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Completion Report

2013

KECAMATAN DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM AND ENVIRONMENT (PNPM-GREEN) IN SULAWESI Component 3: Awareness Raising and Training (TF-090977) PROVINCE: SOUTH AND SOUTH EAST SULAWESI

Dr. Edi Purwanto


Contact Information Name

: Dr. Edi Purwanto

Position

: Director of Operation Wallacea Trust (OWT)

Addresss

: Taman Cimanggu Jln. Akasia Block P III No. 14, Bogor

Phone/Fax

: + 62 251-8111145

Mobile

: + 62 (0) 81 296 55 233

Email

: purwanto.owt@gmail.com

Website

: www.owt.or.id


Table of Contents Page Contact Information ........................................................................................................... i Table of Contents.................................................................................................................... iii List of Tables........................................................................................................................... viii List of Figures.......................................................................................................................... viii List of Boxes............................................................................................................................ ix List of Appendices................................................................................................................... x List of Glossary and Acronym................................................................................................. xiii Executive Summary................................................................................................................ xv I Chapter 1 : Introduction.................................................................................................... 1 1.1.

Background.......................................................................................................... 1

1.1.1. 1.1.2. 1.1.3. 1.1.4. 1.1.5. 1.1.6.

Objective of the Report........................................................................................ 2 Organization of the Report................................................................................... 2

1.2. 1.3.

PNPM-Green.......................................................................................... 1 Development Objective......................................................................... 1 Approach............................................................................................... 1 Operation Wallacea Trust (OWT)............................................................ 2 OWT facilitation supports on PNPM-Green pilots in Sulawesi................ 2 PNPM-Green facilitation sites iJn Sulawesi under TF-090977.................. 2

II Chapter 2 : Dynamic Changes of OWT Facilitation Approaches : Searching the best fit of community empowerment for natural resource management........................................................................ 7

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2.1. 2.2.

Introduction.......................................................................................................... 7 Phase 1: Period 2008............................................................................................. 7

2.2.1. 2.2.2. 2.2.3. 2.2.4. 2.2.5. 2.2.6. 2.2.7.

2.3.

Phase 2 : Period 2009............................................................................................ 10 2.3.1. Condition............................................................................................... 10 2.3.2. Facilitation Strategies............................................................................ 10 2.3.3. Staffing.................................................................................................. 10

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Condition............................................................................................... 7 Facilitation Strategies............................................................................ 8 Staffing.................................................................................................. 9 Problem-1.............................................................................................. 9 Lessons-learned..................................................................................... 9 Problem-2.............................................................................................. 9 Lessons-learned..................................................................................... 10

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2.3.4. Formulation of NRM specialist team...................................................... 10 2.3.5. Problem-3.............................................................................................. 11 2.3.6. Remedial actions.................................................................................... 11

Phase 3 : Period 2010............................................................................................ 12

2.4.

2.4.1. Condition............................................................................................... 12 2.4.2. Main facilitation strategies..................................................................... 12 2.4.3. Problems and implication to the changing approaches........................... 12

Phase 4 : Period 2011............................................................................................ 15

2.5.

2.5.1. Condition............................................................................................... 15 2.5.2. Main facilitation..................................................................................... 15 2.5.3. Facilitated budget design during MAD III................................................ 15 2.5.4. Remedial actions (2012)......................................................................... 16

Phase 5 : Period 2012............................................................................................ 16

2.6.

2.6.1. Condition............................................................................................... 16 2.6.2. Main facilitation in South Sulawesi Province........................................... 17 2.6.3. Conducted film screening through ‘My Darling’ car................................ 17

Remedial actions in South Sulawesi Province........................................................ 18

2.6.4.

III Chapter 3: Strategies and Achievements : Outputs, Outcomes and Success Stories.......... 21 3.1. 3.2.

Introduction.......................................................................................................... 21 Performance Indicator 1........................................................................................ 21

3.2.1.

Result Indicator 1.................................................................................... 21

1a. 1b. 1c. 1d.

3.3.

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3.4.

2d.1. 2d.2. 2d.3. 2d.4. 2d.5. 2d.6. 2d.7. 2d.8. 2d.9. 2d.10. 2d.11. 2d.12. 2d.13. 2d.14. 2d.15. 2d.16. 2d.17. 2d.18. 2d.19. 2d.20. 2d.21.

Mangrove Planting/Rehabilitation............................................ 26 Catchment area rehabilitation and ecotourism development... 27 Recharge wells......................................................................... 28 Fruit and cash crops planting.................................................... 29 Energy saving stove.................................................................. 31 Cashew processing................................................................... 32 Mangrove crab fattening.......................................................... 33 Virgin Coconut Oil (VCO).......................................................... 34 Fish Aggregating Device (Rumpon)........................................... 34 Biogas...................................................................................... 35 Organic fertilizer...................................................................... 37 Coconut shell Charcoal Briquette (CCB).................................... 38 Portable solar drier................................................................... 38 Honey-bee culture.................................................................... 39 King Oyster Mushroom............................................................ 40 Straw mushroom...................................................................... 40 Vegetative Propagation............................................................ 41 Plastic waste handicraft............................................................ 41 Fish chips home-industry.......................................................... 42 Conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas................... 43 Garbage Bank........................................................................... 44

Performance Indicator 3........................................................................................ 50 3.4.1.

Result Indicator 3a.................................................................................. 50

3a.1. 3a.2. 3a.3. 3a.4.

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3.4.2.

Organized NRM Training for village officials and setrawan........ 50 Organized province and (sub) district workshops to introduce and mainstream NRM.............................................................. 50 Inserted NRM subjects on workshop organized by government officials at district nd province level.......................................... 50 Promotion of PNPM-Green on exhibition festival at district and province level..................................................................... 50

Result Indicator 3b................................................................................. 50

3b.1. 3b.2.

Performance Indicator 2....................................................................................... 22

Result Indicator 3c.................................................................................. 52

3.3.1. 3.3.2.

3c.1. 3c.2.

Result Indicator 2a................................................................................. 23 Result Indicator 2b................................................................................. 23

2b.1. 2b.2.

Supported GF recruitment, GF pre-service training design and delivery............................................................................. 21 Delivered NRM training to GF during annual refresher training.................................................................................... 22 Partnered with Danida to develop NRM Manual and Booklets and delivered training to Setrawan and FKL............................. 22 Enhanced GF technical capacity on vegetative and generative propagation, catchment area rehabilitation and solar photovoltaic............................................................................. 22

3.3.3. 3.3.4.

Stimulated women to involve on green decision making process..................................................................................... 23 Enhanced environmental education on secondary schools....... 24

Result Indicator 2c.................................................................................. 25 Result Indicator 2d................................................................................. 26 Dr. Edi Purwanto

3.5.

3.4.3.

Facilitated RPJM-Des formulation............................................ 50 Reviewed RPJM-Des................................................................. 51 Stimulated local community and government to replicate Biogas installation : See Box 3.3................................................ 52 Stimulated local government to run garbage bank: See 2d.21.. 52

Performance Indicator 4....................................................................................... 52 3.5.1.

Result Indicator 4a................................................................................. 52

4a.1. Dr. Edi Purwanto

Facilitated village regulation formulation to sustain PNPM-Green sub-projects assets............................................. 52

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Facilitated sub-projects maintenance....................................... 52 Promoted PNPM-Green ob PNPM-Exit Strategy...................... 52

4.2.9. Lesson Learned 9/2010: The need to empower community roles on budget plans.......................................................................................... 63 4.2.10. Lesson Learned 10/2010: The need to improve tree planting sub-projects implementation................................................................. 63 4.2.11. Lesson Learned No. 11/2010: The need to allocate considerable fund for tree planting sub-project maintenances............................................ 64 4.2.12. Lesson Learned No. 12/20l0: The need to define the tasks of PNPM-Green Management Team........................................................... 64 4.2.13. Lesson Learned No. 13/20l0: The need to strengthen verification process of Green Sub-projects proposals................................................ 65 4.2.14. Lesson Learned No. 14/20l0: The need to link PNPM actors with the existing village institutions..................................................................... 65 4.2.15. Lesson Learned No. 15/2011: Enhancement of tree planting sub-project facilitation during integration with regular development planning......... 65 4.2.16. Lessons Learned No. 16/2012: The need to strengthen solar photovoltaic sub-projects facilitations.................................................... 66 4.2.17. Lesson Learned No. 17/2012: The need to clarify benefit sharing mechanism of tree planting sub-projects............................................... 66 4.2.18. Lesson Learned No. 18/2012: Efforts to avoid hard facilitation exit in South Sulawesi....................................................................................... 66

4a.2. 4a.3.

Result Indicator 4b................................................................................. 52

3.5.2.

4b.1. 4.b.2. 4.b.3. 4.b.4. 4.b.5. 4.b.6. 4.b.7. 4.b.8. 4.b.9. 4.b.10.

Stimulated involvement of relevant development projects (agencies) to support green sub-projects.................................. 52 Replicated PNPM-Green smart practices on FEATI program in Buton and Kolaka Districts....................................................... 53 Replicated PNPM-Green smart practices on AgFor program in Kolaka District.......................................................................... 54 Facilitated monthly coordination meeting among PNPM-Green actors and stakeholders...................................... 54 Building collaborative environmental campaigns with province PMD......................................................................................... 54 Building collaborative environmental campaigns with Centre PMD......................................................................................... 54 Collaborated with BaKTI to promote PNPM-Green smart practices................................................................................... 55 Mainstream green activities through ‘Lestari Desaku’ Magazine................................................................................. 55 Collaborated with TSU to promote PNPM-Green smart practices to NGOs in Sulawesi.................................................. 55 Linking Green farmer groups with UPK..................................... 55

IV Chapter 4. Lessons Learned............................................................................................. 61 4.1. Introduction.......................................................................................................... 61 4.2. Challenges and Lessons Learned.......................................................................... 61 4.2.1. Lesson Learned 1/2009: Environmental awareness should not only be targeted to grass-root but also the elites at village and (sub) districts level....................................................................................................... 61 4.2.2. Lesson learned No. 2/2009: Viability of green sub-projects are highly determined by the availability of local resources.................................... 61 4.2.3. Lesson learned No. 3/2009: The success of tree planting sub-projects are sensitive to season........................................................................... 62 4.2.4. Lesson learned No. 4/2009: The need to consider number of sub-project beneficiaries........................................................................ 62 4.2.5. Lesson Learned No. 5/2009: Democratic ranking of sub-projects proposals are not suitable for green program......................................... 62 4.2.6. Lesson Learned No. 6/2009: Avoid bidding for material procurement..... 62 4.2.7. Lesson learned No. 7/2009: Optimize the use green block-grant for action oriented activities........................................................................ 63 4.2.8. Lesson Learned No. 8/2010: Green block grant should not be perceived as ordinary village funding sources......................................................... 63

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V Chapter 5. Conclusion and Outlook................................................................................... 69 5.1. Conclusions.......................................................................................................... 69 5.2. Outlooks............................................................................................................... 71

5.2.1. 5.2.2. 5.2.3. 5.2.4. 5.2.5.

Roles of CSO on the past Green program................................................ 71 Roles of CSO on future Green program................................................... 71 Local CSOs or CBOs............................................................................... 71 Problems on Greening PNPM Rural in the past....................................... 72 Greening PNPM-Rural............................................................................ 72

Appendices............................................................................................................................ 75

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List of Tables Page Table 2.1. Table 2.2. Table 2.3. Table 3.1. Table 3.2. Table 3.3. Table 3.4. Table 3.5. Table 3.6. Table 3.7. Table 3.8. Table 3.9

Changes facilitation approaches for local community........................................... 13 Changes facilitation approaches for PNPM-Green Facilitators.............................. 14 Changes facilitation approaches to PNPM-Green Stakeholders............................ 14 Summary of published IEC materials.................................................................... 23 Women based income generating activities in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces......... 24 Environmental education on secondary schools in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces... 25 List of Green Learning Houses (Rumah Pembelajaran) in SE Sulawesi.................... 30 List of Green Learning Houses (Rumah Pembelajaran) in S Sulawesi...................... 31 Summary of direct beneficiaries on environmental training and awareness in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces................................................................................. 45 Type and number of demo-plots (D) and GLH in SE Sulawesi................................ 46 Type and number of demo-plots (D) and GLH in S Sulawesi.................................. 46 Summary of Strategy, Activities, Outputs, Impacts, Outcomes and Success Stories.................................................................................................................. 56

List of Figures

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Figure 3.13. Portable solar dryer in Kotilombu Village, Sampolawa.......................................... 39 Figure 3.14. Hone-bee culture demo-plot in Napalakura Village, Napabalano.......................... 39 Figure 3.15. King-Oyster demo-plot in Welala Village, Ladongi................................................ 40 Figure 3.16. Straw mushroom demo-plot in Atula Village, Ladongi.......................................... 40 Figure 3.17. Tree nursery demo-plot in Kahulungaya Village, Pasarwajo.................................. 41 Figure 3.18. Women group facilitation on plastic waste handicraft home industry, Saragih Village, Pasarwajo.................................................................................... 42 Figure 3.19. Women group facilitation on fish-chips home industry, Ampekale, Bontoa........... 43 Figure 3.20. Conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas................................................ 44 Figure 3.21. Plastic garbage collection on Garbage Bank implementation in school................. 44 Figure 3.22. Number and types of demo-plot replication through Green block grant and government.......................................................................................................... 47 Figure 3.23. Number of demo-plot replication by block-grant years in SE Sulawesi Province.... 49

List of Boxes

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Figure 1.1. Maps of Sub-districts facilitation in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces.......................... 4 Figure 1.2. Maps of Sub-districts facilitation in S Sulawesi Provinces...................................... 5 Figure 2.1. Strategy to initiate G-KDP until MD Perencanaan (2008)...................................... 8 Figure 3.1. Mangrove rehabilitation sub-project in Pasir Putih, Bola Wajo.............................. 26 Figure 3.2. Ecotourism sub-project in Latugho Village, Lawa; the situation before (left) and after (right)........................................................................................................... 28 Figure 3.3. Recharge well demo-plot in SMA II Sengkang, Wajo............................................ 28 Figure 3.4. Orange planting demo-plot in Warinta Village, Pasarwajo.................................... 29 Figure 3.5. Training on the making of energy saving stove in Gunung Sejuk Village, Sampolawa.......................................................................................................... 32 Figure 3.6. Women group facilitation on cashew processing in Lalemba Village, Lawa........... 33 Figure 3.7. Mangrove crab fattening in Oengkolaki village, Mawasangka............................... 33 Figure 3.8. Women group facilitation on VCO home industry in Oengkolaki Village, Mawasangka........................................................................................................ 34 Figure 3.9. Fish-aggregating device demo-plot in Oempu Village, Tongkuno.......................... 35 Figure 3.10. Biogas demo-plot in Gunung Sari Village, Watubangga......................................... 36 Figure 3.11. Key-farmer champion for liquid organic fertilizer, Sidarwan (left), champion from Inalipule Village, Tanasitolo; and Andi Monjong (right), champion from Parigi Village, Takallala................................................................................................... 37 Figure 3.12. Women group facilitation on CCB home-industry in Balabone Village, Mawasangka........................................................................................................ 38

Box 2.1. Box 2.2. Box 2.3. Box 2.4. Box 2.5. Box 2.6. Box 3.1. Box 3.2. Box 3.3. Box 3.4. Box 3.5. Box 3.6. Box 3.7. Box 3.8. Box 3.9.

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Main activities from (November 2007-December 2008)....................................... 9 Main activities from (January-December 2009).................................................... 12 Main Page activities from (January-December 2010)............................................ 15 Main activities from January-December 2011....................................................... 16 Main activities from January-October 2012 in SE Sulawesi Province..................... 18 Main activities from May-October 2012 in S Sulawesi Province............................ 18 NRM Capacity Building Strategy for Green Facilitators......................................... 22 NRM Capacity Building Strategy for Rural Community.......................................... 25 Inter-village comittment to rehabilitate mangrove, Mawasangka, Buton.............. 27 Success Story: Adoption of Biogas demo-plots in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces..... 36 NRM Capacity Building Strategy for Government Officials and Parliaments.......... 51 Success story: Village Regulation on bride (groom) tree planting, Panyukukang, Bontoa, Maros...................................................................................................... 51 Success Story: Integrated investment on Wakante Ecotourism, Latugho, Lawa, Muna.................................................................................................................... 53 Success Story: District Government support on VCO Women Group, Oengkolaki, Mawasangka, Buton............................................................................................. 53 Success Story: Integrated investment on CCB village enterprise, Balabone, Mawasangka, Buton............................................................................................. 54

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List of Appendices

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Appendix 1: Beneficiary Success Stories......................................................................... 75 1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12. 13. 14.

Solar Panel in Pewutaa Village, Baula, Kolaka (Success Story No. 1/2011)....... 77 Mangrove Rehabilitation from Haji Muhammad in Bahari, Napabalano, Muna (Success Story No. 2/2011).................................................................... 77 Spring Water Rehabilitation in Awainulu Village, Pasarwajo, Buton (Success Story No. 3/2011).............................................................................. 77 Coastal dyke development in Gerak Makmur Village, Sampolawa, Buton (Success Story No. 4/2011) ............................................................................. 78 Mangrove Rehabilitation in Mawasangka Village, Mawasangka, Buton (Success Story No. 5/2011)............................................................................. 78 Smart Practice House (SPH) at Gunung Sejuk, Sampolawa, Buton (Success Story No. 6/2011)............................................................................. 78 Wa Nadia a women champion from, Lalemba, Lawa, Muna (Success Story No. 7/2011).............................................................................. 78 Zainuddin Mariuddin a key champion from Lahontohe, Tongkuno, Muna (Success Story No. 8/2011)............................................................................. 79 Pak Lanu, beneficiary of tree planting sub-project in Jaya Bakti Village, Sampolawa Sub-District, Buton (Success Story No. 9/2011)........................... 79 Gunung Sejuk Villagers, beneficiary of ecotourism, Sampolawa, Buton (Success Story No. 10/2011)............................................................................ 80 Gusi-Gusi, nursery women group from Waangu-Wangu, Pasarwajo, Buton (Success Story No. 11/2011)............................................................................ 80 Kaluku Lestari, VCO women group from Mawasangka, Buton (Success Story No. 12/2011)............................................................................ 81 Bu Salamah: Key champion of garbage plastic handicraft makers from Saragih Pasarwajo, Buton (Success Story No. 13/2011)................................... 82 Pak Zakaria: Key farmers and environmental hero from Pasarwajo, Buton (Success Story No. 14/2011)............................................................................ 82

Page 21. Bakko Lestari Women Group: Restoring mangrove forest and developing fish cracker home industry (Success story No. 25/2012).................................. 87

22. Sipurio Farmer Group, Inalipu E Village, Tanasitolo, Wajo: Improved horticulture farming using water weed (Eichomia crasipes) organic liquid fertilizer (Success story No. 26/2012).............................................................. 87

Appendix 2 : TF-090977: Information, Education Communications (IEC) Materials Produced by OWT (2008 – 2012).................................................................... 88

Appendix 3a : Community training in SE Sulawesi ............................................................... 99 Appendix 3b : Community training in South Sulawesi........................................................... 107 Appendix 3c : Training workshops for PNPM-Green actors in SE Sulawesi............................ 109 Appendix 4a : Community Awareness in SE Sulawesi........................................................... 110 Appendix 4b : Community Awareness in South Sulawesi...................................................... 116 Appendix 5a : Demo-pilots in SE Sulawesi............................................................................ 117 Appendix 5b : Demo-pilots in South Sulawesi............................................................. 120 Appendix 6 : Summary of Financial Report TF-090977.............................................. 123

15. Kaluku Harapan: CCB community enterprise from Mawasangka, Buton (Success Story No. 15/2011)............................................................................ 83 16. Local Initiatives to replicated Rumpon, Oempu (Muna) and Gumanano (Buton), Success Story No. 16/2012................................................................ 84 17. PNPM-Green has successfully stimulated local community to plant tree crops, Ladongi, Kolaka (Success Story No. 17/2012)........................................ 84

18. Biogas replication in Muna and Buton Districts (Success Story No. 21/2012)... 85

19. Lights break the darkness of Tanjung Village: solar photovoltaic sub-project in the remote village (Success story No. 22/2012)........................ 86 20. Replication of CCB home industries by 2012 PNPM-Green in Muna District (Success story No. 23/2012)............................................................................ 86

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List of Abbreviation and Acronym

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Bappeda

Badan Perencanaan Pembangunan Daerah, Development Planning Agency at district/province level

BUMDES

Badan Usaha Milik Desa, village owned enterprise

BPDAS

Watershed management Centre, technical implementing unit of the Ministry of Forestry

BLHD

Distrtict Environmental Agency, Badan Lingkungan Hidup daerah

BLM

Bantuan Langsung Masyarakat, PNPM-Green block grant

BPD

Badan Perwakilan Desa, Village representative council

CCB

Coconut shell charcoal briquette

CDD

Community driven development

CSO

Civil Service Organization/Non Government Organization

CBO

Community Based Organization

Demo-plots

Demonstration Plots (demo-pilots)

DOK

PNPM’s Operational facilitation fund at sub-district level

DPRD

Dewan Perwakilan Rakyat Daerah (District Parliament)

FKL

Green-PNPM facilitator at kecamatan level (consultant)

FGD

Focus Group Discussion

FEATI

Farmer Empowerment through Agricultural Technology and Information

GF

Green Facilitator (FKL, Astal, SPL)

GLH

Green Learning House/Rumah Pembelajaran Lingkungan

IGA

Income Generating Activity

IEC

Information Education and Communication

KVC

Key village champions

KAP

Knowledge Attitude and Practices

KDP

Kecamatan Development Program

KVG

Key Village Government

KPMD

Kader Pemberdayaan Masyarakat Desa, village development cadre

Korprov

Consultant coordinator at province level

Korkab

Koordinator Kabupaten, OWT facilitator at district level

Korcam

Kordinator Kecamatan, OWT facilitator at sub-district level

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LEM

Lembaga Ekonomi Masyarakat, village owned enterprise/BUMDES

MAD

Inter-villages meetings at sub-district level

MHP

Micro-hydro power

‘My Darling’ Car

‘Masyarakat Sadar Lingkungan’ (Environmental awareness community) car.

NRM

Natural resources management

NMC

National Management Consultant

OWT

Operation Wallacea Trust

PMD

Pemberdayaan Masyarakat Desa, Agency for community and village empowerment at central/province/district level

PSF

PNPM Support Facility

PTO

Guideline of program implementation

PL

Pembantu Lapangan, GF assistance at sub-district level

PLTS

Pembangkit Listrik Tenaga Surya (Solar Photovoltaic)

PJOK

Government official in charge in operating the PNPM-Green at kecamatan level

Perdes

Peraturan Desa, village regulation

Perda

Peraturan Daerah, district regulation

RAB

Rencana Anggaran Biaya, project cost proposal

RE

Renewable energy, energi baru terbarukan

RPJM-Desa

Rencana Pembangunan Jangka Menengah-Desa, Village mid term development plan

Setrawan

PNS fasilitator, Civil servant facilitator

SDA

Sumberdaya alam, natural resources

SKPD

Satuan kerja perangkat daerah, district agencies

TTG

Teknologi tepat guna, appropriate technology.

TPK

Tim Pelaksana Kegiatan, Project implementer Team

UPK

Unit Pelaksana Kegiatan, implementing unit, PNPM Organization at Kecamatan level which is in charge in administering PNPM funding.

VCO

Virgin Coconut Oil

Perda

Peraturan Daerah, District Regulation

Perdes

Peraturan Desa, Village Regulation

QR

Quarterly Report

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EXECUTIVE SUMMARY PNPM-Green is a pilot-project which is designed in part to mainstream NRM and RE issues within the core operations of the national PNPM-Rural program. On Sulawesi (North Sulawesi, South Sulawesi, West Sulawesi, and Southeast Sulawesi), PNPM-Green has been active since 2008 to the end of 2012. A key component of PNPM-Green is the technical assistance provided by CSO. These sub-projects were financed through the PNPM-Green block grants and were focused in NRM practices, IGA, and RE. OWT is a CSO has a GA with PSF to deliver environmental awareness raising and training activities to the pilot’s community beneficiaries and local government officials to assist in the design and implementation of viable ‘green sub-projects’. Under TF-090977, OWT provided full supports in two provinces in Sulawesi, i.e. SE Sulawesi (since November 2007 - October 2012) and S Sulawesi (since April - October 2012). The report provides summary of OWT activities, strategies, achievements to support PNPM-Green in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces. The report documents approaches, strategies and lessons learned to empower community for NRM, IGA and RE sub-projects at village level and the ways to mainstream the smart-practices at (sub) district and (sub)-national level. 1. Achievements 1.1. We developed 14 types of IEC material, ranges from training modules (25 titles), training manuals (7 titles), book (1 title), DVD film (26 titles), radio broadcast (5 tiles), Posters (10 topics), Ballyhoo (4 types), Banners (8 topics), Leaflets (16 titles), Iron campaign boards (9 types), stickers (7 types), T-Shirts (3 model). We also published and distributed three editions of Lestari Desaku magazines. Total direct beneficiaries of the IEC are 30,000 people. 1.2. With reference to the results of KAP survey conducted at the beginning of the program, we designed most community training on the basis of ‘learning by doing’ (emphasis on practical work) principle. Trainings were not conducted in the class but directly doing the jobs on the field. During the course of the program in SE Sulawesi Province (60 months), there were 8.657 male, 4.572 female and 4.244 youth have joined our environmental trainings at village and sub-district level. The level of women participation is 35%. While during 6 months facilitation in S Sulawesi, there were 1.477 male and 795 female and 40 youth attended our environmental training. The level of women participation is 35%. 1.3. We believed that sustainable environmental initiatives can only be achieved when enable to open new opportunities to local community livelihoods. NRM and RE initiatives will only be sustainable if they can enhance IGA or reduce poor household expenditure. Accordingly, we inspired and facilitated local community to develop innovative sub-projects which do not only benefit for environment but also supported site-specific livelihoods development. We developed 21 types of demo-plots: (a) mangrove rehabilitation;

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(b) catchment area rehabilitation and ecotourism development; (c) recharge wells; (d) fruit and cash crops planting; (e) energy saving stove; (f) cashew processing; (g) mangrove crab fattening; (h) virgin coconut oil (VCO); (i) fish aggregating device; (j) biogas; (k) organic fertilizer; (l) coconut shell charcoal briquette (CCB); (m) portable solar drier; (n) honey-bee culture; (o) king oyster mushroom; (p) straw mushroom; (q) vegetative propagation; (r) plastic waste handicraft; (s) fish chips home-industry; (t) conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas; (u) garbage Bank. In SE Sulawesi, we established 31 demo-plots in Buton District, 17 in Muna and 19 in Kolaka Districts. In S Sulawesi, we established 7 demo-plots in Maros, 36 in Wajo and 7 in Tana Toraja Districts. 1.4. The main target groups of awareness rising activities were community at (sub) village level. It was mainly conducted through: (a) FGD involving 10 – 15 KVC; (b) Installed posters at strategic sites; (c) distributed leaflet; (d) cross-visits to demo-plots and GLH; (e) film screening and interactive dialogs at sub-village level during the night using ‘My Darling’ (environmental awareness) car. During the course of the program in SE Sulawesi Province (60 months), there were 16.409 male, 10.160 female and 5.851 youth have become direct beneficiaries of our environmental awareness program at village and sub-district level. The level of women participation is 38 %. While during 6 months facilitation in S Sulawesi Province, there were 7.522 male and 5.395 female and 1.432 youth have become direct beneficiaries of our environmental awareness. The level of women participation is 42 %. 1.5. There were 397 green sub-projects disbursed in SE Sulawesi Province during 5 years (2008-2012). 158 or 40 % of them were the replication of our demo-plots/GLH. Among 8 sub-districts facilitation areas in SE Sulawesi Province, numbers of OWT demo-pilots replication into Green Block-grant sub-projects have been mostly occurred in Ladongi and Pasarwajo Sub-districts; where OWT operated field office in those sub-districts. The establishment of field office at sub-district level enabled us to provide intensive technical assistances and facilitations. We equipped our office with various demonstration pilots, such as tree nursery, mushroom cultivation and display of many awareness products. We also used the office as a Green-shop or Warung Lingkungan, which sell green products produced by farmers and also become show-windows for other farmers. The field office had become a rural community training centre, people gathering site, to discuss various environmental and livelihoods issues.   1.6. The green sub-projects in SE Sulawesi were dominated by tree planting. The most preference tree species for Buton and Muna Districts is Jati or teak (Tectona grandis). The areas which are dominated by limestone and marl substrates are highly suitable for the growth of teak forest plantation.  Teak is known in Munanese as Kuli Dava, meaning as timbers from Java Island. During 19th century, Dutch Government brought teak seeds and Javanese labours to cultivate teak in Muna and Buton Islands. Unfortunately, the wellknown Muna teak, having similar quality with Java teak, in which the forest plantation areas covers about 50% of the Island, has been logged during the last decade. Realizing the high price of teak timbers, now Muna and Buton people are keen to plant teak. Many rich people have invested the money by planting teak. The most preference tree species in Kolaka District is Jati Putih (white teak) or Gmelina arborea.  Agro-climatologically xvi

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speaking, Kolaka is more suitable for intensive agriculture compared to Buton and Muna. Kolaka has deep and fertile soil. The indigenous tribe in Kolaka (Tolaki) relies on their livelihoods on agroforestry development. In 1970s, many migrants from Bali and Java come to develop irrigated rice field on gentle and flat areas, after 1990s, many migrants from Bugis come to develop cacao plantation. Traditionally, people develop pepper based agroforestry, they plant Gamal (Gliricidae) intercropped with pepper.  We introduced Jati Putih to replace Gamal; compared with Gamal Jati Putih has better benefits:  (a) Jati Putih grows up faster than Gamal; (b) limited pruning required for Jati Putih compared to Gamal. Since 2009, Gmelina has become the new preference tree crops in PNPMGreen facilitation sub-districts in Kolaka.   1/7. The critical issues for tree planting is the presence of intensive maintenance, since 2010, we selected 5-6 villages on each sub-districts to receive tree planting maintenance. The tree planting maintenances were composed of the following: (a) facilitated replanting about 2 months after planting; (b) facilitated the making of organic fertilizer (Bokashi) and its application; (c) facilitated regular (every two months) weeding and soil tillage surrounding the planted trees. Such event is organized in association with regular village voluntary working day. This facilitation is important, since after hand-over meeting (MDST), limited PNPM-Green actors and facilitators who care the fate of Green investment. 2. Strategy, outputs, impacts and outcomes against performance indicators Our efforts and strategies to achieve each performance indicators to nurture and mainstream green development mindset to key development agents at village and (sub) district level within and beyond the pilot areas is summarized below.

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Summary of Strategy, Activities, Outputs, Impacts, Outcomes and Success Stories

Performance Indicator 1. Well-trained PNPM-Green facilitators and other local PNPM stakeholder

Strategy

Activities

Capacity building of GF was not only conducted through pre-service and refresher courses, but more importantly through day-to-day facilitation and technical assistances at field level.

