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Thursday, February 21 • The Lyric Oxford • Free! No ticket required 7:15-8:00 p.m. Festival intro, Community Film premiere: Ten

6:00-7:00 p.m. Thacker Mountain Radio

Screen 1 (S1) 1:15-3:15 p.m. Tennessee Queer Friday, February 22 3:15-5:45 p.m. We didn’t get famous,

Three Screens at Malco

Drawing on a Dream, Antenna 5:45-7:30 p.m. Tupelove, Native Son 7:30-8:30 p.m. Conversation with Roger Avary 8:30-10:00 p.m. Ten, Spotlight Film #1 (TBA)

1:00 p.m. Panel: Remembering the 1963 Woolworth’s Sit-In, Overby Center

Screen 2 (S2)

Screen 3 (S3)

11:00 a.m.-12:45 p.m. Animation Block: Grandmothers, Mayday, Strings, Ham, The Loop, Flatland 12:45-2:15 p.m. Documentary Shorts: Ten, Reborning, The Urban Herd, Camino 2:30-3:45 p.m. Narrative Shorts 1: Crush, Why I Make Movies, Remake, Split Time, Free Kick, The Potential Wives of Norman Mao 3:45-6:00 p.m. The Golden Bough, Pictures of Superheroes 6:00-8:00 p.m. Tracer Gun, Congratulations 8:00-10:00 p.m. The Discoverers

11:00 a.m.-1:00 p.m. Narrative Shorts 2: The Beard, DeafBlind, The Hiccup, Dinner with Holly, The Dark Companion, Emergency Contact, Double or Nothing, Crush 472, America 101 1:00-3:00 p.m. Basically Frightened 3:00-5:15 p.m. Ten, Plimpton 5:15-7:30 p.m. Pretty Monsters, Come Morning 7:30-9:30 p.m. Uprising

Saturday, February 23 9:00-10:30 a.m., 10:45 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Panels @ Lyric

10:00 a.m.-12:00 p.m. Casting 12:00-2:00 p.m. Documentary Filmmaking

Children’s Acting Workshop (Powerhouse) Free, reservation required.

2:00-4:00 p.m. Music in Film 4:00-6:00 p.m. Screenwriting

Free! No ticket required.

9:00 p.m. AWARDS CEREMONY (day pass and Saturday party upgrade required)

Screen 1 (S1) 10:00-11:15 a.m. Pretty Monsters, Saturday, Come Morning February 23

Three Screens at Malco

11:15-2:00 p.m. Mississippi Documentaries: April’s Way, Growing our Own, DVD Blues, Pizza Shop, Manifest Destiny 2.0, Mickle’s Pickle 2:00-2:45 p.m. Shorts from 2012 Ole Miss Filmmaking Workshop 2:45-5:30 p.m. Mississippi Narrative Shorts: Third Shift, The Retirement Party, Grasshopper!, Genrevolt, Tube, S for Sally 5:30-8:30 p.m. Rebels: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss, An Ordinary Hero

Screen 2 (S2)

Screen 3 (S3)

10:00a.m.-12:00 p.m. Plimpton 12:00-2:00 p.m. Boomtown, My Brooklyn 2:00-3:45 p.m. Grand Fugue on the Art of Gumbo, Eating Alabama 3:45-5:15 p.m. Music in the Hall / Oxford Sessions 5:30-8:00 p.m. Narrative Shorts 2: The Beard, DeafBlind, The Hiccup, Dinner with Holly, The Dark Companion, Emergency Contact, Double or Nothing, Crush 472, America 101

10:00-11:45 a.m. Animation Block: Grandmothers, Mayday, Strings, Ham, The Loop, Flatland 11:45a.m.-1:30 p.m. Experimental Block: Life, Music for a Self-Transforming Machine, Notes on a Revolution (Silent Version), Thunder May Have Ruined the Moment, Don’t Break Down, Melt in the Shade, Slices of Charity, Milk Sorrow, 30 Miles, Rolling Stock, Dance Elephant Dance 1:30-2:45 p.m. Documentary Shorts: Ten, Reborning, The Urban Herd, Camino 2:45-4:30 p.m. Tennessee Queer 5:00-6:30 p.m. Mississippi Music Videos 6:30-8:30 p.m. Ten, Spotlight Film #2 (TBA)

1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m. Oxford Film History Tour leaves from Malco 12:00-2:00 p.m. Ten, Lecile, Pride and Joy Sunday, February 24 2:00-5:00 p.m. Rebels, An Ordinary Hero

Three screens at Malco

5:00-6:30 p.m. Grand Fugue on the Art of Gumbo, Eating Alabama

Tickets!

12:00-1:00 p.m. Narrative Shorts 1: Crush, Why I Make Movies, Remake, Split Time, Free Kick, The Potential Wives of Norman Mao 1:00-3:15 p.m. Tracer Gun, Congratulations 3:15-5:00 p.m. The Golden Bough, Pictures of Superheroes 5:00-7:00 p.m. The Discoverers

12:00-2:45 p.m. We didn’t get famous, Drawing on a dream, Antenna 2:45-4:45 p.m. Boomtown, My Brooklyn 4:45-6:45 p.m. Uprising

Tickets can be purchased for the 2013 Oxford Film Festival 1) in advance online at both oxfordfilmfest.com and thelyricoxford.com, 2) at the Lyric Box Office (inside Amelia’s) during their regular operating hours and 3) in person at Festival venues from Thursday to Sunday, February 21-24, 2013. Thursday, Feb 21 = FREE, no ticket required! Friday, Feb 10 / Saturday, Feb 11 / Sunday, Feb 12 3-day pass (FRI, SAT, AND SUN) = $30 regular / $25 student 1-day pass (FRI, SAT, OR SUN) = $15 regular / $12 student NOTE: * An individual film pass ALLOWS admission to a single film block, but does not GUARANTEE seating. Seats are first come, first serve. In the event Individual pass * = $8 regular / $6.50 student that a screening room is at capacity, the film pass can be used for another 1-night Party Upgrade ** (FRI OR SAT) = $25 (no student discount) film at the same time, or for the film at an alternate screening time, or can be 2-night Party Upgrade (SAT AND SUN) = $50 (no student discount) refunded. ** Party Upgrade passes require purchase of day pass or higher.

Where to get them? oxfordfilmfest.com

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Ten years

Roll Credits

sounds like a long time. When you’re starting out, it seems like a long time, but really, it isn’t. I remember that first festival in 2003 like yesterday, sitting in the law library mezzanine, the Ford Center auditorium, and the public library with a group of 25-30 people, brainstorming for the inaugural festival: whom to invite, what to name the award, how to get funding to pull it all off, and a myriad of other particulars. For the next few festivals, we spent long hours screening films, talking with prospective sponsors and donors and especially working at selling Oxford to film makers, critics, and other film professionals, convincing them that Oxford was a town they should visit and that we had an audience that would appreciate their work. Details of each festival are something of a blur, but afterward we talked about what worked and what didn’t work, and then started the process all over again. We have followed that pattern every year, trying to eliminate our errors and to build on our successes.

Tenth Annual Oxford Film Festival (2013) Executive Director: Molly Fergusson Operations Director: Michelle Emanuel Communications Director: Melanie Addington Hospitality Director: Diala Chaney Production Director: Micah Ginn Publications Editor: Tom Speed Milly Moorhead West

Volunteer Coordinator: Kristin Rogers Projection and technical support: Media and Documentary Projects, University of Mississippi Experimental Curator: Dwayne Butcher Staff Photographers: Danny Klimetz, Mike Stanton, Bill Dabney Screening Committee: Angie Barmer, Lee Bowie, Dawn Bullion, Nicholas Carr, San Evans, Marilyn Frey, Richard Frey, Laura Harper, Kelly Johnson, Shannon Johnson, Keller Jones, Jasmine Karlowski, Rory Ledbetter, Neil Manson, A.E. Marceaux, Betty Musselwhite, Jillian Pecoraro, Daniel Lee Perea, Timothy Yenter, Nicole Yenter

Over the years trying to find good films and filmmakers to invite turned into trying to find screeners who would help watch all the films submitted, and to have to explain to previous guests that we couldn’t bring them back “just because.” In the beginning, we had to “sell” Oxford, but now we just have to mention “Oxford Film Festival” and we find that people have heard of us and are honored to be invited. We still spend long hours locating sponsors and soliciting donations, recruiting and training volunteers and selecting films to show you. Some things just don’t change. As with all good things, it has taken a lot of commitment, hard work and time. For ten years, during lunches, at night, on weekends, and over holidays, the all-volunteer OFF staff has worked tirelessly to put together an annual event that would represent and entertain the diverse, creative, and intelligent town that has supported us. We hope you like what we’ve lined up this year. See you at the movies! Molly Fergusson Executive Director

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Poster and Ad Design: Amy Woodward Evans / Wide Eye Design Program Design: Susan Bauer Lee / Cool Dog Creative Special Thanks To: Aidan Addington, Harry Addington, Lynda Addington, Wayne Andrews, Bill Beckwith, Bradley Bishop, Elliott Chaney, Michael Chaney, Phillip Chaney, Joy Jones Clark, John Currence, Dianne Smith Fergusson, JoJo Ginn, Gayle Ginn, Sam Haskell, Meta Poole Ginn, Matthew Graves, Greg Gray, Andy Harper, Gail Herrera, Mary Kathryn Herrington, Nathan McDaniel, Kathryn McGaw, Johnny McPhail, Susan McPhail, Karen Scott, Barton Segal, Ethan Stuart, Kevin Stuart, Smith Stuart, Karen Tuttle, the volunteers in red shirts who gave their weekend to make this festival possible, and the people of Oxford who have supported us for ten years. The Oxford Film Festival is an independent non-profit organization with 501c3 status. Donations may be tax deductible. Contact us! info@oxfordfilmfest.com or call 877.560.FILM

oxfordfilmfest.com Find us on Facebook and Twitter

february 21-24, 2013


The Mississippi Film Office welcomes you to the 10th annual Oxford Film Festival. As an original sponsor of the Festival, we are a true believer in the power of film in our state and in our lives. While our everyday mission is to attract film production, our long term vision is to create a supportive and creative environment for all filmmakers. Through the efforts and programming of the Oxford Film Festival, we are able to embrace both. Mississippi is a solid place to make a movie:  beautiful locations, hospitable people, supportive communities, and elected officials who understand our mission and champion its progress. Our film incentive program includes a 25-30% cash rebate on your Mississippi spend, including resident and non-resident payroll, with a low $50,000 minimum spend to qualify…and we are always looking for ways to make it better and easier for all filmmakers to utilize. Mississippi is an amazing place of inspiration and accomplishment. Though blemished by unforgivable moments, Mississippi has yielded an unmatchable heritage. The challenge and responsibility of this office, and the obligation we feel to you, is to continue this great heritage. A Mississippian stands at every crossroads of American culture: with words and notes and paint and film; Mississippians are storytellers. Our commitment is to create, nurture, and support the storyteller – be they using words or film or video. For us filmmaking is more than economics. Every film creates opportunity, and the greatest opportunity comes in the explanation of a life, of a place, of a people. In the telling of our stories, real or imagined, we create understanding, discourse, and illumination. There is nothing better than what we do, as there is no boundary to what we can achieve. We will always encourage you, the filmmaker, with financial and educational opportunity. And we will continue to sustain you, the filmgoer, by supporting film festivals and filmmakers seeking the independent voice. We know that all lives are made richer by the stories we share. We hope you enjoy your time in Oxford and in Mississippi. Ward Emling Director, Mississippi Film Office

