery is more about plotting and precision. The cuts are surgical. What I’m writing is blunt force trauma. I’m less interested in the element of discovery and more interested in putting the aftermath under a microscope. That said, I think the mystery community really embraced my work early on and has continued to be incredibly supportive. From that Edgar nomination for my first novel to the ongoing support from crime critics like Marilyn Stasio and Oline Cogdill, that community has just been very supportive of what I do. I certainly didn’t set out with that intention, but one thing I’ve learned is that those readers tend to be willing to go to places that a lot of audiences aren’t. They’re not put off by the darkness and the violence. I think they tend to be a braver lot. Who are some of your literary influences? As a Southerner, I’m largely a product of the usual suspects—Faulkner, O’Connor, Welty, McCarthy, et al. It gets sort of cliché naming the same old people, I think, but it’s true. As a Southerner, you can’t ignore those writers anymore than you can ignore the influence of The Holy Bible. It shades everything. The first time I ever read something and thought, That’s what I want to do, is when Ron Rash handed me a copy of William Gay’s I Hate To See That Evening Sun Go Down. I think William and Larry Brown continue to be the two writers whose work I most identify with. They wrote about the people I know, the people whose stories I want to tell. But as far as something that might be sort of a surprise, early on all I was writing was creative nonfiction and I really wanted to be the next John Gierach. I wanted to write a book like Trout Bum. I’m still heavily influenced by those outdoor writers, by books like Harry Middleton’s On The Spine Of Time or Datus C. Proper’s Pheasants Of The Mind. I think about an essay like Thomas McGuane’s The Heart Of The Game, and I think that’s about as perfect an essay as I’ve ever read. I think all of that outdoor writing carries over into my fiction in the same way that the poetry does, poets like Maurice Manning and Ray McManus and Kathleen Nalley and Adrian Matejka, Tim Peeler, Rebecca Gayle Howell, Ashley M. Jones, Scott Starbuck. I’m still someone who reads just as much poetry as I read fiction. Who are you reading now? Right now I’m reading a couple of manuscripts. I’m reading a new story collection called Sway by a Kentucky writer named Sheldon Lee Compton. A few years ago he had that brilliant collection The Same Terrible Storm. I’m also reading a debut novel manuscript by a writer I love named Leigh Ann Henion. The novel’s called Behold That Vanishing Grace, and it’s this sort of Edward Abbey meets Barbara Kingsolver eco-thriller. She’s one of the most talented voices in Appalachia, in America for that matter. I’m also reading a book of nonfiction called The Man Who Quit Money by Mark Sundeen. I usually mix up the nonfiction with the novels. I recently read John Branch’s The Last Cowboys, and that’s an incredible story. I also loved Michael Finkel’s The Stranger In The Woods, just the pacing he was able to create in a book of nonfiction. I think it’s been a really great year for the novel. There’ve been a lot of books I enjoyed: Steph Post’s Walk In The Fire, Laura Lippman’s Sunburn, Chloe Benjamin’s The Immortalists, Taylor Brown’s Gods Of Howl Mountain, Robert Gipe’s Weedeater, Leesa Cross-Smith’s Whiskey & Ribbons, Thomas Pierce’s The Afterlives, Silas House’s Southernmost. I think my two favorite novels I’ve read this year are Richard Powers’ The Overstory and Tommy Orange’s There There. The Overstory is almost biblical in scope. From those opening lines of, “First there was nothing. Then there was everything,” to just the sort of layered storytelling. That book’s a tremendous accomplishment. Then Orange’s book came out of nowhere. It’s one of the richest debut novels I’ve read in a long, long time. I reread that novel as soon as I finished. I think that book is damn near perfect.

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BOOKS

ARTS & CULTURE

BOOK PICKS

5 Not-To-Miss in August BY ALEC HARVEY

FEATURED ELIZABETH WARREN: HER FIGHT. HER WORK. HER LIFE. By Antonia Felix As mid-term elections approach, we’ll see more and more political books, including this one by Antonia Felix, who has written about Andrea Bocelli, Sonia Sotomayor, Michelle Obama and others. Here, she takes on a subject who just might be running for president in 2020. (Aug. 28, Sourcebooks)

TAILSPIN By Sandra Brown A fearless freight pilot meets his match in a small Georgia town where he is hired to deliver a mysterious black box. He finds himself in the middle of a mystery that becomes a 48-hour race to deliver the box before time runs out. Brown is the author of 69 New York Times best-sellers. (Aug.7, Hachette)

UNSHAKABLE HOPE: BUILDING OUR LIVES ON THE PROMISES OF GOD By Max Lucado Lucado is senior minister at Oak Hills Church in San Antonio, but he has a worldwide ministry in the many best-selling inspirational books he has written. His latest is a guide for overcoming sadness and despair and, he hopes, renewing one’s sense of purpose. (Aug. 7, Thomas Nelson) (July 17, HarperLuxe)

FEARED By Lisa Scottoline

TEXAS RANGER By James Patterson

Scottoline’s latest thriller featuring the Rosato & DiNunzio law firm centers around a reverse sex discrimination case filed against the firm and led by Nick Machiavelli, a vengeful former foe who is the plaintiffs’ lawyer. (Aug. 13, St. Martin’s Press)

Patterson takes a break from his Alex Cross and Women’s Murder Club series for this standalone thriller featuring Texas Ranger Rory Yates, who is named a suspect in the murder of his ex-wife. Yates is in search of the killer to clear his name. (Aug. 13, Little, Brown & Company)

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Book Chat with Tom Santopietro BY ALEC HARVEY / PHOTO BY JOAN MARCUS

Tom Santopietro, as the author of numerous volumes about American pop culture, knows books. And Santopietro, as stage manager for several New York theater productions, knows Broadway. Those worlds collide with his new book, Why To Kill a Mockingbird Matters, a look at the classic novel before a new adaptation of the Harper Lee work hits Broadway in the fall. Santopietro answered questions about To Kill a Mockingbird and his other reading habits. Have you always been enamored with To Kill a Mockingbird? Absolutely. I read it for the first time in the 9th grade and it resonated with me instantly. The combination of the story itself with the beauty of the language made a huge impression, which was only heightened when I watched the movie. What books shaped you growing up? When I was very young I loved reading The Hardy Boys and the Chip Hilton sports stories. I started to read mysteries for fun and then as I grew older, the two books that really opened up the world of literature for me were To Kill a Mockingbird and The Great Gatsby. Those were the two books that showed me how great books can operate on multiple levels at once; it really was like the proverbial peeling of an onion for me- layer upon layer. When you’re writing, do you have a routine? I actually do have a routine, starting with the fact that I’m not a morning person! But I try to go to the gym in the morning, have lunch and then write in the afternoon until I have to go to my “other” job, which is working on Broadway shows. I try to write each day but give myself holidays off. What are you reading now? I’m reading Chasing Hillary by Amy Chozick, which is an informative and very entertaining account of what it’s like to be a part of the press pool covering a presidential candidate, as well as J.D. Vance’s terrific Hillbilly Elegy. On the fiction side of things, I’m a big fan of Philip Kerr’s Bernie Gunther series, so I’ve just started his last book, Greeks Bearing Gifts. What’s next for you? Stretching my muscles by writing a play- and traveling to parts of the United States I’ve never seen. Tom Santopietro is the author of Sinatra in Hollywood, The Sound of Music Story, Considering Doris Day, The Importance of Being Barbra and other books.

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Thank you Oxford for voting us your best local coffee shop

265 N Lamar Blvd . Oxford Square North uptowncoffeeoxford.com

1101 Jackson Avenue East

Oxford, Mississippi 38655

(662) 380 5141 www.eatsaintleo.com

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food & drink AU G U S T 2 0 1 8

FOOD

La Vida Local A decade later, Ravine still sets the bar in fine dining PHOTO BY TORI DE LEONE

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FOOD & DRINK

Peer into the Ravine Longtime Oxford staple still strikes a chord with locals BY CHRISTINA STEUBE / PHOTOS COURTESY OF RAVINE

T

he Ravine restaurant in Oxford brings a little bit of California style to the Southern center of the culinary scene. Head chef and owner Joel Miller worked in the restaurant industry for more than 26 years in just about every position imaginable. He and his wife, Cori Benefiel, were living in California, where the culinary scene matched up with their own dreams for a dining venture of relaxed elegance. They returned to Mississippi to be closer to family and make their dream a reality. “In California, there were all these restaurants with nice, proper service and white tablecloths, but they were very laid back,” Miller said. “We wanted to bring that to Oxford.” Foodies in Oxford have loved it, and Ravine has been named Best of Oxford 2018 in two categories: Farm to Table and Fine Dining. “We’re happy to be recognized locally,” Miller said. “Our employees work hard to provide the best dining experience, and it’s nice that our customers appreciate that.” When they returned to the South, they found a quaint bed and breakfast available just a few miles south of the Oxford Square. It matched up perfectly with their vision for a place surrounded by trees and nature with a large porch for guest to come together. The Ravine includes two outdoor patios, essentially in the woods, to give customers a secluded dining experience. Another attribute Miller brought to Oxford from the Western dining scene is the farm-to-table trend. The food is contemporary Southern, but menu changes seasonally. The beef and pork are raised locally and the produce comes from farms around North Mississippi. “The restaurants had this farm-to-table way of life

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FOOD & DRINK out there that we wanted in Oxford,” Miller said. “It’s good for the local environment and economy, and it’s good for overall health and well-being.” Ravine sources the necessary ingredients for its dishes from purveyors in Pontotoc, Clarksdale, Batesville, Water Valley and Yocona, among other places in the area. Miller gives credit where credit is due, and all purveyors are listed on the Ravine’s menu and on the website (oxfordravine.com). The seasonality of the menu means the options at Ravine can be different each visit. “Our menu changes in a major way every season with different dishes to focus on local ingredients,” Miller said. At the moment, the main menu’s small plates include creamy oyster stew with potatoes, spinach and mushrooms, beef tenderloin mini-burgers on yeast rolls with red onion jam and bleu cheese and grilled sea scallops in a pomegranate reduction topped with apple walnut slaw. For a larger plate, diners can get a duck breast on wild rice pancakes with sweet and sour cherry sauce, grilled rack of lamb with apple mint jelly and potato latkes or a seared striped bass with crawfish etoufee and remoulade, among other meat, seafood and vegetarian options. On Wednesdays, Ravine offers a tapas menu so you can try a little bit of everything. There are dozens of options from the pasture, pen and pond, but some standouts include roast beet carpaccio with goat cheese, hazelnuts, grapefruit and greens, house ground lamb meatballs with peanut sauce and ginger and sesame crab cakes with miso lime aioli. It’s evident from the menu choices that Miller tantalizes the palate by introducing cuisines from around the world to his Southern flair. He graduated from culinary school at Johnson and Wales University and then traveled extensively to explore other cuisines, with a focus on North and South America. Additionally, he served as sous chef at the Inn on the Blue Horizon in Puerto Rico, as a pastry chef at Victor’s in New Orleans’ Ritz Carlton Hotel and as general manager and sommelier for Catch in San Francisco before bringing his experience and inspirations to Ravine. Of course no menu is complete without a good cocktail list, and Ravine has that as well. The seasons are also reflected with the drink menu. “I’m a big believer in having a strong cocktail list, but I’m not big on the trend of mixology. If something has

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more than three ingredients, I typically tune it out,” Miller said. The Ravine offers classics like the mojito and the Manhattan, but there are a few with a twist. The strawberry lemon drop martini introduces muddled strawberry for a fresh flavor, the lower east side Manhattan features Maker’s Mark infused with vanilla bean and citrus peel with splashes of bitters and vermouth, and the bellini en fuego adds tequila and peach puree to the classic brunch staple. “We wanted to focus on what culinary ingredients we could bring to the bar,” Miller said. “Our cocktail list is simple and local.” The Ravine is open Wednesdays and Thursdays 6 to 9 p.m., Fridays and Saturdays 6 to 10 p.m. and Sunday for brunch from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m. and for dinner 6 to 9 p.m.