Provided technical assistances, support social and political problem solving approaches through day-to-day facilitation at field level.

Outputs, Impacts, Outcomes and Success Stories Outputs: FKL had proper technical capacity and aware on site specific environmental issues and potential livelihoods development.

Performance Indicator

Strategy

Activities

2. Local community members (including women) who are aware of environmental issues and sustainable natural resource decisions

Facilitated community to map natural resources problems and potentials; serial NRM focus group discussion; facilitated learning by doing capacity building; intensive facilitation and technical assistances

• Facilitated the making of NRM maps: problems and potentials; • Organized FGD involving all community groups (including women) • Conducted learning by doing training and established demonstration pilots and Green Learning House/ GLHs • Enhanced environmental education for secondary schools • Conducted environmental awareness rising through various media (manuals, films etc.) and deliver through My Darling Cars.

Impacts: Establishment of sub-projects which were highly relevant with NR problems and potential of the village. Outcomes: Sustainability of Green funded sub-projects and level of self-funded adoption (replication) by rural community within and surrounding villages.

• Mangrove rehabilitation subproject in Buton and Wajo Districts • Planting Tectona grandis (Teak) sub-projects in Muna and Buton Districts (see Figure 3.1). • Planting Gmelina arborea (white teak) sub-projects in Kolaka (see Figure 3.1).

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Outputs: community had better visions on natural resources problems and potential; many local specific environmental management smart practices are available at village level (demoplots and GLH). Impacts: The established demo-plots and GLH have been replicated by villagers using Green block-grants. There are 158 green sub-projects which have replicated our demo-plots. Outcomes: Several key village champions (KVC) become trainers of their fellow villagers and enable to mainstream environmental management smart practices beyond original project sites. Success stories: • Biogas sub-projects in Tana Toraja District (Box 3.4) • CCB sub-projects in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts (Box 3.9). • Organic fertilizer sub-projects in all facilitation districts (2.d.11). • Women groups’ activities: Making garbage plastic handicraft (2d.18) and making fish chips cracker (2d.19)

Success stories:

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Outputs, Impacts, Outcomes and Success Stories

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Performance Indicator 3. Adoption by regional governments of natural resources governance issues as an integral part of the policy development and decision making process

Strategy

Activities

Inclusion of relevant stakeholders and relevant community development agents at village and (sub)district level on PNPM-Green planning, implementation and maintenances.

• Conducted socialization and coordination with relevant community development agents at village and (sub)-district level. • Facilitated monthly stakeholders meeting at district level • Involved all relevant community development agents at village and (sub)-district level to attend our trainings and technical assistances • Facilitated training on village governance on environmental management for village officials and Setrawan • Supported RPJM-Des training and facilitated the inclusion of environmental subprojects in the document. • Facilitated site visits of key government officials and parliaments on PNPM-Green smart practices.

4. A sustainable capacity among both [PNPM] facilitators and [PNPM] stakeholders of all levels to continue the implementation of locally driven ‘green’ development investment and to expand its geographic coverage to new are

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Mainstreamed PNPMGreen smart practices at local, regional and national level through various media and fora.

• Facilitated Perdes formulation to sustain PNPM-Green subprojects maintenance and benefit sharing mechanism • Facilitated maintenance of post sub-project completion (tree planting, solar photovoltaic etc.) • Promoted successful subprojects to be funded by other relevant projects (PNPM-Exit Strategy). • Facilitated the formulation of District Regulation (Perda) on NR protection (Muna and Wajo Districts).

Outputs, Impacts, Outcomes and Success Stories Outputs: Relevant stakeholder’s aware on PNPM-Green program and its benefits for regional development. Impacts: Established sense of ownership to the PNPM-Green sub-projects Outcomes: Local government replicated PNPM-Green smart practices with their own (APBD) funds. Success stories: • Ecotourism sub-project in Latugho Village, Lawa, Muna (Box 3.7) • CCB sub-projects in Balabone, Mawasangka, Buton (Box 3.8) • Organic fertilizer sub-projects in Dangia Village, Ladongi, Kolaka.

3. Lessons Learned During project implementation, we faced many challenges and the associated responses in the form of remedial actions. The challenges and Lessons Learned have been well documented on the OWT Quarterly Reports. In this report, we highlighted 18 out of 40 documented challenges and remedial actions. To have a detailed discussion on challenges and remedial actions the reader can read serial OWT Quarterly Reports which can be visited on www.owt.or.id. 3.1.

Environmental awareness should not only be targeted to grass-root but also the elites at village and (sub) districts level

3.2. Viability of green sub-projects are highly determined by the availability of local resources 3.3.

The success of tree planting sub-projects are sensitive to season

3.4.

The need to consider number of sub-project beneficiaries

3.5.

Democratic ranking of sub-projects proposals are not suitable for green program

3.6.

Avoid bidding for material procurement

3.7.

Optimize the use of green block-grant for action oriented activities

3.8.

Green block grant should not be perceived as ordinary village funding sources

3.9.

The need to empower community roles on budget plans

3.10. The need to improve tree planting sub-projects implementation Outputs: Some selected subprojects well-maintained Impacts: Well-maintained subprojects have started to deliver environmental services, such as: mangrove planting, solar photovoltaic, ecotourism, tree planting for catchment area rehabilitation etc. Outcomes: Local government adopted PNPM-Green approaches and smart practices to enrich their regional development strategy. Success stories: • Biogas sub-projects in Muna and Buton Districts (Box 3.4).

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3.11. The need to allocate considerable fund for tree planting sub-project maintenances 3.12. The need to define the tasks of PNPM-Green Management Team 3.13. The need to strengthen verification process of Green Sub-projects proposals 3.14. The need to link PNPM actors with the existing village institutions. 3.15. Enhancement of tree planting sub-project facilitation during integration with regular development planning 3.16. The need to strengthen solar photovoltaic sub-projects facilitations 3.17. The need to clarify benefit sharing mechanism of tree planting sub-projects 3.18. Efforts to avoid hard facilitation exit in South Sulawesi

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Chapter 1: Introduction 1.1. Background 1.1.1. PNPM-Green: It is a pilot-project which is designed in part to mainstream natural resource management and renewable energy issues within the core operations of the national PNPM-Rural program. On Sulawesi (North Sulawesi, South Sulawesi, West Sulawesi, and Southeast Sulawesi), PNPM-Green has been active since 2008, and in 2010, the pilot program expanded into four provinces on Sumatra (Aceh, North Sumatra, West Sumatra and Bengkulu). A key component of PNPM-Green – to which approximately USD 5.3 million has been allocated – is the technical assistance provided by Indonesian and international civil society organizations (CSO). The CSO partners are responsible for delivering environmental awareness raising and training activities to the pilot’s community beneficiaries and local government officials to assist in the design and implementation of viable ‘green sub-projects’. These sub-projects are financed through the PNPM-Green block grants and are focused in improved natural resource management (NRM) practices, environmentally-sound income generating activities (IGA), and renewable energy (RE). 1.1.2. Development Objective: It is that rural communities in target locations benefit from improved NRM practices and the use of RE technology. This objective is achieved through (i) mainstreaming NRM issues in the community-driven development planning process; (ii) increasing environmental awareness and related management capacity of communities and government stakeholders, and (iii) disbursing block grants to fund environmentally supportive ‘green’ projects at the kecamatan and kabupaten level. 1.1.3. Approach: Operationally, PNPM-Green followed the same mechanism as the national PNPM-Rural program, except the funding was dedicated for ‘green’ projects, and block grants were disbursed at sub-district (kecamatan) - as well as district (kabupaten)level1. These types of ‘green’ projects include, NRM such as mangrove rehabilitation, catchment area rehabilitation, RE schemes i.e. hydro power, solar panel and biomass power and service-based IGA such as developing small-scale enterprises. GOI-contracted facilitators/Green Facilitator/GF and World-Bank contracted CSOs worked together to build informed decisions community on how to best invest block grant funding. The socialization, environmental awareness rising, training, technical assistances provide by CSO and facilitation through PNPM-Green cycle conducted by GF and CSO were made to encourage participating communities to identify ‘green’, environmentally-sound solutions for enhancing their livelihoods. 1 PNPM-Rural’s core operational mechanism only disburses block grants at the sub-district level. PNPM-Green was also disbursed block grants at the district level in recognition that many NRM and RE projects extend beyond the borders of a single sub-district. Dr. Edi Purwanto

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1.1.4. Operation Wallacea Trust (OWT): It is a CSO has a Grant Agreement (GA) with the PNPM Support Facility (PSF) to conduct environmental awareness and training to local community and PNPM-Green actors and stakeholders at village and subdistrict level and mainstreaming sustainable development at district and province level in the Pilot PNPM-Green in South East (SE) Sulawesi Province (November 7, 2007 – October 31, 2012) and South (S) Sulawesi Province (March, 14 – October 31, 2012). Total grant agreed for this contract agreement was USD 1,446, 600.

outlines the achievements against given result indicators. The fourth part of the report discusses selected cases and lessons learned, while the fifth part provides general conclusions and recomendations. A set of appendices are attached.

1.1.5. OWT facilitation supports on PNPM-Green pilots in Sulawesi: Under TF-090977 provided full supports in two provinces in Sulawesi, i.e. SE Sulawesi (since November 2007 – October 2012) and S Sulawesi (since April – October 2012). Based on the fifth amendment of GA (14 March 2012), we received ‘Additional Grant’ of USD 296,950 until 31 October 2012. Considering that the effective start of S Sulawesi activities was two months delay, while we need to strengthen exit strategy in both provinces, in mid June 2012, we submitted revised work plan in Sulawesi along with revised budget and procurement plan to support our proposed no-cost extension until 31 December 2012. After passing several uncertainties, the no-cost extension was not able to be conducted. The main reason was that the planned closing date of the project (October 31, 2010) had already been extended for two years (October 31, 2012). 1.1.6. PNPM-Green facilitation sites in Sulawesi under TF-090977: SE Sulawesi: Muna, Buton and Kolaka Districts, which are composed of 9 sub-districts. Buton District: Pasarwajo, Sampolawa, and Mawasangka; Muna District: Tongkuno, Lawa, and Napabalano; Kolaka District: Ladongi, Lambandia2 and Watubangga. S Sulawesi: Maros, Wajo and Tana Toraja Districts, which are composed of 9 sub-districts. Maros District: Marusu, Tompobulu and Bontoa; Wajo District: Bola, Takkalalla and Tanasitolo; Tana Toraja District: Gandang Batu Sillanan (Gandasil); Sangala Selatan and Bonggakaradeng (Bongkar). 1.2.

Objective of the Report The report provides summary of OWT activities, strategies, achievements to support PNPM-Green in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces. The report documents approaches, strategies and lessons learned to empower community for NRM, IGA and RE subprojects at village level and the ways to mainstream the smart-practices at (sub) district and (sub)-national level.

1.3

Organization of the Report The completion report is composed of two parts: first is activity report; second is financial report. The Summary of Financial Report is presented on Appendix 6. The activity report (this report) composed of four parts. The first part discusses the changes of facilitation approaches and strategies during the implementation of the project and the underlined reasons behind the changes. The second part

2 In 2010, Kolaka district had changed one of PNPM-Green pilot sub-district from Baula Sub-District (2008-2010) to Lambandia sub-district (2011-2012).

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Figure 1.2. Maps of Sub-districts facilitation in S Sulawesi Provinces Figure 1.1. Maps of Sub-districts facilitation in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces

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Chapter 2: Dynamic Changes of OWT Facilitation Approaches: Searching the best fit of community empowerment for natural resource management 2.1. Introduction The Development Objective of PNPM-Green was to make utilization of natural resources by rural communities sustainable. To achieve the objectives, the program was facilitated by three actors, i.e. (a) Directorate General for Community and Village Empowerment (PMD) as implementing agency. To implement their duties, PMD was supported by National Management Consultants (NMC) and GF at province level (SPL/Environmental Specialist), district level (Astal/Assistant of Environmental Specialist) and sub-district level (FKL/Green Facilitator at sub-district level); they facilitated PNPM-Green cycle and disbursement of the Block-Grant (BLM); (b) PSF (Green Task Team); which administered donor funding, provided supports to overall project implementation and management, monitoring and evaluation; (c)CSOs which were originally designed as service provider for environmental awareness and training of PNPM-Green actors and stakeholders. The CSOs role as mentioned above had been interpreted in difference ways among CSOs supporting the program on three provinces in Sulawesi: i.e. WCS in North Sulawesi, CARE International in South Sulawesi and OWT in SE Sulawesi. Each CSO had specific approach to interpret their duties and originally (as it is a pilot program) PSF provided a free room for each CSO to define their own strategy. Our interpretation on the tasks apart from difference with others, were continuously adjusted along the course of the program to search the best fit of community empowerment for environmental management. This chapter summarizes the shifting facilitation strategies on each step of the pilot program implementation.

2.2. Phase 1: Period 2008 2.2.1. Condition: PNPM-Green (during 2008 known as Green-Kecamatan Development Program/G-KDP) was expected to run effectively on January 2008. The 2008 DIPA (Daftar Isian Pelaksanaan Anggaran/List of funded government program) had been ready, while CSO recruitment was completed in November 2007. The main problem was the delayed recruitment of consultant firm. The consultant was not recruited until November 2008 and only effectively worked early 2009. The absence of consultants (NMCand GF) led to uncertainties of the project implementation. The main guidance Dr. Edi Purwanto

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of the program implementation (PTO) was not ready during 2008, while the absence of GF had bottlenecked G-KDP cycle facilitation. Given the situation, all the jobs at grass-root level, training and awareness rising and G-KDP cycle facilitation, were handled by CSOs. 2.2.2. Facilitation Strategies: Our intervention strategy during the first year of the program is presented in Figure 2.1. This was composed of the following activities: (a) Organized inception workshop at province and district level; (b) Collected baseline data, i.e. field environmental observation, followed by a knowledge; attitude and practices (KAP) survey to understand the level of environmental awareness as a basis to design environmental awareness rising and training materials; (c) Facilitated participatory mapping of natural resource potential and environmental problems to identify list of possible environmental project development at village level (Penggalian gagasan/Pegas); (d) Delivered awareness rising during intervillage meetings (Musyawarah Antar Desa/MAD) and village meeting (Musyawarah Desa/MD), and facilitated Green sub-projects planning (MD Perencanaan). Due to uncertainty of the Green block-grant disbursement, our facilitation on G-KDP cycle during 2008 ended until MD-Perencanaan. Figure 2.1. Strategy to initiate G-KDP until MD Perencanaan (2008)

Box 2.1. Main activities from (November 2007-December 2008) November–December 2007: (a) Conduct reconnaissance environmental survey on the pilot (sub) districts; (b) Design Criteria for Green Sub-Project; (c) Designed KAP Survey Questioners and methodology

January–December 2008: (a) Conducted Inception Workshop for PNPM-Green at province level; (b) Conducted Socialization workshop for PNPM-Green at district level; (c) Conducted Knowledge Attitude and Practice (KAP) survey; (c) Conducted participatory survey to develop sub-district environmental profile; (d) Socialization of PNPM-Green at sub-district and village level; (e) Selected key village champions (KVC); (f) Developed environmental campaign films; (g) Conducted environmental awareness and training through PNPM-Green cycle; (h) Facilitated the whole process of PNPM cycle related to the PNPM-Green sub-project proposal development during the absence of GF; (i) Conducted Environmental Workshop at Sub-District level; (j) Participated the recruitment process of FKL; (k) Participated on the pre-service training for FKL; (l) Provided intensive technical assistances on the newly recruited FKL.

2.2.3. Staffing: During 2008, OWT did not work alone, but shared the facilitation activities together with two Kendari based NGOs. OWT was responsible on awareness and training activities at Buton District, while facilitation activities in Muna and Kolaka were delivered by local CSOs partner. Each participating CSO assigned five staff on each pilot district. One as district coordinator; one as admin at district level; each pilot sub-district was facilitated by one CSO facilitator. 2.2.4. Problem-1: It was hard to promote G-KDP during 2008, as the program was not officially launched until November 6, 2008; PTO was not available, while BLM and DOK disbursement were uncertain; the progress of environmental awareness and training as well as G-KDP facilitation cycle varied among three pilot districts. The degree of green activities facilitation was heavily dependence on Rural District KDP facilitators (Faskab). Some Faskab considered our facilitation illegal and they banned us to conduct awareness program, they were worried that the inclusion of G-KDP would impose their extra (uncompensated) workload or bother the KDP process. 2.2.5. Lessons-learned: All project components should be ready on the effective start of project implementation; the absence of particular component will affect to the overall program performances; The situation has been widely realized but often unavoidable on multi-stakeholders program, as the administration system and bureaucratic arrangement are often varied among components 2.2.6. Problem-2: Working with multi CSOs were uncomfortable, the underlined reasons were: (a) Each CSO has their own facilitation style and approaches which difficult to be synchronized as each CSO has their own house and freedom; (b) Each CSO has different capacity, experience and concerns which make difficult to synchronize

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efforts. Considering the problems, we did not extent the sub-contract with local CSOs partners and since 2009 onwards, we handled the authority of facilitation in three pilot districts. 2.2.7. Lessons-learned: The ideas to work with local CSOs were aimed to sustain the initiatives and a way to smooth-out exit strategy. This is not the case, as local CSOs are not always intensively active at grass-root level. They often domicile in towns rather than live in on the facilitation sites. Considering the problem, during 2009 and 2010, we do not work with local CSOs but with community based organization/CBO (especially farmer groups) and Key Village Champions (KVCs) networks.

2.3. Phase 2: Period 2009 2.3.1. Condition: The workload during fiscal year 2009 is doubled than the normal year. There were two years block-grants which have to be implemented during 2009. The first is 2008’s block-grant, where 40% of the fund should be disbursed before the end of April 2009, while the remaining fund (60%) in July 2009. This had to be added with the full implementation of 2009’s block-grant plus inter sub-districts (Lintas Kecamatan) block-grants for 2008 and 2009. 2.3.2. Facilitation Strategies: After FKL recruited and started working at grass-root level, we were ‘back to basics’, return to the core business as environmental awareness and training providers, while the whole facilitation activities were resorted to FKL. We focused to inspire local community on the potential green sub-projects through: (a) Intensive socialization on site specific ‘green-menu’ suitable on each village; (b) established demonstration trials; (c) facilitated inter-villages collaborative commitment to protect and or rehabilitate natural resources/ecosystem; (d) provided technical assistances to FKL and local communities. 2.3.3. Staffing: We reformed staffing format in response to the presence of FKL at subdistrict level; we did not place staff at sub-district level, but established a NRM Specialist Flying Team who delivered awareness, training, technical assistances and facilitation of villagers at village and sub-district level. 2.3.4. Formulation of NRM specialist team: Considering the strong local community need on technical aspect in mid 2009; we started to establish NRM technical specialist team. The underlined reasons of NRM technical specialist team were: (a) FKL had a diverse technical background and normally lack of NRM technical skills; (b) NRM is a wide range and multi-disciplinary specialist; (c) The project need experienced NRM specialist to convince villagers on the importance of NRM sub-projects. Since May 2009, we recruited 4 NRM specialists: (a) Tree improvement (2 persons); (b) soil and water conservation (two persons); (c) Agroforestry (one person); (d) Mangrove and fishery (two persons). The main tasks of specialist teams were: (a) developed awareness and training materials; (b) established demonstration trials; (c) 10

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delivered training, awareness, technical assistances and facilitation. Four specialists acted as flying team in nine sub-districts. The first product of the OWT’s NRM team was a ‘green-menu’ book, with contribution of others; the document was finally published by NMC (2010). 2.3.5. Problem-3: The effects of two years block grant disbursement in one fiscal year had been substantial on the performance of project implementation. To meet the disbursement dead-line, FKL had to speed up the PNPM-Green process, while ignoring the community driven development principles. This led FKL positions on project design were central and handled all the jobs which should be conducted by local communities (including budget planning/RAB). With the absence of price standard of goods and services, this may lead to moral hazard and in many cases waste precious resources. In many cases, RAB and the associated financial administration document (RPD/LPD1) were treated as secret documents to project beneficiaries. The lack of transparency and participation in defining RAB has driven to conflict among beneficiaries which deteriorate the spirit of sub-project ownership and the spirit of community empowerment. 2.3.6. Remedial actions: The above case dictated to the readjustment of our facilitation strategies at sub-district level. We reassigned staff at sub-district level as FKL counterpart. We called them as ’Korcam’ (OWT facilitator). The main tasks of Korcam were to: (a) support FKL to facilitate PNPM-Green cycle; (b) provide technical assistances to villagers on the overall project implementation, from developing green sub-project proposals until project implementation and maintenance; (c) establish and promote demonstration trials at village level. Korcams were selected and recruited from our key village champions (KVC) networks. Given that most FKL were outsiders, this approach can be considered as human capital investment at sub-district level. Local champions are made available to sustain and replicate PNPM-smart practices after the end of the program. We appointed 1 to 2 Korcams on each sub-district. One Korcam worked for 10 villages, if one sub-district is composed of more than 10 villages, then we assigned 2 Korcams in one sub-district.

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Table 2.1. Changes facilitation approaches for local community Box 2.2. Main activities from (January-December 2009)

Interventions

(a) Building capacity of GF at the ground level; (b) provided intensive technical assistances to GF, especially to accelerate the implementation of ‘Green’ sub-project (GS) 2008 and the facilitation process of GS 2009; (c) Developed awareness materials (documentary films, posters, brochures, green-menu); (d) Installed the wooden frame posters at strategic (public) areas; (e) Developed four training modules; (f) Conducted environmental awareness and training throughout PNPM-Green cycle at village and sub-district level to accelerate the implementation of GS 2008 and 2009; (g) Facilitated the establishment of potential GS demonstration pilots/demo-plots; (i) Inter-villages partnership on mangrove restoration; (ii) Inter-villages partnership on riparian restoration; (iii) Biogas; (iv) energy saving stove; (v) honey-bee culture; (vi) Coconut shell charcoal briquette/CCB; (vii) Bio-pores; (viii) recharge wells; (ix) waste separation; (x) Green manure; (h) Facilitated the development of community radio in Watubangga (Gunung Sari Radio) and Ladongi (Green Trust Radio); (i) Conducted Environmental Workshop at Sub-District level; (j) Campaign on village protection areas (Kawasan Perlindungan Desa).

1. Training

2. Awareness

Facilitation approaches during 2010

2007-

Facilitation approaches beyond 2010

Extensive, involving lot of Key Village Governent (KVG) and KVC (30 - 50 persons), no participants selection and not always followed by intensive facilitation and technical assistance.

Intensive, selected KVG and KVC (10-15 persons) and directly followed by intensive facilitation and technical assistance.

Only KVG and KVC of the pilot village and sub-district

Involved KVG and KVC of neighbouring pilot villages and sub-districts.

Not always involved local NGOs

Local NGOs were involved

Most awareness were delivered through PNPM cycle (MAD I, MAD II etc.)

Enrich with Focus Group Discussions (FGD) involved small numbers of relevant KVG and KVC. Special emphasis was given to women, children, youth and disadvantaged people.

2.4. Phase 3: Period 2010 2.4.1. Condition: Year 2010 is the first ‘normal’ condition out of three years project implementation. It was also the first year where the structural positions of PNPM-Green was completely fulfilled, i.e. SPL which was equal to ‘Korprov’ on Rural PNPM, Astal which was equal to ‘Faskab’. PNPM-Green also supported with Management Information System (MIS) Specialist and Financial Specialist at province level. In terms of personnel PNPM-Green had been similar with PNPMRural. This might be good for internal program management, but created sharp distinction between Green and Rural PNPM. 2.4.2. Main facilitation strategies: In this year, we focused our efforts to support FKL to intensify PNPM-Green cycle, improved communication at district and mainstreamed PNPM-Green at district and province level. To do so, we facilitated monthly coordination meeting among PNPM-Green actors and stakeholders at district level as a way to synergized efforts, we also facilitated relevant district agencies (SKPD) and parliament (DPRD) visit on PNPM-Green sub-projects. We also facilitated villagers on Village Mid-term Planning (RPJM Desa) formulation, provided environmental awareness rising to the formulation Team (Eleven Team), supported NRM data collection and ensure the inclusion of green sub-projects on this document.

Only KVG and KVC of the village and sub-district pilot

Involving KVG and KVC of villages from subdistricts of the neighbouring pilot areas.

Only conducted by OWT staff (especially during 2009 and 2010)

Delivered in collaboration with other local development agents (extension workers, NGO, CBO) at sub-district level

Focus on demonstration pilot areas

Replication of demonstration pilot areas

3. Facilitation and technical assistances on NRM and RE technology application

Introduction NRM and RE application

NRM and RE as alternative sources for income generating activities (IGA).

No small grant

Provided small grant on selected ‘NRM Groups’

Much efforts on the establishment of production unit but little market access facilitation

Emphasis on market access facilitation

4. Facilitation of village government and social institution on NRM plannin g,implementation and maintenance.

The target groups were PNPM-Green actors at village level such as TPU, TPK, KPMD, TP etc.

Special emphasis was given to village government (Village Head and BPD) and village social institution (LPM, women group, Karang Taruna).

Only KVG and KVC of the village pilot areas.

Involved KVG and KVC of villages from subdistricts of the neighbouring pilot areas.

Not always attended by local NGOs

Involved local NGOs

2.4.3. Problems and implication to the changing approaches: Based on internal (OWT) monitoring and evaluation conducted in March, 2010 and after having in-depth discussion on the project performance indicators with Mr. Jeremia (PSF) during July 2010, we found that we needed to change (enhance) our facilitation approaches to prepare exit-strategy and mainstream PNPM-Green smart practices beyond the original pilot sites. The paradigm changes of our facilitation are presented on the following tables. 12

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Table 2.2. Changes facilitation approaches for PNPM-Green Facilitators Intervention

Facilitation approaches during 2007-2010

Facilitation approaches beyond 2010

1. Training

Support regular refresher training organized by PMD

Enriched PMD’s regular refresher training with formal practical trainings and field technical assistances on NRM and RE technology application. Provided technical assistances, support social and political problem solving approaches through day-to-day facilitation at field level

2. Facilitate PNPMGreen cycle

3. Facilitate communication with district stakeholders

Only PNPM-Green facilitators

Involved all PNPM Rural facilitators

Supported Verification Process

Leading the Verification Process

Supported MAD II

Facilitated MAD II and III

Little involvement on the maintenance/ management Team (MT) formulation and technical assistance

Facilitated the formulation of MT, provided intensive technical assistance, facilitation, monitoring and evaluation

Facilitated regular monthly coordination meeting with district stakeholders

Intensified regular meeting (every three months) by involving district parliaments.

Table 2.3. Changes facilitation approaches to PNPM-Green Stakeholders Intervention

Facilitation approaches during 2007-2010

Facilitation approaches beyond 2010

1. Training and workshop

Training and workshop were inserted in the coordination meetings and workshops organized by government

Several trainings and workshops were initiated by OWT in collaboration with relevant stakeholders.

Only attended by government officials from pilot areas

Also involved parliaments and key government officials from outside pilot areas.

Most of training and workshop were conducted at district level.

Also conducted at province level.

2. Facilitate PNPM-Green monthly coordination meeting at pilot district

Only involved government officials from the pilot areas.

Also involved parliaments, head of sub-districts of the neighbouring pilot areas, NGOs and journalists.

3. Facilitate field visits to PNPM-Green smart practices sites.

Only involved government officials from the pilot areas.

Also involved parliaments, head of sub-districts (Camat) of the neighbouring pilot areas, NGO and journalists.

4. Facilitate adoption of PNPM-Green on the policy development and decision making process

Facilitations were only conducted at district pilots.

Also conducted outside district pilots.

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2.5. Phase 4: Period 2011

Box 2.3. Main activities from (January-December 2010)

2.5.1. Condition: OWT contract with the Bank was ended on October 31, 2010. Before the end of the first GA, on April 5, 2010 we requested for no-cost extension until October 31, 2011; however the Bank only agreed until April 30, 2011. From November 2010 April 2011, we implemented the no-cost extension facilitation activities. Using the changing paradigms of facilitation approaches as outlined above (Table 2.1-2.3), on March 14, 2011, we submitted Technical Proposal for Additional financing for 18 months extension for the period of May 1, 2011- October 31, 2012. The proposal was agreed by the Bank and used as a basis for the third amendment of the GA which was signed on April 28, 2011.

(a) Mainstreamed NRM issues at sub-district and district level; (b) Mainstreamed NRM issues to nonPNPM-Green facilitators/actors at province level; (c) Facilitated training and intensive facilitation on the development of RPJM-Desa; (d) Developed and installed 18 metal campaign boards on 9 sub-districts; (e) Installed environmental awareness materials at UPK Offices; (f) Facilitated the establishment of Smart Practices House (SPH) at Oengkolaki Village, Mawasangka (Buton), Kahulungaya Village, Pasarwajo (Buton), Gunung Sari Village, Watubangga (Kolaka); (g) Developed ten PNPMGreen films; (h) Facilitated fund raising on the GreenTrust Radio; (i) Facilitated the establishment of NRM smart-practices interest groups (CCB, honey bee culture, nursery, mangrove crab fattening etc.); (j) Facilitated inter-villages partnership for Village Protection Areas Mapping: (k) Improved coordination among PNPM-Green actors at district and sub-district level: (l) Improved Biogas Technology application; (m) Facilitated the adoption of PNPM-Green smart practices by Districts, Province government and business company (CSR): (n) Delivered vegetative and generative tree seedling propagation for PNPM-Green Facilitators, Camats and UPKs; (o) Organized PNPM-Green smart practices workshop for local NGOs in SE Sulawesi; (p) Improved the planning, implementation and maintenances of GS.