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Dear Visitors, On behalf of the Board of Aldermen and the citizens of Oxford, I wish to extend a warm welcome to you while you are here for the 2013 Oxford Film Festival. We are glad to have our own film festival as a place for sharing knowledge, educating viewers and artistic expression. In addition to its charm and hospitality, Oxford offers an excellent venue for enjoying films. We are proud of past festivals in terms of attendance and content and we are glad to see the event continue to grow. While you will be occupied by the festival’s activities, we hope there will also be time for you to get acquainted with Oxford. Please enjoy the natural beauty of the campus of the University of Mississippi, the friendly scale of our streets and neighborhoods, and the excellent restaurants and shops. Thank you for contributing to its growing list of things to do and see. Enjoy your visit and please let us know if we can help you in any way while you are here. With best wishes, Sincerely, George G. Patterson

february 21-24, 2013


A Decade Done 10 Years Of The Oxford Film Festival

oxfordfilmfest.com

Oxford Film Festival

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From inauspicious beginnings in a nowdefunct back alley bar off the Oxford Square, the Oxford Film Festival has persevered in ways its founders may have never imagined. It’s grown to be an integral part of the Oxford arts community, and a favorite stop on the film festival circuit for budding filmmakers. Now the festival celebrates its tenth year—a full decade done with more to come. In 2003, Oxford already had a thriving arts community—music, literature and visual arts all held a place of honor in a small town otherwise known for its state university. But the one component that was missing was cohesive community of film enthusiasts. The much beloved art house theater the Hoka had long since closed its doors. Oxford’s one offbeat video rental store, As Seen on TV, closed two years after the untimely death of its original owner, Robert Freeland, in 2004. The Oxford Film Festival helped to fill that void for watching independent films in Oxford, even if for one weekend out of the year. A cadre of aficionados coalesced around a simple idea and some meager funding to put together a showcase for independent films—always with an eye towards encouraging a homegrown movement of local filmmakers. “All the arts were covered in Oxford, except for film,” says Executive Director Molly Fergusson. “We wanted to provide a place to see the latest independent films and for the industry to see what Oxford had to offer.” The festival started as a project of the local Yoknapatawpha Arts Council. Later, the Department of Media and Documentary Projects at Ole Miss became a sponsor and collaborator, supplying much needed equipment and expertise. After the first three years in local restaurants

“I don’t think people even realize just how much of an impact this festival is making on Oxford,” says Communications Director Melanie Addington. “It is one of the reasons I didn’t move away and I think for a lot of people it gives them a place to express their art locally. It also makes a big economic impact on the community but in quieter ways than a football game. Whereas someone may come to watch football and buy some beer and chicken, filmmakers that come here think about how they can bring millions of dollars to make a film here. We’ve been planting seeds for years that are starting to bear fruit.” MALCO “We put Oxford OXFORD STUDIO 8 + on the map for working LYRIC filmmakers, some of OXFORDFILMFEST.COM whom have come back here for future projects,” adds Operations Director Michelle Emanuel. “Some of our filmmakers had never been to the South, much less Mississippi, before coming to our festival, yet they continue to submit their work to us, in the hopes they can return.” But with so many festivals on the circuit these days, what sets Oxford apart? Some of the charm of the Oxford Film Festival is good ol’ southern hospitality, and that’s bolstered the longevity of the festival too. “I think it’s our focus on hospitality and taking care and celebrating the filmmaker,” says Addington. “Many filmmakers that make shorts or music videos or experimental films have noted and on the Ole Miss campus, Malco that we don’t just cater to celebrities Theaters came on board as a sponsor or to feature films. We are excited for after the completion of the Oxford Studio all the filmmakers to be here and want Cinema. Now the Oxford Film Festival is them to fall in love with Oxford.” a 501(c)3 non-profit entity, produced by As the festival continues to evolve, a team of enthusiastic volunteers each adding workshops and panel discusyear, with financial support from generous sions each year and innovations like the benefactors and community resources. community film, now in its third year, the The festival has not only achieved festival’s promise for the future is bright. the goals or presenting and encouraging “I envision the festival lasting 50 independent film. It’s also become a years,” says Emanuel. “Or at least two feather in the cap of the community and more.” a shot in the arm for local tourism.

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by Tom Speed

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Legend of the Hoka How The Award Got Its Name, And Its Statue by Tom Speed When the Oxford Film Festival was founded in 2003, the subject of awards inevitably came into the picture. When it came time to choose that award, the name Hoka seemed like the natural fit. After all, it was the Hoka theater, founded by Ron Shapiro in Oxford in the 1970s, that first brought independent films to town. At the time, it was a rare and special treat for a small town in Mississippi. It helped to coalesce a community of film buffs too, a community that has blossomed under the care of the film festival over the past decade. The Hoka was a unique hang-out—a free-form combination movie house and café that hosted live music events and served as a cultural nexus for townspeople and college students alike. Prior to the Hoka, the only movies shown in Oxford were what Shapiro calls “formula” Hollywood movies. With the advent of the Hoka, foreign films and independent features became the norm, with concert films geared towards students, midnight screenings of “Rocky Horror Picture Show” and x-rated fare after hours to help pay the bills. The theater was named for Princess Hoka, the Chickasaw woman who, according to legend, first deeded much of Mississippi including the area now known as Oxford to white settlers back in 1832 with the Treaty of Pontotoc. “I don’t know if it’s true,” says Shapiro, “But the story I heard is that the Chickasaws were notorious for a baseball-type game they played and they gambled on it. They were notorious for losing everything. So they’d put stuff in the women’s names so they wouldn’t lose everything. I hope it’s true. I’ve heard that. She’s the one that signed the deed.” The Hoka finally closed its doors in the 1990s, but the legacy it left helped provide inspiration for the advent of the film festival. In many ways, the Oxford Film Festival helps to keep that spirit alive today. Thus, the “Spirit of the Hoka” award was born. “It’s just got that feel,” says Shapiro of the film festival. “There’s a filmmaking community that has built up around it. It’s wonderful. This festival has given me so much hope. We have a vibrant community, almost like the music and the art thing. We’re so lucky that the creative types in Mississippi keep moving here.” When it came time to design a statuette to represent the award, local noted sculptor Bill Beckwith seemed the obvious choice. Beckwith had already done several heralded sculptures of famous figures. In Mississippi, he had created memorials to B.B. King,

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Elvis Presley and the sculpture of William Faulkner on the Oxford Square. He’s a well-renowned master of his craft, and is also featured in the documentary film “Native Son,” which can be seen at this year’s festival. But what prepared him most for his creation of the Hoka award was a previous sculpture he’d done for the Chickasaw nation, and the research he completed to prepare for it. After all, while there were photographs of other famous figures, there were none of the legendary princess. Beckwith had to rely on his research and his imagination to bring forth the visage. Beckwith’s research in preparing for his sculpture of Chickasaw Chief Piomingo in Tupelo, Miss. led him to conversations with tribal leaders, who counseled him and offered suggested reading. “[Piomingo] was a Chickasaw chief in the 1790s and very important to the tribe,” Beckwith says. “I did a lot of research and read a lot of books that the tribe recommended. I got a feel for pre-contact Chickasaw. I formed an image of them through all this reading and research and somehow was sort of adopted by one of the higher-ups in the tribe through email. Mr. Kirk Perry was his name. He guided me and answered all of my questions.” When it came time to design the Spirit of the Hoka award, Beckwith drew on that research. “I don’t know how I could really say that that image of her formed. I had this image of a cool morning on the Yocona River coming out of your winter home— they had winter homes and summer homes— coming out in a nice warm blanket and the air was clean and crisp. I don’t know. That was sort of my…maybe a fantasy of pre-contact before the Europeans arrived” Since then, the Spirit of the Hoka award has been presented to winners at each Oxford Film Festival. Meanwhile, Shapiro says the time might be right for a revival of the Hoka Theater. “I’m so impressed with what’s going on with this festival and the excitement about film,” he says. “The reason I want to do it again is I go up to Memphis and see something like “Beasts of the Southern Wild” and all I want to do is let everybody see it. That’s why I got into the movie business. I’d get so excited about seeing a movie and I’d want to share it with people. People just want to get out. Everybody has great home theaters and everything but there’s still something about it. There’s the beauty of not being interrupted. You’re not going to put it on pause to take a phone call or whatever. You’re giving the director your complete attention for a couple of hours, which you don’t do at home.”

february 21-24, 2013


FRIDAY, February 22

Documentary Filmmaking

Remembering the 1963 Sit-in at the Jackson, Miss. Woolworth’s

Free, no ticket required In this annual panel, filmmakers and industry professionals take a look at the hot topics in documentary filmmaking. Featured panelists include Deirdre Haj (Executive Director of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival), Shirley Mixon (Programming Director for Mississippi Public Broadcasting), film critic Gerald Peary and documentary filmmaker Shannon McCoy Cohn.

Friday, 1:00 p.m. (Overby Center, University of Mississippi) The Overby Center for Southern Journalism and Politics hosts a panel discussion about the 1963 sit-in at Woolworth’s in Jackson by John Salter, Joan Trumpauer, and Anne Moody. Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, featured in the documentary feature An Ordinary Hero, will be in attendance. This free event will be held at the Overby Auditorium on the Ole Miss campus.

Conversation With Roger Avary Friday, 7:30 p.m. (S1) Roger Avary, perhaps best known for his work with Quentin Tarantino in the early 1990’s, helping to write stories such as Reservoir Dogs and the Academy Award-winning Pulp Fiction (Best Original Screenplay, 1994), will discuss his career as a screenwriter with fellow writer Chris Offut. Avary went on to adapt Bret Easton Ellis’ novel The Rules of Attraction into a successful screenplay, before adapting Beowulf with Neil Gaiman, among other projects. He is currently working on a biopic of Ian Fleming. Moderator Chris Offutt is also on the Screenwriting Panel.

SATURDAY, February 23 Children’s Acting Workshop Saturday, 9:00-10:30 a.m. (9-11 year olds); 10:45 a.m.12:00 p.m. (Powerhouse) Free, reservation required (See oxfordfilmfest.com for details.) Acting is part of a collaborative process that cannot happen without the work of writers, directors, gaffers, set designers, makeup artists, and local communities, among others. The workshop will touch on both games and techniques that can help a young actor’s understanding of the work, time, and devotion it takes to truly understand and embody any character within a film or play. Each class is limited to 15 participants and is led by Rhes Low and Anna Donnell of the Oxford Acting Studio.