CARLYLE THOMAS

“Voted Oxford’s Best Realtor... and, possibly, Oxford’s best juggler” 662. 934. 3515 • www.cmrehomes.com

CHERIE MATTHEWS REAL ESTATE 662.234.3878

• SINCE 1924 • FLORAL • BRIDAL • UNIQUE GIFTS

1103 JEFFERSON AVENUE OXFORD, MS 38655

662.234.2515 Photo by Maile Lani

OXFORDFLORAL.COM oxfordma g . co m 33


2216 Jackson Ave. West Oxford, MS (662) 236-WINE (6463) HighCottonWarehouse.com

Voted Oxford’s best liquor store. THANKS OXFORD!

Address: 800 College Hill Rd. #7102 Oxford, MS 38655

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Phone: (662) 371-1576 Hours: 7 Days a Week 11AM - 9PM


Thank you for voting us BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER!

1223 JACKSON AVE E. | OXFORD, MS | 662.236.3977 | SOMETHINGSOUTHERNONLINE.C OM oxfordma g . co m 35


THANK YOU FOR SELECTING HOME STORE

APPLIANCES

FURNITURE

ELECTRONICS

“Best Home Appliance & Electronics Store�

662-371-1313 662-371-1313

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2602 W. OXFORD LOOP

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OXFORD OXFORD 2602 W. OXFORD LOOP

COWBOY COWBOY MALONEY'S MALONEY'S STORE HOME

HOME STORE Chevron

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Woodlaw

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Jackson Aven

6

6

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.0/ 4"5 " . 1 . r SUNDAY: CLOSED 36 ox fo r d m a g . co m

6

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2018


home & style AU G U S T 2 0 1 8

HOME

One, Two, Three A historic home comes to life PHOTO BY ERIN AUSTEN ABBOTT

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HOME & STYLE

TOUR

Dreams Do Come True Megan Patton’s Water Valley Home STORY AND PHOTOS BY ERIN AUSTEN ABBOTT

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E

ver driven down a street and thought, “That’s the house I’m going to live in one day”? Some of us might have that fleeting thought and just brush it off, call it a dream, and go about our day. But for Megan Kingery Patton, that was how she ended up buying her home in Water Valley, Mississippi, over ten years ago. Back in 2007, the Oxford native came across a home that she knew was meant for her. As fate would have it, it was in her price range, so Megan made an offer and the home was hers. “Next thing I know I was buying it! So it just happened really fast.” She moved in and jumped right into the renovations. Her home was built in 1908, but over time it’s gone through many makeovers. Megan has worked hard to strip away previous changes and restore the house to its original glory. “The first major thing I did after buying the house was have central heat/air put in. Next, I tried to tackle all the renovations without hired help. In four

rooms I pulled up two layers of flooring to discover the original hardwood floors; I then sanded and stained them. I removed faux wood paneling to find original bead board beneath it,” Megan shared. She has also re-plastered a wall, pulled down dropped ceilings and repointed her fireplace bricks, learning as she goes. In 2011, Megan married Matt Patton, a musician from Jasper, Alabama. When Matt moved in, he brought a vast record collection with him, as well as pieces of furniture that had been handed down to him from family members. “Almost every piece of furniture in this house was either my grandparents’ or Matt’s grandparents’. I feel lucky that we’ve haven’t really had to buy much furniture, but at the same time we have to make sure it doesn’t feel like we our living in our grandparents’ homes. It’s important for us to add our own touches to the existing older pieces we have- such as my quilts and paintings. Or Matt’s records.” Megan shared.

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HOME & STYLE

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TOUR


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HOME & STYLE

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TOUR


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There are certain pieces that stand out, like Megan’s grandfather’s license plates that hang in the dining room or her grandmother’s yellow telephone that hangs on the wall, just like Megan remembers it. The guest bathroom is lined with a mix of old photos of family, Matt when he was younger, or the couple as they are today. Everywhere you look, it’s an ode to family and to the past, but also to the future they are building together. Three and a half years ago, the couple adopted a little girl named Hazel Sue. “Before Hazel Sue was born, it was more of, ‘I wonder if I can do this renovation myself without messing something up.’ After she was born, it was more of, ‘I’ll never have time to do any renovations ever again,” laughed Megan. Since Hazel Sue was born, too, they have used their yard more, watching her and her friends play from the front steps or enjoying family time on the wrap-around front porch. “For the past two years we have focused on the exterior of our home- we put on a new metal roof, replaced rotting wood, and had the entire house painted. We also wanted a little bit of Matt’s Alabama yard here, in our Mississippi yard, so I planted muscadines and blueberry bushes like he had back home,” Megan expressed. Many of the homes in Water Valley are painted white, but getting away from that tradition, the Pattons decided on a deep, dark purple. It’s striking, even from a block away, with the tin roof and a bright mint-colored door. Megan spent hours driving around Oxford and Memphis, to find the inspiration she had been seeking for the dark exterior color. The street they live on has also seen a lot of growth over the years. You can hear laughter from children most times of the day now, as more and more young families move to town. With that comes more outside socializing, such as cocktails on the porch, bike rides up and down the street or hopscotch on the wide sidewalk out front. Their home is centrally located on the street, so their yard and porch see a lot of activity now that the outside is so inviting. At 2300 square feet, it’s the perfect size for this family of three. When not working on their home or in the yard, you can find Megan managing Ajax on the Oxford Square and find Matt on tour with his band, the Drive-By Truckers, or at the recording studio that he owns, Dial-Back Recording Studio, in Water Valley. While Megan bought this home as a single woman, they have worked hard turn it into the family home that it is today.

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Thank you for voting us Best Construction Company 46 ox fo r d m a g . co m


Garden Glory For all things landscaping, visit The Barn STORY AND PHOTOS BY CHRISTINA STEUBE

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xford residents pride themselves on beauty and charm, so easy to spot perfectly manicured yards all over town. Thanks to The Barn Trading Company, every Oxonian has a shot at a green thumb. The Barn Trading Company has been in Oxford since 2010 and has been named 2018 Best Garden Center by Best of Oxford. Its selection gives customers the tools to develop their own green thumb. The goal of The Barn is provide the community with a garden center resource, said owner Turner Barnes. “Even though this is how we make a living, we want to help people at an affordable price,” Barnes says. “We want everybody to be successful in their own yard.” For those interested in creating their own beautiful landscape, seasonal flowers, plants, trees and shrubs are always available. Roses, azaleas, hydrangeas and hundreds of other flowers are up for grabs, all of which best take root in the spring.

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The Barn also offers the largest selection of trees in Lafayette County. Customers can choose from dozens of trees, which are generally planted in the fall and winter. The most popular are maple and oak. Customers interested in starting their own vegetable and herb garden also have plenty of options. Tomatoes, peppers, rosemary and other herbs are available by the plant. The selection of seeds includes cucumber, peppers, melon, okra, tomato, beet and pumpkin, among others. But planting is the easy part. Luckily, shopping at The Barn also includes an educational experience, where Barnes and his staff make sure each customer has all they need to keep a garden of any kind thriving. “You have to know what you’re doing. You can’t just stick a plant in the ground and expect it to live,” Barnes says. He teaches customers about garden maintenance, including how and when to prune and fertilize. Potting soil, peat moss and plenty of other composts


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“We want everybody to be successful in their own yard.” and fertilizers are available, and Barnes will help decide what’s best for each customer. The Barn also offers insecticides, fungicides and weed prevention products to help maintain any garden. With the exception of special orders, all plants carried by The Barn are suited for this particular climate zone, which is hot and dry. Plants and shrubs typically have a longer growing season in this zone, but extreme winter temperatures are also taken into consideration. “We want to make sure our customers have what they need to grow in this climate,” Barnes says. Sometimes even the best gardens need a little finishing touch. The Barn has dozens of hanging baskets, garden furniture and fixtures such as fountains, statues and birdbaths. To keep beautiful birds in a yard and garden,

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The Barn has a variety of bird essentials like houses and feeders, with the best feed including sunflower seed, wild bird seed and hummingbird nectar mix. The Barn also prides itself on its selection of gifts. In addition to decorative items for the home and garden, The Barn carries wind chimes, gardening books, wall hangings and a lot of locally made products. Pass Christian Soap Company, Mardis Honey, Grit Girl Grits, Sweet Potato Sweets and Wheeler’s Pecans are just a few of the Mississippi brands found in the gift shop. The Barn also sells their own specialty canned goodies including relishes and sauces. “We love locally made stuff, and we carry products that are made in Mississippi as much as possible,” he says.


Bryan Hawkins

Mark Durham Virginia Anderson

Mitchell McCoy Ronney Daniel

Trey McCoy

169 HWY 6 E, Suite 108 Oxford, MS 38655 662.371.1977

Be the smart pig. Build with bricks.

2027 McCullough Blvd. Tupelo, MS 38801 662.840.8221

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TINA MONTGOMERY 662.801.1784

ª ĺ ª p © ĺ J p £ Æ ¯ ¼ĺ ¯ ĺ Æ ĺ g p ¼ĺ ªĺ íëìðĺ Àĺ p © ¯ ª ĺ Æ ĺ À Æĺ ¯ ª ¯ ¼ Àĺ ¯ ¼ĺ pĺ ¼ p £ĺ À Æ p Æ ĺ À p £ Àĺ ¹ ¼ ¯ À À ¯ ª p £ĺ { |p Ê À ĺ¹ ¼ ÀĺÓ¯Æ ĺ ¯¼ĺÆ ĺ ÀÆ ª|Æ ¯ªĝ For Tina Montgomery, a broker associate at Kessinger “And a lot of our children’s friends are doing the same and Real Estate, the honor is doubly sweet, since she has won they all want a professional who will treat them right. I am the honor two times, including once in Meridian and more blessed to get a lot of referrals.” recently in Oxford. Montgomery is active in a women’s mahjong group that “It has been humbling,” she says of the honor and decades plays weekly in Oxford, and she and her husband are active of professional success. “I just try to do a good job for everybody I work with and treat them like friends.” and others from the university – all part of a network of friends and family rooted in faith and a love of Oxford and Ole Miss that keeps her deeply anchored in the community. leader in real estate sales in Mississippi, but now she’s deeply anchored in Oxford as an Ole Miss alum who gets to help “This is such a great place to be,” Montgomery says. “Our friends and others realize the same dream: living here fulland location.” time or part-time in a wonderful home. “I have had a Neilson’s charge account for 45 years,” she says, laughing. “This has always felt like home. My children went to Ole Miss and we kept coming back. When we moved here for good (1990s) it felt right because these are friends and family.” Montgomery has thrived in the real estate business since 1978 – she later became a broker in 1988 – because she treats particularly in a market like Oxford that is growing fast.

the seller’s market doesn’t always match people’s initial impressions.

she says, smiling. “Well so does everybody else. That’s why you need someone with years of experience to help you navigate buying and selling a home in Oxford. “It’s a wonderful place to live. We just have to work

“I have been in the real estate business for 38 years,” Montgomery says. “My husband and I both went to Ole Tina Montgomery is a Broker Associate with Kessinger Real Estate in Oxford. Miss. A lot of our peers are moving back here, or looking for She can be reached at tina@kessingerrealestate.com a second home.

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Best of

Oxf 56 ox fo r d m a g . co m

Dining

Nightlife

Attractions

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We asked you to pick everything you love most about Oxford—and you delivered. Check out the winners, along with this year’s Editors’ Picks.

ford BY CHRISTINA STEUBE AND RHES LOW

Shops

Services

Personalities

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Dining BEST FINE DINING

BEST RESTAURANT

BEST NEW RESTAURANT

SAINT LEO

SOUTHERN CRAFT STOVE + TAP

RAVINE

1101 E. Jackson Ave.

705 Sisk Ave., Suite 111

53 County Road 321

The James Beard Foundation semifinalist restaurant was opened in 2016 by Emily Blount, who wanted to combine metropolitan dining with small-town hospitality, making it a perfect fit for Oxford. The wood-fired Italian pizzas and other dishes are made with fresh and local ingredients. The cocktail list is unmatched. The combination of atmosphere, food and drinks makes it this year’s Best Restaurant.