2.5.2. Main facilitation: We focused our facilitation to boost innovative environmentally sound appropriate technology (Teknologi Tepat Guna/TTG) suitable for PNPM-Green related to NRM and renewable energy (RE) as way to generate income activities. We also facilitated MAD III together with FKL. 2.5.3. Facilitated budget design during MAD III: The critical step between MAD-II and MAD-III was budget (RAB) design. As realized that the output of MAD-II is the rank of village proposal and target number of sub-project (e.g. land rehabilitation area in ha), while the detailed budget has not yet defined during that stage. As such, after MAD-II, PNPM-Green actors have to conduct price survey (e.g. the unit price of tree seedling2 etc.), as reference to count the exact amount of fund required of each sub-project. The budget making was used to be made by FKL with limited involvement of key PNPM actors. Such process was not only lack of transparency and participation, but also negated the need of PNPM actor capacity building on budget development. The poor participation of local development actors (such as KVG) leading to poor ownership of the project. We made use the ‘integration’ process to stimulate PNPM actors and stakeholders at village level on budget (RAB) making. This included the following process: (a) Together with Astal, FKL, KPMD and TPK to conduct price survey of raw materials; (b) ‘Village 2 It was not limited to tree planting sub-project, but all sub-projects, either related with tree planting or non tree planting sub-projects

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to village’ facilitation on sub-project budget making process together with FKL, TPK, KPMD, KVG and involved sub-project beneficiary’s candidates. The budget meetings held on Village Office whom KVG were involved. The latter involvement may be considered as positive improvement of community driven development approach. 2.5.4. Remedial actions (2012): Apart from the good progress, we also realized the weakness of PNPM-Green. In 2011 we found that most of investment (about 70%) of PNPM-Green was dominated by tree plantings, but the implementation of tree planting and spirit of maintenance were still poor. The issues were also found during World Bank Implementation Support Mission in November 2011. In response to the problem, we selected 5-6 villages receiving block-grant on tree planting for each sub-district to have intensive technical assistance and facilitation from us. This facilitation included: (a) Verification on the quality of tree seedlings; (b) Verification the number of planted tree seedlings to compare with Budget planning (RAB); (c) Facilitation of planting activities to ensure that every single tree seedling was planted properly according to its light demand, cropping pattern (open area or enrichment planting), physiographic of the planting sites (gentle or steep slope) etc. Box 2.4. Main activities from January-December 2011 (a) Organized PNPM-Green smart practices training for Setrawan; (b) Facilitated PNPM-Green Workshop for SKPD and district parliament; (c) Institutional capacity building of the established NRM smart practices interest groups; (d) Established permanent biogas demo-plots in Buton, Muna and Kolaka; (e) Delivered ToT on CCB and ‘Nata de Coco’ for women groups in Kolaka and Muna District; (f) Organized PNPM-Green reflection workshop in Muna and Kolaka Districts; (g) Facilitated the establishment of Environmental Shop (Warung Lingkungan); (i) Facilitated the development of village and women group enterprise on VCO, CCB and the making plastic waste handicraft; (j) Facilitated maintenance of 2010 tree planting sub-projects; (k) Maintained the productivity of Field Learning Houses and Smart Practices Demonstration Pilots; (l) Installed ballyhoo and banner to promote PNPM-Green during fasting time and celebration of independence day; (m) Provided training and technical assistance to ‘Gaharu’ (Muna) and ‘Alas’ (Kolaka) local NGO sub-contracted by OWT to support PNPM-Green awareness program: (n) Conducted price survey of planting material for 2011 planting sub-project; (o) Conducted survey on 25 biogas installation sites on 8 sub-districts to replicate biogas funded by Muna District Government; (p) Facilitated the development and promotion of liquid fertilizer out of biogas demonstration pilots (q) Conducted environmental awareness during fasting time; (r) Training to develop poultry feed using organic waste in Mawasangka, Sampolawa and Ladongi Sub-Districts; (l) Training to develop handicraft making (from banana stem and plastic waste) for women group in Napabalano.

held around fourth week of January 2012; (b) In response to the Bank request, we submitted technical proposal entitled: ‘Proposed Additional Financing to the Trust Fund for Kecamatan Development Program (KDP) in Sulawesi to support PNPMGreen in Maros, Wajo and Tana Toraja Districts’. After having some revisions, the proposal was finally accepted and used as a basis of the Fifth Amendment. Since 15 March 2012, we have started working in South Sulawesi Province. 2.6.2. Main facilitation in South Sulawesi Province: We replicated our interventions in SE Sulawesi Province within 6 months period. (a) Training and Awareness Needs Assessment: We started with rapid environmental assessment to understand specific natural resource and environmental condition of each kecamatan pilot; then followed with Kecamatan (sub-district) workshop. The first and the second steps were become a basis to design training, awareness, facilitation and technical assistance on each sub-district; (b) Mainstream PNPM-Green at village and (sub) district level: We supported GF to facilitate 2012 PNPM-Green process, especially establishment of demonstration trials, selection and training of verification team members, verification process, MAD (inter-village meeting) II and III and completed 2011 sub-project implementation; (c) Mainstream PNPM-Green beyond PNPMGreen original target areas: This was conducted by involving rural facilitators on training activities or district and province workshops. 2.6.3. Conducted film screening through ‘My Darling’ car: Since March 2012, in collaboration with local NGOs (Lestari in Buton, Gaharu in Muna and Alas in Kolaka), we have started to use awareness rising car for disseminating environmental issues on every village. The awareness rising methods: (a) During the day: coordination with key village governments and champions and announcement; (b) During the night (7 - 10 PM): (i) Socialization on PNPM-Green; (ii) Film Screening; (iii) Discussion by delivering list of questions related with films and PNPM-Green Program. The topics of film screening are arranged in line with the main potential resource and environmental problems of the village. To energize participants, we provided prizes for some actives participants (T-shirts and books, about USD 20 in total). Each film screening was normally attended by 100 – 150 people.

2.6. Phase 5: Period 2012 2.6.1. Condition: (a) It was the first year where PNPM-Green cycle enabled to follow regular development planning or usually called ‘integration’. Following the process, the village sub-project was selected from Village Annual Work-plan (RKP-Desa), as an annual break-down of the RPJM-Desa. Selection of Green sub-project at village level was conducted during Village Development Planning Meeting (Musrenbang Desa) 16

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Box 2.5. Main activities from January-October 2012 in SE Sulawesi Province (a) Conducted intensive facilitation for planting sub-projects implementation and maintenance of 5 villages per Pilot Kecamatan; (b) Facilitated socialization of Village Regulations to sustain PNPM-Green-investments; (c) As a followup of car procurement (8 March 2012), since mid March, we had started operating ‘Awareness Car’ to mainstream PNPM-Green smart practices at (sub) village level; (d) Facilitated the organization of Workshop Kecamatan to reflect the implementation of PNPM-Green (2008 – 2011) and prepared for 2012; (e) Advocated the inclusion of Green investment on each step of Development Planning Forum (Musrenbang), from Village, Kecamatan until District level; (f) Facilitated marketing of CCB and VCO in Buton; (g) Prepared, published and distributed ‘Lestari Desaku’ Magazine; (h) Assisted Danida to develop Manual and booklets on NRM; (i) Assisted Danida to prepare ‘Tour De Java for NRM Champions: A Travelling Training Event’; (j) inspired and trained local communities with new relevant appropriate technologies (TTG) to enhance NRM and IGA; (k) prepared and printed final revision of training manual on catchment area rehabilitation and protection; (l) prepared exit-strategy on the maintenance and development of PNPM-Green investment; (m) strengthened community institution (Village Regulation; business development and marketing); (n) Provided technical assistance on the replication of biogas initiated by District Government Fund in Muna and Buton; (m) prepared exit-strategy on the maintenance and development of PNPM-Green investment in SE Sulawesi; (i) strengthened community institution (Village Regulation; business development and marketing); (ii) enhanced sense of ownership of key development agents, i.e. extension workers, key village government/KVG and key village champions/KVC etc. at village and (sub) district level; (iii) enhanced sense of ownership of politicians (DPRD) and government on PNPM-Green investment.

such as allocating District budget fund (APBD) to support green initiatives, as the case for Tana Toraja District; unfortunately our facilitation should be terminated. Our presence was indeed quite short, but seemed to be precious for them. The three districts governments had expected us to extent our facilitation, while as a matter of fact, our facilitations in several areas or target groups had not yet been completed. To avoid hard exit of our facilitation, we still maintain our presence in three districts in South Sulawesi Province by maintaining the services of our key local staff (using our own funding) until 30 June, 2013.

Box 2.6. Main activities from May-October 2012 in S Sulawesi Province (a) Staff recruitments; (b) Training of  District Coordinators and field staff; (c) Surveyed potential resources, problems and proposed facilitations of every village on the Pilot Kecamatan; (d) Identified natural resource potential and problem on every sub-district; (e) Organized district and kecamatan workshops and call for collaborative supports and discussed problems and solutions of PNPM-Green implementation; (f) Installed ballyhoo to promote PNPM-Green at sub-district level; (g) Mainstreamed PNPM-Green at grass-root level through film screening and interactive dialogs at sub-village level during the night using ‘My Darling’ car; (h) ‘Village to village’ facilitation on sub-project budget making process involving all key village actors and sub-project beneficiaries; (i) Conducted intensive facilitation for planting sub-projects implementation and maintenance of 5 villages per Pilot Kecamatan (45 villages); (h) Provided technical assistances on biogas installation; (i) Facilitated the establishment of income generating activities for women groups; (i) making fish crackers, Bontoa, Maros; (ii) Mangrove fat fattening, Bontoa, Maros; (iii) mangrove nursery, ‘Bokko Lestari’, Bontoa, Maros; (j) Facilitated tree planting (Sukun/Arthocarpus communis) campaigns in Bontoa, Maros (1000 tree seedling planted); (k) Youth environmental campaigns on secondary schools students in Wajo and Tana Toraja; (l) Refresher training on the procedure and formulation of Village Regulation; (m) Conducted faith based environmental awareness during Ramadan (Moslem fasting time); (n) Mainstreamed PNPM-Green at grass-root level through film screening and interactive dialogs at sub-village level during the night using ‘My Darling’ car; (o) Distributed framed posters and Lestari Desaku Magazines (p) Facilitated Danida support on the establishment of organic fertilizer village enterprise; (q) Promote PNPM-Green beyond the pilots and province level.

2.6.4. Remedial actions in South Sulawesi Province: It is different with SE Sulawesi

Province; our presence in South Sulawesi Province was indeed very short, we had only completed 6 out of 8 month’s work-plan (due to the two months delay start while no-cost extension was not possible). Three districts governments (Maros, Wajo and Tana Toraja) were surprised with our short facilitation. ‘Yesterday, we welcome you and now have to say good-bye to you’ told the Head of BPMD Tana Toraja and Wajo Districts. They had just been aware and started putting great attention with our green initiatives and prepared more intensive engagement; 18

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Chapter 3: Strategies and Achievements: Outputs, Outcomes and Success Stories 3.1. Introduction PNPM-Green set four performance indicators: (a) Well-trained PNPM-Green facilitators and other local PNPM stakeholders, who can ignite and facilitate ‘green’ projects within PNPM, not limited to those within PNPM-Green target locations; (b) Local community members (including women) who are aware of environmental issues and sustainable natural resource decisions that they can participate in; (c) Adoption by regional governments of natural resources governance issues as an integral part of the policy development and decision making process; (d) A sustainable capacity among both (PNPM) facilitators and (PNPM) stakeholders of all levels to continue the implementation of locally driven ‘green’ development investment and to expand its geographic coverage to new areas. To comply with the given performance indicators, we provided supports to the program in the form of: (a) environmental training; (b) environmental awareness; (c) establishment of demo-pilots; (d) facilitation (pendampingan) and (e) technical assistances. This chapter summarizes our main efforts and strategies to achieve each performance indicators, it is also aimed to document our key approaches to nurture and mainstream green development mindset to key development agents at village and (sub) district level within and beyond the pilot areas. The overall discussions are summarized in Table 3.9. & Chapter 5. 3.2. Performance Indicator 1: Well-trained PNPM-Green facilitators and other local PNPM stakeholders, who can ignite and facilitate ‘green’ projects within PNPM, not limited to those within PNPM-Green Target locations. 3.2.1. Result Indicator 1: Increased capacity of GOI-contracted consultants/facilitators to promote viable ‘green sub-project’ proposals (within and outside Green PNPM target locations). 1a. Supported GF recruitment, GF pre-service training design and delivery : We took part on GF selection process in SE Sulawesi, developed NRM pre-service training design and materials and hold responsibility on NRM training delivery during GF preservice training. It was held in Celebes Indah Hotel, Makassar from 24 - 28 November 2008. We delivered the following subjects: (a) NRM strategies in upland and lowland

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ecosystem; (b) Watershed Management; (c) Agroforestry; (d) Village Business development for NR restoration; (e) Restoration of mangrove and coastal ecosystem. The training was attended by 33 participants, 22 male and 11 female. 1b. Delivered NRM training to GF during annual refresher training: To update knowledge and skills, provide technical advices in response to challenges and problems faced by GF, PNPM-Green provided regular refresher training to GF. The training was organized by PMD/NMC, while our role was to provide training materials and its delivery. We supported the refresher training in 2009 (Makassar, 16-22 January 2009), 2010 (Toraja Utara, 26-30 July 2010) and 2011 (Malino, 3-10 October 2011 and Medan (22-28 September 2011). 1c. Partnered with Danida to develop NRM Manual and Booklets and delivered training to Setrawan and FKL: Since November 2011, we worked together with Danida Consultant (Frans Harum) and Danida Advisor (Soren Moestrup) to develop NRM manual and booklets for Setrawan (government official facilitators). We gave a big contribution on manual and booklet development. We supported training implementation and delivered four subjects: (a) Catchment Area Management; (b) Selection of Tree Species, and (c) Tree planting and Maintenance. The training held in Manado (Aryaduta, 4-8 June 2012; attended by 15 GF and 14 Setrawan) and Makassar (Horizon, 11-15 June, 15 GF and 15 Setrawan). Box 3.1. NRM Capacity Building Strategy for Green Facilitators

Community empowerment on NRM is complex and challenging. Each village has specific conditions in terms of: (a) natural resources potential and their degradation status; (b) community access on natural resources (forest, land and water); (c) community social capital. Given the complexity of natural and social problems and its inter-dependency and relationships; Capacity building of GF is not sufficiently fed through formal training, but day-to-day technical assistances and support social and political problem solving approaches at field level. To do so, we assigned one or two local staff (Korcam) who lives in at the pilot sub-district. The roles of our Korcam were to: (a) provide site specific NRM technical assistances relevant with village’s natural resource potential and problems; (b) support GF to organize the whole PNPM-Green cycle, from MAD-1 to MAD-III; (c) provide intensive technical assistances on Green sub-projects implementation and maintenances.

1.d. Enhanced GF technical capacity on vegetative and generative propagation, catchment area rehabilitation and solar photovoltaic: To enhance GF knowledge and skills on special NRM subjects, apart from provided intensive technical training/assistance to individual GF facilitator in the field (see Box 3.1), we also organized formal technical training. We organized three trainings: (a) Generative and vegetative propagation of tree seedlings (BauBau, 9-12 November 2010); (b) Catchment Area Management and Planning (Aden Hotel, Kendari, 26-27 July 2011) (c) Solar photovoltaic (Aden Hotel, Kendari, 22 April 2011). 3.3 Performance Indicator 2 : Local community members (including women) who are aware of environmental issues and sustainable natural resource decisions that they can participate in. 22

Dr. Edi Purwanto

3.3.1. Result Indicator 2a: Increase in amount and quality of environmental information, education, and communication (IEC) material available to PNPM stakeholders. We invested considerable resources to develop, print, distribute and install IEC. There were 14 IEC types developed during project period; the summary of IEC is presented on Table 3.1 and Appendix 2. To promote and mainstream PNPM-Green and green activities to wide audience at national level, we published Green Nationalism (Nasionalisme Lingkungan) Book and three editions of ‘Lestari Desaku’ Magazine; i.e. first edition in March 2012, second edition in September 2012 and third edition in October 2012. We sustain the publication of Lestari Desaku magazine after the end of the program. Table 3.1. Summary of published IEC materials No

Type

No. of Titles

No. of Copies/units

Targeted audiences

1.

Training modules

25

2000

GF, Setrawan, KVC

2.

Training manuals

7

7000

GF, Setrawan, KVC

3.

Green Nationalism Book

1

2000

Public

4.

‘Lestari Desaku’ Magazine

3

9000

Public

5.

Environmental Awareness DVD Film

26

9000

GF, S, KVC. GO, CSO, CBO

6.

Radio Broadcast

4 advertisement 1 program

-

villagers

7.

Posters

10

16000

villagers

8.

Ballyhoo

4

47

villagers

9.

Leaflets

15

40

villagers

10

Banners

8

120

villagers

11

Iron Campaign Boards

9

34

villagers

12

Stickers

7

5000

villagers

13

T-Shirts

2

3000

Project beneficiaries

14

Hats

1

1500

Project beneficiaries

3.3.2. Result Indicator 2b: Women are actively engaged in the selection, planning, and implementation of sub-projects funded by PNPM-Green 2b.1. Stimulated women involvement on green decision making process: We stimulated women participation on NRM decision making process through: (a) Organized Focused Group Discussion (FGD) during PKK (women group association) and Majelis Taklim (Moslem women religious discussion) meetings; (b) Facilitated women groups to develop sustainable income generating activities, See Table 3.2. The impacts of awareness rising have increased women attendance/involvement on the green training and PNPM-Green cycle.

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Table 3.3. Environmental education on secondary schools in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces

Table 3.2. Women based income generating activities in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces Group name

Village, Sub-district

Productive Activities

Members

Buton

Muna

Kolaka

Wajo

SMAN I Pasarwajo SMAN I Mawasangka SMPN I Pasarwajo SMPN I Mawasangka

SMAN I Tongkuno SMAN I Lawa SMAN I Napabalano SMPN I Tongkuno SMPN I Lawa

SMAN I Ladongi SMKN 1 Ladongi SMK 1 Lambandia SMP 1 Lambandia Madrasah Aliyah Ladongi SMAN 1 Watubangga SMKN 1 Watubangga

SMAN II Sengkang SMAN III Sengkang SMAN I Bola

South Sulawesi 1. Bakko Lestari

Ampekale, Bontoa

Fish chip home industry, Mangrove rehabilitation. Mangrove crab fattening, children Library

20

2. Loro Lestari

Botolempangan, Bontoa

Plastic waste handicraft

18

3. Mekar

Nepo, Tanasitolo

Plastic waste handicraft; Glass wall (brick) made of waste bottles

22

3.3.3. Result Indicator 2c: Increase in NRM training opportunities available to local community members (including women)

South-east Sulawesi 1. Rewu Lestari

Saragih, Pasarwajo

Plastic waste handicraft

16

2. Buah Lestari

Kahulungaya, Pasarwajo

Vegetative propagation

25

3. Parawata Lestari

Warinta, Pasarwajo

Bamboo and rattan handicraft

18

4. Gusi-Gusi

Waangu Wangu, Pasarwajo

Mahoni tree nursery

22

5. Nentu Lestari

Tompobulu, Sampolawa

Nentu handicraft

12

6. Kaluku Lestari

Oengkolaki, Mawasangka

Virgin Coconut Oil, Warling

14

7. Sepatudhu

Napabalano, Napabalano

Plastic waste handicraft

8. Maju Jaya

Lalemba, Lawa

Cashew nut processing and packaging

16

9. Jati Makmur

Lalemba, Lawa, Muna

Teak nursery, Warling

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Box 3.2. NRM Capacity Building Strategy for Rural Community

2b.2. Enhanced environmental education on secondary schools: We built a formal cooperation with District Education Agency on pilot districts to support environmental education on the selected secondary schools. Our target groups were students and teachers. Our interventions: (a) trained key teachers on green smart practices and supported the development of local content curriculum on environmental education; (b) run environmental education together with key teachers; (c) Stimulated teachers and students to conduct conservation actions within school areas and support catchment areas planting outside school areas. There were three types of in-school green campaigns: (a) ‘Gemes’ (Gerakan Memilah Sampah/school waste separation within school areas); we granted several rubbish separation bins; (b) ‘Garbage Bank’; school environmental education which aims at stimulating students to care with garbage in term of collection, separation, garbage gathering and selling; the income generating from selling garbage is returned to students; (c) ‘Samu Sapo’ (Satu Murid Satu Pohon/one student one tree);we provided seedlings or nursery development facilitation for tree planting campaigns within school yard/garden or on degraded land nearby school. Our assistances on environmental education program in SMAN II Sengkang (Wajo) had brought the school to win ‘Adiwiyata’ (environmental education) award from the Ministry of Environment.

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Community capacity building on NRM were conducted through several approaches: (a) organized learning by doing training; (b) facilitated the establishment of demo-pilots (demo-plots); (c) facilitated Green Learning Houses/GLH (Rumah Pembelajaran); (d) Organized cross-visits among PNPM-Green actors and KVC. The list of NRM training is presented on Table Appendix 3a-c.

Dr. Edi Purwanto

The Knowledge Attitudes and Practices (KAP) Survey (2008) found that local community badly-need NRM technical skill as none of the existing rural development agents had specific tasks on NRM capacity building. Refer to the findings and based on our experience to organize community training, all community training were designed on the basis of ‘learning by doing’ (emphasis on practical work) principle. Trainings were not conducted in the class but directly doing the jobs on the field (of course with short introduction about the work); each training focussed on one topic, such as biogas installation, generative propagation, vegetative propagation etc. This type of training required well and comprehensive field preparation. Before training implementation, we facilitated KPMD/TPK and/or local community to prepare materials, equipment and basic infrastructures relevant to the training topics. When the training is dealing on nursery, they have to prepare germination bed, poly-bags, organic fertilizer, seeds and seedlings etc. If the training is about biogas installation, we facilitated them to prepare all materials, equipment and site-plan of biogas installation. Before doing practical work, we used to discuss the background and benefits of the training topic, this session were frequently supported with film screening. The trainers could be OWT facilitator, local champions, extension workers or other relevant agents. To ensure the adoption of local community on the introduced smart practices, we followed the training with intensive field facilitation and technical assistances.  Efforts were also made to establish a life example in the form of ‘demonstration pilots’ (demo-plots/demo-plots) or Green Learning House/ GLH. The criteria for demo-plots selection were; (a) the existence of strong KVC and high interest farmer (community) group; (b) the introduced smart practices or technique were relevant with community needs; (c) the demo-plot/GLH sites were highly accessible; (d) The main beneficiaries were poor households. Either demo-plots or GLH were aimed to enhance the existing initiative (for instance: improved their existing nursery) or introduce new technologies (for instance: facilitated biogas installation). Both demo-plots and GLH were used for PNPM-Green actors and community learning sites.

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3.3.4. Result Indicator 2d: Increase in community awareness of links between improved NRM practices and enhanced livelihood The main target group of awareness rising activities were community at (sub) village level. It was mainly conducted through: (a) FGD involving 10 – 15 KVC; (b) Installed posters at strategic sites (UPK, village halls, KCV houses etc.); (c) distributed leaflet; (d) cross-visits to demo-plots and GLH; (e) film screening and interactive dialogs at subvillage level during the night using ‘My Darling’ (environmental awareness) car; We believed that sustainable environmental initiatives can only be achieved when enable to open new opportunities to local community livelihoods. NRM and RE initiatives will only be sustainable if they can enhance IGA or reduce poor household expenditure. Accordingly, we inspired and facilitated local community to develop innovative sub-projects which do not only benefit for environment but also supported site-specific livelihoods development. The list of demo-plots developed during project implementation is discussed below. 2d.1. Mangrove Planting/Rehabilitation Mangrove degradation in Sulawesi is mainly caused by rapid conversion to extensive and intensive fish-pond areas. The peak of degradation occurred during the end of 1990’s, driven by the sharp rising of shrimp price until 4 times. During the time, large areas of fish pond in Sulawesi were established at the expense of mangrove forest. The absence of mangrove forest as the source of detritus (nutrient) in the ecosystem has declined the productivity of fish ponds in many areas. We conducted intensive campaigns on degraded mangrove pilot areas, i.e. Pasarwajo, Mawasangka (Buton), Napabalano (Muna), Watubangga (Kolaka) and Bontoa (Maros). Our awareness tools were: (a) Posters; (b) Film: ‘The guardian of Archipelago’ (‘Menjaga Pagar Nusantara’); (c) demo- plots. We facilitated the establishment of inter-villages commitment as a way to stimulate people to conserve and rehabilitate mangrove. See Box 3.3. Demo-plots: (a) Mawasangka/2008 (Mawasangka, Buton); (b) Lamundre/2009 (Watubangga)/2009; (c) Ampekale 2012 (Bontoa, Maros). Impacts on green sub-projects: All villages in Mawasangka/Buton (Mawasangka, Oengkolaki, Banga, Tanailandu, Kanapanapa, and Terapung), Kondowa (Pasarwajo, Buton), Napabalano/Muna (Tampo, Renda and Bahari) spent 2008 Green block-grant for mangrove rehabilitation; Wawoangi/2009 (Sampolawa, Buton), Kambikuno, Renda, Bahari, Wangkulabu/2010 (Napabalano, Muna). Figure 3.1. Mangrove rehabilitation sub-project in Pasir Putih, Bola Wajo

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Box 3.3. Success-Story: Inter-villages comittment to rehabilitate mangrove, Mawasangka, Buton Environmental awareness often does not give significant effect unless it is followed-up with actions facilitation. As such, after completed serial awareness rising in 6 mangrove villages in Mawasangka Sub-District, we facilitated mangrove rehabilitation actions on selected site which aimed as demo-plot. The demo-plot area was 2 ha and located in Mawasangka Village. Reasons to select the site as demo-plots were: (a) good exposure; (b) the present of KVC; (c) the land is highly suitable for mangrove planting and (d) proximity with mangrove nursery. The planting campaigns (March 24, 2009) held in the morning and involved KVG and KVC at sub-district level. After lunch, we facilitated meeting to develop inter-village commitment for mangrove protection and rehabilitation at sub-district level. The meeting was attended by 35 persons; composed of KVG, KVC and PNPM actors of 6 mangrove villages. At the end of the day the document of inter-village commitment was formulated and signed by KVG and KVC of 6 mangrove village representatives.

2d.2. Catchment area rehabilitation and ecotourism development The geology of Buton and Muna Districts are dominated by limestone where surface water is limited and community rely the fresh water from the springs. Most of catchment areas have been degraded while the environmental conditions around the spring waters were poor; there were no separations between clean and dirty water and no specific facilities for bathing and garbage bins. On the other hand, while water resources in Kolaka District are plenty; the area experienced rapid deforestation at the expense of cacao plantation, as such catchment area rehabilitation is also required. Our awareness tools, activities and strategies included: (a) Posters; (b) Film screening: ‘The giant sponge of Indonesia’ (‘Karet Busa Raksasa Indonesia’); (c) demo-plot. We also facilitated the establishment of inter-villages commitment to protect spring water, riparian ecosystem and land rehabilitation. Land rehabilitation demo-plots: (a) Wasilomata II/2009 (Mawasangka); Warinta/2009 (Pasarwajo), Danagoa /2009 (Tongkuno); Raraa/2009 (Ladongi). Ecotourism demo-plot: Waste management on Awainulu spring water/2009 (Pasarwajo). Impacts on catchment rehabilitation green sub-projects: Wasaga/2008; Laburunci, Kambula-mbulana/2009; Laburunci, Awainulu/2010; Wagola, Kahulungaya, Holimombo Jaya/2011 (Pasarwajo); Gumanano, Kancebungi/2012 (Mawasangka); Labasa and Danagoa/2009 (Tongkuno), Tangkumaho/2009 and Lambiku/2010 (Napabalano); Lambiku, Langkumapo, Napalakura and Pentiro/2011 and 2012 (Napabalano); Ladongi, Lalowosula, Atula/2009 (Ladongi); Sumber Rejeki/2010 (Watubangga); Baula and Watalara/2010 (Baula); Lalowosula, Wungguloko, Welala, Atula, Raraa and Ladongi Jaya/2010 (Ladongi); Peoho/2011 (Watubangga), Pekorea/2011 (Lambandia); Anggalosi, Ladongi Jaya, Dangia, Lalowosula/2011 (Ladongi); Lalowosula/2012 (Ladongi).

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Impacts on ecotourism green sub-projects: Lamorende/2008 (Tongkuno), Lagadi, Latugho/2009 (Lawa); Awainulu/2010, Kaongke-ongkea/2011 (Pasarwajo), Gumanano/2009 (Mawasangka), Gunung Sejuk/2010 (Sampolawa).

Demo-plots: Kahulungaya/2008, Warinta/2009 (Buton); SMA-II Sengkang/2012 (Wajo). Impacts on green sub-projects: Kahulungaya/2008 (Pasarwajo), Sandang Pangan and Hendea/2008 (Sampolawa), Watolo/2009 and 2010 (Mawasangka), Saragi/2010 (Pasarwajo), Wasaga/2011 (Pasarwajo), Lipumangau/2011 (Sampolawa). 2d.4. Fruit and cash crops planting Buton and Muna Islands produced limited fruits. In 1980’s, Pak Alala (SE Sulawesi Governor) run Gersamata (Gerakan Desa Makmur Merata, Government program to empower rural community livelihoods); the program stimulated local community to plant cash-crop (cacao, clove, cashew and peppers) and fruits (rambutan) on arable land. The impacts of the program have been significant for rural community livelihoods in SE Sulawesi. Muna and Buton has become the major producer of cashews in Sulawesi while Kolaka is the major producer of cacao and pepper. Apart from cashews, Muna and Buton are lack of fruit and cash crop. Accordingly, we stimulated local community to plant fruits and cash crops.

Figure 3.2. Ecotourism sub-project in Latugho Village, Lawa; the situation before (left) and after (right)

2d.3. Recharge wells

GLH: Pala (Myristica fragrans) nursery Pak La Ode Wero (Kancinaa, Pasarwajo);, Kemiri/ Aleurites Moluccana nursery Pak Zakaria (Kahulungaya, Pasarwajo), Mahoni nursery Pak Lahuma (Waangu Wangu, Pasarwajo); Rambutan and orange plantation Pak Sukarno (Lasembangi, Lasalimu Selatan).

Recharge or infiltration wells (sumur resapan) aimed to enhance infiltration and reduce surface runoff. It is a simple water conservation measures suitable for high coefficient runoff areas, i.e. settlement areas. The correct installation sites will effectively reduce flood hazards and increase groundwater table. To enhance the ownership and effective uses of the recharge well, we added water tank as a rain-water harvesting (see Photo). The rainwater from the house roof fill-up the water tank first before the overflow infiltrate on the recharge well. Figure 3.3. Recharge well demo-plot in SMA II Sengkang, Wajo

Figure 3.4. Orange planting demo-plot in Warinta Village, Pasarwajo

Impacts on green sub-projects: Wasaga, Warinta, Lapodi, Kombeli, Kancinaa, Wakaokili, Awainulu/2008, Waangu-angu, Takimpo/2012 (Pasarwajo); Lailangga, Lakanaha, Lindo, Watumela and Wakontu/2008, Madampi, Wamelai, Kampani/2009, Lagadi/2012 (Lawa); Kontumolepe,

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Lakologou, Lahontohe, Lamorende, Tombula/2011 (Tongkuno), Lambiku, Napalakura/2011 (Napabalano); Todombulu/2009 (Sampolawa); Sandang Pangan/2012 (Sampolawa); Kanapa-napa/2012 (Mawasangka); Bou, Pomburea, Inotu, Atolano/2012 (Lambandia). Table 3.4. List of Green Learning Houses (Rumah Pembelajaran) in SE Sulawesi Name of KVC

Learning activities

Sites

1. Pak Lasamira

Biogas, green-shop (Warung Lingkungan), cashew nursery

Oengkolaki, Mawasangka

2. Bu Erwina

VCO

Oengkolaki, Mawasangka

3. Pak Ladodi

Tree nursery, green library

Gunung Sejuk, Sampolawa

4. Pak Lahuma

Mahoni and Rambutan nursery

Waangu Wangu, Pasarwajo

5. Pak Zakaria

Fruit trees vegetative propagation, organic fertilizer, coconut plantation

Kahulungaya, Pasarwajo

6. Pak La Ode Wero

Myristica fragans (Pala) nursery

7. Pak Sukarno

Name of KVC

Learning activities

Sites

12. Pak Suprayitno

Biogas

Lambandia, Lambandia

13. Pak Made Tinggal Karyasa

Tree nursery, organic fertilizer, biogas, ‘Gunung Sari’ community Radio

Gunung Sari, Watubangga

Table 3.5. List of Green Learning Houses (Rumah Pembelajaran) in S Sulawesi

Buton Learning activities

Sites

Pak Mansyur

Jabon tree nursery

Tompobulu, Maros

Bu Darmiah

Plastic waste handicraft

Botolempangan, Botoa

Bu Siti Hawang

fish chips home industry

Ampekale, Bontoa

Pak Taba

Organic fertilizer

Bontoa, Bontoa

Kancinaa, Pasarwajo

Pak Abdul Jalil

Nursery

Tompobulu

Orange nursery and plantation

Lasembangi, Lasalimu Selatan

Wajo

8. Ibu Salamah

Plastic waste handicraft

Saragih, Pasarwajo

Pak Sidarwan

Inalipule, Tanasitolo, Wajo

9. Pak Laboce

Biogas

Kabakole, Pasarwajo

Liquid organic fertilizer, conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas, sugar cane processing.