Tips from Casting Agents and Actors in the Trenches Saturday, 10:00 a.m. (Lyric) Free, no ticket required Come learn more about breaking into Hollywood and independent productions from a range of panelists, with topics on the casting process from getting an audition to choosing an agent. See an updated list of panelists online at oxfordfilmfest.com.

oxfordfilmfest.com

Saturday, 12:00 p.m. (Lyric)

After attending the Professional Actors training program at SUNY Purchase, Deidre Haj spent many years in front of the camera with roles on television shows such as Dallas, Star Trek: the Next Generation, and Cheers before transitioning to legal affairs and production. Her work includes documentaries such as Scene Smoking and Brushes with Life, and running her own production company, Ruffian Media. In 2010, she became the executive director of the Full Frame Documentary Festival at Duke University. Andy Harper is the Director of the Media and Documentary Projects Center and an Instructional Assistant Professor of Southern Studies and Journalism at the University of Mississippi, where he teaches documentary and environmental studies classes. He holds a Ph.D in History from Northern Arizona University. Harper is the executive producer of all MDP projects, including those in this year’s OFF: Lecile, Pride and Joy, and Rebels: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss. Shirley Mixon joined Mississippi Public Broadcasting as Director of Content in May of 2004 overseeing MPB’s radio department, news and public affairs and a staff of eight television producers. In January of 2010, she assumed the role of programming director. Mixon’s career began as a newsroom assistant in 1976 at WLBT-TV in Jackson. In 1981 she joined WLOX-TV in Biloxi where she stayed for 10 years, before returning to WLBT-TV in 1992 as executive producer. She has produced a wide array of programming during her television career including award-winning newscasts, documentaries, public affairs programs and weekly magazine programs. She attended Mississippi University for Women, Mississippi State University, Hinds Community College and the Poynter Institute of Media Studies. Mixon resides in Madison County with husband, Bill, and three long-haired Chihuahuas. Shannon McCoy Cohn is an independent film/TV producer and lawyer. She has worked with Mangusta Productions, an international film production company based in New York City, Rome and Los Angeles, since 2006 producing and distributing such award-winning films

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as Being in the World (2010), 2012 Time for Change (2010) and The Memento Mori Project. She recently completed filming a new travel series, Sea Nation, which she produced and appears on camera alongside Globe Trekker’s Megan McCormick, currently airing on Discovery Channel International and National Geographic.  She attended the Graduate Film Program at NYU’s Tisch School of the Arts and has a law degree from Vanderbilt University. Gerald Peary is a long-time film critic for the Boston Phoenix, a cinema studies professor at Suffolk University, Boston, and the programmer of the Boston University Cinematheque. He is the author of nine books on film, and the film editor for the University Press of Mississippi “Conversations with Filmmakers” series. His documentary, For the Love of Movies: the Story of American Film Criticism, played at the 2010 Oxford Film Festival.

Film History Tour Hosted by Jack Mayfield Saturday, 1:00 p.m. and 3:00 p.m., leaving from Malco, 60 min. Free, no ticket required Take a tour through the city of Oxford on the iconic Double Decker bus with local historian Jack Mayfield. The tour will visit sites of former movies filmed in Oxford, settings from novels now turned into films (upcoming Joe and As I Lay Dying and more) along with some William Faulkner trivia as it relates to his more cinematic storytelling. Buses are courtesy of the Oxford Convention and Visitors Bureau.

Music in Film Saturday, 2:00 p.m. (Lyric) Free, no ticket required Music plays such a pivotal role in film and television that many filmmakers find the search for the right music a daunting task. In this panel, experts from all sides of the music and film industry sound off on the process of finding the best music, whether its originally composed or licensed, and the real-world experience of scoring and licensing music.  Panelists Scott Bomar, Ian Hieron, and Rush Hicks discuss the state of film music and modern-day trends, the role of music in film, placement of music in film and licensing issues, essential information for anyone interested in the business, process, and procedures of creating and finding music for film and television.   Scott Bomar is a Memphis musician, Emmy Award-winning film composer and Grammy nominated music producer and recording engineer.  Projects include the films Hustle & Flow, Black Snake Moan and Soul Men and producing and engineering Cyndi

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Lauper’s Grammy nominated album Memphis Blues at his Electraphonic Recording Studio. Bomar is also the leader of The Bo-Keys, a Memphis soul group whose most recent album, Got to Get Back! has been featured on NPR, the BBC, the Wall Street Journal and USA Today. Bomar is a Trustee of the Memphis Chapter of the Recording Academy. Ian Hierons was the Senior Vice President, Acquisitions, of Milan Records, one of the premiere soundtrack record labels in the world. For more than ten years he successfully distributed soundtrack albums for numerous commercially and critically successful films including Pan’s Labyrinth, Mulholland Drive, The Queen and City of God. Score Revolution connects film music rights holders with licensing customers worldwide. Employing the most sophisticated web technology, music is presented in a dedicated, expertly curated catalog making it easier for filmmakers and music licensing customers to explore and license music while providing music owners the opportunity to monetize their music assets while retaining ownership rights. Rush Hicks has practiced law in Nashville on historic Music Row representing artists, songwriters, artist managers, business managers, record companies, record producers, booking agencies and publishing companies for more than twenty-five years. He is professor and Chairman of the Music Business Program at the Mike Curb College of Entertainment and Music Business at Belmont University, teaching Music Licensing, Artist Management, Intellectual Property and Legal Issues in the Music Industry.

Screenwriting as Storytelling Saturday, 4:00 p.m. (Lyric) Free, no ticket required Moderator Coop Cooper talks with veteran screenwriter David Sheffield, critic turned screenwriter Kim Voynar, screenwriter and professor Chris Offutt and critic Gerald Peary on the importance of storytelling for the screen. Coop Cooper, the “Small Town Critic,” has the versatility of a Swiss Army knife when it comes to writing in the motion picture industry. After earning his BFA in Cinema at Southern Methodist University and an MFA in Screenwriting at the American Film Institute in Hollywood, he collaborated with Academy Award-winning director Seth Winston on a Civil War-themed screenwriting project. He then applied his newly acquired skills to writing script coverage, movie reviews, entertainment-related articles and various screenwriting projects. After five years spent teaching English, writing and screenwriting at North Hollywood High School, he returned to his hometown of Clarksdale, Mississippi where he writes

february 21-24, 2013


movie reviews for the Clarksdale Press Register, operates his movie-related website Smalltowncritic.com, aids/promotes film crews seeking to shoot feature films in in the Mississippi Delta, teaches seminars, does location scouting, works on about a dozen screenwriting/film projects at a time and still manages to watch an average of 2 movies per day. CHRIS OFFUTT has written and produced for True Blood, Weeds, and Treme. He’s also written two pilots, “Tough Trade” for Lions Gate, shot on location in Nashville, and “Star Wheel Badge” for CBS, set in Texas. His screenplays include the produced short The Trapper. He lives in Oxford, Mississippi, and joined the Department of English at the University of Mississippi in 2011. Gerald Peary is a long-time film critic for the Boston Phoenix, a cinema studies professor at Suffolk University, Boston, and the programmer of the Boston University Cinematheque. He is the author of nine books on film, and the film editor for the University Press of Mississippi “Conversations with Filmmakers” series. His documentary, For the Love of Movies: the Story of American Film Criticism, played at the 2010 Oxford Film Festival. Mississippi native David Sheffield began his writing career at the age of 18 when he won the Deep South Writers Conference award with his short story, “Out of the Cold.” Following graduation from the University of Southern Mississippi, David and his brother Buddy wrote several children’s musicals for the Sheffield Ensemble Theater, a national touring company, that appeared at several prestigious venues around the country, including Wolf Trap and the Kennedy Center. In 1980, he joined the writing staff of Saturday Night Live where he met writing partner Barry W. Blaustein. The two wrote several of Eddie Murphy’s most famous sketches, including Buckwheat, Gumby, Velvet Jones and James Brown’s Celebrity Hot Tub Party. In 1988, Blaustein & Sheffield wrote the screenplay for Coming to America, followed by Boomerang and The Nutty Professor I and II. They also co-wrote and produced What’s Alan Watching? for CBS, which won the National Television Critics Award as best special of the year. In 2004, Sheffield won the Faux Faulkner contest with his parody, “As I Lay Kvetching”. More recently, Sheffield has returned to fiction.  In 2010 his short story “Love In Vain” was anthologized in Delta Blues which included short stories by John Grisham, and Charlaine Harris.

Mission Statement Founded in 2003 as a project of the Yoknapatawpha Arts Council, the Oxford Film Festival is an independent nonprofit 501(c)3 organization committed to celebrating the art of independent cinema. The Oxford Film Festival entertains and educates its participants, providing residents and visitors with the opportunity to watch independent films as well as to meet the filmmakers and learn from industry professionals. The variety of films and panels attracts filmgoers of all ages and backgrounds.

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Kim Voynar, a long-time film critic for Movie City News, began transitioning into filmmaking last year with her short film, Bunker (sneak preview, OFF 2012). She is currently producing projects in the realm of gaming and epic fantasy drama for Hostile Work Environment, a production company founded by former Wizards of the Coast owner Peter Adkison.

oxfordfilmfest.com

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Our judges will determine winners in each of our categories. The winning films will be announced at the awards ceremony on Saturday at 9:00pm at the Lyric Oxford. Winners will receive The Spirit of the Hoka, a beautiful statuette created by renowned sculptor Bill Beckwith in the likeness of the Chickasaw Princess Hoka in 1835. In addition to the Spirit of the Hoka, we will also present the Lisa Blount Memorial acting award to the strongest independent performance that shows an actor or an actress willing to take risks for their art. Lisa Blount, an award winning actress from Arkansas, was nominated for a Golden Globe in 1983 for her breakout role in An Officer and a Gentleman, and received the Best Actress prize at the 2004 Stockholm Film Festival for her lead role in the independent feature film Chrystal. Along with her husband Ray McKinnon and co-producer Walton Goggins, Lisa took home an Academy Award for their Live Action Short The Accountant. Lisa passed away in 2010, not long after agreeing to be a juror for our 2011 festival. All films in the lineup – including those not in competition – are eligible for the coveted Ron Tibbett Audience Award, named for the founding director of the Magnolia Film Festival in Starkville, the first independent film festival in Mississippi. Tibbett died in 2004 in a car accident just over a year after his short film Buffalo Common debuted at the Sundance Film Festival. This award will be announced online after the festival ends on Sunday, February 24.

Documentary Feature A lifelong southerner, Ted Speaker has had the good fortune of working on a wide variety of projects over the last ten years, including documentaries, short films, and narrative features. Presumably against their better judgment, filmmakers such as Peter Gilbert (Hoop Dreams), Jennifer Maas (Wheedle’s Groove, OFF 2010), Lynn Shelton (Humpday), and Dusty Bias (Prairie Love –OFF 2011 Narrative Feature Winner) have enlisted Ted’s help as a producer, editor, and composer. He has also actively volunteered as a consultant, panelist, and juror for film festivals throughout the Southeast, including OFF, Indie Memphis, Atlanta, Little Rock, and Sidewalk. A graduate of Duke University, Tim Harms is producing partner to writer, director and playwright Neil LaBute, for whom he produced the upcoming feature film Some Velvet Morning, as well as the short films Sexting (OFF 2011) and BFF. He produced The Vicious Kind (OFF 2010), the feature film debut of writer/director Lee Toland Krieger, which premiered at the 2009 Sundance Film Festival and received Independent Spirit Award nominations for Best Lead Actor and Best Screenplay. Harms also codirected, edited, and appears in the short film The Last Payphone in Los Angeles (OFF 2012).