The modern and rustic newcomer to Oxford offers an atmosphere for the whole family. Menu highlights include a fried pimento cheese sandwich, fried chicken, grilled chicken pasta, pan-seared salmon, and a variety of sandwiches and fireroasted pizzas to choose from. Southern Craft also features an outdoor dining patio and a playground so the whole family can enjoy.

It’s fine dining without the stuffiness. Ravine, just south of Oxford, is quaint and rustic with two outdoor patios and offers relaxed elegance. The farm-to-table dishes, crafted by chef Joel Miller, change seasonally and are combined with proper service, resulting in a superior dining experience.

2nd: Ajax Diner 3rd: Snackbar

2nd: Lost Pizza 3rd: Moe’s Original Bar B Que

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2nd: Oxford Grillehouse 3rd: City Grocer y


BEST CHINESE RESTAURANT

NOODLE BOWL 1501 Jackson Ave. West

The Noodle Bowl Asian Bistro has something for everyone’s taste. Chef specialties include Szechuan Duck, Kung Pao Chicken and Chinese BBQ pork, among many other choices from several Asian cuisines. 2nd: China Royale 3rd: Ming’s Kitchen

BEST BBQ

HANDY ANDY 800 N. Lamar Blvd.

There no shortage of good food in this town, and Handy Andy takes home this year’s title of Best BBQ for its pit-smoked delights. Options include pulled pork sandwiches, BBQ plates and, of course, slabs of ribs. 2nd: Moe’s Original Bar B Que 3rd: B’s Hickor y Smoke Bbq

BEST MILKSHAKE

SONIC 2000 Jackson Ave. West

With Sonic’s wide variety of hand-mixed shakes, it wins this year’s Best Milkshake. Oreo Peanut Butter, Strawberry Cheesecake, Fresh Banana or classic Chocolate are just a few available at Sonic to settle your sweet tooth. 2nd: Holli’s Sweet Tooth 3rd: Cookout

BEST BAR

THE LIBRARY 120 S. 11th Street BEST VEGGIE BURGER

Proud Larry’s 211 S. LAMAR BLVD.

Proud Larry’s is known for its live music, but the locals also love the Veggie Burger. This veggie delight is topped with grilled onion, roasted red peppers, creole mustard, fresh spinach and tomatoes and served on a whole wheat bun.

The Library Sports Bar serves as a great place to watch the game – any game – when you can’t be there in person. Televisions surround the bar, so you don’t even have to choose which game you watch as you snack on some wings or quesadillas. In fact, the most difficult choice you may have to make during an outing at the Library is which beer to pick, because there’s always plenty on tap. 2nd: City Grocer y 3rd: Rafters

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Voted

“BEST IN OXFORD” Three years in a row!

Experience the finest in Assisted Living & Memory Care.

110 Ed Perry Blvd. | Oxford, MS 38655 (662) 234-5050 | www.blakeliving.com

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AT OXFORD


BEST FRIED CHICKEN

BEST BREAKFAST

GUS’S FRIED CHICKEN

BIG BAD BREAKFAST

1309 N Lamar Blvd

719 N. Lamar Blvd.

The Memphis favorite opened in Oxford a few years ago, and it’s become a favorite here, too. The hot and spicy chicken has a slight sweetness to it that the locals love, especially paired with baked beans and cole slaw.

John Currence brings out some unique Southern stops for the most important meal of the day. Try the Breakfast Crumble – a buttermilk biscuit, grits, tomato gravy, poached eggs and crumbled BBB bacon. There are also traditional breakfast plates and signature skillets, loaded with your favorite breakfast choices.

2nd: Mama Jo’s Countr y Cookin’ 3rd: Abner’s

2nd: Beacon Restaurant 3rd: Fill-Up with Billups

BEST BRUNCH

RAFTERS 1000 E. Jackson Ave.

Rafters is known as a nightlife spot, but it also has a pretty great brunch for the morning after. Shrimp and grits and chicken and waffles are Southern brunch staples, but it brings a little more Louisiana style to dishes like Thibodeaux’s Fried Chicken, handmade and Cajun-marinated chicken tenders presented on a bed of etouffee.

BEST THAI FOOD

ZAAP THAI 1438 N. Lamar Blvd.

The authentic Thai restaurant serves up classics like Pad Thai, Drunken Noodle and varieties of fried rice and curries. Specialties include beef pho, the bahn mi and the Sa La Pao, which is a steamed bbq bun.

Rasita of Zaap Thai is the sweetest, most hard-working person I know. Oxford is lucky to have her, her daughter and her food.” -TORI DE LEONE

2nd: Big Bad Breakfast 3rd: Ravine

BEST BAKERY BOTTLETREE 923 Van Buren Ave.

Bottletree Bakery is the perfect place to grab a quick pastry on the go before work or lounge with a cup of coffee and a freshly baked treat. There are plenty of flavor choices for Bottletree’s scones, muffins and croissants, but you may gravitate towards a plate-sized cinnamon roll with vanilla icing as soon as you lay eyes on it. The brioche is also a favorite, as the sweet dough is hollowed out and filled with sweet cream and fruit filling of the day. 2nd: The Cakery 3rd: Lusa Bakery & Café

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BEST DESSERT HOLLI’S SWEET TOOTH 265 N. Lamar Blvd. Candies galore! Holli’s Sweet Tooth will turn any grown adult into a kid in a candy store. Just grab a bag and start filling it with random candies – sweet, sour, chocolatey – whatever your heart desires. Holli’s also has ice cream and a variety of floats, sundaes and milkshakes for the best dessert options after a full meal on the Square. 2nd: YaYa’s Frozen Yogurt 3rd: Insomnia Cookies

Best Local Bites BEST TACO

CANTEEN Breakfast Tacos

BEST TAKE ON A BISCUIT

BEST COCKTAIL

BIG BAD BREAKFAST Redneck Benny

GREEN ROOF LOUNGE Lab Rat

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BEST PREPARED TAKE-HOME DINNER

BEST CATERING

BEST COFFEE

BEST BURGER

TALLAHATCHIE GOURMET

MY MICHELLE’S

UPTOWN COFFEE

OXFORD BURGER CO.

1308 N. Lamar Blvd.

265 N. Lamar Blvd.

920 E. Jackson Ave.

Oxford native Michelle Rounsaville loves cooking, and her catering business provides delicious options at any event. Take your Groving up a notch with her mini muffalettas, mini beef wellington and famous pimento cheese on a croissant, or host a birthday party, corporate event or a wedding, My Michelle’s has plenty to offer and can customize a menu to fit dietary sensitivities and meal preferences.

The baristas at the locally owned and operated coffee shop just north of the Square can make coffee any way you can think of – hot, iced, frozen, you name it. The coffee beans used in Uptown products are roasted locally every week, which allows them to serve the best and freshest coffee available.

Oxford Burger Co. gets a little creative for everyone’s taste. All gourmet burgers are made with fresh beef, and their specialties add a little something extra that you can’t find anywhere else. The Mac Attack burger is topped with, you guessed it, macaroni and cheese. The Peanut Better Burger combines bacon and house made peanut butter with a perfectly cooked patty and Colonel’s Ghost Burger is topped with pepper jack cheese, grilled onions, bacon and comeback sauce.

1221 Van Buren Ave.

Tallahatchie Gourmet serves up some of the best plate specials throughout the day, but also provides full meals to take home a whip up quickly. The restaurant offers a variety of take home meals like chicken spaghetti, crawfish jambalaya, shrimp and grits, baked ziti, lasagna and poppyseed chicken, among many others, that can feed the whole family.

2nd: Cups 3rd: Bottletree Baker y

2nd: Taylor Grocer y Catering 3rd: Elizabeth Heiskell

2nd: Handy Andy 3rd: Phillip’s Grocer y

for $10 or Less BEST SWEET TREAT

LARSON’S CASHSAVER Banana Pudding

BEST SUSHI

BEST BURGER

JINSEI Jinsei Special Roll

NEON PIG Smash Burger

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Sweet! Life is

Thank you, Oxford, for choosing Holli’s as Best Dessert! We love making our town Sweeter!!

265 N Lamar Blvd, Ste. F 662-236-7505

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BEST NEW LUNCHTIME OPTION

THACKER 564 3000 Old Taylor Road, Suite C

Thacker 564 is the perfect place for those who want to try a little bit of everything. The slider-size sandwiches make it so you don’t have to order just one thing. Favorites include The Dog, a grilled pimento cheese hot dog, Faulkner’s Fav, bourbon brown sugar glazed ham and brie with mint Dijon sauce, Sorority Row, blackened chicken with fried pickle and pimento cheese and The River, blackened catfish, provolone and olive salad. There are plenty of appetizers, salads and sides to choose from to round out the lunch variety.

BEST LUNCH

AJAX 118 Courthouse Square

It’s quick and easy and you’ll be in and out in under an hour. Although you may be in a food coma the rest of the day. Ajax has tons of great lunch sandwiches and po-boys like the Big Easy – country fried steak on a bun with mashed potatoes gravy, and butter beans, all on a sandwich. The plate lunches like the meatloaf, turkey and dressing, honey baked ham and chicken and dumplings let you pick two veggies and are served up with a piece of jalapeño corn bread, adding a little southern soul to your midday meal. 2nd: Tallahatchie Gourmet 3rd: Volta Taverna

BEST MEXICAN

El Agave

BEST LUNCH UNDER $10

SOUTH DEPOT 1004 Van Buren Ave.

2305 JACKSON AVE. W. #211

Fresh salsa, house-cooked red and green sauces, and slow-roasted beef and pork: it’s all in the details at this delicious Mexican joint. Be sure to try a cantarito while you’re there. Freshly squeezed orange, grapefruit, and lime juice mixed with Tequila Cazadores Reposado and Mexican grapefruit soda make this drink refreshing and delicious. 2nd: La Perla Tapatía 3rd: Casa Mexicana

South Depot brings a twist of Tex-Mex just off the Square. Build your own burrito, quesadilla or tacos with fresh ingredients for under $10. There are also plenty of specialty tacos to choose from as well, like the buffalo chicken, Korean steak, or Memphis BBQ Pork. For a lower carb option, there are salads and burrito bowls to get a quick and healthier lunch that delicious and inexpensive. 2nd: Larson’s CashSaver 3rd: Handy Andy

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BEST SALAD

BEST SANDWICH SPOT

BEST FOOD TRUCK

BEST STEAKHOUSE

GREENLINE

THE BLIND PIG

OXFORD GRILLEHOUSE

1002 Van Buren Ave.

105 N. Lamar Blvd.

ON A ROLL GOURMET EGG ROLLS

Greenline just off the Square lets you create your own gourmet salad from a wide variety of greens, dozens of toppings and proteins. Top it with one of the restaurant’s unique vinaigrettes like sweet chipotle, lime cilantro, honey peanut or tomato bacon. You can also choose from several signature salads like the Superfood, made with kale, quinoa, goat cheese, broccoli, avocado and almonds or the Asian Shrimp with romaine lettuce topped with tomatoes, avocado and Edamame.

The Blind Pig offers much more than just bar food. The extensive menu of grilled hoagies features sandwiches like Bonnie Meet Clyde, with roasted turkey, prime rib, cheddar and horseradish mayo with other dressings, and The Italian Family Club, with genoa salami, prosciutto, pepperoni, bologna, provolone and banana peppers. Other options include the Cuban, French Dip and the Big New York Reuben.

114 Courthouse Square

2502 Old Taylor Road

The food truck is now also a fixture inside Ward’s Chevron on Old Taylor Road. These are eggrolls like you’ve never seen them – buffalo chicken, Philly cheese, spicy shrimp and pulled pork all wrapped in a crispy, flaky shell. Dessert rolls are also available, like cheesecake, peach cobbler and beignet. The menu constantly has new specials, so visit often to try everything.

2nd: McAlister’s Deli 3rd: Phillip’s Grocer y

This casual fine-dining gem has brought the most mouth-watering and melt-in-your-mouth cuts of meat to the Oxford Square. All steaks at Grillehouse are cut in house from certified angus beef which gives customers the best Ribeyes, New York strips and filets. Steak toppings include jumbo lump blue crab meat, grilled onions, sautéed crawfish tails and several others, served up with two delicious sides for an affordable and filling steakhouse experience that will keep you coming back. 2nd: King’s 3rd: The Sizzler Steakhouse

2nd: Newk’s Eater y 3rd: Volta Taverna

BEST CUPCAKES

THE CAKERY 1944 University Ave.