Pak Andi Monjong

Biogas, Liquid organic fertilizer, conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas

Parigi, Takallala, Wajo

Pak Hasan

Biogas, Liquid organic fertilizer, conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas

Sanrengseng Ade, Bola, Wajo

Bu Dina

Plastic waste handicraft

Tanasitolo

Ne’ Togen

Biogas

Benteng Ambeso, Gandasil

Ne’ Sitti

Biogas

Pemanukan Gandasil,

Pong Edi

Biogas

Buakayu, Bonggakaradeng

Pong Semu

Biogas

Poton, Bonggakaradeng

Maros

Muna 1. Pak Zainuddin

Biogas, biogas slurry as liquid organic fertilizer, vegetable planting

Lahontohe, Tongkuno

2. Bu Nadia

Teak nursery, organic fertilizer, green-shop

Lalemba, Lawa

3. Pak Tairan

Teak nursery, honey bee culture

Napalakura, Napabalano

4. Pak Alexander

Plastic waste handicraft

Napabalano, Napabalano,

5. Pak La Ode Sipu

Organic fertilizer

Pentiro, Napabalano

1. Pak Dewa

Biogas, hatchery, organic poultry, livestock fodder

Gunung Jaya, Ladongi

2. Pak Kusuma

Straw mushroom cultivation

Atula, Ladongi

3. Pak Suganda

Tree nursery, oyster mushroom cultivation, ‘Green Trust’ Radio

Welala, Ladongi

4. Pak Abas

Tree nursery

Raraa, Ladongi

5. Pak Sudariana

Tree nursery

Atula, Ladongi

6. Pak Jufri

Organic fertilizer

Dangia, Ladongi

7. Pak Amir

Water purification

Wungguloko, Ladongi

8. Pak Hadise

Land rehabilitation

Raraa, Ladongi

9. Pak M.Arief

Tree nursery

Mokupa, Lambandia

10. Pak Hamid

Tree nursery

Tinete, Lambandia

11. Pak Tambrin

Tree nursery

Lambandia, Lambandia

Kolaka

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Name of KVC

Tana Toraja

2d.5. Energy saving stove

Dr. Edi Purwanto

In response to the high consumption of rural communities on firewood at the expense of forest resource degradation, many foundations and NGOs has started to initiate the use of energy saving stove. In Java, the initiation has already started since three decades ago. It is first recorded the development of ‘Lorena’ stove. The design of energy saving stoves have gradually changed and improved from time to time. The most recent design is developed by Indonesian Stove Networking led by Yayasan Dian Desa. The design of the stove is not so difference with common clay-soil stove. The stove is designed to enhance the efficient flow and maximum used of heat energy; it produces little smoke due to the effective burning process. The stove enables to save the use of firewood until Dr. Edi Purwanto

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50%. Cost for construction of the stove is Rp.50,000, each household normally need more than one stove, as the stove has only one burning hole. The benefits of using energy saving stove are: (a) Reduce the use of firewood, so this will save forest, save money or less time for women to collect firewood which mean more time for children; (b) It is better for health and planet (due to the minimum smoke production). GLH: (a) Tira (Sampolawa); (b) Banga (Mawasangka); (c) Lalemba (Lawa) Impacts on green sub-projects: Tira/2011, Katilombu, Todombulu and Bahari/2012 (Sampolawa); Lalemba/2010 (Lawa).

Figure 3.6. Women group facilitation on cashew processing in Lalemba Village, Lawa

2d.7. Mangrove crab fattening The absence of sustainable livelihoods in mangrove ecosystem dictated mangrove cutting and conversion into fish-ponds. Local community is used to collect mangrove crab on mangrove forest; but no efforts to cultivate them. We initiated efforts to fatten mangrove crab on sea-cage (keramba) in mangrove forest where fishers can raise the crab weight significantly within a short-time. Demo-plot: Banga (Mawasangka).

Figure 3.5. Training on the making of energy saving stove in Gunung Sejuk Village, Sampolawa

2d.6. Cashew processing Community in Buton and Muna are used to trade ‘shell-on’ cashews (gelondongan) rather than kernels. By selling unprocessed cashews, community experiences opportunity lost until Rp 2600 per kg. They trade gelondongan due to lack of skill and capital and also the need for immediate cash after harvesting. We trained community to process and trade cashews kernels. Demo-plots: (a) Tira (Sampolawa); (b) Banga (Mawasangka); (c) Lalemba (Lawa) Impacts on green sub-projects: Saragi/2008, Dongkala, Lapodi, Pasarwajo/2009 (Pasarwajo); Lapudaku, Lalemba/2009 (Lawa); Katobu, Lindo and Kampani/2010 (Lawa). Figure 3.7. Mangrove crab fattening in Oengkolaki village, Mawasangka

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2d.8 Virgin Coconut Oil (VCO) VCO is a potential coconut based home industry which can provide considerable income generating activity for household wife. We trained and facilitated the establishment of VCO generating activity women group, support the packaging and marketing. Demo-plot: Oengkolaki (Mawasangka)/2010.

Figure 3.9. Fish-aggregating device demo-plot in Oempu Village, Tongkuno

2d.10. Biogas

Figure 3.8. Women group facilitation on VCO home industry in Oengkolaki Village, Mawasangka

2d.9. Fish Aggregating Device (Rumpon) At the absence of key supporting life system in the coastal areas (coral reef, mangrove and sea-grass), fishers can build Rumpon as artificial ways to restore fish-catch. Rumpon is made of wooden platform (5 x 5 m) anchored on big stone. To keep the platform ‘floating’, a plastic drum (200 litres) is attached on each of the corner. Several bunch of coconut leaves are hanged on the platform which functions as shelter of small fishes to attract big fishes. We initiated local community to establish Rumpon. Demo-plots: (a) Holimombo Jaya/2009 (Pasarwajo); (b) Oempu/2011 (Tongkuno). Impact on green sub-projects: Mawasangka/2009, Gumanano/2010, Wakambangura/2011, Terapung/2012 (Mawasangka); Bangun/2010, Bahari/2011, Gerak Makmur/2012 (Sampolawa); Holimombo Jaya/2010 (Pasarwajo).

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Biogas is a driver for NRM practices for rural community. Biogas is a smart practices which stimulate rural community to: (a) cage their cattle; (b) use the livestock dung for biogas while its urine for liquid fertilizer; (c) use small scale biogas for cooking and lightning while big scale biogas for engine fuel; (d) use biogas slurry for liquid fertilizer. (e) improve environment; (f) reduce domestic expenditure. The liquid fertilizer can raise the growth of annual and perennial cash/tree crops. The organic wastes of cash crops are used as fodder to improve cattle diet; We gradually developed the application of biogas technology; started with plastic digester which only suitable for one household (2010), to fibre digester (2011) suitable for several households; then used the slurry for liquid organic fertilizer (2011) and finally used the gas for lighting and generator fuel (2011). Demo-plots: (a) Mawasangka/ 2010 (Mawasangka); (b) Kancinaa/2010 (Pasarwajo); (c) Lahontohe/2010 (Tongkuno); Lapandidi/2010 (Lawa), Lakumampo/2011 (Napabalano); (d) (Lawa); (e) Gunung Jaya, Atula, Lalowosula/2010 (Ladongi); (f) Penanggo Jaya/2011 (Lambandia); (g) Gunung Sari, Sumber Rejeki/2010 (Watubangga). Impacts on green sub-projects: Saragi/2009 (Buton), Lapadaku, Latugho/2011 (Lawa), Lapadindi, Lahontohe/2012 (Tongkuno); Gunung Sari/2008 (Watubangga); Pewutaa/2008, Puuroda/2009 (Baula); Gunung Jaya, Raraa, Atula/2011 (Ladongi).

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2d.11. Organic fertilizer

Box 3.4. Success Story: Biogas Replication in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces Our intensive campaigns on the multi-uses of biogas have attracted rural community, government and Corporate Social Responsibility (CSR) program to replicate biogas. Tana Toraja, S Sulawesi Most of Toraja community raised livestock. In May 2012, we provided technical assistance on four Green biogas sub- projects (2011) in Gandasil, this was followed by establishing one biogas demo-plot on each pilot sub-district (Gandasil, Sangala Selatan and Bongkar). In October 2012, the initiatives were replicated by 11 community self-funded biogas, i.e. 6 self funded biogas plus 6 on facilitation waiting lists (Gandasil); 2 self-funded biogas (Sangala Selatan); 5 self-funded biogas (Bongkar). The biogas ‘fever’ had attracted District Veterinary Agency to build 4 units biogas in Bongkar during October 2012. Now, there are many KVCs have been skilful on biogas installation. PNPM-Green ‘Exit Strategy’, Wajo, S Sulawesi Our biogas demo-plots in Takalalla and Bola Sub-districts attached beneficiaries of PNPM-Exit Strategy to build 14 units biogas in Manyili Village, Takalalla Sub-district.

Muna, SE Sulawesi Starting with one unit biogas demo-plot in Lahontohe (Tongkuno/2010), followed with two other biogas demo-plots in Madampi (Lawa) and Lakumampo (Napabalano/2011). In October 2012, there have been 23 biogas installed in the district. During 2011: (a) PNPM-Green funded 11 unit biogas in Lawa, i.e. Latugho (3 units), Wamelai (3 units), Lapadaku (4 units); (b) Muna Environmental District Agency (BLH) established 3 units biogas (Napalakura/Napabalano, Wamelai/Lawa and Barangka/Barangka). During 2012: (a) PNPMGreen funded 12 biogas units, i.e. Lapandidi (6 units) and Lahontohe (6 units); (b) BLH added with 3 biogas units, i.e. Pentiro (Napabalano); Danagoa (Tongkuno), Lianosa (Tongkuno Selatan); PT INCO, Kolaka SE Sulawesi In response to PT. INCO (a Canadian nickel mining company) and BPMD interest on biogas demo-plots in our facilitation sub-districts. By the end of 2010, we assisted the Head of BPMD Kolaka (Pak Andy) to develop CSR proposal to PT. INCO. In 2011, the proposal was accepted by PT. INCO (which later changes to PT Valley); interestingly, the Company did not only agree to fund biogas installation but also adding the most important part of biogas sustainability, i.e. establishment of livestock (cows) husbandry. In October 2012, we received good news that PT. Valley agreed to deliver fund of IDR 40 billion for cows grant and biogas installation fund (Pak Amri, PJO-Kab pers.com).

Figure 3.10. Biogas demo-plot in Gunung Sari Village, Watubangga

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Organic fertilizer is the key input for sustainable farming in the tropics. We trained farmers on the making of organic fertilizer using local microorganism (bacteria and fungi) which can be used as bio-fertilizer, organic fertilizer and bio-activator for organic decomposition. Organic fertilizer can be easily developed from biogas slurry. Since biogas installations were still limited, we introduced technique to develop liquid fertilizer from livestock (cows) dung. The fresh dung is stored in the anaerobic tube; spray with EM4, after about two weeks, the liquid fertilizer can be tapped. The remaining waste (decomposed dung) can be developed for manure by mixing with decomposed rice husk or dust saw. Pak Andi Monjong, Head of Parigi Farmer Group uses liquid fertilizer for rainfed rice farming. Using similar process, liquid fertilizer can be developed from market organic waste, or Enceng Gondok (water hyacinth), a notorious invasive species from Lake Tempe (Wajo). Since July 2012, we developed several demo-plots in Inalipue Village (Tanasitolo), Pak Sidarwan, Head of Sipureo Farmer Group, his farmer group use liquid fertilizer for rainfed agriculture crops (chili, beans and maize). The liquid fertilizer contains multi nutrients. In many cases plant may experience a single nutrient deficiency, such as lack of N or P only. We introduced technique to make single nutrient organic fertilizer. Organic material such as chicken dung contains 80% Phosphor, cow and goat dungs contain 60% Nitrogen, and the inner part (core) of banana trees contains 85% Phosphor. The process is similar with the making liquid fertilizer from other organic material. GLH: Pak Zakaria (Pasarwajo); Pak Lasamira (Mawasangka); Pak Zainuddin (Tongkuno), La Ode Sipu (Napabalano), Made (Watubangga), Dewa and Suganda (Ladongi); Sidarwan (Inalipule, Tanasitolo), Andi Monjong (Parigi, Takalalla). Impacts on green sub-projects: Wakaokili, Wasaga/2009 (Pasarwajo); Putemata/2011, Dangia and Raraa/2012 (Ladongi); Dangia/2012 (Ladongi).

Figure 3.11. Key-farmer champion for liquid organic fertilizer, Sidarwan (left), champion from Inalipule Village, Tanasitolo, and Andi Monjong (right), champion from Parigi Village, Takallala Dr. Edi Purwanto

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2d.12. Coconut shell Charcoal Briquette (CCB) It is suitable to be developed in coastal areas, where coconut shell has not been intensively utilized. CCB can reduce the use of fuel woods from mangrove or terrestrial forest and potential for income generating activity. One kilogram CCB (cost about Rp.7000) can be used for 4 days cooking; which is much lower compared to kerosene fuel (Rp. 5,000 – 10,000 a day). We trained local community to make CCB manually and/or using simple machine which can be prepared by local workshop. Demo-plot: Lamundre (Watubangga), Balobone and Oengkolaki (Mawasangka) Impacts on green sub-projects: Lamundre/2008 (Watubangga), Gunung Sari (Watubangga)/2008, Watubangga/2009 (Watubangga); Raraa/2012 (Ladongi), Balobone/2010 (Mawasangka); Lakologou/2012 (Tongkuno).

Figure 3.13. Portable solar dryer in Kotilombu Village, Sampolawa

2d.14. Honey-bee culture We trained and facilitated community to domesticate local wild bees; this approach has been able to stimulate local community to cultivate honey-bees surrounding their houses; rather than collecting honey from forest. One of our well-established honey-bee demoplot is in Napalakura Village, Napabalano Sub-district, Muna. Demo-plots: (a) Atula/2009 (Ladongi); (b) Napalakura/2009 (Napabalano) Impacts on green sub-projects: Watalara/2008 (Baula); Gunung Sejuk/2011 (Sampolawa) Figure 3.12. Women group facilitation on CCB home-industry in Balabone Village, Mawasangka

2d.13. Portable solar drier It is a simple equipment to dry coffee, seaweed, clove, seeds etc. It is made from timber, plastic, and thin metal. We introduced for seaweed farmers. The equipment is movable and able to raise air temperature until 60 degree Celsius. Demo-plots: (a) Mawasangka/2011(Mawasangka); (b) Katilombu/2011 (Sampolawa) Impacts on green sub-projects: Mawasangka 2012 (Mawasangka).

Figure 3.14. Hone-bee culture demo-plot in Napalakura Village, Napabalano

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2d.15. King Oyster Mushroom

2d.17. Vegetative Propagation

It is highly suitable in cold climate (upland area). The growth media is made of organic waste: dust saw, rice husk, rice bran and rice straw. It is ready to harvest within forty days and harvest can be conducted until two months. It is a good example for sustainable income generating activity in rural areas.

Rural community has special preference to grow fast growing trees for timber production rather than fruits. Planting fruit trees take a long time (at least 10 years) from planting to fruit harvesting, while the harvested fruits of planted trees often have different (poor) quality than the mother tress. Planting fruit trees is often considered as financially less attractive than planting fast growing species. Vegetative propagation, such as cutting (stek), budding (okulasi), grafting (sambung), air layering (cangkok) etc has been creatively developed by small-scale fruit tree breeders. They have successfully applied (and to a certain extent ‘invented’) various tree improvement techniques to speed-up fruiting time, enhance and maintain production all over year. Planting fruit tress provide long-lived ecosystem protection (as community do not cut the trees but take the fruits), while also provide long-term sustainable income. We facilitated farmer groups who manage village nursery to establish root-stock (lower stump) established from generative propagation and to select potential mother trees as a source of cutting.

Demo-plot: Welala/2012 (Ladongi). There was no green sub-project replication, as the demo-plot was built in June 2012.

Demo-plot: GLH Pak Zakaria, Kahulungaya/2010 (Pasarwajo), GLH Pak Mansyur, Tompobulu/2012.

Figure 3.15. King-Oyster demo-plot in Welala Village,

2d.16. Straw mushroom It is highly suitable in warm climate (lowland area). Farmers enable to use straw which widely considered as low value agriculture (rice) side-product. The straw mushrooms are ready to harvest within 24 days. It is a good example for sustainable income generating activity in rural areas. Demo-plot: Atula/2012, Ladongi, There was no green sub-project replication, as the demo-plot was built in August 2012, however the initiative has been replicated by two households. Figure 3.17. Tree nursery demo-plot in Kahulungaya Village, Pasarwajo

2d.18. Plastic waste handicraft Taking experience from ‘Rumah Boemi’ Sukunan, Yogyakarta, where plastic garbage is collected and transferred into handicraft, mostly in the form of plastic bags, we replicated the initiative for Rewu Lestari Women Group (Pasarwajo); Loro Lestari (Bontoa) and Mekar (Tanasitolo). Sample case: Loro Lestari group received 2011 PNPM-Green block-grant in the form of plastic waste handicraft training; they did not follow-up the training into action as the group did not have sewing machines. In June 2012, we provided facilitation, training and

Figure 3.16. Straw mushroom demo-plot in Atula Village, Ladongi

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granted one sewing machine. The grant had stimulated the group to produce creative products. On August, we promoted the products in the Ramadan Exhibition held in Makassar (8-9 August 2012). The products (50 plastic bags) were sold out in one evening. This had fuelled their spirits to enhance the production quantity. In response to their request, and considering the development of the group, in September we added two sewing machines. The group have trained similar community development initiatives in Takabonerate National Park, Selayar Island.

Figure 3.18. Women group facilitation on plastic waste handicraft home industry, Saragih Village, Pasarwajo

Figure 3.19. Women group facilitation on fish-chips home industry, Ampekale, Bontoa

2d.19. Fish chips home-industry

2d.20. Conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas

Considering the degradation of mangrove forest at the expense of unsustainable fish pond development and the absence of smart practice on mangrove rehabilitation, we facilitated the development of mangrove nursery by involving women (fisher wives). The facilitated women group had named themselves as Bakko Lestari (Sustainable Mangrove). While waiting the mangrove seedlings were ready to plant, we trained women group members on the making of fish chips and facilitated the establishment of fish-chips (Amplang) home-industries. We provided facilitation, technical assistances and small grant to procure kitchen utensils (mixer, blender and freezer). We facilitated the packaging, marketing and also food (health) certification. The fish chips has entered ‘Kota Daeng’ gifts shopping centre (Pusat Oleh-Oleh) in Makassar and several food gifts kiosks in Maros. The production capacity per week is 100 – 150 packages.

About 70% (60,000 ha) of paddy field in Wajo District is rainfed land; community rely on irrigation water from river, lake and retarding basin. Farmers pump water out of the river and flow the water through the rubber pipes to irrigate the land, they used to use benzene fuel to run the generator. Considering the availability of oil fuel is limited, while the price is much expensive than gas fuel, we invented technique to change generator fuel from benzene to gas. To do so, farmers only need to modify gas regulator in which the apparatus is widely available in the shops (cost Rp. 65,000). Such practice is able to reduce the fuel cost until 60%. Generator consumes 7 - 8 litters benzene a day or Rp. 35,000 – 40,000 (excluding transportation cost). While using gas it only cost Rp. 15,000/ day. The initiative has been followed by 350 farmers.

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Table 3.6. Summary of direct beneficiaries on environmental training and awareness in S and SE Sulawesi Provinces.

No.

Activities

Number of direct beneficiaries   Male

Female

Youth

Environmental Training on Pilot Sites 1.

Community training at village and sub-district level in SE Sulawesi Province

8.657

4.572

4.244

2.

Community training at village and sub-district level in S Sulawesi Province

1.477

795

40

3.

Training workshops for PNPM Green actors in SE Sulawesi Province

4.794

2.857

-

14.928

8.224

4.284

Total Environmental awareness on Pilot Sites

Figure 3.20. Conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas

2d.21. Garbage Bank

1.

Community awareness at village and sub-district level in SE Sulawesi Province

16.409

10.160

5.851

2.

Community awareness at village and sub-district level in S Sulawesi Province

7.522

5.395

1.432

23.931

15.555

7.283

Total

Garbage Bank is awareness rising strategy to stimulate local community to care of garbage in terms of collection, separation, garbage gathering and selling. In collaboration with Wajo District Environmental Agency (BLHD), we started the campaigns on formal education from primary to secondary schools. The campaigns started by providing environmental education as local content curriculum or extra-curricular which followed with practical actions, among other are garbage bank. After four months awareness campaigns, now there are 9 schools (and one office/BLHD) have run Garbage Bank in Sengkang Town. Total clients are 5,077 persons; total collection of non-organic garbage is 26 ton/month with total financial return of 40 millions rupiahs. Sample Case: SMAN II (senior high school) Sengkang has 800 students. Each student is compulsory to collect 1 kg plastic garbage per week from their home and school areas; the total garbage is 800 kg per week. The price of 1 kg plastic garbage is Rp. 1500, so the total school income from garbage collection is Rp. 1,200,000 per week or Rp. 4,800,000 per month or Rp. 57,600,000 per year.

Mainstreamed PNPM-Green Smart Practices Beyond Pilot Sites 1.

SKPD (including Calmat) Coordination meetings in Kendari (2011)

85

12

2.

PNPM-Rural facilitators Workshop in Makassar (2012)

75

20

3.

NGOs in Sulawesi and Sumatra during GIZ Management team training of traners in Makassar (2012)

13

2

4.

NGOs, Universities, SKPD during Oxfam National Workshop in Makassar (2012)

95

15

5.

NGOs, Universities, SKPD on CIDA workshop on Green Economic in Makassar (2012)

90

10

6.

Tropenbos workshop on Green Nationalism (2011)

108

12

7.

Pamsimas facilitators workshop in Jakarta (2012)

85

10

8.

Setrawan of SDA Lestari during PMD Training in Makassar (2012)

12

2

9.

PNPM-Green Exhibition in Jakarta (2012)

98

11

10.

Setrawan during Danida training in Manado, Medan, Padang and Bengkulu (2012)

125

23

11.

NGOs in Makassar during Launching Green Nationalism Book in Bakti (2012)

25

6

Figure 3.21. Plastic garbage collection on Garbage Bank implementation in school

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Table 3.7. Type and number of demo-plots (D) and GLH in SE Sulawesi No.

Type

Buton

Muna

Kolaka

1

Mangrove rehabilitation (D)

1

1

2

Catchment area rehabilitation (D)

2

1

3

Ecotourism (D)

1

1

4

Recharge wells (D)

1

5

Fruit and cash crops planting (GLH)

3

1

2

6

Organic fertilizer (GLH)

3

2

1

7

Organic fertilizer (D)

8

Energy saving stove (GLH)

2

1

9

Cashew processing (D)

2

1

10

Mangrove crab fattening (D)

1

11

Virgin Coconut Oil (D)

1

1

12

Fish aggregating device (D)

1

1

13

Biogas (GLH)

3

3

6

14

Biogas (D)

1

2

15

Coconut shell charcoal briquette/CCB (D)

2

1

16

Portable solar drier (GLH)

2

1

1

17

Honey-bee culture (D)

1

1

18

King Oyster Mushroom (D)

1

19

Straw Mushroom (D)

1

20

Fruit trees vegetative propagation (GLH)

1

1

21

Plastic waste handicraft (D)

1

1

22

Nentu handicraft (D)

1

23

Bamboo handicraft (D)

1

24

Banana, plastic and wood handicraft (GLH)

1

6

Conversion of benzene into gas

7

Plastic waste processing (D)

8

Straw Mushroom (GLH)

9

Fish chips home-industry (D)

10

Garbage Bank (D)

Total

Maros

Wajo

Tana Toraja

12 1

1 1

1 10 7

36

7

1

Figure 3.22. Number and types of demo-plot replication through Green block grant and government.

1 31

17

19

Wajo

Tana Toraja

3

6

1

1

Table 3.8. Type and number of demo-plots (D) and GLH in S Sulawesi

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Type

1

Total

No.

No.

Type

Maros

1

Mangrove rehabilitation (D)

1

2

Biogas (GLH)

1

3

Jabon nursery (GLH)

2

4

Organic fertilizer (D)

1

5

Liquid fertilizer (D)

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Dr. Edi Purwanto

Interpretation of Figure 3.1.: The figure is only for SE Sulawesi, as activities in South Sulawesi only started after May 2012, so as to our environmental awareness campaigns had no chance to replicate with Green-block grant since the project ended on December 2012.  Observing Figure 3.1., planting activities dominated the replication of our demoplots through green block grant.  The most preference tree species for Buton and Muna Districts is Jati or teak (Tectona grandis).  The areas which are dominated by limestone and marl substrates are highly suitable for the growth of teak forest plantation.  Teak is known in Munanese as Kuli Dava, meaning as timbers from Java Island. During 19th century, Dutch Government brought teak seeds and Javanese labours to cultivate teak in Muna and Buton Islands. Unfortunately, the well-known Muna teak, having similar quality with Java teak, in which the forest plantation areas covers about 50% of the Island, has been logged during the last decade. Realizing the high price of teak timbers, now Muna and Buton people are keen to plant teak. Many rich people have invested the money by planting teak. This is the underlined reasons why the Green sub-projects Dr. Edi Purwanto

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Dr. Edi Purwanto

Figure 3.23. Number of demo-plot replication by block-grant years in SE Sulawesi Province

in Muna and Buton Districts were dominated by planting teak. Project beneficiaries in Kolaka were also keen to use Green block-grant to plant trees.  The most preference species is Jati Putih (white teak) or Gmelina arborea.  Agro-climatologically speaking, Kolaka is more suitable for intensive agriculture compared to Buton and Muna. Kolaka has deep and fertile soil. The indigenous tribe in Kolaka (Tolaki) relies on their livelihoods on agroforestry development. In 1970s, many migrants from Bali and Java come to develop irrigated rice field on gentle and flat areas, after 1990s, many migrants from Bugis come to develop cacao plantation.  Traditionally, people develop pepper based agroforestry, they plant Gamal (Gliricidae) intercropped with pepper.  We introduced Jati Putih to replace Gamal; compared with Gamal Jati Putih has better benefits:  (a) Jati Putih grows up faster than Gamal; (b) limited pruning required for Jati Putih compared to Gamal. Since 2009, Gmelina has become the new preference tree crops in PNPMGreen facilitation sub-districts in Kolaka. 

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Interpretation of Figure 3.2.: Among 8 sub-districts facilitation areas in SE Sulawesi Province, numbers of OWT demo-pilots replication into Green Block-grant sub-projects have been mostly occurred in Ladongi and Pasarwajo Sub-districts; where OWT operated field office in those sub-districts. The establishment of field office at sub-district level enabled us to provide intensive technical assistances and facilitations. We equipped our office with various demonstration pilots, such as tree nursery, mushroom cultivation and display of many awareness products. We also used the office as a Green-shop or Warung Lingkungan, which sell green products produced by farmers and also became show-windows for other farmers. The field office had become a rural community training centre, people gathering site, to discuss various environmental and livelihoods issues.   3.4. Performance Indicator 3: Adoption by regional governments of natural resources governance issues as an integral part of the policy development and decision making process. 3.4.1. Results Indicator 3a: Increased emphasis of NRM/environmental issues in local development plans. 3a.1. Organized NRM Training for village officials and setrawan: We delivered serial NRM training to Village Head, BPD and Setrawan in all pilot villages in S and SE Sulawesi. The training covered the following subjects: (a) Practical approaches on indentifying natural resource potential and problem at village level; (b) Methods to restore natural resource and environmental degradation; (c) Procedure to develop RPJM-Des; (d) Procedure to develop village enterprise. 3a.2. Organized province and (sub) district workshops to introduce and mainstream NRM: We conducted inception workshop at province and district level during 2008; organized district and sub-district workshops to understand key NR and environmental issues and also to evaluate annual implementation of PNPM-Green at (sub) district level. Similar approaches were also conducted in S Sulawesi. 3a.3. Inserted NRM subjects on workshop organized by government officials at district and province level: To mainstream PNPM-Green approaches and smart practices to key government officials, since 2010 we collaborated with district and province agencies in SE Sulawesi to introduce PNPM-Green on government workshops. From 2010-2012, we were involved on the design and implementation of ‘semi-loka’ workshops for district government (SKPD) and parliament. 3a.5. Promotion of PNPM-Green on exhibition festival at district and province level: We used to open an exhibition stand to promote PNPM-Green smart-practices and products produced by farmer groups. 3.4.2. Results Indicator 3b: Green sub-projects’ are aligned with local development plans/ village regulations

and Ministry of Home Affair No. 66/2007, village governments have to formulate RPJMDes (mid-term village plan) and RKP-Des (village annual plan) by the end of 2010. The document is used as the main reference to conduct any development initiatives at village level, including PNPM-Rural. Having RPJM-Des, PNPM-Rural cycle can be short-cut and fully integrated with regular development planning, i.e. Musbang Des, Musrenbang Kecamatan etc. Since January 2010, together with Green and Rural Facilitators we facilitated RPJM-Des, especially to include relevant village green sub-projects on the document. Our interventions were: (a) Trained village ‘Eleven Team’; (b) Facilitated ‘Eleven Team’ to understand village environmental issues, problems and potential resources; (c) Provided technical assistance on the writing of RPJM-Des document; (d) Ensured the list of relevant green sub-projects were included in the document.