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Shirley Mixon joined Mississippi Public Broadcasting as Director of Content in May 2004 overseeing MPB’s radio department, news and public affairs and a staff of eight television producers. In January 2010, she assumed the role of programming director. Mixon’s career began as a newsroom assistant in 1976 at WLBT-TV in Jackson. After ten years in Biloxi with WLOX-TV, she returned to WLBT-TV in 1992 as executive producer. She has produced a wide array of programming during her television career including newscasts, documentaries, public affairs programs and weekly magazine programs, and has won numerous awards including a George Foster Peabody Award, a national Associated Press award, and an Emmy. Mixon attended Mississippi University for Women, Mississippi State University and Hinds Community College, in addition to the Poynter Institute of Media Studies in St. Petersburg, Florida. She resides in Madison County with husband, Bill, and three long-haired Chihuahuas.

Narrative Feature Kim Voynar, a long-time film critic for Movie City News, began transitioning into filmmaking last year with her short film, Bunker. She is currently producing projects in the realm of gaming and epic fantasy drama for Hostile Work Environment, a production company founded by former Wizards of the Coast owner Peter Adkison. Lee Caplin produced the $125 million Sony/Columbia Pictures release Ali, starring Will Smith. His company, Picture Entertainment, is the feature film production entity for the works of William Faulkner, and PMC, the media company he co-founded, owns the magazine Variety. Elizabeth Dollarhide has worked in film and video for twenty years.  After working on several projects in Mississippi, Chicago and Baltimore, she moved to Los Angeles where she managed Kasdan Pictures, the production company of Lawrence Kasdan, and was a producer on his film Dreamcatcher. She also worked as a writer/producer of DVD documentaries for several movies, including Cinderella Man, Flags of Our Fathers, Letters from Iwo Jima, as well as the re-releases of Backdraft, The Accidental Tourist, Wyatt Earp, Parenthood.  She also wrote and produced a HBO First Look show on Cinderella Man and a promotional video for Silverado.  She relocated from California to Oxford/Taylor, Miss. and has several projects in development, including two original feature animation films. Currently, she is in development on the film Theater of the Stars, which she adapted from the novel of the same name, and which she is producing as a French film in France and Morocco.

february 21-24, 2013


Short Films (narrative/doc) Mississippi native David Sheffield began his writing career at the age of 18 when he won the Deep South Writers Conference award with his short story, “Out of the Cold.” In 1980, Sheffield joined the writing staff of Saturday Night Live where he and writing partner Barry W. Blaustein wrote several of Eddie Murphy’s most famous sketches, including Buckwheat, Gumby, Velvet Jones and James Brown’s Celebrity Hot Tub Party. In 1988, they wrote the screenplay for Coming to America, one of the most popular and successful film comedies of all time. Other film credits include Boomerang and The Nutty Professor I and II. In 2004, Sheffield won the Faux Faulkner contest with his parody, “As I Lay Kvetching.” More recently, Sheffield has returned to fiction.  In 2010 his short story “Love In Vain” was anthologized in Delta Blues which included short stories by John Grisham, and Charlaine Harris. Eric Snider is a freelance film critic and journalist whose work appears mostly on “the Internet” at such sites as Film.com, Twitch, Pajiba, Movies.com, and his own site, EricDSnider.com. He is also the cohost of the podcast Movie B.S. with Bayer and Snider. Eric has a B.A. in journalism and lives in beautiful Portland, Oregon.  Jack Barbera is a Professor Emeritus of English at the University of Mississippi, where he taught film courses for over 30 years.  The syllabus for his “Introduction to Film” course was published in Film Studies (N.Y., 1987).  His only attempt at filmmaking, the nine-minute “The Janitor,” was screened at the Silver Images Film Festival (Chicago, 1997).  Barbera has lectured on film at several scholarly conferences and published in scholarly journals. 

Animation/Experimental/Music Video April Grayson makes films across genres, including documentary, experimental, and short-form narrative. A native Mississippian and former Oxonian, she is currently based in Seattle. Nature Humphries grew up in Vicksburg, Mississippi. She served in the Navy before moving to Oxford in 2004, where she graduated cum laude from the University of Mississippi with a BA in English and Modern Languages in 2007. She has been Managing Editor of The Local Voice for six years.

oxfordfilmfest.com

A veteran of the film festival circuit, Mark Bell was an associate producer of the Slamdance Film Festival and has also acted as a videographer/reporter for both Slamdance and the Seattle International Film Festival. In 2003, Bell became Senior Account Executive of Film Threat DVD before becoming Editor in Chief of FilmThreat.com from 20052009. In 2010, he became owner and publisher of Film Threat after purchasing the company from Chris Gore during the Sundance Film Festival. He has appeared as a film pundit on G4’s Attack of the Show, and has been a juror and panelist at numerous film festivals, including the 2011 Oxford Film Festival.

Mississippi Films (Documentary and Narrative) Gerald Peary is a long-time film critic for the Boston Phoenix, a cinema studies professor at Suffolk University, Boston, and the programmer of the Boston University Cinematheque. He is the author of nine books on film, and the film editor for the University Press of Mississippi “Conversations with Filmmakers” series. His documentary, For the Love of Movies: the Story of American Film Criticism, played at the 2010 Oxford Film Festival. John Beifuss is the movie reviewer and a reporter at The Commercial Appeal, the daily newspaper in Memphis, where he has worked since 1983. He has reviewed movies since 1996. His first published work appeared in the magazine Famous Monsters of Filmland, and he has written for The New York Times, TV Guide and the Encyclopedia of Southern Culture, among other publications. He is the author of Armadillo Ray, a children’s book from Chronicle Books. His favorite movie is Bride of Frankenstein. Alan Arrivée is a filmmaker, writer, and artist and is Assistant Professor of Cinema and Cinema Director at The University of Mississippi. His short film Silent Radio (OFF 2011) was awarded Best Foreign Film at The European Independent Film Festival 2007 in Paris. His short play “The Original I.Q. Tester” was a finalist for the 2007 Heideman Award and was recently published in The Tusculum Review. His memoir The Appropriate Use of Hands appeared in the Summer 2012 issue of The Florida Review. Man at the Door, a film allegory of the complex issues surrounding illegal immigration, screened at last year’s Oxford Film Festival. He lives in Oxford, Mississippi with his wife and daughter.

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America 101

April’s Way

Narrative Short, 10 min.

Mississippi Documentary Short, 35 min.

Directed by Richard Speight, Jr.

Directed by Candace Harralson

Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2

Screening: Saturday 11:15 a.m. (S1) in Mississippi Documentary block

One man’s life becomes the lesson of the day as he takes a frenetic ride through his own twisted version of the American experience.

April defies the odds by living. But when she outgrows the school system and no adult day programming is available, her family must find a way for her to continue to thrive with meaningful work and relationships.

Antenna Documentary Feature, 96 min. Directed by C. Scott McCoy Screening: Friday 3:15 p.m. (S1), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S3), preceded by We Didn’t Get Famous and Drawing on a Dream A history of the Antenna, Memphis’ first punk rock club, and the musical explosion it inspired.

Awards Ceremony Saturday, 9:00 p.m. (Lyric Theater) Join us as we present the Spirit of the Hoka award to the best films in our categories as determined by our judges.

Basically Frightened: The Musical Madness of Colonel Bruce Hampton Documentary Feature, 87 min. (not in competition) Directed by Michael Koepenick Screening: Friday 1:00 p.m. (S3)

The Fine print

Unless otherwise indicated, films will occur at Malco’s Oxford Studio Cinema (1111 Jackson Avenue West, Oxford) and panels will occur at the Lyric Oxford (1006 Van Buren Ave, Oxford). All films contain adult content and are not recommended for children under 18 unless otherwise indicated. Views expressed in the screened films are of the filmmakers, and not necessarily shared by the Oxford Film Festival. Presentation of films does not mean that the Oxford Film Festival promotes the behavior contained therein. All times are tentative and subject to change. Refer to our website (oxfordfilmfest.com) for the latest info on guest scheduling, panel, and event info. An individual film pass allows admission to a single film block but does not guarantee seating. Seats are first come, first serve. In the event that a screening room is at capacity, the film pass can be used for another film at the same time, or for the film at an alternate screening, or can be refunded.

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With fans including Billy Bob Thornton, Dave Matthews, Peter Buck, Derek Trucks, Phish, Widespread Panic, and Blues Traveler, Colonel Bruce Hampton began his career with an unprecedented six figure record deal in 1970. After releasing the worst selling album in the history of Columbia Records, he made a brave decision and continued his musical career, devoting himself to creating pure art rather than attempt any commercial success. See Colonel Bruce LIVE at Proud Larry’s, Friday Feb. 22!

(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


The Beard Narrative Short, 6 min. Directed by Yaz Rabadi Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2 An elderly Sikh who has been victimized as a result of his race struggles to deal with his given circumstances in the aftermath of the violent attack.

Casting Panel: Tips from Casting Agents and Actors in the Trenches Saturday 10:00 a.m. (Lyric Theater) Free, no ticket required! Come learn more about breaking into Hollywood and independent productions from a range of panelists, with topics on the casting process from getting an audition to choosing an agent. See our list of panelists online at oxfordfilmfest.com

Children’s Acting Workshop with Oxford Acting Studio (Powerhouse Community Arts Center)

Boomtown

Saturday 9:00-10:30 a.m. (9-11 year olds); 10:45 a.m.12:00 p.m. (12-17 year olds)

Documentary Short, 12 min.

Free, reservation required Acting is part of a collaborative process that cannot happen without the work of writers, directors, gaffers, set designers, makeup artists, and local communities, among others. The workshop will touch on both games and techniques that can help a young actor’s understanding of the work, time, and devotion it takes to truly understand and embody any character within a film or play.

Directed by Torben Bernhard and Travis Low Screening: Saturday 12:00 p.m. (S2), Sunday 2:45 p.m. (S3), screens before My Brooklyn In 1875, the Horn Silver Mine was discovered in the red rock cliffs of southwestern Utah. The town of Frisco was born and quickly became one of the most economically productive and notoriously violent towns in the Wild West. Boomtown blends serendipitously found audio interviews of the town sheriff and other remaining inhabitants, recorded just before their deaths, with images of the decaying ghost town in 2011.

Camino, the Journey to Santiago Documentary Short, 15 min. Directed by Alicia Wszelaki and Matthew Nothelfer Screening: Friday 12:45 p.m. (S2), Saturday 1:30 p.m. (S3), screens in the Documentary Shorts block This short documentary is a film about a pilgrim’s hike across Spain on the popular Camino de Santiago. It is an impressionistic film that creates a casual narrative about the ancient journey and what it is like during its modern revival.

oxfordfilmfest.com

Come Morning Narrative Feature, 85 min. Directed by Derrick Sims Screening: Friday 5:15 p.m. (S3), Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S1), preceded by Pretty Monsters As evening falls, two hunters, a 10-yearold boy and his grandfather, wander into the darkening woods to track down their recent kill. To their horror, they discover that, instead of a deer, they’ve shot a trespassing neighbor. With a history of land disputes with the neighbor’s family fresh on his mind, the grandfather decides to hide the body.