The Cakery is known for their unique designs on cakes, cupcakes and cookies, and there’s always something special available in their case. The Cakery can craft chocolate or white cake cupcakes with any theme you can imagine. Past cupcake treats include strawberry lemon, lavender honey, chocolate chip cookie dough, green tea and honey, Italian crème, margarita, pina colada, Oreo…this goes on and on. If you can think of it, The Cakery can probably turn it into a cupcake. 2nd: MUGG Cakes 3rd: Holli’s Sweet Tooth

BEST CHICKEN SALAD

BEAGLE BAGEL 1801 W. Jackson Ave., Suite B-104

The Mississippi-established restaurant opened recently in Oxford and is known for its fresh chicken salad, served on a sandwich, by the scoop, or on a Panini with provolone cheese, tomato and pesto mayo. The chicken salad is also available to take home in half pound to two pound quantities.

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BEST FARM-TO-TABLE RAVINE 53 County Road 321 Part of Joel Miller’s mission at Ravine was to bring farm-to-table dining to North Mississippi to create a sustainable community. Ravine gets all their meat and vegetables for their menu from local purveyors, and the menu changes seasonally to reflect those efforts. 2nd: Grit 3rd: Ajax Diner


BEST CATFISH

TAYLOR GROCERY 4 First Street, Taylor, Mississippi

Taylor Grocery, located just outside of Oxford, is one of our town’s dining must-do’s. It’s known as some of the South’s best catfish, and Taylor Grocery serves it whole, in fried, grilled or blackened fillets, a la carte or all-you-can-eat. The lightly handbreaded fillets go hand-in-hand with hushpuppies and good Southern sides like fried okra, cole slaw, potato salad or baked beans. The chocolate cobbler is a must. 2nd: Ajax Diner 3rd: Oby’s

LYNN HEWLETT, OWNER OF TAYLOR GROCERY

BEST SWEET TEA

BEST NEW BREAKFAST OPTION

BEST GAS STATION MEAL

BEST ITALIAN

MCALISTER’S

COMMUNITY DONUTS

LINDSEY’S CHEVRON

SAINT LEO

321 N. Lamar Blvd.

1101 E. Jackson Ave.

1515 University Ave.

The franchise founded in Oxford is famous for its sweet tea. The tea is made fresh continuously throughout the day. We’ve all had sweet tea before, but McAlister’s black tea has an unmistakable flavor that sets it apart from any other restaurant sweet tea. The Southern staple is just the right amount of sweet and goes well with just about any meal you can imagine. 2nd: Newk’s Eater y 3rd: Ajax Diner

1703 University Ave.

Community Donuts on University allows everyone to start their day with a sweet treat. The freshly made donuts have original glaze, chocolate, or just about any other topping. There’s also a Devil’s Food Cake donut, blueberry cake donut and other specialties like apple fritters. For those that prefer savory to sweet for breakfast, community donuts has biscuits, breakfast tacos, croissant sandwiches and kolaches stuffed with cheese and sausage.

The food in Oxford is so great that even gas stations are known for their cuisine. Lindsey’s Chevron on the north side of the Square serves filling plate breakfasts and lunches. Home cooked meals include chicken and dressing, hamburger steak and fried chicken, served up with southern sides. Lindsey’s is also known for fresh homemade chicken salads and dressings that stay stocked and ready to go. 2nd: Four Corners Chevron 3rd: Sky Mart

Stepping into Saint Leo just off the Square feels like stepping into a metropolitan city. Local and fresh ingredients make up this Italian menu, which includes wood-fired pizzas like the margherita, burrata and soppressata, and prosciutto, arugula and mozzarella. There are always specials available, but pastas like spaghetti with shrimp and cherry tomatoes add a twist to a classic. 2nd: Old Venice 3rd: Tarasque

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BEST SOUL FOOD

BEST QUICK HEALTH BOOST

BEST BOOZY BRUNCH

MAMA JO’S COUNTRY COOKIN’

LIVING FOODS ORGANIC CAFÉ AND MARKET

MCEWEN’S

CHICK-FIL-A

1110 Van Buren Ave.

2307 Jackson Avenue West

1503 Old Highway 7 N.

Mama Jo’s Country Cooking on Highway 7 just South of Oxford serves up all the best soul food. The authentic country cooking features fried chicken, pork chops, mashed potatoes, greens pot roast and cornbread for a Southern fillup that feels like home. 2nd: Ajax Diner 3rd: B’s Hickor y Smoke Bbq

809 College Hill Road

Living Foods is known for its veggie burgers, healthy sandwiches and smoothie bowls. They also offer smoothies and juices like Monkey Bait with banana and almond butter, the Green Warrior with pineapple juice and ginger and many other health options with fresh fruit for a health boost on the go.

BEST ICE CREAM/FRO-YO

YAYA’S FROZEN YOGURT 100 Courthouse Square

The assortment of frozen yogurt choices at Yaya’s is an ideal way to cool off this sweltering summer. Yaya’s fro-yo can also be a lighter alternative to regular ice cream, as they offer fat free, low fat and dairy free options. Fill up the bowl with whatever flavors you want, but your next difficult choice is the toppings. Customers can top their treats with fruit, candy, cheesecake crumbles, brownie bites, chocolate syrup, caramel and so many other options. 2nd: Holli’s Sweet Tooth 3rd: Marble Slab Creamer y

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Mimosas and Bloody Marys are brunch staples, and McEwen’s has an extensive selection of other cocktails that are great with a midday meal. Pair that with chicken and waffles, beignets, a skillet breakfast or steak and eggs benedict for the perfect start to a lazy Sunday.

LITTLE EASY 319 N. Lamar Blvd. 201

Inside Little John’s BP on Highway 30, Tim Woodard serves up some of the best Southern style food. Hamburgers, barbeque chicken, spaghetti, meatloaf – these are just some of the specials available with your choice of side for a hearty lunch. Try the coconut cream pie or the chocolate chess pie for an extra sweet finish.

Chick-Fil-A is known for its speedy service, so you can get the kids meal to those hungry children a little faster. The children’s favorite offers fried or grilled chicken nuggets and chicken strips served with a choice of cinnamon apple sauce, waffle fries or a fruit cup and kids drink, complete with a toy. 2nd: McDonald’s 3rd: Southern Craft Stove + Tap

BEST PIZZA BEST PLATE LUNCH

BEST KIDS MEAL

BEST SUSHI

LOST PIZZA

JINSEI

7102 College Hill Road

713 N Lamar Blvd.

The newcomer to Oxford has been known around the state for the last decade. Lost Pizza uses fresh dough, house made sauces, fresh vegetables, all natural cheese and 100 percent meat to create signature pizzas like Hector’s Taco Pie, The Hot Chick with grilled chicken and buffalo sauce, The Pitt Boss with pulled pork, and The Kujo with bacon, ham, pepperoni, Italian sausage, beef and veggies. 2nd: Saint Leo 3rd: Soulshine Pizza Factor y

Jinsei brings unique atmosphere to Oxford when it comes to Japanese restaurants. The modern but casual establishment uses only the freshest fish for its sushi, which includes signature rolls like the Jinsei special – with tuna, yellowtail, masago and jalepeno – and the Spiro, a roll featuring spicy tuna, tempura asparagus, and salmon. 2nd: Toyo 3rd: Kabuki


BEST RESTAURANT MAKEOVER STELLA 208 S. Lamar Blvd.

Just off the south side of the Square is a relaxed upscale atmosphere with superior dishes. Stella has transformed the location to make it unique, incorporating décor with a personal touch from co-owner Cindy Kirk.

BEST CHEF

BEST SEAFOOD

BEST WINGS

BEST CASUAL DINING

VISH BHATT, SNACKBAR

SNACKBAR

BUFFALO WILD WINGS

AJAX DINER

2315 Jackson Ave. West

118 Courthouse Square

Traditional, boneless or both, Buffalo Wild Wings has an extensive list of flavors and seasonings to satisfy any wing craving. For a more flavor than spice, there’s sweet bbq, salt and vinegar, lemon pepper and bourbon honey mustard. If you want a combination of the two, there’s chipotle bbq spicy garlic, buffalo and Asian Zing. If you can stand the heat, there’s hot, mango habañero, wild and blazin’. These handspun wings pair great with a choice of draft beer.

THE Oxford staple. Whether you’re getting a quick, hearty meal for lunch or savoring every bite with a cocktail at dinner, Ajax is the place for a chill atmosphere and great Soul Food like chicken and dumplings, red beans and rice, country fried steak, meatloaf and fried catfish.

721 N. Lamar Blvd.

721 N. Lamar Blvd.

The executive chef of Snackbar, Vish Bhatt uses traditional Southern ingredients to cook up unique dishes that combine French and Southern cuisine. The James Beard Award semifinalist is constantly creating a changing selection of menu items that can’t be found anywhere else. 2nd: John Currence 3rd: Joel Miller

Snackbar is the place to go in Oxford for fresh Gulf seafood. The raw bar serves up platters of dozen or half dozen oysters, but you can also get steamed jumbo shrimp or marinated blue crab claws. The main menu features Simmons Farm Catfish with a black-eyed pea grits crust, Wild Caught Gulf Shrimp with roasted eggplant and Sunburst Trout with cauliflower-tahini puree. 2nd: King’s 3rd: Bacchus On The Square

2nd: Bouré 3rd: Volta Taverna

2nd: Jinsei 3rd: Bim Bam Burgers

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Nightlife BEST COCKTAILS

BEST BARTENDER

BEST DATE NIGHT

CHICKEN-ON-A-STICK

SNACKBAR

BOURÉ

502 S. Lamar Blvd.

721 N. Lamar Blvd.

JOE STINCHCOMB, SAINT LEO

BEST LATE-NIGHT FOOD

110 Courthouse Square

1101 E. Jackson Ave.

When the bars close, Four Corners Chevron becomes the place to be. The line wraps through the store for the greasy and famous chicken on a stick. The large fried chicken tender is put on a skewer, to make it the perfect grab and go food to cap off the night out. 2nd: Square Pizza 3rd: YoknapaTaco

Find classics like the French 75, Paloma and Sazerac, but the specialty cocktails will intrigue you with ingredients and name. Try the Stop Your Nonsense and Drink Your Bourbon, which includes Bulleit 10 year, cynar, angostura and a strawberryyerba mate ice cube, or the Big Bad Old Fashioned with Bourbon and bacon bitters. 2nd: Bouré 3rd: Saint Leo

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Rising star Joe Stinchcomb crafts thoughtful, seasonal cocktails that never cease to impress. Keep an eye on this guy—he’s going places. 2nd: Ivy McLellan (Snackbar) 3rd: “Cooney” ( City Grocer y)

Start your meal in the spacious dining room, then wrap up with a cocktail on the balcony overlooking the Square. Their shrimp and grits never disappoint, and be sure to save room for dessert—we recommend the bread pudding. 2nd: Snackbar 3rd: Oxford Grillehouse


Nick Reppond Angie Sicurezza

BEST OFF THE SQUARE DATE NIGHT

Grit

32673 2 Town Square Lane, Taylor

Just South of Oxford in Taylor’s Plein Air community is Grit. The rustic yet refined dining experience offers guests signature seasonal bourbon-based cocktails on a patio or indoors. Menu choices like Curried Goat, Grilled Mississippi Gulf Fish and the Smoked Pork Chop add a unique twist to Southern fare, making it the perfect date night getaway.

BEST DANCE SPOT

BEST ROOFTOP

BEST HAPPY HOUR BANG FOR YOUR BUCK

BEST PATIO

THE LIBRARY SPORTS BAR

THE COOP

SAINT LEO

PROUD LARRY’S

400 N. Lamar Blvd.

1101 E. Jackson Ave.

211 S. Lamar Blvd.

While it is a great place to watch the game, the Library is probably one of the most versatile nightlife places in Oxford. Just past the sport bar is a dance floor that fills up several nights during the week where people let loose to light shows and a live DJ.