Box 3.5. NRM Capacity Building Strategy for Government Officials and Parliaments Government officials capacity building was conducted through: (a) Involved relevant development agents on the design and implementation of green sub-project; (b) Enhanced natural resource governance policy: (i) improved the quality of spatial maps to support environmental policy; (ii) working together to run environmental program (such as Biogas installation, garbage banks, catchment areas rehabilitation etc.). Our strategy in organizing government training were: (a) it was not much aimed at raising skills but mainstreaming sustainable development visions; (b) the training duration should not longer than 8 hours (one-day); (c) the selected training subjects should be: (i) relevant with the existing development practices; (ii) inspire on better use of government fund for green investment. To reduce training cost, ease technical arrangement and to deliver the training to considerable numbers of intended participants, we organized training implementation (delivery) in collaboration with relevant agencies. Since 2010, we had organized field visits of key government officials and parliaments to green sub-projects.

3b.2. Reviewed RPJM-Des : During 2011 and 2012, we facilitated 8 villages in Ladongi, 14 villages in Lambandia, and 5 villages in Watubangga1 (Kolaka) to integrate green subprojects in their RPJM Des documents.

Box 3.6. Success story: Village Regulation (VR) on bride (groom) tree planting, Panyukukang, Bontoa, Maros

Before married, bride (groom) candidates should have approval letter from the Village Head as a basis to arrange a legal marital status cards. The VR rules bride (groom) couple candidates to plant trees as a pre-requirement on the issuance of the approval letter. We facilitated the formulation of VR which aligned to government regulation. The facilitation were composed of: (a) Socialization at village level; (b) Capacity building of the formulation Team; (c) Developed VR legal drafting; (d) FGD on each sub-village with various target groups to collect ideas on the most comfortable administrative arrangement; (e) facilitated VR socialization at sub-village; (e) Coordination with Law section at district level to check the alignment with relevant law and regulations; and (f) BPD Plenary session to legalize VR. Team formulation was composed of: (i) BPD; (ii) KVC; (iii) Youth representatives and (iv) Sub-village Heads. The whole process took about 1.5 months.

3b.1. Facilitated RPJM-Des formulation: Refer to Government Regulation No. 72/2005

1 Ladongi Sub-district: (a) Anggaloosi, (b) Lalowosula, (c) Putemata, (d) Wungguloko, (e) Pombeyoha, (f) Dangia, (g) Wande, (h) Gunung Jaya, (i) Lembah Subur; Lambandia Sub-district: (a) Lere Jaya, (b) Atolanu, (c) Mokupa, (d) Bou, (e) Iwoimeajaya, (f) Iwei Meiggura, (g) Aladadio, (h) Penangoosi, (i) Tinete, (j) Lalorera, (k) Pekoria, (l) Awiu, (m) Taore, (n) Wonoambuteo, (o) inutom, Loa; Watubangga Sub-district: (a) Gunung Sari, (b) Kukutiu, (c) Lamundre, (d) Langgosipi, (e) Mataosu.

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3.4.3. Results Indicators 3c: Increase in local government awareness of links between improved NRM practices and enhanced livelihood 3c.1. Stimulated local community and government to replicate Biogas installation: See Box 3.3.

meeting, training, in-formal meetings etc.) to invite relevant development agents at (sub) district level to support green-sub project implementation and development. Some success stories can be inspected on Box 3.7; Box 3.7. Success Story: Integrated investment on Wakante Ecotourism, Latugho, Lawa, Muna

3c.2. Stimulated local government to run garbage bank: See 2d.21 3.5. Performance Indicator 4 : A sustainable capacity among both [PNPM] facilitators and [PNPM] stakeholders of all levels to continue the implementation of locally driven ‘green’ development investment and to expand its geographic coverage to new areas. 3.5.1. Results Indicator 4a : ‘Green sub-projects’ are sustainably managed beyond initial year of block grant funding. 4a.1. Facilitated village regulation formulation to sustain PNPM-Green sub-projects assets: Since 2010, we facilitated village regulation formulation to sustain Green subprojects maintenance and benefit sharing mechanism. We supported the village regulation completion of the following villages: Oengkolaki, Balabone, Gumanano (Mawasangka); Wining, Holimombo Jaya and Kahulungaya (Pasarwajo); Gunung Sejuk and Hendea (Sampolawa); Lahontohe, Oempu (Tongkuno); Lalemba and Wamelai (Lawa), Napalakura and Napabalano (Napabalano) Muna; Wande, Gunung Jaya, Lembah Subur, Anggaloosi (Ladongi) and Gunung Sari, Lamundre (Watubangga) Kolaka. 4a.2. Facilitated sub-projects maintenance: Since 2010, we selected 5-6 villages on each sub-districts to receive sub-project maintenance facilitation. The tree planting maintenance were composed of the following: (a) facilitated replanting about 2 months after planting; (b) facilitated the making of organic fertilizer (Bokashi) and its application; (c) facilitated regular (every two months) weeding and soil tillage surrounding the planted trees. Such event is organized in association with regular village voluntary working day. This facilitation is important, since after hand-over meeting (MDST), limited PNPMGreen actors and facilitators who care the fate of Green investment. Since 2010, we focussed our maintenance facilitation to 5-6 selected villages on each sub-districts. We also provided solar photovoltaic maintenance: (a) setting a new type of LED lamps to make the light brighter and divergence; (b) In response to the voltage decline with the longer distance from solar panels, we trained KVG to install different resistance, in line with the voltage input, on each LED. By doing this, the brightness of LED lamps is equal and independent on its distance to solar panel unit. 4a.3. Promoted PNPM-Green ob PNPM-Exit Strategy: 3.5.2. Results Indicator 4b: Increase of coordination between ‘green sub-projects’ implementation and other environment/NRM related activities in the region. 4b.1. Stimulated involvement of relevant development projects (agencies) to support green sub-projects: We made use various occasions (socialization, workshops, coordination 52

Dr. Edi Purwanto

The historical background behind the establishment of ecotourism in Latugho village dated back in 2008, where we conducted awareness rising on water crisis and facilitated mapping of natural resource potential and problems in Latugho village. After ranking the severity of the problem, the top rank was spring water rehabilitation. In that year, PNPM-Green facilitators had not yet been recruited and the process followed the cycle of PNPM-Rural. Realizing that the environment surrounding spring water is beautiful then we stimulated villagers to change the title of subproject into Ecotourism development. In June 2008, we facilitated discussion involving key actors and stakeholders of PNPM-Green, PMPM-Sadi1 and PNPM-Rural at the UPK office. We agreed to stimulate the integration of each project to support ecotourism development. In November 2008, we facilitated Sub-district Workshop to conserve village protection area which was attended by PNPM-Green actors and stakeholders. The workshop concluded on the pressing need to conserve spring water and the need to conserve Wakante spring water as ecotourism site. The commitments paved the way on the MAD-II smooth decision to fund the sub-project through green block-grant (2009). Prior this, PNPM-Sadi had built access roads from main road to the spring water. PNPM-Rural 2010 established clean water piping from Wakante Spring which feed 250 households (IDR 320 millions), while Rural Infrastructure Development Program/PPIP 2010 (Public work) concreted the access road and also stabilized sloping areas surrounding the spring water (IDR 150 millions). As a follow-up of our facilitation for DPRD and SKPD visits to Wakante Ecotourism (April 2012), Muna District Government allocated IDR 300 million for 2013 budget year; this aimed to develop fresh water fish ponds (for fishing site) on Ecotourism areas.

4.b.2. Replicated PNPM-Green smart practices on FEATI program in Buton and Kolaka Districts: Since 2011, we had built a closed relation with FEATI (Farmer Empowerment through Agricultural Technology and Information) program in Buton and Kolaka Districts. They used to bring farmers to learn agriculture technologies on our demo-plots, such as biogas, CCB, VCO and nursery, while also invite us to train their farmer groups. We also follow-up and replicate their smart-practices to PNPM-Green pilot villages. Box 3.8. Success Story: District Government support VCO Women Group, Oengkolaki, Mawasangka, Buton

Pak Lasamira, Head of ‘Tunas Lestari’ Farmer Group is a pioneer of VCO making in Mawasangka Sub-District. Since 2009, he has used a small room in his house to produce VCO. In October 2010, with our support, his VCO production received ‘health certification’ from National Food and Medicines Supervision Agency. We also improved the packaging (from mineral water waste to sterile bottle); we also provided labelling and promoted the products on several super markets in Baubau Town. As a matter of fact, VCO home industries provided significant added value and good opportunities for income generation. One old coconut (price IDR 2,000) produces about 130 ml VCO (price IDR 20,000) or 10 times higher than the price of coconut. We facilitated the establishment of VCO women group, named ‘Kaluku Lestari’. The group is composed of 25 household wives. The benefits of VCO group, as opposed of individual home industry are: (a) product standardization; (b) avoid unhealthy competition among households; (c) greater opportunity to access capital. The latter has attracted attention of Buton District Government. In 2011, the group received several grants from Buton District Government: (a) Coconut grinding and milk extraction machines from Buton District Small and Medium Enterprise Agency; (b) Centrifuge (to separate water out of the coconut milk) from Agriculture Agency. 1 PNPM-Sadi/Agriculture development (2008 and 2009) Dr. Edi Purwanto

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4.b.3. Replicated PNPM-Green smart practices on AgFor program in Kolaka District : Since February 2012, we facilitated CIDA-AgFor program in Kolaka District. We selected six facilitation villages out of three sub-districts. Some replicated Green smart practices were: (a) making organic fertilizer; (b) Jabon (Anthocepalus cadamba) nursery; (c) mushroom farming; (d) making livestock fodder. Box 3.9. Success Story: Integrated investment on CCB village enterprise, Balabone, Mawasangka, Buton

The landscape of Balabone Village, Mawasangka (Buton) is dominated by coconut trees. Before they had familiar with CCB, they sold coconut shell Rp. 500,000 per truck. In 2008, we introduced CCB as alternative domestic energy. In 2010, Balabone Village received Green block grant (IDR 160 millions) to build production house and procure CCB processing machine. In May 2011, the building and machine were ready, but no processing activities until July 2011. The underline reasons: (a) conflicts among beneficiaries; (b) lack of technical skill and capital to run initial production. We facilitated: (a) conflict resolution; (b) establishment of CCB village enterprise ‘Kaluku Harapan’ (KH); (c) initial production by providing technical assistances and the first order; (d) packing and labelling of the products; (e) promotion and link to market beyond Mawasangka areas. The strong leadership of the Village Head and strong CCB promotion have attracted the synergetic investment of other government programs. In 2011, Balabone village received: (a) PNPMRural block-grant (IDR 108 millions) to build coconut shell charcoal storage; (b) APBD fund (disbursed through Buton District Agriculture Agency, IDR 180 millions) to build production house and VCO processing machine. The three buildings (CCB and VCO production houses and coconut shell charcoal storage occurred on the same land while the land is owned by Balabone Village.

4.b.4. Facilitated monthly coordination meeting among PNPM-Green actors and stakeholders: Since May 2011, we regularly organized monthly coordination meeting among PNPM-Green actors and stakeholders on pilot district. The objectives of the meeting were: (a) to discuss the problems faced and remedial actions taken among key actors and stakeholders; (b) to mainstream PNPM-Green smart practices at district level. 4.b.5. Building collaborative environmental campaigns with province PMD: We collaborated with Province PMD Province through: (a) sharing fund to organize environmental workshops at province level; (b) supported the facilitation of Province environmental workshops; (c) technical assistance on the implementation of National Appropriate Technology Festival in 2011. 4.b.6. Building collaborative environmental campaigns with Centre PMD : We supported them through: (a) organization and facilitation of national trainings workshop on watershed management (Medan, June, 2011, Denpasar, Batam, July 2012), coastal conservation training (Surabaya, 2010) and promotion of PNPM-Green (Jakarta, December 2012); (b) facilitated SDA Lestari’s Setrawan Training (Makassar, October, 2012); (c) support the formulation of general and technical guidelines on catchment area management implementation, with special emphasis on capacity building and institutional development.

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Dr. Edi Purwanto

4.b.7. Collaborated with BaKTI to promote PNPM-Green smart practices: We collaborated with BaKTI Foundation to mainstream PNPM-Green Program in the BaKTI Newsletter; we enriched BaKTI smart-practices with green smart-practices during the 4th (2010), the 5th (2011) and 6th (2012) Eastern Indonesia Forum Meeting; We collaborated with BaKTI on the launching of Green Nationalism Book (March, 2012) and public discussion on Community Empowerment on environmental conservation and PNPM-Green smart practices in Sulawesi (October 23, 2012). 4.b.8. Mainstream green activities through ‘Lestari Desaku’ Magazine: We commit to publish ‘Lestari Desaku’ Magazine on regular basis (every two months) as a way to mainstream green activities and strengthen village governance. During the last three editions (April, September and October 2012), we printed each edition for 3000 copies and distributed the hard copies at national level. We have already selected 12 of the existing farmer groups as Lestari Desaku farmers groups by facilitating discussion on every edition of Lestari Desaku magazine in West Sumatra and Bengkulu. We also published the electronic copy of the magazine in the website and promoted on social media. 4.b.9. Collaborated with TSU to promote PNPM-Green smart practices to NGOs in Sulawesi : We collaborated with Technical Support Unit (GIZ) for MHP construction to organize Training of Trainers (ToT) for Sulawesi NGOs on MHP management Team training (October 2012). We made use the occasion to mainstream PNPM-Green smart practices 4.b.10. Linking Green farmer groups with UPK: UPK is a sub-district institution established by PNPM-Rural to administer PNPM sub-projects fund, and Revolving Loan Fund (RLF) such as SPP (safe and loan for women groups), UEP (safe and loan for enterprise groups) and PNPM rural/green block-grant. UPK is expected to become a financial institution at sub-district level. During the last three years, PNPM-Green has facilitated the establishment of ‘green’ enterprises which produced various green products such as organic fertilizer, livestock fodder, CCB, VCO, tree seedlings, honey-bees etc. Many villages have MHP and establish its Management Team (TP3). Several MHPs in Sulawesi and Sumatra have been operated during the day enabling to support productive use energy (PUE). There are many PUE groups established and demand capital loan to procure electronic equipment. To strengthen UPK as a financial institution at sub-district level, while enhancing the capacity of some newly established green enterprise groups; on this quarter, we worked together with PL (PNPM assistant at sub-district level) to list potential green enterprises and link to UPK’s RLF.

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Tabel 3.9. Summary of Strategy, Activities, Outputs, Impacts, Outcomes and Success Stories Performance Indicator 1. Well-trained PNPM-Green facilitators and other local PNPM stakeholder

Strategy

Activities

Capacity building of GF was not only conducted through pre-service and refresher courses, but more importantly through day-to-day facilitation and technical assistances at field level.

Provided technical assistances, support social and political problem solving approaches through day-to-day facilitation at field level.

Outputs/Impacts/ Outcomes Outputs: FKL had proper technical capacity and aware on site specific environmental issues and potential livelihoods development. Impacts: Establishment of sub-projects which were highly relevant with NR problems and potential of the village.

Performance Indicator 2. Local community members (including women) who are aware of environmental issues and sustainable natural resource decisions

Outcomes: Sustainability of Green funded subprojects and level of self-funded adoption (replication) by rural community within and surrounding villages.

• Mangrove rehabilitation subproject in Buton and Wajo Districts • Planting Tectona grandis (Teak) subprojects in Muna and Buton Districts (see Figure 3.1).

• Facilitated the making of NRM maps: problems and potentials; • Organized FGD involving all community groups (including women) • Conducted learning by doing training and established demonstration pilots and Green Learning House/GLHs • Enhanced environmental education for secondary schools • Conducted environmental awareness rising through various media (manuals, films etc.) and deliver through My Darling Cars.

Outputs/Impacts/ Outcomes Outputs: community had better visions on natural resources problems and potential; many local specific environmental management smart practices are available at village level (demo-plots and GLH). Impacts: The established demo-plots and GLH have been replicated by villagers using Green block-grants. There are 158 green sub-projects which have replicated our demo-plots.

Success stories: • Biogas sub-projects in Tana Toraja District (Box 3.4) • CCB sub-projects in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts (Box 3.9). • Organic fertilizer sub-projects in all facilitation districts (2.d.11). • Women groups’ activities: Making garbage plastic handicraft (2d.18) and making fish chips cracker (2d.19)

• Planting Gmelina arborea (white teak) sub-projects in Kolaka (see Figure 3.1).

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Facilitated community to map natural resources problems and potentials; serial NRM focus group discussion; facilitated learning by doing capacity building; invensive facilitation and technical assistainces

Activities

Outcomes: Several key village champions (KVC) become trainers of their fellow villagers and enable to mainstream environmental management smart practices beyond original project sites.

Success stories:

56

Strategy

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Performance Indicator 3. Adoption by regional governments of natural resources governance issues as an integral part of the policy development and decision making process

Strategy Inclusion of relevant stakeholders and relevant community development agents at village and (sub)-district level on PNPM-Green planning, implementation and maintenances.

Activities • Conducted socialization and coordination with relevant community development agents at village and (sub)district level. • Facilitated monthly stakeholders meeting at district level • Involved all relevant community development agents at village and (sub)district level to attend our trainings and technical assistances • Facilitated training on village governance on envrionemental management for village officials and setrawan • Supported RPJM-Des training and facilitated the inclusion of environmental sub-projects in the document. • Facilitated site visits of key government officials and parliaments on PNPM-Green smart practices.

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Outputs/Impacts/ Outcomes

Performance Indicator

Strategy

Activities

Outputs: Relevant stakeholder’s awared on PNPM-Green program and its benefits for regional development.

4. A sustainable capacity among both [PNPM] facilitators and [PNPM] stakeholders of all levels to continue the implementation of locally driven ‘green’ development investment and to expand its geographic coverage to new are

Mainstreamed PNPMGreen smart practices at local, regional and national level through various media and fora.

• Facilitated Perdes formulation to sustain PNPM-Green sub-projects maintenance and benefit sharing mechanism • Facilitated maintenance of post sub-project completion (tree nplanting, solar photovoltaic etc.) • Promoted successful subprojects to be funded by other relevant projects (PNPM-Exit Strategy). • Facilitated the formulation of District Regulation (Perda) on NR protection (Muna and Wajo Districts).

Impacts: Established sense of ownership to the PNPMGreen sub-projects Outcomes: Local government replicated PNPM-Green smart practices with their own (APBD) funds. Success stories: • Ecotourism subproject in Latugho Village, Lawa, Muna (Box 3.7) • CCB sub-projects in Balabone, Mawasangka, Buton (Box 3.8) • Organic fertilizer subprojects in Dangia Village, Ladongi, Kolaka.

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Outputs/Impacts/ Outcomes Outputs: Some selected sub-projects wellmaintained Impacts: Well-maintained sub-projects have started to deliver environmental services, such as: mangrove planting, solar photo- voltaic, ecotourism, tree planting for catchment area rehabilitation etc. Outcomes: Local government adopted PNPM-Green approaches and smart practices to enrich their regional development strategy. Success stories: • Biogas sub-projects in Muna and Buton Districts (Box 3.4).

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Chapter 4. Lessons Learned 4.1. Introduction During project implementation, we faced many challenges and the associated responses in the form of remedial actions. This topic have been well documented on the OWT Quarterly Reports, we documented 40 challenges and remedial actions strategy. This chapter aimed to highlight challenges and document them as Lessons Learned. We only presented 18 out of 40 documented challenges and remedial actions in the Quarter Reports. To have a detailed discussion on challenges and remedial actions the reader can read serial OWT Quarterly Reports which can be visited on www.owt.or.id.

4.2. Challenges and Lessons Learned 4.2.1. Lesson Learned 1/2009: Environmental awareness should not only be targeted to grass-root but also the elites at village and (sub) districts level Mangrove rehabilitation planting in Bahari, Renda and Tampo Villages, Napabalano; Oengkolaki, Banga, Tanailandu, Kanapa-napa and Terapung Villages, Mawasangka had demonstrated the success of environmental awareness during the first year of pilot program implementation. We conducted serial awareness prior to Village Planning Meeting (Musdes Perencanaan) and MAD II. The awareness campaigns not only directed to the ‘hot spot’ sites but also the whole villages within pilot sub-district. We noted that our awareness were successful in Napabalano and Mawasangka Sub-districts where mangrove rehabilitation was selected as green sub-projects, but not in Sampolawa Sub-district where mangrove rehabilitation issues failed to compete with physical restoration. We noted the pressures of sub-district elites were outweighed the success of environmental awareness at grass-root level. 4.2.2. Lesson learned No. 2/2009: Viability of green sub-projects are highly determined by the availability of local resources The cases frequently occurred on tree planting sub-projects. For the sake of respecting local initiatives, GF was used to follow project beneficiaries’ proposals without giving assessment/argument/recommendation on the feasibility of sub-project implementation. For instance, local community need Rambutan planting materials for catchment areas rehabilitation, while the seedlings were not available at local level. The seedlings then

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brought from other areas, the long distance seedling transport had degraded its viability which led to the poor survival rate of the plated rambutan. The cases were frequently happened, the planting materials should ideally be developed by local community. 4.2.3. Lesson learned No. 3/2009: The success of tree planting sub-projects are sensitive to season The only planting activity which can be conducted on any season is mangrove. Tree planting on terrestrial ecosystem should be conducted during wet season. Local community and GF had been aware of the issues, but for fulfilling physical project achievements, they forced to grow seedlings on the wrong season. The cases were again frequently happened in many project plantings. To avoid the problems, we need a multi-year block-grant administrative disbursement. 4.2.4. Lesson learned No. 4/2009: The need to consider number of sub-project beneficiaries Related to Lesson Learned No.1, the strong voice of elites has led to the emergence of sub-projects with little beneficiaries (less than 10 households). The number sub-project of beneficiaries should become a hard screening for green sub-project proposal selection. The role of Verification Team should be strong. 4.2.5. Lesson Learned No. 5/2009: Democratic ranking of sub-projects proposals are not suitable for green program The eligibility of funded sub-projects proposals are determined by voting of village representatives during Inter-Village Meeting (MAD) II. This is a well-established rule within Rural PNPM; however care should be taken to adopt the procedure on PNPMGreen. It is widely acknowledged that successful proposals are often highly determined by the ability of key village representatives to persuade the neighbouring villages, based on friendships or ‘take and give’ mechanism rather than the urgency of environmental rehabilitation. In many areas, the block-grant captures were dominated by four to six villages having strong inter-villages negotiation power. Adopting the method to PNPMGreen was misleading. The villages having urgent environmental problems were frequently overshadowed by less urgent environmental proposals. 4.2.6. Lesson Learned No. 6/2009: Avoid bidding for material procurement Refer to Rural PNPM rule on project implementation that materials and equipment for construction works having values more than 15 millions rupiah, if it is not available at local level, can be procured through bidding process. The rule is clearly emphasized that bidding is only conducted for the last resort. In many cases, any procurement materials more than 15 million rupiah were directly conducted through bidding process. The condition implied to open conflicts due to unfair benefit sharing among implementers. There was also a case where communities have implemented the green sub-project using their own resource at low cost and then claimed higher cost reimbursement from the bid winner. Another case: community nursery group, which produced teak seedlings of 62

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good quality were unable to sell the seedlings to their own village which received green block grant to plant teak, since project implementers (for financial benefit) preferred to purchase teak seedlings to supplier from other sub-district which had a higher price. These practices had waste precious resources and distracted the spirits of community empowerment for NRM. 4.2.7. Lesson learned No. 7/2009: Optimize the use green block-grant for action oriented activities Some community groups frequently preferred to use green block grant to organize community trainings rather than actions oriented activities. As results, a big amount of resources were spent up for training rather than practical actions. Training is useful if it is designed as a prerequisite for actions, the core activity is the action and not the training. Moreover, with the presence of CSO as a community training service providers, the training should be handled by CSO. 4.2.8 Lesson Learned No. 8/2010: Green block grant should not be perceived as ordinary village funding sources Some PNPM actors perceived Green block grant as the ordinary source of village funding rather than incentive to improve environmental condition and natural resource management. Some sub-districts made gentlemen agreement to evenly distribute the green block-grant to all villages. Each year, there were a particular number of villages receiving Green block grant. As results, villages which had already received block-grant had no interest to participate PNPM-Green process on the following years. 4.2.9 Lesson Learned 9/2010: The need to empower community roles on budget plans Budget plans (RAB) in some villages were used to prepare by GF rather than TPK (green sub-project implementer Team). At the beginning, such practice was driven with the emergency condition; it was done to meet the deadline of fund disbursement. If FKL relied on TPK, the RAB development would take longer. The situation underlined the reason why FKL doing things beyond their job. The problem rooted down on one year late start of the PNPM-Green, where the 2008’s Green Block Grant was disbursed in 2009, similarly with 2009’s block-grant which was disbursed in 2010. The overall situation had shifted the main tasks of GF, from community facilitator to block-grant disbursement facilitator. This led the position of GF on RAB development and project implementation was central. In some cases RAB and the associated financial administration document were treated as secret documents to project beneficiaries. The lack of transparency and participation in defining RAB had driven to conflicts among project beneficiaries which deteriorate the ownership spirits. 4.2.10. Lesson Learned 10/2010: The need to improve tree planting sub-projects implementation Dr. Edi Purwanto

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About 70% of green block-grant was spent for tree planting. Based on ‘problem-tree’ analysis (November 2011), we generally identified five problem roots, which impacted to the poor performance of tree planting sub projects: (a). Poor identification of proposed planting site; (b). Plantings are sporadically distributed into small land holders with unclear demarcation boundaries; (c). Seedlings/planting materials are bought from outside village; (d). Lack of facilitation and technical assistance on planting preparation and implementation; and; (e). Poor facilitation and technical assistance on maintenance. We need rethinking the suitability of planting proposals within PNPM-Green, there were so many source of moral hazard, such as: (a) the difference number between proposed planting materials with real planted planting materials; (b) the difficulty to check how large (the size area) they had really planted; (c) the high variation of planting materials price from site to site; (d) the low seedlings survival on enrichment planting. Planting proposals may only reasonable if the planting is conducted an open land which clearly known the exact size area (m2). Development of community based nursery may be more suitable than planting proposal. 4.2.11. Lesson Learned No. 11/2010: The need to allocate considerable fund for tree planting sub-project maintenances Most of the block-grant resource were invested for the planting activities and limited for the maintenance. There are hardly maintenance activities of the newly planted trees after hand-over meeting (MDST). The maintenance is required for any planting activities, especially mangrove. It is to safeguard the fences of the planted mangrove seedlings to prevent the flow of garbage during high tide and life-stock raids during low tide. The growth of infant trees is often disturbed by garbage/rubbish. Big proportion of fund certainly needs to be invested for the maintenance rather than planting as the maintenance activity should take at least 2 years after planting. 4.2.12. Lesson Learned No. 12/20l0: The need to define the tasks of PNPM-Green Management Team The tasks of PNPM-Green maintenance (management) teams were similar with regular PNPM, while the natures of the sub-projects were different. In many areas, Maintenance Team was legally defined but with no reasonable funding support to implement the tasks. Maintenance in PNPM-Green, in many cases, is much more important than the establishment itself. The problem, there are always limited costs for maintenance activities as most of the funding had been invested on the establishment phase. The maintenances for planting tree seedlings (watering, replanting, manuring etc) ideally take for two years. This will be a big job if the planting areas are large (say more than 2 ha) and the sites are far away from their resident.

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4.2.13. Lesson Learned No. 13/20l0: The need to strengthen verification process of Green Sub-projects proposals Verification process is the most crucial step in the PNPM-Green, but the process often conducted as a matter of ‘formal’ practices. Different with physical, environmental subproject, this required a detailed and comprehensive verification. For planting sub-project: (a) Where are the exact planting sites, how large the size (ha)? (b) What the status of the land? (c) What kind of planting techniques to be applied? Planting on clear land or enrichment planting? (c) What are the species; Is the species affects on environmental improvement? Is the species light demanding and what will be the implication for planting scheme? Have the seedlings already been available or going to be purchased from other areas? (v) When the seedling is going to plant, associated with dry or wet season? etc 4.2.14 Lesson Learned No. 14/20l0: The need to link PNPM actors with the existing village institutions. Any village development projects should ideally strengthen local village institution such as BPD and LPM. Instead of empowering the existing local village institution, PNPM develops various ‘ad-hoc’ project implementing bodies (PNPM actors) at village level, such as TPU, TPK, and TP. The developed project implementing bodies, in many cases, have no direct link with the existing local village institutions. Ideally TPU, TPK, TP should be part or linked with LPM as village development implementing body, while BPD as village legislative and supervisory body should supervise TPK’s jobs. Training on writing proposal, project implementation management etc. should be given to LPM and thereby LPM formulated TPU and TPK Team. Training should also be given to BPD, so BPD can develop a supervision team to control TPK. By doing this, the project have a strong social control and empower local village institutions. The absence links between PNPM actors and local village institutions led the project have no or little impacts on village institution empowerment, poor social control and experience difficulties to maintain the (Green) PNPM assets and benefits during post project. The mindset of PNPM program formulated during the end of 1990s should be changed with the new development paradigms. 4.2.15 Lesson Learned No. 15/2011: Enhancement of tree planting sub-project facilitation during integration with regular development planning Integration of PNPM-Green with regular development planning provided good opportunity for tree planting project beneficiaries to develop their own tree nursery. We made use the ‘integration’ process to improve the quality of tree planting sub-projects facilitation. As the Green block grant reached UPK account in mid May, 2012. As such, there had been about four months toward planting activities scheduled in October 2012 (beginning of wet season). The long time project implementation had enable project beneficiaries to develop their own tree nursery.

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4.2.16. Lessons Learned No. 16/2012: The need to strengthen solar photovoltaic subprojects facilitations

have not yet been completed. To avoid hard exit, we maintain our presence in three districts in South Sulawesi by maintaining the services of our key local staff (using our own funding) at least until June, 30, 2012.