Join the convo: tweet #oxff13 13


Congratulations Narrative Feature, 93 min. Directed by Eric Levy and Juan Cardarelli Screening: Friday 6:00 p.m. (S2), Sunday 1:00 p.m. (S2) preceded by Tracer Gun Jim and Bridget are on a road trip to visit Jim’s mother on the anniversary of his father’s death. Along the way, Jim proposes and Bridget says no. When they arrive at his mother’s house, she showers them with congratulations. Caught up in the moment, they pretend to be engaged for the weekend.

Conversation with Roger Avary Friday 7:30 p.m. (S1) Best known for his work with Quentin Tarantino, including Reservoir Dogs, True Romance, and their Academy Award-winning screenplay Pulp Fiction, screenwriter Roger Avary discusses his more recent projects, including adaptations of literary works such as The Rules of Attraction and Beowulf. 60 min.

Crush Narrative Short, 7 min. Directed by Rebecca Pugh and Jen West Screening: Friday 2:30 p.m. (S2), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S2), screens in the Narrative Shorts block 1 One woman’s quest to find the perfect chair.

Tim thinks he might just have found the girl of his dreams, again!

Dance Elephant Dance Experimental Short, 4 min. Directed by Lionel Popkin and Cari Ann Shim Sham Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block Featuring a man in an elephant costume, Dance Elephant Dance uses images of multiple elephants in outer space to portray a pachyderm’s awkward desire to get his groove on.

The Dark Companion Narrative Short, 14 min. Directed by Darrell C. Hazelrig Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2 Howard (a puppet) has an existential crisis and nervous breakdown when he, and only he, can see his puppeteer: a featureless, humanoid shape that always looms over him, that he calls his Dark Companion. His relationship with his wife and friends quickly breakdown, when no one believes him, forcing Howard to take drastic measures.

DeafBlind Narrative Short, 16 min. Directed by Ewan Bailey Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2

Crush 472 Narrative Short, 4 min. Directed by Jess Scott-Hunter Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2

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A deaf and blind woman and a young man share a spiritual and disturbing connection.

(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


The Yoknapatawpha Arts Council supporting the arts and artists in Oxford & Lafayette

www.oxfordarts.com

OxFilm Society season begins March 2013 www.oxfilmsociety.com

oxford’s only locally owned radio station


Dinner with Holly

Double or Nothing

Narrative Short, 12 min.

Narrative Short, 11 min.

Directed by Josh Crockett and Daniel Sinclair

Directed by Nathaniel Krause

Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2

Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2

A young couple has a big plan to spice up their love life when their friend, Holly, comes over for dinner.

Clark and Becca leave a bar after a night out with friends. When a homeless man approaches them on the street, Clark gets an idea. Adam Brody, Louisa Krause and Keith David star in this dark comedy by master playwright Neil LaBute.

The Discoverers Narrative Feature, 104 min. Directed by Justin Schwarz Screening: Friday 8:00 p.m. (S2), Sunday 5:00 p.m. (S2) Washed-up history professor Lewis Birch (Griffin Dunne) takes his begrudging teenage kids – Zoe and Jack – on a road trip to a conference in hopes of putting his career back on track. But, when Lewis’s estranged father Stanley goes AWOL on a Lewis and Clark historical reenactment trek, Lewis is forced to make a family detour.

Drawing on a Dream Mississippi Documentary Short, 14 min. (not in competition) Directed by Susan Dobbs and David Rae Morris Screening: Friday 3:15 p.m. (S1), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S3), preceded by We Didn’t Get Famous, followed by Antenna The colorful complexities of the late Delta rocker and artist, Duff Dorrough of Ruleville.

Documentary Filmmaking: Panel Saturday 12:00 p.m. (Lyric Theater) Free, no ticket required! Each year filmmakers and industry professionals take a look at the hot topics in documentary filmmaking. Hosted by Media and Documentary Projects Director Andy Harper, the panel will include Deirdre Haj (Executive Director of the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival), Shirley Mixon (Programming Director for Mississippi Public Broadcasting), film critic Gerald Peary and documentary filmmaker Shannon McCoy Cohn.

DVD Blues: or Thad calls Barton about Renaldo and Clara Mississippi Documentary Short, 10 min. (not in competition) Screening: Saturday 11:15 a.m. (S1) in Mississippi Documentary block Directed by Thad Lee Barton Segal sold Thad Lee a seemingly faulty copy of Renaldo and Clara, so Thad calls Barton for answers.

Don’t Break Down Experimental Short, 7 min. Directed by Matt Meindl Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block This film is total garbage.

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(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


Festival Flashback: Q&A with Daniel Epting, co-star of “Darius Goes West” (2007) When did your film screen at the Oxford Film Festival? Between copious amounts of awesome house and downtown and waterworks building [the Powerhouse] parties and other great movies… maybe 2007 I think… lots of parties and late night Chevron chicken on a stick. What did you like best about Oxford Film Festival? The non-pompous, fun, all-inclusive festival feel. Of the 17 festivals [that the Darius crew attended] I personally went to it was the BEST closing ceremonies. What surprised you? Michelle didn’t want our film [at first]. What did you learn? She changed her mind. [Michelle responds: It’s true! I am embarrassed to admit that at first I did not think that the film should go to Round 2, but fortunately I was outvoted! Because when I saw the entire film, it became one of my favorites. There’s a reason that this festival is not programmed by just one person.] What happened next? We won. [Best Documentary Feature and the Audience Award] What was the funniest joke you heard? Nigel Fortenberry, IIIT’S MOOOOVIES! IT’S MOOVIES IT’S MOVIES its movies its movies its movies Who did you meet? Melanie, Molly, Micah, m,m,m,m,m,m. The cool older lady [Donna Ruth Roberts] that had the nice house. Saw that chic from Chasing Amy [Joey Lauren Adams] hanging out at the bar, the cashier at the Chevron who I told chicken on a stick was my favorite chicken back when I would visit in college and now post college, the bouncer, the cops, cashier at [the now closed] Rebel Barn, and then on day 2… What was the first thing you told another person about the festival when you returned home? Always a blast in Oxford, maybe I should go to grad

oxfordfilmfest.com

school there. There are some awesome folks involved with the festival. I still say it was one of, if not the funnest of the festivals I went to. Why are there only nine questions? Because Melanie’s last name, Addington, has nine letters, why the hell else?

WHAT ABOUT DARIUS? Six years later, as of press time, Darius Weems is still with us, and continuing to raise both money and awareness for his condition: Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy (DMD). In 2012 ABC’s Nightline devoted its entire Thanksgiving night episode to Darius’s story, and his long-awaited rap album – My Life in this Chair – was released on Christmas Eve 2012. Each August, the city of Athens, Georgia celebrates the annual Darius Goes West Day which included a poker tournament and casino night, a massive carnival, local screening of the documentary, and a rap concert featuring “Big Daddy Weems” himself (pictured above). Keep up with Darius and his story on Facebook and on the film’s website: dariusgoeswest.org

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Eating Alabama

Free Kick (Libre Directo)

Documentary Feature, 63 min.

Narrative Short, 12 min.

Directed by Andrew Grace

Directed by Bernabé Rico Herrera

Screening: Saturday 2:00 p.m. (S2), Sunday 5:00 p.m. (S1), preceded by Grand Fugue on the Art of Eating Gumbo

Screening: Friday 2:30 p.m. (S2), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S2), screens in the Narrative Shorts block 1

A quest to eat locally becomes a meditation on community, the South and sustainability and a story about why food matters.

Having turned 60, Adela is living a life she never wanted. She has no children, a husband who walks all over her and, worst of all, nothing to look forward to. Then one day she has the chance to win 300,000 euros and leave her old life behind. All she has to do to get it is kick a ball into an open goal from the halfway line at half-time in a Spanish league match. Accepting the challenge, Adela starts training for the big day. In Spanish with English subtitles.

Emergency Contact Narrative Short, 6 min. Directed by Jeffrey Ruggles Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2

Genrevolt Mississippi Narrative Short, 9 min.

Things get dicey when a woman reveals to her livein boyfriend that she’s listed him as her emergency contact.

Directed by Casey Dillard Screening: Saturday 2:45 p.m. (S1) in the Mississippi Narrative Shorts block Movie romance isn’t all it’s cracked up to be, as a couple discovers when they scramble to find the right genre for them.

Flatland Animated Short, 35 min. (not in competition) Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S2), Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S3), screens in the Animation block Directed by Jeffrey Travis and Dano Johnson When a mysterious visitor arrives from Spaceland, Arthur Square and his granddaughter must come to terms with the truth of the third dimension, risking dire consequences from the evil Circles that have ruled Flatland for thousands of years.

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The Golden Bough (Der Goldene Zweig) Narrative Short, 25 min. Directed by Matthias Zucker Screening: Friday 3:45 p.m. (S2), Sunday 3:15 p.m. (S2), screens before Pictures of Superheroes After a string of unsuccessful job interviews, out-of-work David realizes that someone is conspiring to keep him from finding employment. Based on a short story by Salman Rushdie. In German with English subtitles.

(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


R&B Feder

Charitable Foundation for the Beaux Arts P.O. Box 1943 Ocean Springs, MS 39566 rnbfeder@cableone.net

Inspiring Diversity and Exploration


Grand Fugue on the Art of Gumbo

Growing Our Own

Documentary Short, 10 min.

Mississippi Narrative Short, 27 min.

Directed by Isabel Machado and Gideon C. Kennedy

Directed by Philip Scarborough

Screening: Saturday 2:00 p.m. (S2), Sunday 5:00 p.m. (S1), screens before Eating Alabama

Screening: Saturday 11:15 a.m. (S1) in Mississippi Documentary Short

This film studies ‘the baroque complexity of the South’ through the musings of Mobile, Ala. native Eugene Walter, author, actor, artist, creator and chef. Using Walter’s own radio broadcasts as narration, the film takes a peek at the simple ingredients that make up the Gulf Coast and its signature cuisine, gumbo, and shows how their staggered repetition builds something wholly unique and intricately beautiful.

Each summer, high school students from all types of racial and socioeconomic backgrounds from all over Mississippi attend a nine-day seminar on race, civil justice, and community while learning the dark history of civil rights of their state, not taught in Mississippi schools.

Ham (Jamón) Animated Short, 8 min.

Grandmothers (Abuelas) Animated Short, 10 min. Directed by Afarin Eghbal Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S2), Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S3), screens in the Animation block In a small apartment in Buenos Aires, an old woman eagerly awaits the birth of her grandchild and all the joys of becoming a grandmother. However, horrific circumstances mean that she will be forced to wait for over 30 years. Using real-life testimonials this animated-documentary raises issues of memory, repression and loss. In English and Spanish with English subtitles.

Directed by Iria Lopez Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S2), Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S3), screens in the Animation block Jose is a teenage pig living in a Spanish town, and he is the only pig in his family. One day a new neighbor moves in next door, and Jose starts to come to terms with who he really is.