The Coop, located on the fourth floor of The Graduate Hotel, offers a picture perfect view of Downtown Oxford. The vintage style space offers Southern cocktails like the Kentucky mule and the Frose, as well as sliders, pulled pork fries and a meat and cheese board.

Saint Leo’s happy hour runs from 3-6 p.m. every weekday and boasts a lineup of classic cocktails and quality wines for just $5. Even better, you’ll enjoy the complimentary antipasti straight from the wood fired oven.

Nothing beats patio drinking on a sunny day in Oxford. The patio at Proud Larry’s is tucked away just South of the Square and lets you chill out with a cocktail and some appetizers while you look out on the rest of the town.

2nd: The Levee 3rd: Funky’s Pizza and Daquiri Bar

2nd: Green Roof Lounge 3rd: The Chancellor’s House

120 S. 11th Street

2nd: Volta Taverna 3rd: The Graduate

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BEST TOWNIE BAR

BLIND PIG 105 N. Lamar Blvd.

It’s a favorite among locals for so many reasons. The Blind Pig has it all – great menu, affordable drinks, trivia night and places to watch the game. There’s also pool tables and a dart board available if you prefer a more competitive night. Just north of the Square, this place is perfect for meeting up and hanging out.

BEST LIQUOR STORE

HIGH COTTON WINE & SPIRITS 2216 Jackson Avenue West

High Cotton’s warehouse-style store offers customers a massive selection of wine and liquor at reasonable prices. The best part: if you can’t find a specific type of wine or liquor there, they’ll do their best to track it down and order it for you. 2nd: Kiamie Package Store 3rd: Magnolia Wine and Spirits

BEST BEER SELECTION

JACKSON BEER COMPANY 1801 Jackson Ave. West

There are those who like beer, and those who like craft beer. Jackson Beer Company offers a massive selection of craft beer from all over the country, with a robust lineup of Mississippi brews. Buy it by the case or by the growler to keep your fridge stocked with the best.

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BEST UNDERGRAD BAR

BEST DOG-FRIENDLY BAR

ROUND TABLE

THE GROWLER

132 Courthouse Square

265 N. Lamar Blvd.

Round Table has become the bar of choice for the college crowd, and for good reason. It has a bar and grill, an outdoor patio, drink and food specials each day and even a club-style bar upstairs with pool and live music, providing something for everyone.

The fur babies deserve to go out and about too, and The Growler allows pups to partake in the hangout. Located just north of the Square, The Growler offers dozens of craft beer on draft as well as tasting flights. And the best part is, you can enjoy all of this with your best bud.

BEST HAPPY HOUR

BEST TRIVIA

SNACKBAR

THE BLIND PIG

721 N. Lamar Blvd.

105 N. Lamar Blvd.

Snackbar’s happy hour includes $2 domestic beer, $3 draft beer, $4 wines and $5 select cocktails, including negronis, sazeracs, Pimm’s Cups, French 75s and margaritas. Plus, the chic vibe just can’t be beat.

Oxford’s favorite dive bar brings a battle of wits to the Square every Monday. Participants buyin to show off their knowledge of random facts in categories like current events, general knowledge, sports, history, etc. The winning team leaves with a cash prize and the feeling of being the smartest of the night.

2nd: Rooster’s Blues House 3rd: Volta Taverna

2nd: Moe’s Original Bar B Que

Jackson Beer Company has everything you could want in a beer store. The selection is great, the staff knows beer, and Allen loves pouring samples and finding the perfect fit for each customer.” - JOEY VAUGHAN, BETTER BRANDS DISTRIBUTING

BEST WINE SELECTION

RAVINE 53 County Road 321

Before chef Joel Miller brought his talents to north Mississippi, he served as sommelier for Catch in San Francisco. His carefully curated wine list includes French Côtes du Rhône, German Reislings, Spanish Riojas, and much more.

BEST HANGOVER CURE Oxford Canteen Cheesy Chicken Ramen with Fried Egg 766 N. Lamar Blvd.

Oxford Canteen’s Cheesy Chicken Ramen with Fried Egg is the perfect solution for when the sun’s too loud the next morning. Eggs and carbs are always good go-tos to soak up the night before, and this delicious dish takes it to the next level. oxfordma g . co m 73


Attractions BEST MUSEUM

BEST WEDDING VENUE

BEST PLACE FOR FAMILY

BEST MUSIC VENUE

UM MUSEUM

THE JEFFERSON

University Avenue and 5th St.

365 Highway 6 East

MALCO AT THE COMMONS / PREMIERE LANES

1006 Van Buren Ave.

The UM Museum experience presents one with the opportunity to have the most perfect day Oxford can offer. Grab a coffee on the square, at your condo, or in your home and head to the UM Museum. Explore housed pieces alongside current exhibitions curated by a superior staff. After you’ve had your fill of interior art, head out the back door, and saunter through Bailey Woods to William Faulkner’s esteemed Roanoke.

The Jefferson is an unforgettable structure. Compiled with age old materials from around the south, the event space bleeds charm and elegance while embracing the rustic hues of the Mississippi farmland it sits on. From the chandeliers plucked out of an aging church in Memphis to the centuriesold cotton warehouse doors from Danville, VA, the courtly country expanse is the perfect locale for any Southern extravaganza.

2nd: Southside Galler y 3rd: Rowan Oak

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2nd: The Lyric 3rd: Castle Hill

THE LYRIC

204 Commonwealth Blvd

Premier lanes commitment to service and fun allows any family that enters their doors the opportunity to feel like royalty; whether they are munching on a pizza slice, playing ski ball in the vast arcade or bowling down a sleek wooden pathway. 2nd: Lamar Park

The Lyric’s owner and staff yearly execute excellence. From consistently providing a legendary lineup of music and performances to being the premiere event venue on the square, The Lyric is simply The Best of Oxford. And considering Oxford’s Square is the center of the universe, The Lyric is to be ordained, forevermore, “The Best Music Venue in the Universe”. 2nd: Proud Larr y’s 3rd: Ford Center


BEST STORY TIME

SQUARE BOOKS, JR. 111 Courthouse Square

Parents of young children know—there’s no better place to be on a Saturday morning than circled around Jilleen Elaine Bennett Moore (better known as Miss Jill) while she plays Milk Cow Blues and reads from the latest and greatest storybooks. BEST REASON TO TAKE A STAYCATION

THE INN AT RAVINE 53 Co Rd 321

For those looking for a serene getaway without leaving town, the Inn at Ravine can’t be surpassed. Nestled in the woods next to the upscale restaurant, the rustic exterior gives way to a modern room with a queen bed, kitchenette, TV and wireless internet. Guests enjoy a full breakfast, can relax in the pool, or survey nature from rocking chairs on the covered front porch. BEST STUDY SPOT

CUPS 1501 Jackson Ave. West

Cups is a spacious cafe with carefully crafted coffee and a quiet environment. With reliable wifi, an assortment of snacks, and plenty of seating, Cups helps you focus and fuels good work. Don’t forget to check out the rotating work of local artists lining the walls.

BEST STROLLER RUN

Pat Lamar Park Lamar Park, located at the corner of College Hill Dr. and Country Club Rd., is officially an arboretum. Fortunately for you and me, it has evolved into a sculptoretum—a made-up description for a green expanse, housing a collection of enormous works of modern art for social study and, more commonly, visual pleasure while walking, jogging, or picnicking with the kids. 2nd: Avent Park 3rd: Ole Miss Campus

BEST HAPPY HOUR MUSIC

THACKER 564 In a town with too few music venues and even fewer early performances, Thacker 564 is picking up the slack. Pair their Thursday night happy hour shows with a local beer or an assortment of their signature sliders. Bring the kids (or don’t), eat, drink, dance, and be in bed by 10 p.m.

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ULTIMATE FOOTBALL RENTAL

BEST PARK

BEST LOCAL EVENT

BEST HOTEL

JOE & KRISTI CULPEPPER HOME

LAMAR PARK

DOUBLE DECKER ARTS FESTIVAL

CHANCELLOR’S HOUSE

309 Country Club Road

Just a short walk to The Grove and The Square, this 3000 square foot home has amenities you didn’t even know you were looking for. The screened-in deck features an outdoor gas log fireplace, plenty of seating and a 60 inch flatscreen TV. With a spacious, covered front porch, this rental comfortably sleeps up to twelve guests and offers a gas grill, corn hole boards, an air hockey table, rocking chairs and a piano. On a quiet street with ample parking, guests can relax with a Jacuzzi tub in the master bedroom, along with complimentary wine and beer.

The beautiful Lamar Park, just off of College Hill Road, features gorgeous scenery along its walking trails, making it the perfect spot for a peaceful stroll. The goal of the space is to offer a tranquil outdoor experience for residents, which it accomplishes with greenery and a quiet lake. 2nd: Avent Park 3rd: FNC Park

Jill Moore Square Books, Jr.

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The Oxford Square

Take a trip on the music, food and art bus that is The Double Decker Arts Festival in Oxford, MS. Fueled by the quaint, idyllic setting and the flood of visitors that rain down on the micropolus, Double Decker is quickly becoming the premier arts festival of the South. And don’t fret, the bollards are set to appropriate a large area to allow for premium milling. 2nd: Oxford Film Festival 3rd: Ole Miss Football

425 S Lamar Blvd

Get away without leaving town at Oxford’s premiere luxury hotel. Enjoy a classic cocktail on the patio terrace, host a private meal in the Tea Room, or peruse an impressive collection of Mississippi authors in the Library. With seamless service and continental cuisine, there’s nothing not to love.


MOST UNDERRATED SPORTS EXPERIENCE OLE MISS TENNIS

With a top twenty-five men’s team and the women’s team at number eight in the nation, there’s a lot to get excited about for Ole Miss Tennis fans. And, says one fan, “You don’t have to worry about drunk people falling in your lap.”

BEST MEETING SPOT

BEST WORTH-THE-DRIVE ADVENTURE

THE GRADUATE 400 N. Lamar Blvd.

TRIBECCA ALLIE

Whether it’s for business or pleasure, the lobby at The Graduate makes for an ideal spot to meet up, catch up or simply soak in the bright, cheery ambiance of the room’s wooden floors and eclectically decorated bar. Walk a few steps to the hotel’s casual dining restaurant, Cabin 82, and chances are you might never leave.

When Rebecca and Damian Van Oostendorp moved to Mississippi from New York, their search for satisfying pizza came up short again and again. So they built their own wood-fired oven. Expect Italian-style pies with a slightly charred crust and fresh, quality ingredients. Bring your own spirits if you like, and don’t forget dessert.

216 S. Main Street (Sardis)

BEST PLACE TO WATCH THE GAME

BEST WALKING TRAIL

THE LIBRARY

WHIRLPOOL TRAILS

120 S. 11th Street

Off Chucky Mullins Dr.

When you can’t be at the game, at least watch it in the best possible atmosphere. That’s what the Library Sports Bar offers. Multiple televisions surround the bar, so you don’t even have to choose a game – you can watch them all. The experience is enhanced by classic bar staples like wings, quesadillas and, of course, plenty of draft beer.

Officially the South Campus Rail Trail, this is the place for a peaceful outdoor walk, and energizing run or a rigorous bike ride. It’s close enough to be convenient, but secluded enough to feel like an invigorating escape.

2nd: Buffalo Wild Wings 3rd: Blind pig

BEST GOLF COURSE

OLE MISS GOLF COURSE 147 Rd 1056

If you’ve been playing the Ole Miss Golf Course for more than 20 years, you know the facilities have gone from “totally geek to totally chic.” With an ever-prudent commitment to excellence, several years ago the University revitalized the course’s aesthetic and design. Now, not only is it a supremely fun course to play, its beauty is exquisite. Plus, there’s always the chance of running across one of the SEC’s top college players blossoming from the UM Golf program.

BEST-KEPT SECRET

SECRET GRILLED CHEESE 1112 Van Buren Ave.