Solar photovoltaic (PLTS) sub-project started to emerge in 2010 and become widespread during 2011, the benefits: (a) it operates on the freely available solar energy thus saving the expenditure on electricity and fossil fuels; (b) No fear of power cuts; (c) It is trouble free, pollution free and noise free, has a long life and is reliable; (d) Easy to handle and operate; (e) Negligible cost of operation and maintenance. Each photovoltaic module normally produces 50 – 150 Watt; this is used by 5 – 10 households. The problems: (a) the absence of maintenance and technical facilitation from the contractors; (b) the installation set-up, in many cases, were not properly done; (c) The LED lamps is like a flash-light rather than house lamps; (d) The longer distance from the Solar Panel, the lesser voltage and the weaker light; (e) Beneficiaries have poor skill to response installation problems; (f) Poor access on spare-parts. Due to the problems, many PLTS installation did not work well after several months. In response to the problem, we delivered: training and technical assistance on solar photovoltaic operation to project beneficiaries. We provided technical assistance on: (a) setting a new type of LED lamps to make the light brighter and divergence; (b) In response to the voltage decline with the longer distance from solar panels, we trained KVG to install different resistance, in line with the voltage input, on each LED. By doing this, the brightness of LED lamps is equal and independent on its distance to solar panel unit. We did not only deliver training but also provided facilitation, technical assistance and procured all required electronic materials. 4.2.17. Lesson Learned No. 17/2012: The need to clarify benefit sharing mechanism of tree planting sub-projects About 70% activities of PNPM-Green sub-project is tree planting on farmer land. As such, farmers who own and manage their land have better position to access project benefits compared to landless, while the main target of PNPM is landless (poor) farmers. To avoid future conflicts during tree harvesting about ten to fifteen years later, benefit sharing among project beneficiaries should be clarified in the form of village regulation. 4.2.18. Lesson Learned No. 18/2012: Efforts to avoid hard facilitation exit in South Sulawesi. It is different with SE Sulawesi; our facilitation in S Sulawesi was very short (6 months). Three districts governments were surprised with our short facilitation. ‘Yesterday, we welcome you and now have to say good-bye to you’ told the Head of PMD Tana Toraja and Assistant II of Wajo District Secretary. They had just been aware and started putting great attention with our green initiatives and prepared more intensive engagement; such as allocating District budget fund (APBD) to support green initiatives; unfortunately our facilitation was terminated. Our presence was indeed quite short, but seemed to be precious for them. The three district government have expected us to extent our facilitation, while as a matter of fact, our facilitations in several areas or target groups 66

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Chapter 5. Conclusion and Outlook 5.1. Conclusions 5.1.1. We developed 14 types of IEC material, ranges from training modules (25 titles), training manuals (7 titles), book (1 title), DVD film (26 titles), radio broadcast (5 tiles), Posters (10 topics), Ballyhoo (4 types), Banners (8 topics), Leaflets (16 titles), Iron campaign boards (9 types), stickers (7 types), T-Shirts (3 model). We also published and distributed three editions of Lestari Desaku magazines. Total direct beneficiaries of the IEC are 30,000 people. 5.1.2. With reference to the results of KAP survey conducted at the beginning of the program, we designed most community training on the basis of ‘learning by doing’ (emphasis on practical work) principle. Trainings were not conducted in the class but directly doing the jobs on the field. During the course of the program in SE Sulawesi Province (60 months), there were 13,451 male, 7,429 female and 4,284 youth have joined our environmental trainings at village and sub-district level. The level of women participation is 36%. While during 6 months facilitation in S Sulawesi, there were 4794 male and 2857 female attended our environmental training. The level of women participation is 37 %. 5.1.3. We believed that sustainable environmental initiatives can only be achieved when enable to open new opportunities to local community livelihoods. NRM and RE initiatives will only be sustainable if they can enhance IGA or reduce poor household expenditure. Accordingly, we inspired and facilitated local community to develop innovative sub-projects which do not only benefit for environment but also supported site-specific livelihoods development. We developed 21 types of demo-plots: (a) mangrove rehabilitation; (b) catchment area rehabilitation and ecotourism development; (c) recharge wells; (d) fruit and cash crops planting; (e) energy saving stove; (f) cashew processing; (g) mangrove crab fattening; (h) virgin coconut oil (VCO); (i) fish aggregating device; (j) biogas; (k) organic fertilizer; (l) coconut shell charcoal briquette (CCB); (m) portable solar drier; (n) honey-bee culture; (o) king oyster mushroom; (p) straw mushroom; (q) vegetative propagation; (r) plastic waste handicraft; (s) fish chips home-industry; (t) conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas; (u) garbage Bank. In SE Sulawesi, we established 31 demo-plots in Buton District, 17 in Muna and 19 in Kolaka Districts. In S Sulawesi, we established 7 demo-plots in Maros, 36 in Wajo and 7 in Tana Toraja Districts.

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5.1.4. The main target groups of awareness rising activities were community at (sub) village level. It was mainly conducted through: (a) FGD involving 10 - 15 KVC; (b) Installed posters at strategic sites; (c) distributed leaflet; (d) cross-visits to demo-plots and GLH; (e) film screening and interactive dialogs at sub-village level during the night using ‘My Darling’ (environmental awareness) car. During the course of the program in SE Sulawesi Province (60 months), there were 16,409 male, 10,160 female and 5,851 youth have become direct beneficiaries of our environmental awareness program at village and sub-district level. The level of women participation is 38 %. While during 6 months facilitation in S Sulawesi Province, there were 7,522 male and 5,395 female and 1,432 youth have become direct beneficiaries of our environmental awareness. The level of women participation is 42 %. 5.1.5. There were 397 green sub-projects disbursed in SE Sulawesi Province during 5 years (2008-2012). 158 or 40 % of them were the replication of our demo-plots/GLH. Among 8 sub-districts facilitation areas in SE Sulawesi Province, numbers of OWT demo-pilots replication into Green Block-grant sub-projects have been mostly occurred in Ladongi and Pasarwajo Sub-districts; where OWT operated field office in those sub-districts. The establishment of field office at sub-district level enabled us to provide intensive technical assistances and facilitations. We equipped our office with various demonstration pilots, such as tree nursery, mushroom cultivation and display of many awareness products. We also used the office as a Green-shop or Warung Lingkungan, which sell green products produced by farmers and also become show-windows for other farmers. The field office had become a rural community training centre, people gathering site, to discuss various environmental and livelihoods issues.   5.1.6. The green sub-projects in SE Sulawesi were dominated by tree planting. The most preference tree species for Buton and Muna Districts is Jati or teak (Tectona grandis). The areas which are dominated by limestone and marl substrates are highly suitable for the growth of teak forest plantation.  Teak is known in Munanese as Kuli Dava, meaning as timbers from Java Island. During 19th century, Dutch Government brought teak seeds and Javanese labours to cultivate teak in Muna and Buton Islands. Unfortunately, the wellknown Muna teak, having similar quality with Java teak, in which the forest plantation areas covers about 50% of the Island, has been logged during the last decade. Realizing the high price of teak timbers, now Muna and Buton people are keen to plant teak. Many rich people have invested the money by planting teak. The most preference tree species in Kolaka District is Jati Putih (white teak) or Gmelina arborea.  Agro-climatologically speaking, Kolaka is more suitable for intensive agriculture compared to Buton and Muna. Kolaka has deep and fertile soil. The indigenous tribe in Kolaka (Tolaki) relies on their livelihoods on agroforestry development. In 1970s, many migrants from Bali and Java come to develop irrigated rice field on gentle and flat areas, after 1990s, many migrants from Bugis come to develop cacao plantation. Traditionally, people develop pepper based agroforestry, they plant Gamal (Gliricidae) intercropped with pepper.  We introduced Jati Putih to replace Gamal; compared with Gamal Jati Putih has better benefits:  (a) Jati Putih grows up faster than Gamal; (b) limited pruning required for Jati Putih compared to Gamal. Since 2009, Gmelina has become the new preference tree crops in PNPMGreen facilitation sub-districts in Kolaka.  70

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5.1.7. The critical issues for tree planting is the presence of intensive maintenance, since 2010, we selected 5-6 villages on each sub-districts to receive tree planting maintenance. The tree planting maintenances were composed of the following: (a) facilitated replanting about 2 months after planting; (b) facilitated the making of organic fertilizer (Bokashi) and its application; (c) facilitated regular (every two months) weeding and soil tillage surrounding the planted trees. Such event is organized in association with regular village voluntary working day. This facilitation is important, since after hand-over meeting (MDST), limited PNPM-Green actors and facilitators who care the fate of Green investment.

5.2. Outlooks 5.2.1. Roles of CSO on the past Green program: Our experience showed that the roles of CSO grew from environmental training and awareness providers (as originally designed), during the course of project implementation, had been developing to cover technical assistances and facilitation of project beneficiaries from preparation, implementation and maintenance of the green sub-projects. The last two tasks, by design, were expected as the tasks of GF, however in most cases they were unable to tacke the jobs, due to capacity and time constrains. 5.2.2. Roles of CSO on future Green program: The most critical part of the green project is how to design the site specific green activities which highly suitable with local specific need. The ‘failure’ on defining local community needs on green activities had led to the dominance of tree planting sub-projects on many pilot sites. In many cases, ‘planting trees seedlings’ had become ‘the easy, simple and logic reasons’ to use the green block grant, while many other green activities were actually opened. In some pilot areas, such as in Tana Toraja District, planting trees still become a dominant sub-projects while there have been little space to plant trees. Green sub-projects, in many cases have been simplified as planting trees. Green technical assistance were highly needed in this program, unfortunately many positions with ‘green’ and ‘environmental’ titles have poor capacity on green program. As a matter of fact recruitment of ‘environmental specialist’ position in a big numbers were not easy, as ‘environment’ is a wide disciplines, while environment technical skill is not easily upgraded through short trainings. Given the conditions, green technical assistance may well-fit to be handled by CSOs, especially those who had long track records on grass-root community empowerment in green activities. 5.2.3. Local CSOs or CBOs? The ideas to involve local CSOs as the way to sustain green initiatives were frequently not confounded on the actual life. It is true that we need the strong roles of local champions/organizations to sustain green sub-projects. Are those local CSOs? Yes, if CSOs are respected by local community with proven long tract records. Many local CSOs have weak experience and ground basis. At the absence of proper local CSOs, the program can use local CBO, such as KVC, farmer group, forest farmer group, women groups etc.

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5.2.4. Problems on Greening PNPM Rural in the past: PNPM-Green as a window within PNPM-Rural is ideally well-integrated within PNPM-Rural house. The problem, PNPM-Green which aimed to support PNPM-Rural was considered as completely different program by PNPM-Rural. PNPM-Green was designed as a new program, rather than a sub-program under PNPM-Rural. PNPM-Green established their own National Management Consultant and facilitators but little efforts to synchronize working relations, role and responsibilities among actors at centre level (Jakarta) down to grass root level. The failure to build a solid institutional arrangement at centre level had affected to the weak integration among projects actors at grass-root level. 5.2.5. Greening PNPM-Rural: Green sub-projects should be clearly defined in the PNPMRural PTO.

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Appendices

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Appendix 1: Beneficiary Success Stories

1. Solar Panel in Pewutaa Village, Baula, Kolaka (Success Story No. 1/2011) In 2010, one of the villages in Kecamatan Baula received three units of solar panel installation for 30 household users; ten households share one unit. The green sub-project block-grant was proposed by the villagers due to the far–away distance with the electricity pole. Ms. Sumiati is as one of the beneficiaries, she is a widow with four children and two grand children, she has been long waiting the state electricity to reach her house, and she is very gratitude to have been targeted as beneficiaries of Green PNPM block grant. She is now are able to bundle vegetable and make cake early morning for sale to support her livelihood. She expects that the solar panel will be sustainably managed so that she would no longer use kerosene for lighting. 2. Mangrove Rehabilitation from Haji Muhammad in Bahari, Napabalano, Muna (Success Story No. 2/2011) Bahari Village received block grant for mangrove rehabilitation during 2008, the proposal idea was initiated by Haji Muhammad, the key village champion who aware on the importance of mangrove plantation to maintain ecosystem and livelihood. He used to become a staff of Muna NGO (Yayasan Sama). From his past experience on mangrove rehabilitation, he motivated local communities to plant mangrove with Green block grant support. Since 2008, the coastal communities feel that fish and crab population are rising. In general, local community in Bahari is optimistic that the mangrove plantation has benefit to them, they have planned to encourage other villages to plant mangrove. For protection purposes, they have started to develop village regulation. As the impact, Renda Village, the neighbor which experiences rapid mangrove deforestation has started to plant mangrove by their own initiative. 3. Spring Water Rehabilitation in Awainulu Village, Pasarwajo, Buton (Success Story No. 3/2011) Awainulu Village received block-grant 2008 to build dam (dyke) aimed at retaining sea intrusion to the spring water which become the main source of fresh water (drinking, washing) source of the coastal villagers. During the rainy season the spring were often contaminated by overland flow (run-off) due to the absence of drainage. The villagers also had a bad sanitation which contaminates the spring. The rehabilitation measures have made the spring environment tidy and clean. The village has developed Village Regulation (Perdes) to protect the spring. Our awareness campaigns have successfully changed local community attitude, they are no longer throwing garbage around the spring and the washing space has been separated to avoid detergent pollutant.

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4.

Coastal dyke development in Gerak Makmur Village, Sampolawa, Buton (Success Story No. 4/2011)

Gerak Makmur Village received Green PNPM block grant 2008 to develop coastal dyke sub-project. The underlined reason is to protect sub-district market building (built with Rural PNPM in 2005) which was threatened by abrasion. The dyke constructions have effectively stopped the problem. Apart from protecting the market from abrasion, the construction is also used by community as a place land and sells fishes. For the maintenance reason, the village government has developed Village Regulation to collect retribution of 500 IDR per individual at each market day. 5. Mangrove Rehabilitation in Mawasangka Village, Mawasangka, Buton (Success Story No. 5/2011) The sub-project was implemented in 2008 as result of OWT awareness campaigns on mangrove forest rehabilitation. From 6 villages (Oengkolaki, Tanailandu, Banga, Kanapanapa, Terapung and Mawasangka) which implemented the same sub-project, only Mawasangka community who successfully maintain the highest percentage of mangrove survival (95%). Now, the mangrove (Rhizopora sp) plantation has reached two meters height. The key success is on the maintenance and this is highly dependent on the social capacity. For the case of Mawasangka Village, local community conduct regular voluntary work to clean marine ‘garbage’ which often hamper the growth of mangrove sapling. 6. Smart Practice House (SPH) at Gunung Sejuk, Sampolawa, Buton Success Story No. 6/2011) The village received block grant 2010 (IDR 125 million) to rehabilitate Laloya Spring water and natural forest surrounding the area for ecotourism site. The developed ecotourism site will be potentially visited by many guests considering the site is very near from Baubau Town. Understanding this, we facilitated the establishment of SPH on the ecotourism site. The SPH is made of wooden construction (size: 5 x 5 m2). We set library in the SPH, which is composed of environmental books, awareness materials (posters, leaflets and banners) and local business products (CCB, organic fertilizer, VCO, Nentu handicraft). We developed tree nursery on the SPH. We also developed and installed information boards outlining the ecological roles of several protected indigenous wildlife species (Buton macaque, hornbill etc.) to maintain ecosystem in the area. The SPH has multi-functions, as a meeting place and information center of the ecotourism areas. We handed over the management of the learning house to the Village Government, Women, and Youth Group. 7. Wa Nadia a women champion from, Lalemba, Lawa, Muna (Success Story No. 7/2011) Since 2008, Wa Nadia (women, 30 year) has initiated to develop village nursery in Lalemba Village involving 12 housewives in her village. So far, the nursery has developed 180,000 teak seedlings and used to supply teak seedlings demand of all trees planting sub-project in Lawa sub-district and surrounding areas. 78

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8.

Zainuddin Mariuddin a key champion from Lahontohe, Tongkuno, Muna (Success Story No. 8/2011)

To many biogas (as we familiar now) is marginally suitable for PNPM-Green. The main underlined reason is the limited household’s user of one installation. One biogas may be able to use one or maximum three beneficiaries households. We try to reverse the common though by making biogas residue to become liquid fertilizer. One biogas, which digester capacity of 1200 liter, can produce 15 liter residue a day1. The residue is then mixed with water (ratio 1 to 2 during wet season and 1 to 3 during dry season). As such, one biogas can produce 45 liter of liquid fertilizer a day. The frequency of fertilization is twice a month, while one liter liquid fertilizer can be spray 4 vegetable crops or 2 tree seedlings. Based on this fact, one can calculate how much the multiplier effects of biogas. Based on our experience in Lahontohe Village, one biogas can supply liquid fertilizer for 131 farmers. The use of organic fertilizer can raised 40% of vegetable crop production and extent fruiting season from 4 to 6 months! Pak Zainuddin is the champion behind the success adoption of the liquid fertilizer development. His effort to develop liquid fertilizer out of biogas disposal has increased vegetables production in his village. There are 165 farmers who have been relying on his biogas disposal. The BPMD (Rural Community Empowerment Agency) sent him to represent Muna District on the National Appropriate Technology Exhibition which was held in Kendari (October 12 – 16, 2011) 9. Pak Lanu, beneficiary of tree planting sub-project in Jaya Bakti Village, Sampolawa Sub-District, Buton (Success Story No. 9/2011) Driven by its geological condition, the key environmental issue of the village (as the case of many villages in Buton and Muna Islands) is lack of water and declining its availability due to land-cover changes. Local community in the area normally spends several hours a day to collect clean water from springs. In 1990s, CARE developed water infrastructure to shorten the distance between the sources of water to housing areas. CARE installed galvanized metal pipe network to channel clean water by gravitation. Up till now, CARE installation still works well, however the dependable spring discharge continuously decline due to massive conversion of natural forest to rainfed agriculture. The worst condition is during long dry season like now. After limited rainfall for about 5 months, many streams are dried-up. The situation has occurred since many years ago. In response to the problem, OWT puts its environmental awareness emphasis on catchment areas restoration through vegetative planting. We have stimulated local community to plant trees as environmental restoration and source of livelihoods. In 2009 and 2010, Jaya Bakti Village proposed planting trees sub-project. They received block-grant 108 million rupiah to plant Sengon (Albizia falcataria) seedlings (18,334 seedlings) for 24 poor household, while in 2010 received 84 million rupiah to plant Mahoni (Swietenia mahagony) for 29 poor households. Pak Lamiu is one of the beneficiaries, he planted seedlings to rehabilitate areas surrounding Makolona spring water, 1 ha Sengon in 2009 and another 1

5000 liter digester can produce 50-60 litres residue a day.

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1 ha Mahoni in 2010. The seedlings come from farmer groups of the neighboring village who received OWT technical assistance on nursery development. In response to the declining spring discharge, in 2010, Rural PNPM delivered block-grant to build water capture in Makolona spring water. 10. Gunung Sejuk Villagers, beneficiary of ecotourism, Sampolawa, Buton (Success Story No. 10/2011) Local community mainly uses the Laloya spring water for bathing, washing and water extraction for domestic and commercial use. The key environmental issues were poor protection, maintenance and uncontrolled water extraction. The whole landscape and water resource has many precious values for ecotourism development. The underlined reasons: (a) The presence of natural forest (Hutan Lakompa, about 8000 ha) which has been defined by Laporo ethnic as a customary forest2 (hutan adat ); (b) iHigh spring water discharge (6 liter/second); (c) Good accessibility: located on the main roads of Sampolawa-Batauga-Pasarwajo-Baubau; (d) Comfortable micro-climate; (e) Landscape beauty; (f) Habitat of South Buton flagship species: Hornbill (Julang Sulawesi, Burung Halo, Aceros cassidic), Buton macaque (Andoke, Macaca ochreata brunescens), Tarsius (Tangkasi, Tarsius sp), Kuskus (Phalanger ursinus) and Civet (Musang Tenggalung/Viverra tanggalunga). Until 2009, no regulation to control large scale water extraction and no efforts to maintain clean environment in the spring water and surrounding. There is some refill mineral water (Al Kautzar, Tirta Agung, Tirta Segar and Dian) which use the spring water. The water also used by several villages (Sandang-Pangan, Hendea and Tira) and surrounding sub-districts. Considering its precious resource, since the start of PNPM-Green, OWT has stimulated villagers to rehabilitate spring water and to a certain extent facilitated water extraction regulation. In 2010, Gunung Sejuk Village proposed ecotourism sub-project, this consisted of concrete embankment of spring water and construction of ecotourism facilities. The village received block grant 110 million rupiah. To add the value of ecotourism site, OWT facilitated the establishment of wooden house for library and information center. The smart practice house (SPH) is made of wood construction (size: 5x5 m2). Now, the house has been used for student library, women/farmers group and sub-village meetings. The area is deserved further sustainable development. 11. Gusi-Gusi, nursery women group from Waangu-Wangu, Pasarwajo, Buton (Success Story No. 11/2011) The key weakness of tree planting sub-project in many areas is failure to stimulate local community spirits to develop their own tree nursery. Considering this, since 2008, OWT has delivered training, awareness, technical assistance and facilitation on the development of community based tree nursery. The objectives of this facilitation are to: (a) raise the capacity of local community to produce good quality planting materials; (b) shorten the

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distance between the sources of planting materials and planting areas; (c) strengthen ownership of the planted trees; (d) use tree nursery as income generating activity; (e) develop spirit of independence (mandiri). Understanding, the importance of vegetative rehabilitation and lack of local capacity on vegetative propagation, in 2008, we conducted training on nursery development in Kahulungaya Village (Pak Zakaria garden). The training was attended by key village champions (KCV) representatives of 20 villages in Pasarwajo. Pak Lahuma is one who interest to develop nursery in his village. We followed-up training at Pak Lahuma garden involving local KVC. The training is followed by intensive facilitation on Mahoni and Rambutan3 (Nephelium lapacheum) nursery development. Considering the active women participants, then we facilitated the establishment of women nursery group, named ‘GusiGusi’, headed up by Bu Lahuma. Apart from intensive technical assistance we supported seedlings, poly-bags, high quality seeds and organic fertilizers on the pilot site. On 2009, Waangu-Wangu village received block-grant of 51 million to plant mahoni (15,625 seedlings), this was fully supplied by ‘Gusi-Gusi’ women group. In 2010, WaanguWangu received another 46 million block-grant to plant Rambutan (5,148 seedlings), this was again fully supplied by the group. At the same year, the group sold 13,000 Mahoni seedlings to Lapodi Village. At present, the group only has 4,000 mahoni seedlings (from last year), which has been allocated for Waangu-Wangu planting in 2011. This year, the group also received order from Buton District Forestry Office. 12. Kaluku Lestari, VCO women group from Mawasangka, Buton (Success Story No. 12/2011) Kaluku Lestari has been successful to produce and market large numbers of VCO products. The group has enabled to produce and market 8-10 liter VCO per week. Mawasangka is area which blessed with large coconut (Cocos nucifera Linneaus) plantation. A massive strip of coconut plantation dominated its relatively deep coastal line. The remaining landscape is dominated by coral stone which is marginal for rainfed agriculture. Until 2008, local community only sells coconut fruits; no other derivative products from coconut which is popularly known as ‘tree of life’ (because of its wide-ranging uses). Pak Lasamira (Head of Farmers Union Group/Gapoktan ‘Tunas Lestari’) is a pioneer on VCO making in Mawasangka. Since 2009, he has used a small space in his house to produce VCO. In October 2010, with our support, his VCO production received ‘health certification’ from National Food and Medicines Supervision Agency (Badan POM). We also improved the packaging (from mineral water waste to sterile bottle); we also provide labeling and help to market and promote the products at local and regional level.

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Legally it is protection forest (state forest area). Dr. Edi Purwanto

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VCO home industries provided significant added value and good opportunities for income generation. One old coconut produces about 130 ml VCO, the normal price is Rp. 25,000, while the local price of one old coconut is only Rp. 2,000. In response to the great interest of women to create income generation while they can remain stay at home; we facilitated the establishment of VCO women group, named ‘Kaluku Lestari’. Kaluku means coconut in local language. The group is composed of 25 household wives. The benefits of VCO group, as opposed of individual home industry are: (a) possible enforcement of product standardization; (b) avoid unhealthy competition among households; (c) greater opportunity to access capital. The main challenge on community enterprise facilitation is working ethic building. Why this is important? The basic enterprise (industrial) attributes (including VCO making) is a culture that includes principles and values of discipline and honesty, while the major weakness of community-based enterprises is lack of discipline and honesty. People are not used to strict standard operating procedures (SOPs). Due to a relaxed mood or laziness, short cuts in work procedures may occur which negatively impacts to the end quality of VCO product. Such facilitation will take longer than just training on VCO processing. So far, our facilitations are composed of: (a) Strengthen the institution; (b) training on administration and management; (c) support equipment for VCO processing; (d) packaging and labeling; (e) enhance market access. The women group is now ready to apply Rural PNPM schemes (SPP or Green-block grant) to enhance the capital. 13. Bu Salamah: Key champion of garbage plastic handicraft makers from Saragih, Pasarwajo, Buton (Success Story No. 13/2011)

In 2010, we visited ‘Rumah Boemi’ Sukunan Village, Yogyakarta, where we learned how plastic garbage of various products can be changed into beautiful handicraft, mostly in the form of plastic bags. During early 2011, we facilitated training on handicraft making from plastic garbage on several women groups (PKK) in Pasarwajo. This training had awakened awareness toward garbage management and use. We presented the garbage route from market, home and finally to the landfill, the impact of poor garbage management and demonstrating best practices of garbage management in Sukunan Village, Yogyakarta. Bu Salamah representing women group of Saragih Village expressed their enthusiasm to receive our further facilitation. We facilitated the establishment of women group, named ‘Rewu Lestari, ‘rewu’ means garbage in local language. They sort garbage and encourage their neighbor to do garbage sorting. So far, the group has already produced more than 200 handicrafts and able to sell in local market. We have stimulated the production by giving order to develop bags for our training workshop, provided 4 sewing machines and promote their products at district and regional level. The group is expected to receive Rural PNPM women credit (SPP) to enhance the capital. 14. Pak Zakaria: Key farmers and environmental hero from Pasarwajo, Buton (Success Story No. 14/2011)

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Identification and selection of Key Village Champions (KVC) is central for project success. The same inputs and approach will output different impacts when we involve the right KCV. Much local wisdom, smart practices, good farmer’s attitudes are readily adopted from project areas without reinvent the wheel. Pak Zakaria is one of our KVC in Pasarwajo; he is a good famer and environmental hero model, he only manages 2 ha home-garden, but able to plant about 300 coconut trees. The severe pig raids have led planting coconut in Buton Island laborious. In return of his long and painstakingly investment, he is now able to harvest at least 100 coconut fruits per day. His motto: ‘Do not expect to harvest if you never plant’; ‘Any one should be able to plant two (tree) seedlings a day’. In 2008, we met Pak Zakaria and since then we used his home garden as field learning house for PNPM-Green actors. Several KPMD, farmer-to-farmers visit and facilitators training have been occurred in his resident. We trained Pak Zakaria on organic fertilizer, facilitated the establishment of ‘Bokashi’ house, the use of liquid fertilizer from biogas residue (installed in his neighboring village/Kancinaa Village), support poly-bags and high quality seeds for his nursery. In 2009, we facilitated the development of ‘Buah Lestari’ farmer group. We trained the group on vegetative propagation. The farmer group has sold high quality (grafted) fruit tree seedlings such as Duku, Durian, Salak and Sukun to government and PNPM-Green Project. 15. Kaluku Harapan: CCB community enterprise from Mawasangka, Buton (Success Story No. 15/2011) As an impact of our training and awareness on the making and use of Coconut Shell Charcoal Bricquette (CCB) in Mawasangka Sub-district, Community economic institution (Lembaga Ekonomi Masyarakat/LEM ‘Sejahtera’) of Balabone Village proposed and successfully received Green-block grant (2010) 188 million rupiah to procure CCB machine and construct the production house. Unfortunately, there was an internal conflict among PNPM-Green actors at village level which hamper the follow-up operation. The LEM also has no capital to conduct initial production, as all the PNPM-Green block grant was spentup for CCB machine and production house. In response to the problem and our great concern to support community based renewable energy production, we facilitated: (a) conflict resolution among the PNPM-Green beneficiaries at village level; (b) strengthen the economic institution (LEM Sejahtera); (c) Facilitate the initial production; (d) Promotion and marketing of the products at local and regional level. CCB is a potential alternative energy at local level especially in the area such as Mawasangka which often experience scarcity of kerosene and lack of fuelwood. The price of kerosene at local level ranges from Rp. 6,000 – 10,000. Household demand on average 1.5 liters or Rp. 9,000 – 15,000. The local price of CCB is only Rp. 4,000 per kilogram (8 – 10 pieces). On average one family require 1 - 1.5 kg per day or Rp. 4000 – 6,000. The Dr. Edi Purwanto

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uses of CCB also have many other benefits: (a) less smokes; (b) cleans kitchen utensil; (c) abundance raw materials; (d) minimize fuel wood consumption. With our facilitation, since August 2011, LEM Sejahtera has sell CCB to surrounding villages. 16. Local Initiatives to replicated Rumpon, Oempu (Muna) and Gumanano (Buton), Success Story No. 16/2012

The destruction of costal ecosystem, such as coral reef, mangrove and sea-grass beds has declined the capacity and functional roles of coastal areas as the source of income generating activities. Fishers are forced to go far away out of the coastal line to catch fishes. The roles of mangrove and coral reef are as shelter, nursery and feeding ground. At the absence of the key supporting life system, fishers can build Rumpon as artificial method to restore the roles of those ecosystems. Rumpon is a fish aggregating device which provides shelter for small fishes which often also attract big fishes. Rumpon is made of wooden platform (5 x 5 m) anchored on big stone. To keep the platform ‘floating’, a plastic drum (200 liters) is attached on each of the corner. Several bunch of coconut leaves then attached on the platform which function as shelter and to a certain extent a nursery ground of small fishes. The cost to make and install Rumpon is about 3 millions. In response to destruction of coastal ecosystem and the absence of fish aggregating device, in December 2011, we initiated to establish Rumpon at Oempu Village (see Photo A.3.6). The initiative was highly supported by Key Village champions. In fact, the device has functioned well and provided positive impacts to local fishers. Every morning and afternoon, many fishers fish small fishes surrounding the Rumpon. The coughed fishes are used to fish a big pelagic fishes; however they often catch big fishes in the Rumpon site. The initiative has inspired Oempu Village to propose Rumpon sub-project to be funded by 2012 Green-Block grant. In March 2012, we presented the initiatives in the District Musrenbang, and the ideas have been adopted by Muna District Fishery Agency. Gumanano Village, Mawasangka (Buton) which received 2009 blockgrant to establish two Rumpon has successfully replicated three other Rumpon using 2010 District Block-Grant (ADD). 17. PNPM-Green has successfully stimulated local community to plant tree crops, Ladongi, Kolaka (Success Story No. 17/2012) The population in Ladongi Sub-district (Kolaka) is dominated by transmigrant from South Sulawesi (Bugis), Java (Javanese and Sundanese) and Bali (Balinese). Land-use in Ladongi is dominated by semi-irrigated agriculture (sawah) for the low-land terrain, while the upland terrain (rainfed land areas) is dominated by cacao and pepper based cropping system, such as: (a) Cacao (planting space: 3 x 4 m2) intercropped with Nilam (Pogostemon cabin); (b) Mrica (pepper) grows in Gamal tree (planting space 3 x 2.5 m2);  (c) Coconut  (planting space 10 x 10 m2) intercropped with cacao (3x4 m2) and Nilam.  The dominance crop is Cacao and Nilam.

The PNPM-Green, our intensive awareness program, has successfully stimulated local community to grow tree crops and has significantly changed the existing cropping pattern. Since 2009, local community has started to plant (a) Jati Putih (Gmelina arborea), (b) Jati/ Teak (Tectona grandis); (c) Cengkeh (Syzygium aromaticum) and (d) Durian (Durio cibetinus). The most preference tree crop is Jati Putih. This can be illustrated on the funded block grant during 2010, where 80% of block-grant is used to plant Jati Putih; Jati Putih has replaced Gamal (Gliricidae) as the dominant shelter crop in the past. Jati Putih, similar with Gamal, is a fast growing species, however. Jati Putih has a better timber quality (enable to use for construction after 6-7 years) rather than Gamal which is basically fuel-woods. Jati Putih is similar with Gamal can grows after coppicing (cutting trees by leaving the roots). Both are good to be intercropped with Cacao as a shelter crop. Local community also likes to intercrop Cacao with Durian, especially in the old cacao where the productivity has been declined.