The Hiccup Narrative Short, 10 min. Directed by Matt Smukler Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S3), Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S2), screens in Narrative Shorts block 2

Grasshopper! Mississippi Narrative Short, 15 min. Directed by Michael Usry and Ryan Roy Screening: Saturday 2:45 p.m. (S1) in the Mississippi Narrative Shorts block

Two friends desperately trying to skip town find that an overheated radiator is the least of their problems.

An average suburban housewife tries to stop her neighbor from going on a rampage after he witnesses a gruesome attack.

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(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


Lecile Mississippi Documentary Short, 29 min. (not in competition)

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Directed by Rex Jones Screening: Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S1) after Ten, before Pride and Joy Lecile Harris, 76, began his career as a bull rider and bullfighter, but a devastating accident in the arena at the age of 52 led him into comedy as a full-time professional rodeo clown.

Serving Oxford, Memphis

Life

and the Mid-South

Experimental Short, 1 min.

www.harrisshelton.com

Directed by Christopher Miner Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block

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The Loop Animated Short, 12 min. Directed by Jolie Ruelle Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S2), Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S3), screens in the Animation block

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Armed with the 50th Anniversary special edition audio book of the original, unedited version of Jack Kerouac’s On the Road, two intrepid road trippers ball

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Screening: Saturday 11:15 a.m. (S1) in Mississippi Documentary block

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Mississippi Documentary Short, 15 min. (not in competition) Directed by Jordan Berger

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Manifest Destiny 2.0

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A stop-motion animation exploring human relationships with anxiety. Through the use of metaphorical structure the main character demonstrates reactions and possible responses to an abstract feared stimulus.

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the jack across America’s West. Reprising the westward movement of Manifest Destiny through John Ford’s location where he filmed The Searchers, the film makers take the viewer into a postmodern Brigadoon known to the world as Burning Man.

Milk Sorrow Experimenal Short, 1 min. Directed by Maria Pithara Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block

Mayday Animated Short, 4 min. Directed by Trevor Jones Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S2), Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S3), screens in the Animation block When an emergency crash landing leaves a young girl alone in the woods, she must defend herself against herself.

Mississippi Music Videos Screening: Saturday 5:00 p.m. (S3)

Melt in the Shade Experimental Short, 6 min. Directed by Kyojungju Kim Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block

Mickle’s Pickle Mississippi Documentary Short, 15 min. Directed by Nathan Willis Screening: Saturday 11:15 a.m. (S1) in Mississippi Documentary block The story of a small town pickle shop, its eccentric owner, and the theft of the store’s beloved icon, a giant pickle.

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Bye Bye Baby / Directed by Danny Klimetz for Oxford Sessions; performed by Gina Sexton A Change is Coming / Directed by Danny Klimetz for Oxford Sessions; performed by Zechariah Lloyd Crossroads Blues / Directed by Bryan Ward; performed by Adam Gussow Flood You Under / Directed by Russell Fox; performed by Robodrum Growing Pains / Directed by Deepak Mantena; performed by Junk Culture In The Garden / Directed by Robert Earl Reed; performed by Jimbo Mathus JoLynn / Directed by Danny Klimetz for Oxford Sessions; performed by Bill Perry Lanthanum / Directed by Clay Hardwick; performed by Loki Mother Never Held Me / Directed and performed by Wolf Ruffin Notes on the Revolution / Directed by Louis Bourgeois; music by Dennis Herring Passing By / Directed by Daniel Ethridge; performed by Clayton Matthews Pepper Twice On Sunday / Directed by Ryan Frazier; performed by Bonfire Orchestra Waiting for You / performed by Andrew and Ciera White Buffalo / performed by Jimbo Mathus (not in competition) Zebraprint / Directed by Michael Williams; performed by Sipsy Fires

(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


John H. Dunbar

Walter Alan Davis

Kate M. Embry


Music for a Self-Transforming Machine Experimental Short, 4 min. Directed by Aaron Ross Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block

Sushi • Music • Vibes

Aesthetic machineVirtual architectureUnfrozen musicInevitablyCelestial music boxFolds inside itselfRecursive sculptureFractal ego-boundaryChaos in motion

Music in Film: Panel Saturday 2:00 p.m. (Lyric Theater)

1107 E. Jackson Ave

Free, no ticket required! A panel of music supervisors and attorneys specializing in entertainment law will address issues and questions facing filmmakers adding music to their films, and musicians looking to work with the industry. Co-sponsored by the Mississippi Intellectual Property Institute. 60 min.

Oxford, MS 38655 662.236.6639

Music in the Hall and Oxford Sessions Directed by Daniel Morrow and Danny Klimetz Screening: Saturday 3:45 p.m. (S2) Selections filmed during Music in the Hall, a grass roots music video series based in Oxford, Mississippi, and Oxford Sessions, a new video series featuring recordings done unplugged and in a location unique to every artist.

My Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate and the Future of Cities Documentary Feature, 75 min. Directed by Kelly Anderson Screening: Saturday 12:00 p.m. (S2), Sunday 2:45 p.m. (S3), preceded by Boomtown Follow director Kelly Anderson’s journey, as a Brooklyn gentrifier, to understand the forces reshaping her neighborhood. The film documents

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(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


the redevelopment of Fulton Mall, a bustling African-American and Caribbean commercial district that - despite its status as the third most profitable shopping area in New York City - is maligned for its inability to appeal to the affluent residents who have come to live around it.

Native Son Mississippi Documentary, 56 min. (not in competition) Directed by Mike McCarthy Screening: Friday 5:45 p.m. (S1), preceded by Tupelove In 2012, Elvis Presley, born in 1935, had been gone 35 years. That same year, he would have been 77 years old (he died in 1977). And 56 years before, Elvis had performed at the historic 1956 homecoming show in Tupelo. These numbers were not lost on writer/director Mike McCarthy, who, after pitching the idea of a seven foot tall bronze statue of Elvis Presley to the Tupelo Convention & Visitors Bureau, went about shooting a documentary on Taylor, Mississippi sculptor Bill Beckwith, as he rushed to complete the inspired pose (taken from the Roger Marshutz photo) by deadline. In the process, McCarthy discovers his own personal connection to the homecoming show.

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Notes on a Revolution (Silent Version) Experimental Short, 4 min. Directed by Louis Bourgeois Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block A short film structured around found footage of a New Orleans Mardi Gras in 1948 that incorporates the aphorisms of the poet Louis Bourgeois.

Ole Miss Filmmaking Workshop Films Mississippi Narrative Shorts, 30 min. (not in competition) (Various directors) Screening: Saturday 2:00 p.m. (S1) Film projects from an intensive 3½-day workshop held at the University of Mississippi in July 2012, designed to introduce amateurs to both film appreciation and the actual techniques of filmmaking.

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An Ordinary Hero

Pizza Shop

Documentary Feature, 91 min.

Mississippi Documentary, 2 min.

Directed by Loki Mulholland

Directed by Ben Guest

Screening: Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S1), Sunday 2:00 p.m. (S1), preceded by Rebels: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss

Screening: Saturday 11:15 a.m. (S1) in Mississippi Documentary block

The amazing true story of one white Southern woman’s courage to choose her convictions and join the Civil Rights Movement. By the time she was 19, Joan Trumpauer was shot at, attacked, and put on death row, but that’s just the beginning of her remarkable journey to help change the world. Friday at 1:00 p.m. Joan Trumpauer Mulholland will participate in a free panel discussion at the Overby Center on the UM campus remembering the 1963 sit-in at the Jackson, Miss. Woolworth’s.

Panel Discussions (Lyric Theater) – Free! No ticket required. Descriptions and times listed separately: Casting, Documentary Filmmaking, Music in Film, Screenwriting

A master pizzaiola, working in rural Mississippi, discusses his craft.

Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton as Himself Documentary Feature, 89 min. Directed by Thomas Bean Screening: Friday 3:00 p.m. (S3) preceded by Ten, Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S2) Plimpton! is a feature length documentary film about the exciting life and times of Paris Review co-founder, participatory journalist, protean New York literary impresario, and friend to many, George Plimpton.

Pictures of Superheroes Narrative Feature, 74 min. Directed by Don Swaynos Screening: Friday 3:45 p.m. (S2), Sunday 3:15 p.m. (S2), preceded by The Golden Bough An out-of-work maid gets a job cleaning up after an overworked businessman and the aggressively messy roommate he’s forgotten about, sending her into a surreal world of candy, insult comics, and pretend marriages.

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The Potential Wives of Norman Mao Narrative Short, 9 min. Directed by Derek Nguyen Screening: Friday 2:30 p.m. (S2), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S2), screens in the Narrative Shorts block 1 Norman Mao is an overweight, socially-awkward junior businessman from Hong Kong, who, at the age of 33 is still a virgin and unwed. Desperate to get him married, his parents take him on an international junket across the globe to find him a worthy Chinese wife. Narrated by George Takei.

(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


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Pretty Monsters Narrative Short, 11 min. Directed by G.B. Shannon and Ryan Parker Screening: Friday 5:15 p.m. (S3) and Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S1) screens before Come Morning When a man and his young son spend the night at a motel in the town where the father grew up, the man gives in to an old temptation and invites a woman to their room.

Pride and Joy Mississippi Documentary, 57 min. (not in competition) Directed by Joe York Screening: Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S1), screens after Ten and Lecile

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For the past six years, Joe York has traveled across the South in a state vehicle chronicling the unique people, places, and culture of America’s tastiest region. See what he found in this opus on contemporary Southern food culture.

Rebels: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss Mississippi Documentary, 58 min. (not in competition) Directed by Matthew Graves

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Screening: Saturday 5:30 p.m. (S1), Sunday 2:00 p.m. (S1), screens before An Ordinary Hero. On October 1, 1962 James Meredith became the first black student enrolled at the University of Mississippi. His journey to Ole Miss began with the State of Mississippi’s denial and open defiance of the federal court’s mandate of his admission. It ended on the night of September 30th as thousands of armed protestors rioted against the U.S. Marshals, Mississippi National Guard, and U.S. Troops sent by President Kennedy. This is the incredible true story of one man’s mission for equality and a state that would do everything in its power to stop him.

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(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


Reborning Documentary Short, 8 min. Directed by Helen Hood Scheer and Yael Bridge Screening: Friday 12:45 p.m. (S2), Saturday 1:30 p.m. (S3), screens in the Documentary Shorts block Jean likes to make something out of nothing.

Remake Narrative Short, 6 min. Directed by Chris Tomkins Screening: Friday 2:30 p.m. (S2), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S2), screens in the Narrative Shorts block 1 A smash and grab robbery takes an unexpected twist when two thieves find themselves confronted with a haul they can’t possibly carry.

The Retirement Party Mississippi Narrative Short, 9 min. Directed by Ryan Bohling and Chris Bufkin Screening: Saturday 2:45 p.m. (S1) in the Mississippi Narrative Shorts block Originally entered in the 2012 Mississippi 48 Hour Film Challenge. Shot in the style of “The Office,” this film tells the story of a superhero’s retirement party.

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Rolling Stock

Slices of Clarity

Experimental Short, 8 min.

Experimental Short, 5 min.