Through a door down Faulkner’s Alley, beside Old Venice Pizza, is what is officially known as the Downstairs Bar, a.k.a. “the secret grilled cheese place.” One of the most popular orders, the Magnificent, is a grilled cheese with smoked gouda, provolone, a fried egg, avocado and honey sriracha sauce. The secret’s out. 2nd: The Taco Shop 3rd: High Cotton Wine & Spirits

2nd: The Countr y Club of Oxford 3rd: Mallard Point (Sardis, MS)

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David Naron & Ashley Wilkinson Oxford Floral

Shops BEST ANTIQUE SHOP

BEST FLORIST

BEST BOOKSTORE

THE MUSTARD SEED

OXFORD FLORAL

SQUARE BOOKS

NEILSON’S

1901-A Jackson Avenue West

1103 Jefferson Ave.

160 Courthouse Square

119 Courthouse Square

Antique shops are full of little hidden gems, and The Mustard Seed always has something that could be your latest conversation piece. Everything from interesting furniture to antique accessories to local art can be found in the 12,000 square-foot facility.

Oxford Floral earned its reputation providing customers with customizable and high-end floral arrangement as well as bridal services. The store also offers a great selection of gifts including locally made items and accessories.

It’s an Oxford icon. This independent bookstore thrives by offering books for readers of any age and interest. There are always signed books available from several authors, and the store brings in prestigious names every month for readings and signings, which continue to add to the rich literary culture of our town.

The 175-year old department store keeps the closets of locals and visitors ready for all occasions. Their current motto is “Trend Meets Tradition,” which perfectly captures their selection of looks for men, women and children. The store also carries cosmetics, shoes, accessories and housewares.

2nd: Sugar Magnolia 3rd: The Depot Antique Mall

2nd: Bette’s Flowers 3rd: University Florist

2nd: Off-Square Books 3rd: Barnes & Noble

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BEST DEPARTMENT STORE

2nd: Belk 3rd: Marshall’s


BEST COSMETICS

ZOE 265 N. Lamar Blvd.

This independent store carries high-end products in cosmetics and skincare to help those of all ages look their best. Designer brands including NARS, Smashbox, Bare Minerals and Mario Badescu are just a few of the luxury lines available at Zoe. 2nd: Amy Head

BEST JEWELER

LAMMON’S FINE JEWELRY 1126 N. Lamar Blvd.

Lammon’s offers jewelry selection from vintage to modern, in all different styles. With a variety of colored stones, emeralds, sapphires and pearls, Lammon’s also provides custom designs to ensure the timeless piece is exactly what the customer wants. 2nd: Van Atkins 3rd: Steven Rose

BEST CONSIGNMENT

HOLDING HANDS 2618 W. Oxford Loop

David Swider

BEST NEW ADDITION TO THE SQUARE

End of All Music 103 Courthouse Square A

Oxford’s independent music store is thriving and just recently relocated to Square. In a digital world, The End of All Music offers new and used vinyl records of every genre for the music lover and collector. The store also carries turntables and record accessories.

In addition to providing great finds at this thrift shop, Holding Hands helps the community by employing men and women with special needs. A purchase from Holding Hands adds a little something to your own collection, while also supporting the good work the shop is doing. 2nd: Goodwill 3rd: Sugar Magnolia

BEST GIFT SHOP

OXFORD FLORAL 1103 Jefferson Avenue

Oxford Floral’s expansive store offers so much more than flowers. Locally made items, fine gifts and accessories and a full bridal registry are just some of the awesome finds in the store. 2nd: Katherine Beck 3rd: Olive Juice

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KATHERINE BECK gifts • home • gourmet • jewelry

Pre-order your Rush Happies & Bid Day Gifts 662.234.9361

katherinebeckgreek@gmail.com • Instagram: @Katherinebeckgifts

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BEST AUTO DEALER

BEST HOME DECOR

CANNON MOTORS

JONES AT HOME

100 N. Thacker Loop

1005 Jackson Avenue East

The locally-owned dealership works to give their customers the best deal on price and service. Cannon prides itself on helping everyone get what they need, whether it’s a new or pre-owned vehicle or parts and service to their current car.

Contemporary classic furniture and accessories are the focus of Jones at Home. Their style is one that remains timeless, yet trendy, and offers a clean and fresh look to home decor. Customers can purchase directly from the showroom floor or they can order custom pieces to find the exact look for their home’s personality.

2nd: Belk Ford 3rd: Allen Samuels

Amazing quality pottery by a local craftsman! Would recommend Satterfield Pottery to anyone and love the Hotty Toddy Collection!” - KIMBERLY DAWN INGRAMSWANNER, FACEBOOK

2nd: Something Southern 3rd: Sugar Magnolia BEST OLE MISS GIFTS

BEST SHOE STORE

BEST MEN’S CLOTHING STORE

BEST FURNITURE STORE

REBEL RAGS

MY FAVORITE SHOES

HINTON AND HINTON

JOHNSON’S

2302 Jackson Ave. West

138 Courthouse Square

135 Courthouse Square

2128 Jackson Avenue West

This place really does have anything and everything Ole Miss. Apparel for men, women and children, jerseys, headwear, accessories, you name it. You can also find housewares, gifts and decorations and even pet wear for your favorite Rebel fan with paws.

Located on the Square, this boutique shoe store has just about any style you could want. From casual sandals to pumps, My Favorite Shoes carries brands like Steve Madden, Jessica Simpson and Volatile, among many others to suit your style.

Hinton and Hinton offers a wide variety of men’s clothing that’s Southern and classic. It carries brands like Ugg, True Grit, Peter Millar, Lucchese, Patagonia and Southern Tide, among others. The Southern gentleman can find footwear, outerwear, luggage and accessories in addition to everyday clothing.

Have you ever walked into a store and wanted everything in it? That’s Johnson’s Furniture. Their massive location offers a wide variety of home selections for every nook and cranny of your house. And if they don’t have it in store, they’ll get it. Their website offers even more options for customers to choose from to find the best fit.

2nd: Campus Book Mart 3rd: University Sporting Goods

2nd: Lulu’s 3rd: Belk

2nd: Landry’s 3rd: Belk

2nd: Jones at Home 3rd: Oxford Home Furnishings

BEST T-SHIRT SHOP JCG APPAREL 116 Courthouse Square

For the most comfortable t-shirt you can possibly find, visit JCG on the Square. These soft shirts have a vintage look and feel, and there are plenty of unique Oxford and Ole Miss prints to choose from. 2nd: Catdaddy’s 3rd: Oxford T-shirt Company

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BEST NURSERY/GARDEN STORE

THE BARN 2657 W. Oxford Loop

This garden center has everything you need whether you’re just starting a garden or maintaining a landscape. In addition to plants, seeds and garden care, The Barn carries animal feed, bird essentials and unique gifts. 2nd: Home Depot

BEST SPORTING GOODS STORE

DICK’S SPORTING GOODS 300 Merchants Drive

Dick’s pretty much covers everyone’s hobby, from golf, basketball or weightlifting to kayaking, hunting and fishing. The store’s wide selection includes a variety of goods, apparel and shoes for those who are active at any level. 2nd: University Sporting Goods 3rd: Hunter’s Hollow

BEST WOMEN’S CLOTHING STORE

NEILSON’S 119 Courthouse Square

Women can find something for any occasion at Neilson’s, whether it’s gameday, date night or just a night on the Square. Neilson’s carries brands like BCBGeneration, 7 for All Mankind and Joe’s Jeans, among many others. The department store also has a selection of lingerie, accessories and cosmetics for a complete look. 2nd: Miss Behavin’ 3rd: Village Tailor

BEST FOODIE GIFTS

J. Olive Company 265 N. Lamar Blvd, Suite J

J. Olive Company, just north of the Square, offers a selection of fine oils and balsamics for the culinary genius in your life. Blood orange, white truffle, roasted California walnut and Tuscan herb are just a few of the oils available. Balsamics include apricot, peach, honey ginger and fig. Customizable gift boxes are available to add that extra touch to a special gift.

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BEST BID DAY GIFTS

BEST HOSTESS GIFTS

BEST QUIRKY GIFTS

LILY PAD

OLIVE JUICE

OFF SQUARE BOOKS

SATTERFIELD POTTERY

128 Courthouse Square

305 S. Lamar Blvd.

129 Courthouse Square

138 Courthouse Square

Lily Pad has become the source for custom Greek Life accessories for the sorority girl in your life. Bid day gifts include totes, water bottles, pillows, apparel or accessories for each specific sorority, all of which can be purchased individually or assembled into “good luck” and “bid day” basket.

Olive Juice has a great selection of gifts that are Mississippi specific, including wall and door hangings, local art and other household items. The store has everything from pottery to jewelry so you can find the perfect gift for any hostess.

Off Square Books is home to all of the lifestyle and leisure books and magazines, but one of the best things about it is its random selection of gifts. From games and puzzles to socks and totes, Off Square Books has just about everything you need in a gift for that someone with a quirky sense of humor.

Michael Satterfield, an M.F.A. graduate of the University of Mississippi, creates a variety of ceramics including dinnerware, home décor, and figurines. There are also plenty of Mississippispecific items, perfect for the ex-Oxonian that needs a little bit of home.

BEST APPLIANCES/ELECTRONICS

COWBOY MALONEY’S 2602 W. Oxford Loop

Cowboy Maloney’s has 13 locations in the state and the local retailer specializes in home entertainment and appliances. The retailer offers deals on the latest televisions, home audio systems, portable electronics, washers and dryers, mattresses and furniture.

BEST LUXURY TAILGATING GIFTS

KATHERINE BECK GIFTS 134 Courthouse Square

This gift shop offers luxury items including housewares, artisan gifts and jewelry. As with any Oxford gift shop, Katherine Beck has a section specific to Ole Miss tailgating which includes clear handbags, Ole Miss plates, cups and décor and a few gourmet snacks.

BEST FASHION SPLURGE

BEST GIFTS FOR EX-OXONIANS

BEST CHILDREN’S BOUTIQUE

HINTON AND HINTON

ELLIOTT LANE

135 Courthouse Square

1801 West Jackson Ave.

The designer brands at Hinton and Hinton are worth treating yourself occasionally. The store carries Filson brand luggage, Lucchese traditional western boots and Cole Haan footwear that’s worth the occasional splurge for a fine product.

There are plenty of places to buy traditional baby clothes, but Elliott Lane offers a wide selection for boys and girls, sizes 4 to 16. The contemporary children’s boutique also has shoes and accessories to give your children a fashionable and age-appropriate outfit.

BEST INTERIOR DESIGNER SOMETHING SOUTHERN 1223 E Jackson Ave Whether it’s a permanent home in Oxford or a game day weekend getaway, Something Southern gets it right. From design consultation services to furnishings, accessories, artwork and custom upholstery, the business strives to give their clients the best products to fit their budget. Something Southern has been previously voted Best of Oxford and they pride themselves on exemplary service. 2nd: Jennifer Russell 3rd: Julie Montgomery

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Editor’s Pick

Best Children’s Boutique

Clothing / Shoes / Accessories / Gifts 1801 West Jackson Ave. / Oxford, MS www.facebook.com/elliottlaneoxford

FULL SERVICE SALON

WE WOULD LIKE TO THANK EVERYONE THAT VOTED THE PARLOR BEST HAIR SALON IN OXFORD!

It is Our Goal to make You Feel as Beautiful as You Look! 2305 WEST JACKSON AVENUE, SUITE 203 OXFORD, MS 38655 • 662.513.0015 www.theparlorofoxfordsalon.com 84 ox fo r d m a g . co m


BEST 1 HOUR WORKOUT IN THE COUNTRY! Call to book your class today.

662.380.5149 1801 Jackson Ave. West • Suite D115 Oxford, MS 38655

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Services BEST SPA

BEST ASSISTED LIVING HOME

BEST CHILDCARE

BEST ACCOUNTING FIRM

EPICURE

THE BLAKE 110 Ed Perry Blvd.