18. Biogas replication in Muna and Buton Districts (Success Story No. 21/2012) The acronym of major agriculture commodities in Muna District known as ‘SarungMekah’ (Sapi, Rumput-Laut, and Jagung, Mete, Kayu dan Hasil Hutan/Cows, Seaweed, Maize, Cashew, Timbers and forest products). Unfortunately cows in Muna are not put in the cage (tidak dikandangkan), the implications: (a) the meat production is poor due to uncontrolled diet; (b) the dung and urine are not used; (c) cows in some places raid agriculture crops4; (d) environmental and health problems (due to the widespread of cows dung). The key efforts to control the problem are to cage cows. However, it is not easy as this is related with culture. One effort toward cows caging road program can be reached through biogas. In our view, biogas can be a potential driver for natural resource management practices at famer level. By using biogas, farmer will: (a) cage their cattle; (b) using the dung for biogas and possibly the urine for liquid fertilizer; (c) use small scale biogas for cooking and light, while large scale biogas as engine fuel; (d) use the biogas slurry (waste) for liquid fertilizer. The produced fertilizer can raise the growth of annual and perennial cash/tree crops. The organic wastes of cash crops can be used as the source of fodder and concentrate to improve caged cattle diet; (e) improve environment; (f) reduce the domestic expenditure. With the above thoughts in mind, we were keen to introduce biogas in Muna District. The first step was to find the right KVC, this is important as the performance of biogas installation is dependent on its maintenance. The KVC is Pak Zainuddin, a Setrawan (Civil Servant Facilitator of Tongkuno Sub-district). We installed the first biogas at Pak Zainuddin house, Lahontohe Village, Tongkuno which is the first biogas in Muna District. Pak Zainuddin actively promoted the use of biogas slurry for liquid fertilizer, since March 2011, with OWT support; he let hundreds of farmers within and beyond Tongkuno sub4 The failure of mangrove planting in Tampo Village, Napabalano, Muna (funded by PNPM-Green block-grant 2008) was due to cows’ raids.

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district, to use his biogas slurry for liquid fertilizer. The fertilizer is also used to fertilize tree planting campaign funded by PNPM-Green 2010 and 2011. Recently, we sent the liquid fertilizer produced out of biogas slurry to be analyzed its chemical content in the Faculty of Agriculture Haluoleo University. Together with Pak Zainuddin, we promoted the biogas smart practices to other PNPMGreen actors and stakeholders through sub-district workshop, semi-loka (workshop) organized by SKPD and OWT organized the site visit of DPRD to PNPM-Green smart practices etc. Similar activities were also conducted in Buton and Kolaka. As a results, there are numbers of replication of biogas in Muna and Buton, and possibly also in Kolaka: (a) Muna District Environment Agency built 5 biogas demo-plots; (b) Buton District Agriculture Agency built 2 biogas demo-plots; (c) PNPM-Green block-grant funded the instillation of 11 unit biogas in Lawa Sub-district (2011) and 2 unit biogas in Tongkuno Sub-district (2012); (d) ANTAM (State owned enterprise for Nickel mining in Kolaka) has committed 4 billion (Rp) to grant cows to farmer-group and Islamic boarding school, including the cost to install biogas. 19. Lights break the darkness of Tanjung Village: solar photovoltaic sub-project in the remote village (Success story No. 22/2012) Tanjung Village is a poor and remote coastal village in Tongkuno Sub-District (Muna). The village is located in the boundary areas between Buton and Muna District. In 1980, Lakapera Villagers (Buton) cultivated empty land in Oempu Village (Muna). As the population grew, while the area was far away from the center village (Oempu Village, Muna), then in 1999 (during reformation) the villagers developed a new village, partitioned from Oempu which is called Tanjung Village. In 2010, driven by the limited Muna District government program which ever reach the village; Tanjung villagers intended to merge with Buton rather than Muna. The case has driven conflicts among villagers and also with Muna Government. As results, in 2010, most of migrant’s villagers left Tanjung and returned to the original Village (Lakapera Village, Buton). The remaining Tanjung resident, after conflicts were 15 households whom they all were originated from Oempu Village. Understanding the limited village resource and technical assistance, since 2011 we provided environmental awareness in the village. We inspired villagers to install solar photovoltaic. After discussion with Sub-District Head and all village heads in Tongkuno Sub-district about the urgency of Tanjung Village assistance, the sub-project proposal enable to pass MAD-II and as results lights have finally hits the village. There are 8 unit solar photovoltaic installed in the village and used by 15 poor households (50 WP, 20 Ampere battery). The installation is parallel, by which one solar panel is used by 2 households. Every house uses two lamps, 15 watt each with 9 hours light duration a day. The lights, although unable to use for television and radio has enabled to support their livelihoods, especially to manage their seaweed during the night. 20. Replication of CCB home industries by 2012 PNPM-Green in Muna District (Success story No. 23/2012) 86

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Since 2011, we intensively campaign the benefits of CCB for cooking. We used to bring stove and demonstrate how to use CCB on daily cooking. Our intensive campaigns on CCB have inspired Lakologou Village/Tongkuno Sub-district to replicate the initiative. The design and the type of CCB processing are similar with CCB sub-project in Balabone. This is the first replication of CCB machinery processing in SE Sulawesi after Balabone. 21.

Bakko Lestari Women Group: Restoring mangrove forest and developing fish cracker home industry (Success story No. 25/2012)

Bakko Lestari is the name of fisher women group in Binanga Sangkara Sub-Village, Ampekale Village, Bontoa-Maros. Our intervention started in June 2012 to facilitate the development of mangrove nursery of Rhizopora sp (Bakau), Avicennia sp (Api-Api) and Soneratia sp (Padada) using aqua bottle wastes on the land of Ibu Hawang. Due to the enthusiasm of local community in which they were willing to work voluntary, we facilitated some relevant activities in the villages: (a) Facilitated their husband (male groups) to develop mangrove crab fattening (Photo 2); (b) Facilitated women groups to develop home industries of various chips made of crabs and fishes (Photo 4); (c) Facilitated the establishment of public library (Taman Baca) for children; (d) Facilitated the establishment of wave prevention fences (Alat Pemecah Ombak/APO) to protect planted mangrove seedlings; (e) Mangrove planting campaigns involving students association representatives from Java and Sulawesi. There are many developments during four months facilitations. Many fishery students visit the village to learn. 22.

Sipurio Farmer Group, InalipuE Village, Tanasitolo, Wajo: Improved horticulture farming using water weed (Eichomia crasipes) organic liquid fertilizer (Success story No. 26/2012)

In response to the lack of irrigation water in Wajo District, Sipuro Farmer group led by Sidarwan (young champion farmer) has initiated the group members to change their paddy field into semi organic horticulture farming (capsicum, tomato and melon). We have provided intensive technical assistance to Sidarwan and his group. We facilitated the development of organic liquid fertilizer made of local weed (Enceng Gondok/Eichomia crasipes) which naturally grows in Tempe Lake5. Tanasitolo sub-district is located nearby Tempe Lake. The use of compost (the raw material are made from vegetable market waste), together with liquid fertilizer and Phosphorus organic fertilizer made of banana trees have reduced the use of chemical fertilizer and production cost until 50 percent.

5 Tempe Lake is the largest lake in South Sulawesi Province, the lake is fed by two rivers, i.e. Walanae River in where the catchment areas cover 5 districts (Maros, Bone, Sopeng, Wajo) and Bila River which come from 3 districts (Enrekang, Sidrap, Wajo). The Tempe Lake discharges the water to Bone Gulf. Dr. Edi Purwanto

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8. Maintenance of tree planting 7. Evaluation of tree planting survival 6. Generative propagation of tree species 5. Vegetative rehabilitation and protection of spring water 4. Develop catchment area spatial planning 3. Mapping of catchment area boundary 2. Principle of vegetative rehabilitation 1. The concept of catchment area

First version First version First version First version First edition First edition First edition First edition First edition

GF, Setrawan, KVC GF, Setrawan, KVC GF, Setrawan, KVC GF, Setrawan, KVC GF, Setrawan, KVC GF, Setrawan, KVC GF and Setrawan GF and Setrawan GF (FKL, Astal) GF (FKLl)

T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F T, TA, F Use of material

20 Nov 2010 15 Sep 2010 20 August 2010 5 August 2010 18 April 2010 16 April 2010 12 April 2010 15 Sept 2009 15 Sept 2009 15 Sept 2009 2 Nov 2008 Date of production

80 copies 90 copies 100 copies 80 copies 100 copies 100 copies 80 copies 100 copies 60 copies 60 copies 80 copies No of copies

Target group

Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

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22. Making ‘Kascing’ organic fertilizer 23. Species selection for catchment area rehabilitation 24. Oyster mushroom cultivation 25. Straw mushroom cultivation

Final version Final version Final version

3. Generative propagation of tree seedlings; 4. Vegetative propagation of fruit trees

Final version 2. Mapping catchment areas

cat chment areas

1.    Concept of protection and rehabilitation of

First version

21. Coconut-Shell Charcoals Bricked

GF, Setrawan, KVC

GF, Setrawan, KVC

GF, Setrawan, KVC

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GF, Setrawan, KVC

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T, TA, F

B. Training Manuals (The final version of selected training modules)

First version

Second version

18. Generative and vegetative tree seedlings propagation

20. Biogas Installation

First version

17. Participatory mapping to develop village Spatial Planning

First version

First version

16. Making live-stock fodder from organic waste

19. Community empowerment on environmental management

First version

Status

15. Village Regulation and inter-village collaboration to protect catchment areas

Title (all are in Indonesians)

20 Sep 2012

20 Sep 2012

20 Sep 2012

20 Sep 2012

5 March 2012

3August 2012

12 December 2011

10 Oct 2010

10 Oct 2010

10 Oct 2010

10 Oct 2010

10 Oct 2010

10 Oct 2010

10 Oct 2010

10 Oct 2010

Date of production

1000 copies

1000 copies

1000 copies

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80 copies

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80 copies

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120 copies

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No of copies

Table Appendix 2: TF-090977: Information, Education Communications (IEC) Materials, Produced by OWT (2008 – 2012)

Status

9. Agroforestry

First version

GF, Setrawan, KVC

Title (all are in Indonesians)

10. Mangrove Rehabilitation

First version

A. Training Modules

11. Vegetative propagation of tree species

60 copies

60 copies 15 Dec 2010

15 January 2010

20 March 2010 T, TA, F

T, TA, F GF, Setrawan, KVC

GF, Setrawan, KVC First version

First version 12. Making ‘Bokashi’ organic fertilizer

13. GIS for Environmental Management

14. Spatial planning for environmental management

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4. The Guardian of Archipelago (Menjaga Pagar Nusantara). mangrove conservation - movie* 2. The making of Coco-shell Charcoal Bricked (CCB) 1. Home Biogas installation - tutorial film

Awareness Awareness Documentary Tutorial Tutorial

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

T, TA, F, A T, TA, F, A T, TA, F, A T, TA, F. A T, TA, F, A T, TA, F, A

20 February 2009 20 February 2009 16 August 2008 15 Nov 2008 20 June 2009 10 Oct 2010

20 copies 250 copies 250 copies 250 copies 150 copies 150 copies First Edition

Public Public

A, T, TA A, T, TA A, T, TA A T, TA, F

October, 2012 September, 2012 April, 2012 20 Sep 2012 20 Sep 2012

3000 copies 3000 copies 3000 copies 2000 copies 1000 copies Date of production

1000 copies No of copies

Dr. Edi Purwanto

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

Awareness Awareness Awareness Awareness Awareness Awareness Awareness Awareness

16. One Catchment One management 17. Micro-hydro power for People 18. Oyster Mushroom cultivation 19. Straw Mushroom cultivation 20. Manmade natural disaster 21. Film Compilation DVD-16 22. Film Compilation DVD-2a7 23. Film Compilation DVD-2a8

91

DVD 2A: (i) Menjaga Pagar Nusantara (The Guardian Archipelago); (ii) Nentu Lestari (Nentu handicraft); (iii) Pak Made: Tokoh Pelestari Lingkungan (Pak Made: a Conservation Champion); (iv) Pak Lasamira; Tokoh Pelestari Lingkungan (Pak Lasamira: a Conservation Champion); (v) Laboratorium Bawah Laut di Jantung Karang Dunia (Underwater Laboratory in the Centre of Coral Triangle). DVD 2B: (i) Pembuatan Arang Briket (The Making of Coconut shell charcoal Briquette/CCB); (ii) Instalasi Biogas (Biogas Installation); (iii) Lebah Madu (Honey Bee Culture); (iv) Persemaian dan Pembibitan (Tree seedling propagation). DVD 3: (i) Karet Busa Raksasa Indonesia (The Giant Sponge of Indonesia); (ii) Mamasa Menanam (Mamasa Planting Campaigns); (iii) Micro Hydro Power (MHP) for People; (iv) Rahabilitasi DAS (Catchment Area Rehabilitation).

8. 9.

1000 copies

1000 copies

1000 copies

100 copies

100 copies

100 copies

100 copies

100 copies

100 copies

100 copies

100 copies

150 copies

150 copies

200 copies

150 copies

300 copies

10 copies

DVD 1: (i) Best Practice Lambusango; (ii) Pelestarian Hutan Lambusango (Conservation of Lambusango Forest); (iii) Lambusango Surga Peneliti (Lambusango is the heaven of researchers);

30 June 2011

30 June 2011

30 June 2011

21 January 2012

21 August 2012

28 January 2012

5 March 2011

30 July 2011

10 Oct 2010

10 Oct 2010

30 Sept 2010

15 November 2010

2 November 2010

30 Sept 2010

12 Sept 2010

11 August 2010

10 July 2010

No of copies

7.

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

Date of production

6.

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

Tutorial

15. Honey Bees Culture

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

Tutorial

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

14. Biogas Installation

Documentary

Tutorial

11. Vegetative and generative tree seedlings propagation

13. Underwater Laboratory in the world coral triangle

Awareness

10. Profile of ‘Nentu’ handicraft maker group

Documentary

Awareness

9. Profile of Key Village Champions (Pak Lasamira)

12. Lambusango Forest: the heaven of biodiversity researchers

Documentary

Tutorial

8. Towards Sustainable and Energy SelfSufficiency Villages’ Talk-Show with KBR68H

7. Separation of domestic waste

Use of material

Use of material

20 Sep 2012

Target group

Target group

T, TA, F

1000 copies Status

Status

GF, Setrawan, KVC

20 Sep 2012

Dr. Edi Purwanto Title (all are in Indonesians)

Final version

T, TA, F

Title (all are in Indonesians)

5. Agroforestry

GF, Setrawan, KVC

GF, Setrawan, KVC

Final version

Final version

C. Book

Public

6. Mangrove rehabilitation

7. Cultivation of straw and oyster mushroom.

Final version

1.    Oyster mushroom cultivation; good business and environmentally sound

First Edition

Public

1.    Green Nationalism

2.    Transforming waste into grace: Strategy to empower microorganism troop

First Edition

D. ‘Lestari Desaku’ Magazine

3.    Vegetative propagation of fruit trees; planting now, harvesting tomorrow

E. DVD Film on Environmental Awareness

5. The Giant Sponge of Indonesia (Karet Busa Raksasa).

Awareness 3. PNPM-Green in Kolaka District

6. Best practices of Lambusango forest management

90


Villagers in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts, SE Sulawesi, Maros, Wajo and Tana Toraja In S Sulawesi Province

Villagers in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts, SE Sulawesi, Maros, Wajo and Tana Toraja In S Sulawesi Province

Villagers in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts, SE Sulawesi, Maros, Wajo and Tana Toraja In S Sulawesi Province Framed poster installed at strategic sites

Framed poster installed at strategic sites

Framed poster installed at strategic sites 8. Protect watersheds as life supporting system from ridge to reef.

9. Multiuses of biogas

10. Edible mushroom farming

Ballyhoos

A Villagers in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

Framed poster installed at strategic sites 7. Utilizing livestock-dung as a new source of sustainable fuel

Ballyhoos were installed at the capital of subdistrict A Villagers in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

Framed poster installed at strategic sites

6. Let’s sort domestic waste: Dislocating waste without sorting and processing is just moving problems

1. Garbage separation

PNPM-Green stakeholders and Villagers in 9 sub-districts in Buton, Muna and Kolaka District, SE Sulawesi Province

A Villagers in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

Framed poster installed at strategic sites 5. Save water movement through build millions of recharge areas

H. Ballyhoo A Villagers in Kolaka District

Framed poster installed at strategic sites

4. Stop Deforestation: Cutting forest means inviting flood disaster*

14 Pebuary 2010 17 August 2012 17 August 2012 2 March 2012 13 August 2010 13 August 2010 13 August 2010 10 April 2010 Date of production

9 units 2000 copies 2000 copies 2000 copies 1000 copies 1000 copies 1000 copies 1000 copies No of copies Status GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

Target group

T, TA, F, A

T, TA, F, A

Use of material

21 June2012

21 June 2012

30 June 2011

Date of production

2000 copies

2000 copies

1000 copies

No of copies

Use of material

A

A

A Target group

Status

Awareness GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

T, TA, F, A

Title (all are in Indonesians)

24. Film Compilation DVD-2a9 Awareness GF, S, KVC,GO, CBOs, CSOs

Title (all are in Indonesians)

24.   Film Compilation : Catchment Areas Management10 Awareness

Information

Talk show

Jingle

Advertisement

Radio campaigns in Muna District

Community Radio in Watubangga and Ladongi Subdistricts

Radio campaigns at Kolaka and Buton Districts

Radio campaigns at Kolaka and Buton Districts

Radio campaigns at SE Sulawesi Province

A

A

A

A

A

3 times/day, 2010

3 times/ Week,2009 -2012

3 times/ Week,2009

3 times/ week, 2009

12 times/ Week, 2008 - 2009

-

-

-

-

-

F. Radio Broadcast

25.   Film Compilation: Smart Practices of PNPM-Green11

1. PNPM-Green 2. PNPM-Green Jingle 3. Talk Show on Green Village

4. PNPM-Green Update

Jingle

Framed poster installed at strategic sites

Villagers in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

Villagers in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

A

A

10 August 2009

10 April 2010

11000 copies

1000 copies

1000 copies

5. Keep Muna Green

1. Drought disaster could only be prevented by avoiding deforestation*

Framed poster installed at strategic sites

10 April 2010

G. Posters

2. Mangrove forest prevent coastal disaster

A

DVD Film on Catchment Area Management: This DVD film is composed of six films: (i). Manmade natural disaster (Bencana Alam Buatan Manusia); (ii) One Catchment One Management (Satu DAS Satu Pengelolaan); (iii) Planting campaigns in Agam District (Agam Menanam); (iv) Giant Sponge of Indonesia (Karet Busa Raksasa Indonesia); (v) MHP for People and (vi) Nursery development (Persemaian dan Pembibitan).

Villagers in Muna District

DVD on PNPM-Green Smart Practices: This DVD is composed of five films: (i) Vegetative propagation technique (Teknik Pembibitan Vegetatif); (ii) PNPM-Green smart practices (Praktik Cerdas PNPMGreen); (iii) World Bank Supervision Mission in SE Sulawesi; (iv) Mushroom Cultivation (Budidaya Jamur); (v) The making of Kascing Fertilizer (Pupuk Kascing).

Framed poster installed at strategic sites 10.

3. Save ‘Jompi’ Forest as the water tower of Raha Town*

11

93 Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

92


Leaflets

Leaflets

Leaflets

Leaflets

Leaflets

Leaflets 12. The making of ‘Agar wood’ (Gaharu)

13. Permanent Biogas Installation

14. The making of Charcoal Coconut shell briquette

15. Selection of tree species for land rehabilitation

16. Tree Planting Techniques

Leaflets

Leaflets

Leaflets

11. The making of Bokashi Tree planting techniques

9.

Leaflets Shoot cutting techniques

8.

10. Generative seedlings propagation Developing Village Nursery

7.

A, T, TA

A, T, TA

A, T, TA

A, T, TA

A, T, TA PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

J. Banners A, T, TA

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012

4000 copies 4000 copies 4000 copies 4000 copies 4000 copies 4000 copies 4000 copies No of copies

A, T, TA

4000 copies Date of production

9 units

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

2012 Use of material

12 September 2010

9 units

A, T, TA

4000 copies Target group

Ballyhoos were installed at the capital of subdistrict

25 May 2011

18 units

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

2012 Status PNPM-Green stakeholders and Villagers in 9 sub-districts in Buton, Muna and Kolaka District, SE Sulawesi Province

Ballyhoos were installed at the capital of subdistrict

25 April 2012

2000 copies

A, T, TA

2000 copies Ballyhoos

PNPM-Green stakeholders and Villagers in 9 sub-districts in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts, SE Sulawesi Province

Ballyhoos were installed at the capital of subdistrict

2008

2000 copies

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in SE and S Sulawesi Province

2010 Ballyhoos

PNPM-Green stakeholders and Villagers in 9 sub-districts in Maros, Wajo and Tana Toraja Districts, S Sulawesi Province

A, T, TA

2009

2000 copies

A, T, TA

No of copies Ballyhoos

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

A, T, TA

2009

1000 copies

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

Date of production Leaflets

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

A, T, TA

2009

2000 copies

Use of material Leaflets

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

A, T, TA

2009

2000 copies

Target group

Developing Community Based Institution for Mangrove Forest Conservation

Leaflets

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

A, T, TA

2010

Status

2.

Let’s Sort and Process Domestic Waste

Leaflets

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

A, T, TA

Title (all are in Indonesians)

3.

Ten Important Questions on Green PNPM

Leaflets

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

Title (all are in Indonesians)

4.

Human Obligation to Maintain Life Sustainability

Leaflets

1.     Village meeting to discuss green development

4. PNPM-Green Program

3. PNPM-Green Program

2. Site Map of PNPM-Green demo-pilots at sub-district level

5.

Honeybee Culture : tip and benefit

I. Leaflets

6.

95 Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

94


Stickers

Stickers

Stickers 1. Janthropa Stoves User (Pengguna Kompor Jarak)

2. Solar Voltage User (Pengguna Listrik Tenaga Surya)

3. Green- PNPM: Towards Sustainable and Energy Self – Sufficiency

Rural community Rural community Rural community L. Stickers Rural community

Rural community

Rural community

Rural community

Rural community Conservation Action reminder

Conservation Action reminder

Conservation Action reminder

Conservation Action reminder

Conservation Action reminder 3. Save the Earth

4. Domestic waste management

5. Forest Protection

6. Nature Conservation

7. Domestic waste management

8. Mangrove Conservation

Rural community Rural community

Conservation Action reminder 2. Coastal conservation

9. Water Conservation

Rural community

Conservation Action reminder Use of material

Date of production

20 sets

No of copies

Target group Target group

2010

Status

A A A A A A A A A A A Use of material Status

A

Title (all are in Indonesians)

2010 2010 2010 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2010 2010 2010 Date of production

Wajo (3) Wajo (3)

1000 350 80 Wajo (3). Tana Toraja (2) Tana Toraja (2) Tana Toraja (2), Wajo (1) 6 boards Kolaka (2) Muna (2) Buton (2) 6 boards Kolaka (2) Muna (2) Buton (2) 6 boards Kolaka (2) Muna (2) Buton (2) No of copies Title (all are in Indonesians) PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

5. Honeybee culture yield honey (Memelihara Lebah Menuai Madu)

4. To maintain soil fertility using Bokashi (Menjaga Kesuburan Tanah dengan Bokashi)

3. Keep the village green with energy saving stoves (Melestarikan Kehijauan Desa dengan Tungku Hemat Energi)

2. My green village, my green country (Hijau Desaku Lestari Negeriku)

Promotion of Green smart practices

Promotion of Green smart practices

Promotion of Green smart practices

Promotion of Green smart practices

Promotion of Green smart practices

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts

A

A

A

A

A

A

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

20 sets

20 sets

20 sets

20 sets

20 sets

20 sets

Promotion of Green smart practices

6. Recovering coastal fortress (Memelihara Benteng Pesisir)

Promotion of Green smart practices

20 sets

1. Healthy, clean and efficient with charcoal briquettes

7. Livelihoods from coastal fortress (Sumber Kehidupan dari Benteng Pesisir)

2010

1 boards

A

2010

PNPM-Green Stakeholders, KVCs in Buton, Muna and Kolaka Districts K. Iron Campaign Boards

Rural community

A

Promotion of Green smart practices

Conservation Action reminder

8. Turning livestock dung into biogas (Meyulap Kotoran Menjadi Biogas)

1. Village Conservation Areas

97 Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

96


Project beneficiaries

A A

2011 2011 2011

1500 1500 1500

5. Save Energy

Stickers Stickers Cutting Stickers Status

Rural community Rural community Rural community Rural community Target group

A A A A Use of material

2012 2012 2012 2010 Date of production

3 cars 2000 2000 1000 No of copies

Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district

Training on slope and riverbank stabilization through vegetative planting Biopore, Training and demo-plot development Seaweed farming Energy Saving stove Mangrove crabs fattening Training on Soil conservation Cashew Processing Biogas Installation Bokashi Nursery training and demo-plot development Nursery development Honey bee culture, technical skill and demo-plot development Cashew Processing Permanent Biogas training and demo-plot development

3

4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

District

GPS training for FKL and PNPM green actors

2

Province

Workshop for Sub PNPM Green FKL in SE-Sulawesi Province

Level

1

Activity

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Kendari

District

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

Year

7

78

37

60

214

60

40

20

37

35

30

32

16

28

30

16

Male

39

41

15

91

20

15

5

41

5

15

17

12

0

10

2

2

Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Youth

Appendix 3a: Community training in SE Sulawesi

Villagers, project beneficiaries

Woman Group

Farmer Group

TPK, Sub project beneficiaries

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Women Group

Farmer Group

Fishermen group

Villagers

Fishermen group

Villagers, FK-L, Sub district government

Sub district government, Green PNPM and Rural PNPM actor at village and Sub district level

PJOK, FK regular, FKL and PL

PNPM Green facilitator (FKL)

Participants

Title (all are in Indonesians)

4. OWT: Empowering Community for Conservation

6. PNPMGreen-OWT:Bersama Masyarakat Melestarikan Alam

Car Stickers

No.

T-Shirts

Project beneficiaries

A

7. PNPM-Green Awareness cars

1.   PNPM-Green: Toward sustainable village and Energy Sufficiency

T-Shirts

Key stakeholders, KVCs, Project beneficiaries M. T-Shirts and Hats

2.   PNPM-Green-OWT: Together with local community to conserve natural resource

Hats

3.    PNPM-Green-OWT

Remarks: GF (Green Facilitators/FKL, Astal, SPL), T: Training, A: Awareness rising; TA: Technical Assistances; F: Facilitation; KVC: Key village champions

98 99


30 29 28 27 26 25 24 23 22 21 20 19

The use of Janthropa stove CCB, training and economic group development Bokashi training Biopore, Training and demo plot development Training on orange grafting and nursery development in Warinta Catchment Rehabilitation/Generative and Vegetative tree seedlings propagation Workshop for PNPM Actors PE Biogas Honey bee culture, technical skill and demo-plot development CCB, training and economic group development Training on Mangrove rehabilitation Training on land rehabilitation Training and development of community radio

Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district

Buton Buton Buton Buton Buton Buton Buton Kendari Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka

2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2010 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009

55 10 30 40 28 15 14 50 78 30 35 23 85 24

30 15 25 15 0 0 2 9 39 4 45 10 30 2

0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0

Villagers Villagers Villagers Villagers Villagers, FK-L, Sub district government Farmer group PNPM Green FKLs Provincial government GreenPNPM and Rural-PNPM Province and district facilitator Villagers Villagers Villagers Villagers TPK, KPMD and village’s farmer group Youth group, UPK, KPMD, General public

Dr. Edi Purwanto

CCB, training and economic group development Making energy saving stove Making of bokashi

36 37 38

Sub-district

Sub-district Sub-district

Technical assistance to BLM nurseries group

Training on watershed management and upper catchment rehabilitation strategy

Training on making poultry feed using cocoa skin and snail Training on making handicraft made of banana trunks and plastic garbage Training on making bokashi

43

44

45 46 47

Training on making VCO

Sub-district

Developing PE Biogas

42

48

Sub-district

Honey bee culture, technical skill and demo-plot development 41

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Water Purification

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

40

Organic farming training

Sub-district

Permanent Biogas training and demo-plot development 35

39

Sub-district

Honey bee culture, technical skill and demo-plot development

34

Sub-district

Sub-district

Catchment management

33

Muna

Muna

Muna

Buton

Kendari

Buton

Kolaka

Kolaka

Kolaka

Kolaka

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2

13

2

45

40

102

78

35

30

75

30

15

35

78

60

250

15

2

15

12

4

20

39

2

11

5

11

25

30

39

15

100

Youth

Villagers

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Village woman group

Farmer group

Women group

Poultry farmer in 3 villages

Facilitators/GOI sub contracted consultant (SPL,FK-L) developed action plan to implement watershed conception in green PNPM development objective

BLM beneficiaries

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Farmer group, biogas project beneficiaries

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers, project beneficiaries

Farmer Group

Senior high school

Participants

Female

0

Village representative

Youth

3

0

Male

Year

20

30

Year

District

2009

150

District

Level

Muna

2009 Level

Activity

Sub-district

Muna

Dr. Edi Purwanto Activity

No.

Developing community forestry

Sub-district

Participants

17

Village regulation development

Male

18 Female

31

Training on making VCO

No.

32

100 101


Sub-district Key Village Identification for fruit seedling nursery development

Enhancing the role of KPMD trough KPMD monthly meeting

Training for Verification Team

Training on Ducks farming (eggs hatchery)

Training of Trainer on permanent biogas installation

Training on making energy saving stove and CCB

Training on Catchment management

Development of Bokashi

Practical Exercise on making biogas outflow

Develop Patchouli nursery

Training on making Nata-de-Coco and CCB

On the job training to Madu Rasa apiculture group

Training on making handy craft from garbage

Training on community radio

Strengthening RGS community Radio

Fixing biogas demo-plot 71

72

73

74

75

76

77

78

79

80

81

82

83

84

85

86

Sub-district Sub-district Training for Verification Team

70

Level

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district Sub-district

Training on making energy saving stove

69

Activity

Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka Muna Muna Muna Muna Muna Buton Kolaka Kolaka Muna Muna Muna Kolaka District

2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 2011 Year

7 4 8 20 15 2 10 20 20 66 20 7 40 26 20 16 24 12 Male

1 2 3 30 1 20 4 2 15 33 15 3 0 2 15 0 4 2 Female

0 0 0 15 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 Youth

Farmer group Radio crew CR staff Women group, shool children Farmer group Women group Farmer group Villagers Farmer group KPMD Villagers Villagers Farmer group Verification team KPMD, Local NGO, FK-L Headmen, BPD and villagers Verification Team Villagers Participants 0

Apiculture group

Farmer group

No. Participants

6

0

Villagers

Youth

18

1

0

Village government and Villagers

Female

Male

2011

4

3

0

Beneficiaries

Year

Muna

2011

20

3

0

Verification team, villagers

District

Activity

Sub-district Muna

2011

20

14

0

Villagers

Level

No.