Directed by Dan Inglis

Directed by Brooke White

Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block

Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block

An experimental digital short film examining ideas of perception and subjectivity as two workers toil in a surreal factory.

A short experimental movie comprised of photographs, videos, and archival super 8mm film footage, that investigates the relationship between memory, landscape, and place through the lens of Alzheimer’s Disease.

S for Sally Mississippi Narrative, 13 min. (work in progress screening, not in competition) Directed by Melanie Lynn Addington Screening: Saturday 2:45 p.m. (S1) in the Mississippi Narrative Shorts block

Split Time Narrative Short, 3 min. Directed by Fabrice Bracq Screening: Friday 2:30 p.m. (S2), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S2), screens in the Narrative Shorts block 1

When her 10-yearold daughter Sally starts having difficulties, Mona sets out to help her despite the lack of support from her husband Phil, the schools or the church.

Screenwriting Panel: Screenwriting as Storytelling Saturday 4:00 p.m. (Lyric Theater) Free, no ticket required! Moderator Coop Cooper talks with veteran screenwriter David Sheffield (The Nutty Professor, Coming to America), film criticturned-screenwriter Kim Voynar, screenwriter and professor Chris Offutt (True Blood, Treme), and film critic Gerald Peary on the importance of storytelling for the screen.

A man and a woman in their mid-thirties. Attractive, single day-dreamers, they cross each other a million times without ever meeting. Yet, they are meant to be together.

Spotlight Film #1 TBA, check oxfordfilmfest.com for details. Screening: Friday 8:30 p.m. (S1) after Ten

Spotlight Film #2 TBA, check oxfordfilmfest.com for details. Screening: Saturday 7:15 p.m. (S3) after Ten

Barton’s Pick

Barton Segal, projectionist emeritus of the famed Hoka Theater (19761997) and film enthusiast, has an unrivaled knowledge of film history and trivia. His trivia quizzes frequently appear in The Local Voice. See (and hear) him this year in DVD Blues: or Thad Calls Barton About Renaldo and Clara (Mississippi Documentary Block, Saturday, 11:15 a.m.) and check out the film that he picked to be in this year’s OFF lineup, Flatland, inspired by Edwin A. Abbott’s classic novel of the same name.

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(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


Mississippi Connections We are pleased to highlight local talent in our Mississippi blocks (documentary, music video, and narrative), and delighted to find Mississippi connections in those entries submitted from out of state. An Ordinary Hero (documentary feature) – tells the story of Joan Trumpauer Mulholland, a pivotal figure in Mississippi’s Civil Rights History Camino, a Journey to Santiago (documentary short) – codirector Matthew Nothelfer has lived in Oxford, and his production company often has projects in Mississippi Crush (narrative short) – codirector Rebecca Pugh attended high school in Columbus. Eating Alabama (documentary feature) – Joey Thompson, currently a graduate student in the UM Southern Studies program, scored the film. Life (experimental short) – the film’s director, Christopher Miner, grew up in Jackson. Notes on the Revolution (experimental short, silent; music video, sound) – filmmaker/poet Louis Bourgeois lives in Oxford, and is the executive director of VOX Press.

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Pretty Monsters (narrative short) – lead actress Lindsey Roberts grew up in Oxford. The Potential Wives of Norman Mao (narrative short) – producer Shannon McCoy Cohn is a native Mississippian, and currently lives in Taylor. Slices of Clarity (experimental short) – filmmaker Brooke White is an associate professor of Art at the University of Mississippi. Tracer Gun (narrative short) – lead actress Mary Elizabeth Ellis is a native of Laurel. She is best known for her recurring role as “the waitress” on It’s Always Sunny in Philadelphia. Tupelove (narrative short) and Native Son (documentary feature) -- Memphis filmmaker Mike McCarthy, grew up in Blue Springs. Uprising (documentary feature) – the film’s editor is a Mississippi native. Why I Make Movies (narrative short) – The film is “partially inspired” by filmmaker Sam Frazier, Jr.’s experiences attending the Oxford Film Festival.

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Strings Animated Short, 12 min. Directed by Tal Arbiv and Lior Golan Screening: Friday 11:00 a.m. (S2), Saturday 10:00 a.m. (S3), screens in the Animation block A marionette with aspirations of glory realizes that the way to fulfill them is not that simple when you are a puppet with feelings.

Ten 3rd annual Community Film, 15 min. (not in competition) Directed by Joe York Screening: Thursday 7:15 p.m. (Lyric), Friday 12:45 p.m. in the Documentary Shorts block (S2), Friday 3:00 p.m. before Plimpton! (S3), Friday 8:30 p.m. (S1), Saturday 1:30 p.m. (S3) in the Documentary Shorts block, Saturday 6:30 p.m. (S3), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S1) before Lecile and Pride and Joy

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To celebrate the tenth anniversary of the Oxford Film Festival, the University of Mississippi’s Media & Documentary Projects Center is teaming up with the Oxford Film Festival to create a documentary film starring 10-year-olds from the Oxford/Lafayette County community discussing the joys and trials of being 10 years old.

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Tennessee Queer Narrative Feature, 90 min. Directed by Earl C. Goshorn Screening: Friday 1:15 p.m. (S1), Saturday 2:45 p.m. (S3) When “out and proud” Jason Potts returns to his Tennessee hometown, he quickly learns that life has not gotten better for the gay high school kids. Wanting to give them some hope, Jason plans to hold the first ever gay pride parade down Main Street. Unknown to Jason, a conservative politician plots to use the parade for his own political reasons.

(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


Third Shift Mississippi Narrative Short, 33 min. Directed by Glenn Payne Screening: Saturday 2:45 p.m. (S1) in the Mississippi Narrative block Elaine and Melinda are holed up in a small town diner. They’ve been on the run and are now pinned into a corner. They know they’ve been followed, but by whom they aren’t sure. Their only comfort is that they are fairly certain that their pursuers don’t know their faces either. Can they uncover their assassin’s identity before it’s too late? Everyone is a suspect.

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30 Miles Experimental Short, 4 min. Directed by Ronnie Cramer Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block Two time-lapse accounts of the same 30-mile trip; taken 23 years apart and presented via split-screen.

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Thunder May Have Ruined the Moment Experimental Short, 13 min. Directed by Pete Monro Screening: Saturday 11:45 a.m. (S3), screens in the Experimental Shorts block

Tracer Gun Narrative Short, 17 min.

M I K E

Directed by Paul Grellong Screening: Friday 6:00 p.m. (S2), Sunday 1:00 p.m. (S2), preceding Congratulations

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Uprising

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Documentary Feature, 85 min. A little mistake turns into a living nightmare when Abby apologizes for a drunken kiss by giving the right gift to the wrong man.

Directed by Fredrik Stanton Screening: Friday 7:30 p.m. (S3), Sunday 4:45 p.m. (S3)

Screening: Saturday 2:45 p.m. (S1) in the Mississippi Narrative Shorts block

Tells the inside story of the Egyptian revolution from the perspective of its principal leaders and organizers, including four Nobel Peace Prize nominees. Their success in forcing the downfall of a brutal dictatorship has changed the face of the Middle East and provided hope for millions of oppressed people across the world.

Melanie Moore has forgotten a life without television.

We Didn’t Get Famous: The Story of the Southern Music Underground, 1978-1990

Tube Mississippi Narrative Short, 25 min. Directed by Jordan Berger

Mississippi Documentary Short, 20 min. Directed by Camilla Ann Aikin Screening: Friday 3:15 p.m. (S1), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S3), before Drawing on a Dream and Antenna

Tupelove Mississippi Narrative Short, 15 min. (not in competition) Directed by Mike McCarthy Screening: Friday 5:45 p.m. (S1) before Native Son. Created for the Tupelo Convention & Visitors Bureau, Tupelove explores the boyhood mythos of Elvis, which features little-known places in and around Tupelo, Mississippi. Narrated by Elvis Presley’s original drummer, D.J. Fontana.

The Urban Herd Documentary Short, 13 min. Directed by Sonja Alsofi Screening: Friday 12:45 p.m. (S2), Saturday 1:30 p.m. (S3), screens in the Documentary Shorts block The story of how a small herd of goats in an inner city vacant lot brings joy and unity to a diverse community, leading to questions about the role of nature in the urban experience.

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The Southern bands making what we’d now call “indie” music in the 1980s were as much in debt to punk rock, new wave, and Big Star, as they were to Southern culture and traditions. Their Southern identity, which was sometimes accepted and embraced only reluctantly, and geographical roots deeply affected the route these bands and their local scenes took. Their sound, spirit, style, and careers were all shaped by being from the South.

Why I Make Movies Narrative Short, 4 min. Directed by Sam Frazier, Jr. Screening: Friday 2:30 p.m. (S2), Sunday 12:00 p.m. (S2), screens in the Narrative Shorts block 1 A short explanation of one filmmaker’s unsatisfying life at work and home but glamorous lifestyle when he’s accepted into film festivals.

(S1) = Screen 1 / (S2) = Screen 2 / (S3) = Screen 3 at Malco Oxford Studio

february 21-24, 2013


Favorite Films After ten years of programming the Oxford Film Festival, we are frequently asked for our favorite films. We fondly remember some films because of the story itself – often “It was hilarious,” or, “I had no idea that existed,” but also, “because of that film, we got to meet [insert name]”. We each have our own lists (Molly prefers documentaries, Michelle likes comedies, Melanie likes horror, Micah likes sports movies, Diala likes familiar faces), but these are some of the ones we all agree on. All are available on Netflix, and similar VOD. Blackballed: The Bobby Dukes Story (OFF 2004, OFF 2005) We loved this film so much -- a mockumentary about a disgraced paintball champion -- we programmed it two years in a row. Molly and Kevin had seen the film at that spring’s SXSW festival, and convinced the filmmakers to take a chance on us. One of the producers (Jesse Scolaro, who later returned to OFF with The Cake Eaters, featuring a then-unknown Kristin Stewart) described the Oxford square as “straight out of a movie studio.” (Winner: Best Narrative Feature, Audience Award) Wristcutters: A Love Story (OFF 2007) – A dark comedy depicting a bleak afterlife reserved for those who commit suicide, this was a film we were so proud to program because it put us in a higher tier of festival. It sounds so obvious now to say, “to have a good festival, you have to program films that are playing other prominent festivals,” but at the time, that was easier said than done. (Winner: Best Narrative Feature)

Darius Goes West: The Roll of His Life (OFF 2007) – A feel good story and a great group of guys. It was only the second film festival (of close to fifty) where the film would appear, but the first to offer Darius a can of wasabi peas. Hilarity ensued. (Winner: Best Documentary Feature, Audience Award)

Good Dick (OFF 2009) – This was the film that brought us Jason Ritter, who delayed his return flight so he could stay longer. The story of a lonely woman and the video store clerk who pines for her, the film marked the directorial debut of Ritter’s costar and life partner, Marianna Palka. Who knew that we would feel nostalgic for video stores a mere four years later?