OXFORD FIRST BAPTIST

SWETLAND COOK

2154 S. Lamar Blvd.

There are few spaces that, upon entrance, immediately transform one into a willow tree of serenity and calm. Epicure, via relaxing aromas, a caring staff and an exemplary offering and execution of services is one of those elite spaces. There is no secret to their success, simply walk through the door, and it will be clear why they are the best. 2nd: La Rousse 3rd: Suthern Oasis

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Oxford is a town of social amenities and entertaining, and The Blake, Oxford’s best assisted living facility, is no different. The Blake offers its inhabitants a resort style atmosphere full of plush social spaces and a calendar of rousing activities. The crowds may be on the Square, but The Blake is “where it’s at”. 2nd: Hermitage Gardens 3rd: Azalea Garden

800 Van Buren Ave.

Even though our children talk back and make messes that would freak out Eris, the Greek goddess of Chaos and Disorder, we do want them to be well cared for when not in our shadow. FBC daycare has, throughout the years, upheld the care and education of our babes as if the dropped off tots were their own flesh and blood. Thanks for the peace of mind, FBC. 2nd: Mother Goose 3rd: ABC Learning Center

2409 S. Lamar Blvd.

Vicki M. Cook and Melissa A. Swetland combined their nearly 50 years of accounting experience in 2012 to form Swetland Cook PLLC. They pair excellent service with a uniquely personal touch, building the trust you need to make your best financial decisions. 2nd: DeVoe Carr


BEST YOGA

SOUTHERN STAR YOGA 723 N. LAMAR BLVD.

Southern Star Yoga is the number one place for Oxonians to get their meditation on. Whether it’s fitness, flexibility, or chakras alignment that you’re after, Southern Star will make any yogi, beginner or master, feel right at home.

BEST EVENT CATERING

QUEENISSIPPI queenissippi.com

From event catering to private parties, Queenissippi catering has you covered. Operating in partnership with The Wine Bar, chef Erika Lipe gets her culinary inspiration from “Mississippi,” which she describes as “Everything from Memphis to New Orleans.” Hosting a dinner party and don’t feel like cooking? Hire a Queenissippi personal chef to cook—and clean!—in your home.

BEST PHARMACY

CHANEY’S 501 Bramlett Blvd

BEST SALON FOR AFRICAN AMERICAN HAIR

Whether you are searching for some cologne for a Father’s Day present, a gift basket for a graduate, or the healing power of pharmaceutical remedies, Chaney’s has the hook up. Btw, they can also fuel your veins with a rock-your-socks-off cup of coffee.

GOOLSBY’S HAIR WORLD

2nd: G & M Pharmacy 3rd: CVS

110 Ed Perry Blvd.

Family-owned and operated since 1968, Goolsby’s Hair World promises affordably priced, unparalleled hair styling and grooming services that are tailored to all hair types and lengths. The exceptional service and distinctively traditional atmosphere has earned Goolsby’s a singular reputation in the Oxford community.

BEST PET GROOMER

BEST OFFICE SUPPLY

THE SPAW

PITNER OFFICE SUPPLY

426 S. Lamar Blvd.

1714 University Ave

The Homeward Bound team has created a heavenly haven for your dog’s mental, physical and emotional rejuvenation. Stop in, chat with the exemplary staff, and explore the digs. You’ll most certainly be sold on the services they offer your four-pawed loved ones and possibly find a bit of residual canine serenity for yourself.

The only locally owned and operated office supply store in Oxford, Pitner’s opened its doors in 1982. Not only do they have a large inventory on site, the knowledgeable staff will also order anything you lack for next morning arrival. Every interaction, whether in the store or over the phone, feels like talking with family. Only more reliable.

2nd:PetSmart 3rd: Pampered Paws

2nd: Office Depot

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To the L-O-U Community, A very special thank you for making Mayo Financial a "Best of Oxford"! Sincerely,

Brad Mayo

Q.

Why were we voted Best Museum?

A.

Come for a visit, escape the heat, and find out why!

Mayo Financial (662) 234-5112 Executive Benefit Stategies Employee Benefits

Family Protection Wealth Accumulation

Registered Representative/Securities and Investment Advisory Services offered through Signator Investors, Inc. Member FINRA, SIPC. Mayo Financial is independent of Signator Investors, Inc. OSJ Main Office - 210 25th Ave North, Suite 1200,, Nashville, TN 37203. 615-385-3867.

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The University of Mississippi Museum and Historic Houses A D M I S S I O N A N D P A R K I N G A R E A L W AY S F R E E Tues.–Sat. 10 a.m.–6 p.m. Closed every Sunday and Monday along with most University Holidays. MUSEUM

at U N I V E R S I T Y A N D 5 t h

M U S E U M . O L E M I S S . E D U

|

R OWA N OA K

662.915.7073


BEST DEAL FOR MANI/PEDI

BEST NEW BUSINESS

PRO-NAILS

BLO/DRY BAR

1514 Jackson Ave. W

1801 Jackson Ave.

Oxford has plenty of nail salons…but mani-pedis are also in high demand. ProNails is centrally located on Jackson Avenue, and it has plenty of space to serve walkins just about any time. Not to mention, the mani-pedi combo comes at a superaffordable $45.

Blo/Dry Bar gives you one less thing to worry about in the morning. Have your hair and makeup styled in an intimate relaxing environment, and leave knowing you look your absolute best. 2nd: Lost Pizza 3rd: High Cotton Wine & Spirits

BEST HAIR SALON

BEST NAIL SALON

THE PARLOR

THE NAIL BAR

2305 Jackson Ave W

107 N 13th St.

The Parlor’s customers brag on the stylists’ skill, but they also love that they make clients feel at home. In a colorfully hip and comfortable environment, all are welcome to be pampered and beautified by a staff that quickly becomes family. The Parlor is the place for the simplicity of excellent style and great service.

All of us need a place of refuge, whether it be to laugh or to meditate. The Nail Bar furnishes a space, a wealth of services and a staff that deliver whatever type of escape you desire. From pampering to parties, the Nail Bar will indulge your fancy and uplift your day. 2nd: The Nail Shop 3rd: Bella Mia Salon

2nd: La Rousse 3rd: La Mystique

BEST DRY CLEANER

BEST CONSTRUCTION

RAINBOW CLEANERS

MR CONSTRUCTION

1203 Jackson Ave. W

93 Hwy 328

Rainbow Cleaners is as much an institution in Oxford as Faulkner and the Square. This distinction is not only due to their longevity but to the exemplary work performed over and over, day in and day out. In a town of southern dandies, both male and female, Rainbow Cleaners has assisted in Oxford’s visual beautification as much as the architects and landscape artists.

JW McCurdy and Chad Russom of MR Construction are wellknown and well-respected contractors in Oxford, Mississippi. As experienced builders with an undeniable talent for bringing their visions to life, MR Construction built more than 80 homes in 2016 alone. The duo bases its methods on efficiency, quality and professionalism, which is also portrayed within their work force. 2nd: Ryan Avent Handyman Services

SevenSouth has been great for our tailgate. If you want it done right, I would highly recommend SevenSouth for all your tailgate needs.” - JEFF M.

Best Tailgating Setup Ser vice

Best Medical Clinic

SEVENSOUTH

URGENT CARE CLINIC OF OXFORD

sevensouthtailgating.com

Owned and operated by two Ole Miss alumni, SevenSouth knows the importance of a Grove tailgate done right. The company offers full season, SEC and individual game packages, all of which include full setup and cleanup. Patrons can rent any equipment they lack and even store their own equipment with SevenSouth during the offseason. Right down to the smallest detail, SevenSouth will take your Grove tent to the next level.

1487 Belk Rd.

Ever notice how injuries and illness like to sneak up after business hours and on the weekends? Visit Urgent Care Clinic of Oxford any day of the week for premium care without the expense and hassle of the emergency room. 2nd: Oxford Urgent Care 3rd: MS Eye Consultants

BEST BUSINESS

OXFORD UNIVERSITY BANK 1500 University Ave and 2301 Jackson Ave W.

It’s important to find a bank you love and even more important to find one that loves you back. At either location, on University or Jackson Avenue, Oxonians can trust they’ll be taken care of at OU Bank. 2nd: Square Books 3rd: Oxford Urgent Care

2nd: Lapels 3rd: University Cleaners

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BESTLANDSCAPING

BEST AUTO REPAIR

BEST BARRE CLASS

BEST CARPET/FLOORING

SMITH LAWN MGMT.

SOUTHLAND BODY & PAINT SHOP

PURE BARRE

STOUT’S CARPET & FLOORING

14668 Hwy 6 West (Thaxton)

No one brings a yard to life quite like Smith Lawn Management. From contracting a new yard to conducting regular maintenance, Smith Lawn’s goal is to beautify America one yard at a time. The landscapers will plant flower beds, trees, living fences or sod with the goal of helping Oxford shine. Their trained staff works to exceed customer expectations to do the job as if they were paying for it themselves.

265 N Lamar Blvd., Suite E

2622 W Oxford Loop

Let’s face it, car repairs are the bane of modern living. Southland’s mechanics are not only extremely knowledgeable, they’ll also get you back on the road quickly and without trying to tack on unnecessary expenses. No wonder they have such a loyal following.

2 Private Road 2050

Pure Barre offers a total body workout that uses the ballet barre to perform small, isometric movements, which burn fat, sculpt muscles and create long, lean physiques. Sculpt and tone your physique in their friendly, high-energy atmosphere right on the Oxford Square.

2nd: Deal’s Auto Repair 3rd: Oxford Auto Care

Whether you are looking to re-tile your bathroom, install new flooring throughout your home or just sand and stain your existing flooring, Stout’s will help you get the job done. Their experienced staff will walk you through every step of the process, making sure the final product is even better than you’d hoped.

2nd: Mastercuts 3rd: Grasshopper

BEST EYE CARE

BEST INSURANCE AGENCY

BEST PHYSICAL THERAPY

BEST PEST CONTROL

OXFORD EYE CLINIC

OXFORD INSURANCE

ENDURANCE

14668 Hwy 6 West (Thaxton)

403 N. Lamar Blvd.

PICKENS PEST CONTROL

Since 1987, Oxford Eye Clinic & Optical has provided quality vision care products and personalized optometric services to Oxford and the surrounding areas. Experienced doctors and staff offer comprehensive vision examinations and specialize in the diagnosis and treatment of a wide array of eye diseases, conditions, and problems.

Oxford Insurance has been a mainstay in town since 1911, largely in part of its customer service values. Beyond offering commercial, personal and life coverage, Oxford Insurance works for their clients and takes time to get to know them. Most of their clientele is located in the L-O-U community, which they are happy to serve.

2714 W. Oxford Loop & 2205 Jefferson Davis Dr

2nd: Brown Insurance Agency 3rd: Farm Bureau

No pain, no gain? Not at Endurance. The highly experienced team of rehabilitation professionals use a hands-on, personalized approach to help you heal comfortably. Their professional treatment team includes board certified physical therapists, occupational therapists, athletic trainers and personal trainers, using advanced technology and equipment to help you achieve optimal results.

2613 W Oxford Loop

When the creepy crawly critters decide your home is their home, Pickens has you covered. Their array of odorless, carefully tested products are safe around the house for children and pets while still ridding the area of the unwanted roommates.

2nd: MS Eye Consultants 3rd: Rayner Eye Clinic

BEST TAXI SERVICE

UBER

BEST CAR WASH

CAR WASH USA 1898 Jackson Avenue E

Any university town needs a robust pool of designated drivers to carry all the revelers safely home each night. Though controversial at first, Uber has won out as Oxford’s preferred ride-sharing service, both for convenience and affordability. 2nd: Angel Taxi 3rd: Austin Taxi

When you love your car, it matters who gives her a bath. Car Wash USA on Jackson Avenue offers five levels of washes, all including a foamy bath, tire scrub and spot-free rinse in as little as three minutes. Customers are welcome to use their on-site vacuums for free with any wash purchase, and attendants are always on duty to help. 2nd: Elite Mobile Detailer

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BEST REAL ESTATE

BEST LAW FIRM

KESSINGER REAL ESTATE

TANNEHILL, CARMEAN & MCKENZIE

2091 Old Taylor Road

The team known as Kessinger Real Estate covers the Oxford and Water Valley areas for both residential and commercial sales. Led by president Don Kessinger in the Oxford office, their group of more than two-dozen realtors can help you sell your home to the perfect family or move an entrepreneur into a commercial dream.