Tell us about you! Take our survey! Your answers are taken seriously, and are both used to improve the festival and apply for grant funding. In appreciation, you will be entered to win prizes which may include t-shirts, items from our sponsors, or tickets to next year’s festival. Winners will be announced on our Facebook page, and notified via email.

http://tinyurl.com/off2013attended

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A guaranteed good time in 90 seconds or less by Melanie Addington Oxford Film Festival decided to place a new challenge on local filmmakers this year by asking for a variety of 90-second films to play in between festival programming. Several rose to the challenge and their films will premiere opening night. Don’t fret if you miss out on Thursday though, as the films will play several times throughout the festival! Check them out after the festival on our Youtube page. Palindrome by Meg Burke and starring Greg Earnest is a 90-second short about an unsuccessful shell game. “He initially wanted to do a comedic film about a guy running a shell game and the annoyed people that he conned out of their money,” Burke said.

“The idea was funny, but as we were drawing it up we realized that it would be really tight to tell the whole story in 90 seconds. So we switched to a more abstract kind of film that focused more on the shell game operator and his inability to connect with the public.” For Burke and Earnest, this was their first film to complete from start to finish. The two have been actors in numerous films but decided to try their hand at filmmaking. They have since gone on to direct and produce another film to be seen at festivals later this year.

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“We have been fortunate enough to act in several films (Greg has been in The Show Must Go On, Third Shift, and the upcoming Kane),” Burke said. “We have also been lucky to crew in several different productions. Greg has worked sound on a couple productions, including S for Sally, Human Resources, Nights in White Satin.  I have gotten to AD on S for Sally, was cinematographer on The Training Run, and directed The Artifact. Finding a song available in the public domain was the next challenge after nailing down the story. 

“I fell in love with a Scott Joplin rag, and knew that I would use it as the background for the piece so that I didn’t have to worry about recording sound,” Burke said. “I set up the camera, but when a couple extras fell through the day of the shoot, I actually wound up being one of the extras that passed by Greg. So I just set the camera to record and hopped into place” Burke said she learned that having an AC (assistant camera) or an AD (assistant director) would have helped. The other extra in the film is Beth Ziegenhorn who has her own 90-second film. Training Run by Ziegenhorn is the story of finding motivation in some of life’s most difficult situations. She was inspired by friends that are runners.  “I want so badly to be a runner, but it seems every time I make progress towards that goal I injure my toe, or something equally limiting,” Ziegenhorn said. “I feel I will always be that friend on the sidelines holding the sign encouraging those running by me, but at least people like me can have a sense of humor about it.” This was Ziegenhorn’s first film and she said she was inspired by her friends who are connected to film.  “My friends have always encouraged me to be an extra or feel free to help on set during a shoot,” Ziegenhorn said.

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“I’ve had some experience with writing for radio scripts and short stories; I thought I might give writing for film a whirl. It was a LOT more work than I originally anticipated, but it was also really exciting learning how to draw out a story board, picking out my cast and crew, and watching people approve and be excited about something I wrote.” Her film includes lots of local actors and extras including local actor Johnny McPhail who stars in another 90-second film. Two other actors from her film are Jennifer Pierce Mathus and Jillian Pecoraro who set out to make their own 90-second film. Chickens and Pills: The Lola Jolene Story Parts I and II is a mockumentary on celebrities living in Oxford.  The idea was inspired by basing a film around Mathus’ dog Lola.  “I wrote a script and Jill added some key lines and scenes and shot it,” Mathus said.  For Mathus this was her first time

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directing, or co-directing with Pecoraro. For Pecoraro, her previous work includes a short film in last year’s award ceremony. Like the other 90-second films this year, the two directors worked with local actors and crew, many of which also helped in the other films. [Full disclosure: I was asked to be in this film and am the bad actor in Part II.] Their film is an epic tale that is broken into two films with a cliffhanger in the middle.  The final 90-second film, A.I.S.D, is made by Daniel Lee Perea, a recent transplant to Oxford from the Tupelo area. Perea’s film stars Johnny McPhail in an homage to noir films of the 1940s and 50s.  “A deal goes wrong when a man makes a transaction with shady criminals,” Perea said. “I had been tossing around the concept of a Johnny McPhail noir film involving the famous Oxford phone booth for quite some time. The

90-second format gave me the perfect opportunity to pare the production down to a very quick and easy guerilla shoot.” Perea has been making films since 2006 and has screened at over 25 film festivals, including the Oxford Film Festival, appearing frequently in a kilt, and worked on a variety of other projects. “My experience in the field has led me to a career in media production,” Perea said. “But in the process of independent filmmaking, I’ve made a lot of lifelong friends, made some amazing memories, and gotten to work creatively with countless talented people.” The crew consisted of Susan McPhail, Jill Pecoraro, Perea and Johnny McPhail. [Full disclosure: I also helped write the script dialogue and was second camera.] “This year marks Oxford Film Festival’s tenth anniversary,” Perea said. “To have been around the festival for half its lifetime has been an honor and privilege, and I would like to thank all my collaborators who I’ve had the opportunity to work with on the projects that have been a part of it.” See all the 90-second films at this year’s Oxford Film Festival or after the fest at www.youtube.com/oxfordfilmfest.

Notes:

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Puzzle! U P R I S I N G C

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MAYDAY

BEARD

PLIMPTON

BOOMTOWN

REBELS

CAMINO

REBORNING

CONGRATULATIONS

REMAKE

CRUSH

SPLITTIME

DEAFBLIND

STRINGS

DISCOVERERS

TEN

FLATLAND

TUBE

GRASSHOPPER

TUPELOVE

HICCUP

UPRISING

LANTHANUM

ZEBRAPRINT

F N S J J Y

LECILE

38

february 21-24, 2013


Animated Shorts

Native Son T Pizza Shop u Pride and Joy T Rebels: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss T Ten T We Didn’t Get Famous: The Story of the Southern Music Underground, 1978-1990 T

Flatland Grandmothers (Abuelas) Ham (Jamón) The Loop c Mayday c Strings N

Mississippi Narrative Shorts Bp

Documentary Features Antenna Basically Frightened: The Musical Madness of Colonel Bruce Hampton T Eating Alabama Bp My Brooklyn: Race, Real Estate, and the Future of Cities c p An Ordinary Hero Bp Plimpton! Starring George Plimpton as Himself Uprising B

Documentary Shorts Boomtown Camino, the Journey to Santiago Grand Fugue on the Art of Gumbo Reborning c The Urban Herd N

Narrative Features Come Morning p Congratulations c p The Discoverers c p Pictures of Superheroes Tennessee Queer p

u Bp

cp

Narrative Shorts

Experimental Shorts 30 Miles Dance Elephant Dance c Don’t Break Down Life B p Melt in the Shade Milk Sorrow Music for the Self-Transforming Machine Notes on the Revolution (Silent version) B u Rolling Stock N Slices of Clarity B p Thunder May Have Ruined the Moment c

p

Events Awards Ceremony Conversation with Roger Avary Film History Tour Panel: Casting Panel: Documentary Filmmaking Panel: Music in Film Panel: Remembering the 1963 Sit-in at Jackson, Miss. Woolworth’s Spotlight Documentary (TBA) Spotlight Narrative (TBA) Thacker Mountain Radio Workshop: Children’s Acting Workshop

Mississippi Documentary Shorts Bp April’s Way Drawing on a Dream T DVD Blues: or Thad Calls Barton About Renaldo and Clara Growing our Own Lecile Manifest Destiny 2.0 Mickle’s Pickle

oxfordfilmfest.com

Genrevolt Grasshopper! c Ole Miss Filmmaking Workshop Films T The Retirement Party S for Sally T Third Shift u Tube Tupelove T

America 101 u p The Beard Crush B p Crush 472 N The Dark Companion p DeafBlind c Dinner with Holly u p Double or Nothing Emergency Contact u p Free Kick (Libre Directo) c The Golden Bough (Der Goldene Zweig) c The Hiccup p The Potential Wives of Norman Mao B p Pretty Monsters B p Remake SplitTime Tracer Gun B Why I Make Movies B p

Mississippi Music Video Bp Bye Bye Baby / Gina Sexton A Change Is Coming / Zechariah Lloyd Crossroads Blues / Adam Gussow Flood you under / Robodrum Growing Pains / Junk Culture In the Garden / Jimbo Mathus JoLynn / Bill Perry Lanthanum / Loki Mother Never Held Me / Wolf Ruffin Notes on the Revolution (Sound version) / Louis Bourgeois, Dennis Herring Passing By / Clayton Matthews Pepper Twice on Sunday / Bonfire Orchestra Waiting for You / Andrew and Ciera Zebra Print / Sipsy Fires

T Not in competition • B= Mississippi Connection • u = world premiere N = national premiere • c = regional premiere • p = scheduled to attend

39


Presenting Level

Supporting Level

Malco Theaters

Cottages at Kirkwood

Media and Documentary Projects

Dianne Smith Fergusson

Oxford Convention and Visitors Bureau

Laura Harper

Donna Ruth Roberts

Ink Spot

Patron Level

LB’s Meat Market

Captured Photography

Magnolia Rent-All and Supply

The Lyric Oxford

Newk’s Express Cafe

Mississippi Intellectual Property Institute

Oxford Bicycle Company

Oxford Taxi

Percy Law Firm

Yoknapatawpha Arts Council

Laura Sheppardson

Donor Level

Marquis and Rachel Sledge

Bullseye 95.5

Z Productions

Dunbar Davis, PLLC

Friend Level

Mississippi Arts Commission Mississippi Film Office Nautilus Publishing R&B Feder Charitable Foundation for the Beaux Arts Wilson Roberts

Lynda and Harry Addington Baptist Memorial Hospital of North Mississippi Garden and Gun High Point Roasters Honey Bee Bakery

Contributor Level

My Michelle’s

Janice and Walt Antonow

Carter and Lydia Myers

The Blind Pig

Oxford Film Festival Fan Club, Birmingham chapter

Chick Fil-A

Proud Larry’s

Footage Firm and Video Blocks

Twisted Twig

Harris Shelton Hanover and Walsh, PLLC Indoor Advantage Tiffany Kilpatrick McAlister’s Deli Oby’s Oxford Bank Association Southside Gallery Hubert and Rose Spears Mike Stanton Leo Torres Two Stick

40

february 21-24, 2013


UM Media and Documentary Projects and The Center for the Study of Southern Culture Congratulate Southern Studies faculty, staff, students, and alumni with films in the 2013 Oxford Film Festival. Camilla Ann Aikin – “We Didn’t Get Famous” Jordan Berger – Tube Ben Guest – Pizza Shop Matthew Graves – Rebels: James Meredith and the Integration of Ole Miss Adam Gussow – Crossroads Rex Jones – Lecile Joe York – Pride and Joy, Ten University of Mississippi Media and Documentary Projects and the Center for the Study of Southern Culture teach documentary filmmaking, photography, and oral history to students in the Southern Studies BA and MA programs. For information on available courses and to learn more about Media and Documentary Projects, visit olemissmedia.com and southernstudies.olemiss.edu. To see work by faculty, staff, and students, visit southernstudiesatuofm.tumblr.com.


OFF 2013 Printed Program  

Printed guide to the 10th annual Oxford Film Festival. Contains schedule, film descriptions, profiles of panelists and judges, sponsor adver...

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