829 N. Lamar Blvd. #1

There are few areas of the law that Tannehill, Carmean & McKenzie haven’t dealt with, but their focus over the years has become personal injury, criminal defense and real estate. Oxford residents have trusted the firm to handle their cases for more than 15 years now. 2nd: Daniel Coker Horton & Bell 3rd: Richard Barrett


BEST WORKOUT

BEST NEW WORKOUT

BEST BANK

ORANGETHEORY

HOTWORX

FNB

1801 Jackson Ave W

916 E Jackson Ave

Multiple Locations

Sweat it out along with everyone else who’s caught on to this popular workout trend that arrived in Oxford not too long ago. Orangetheory Fitness took over the town (and the rest of the country) when it opened its doors with its unique, fastpaced, heart-pumping workout. Their unique heart rate detection system is a proven way to burn fat fast.

Hotworx’s innovative methods make it our favorite new workout. The studio offers virtually instructed, high-heat exercise classes that burn, tone and sculpt while removing toxins from the body. The workouts are quick, lasting between 15 and 30 minutes, but don’t worry—the heat is high enough to give your body the workout it needs.

FNB began as First National Bank in 1910, but the local institution strives to be the L-O-U and Tupelo communities’ Friendly Neighborhood Bank. Apart from having bankers that care about their customers’ financial needs and happiness, the FNB team also gives back to the community by participating in service projects and volunteer organizations. 2nd: OU Bank 3rd: Bancorp South

2nd: HotWorx 3rd: HIIT

BEST MASSAGE

BEST TANNING SALON

HEALING HANDS

OXFORD SUPER TAN

1205 Office Park Dr.

From deep tissue and prenatal massages to shiatsu and hydrotherapy, massage therapist Rebecca Kelley has the skills and experience to relieve your pain and stress. Not stressed or in pain? Just treat yo’self. 2nd: Epicure 3rd: Living Well

1715 University Avenue

A clean environment with great products and knowledgeable staff keeps people coming in droves for both tanning beds and spray tan services. For a natural look like you’re fresh from a beach vacation, Oxford Super Tan is far more costeffective and convenient than a trip to the Gulf Coast.

THANKS FOR VOTING US BEST OF OXFORD “BEST QUICK HEALTH BOOST” 809 College Hill Rd. • 662.234.4443 www.livingfoodsoxford.com

2nd: Sunsations 3rd: Suthern Oasis

BEST GROVE CATERING

BEST LUXURY HAIRCUT

MY MICHELLE’S

LA ROUSSE

1308 North Lamar

1006 Jefferson Avenue

My Michelle’s catering is all about just that—catering to the tastes and needs of their clients. From intimate birthday parties to massive weddings, My Michelle’s can handle it all. Plus, the talented chefs behind this operation design every menu based on what their clients want.

At La Rousse, you don’t just get a haircut. You get a luxury experience. The high-end salon features trained stylists who are well-versed on the latest trends and are ready to make their clients look amazing with topof-the-line products. These stylists even work with clients to offer tips for hair care and styling beyond their salon appointment.

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Personalities BEST OXONIAN TO FOLLIOW ON INSTAGRAM

BRADLEY GORDON @bradleysgordon BEST PHOTOGRAPHER

JOEY BRENT

2ND: ANN-MARIE WYATT 3RD: SCOTT BURTON

BEST LOCAL MUSICIAN/BAND

KUDZU KINGS 2ND: AND THE ECHO 3RD: KEITH SANDERS

BEST LOCAL ARTIST

JONATHAN KENT ADAMS BEST OXONIAN TO FOLLOW ON SOCIAL MEDIA

KARA GILES

2ND: JOHN COFIELD 3RD: JAY CARMEAN

BEST LOCAL WRITER

ACE ATKINS

2ND: BETH ANN FENNELLY 3RD: TOM FRANKLIN

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2ND: NICOLE LAMAR 3RD: ALLY CUNNINGHAM


BEST K-12 TEACHER

JOANNE McGEHEE 2ND: SHERRY BUFORD 3RD: ANN MORGAN GRAHAM

BEST COLLEGE PROFESSOR

ALLYN WHITE 2ND: JASON CAIN 3RD: KATHRYN MCKEE

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BEST DENTIST

BEST NURSE

BEST REALTOR

ROSS FAMILY DENTAL

STEPHANIE BARRETT

CARLYLE THOMAS

2ND: HAL HANEY 3RD: WALKER SWANEY

2ND: HOLLY ARMSTRONG

2ND: MARY AQUINO 3RD: MATT MCGRAW

BEST PEDIATRICIAN

MICHAEL DENNIS 2ND: DOUG SANFORD 3RD: CATHERINE PHILLIPS BEST PSYCHIATRIST

TIM KELLY

2ND: MEGHAN ANDERSON 3RD: PHIL BAQUIE BEST OB-GYN

BLAKE SMITH 2ND: JULIE HARPER 3RD: ELIZABETH MIZE

BEST VETERINARIAN

LEE PAYNE

2ND: WARE SULLIVAN 3RD: HANNAH HEATON BEST DOCTOR

KECIA KIRK 2ND: WILLIAM MAYO 3RD: DAVID COON

BEST LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICER

JOEY EAST

2ND: BO PRINCE 3RD: BRADLEY MCDONALD BEST LIFESTYLE PHOTOGRAPHER

PAUL GANDY BEST ELECTRICIAN

BEST LAWYER

RICK HENRY

2ND: RHEA TANNEHILL 3RD: JAY CARMEAN

BEST FINANCIAL ADVISOR

BEST FIREFIGHTER

2ND: ED JONES 3RD: OUB WEALTH MGMT.

RICHARD BARRETT

WES ANDERSON

BRAD MAYO

2ND: JODY BLACK 3RD: BRIAN WHITTEN

Thank you for once again putting your trust in SLM and voting us Best Landscape Services in the 2018 Best of Oxford!

(662) 513-6586 SmithLawnManagement.com

SmithLawnManagement.com

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Out and About FOXFIRE RANCH BLUES AT THE BARN Blues virtuoso Christone “Kingfish” Ingram plays fairly often at Foxfire Ranch’s Sunday Night Blues at the Barn events. We caught him on June 24, along with lots of other Oxonians and even a few out-of-towners. If you’re curious about the history of Foxfire Ranch, or dying to catch some live hill country blues with a side of Southern cooking, check out Keerthi Chandrashekar’s “100 Years and Counting” in our June 2018 issue.

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Top - Spectators enjoying the show. bottom left- JT and Afton Thomas, bottom right- Susie Penman.

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SAID AND DONE

Brown Water Saves Us

W

hile ruminating on the mysteries of the Gulf of Mexico, I was reminded I once caught a salt-water catfish with my foot - while not fishing. I was probably seven or eight years old and was confined to quarters at the old Broadwater Hotel in Biloxi along with my two sibCONTRIBUTING lings. Our parents had sternly EDITOR JIM DEES warned us to stay in the room is a writer and longtime before they left to attend a host of Thacker Mountain Radio. He is the author of dinner in the hotel ballroom. The Statue and the Fury Of course, we slipped A Year of Art, Race, Music out for a quick frolic on the and Cocktails. beach. Dozens of baby catfish had washed up dead, stiff in body and fin. I stepped on one, the fin like a nail, driving deeply into the pink ham of my right foot; a six-inch catfish lodged and dangling. I was left to hop back to our room, the catfish jiggling which each painful step. We alerted our mom and dad there’s a phone call , went to the ER I remember the wheel chair was wooden and sometime later, I’m sure I endured a quasi-Biblical caning. Memory banks have deleted that part . Growing up in Mississippi, “the coast” was our Oz, the golden destination for honeymoons, business conventions, vacations, and during the “Dixie Mafia” days, murder, mayhem and gambling. The Mississippi Gulf Coast suffers in comparison to our neighbors. We don’t have the exotic European decadence of New Orleans to our west, nor the sugary beaches and emerald water of Alabama and Florida to our east. Thanks to our barrier islands of Cat, Ship, Deer, Horn, Round and Petit Bois, our Gulf water is stifled in beauty, more brine than fine. Some days it resembles a shallow brown puddle through which you could walk half way to Portugal. Indeed, my longtime crafty counselor, Semmes Luckett, has maintained that our less-than-stellar sand and surf keeps the snowbirds and condos at bay. “The brown water saves us,” he says in his Pyrrhic mantra. The Gulf has long captured the muse of artists from marine wildlife painter, Walter Anderson to gonzo potter, George Ohr to William Faulkner, whose wife, Estelle, biographers report, 90 ox fo r d m a g . co m 98 ox fo r d m a g . co m

tried to drown herself in the Gulf surf - on their honeymoon. Jesmyn Ward has earned two National Book Awards for her work set there. Add to the list, Jack E. Davis, author of The Gulf – The Making of the American Sea Liveright . Clocking in at 5 0 pages, it is the “biography” of the Gulf, an epic sprawl of weird, wonderful and sometimes, savage characters. Lonesome Dove on the water. Or, Shelby Foote’s Civil War trilogy in a single volume. Ken Burns would be perfect to make a series of this book . This past April, The Gulf was awarded the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for History. Davis starts with the original underwater “rift” that formed the Gulf 150 million years ago and expertly guides the story through the Deepwater Horizon disaster in 2010. The petroleum industry is covered in the middle chapters like a slick. There is also a nifty chapter on tarpon fishing, crime writer John D. MacDonald, and a happy update on formerly extinct coastal birds . The early chapters portray the first explorers from Spain, France and England as inept but vicious. In 1527 Parfilo de Narvaez was a red-bearded “Mad Dog” conquistador, who once sliced off the nose of a native in a dispute and fed the offending native’s mother to his pack of war dogs. Unschooled in harvesting the abundant food right in front of them - oysters, crabs, redfish, mullet - Narvaez ordered his men to eat their horses. After a nautical error, landing at Tampa Bay thinking he was in Mexico, Narvaez was eventually swept out to sea in a storm, shark food one hopes. On the heroic side, the chapter on Ocean Springs painter Walter Anderson 190 -1965 is worth the book. “Mississippi has a sense of place that is profound. Faulkner crafted his literary career around it. The pen of Eudora Welty was loyal to it. Anderson might have painted somewhere else, but it is hard to imagine somewhere else with a grace of color and motion and life equivalent to that of the Mississippi Gulf coast and its islands.” Maybe the brown water saves us but it also feeds us. The magic I felt as a youngster going on summer trips to “the coast” sans catfish-in-foot is the same I felt reading this book: Discovery and wonder. History isn’t just in books, it is all around us; entrancing and mysterious like a purple sunset on a breezy beach. Jim Dees will interview Jack E. Davis on Saturday, Sept. 1 at 7 pm on Mississippi Public Broadcasting.


HOME TOWN TEAM Cooper Terry, MD | Daniel Boyd, MD | Kurre Luber, MD Anna Burns, MS, PA-C, ATC | Beth Norris, FNP-BC

662.513.2000 OXFORD 497 Azalea Drive, #102 Oxford, MS 38655

GRENADA 1300 Sunset Drive, Suite T Grenada, MS 38901

oxfordortho.org BATESVILLE 107 Eureka Street Batesville, MS 38606

OF F IC IAL ORT HOPAE D IC T E A M P H Y S I C I A N S F O R

HERNANDO 2018 McIngvale Road, Suite 101 Hernando, MS 38632

AT Hoxfordmag LE T I C S . co m

Cooper Terry, MD | Daniel Boyd, MD | Kurre Luber, MD | Anna Burns, PA-C, ATC | Beth Norris FNP-C

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In 1978, a woman died of breast cancer, and with her the talents I never knew. She crocheted. She embroidered.

She was my grandmother.

So that history doesn’t repeat itself,

Call today to schedule your mammogram, 662-636-4252

it’s important to me to find the right place for annual exams, guidance and treatment if needed. I choose Baptist North Mississippi for their expertise and compassionate care. They stand by their commitment to provide advanced health care for women. Now offering 3D mammography, a screening tool that improves early detection of breast cancer, I’ve found not only the best breast care services, but a place that feels like home.

Get Better.

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