Training on making liquid fertilizer made of biogas disposal Sub-district Kolaka

2011

25

175

0

Sub-project beneficiaries

Verification team

51 Training on honey bees harvesting Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

200

0

0

Sub-project beneficiaries

0

52 Mapping on the environmental potential using GPS Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

27

0

0

KPMD and TPU

4

53 Technical assistance and facilitation on developing customary forest regulation Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

20

1

0

Villagers

10

54 Technical assistance for 2009 BLM sub project

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

12

19

0

Villagers

2011

55 Assisted field verification process

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

33

1

0

Woman Group

Muna

56 Training on making village nursery and bokashi

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

25

45

0

Villagers

Sub-district

57 Training on pruning and practical exercise of using bokashi

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

35

18

0

Woman Group

Training for Verification team

58 Training on making EM-4

Sub-district

Buton

2011

2

5

0

Woman Group

49

59

Environmental potential training for KPMD and TPU in Lambandia sub-distric

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

32

25

2

Villagers

Maintenance Team

60

Permanent Biogas training and demo-plot development

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

75

20

0

KPMD, TPU

0

61

CCB, training and economic group development

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

7

7

0

8

62 Making Nata-de-Coco

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

9

20

63

63

Permanent Biogas training and demo-plot development

Sub-district

Buton

2011

46

2011

64

Domestic waste separation movement

Sub-district

Muna

2011

Muna

65

Making garbage handicraft

Sub-district

Muna

Sub-district

66

Training on biogas and demo-plot development

Sub-district

Training for Maintenance Team (TP)

67

Technical assistance for TPU in writing village sub project proposal

50

68

103 Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

102


TPU Training

TPK Training

TPU Training

TPK Training

TPU Training

TPK Training

TPU Training

TPK Training

TPU Training

TPK Training

RHL Training 99

100

101

102

103

104

105

106

107

108

109

Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district

2010

2011

2011

2012

2012 Buton, Muna, Kolaka

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

2009 2010

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

Kolaka

2009

281 288 288 288 288 281 281 281

134 134 134 134 132 132 132 132

0 422 422 422 422 413 413 413 413

Villagers TPK TPK TPK TPU TPK TPU TPK TPU TPK Youth

Farmer group

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

281

413 Female

0

Farmer group

2009

132

TPU 15

0

Sumbersari farmer group

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

281

413 Year 20

4

0

Sidomuncul farmer group

2008

132 District 2011

10

2

0

PNPM green facilitator

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

281 Level Muna 2011

12

7

0

PNPM green facilitator

2008 Sub-district Muna

2011

18

7

0

KPMD

Participants Development of Bokashi Sub-district Kolaka

2011

28

10

0

OWT Staff, Local NGO

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

Youth

87 Develop Patchouli nursery Sub-district Kolaka

2008

42

282

0

KPMD

Female

88 Training on making Bokashi Sub-district

Makassar

2009

282

5

0

KPMD

Male

89 Training on making organic pesticide Sub-district

Makassar

2008

15

282

0

KPMD

Year

90 Pre-service training for PNPM-Green facilitator

Sub-district

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

2008

282

282

0

KPMD

District

91 Refresher training for PNPM green facilitator

Sub-district

Baubau

2009

282

282

0

Level

92

KPMD Training on NRM

Sub-district

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

2010

282

282

Activity

93

In-service training for CSO facilitators

Sub-district

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

2011

282

No.

94

Refresher training for KPMD

Sub-district

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

2012

Participants

95

Refresher training for KPMD

Sub-district

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

Male

96

Refresher training for KPMD

Sub-district

Activity

97

Refresher training for KPMD

No.

98

105 Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

104


Villagers Male

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Sub-district Sub-district

Sub-district Sub-district Sub-district

Training on generative and vegetative propagation Strengthen capacity building of village heads to enhance environmental village governance Biogas Installation Sub-district Workshop, Identification of potential NR and NRM Problems Energy Saving stove Making CCB Making Fertilizer and Strength the Group Biopore and recharge wells Environmental awareness to religion group and youth group Field Trip for Parliament and SKPD to PNPM-Green smart practices Nursery development

5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15

Liquid Fertilizer

District

Training fish chips

4

16

District

Mangrove Nursery

3

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Sub-district

Mangrove crabs fattening

2

Sub-district

Level

Making Garbage Handicraft

Participants 1

Activity

Wajo

Wajo

Tana Toraja

Tana Toraja

Tana Toraja

Tana Toraja

Tana Toraja

Tana Toraja

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

Maros, Wajo, Tana Toraja Maros

2012

2012

2012

2012

Tana Toraja and Wajo

Maros

Maros

Maros

2012

2012

Maros and Wajo Maros

Year

District

50

25

70

64

358

54

25

25

30

124

120

25

10

5

5

10

Male

7

5

32

40

332

77

13

13

13

24

32

19

0

12

12

40

Female

0

0

0

0

0

Â

0

0

0

0

0

0

2

15

15

8

Youth

Participants

Farmer Group

Farmer Group

SKPD and district Parliaments

Religion Group and Youth

Students

Villagers, Women Groups

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers, FK-L, Sub district government

Villagers

Head Village, BPD, Setrawan

KPMD, Tim Pemelihara, Farmer Group

Villagers, Children

Vilagers, Children

Vilagers, Children

Vilagers (women Group)

Activity

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Appendix 3b: Community training in South Sulawesi

No.

No.

10

Farmer group Youth

25

0

Village government, KPMD, TPK, villagers Female

45

10

0

Woman group Year

2010

20

75

0

Farmer group District

Kolaka

2010

225

25

0

Farmer group Level

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

5

20

0

Farmer group Villagers

Green Learning House

Sub-district

Kolaka

2011

30

15

0

Villagers 0

112

Organic fertilizer

Sub-district

Kolaka

2012

20

15

0

Ibu-ibu PKK se-Kec. Pasarwajo 15

113

Village cadres on RPJM-Desa

Sub-district

Kolaka

2012

20

0

51

Villagers 35

114

Coconut oil making

Sub-district

Kolaka

2012

10

49

0

Villagers 2010

115

Bokashi/EM4

Sub-district

Kolaka

2012

2

8

0

Villagers Kolaka

116

Oyster mushroom

Sub-district

Kolaka

2012

19

10

0

Masyarakat Sub-district

117

Vegetative propagation

Sub-district

Buton

2012

29

1

0

Masyarakat

Domestic waste separation movement (Gemes)

118

Grinding machine for organic fertilizer

Sub-district

Buton

2012

7

6

0

Masyarakat

110

119

Garbage separation and garbage bank

Sub-district

Buton

2012

18

2

0

Villagers Woman group

120

Biogas Replication

Sub-district

Buton

2012

17

9

0

Villagers 0

121

Bokashi

Sub-district

Buton

2012

35

11

0 20

122

Team verification

Sub-district

Buton

2012

38

6 5

123

Bokashi

Sub-district

Buton

2012

58

Penerima Manfaat BLM 2010

124

Solar photo-voltaic

Sub-district

Buton

2012

0 Kolaka

125

Portable solar dryer

Sub-district

Buton

1 Sub-district

126

Maintenance Team

Sub-district

8 Developing CCB

127

Village regulation

2012

111

128

Buton

4244 Sub-district

4572 Solar photo voltaic

8657 129

Total

106 107


0

District Level

Wajo District

2012 Year

103 Male

89 Female

0 0

Villagers Students Participants

Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

Training for Maintenance Team (TP) Technical assistance for 2009 BLM sub project Assisted field verification process Technical assistance for TPU in writing village sub project proposal Training for Verification Team Enhancing the role of KPMD trough KPMD monthly meeting Pre-service training for PNPM-Green facilitator Refresher training for PNPM green facilitator In-service training Refresher training for KPMD TPU Training TPK Training Training for land rehabilitation

2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14

Remarks: PW = Pasarwajo, SL = Sampolawa, MS = Mawasangka LW = Lawa, TK = Tongkuno, NB = Napabalano, LD = Ladongi, BL = Baula, WB = Watubangga, LB = Lambandia

Total

Workshop for PNPM Actors in Kendari

1

Activity

4

4

4

4

4

1

4

4

PW

4

4

4

4

4

1

4

4

SL

BUTON

4

4

4

4

4

1

4

4

MS

4

4

4

4

4

1

4

1

4

1

LW

4

4

4

4

4

1

4

1

4

1

TK

MUNA

4

4

4

4

4

1

1

4

1

4

1

NB

4

4

4

4

4

1

4

4

1

LD

4

4

4

4

4

1

4

4

BL

4

4

4

4

4

1

4

4

WB

KOLAKA

4

4

4

4

2

1

2

1

LB

8

9

2857

6

58 4794

132

664

664

1128

5

10

7

15

20

175

14

Female

281

1419

1419

1128

15

42

28

20

46

200

25

63

50

Male

Appendix 3c: Training workshops for PNPM-Green actors in SE Sulawesi

Activity

Bokashi Fertilizer

34

No.

17

354

Trainer MHP No

1 Youth

20 2012

2012

Wajo

Makassar

40

District

Province

795

Conversion of generator fuel from benzene to gas

Watershed Management

1477

18

19

Total

108 109


5 4 3 2 1

Sub-district Workshop to socialize village conversion areas. Workshop on Sustainable forest management for community welfare Sub-District commitment for mangrove rehabilitation Facilitated PNPM Green cycles at Sub district Re-greening Campaign on Secondary School Green Exhibition Festival in Baubau Town

Sub district Sub district District Sub district Sub district Sub district Province

Kolaka Kolaka Muna Muna Buton Buton, Muna, Kolaka Buton Buton

2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2009 2008 2008 2008

586 75 20 157 381 169 50 1200 70 300

750 371 50 17 87 105 3 20 600 50 350

0 0 20 0 0 0 0 0 0 500 200

Village representative Villagers Villagers, general public TPK, KPMD, villagers Students of Senior High School KPMD, Elementary school students and their parents Sub district government, Senior high school student, KPMD, TPK Project beneficiaries Villagers and Sub District Government Community Villagers and students General public Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

Sub district Sub district

Sub district Sub district Sub district

PNPM Green Exhibition in HALO Festival PNPM Green Exhibition on Baubau EXPO PNPM Green Exhibition on Buton Festival Domestic waste separation movement Distribution and installation of environmental factsheet Development of Green Learning House Development of environmental kiosk Promotion of CCB Verification/Identification of MHP site in Lasalimu and Wolowa sub-districts Survey on nursery feasibility for PNPM Green sub project Supported the world bank supervision mission Green sub-project verification Socialization green menu during MAD I Site feasibility survey for apiculture development Re-greening movement on the roadsides Re-greening movement for high school student

18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

District

District

Province

Province

Supported National planting campaign movement

17

Sub district

16

Level

Planting movement during World Environmental Day in Ladongi

Activity

Buton, Muna

Buton

Buton

Kolaka

Muna

Muna

Muna

Buton

Buton

Muna

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Kendari

Wakatobi

Kolaka

District

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

Year

108

20

8

45

98

33

12

63

3

17

7

1000

415

1000

2000

1062

200

400

Male

118

0

0

15

22

18

5

35

20

15

0

800

186

500

1000

788

300

300

Female

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

10

0

0

0

200

30

1000

1500

0

100

50

Youth

High School student

Villagers

Villagers

General public

Verification team, local communities

Communities and beneficiaries

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

General Public

General public

General public

Governments, NGO and all parties all over SE Sulawesi

Sub district government, Senior high school student, Green PNPM actors at sub district and village level

Appendix 4a: Community Awareness in SE Sulawesi

Participants No.

Participants

6

Tree planting movement in Ladongi

District

Buton

2009

1200

55

0

Villagers Youth

7

Encouraging early age children and their parents to do planting activities

Sub district

Kolaka

2009

80

10

0

Senior high school student, KPMD Female

8

Garbage separation movement at Secondary school

Sub district

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

2009

40

1

0 Male

9

Faith based environmental campaigns

Sub district

Buton

2010

22

180 Year

10

Discussed and installation of wooden framed posters

Sub district

Buton

2010

270 District

11

Faith based campaign during Friday Pray

Sub district

Buton

2010 Level

12

Sub-district workshop to socialize village conservation areas

Sub district

Muna Activity

13

Workshop on Evaluation of PNPM Green Implementation

Sub district No.

14

Training on catchment rehabilitation to Secondary school students and village cadres

Villagers and Village Government

15

110 111


Sub district Level

Buton, Muna, Kolaka Kolaka District

2011 2011 2011 Year

162 161 150 125

10 81 89 150 45 Female

33 0 0 0 0 0 Youth

Project beneficiaries General public Village government Village government, BPD, communities, BKAD Village government, BPD, and communities General public General public

3

Facilitated Musrenbang Kecamatan

Sub district

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

2011

38

118

0

Villagers Dr. Edi Purwanto

Sub district Sub district

Sub district Sub district National Sub district

Sub district Sub district

Initiating Voluntary work to maintain sub project plantation Initiating voluntary work to maintain ecotourism sub project Handover of village library and planting campaigns Group discussion with Beringin farmer group Group discussion on coastal Abrasion with Key Villages PNPM Green socialization through Sultra Exposition PNPM Green smart practices socialization through local Radio (SAW FM) Garbage utilization demo-plot Garbage separation movement socialization Garbage separation movement campaign Formulation of VCO business group “Kaluku Lestari� Formulation of mangrove conservationist group FGD on NR potential, environmental problem Environmental awareness through awareness cars Feasibility survey of for biogas development site for BLH demo-plot Facilitating journalist trip Facilitated focus group discussion on biogas installation with Masseddiada farmer group

51 52 53 54 55 56 57 58 59 60 61 62 63 64 65 66 67

Sub district

District

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Intensive facilitation on honey bee culture

50

Sub district

Introducing PNPM smart-practices on garbage separation

49

Level

Kolaka

Kolaka, Muna

Muna

Buton

Kolaka

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Muna

Buton

Baubau

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Muna

Kolaka

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

13

15

25

255

30

20

5

20

15

2

15

220

17

17

36

20

15

10

4

0

15

121

10

3

15

15

20

13

3

300

5

8

13

3

0

2

13

0

0

0

217

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

75

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

Villagers

Wartawan TV dan Surat kabar

Communities and beneficiaries

General public

Villagers

Senior high school, villagers

Kaluku Lestari member

Villagers

Villagers

Women group

General Public

General public

Villagers

Farmer group

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Apiculture group

Women group

Participants

34

Facilitated MAD-I

Sub district

Buton, Kolaka, Muna

2011

250

2

0

Villagers

Youth

35

Facilitated MAD-II

Sub district

Buton

2011

3

3

0

Biogas beneficiaries Female

36

Facilitated MAD-III

Sub district

Kolaka

2011

17

5

0

Village government, local communities Male

37

Participated regular village quarterly meeting organized by village government

Sub district

Buton

2011

15

10

0

Village government, BPD, and communities Year

38

Organized PNPM Green exhibition at Gelora football field

Sub district

Buton

2011

12

12

0

Sub district government, villagers, students Dr. Edi Purwanto

District

39

Monitoring PNPM Green solar panel (PLTS) sub project implementation

Sub district

Buton

2011

32

166

65

Activity

40

Monitoring PNPM Green project implementation of Sengon dan Mahoni plantation

Sub district

Muna

2011

208

15

District, Sub district and Village government No.

41

Monitoring and evaluation of Mahoni plantation sub-project implementation

Sub district

Muna

2011

36

0

Participants

42

Meeting to verify biogas beneficiaries of block-grant 2011

Sub district

Muna

2011

73 Male

43

Meeting to discuss the improvement of 2008 blockgrant mangrove plantation

Sub district

Buton

141

Headmen, BPD and Villagers Activity

44

MD Information

Sub district

2011

0 No.

45

Replanting mangrove plantation

Muna

0 46

District

8 Mainstreaming environmental issues through village development plan meeting

2011 47

Muna

Key village identification for fruit seedling nursery development

Sub district

48

112 113


Sub district

Sub district

Sub District

Sub district Awareness of PNPM Green and smart practices to teachers an senior high school students

Develop innovative Green-PNPM smart practices applicable to each pilot Sub districts

Support environmental awareness for teachers and senior high schools

Support environmental awareness for teachers and junior high schools

Environmental Film Screening

Faith based awareness 88

89

90

91

92

93

94

Total Sub district

Environmental awareness through film screening (My Darling) 87

Sub district Sub district

Door to door awareness raising targeted women, disadvantaged communities (DC) and youth conducted by sub contracted NGO (LSM Lestari (buton), LSM Gaharu (Muna), LSM Alas (Kolaka)

Sub district Sub district

Awareness during inter-kecamatan sub project handover meeting (MDST) Participants

Buton Buton Buton

2012 2012 2012 2012 2011

Buton, Muna, Kolaka

Buton

2011 Year

2011

2011

2011

Buton, Muna, Kolaka Muna Buton, Muna, Kolaka Buton District

16409 123 1023 5 7 180 45 168 580 30 Male

10160 37 791 3 2 82 57 154 398 20

5851 67 921 260 348 0 0 123 168 0 Youth

Government and Villagers Villagers Teacher and Students Teacher and Students General public Senior high school students General Public Rural Community Villagers Participants 69 Environmental awareness on energy self sufficient village during Ramadan

Environmental campaign through banner and ballyhoo in three sub-district

Sub district

Sub district

Sub district

Muna

Muna

Muna

Buton

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

7

7

225

75

120

0

80

1

0

45

50

30

0

0

0

0

0

0

0

8

0

Farmer group

Local communities

General public

Villagers

Villagers

Farmer group

General public

Village government, BPD, and communities

General public

Female

70 Distributing sticker Sub district

Buton

2011

100

10

0

Farmer group

Youth

71 Dissemination of factsheet Sub district

Muna

2011

18

38

0

Local communities

Female

86

Level Male

72 Development of SPH

Sub district

Muna

2011

27

4

0

General public

Year

73 Development of Environmental Kiosk

Sub district

Muna

2011

23

2

0

Village government

District

74 Develop CCB production unit

Sub district

Buton

2011

4

50

0

Villagers

Level

Activity

Activity

75 Demo-plot monitoring in preparation of the WB visits

Sub district

Muna

2011

150

14

0

Woman group

No.

No.

76 Critical land rehabilitation movement

Sub district

Muna

2011

30

2

0

Villagers

Traditional leader, villagers and student

77 Bokashi demo-plot development

Sub district

Muna

2011

26

40

0

Villagers

56

78 Biogas monitoring

Sub district

Buton

2011

5

63

0

54

79 Awareness through factsheet

Sub district

Buton

2011

95

20

74

80

Awareness raising through informal discussion with village government

Sub district

Kolaka

2011

40

2011

81

Awareness on spring water protection

Sub district

Buton

2011

Buton

82

Awareness on garbage separation with District’s Health Agency

Sub district

Kolaka

Sub district

83

Awareness during MD socialization

Sub district

Environmental faith based in campaign

84

Awareness during MAD I PNPM-MP

68

85

115 Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

114


2012

279 81

1675 95 46

542 890 0 0

Students and Teacher Community, villagers Villagers Villagers, FK-L, Sub district government Government in District Level Dr. Edi Purwanto Teak Nursery. Cashew Nut Nursery Teak vegetative Propagation Planting Teak Coconut oil processing Nursery “Gusi-gusi” Fishery Ecotourism Honey bee Demo-plot Coffee nursery Teak community plantation Coconut Charcoal Briquette Efficient Energy stow Cashew nut processing Mete Farmer group facilitation Myristica fragrans nursery Water spring protection Orange nursery Ecotourism Albizia planting

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19

Demo-plot Name

Sandang Pangan

Gunung Sejuk

Bangun

Kahulungaya

Kabawakole

Kahulungaya

Lalemba

Wamelai

Tombula

Lianosa

Watumela

Gunung Sari

Gumanano

Waangu-Wangu

Lakologou

Latompe

Fongkaniwa

Lalemba, Lapadaku

Lalemba

Village

Sampolawa

Sampolawa

Sampolawa

Pasarwajo

Pasarwajo

Pasarwajo

Lawa

Lawa

Tongkuno

Tongkuno

Lawa

Watubangga

Mawasangka

Pasarwajo

Tongkuno

Lawa

Tongkuno

Lawa

Lawa

Sub district

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Kolaka

Buton

Buton

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

District

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2010

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2009

2008

Year

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Former Group

Women group

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Farmer group

Farmer group

Villagers

Villagers

Women group

Villagers

Villagers

Farmer group

Villagers

Appendix 4b : Community Awareness in South Sulawesi

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Appendix 5a : Demo-pilots in SE Sulawesi Beneficiary

Maros, Wajo, Tana Toraja

2012

2135

1214

0

Students and Teacher No.

District

All Sub-district Pilot Green PNPM

2012

1542

280

0

Faskab, Fastekab, Faskeu and Satker PNPM Participants

Coordination Meeting With Government In District Level

Sub-District

Maros, Wajo, Tana Toraja

2012

378

2022

0

Faskab, Fastekab, Faskeu and Satker PNPM Youth

1

Workshop Socialization, NRM potential and problems identification

District

Makassar, Maros, Wajo, Tana Toraja

2012

2978

23

0 Female

2

Film Screening through awareness car

Province

Tana Toraja, Wajo

2012

53

23 Male

3

Discussed and distributed awareness materials

District

Wajo

2012

53

Local NGO, Government and Public Year

4

Green education on secondary school

District

South Sulawesi

2012

0 District

5

Garbage bank

Province

South Sulawesi

17 Level

6

Mainstreaming Green PNPM on Rural PNPM in Province Level

Province

23 Activity

7

Discussed and distribute Lestari Desaku Magazine

2012

No.

8

South Sulawesi

1432 Province

5395

Public Discussion on PNPM-Green smart practices in Sulawesi

7522

9

Total

116 117


Teak Planting

Mangrove planting

King grass farming

Spring water rehabilitation

Bamboo handicraft

Portable seaweed dryer

Portable seaweed dryer

Solar Photovoltaic

Honey bee demo-plot

Village tree nursery

Biogas demo-plot 42

43

44

45

46

47

48

49

50

51

52

Demo-plot Name

Atula Gunung Sari Gunung Sari Mawasangka Wakambangura Napa Warinta Lagadi Danagoa Mawasangka Polindu Village

Ladongi Watubangga Watubangga Mawasangka Mawasangka Mawasangka Pasarwajo Lawa Tongkuno Mawasangka Mawasangka Sub district

Kolaka Kolaka Kolaka Buton Buton Buton Buton Muna Muna Buton Buton District

2009 2010 2009 2010 2012 2012 2012 2012 2012 2011 2011 Year

Farmer group Farmer group Farmer group Villagers Villagers Villagers Women group Villagers Farmer group Villagers Villagers Beneficiary 32

31

30

29

28

27

26

25

24

23

22

21

20

Biogas

Plastic waste handicraft

Biogas

Biogas

Planting Vitex pubescens

Virgin Coconut Oil

Fish aggregating device

Liquid organic fertilizer

Organic cultivation

Bokashi

Nilam nursery

Nursery demo-plot

Solar Photovoltaic

CCB Village Business

Winning

Kabawakole

Danagoa

Madampi

Lahontohe

Oempu

Lamorende

Oempu

Lahontohe

Lahontohe

Wamelai

Wamelai

Gunung Sari

Kel. Mawasangka

Balobone

Pasarwajo

Pasarwajo

Pasarwajo

Tongkuno

Lawa

Tongkuno

Tongkuno

Tongkuno

Tongkuno

Tongkuno

Tongkuno

Lawa

Lawa

Watubangga

Mawasangka

Mawasangka

Buton

Buton

Buton

Buton

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Muna

Kolaka

Buton

Buton

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2011

2010

2010

2010

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Women group

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Fisherman group

Farmer group

Farmer group

Farmer group

Farmer group

Farmer group

Villagers

Villagers Group

No.

33

Community planting campaigns

Kombeli

Sampolawa

Buton

2011

Community group

Beneficiary

34

Mahoni planting campaigns

Bangun

Sampolawa

Buton

2011

Villagers

Year

36

Solar photo-voltaic

Katilombu

Mawasangka

Buton

2011

District

37

Teak planting

Gumanano

Mawasangka

Buton

Sub district

38

Teak planting

Oengkolaki

Mawasangka

Village

39

VCO

Mawasangka

Demo-plot Name

40

Biogas

No.

41

119 Dr. Edi Purwanto Dr. Edi Purwanto

118


No.

Demo-plot Name

3

2

Solid organic fertilizer

Liquid organic fertilizer

Plastic waste handicraft

Wajoriaja dan Pucak

Salubarani

Wajoriaja, Nepo dan Inalipue

Botolemmpangan Nepo

Bontoa

Tanasitolo dan Tompobulu

Gandang Batu Sillanan

Tanasitolo

Bontoa Tanasitolo

Maros

Maros

Wajo dan Maros

Tana Toraja

Wajo

Maros Wajo

Maros, Wajo, Tana Toraja

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

2012

Teacher and students

Villagers

Villagers

Villagers

Farmer Group

Farmer Group, Villagers

Farmer group, Villagers, women group

Villagers

Villagers

Beneficiary

4 Tree nursery Ampekale

Bontoa

Maros

2012

Teacher and students

Year

5 Environmental Library for children

Ampekale

Bontoa

Wajo

2012

District

Appendix 5b : Demo-pilots in South Sulawesi Sub district

6 Mangrove Nursery

Ampekale

Tanasitolo

Wajo

Village

7 Fish chips

School environment

Tanasitolo

Biogas demo-plot

8 Recharge well

School environment

1

9 Garbage Bank

Marusu(1), Tanasitolo(1), Takkalalla(1), Bola(1), Gandasil (2), Bonggakaradeng(2), Sangalla Selatan(2)

10

Dr. Edi Purwanto

120


Appendix 6 : Summary of Financial Report TF-090977

3. Operational of the Trust Fund This chapter will outline the overall performance on each of the operational aspects of the Grant/Trust Fund.

3.1. Institutional and Implementation Arrangements. Grant Agreement of TF090977 G-KDP in Sulawesi were signed on November 2007. When the 7th Amandment of GA TF090977 for No Cost Extension of G-KDP in South Sulawesi were signed and had been aggreed to be implemented on February 14, 2012 Operation Wallacea Trust had established the updated organization structure to conduct programs and activities in targetetted areas. Besides the above structure staff, there were some staff had been working for assisting daily office operational issues such as website operator, IT person, petty cashier and office assistant and awarness assistant. Selection of staff to be appointed in South Sulawesi was open selection. The recruitment was in written and interview tests. The Announcement of selected candidate was on February 10, 2012 then the team of G-KDP of South Sulawesi had begun to work on February 15, 2012. Summary of Staff Structure of TF090977 G-KDP in Southeast Sulawesi and South Sulawesi: No.

Position

Number

Gender Female

Male

01.

Team Leader

1 person

02.

Program Manager

2 persons

03.

Finance Manager

1 person

04.

Accountant/Operation Manager

1 person

05.

FM Assistant/Petty Cashier

1 person

06.

OM Assistant

1 person

07.

Awarness Assistant

2 person

08.

IT/Data Base person

1 person

09.

Renewable Energy Application Specialist

1 person

10.

Training & Awareness Materials Specialist

1 person

11.

Design Graphic Specialist

1 person

12.

Natural Resources Management Specialist

1 person

Dr. Edi Purwanto

123


No.

Position

Number

3.2. Disbursement Profile

Gender Female

Male

13.

Provincial Coordinator

2 person

14.

District Coordinator

6 persons

15.

Sub-district Coordinator

18 persons

√ (2)

Totals

40 persons

3

37

The Organizational Chart of Operation Wallacea Trust (OWT) for TF 090977 Green PNPM in Sulawesi:

124

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Provide disbursement summary (in USD) The detail of Fund disbursement by submiting of Withdrawal Application through Client Connection The World Bank since November 2007 until 17 October 2012 and disbursement for Reimbursement to Operation Wallacea on 31 January 2013 in grace period as follow: WB/Trans No

WA # by OWT

WA Amount in USD

WA Paid Amount in USD

Date Received

Value Date

Date Closed

0001

001

69,050.00

69,050.00

30-Nov-07

06-Dec-07

06-Dec-07

0002

002

44,225.66

44,225.66

26-May-08

06-Jun-08

06-Jun-08

0003

003

24,295.90

24,295.90

25-Aug-08

03-Sep-08

03-Sep-08

0004

004

62,064.42

62,064.42

16-Jan-09

29-Jan-09

29-Jan-09

0005

005

50,100.17

49,861.89

15-Apr-09

23-Apr-09

23-Apr-09

0006

To adjust Expenditures

0.00

0.00

27-Apr-09

27-Apr-09

28-Apr-09

0007

006

48,625.37

48,625.37

20-Aug-09

26-Aug-09

26-Aug-09

0008

007

33,984.12

33,984.12

30-Nov-09

02-Dec-09

02-Dec-09

0009

008

43,505.86

43,505.86

01-Feb-10

02-Feb-10

02-Feb-10

0010

009

52,613.29

52,613.29

13-Apr-10

19-Apr-10

19-Apr-10

0011

010

66,601.17

51,601.17

14-Jul-10

21-Jul-10

21-Jul-10

0012

011

15,000.00

44,384.54

20-Oct-10

22-Oct-10

22-Oct-10

0013

012

44,384.54

15,000.00

20-Oct-10

22-Oct-10

22-Oct-10

0014

013

44,926.42

32,926.42

16-Dec-10

23-Dec-10

23-Dec-10

0015

014

50,043.02

30,709.69

16-Mar-11

24-Mar-11

24-Mar-11

0016

015

65,000.00

29,002.73

19-Apr-11

29-Apr-11

29-Apr-11

0017

016

40,617.97

40,617.97

30-May-11

06-Jun-11

06-Jun-11

0018

017

73,000.00

73,000.00

11-Jul-11

18-Jul-11

18-Jul-11

0019

018

39,883.95

39,883.95

15-Aug-11

19-Aug-11

19-Aug-11

0020

019

68,284.34

68,284.34

18-Oct-11

24-Oct-11

24-Oct-11

0021

020

60,332.59

60,332.59

16-Dec-11

21-Dec-11

21-Dec-11

0022

021

30,704.47

30,704.47

30-Jan-12

02-Feb-12

02-Feb-12

0023

022

20,740.12

20,740.12

09-Mar-12

12-Mar-12

12-Mar-12

0024

023

60,424.05

24,611.38

11-Apr-12

20-Apr-12

20-Apr-12

0025

024

31,322.39

21,322.39

30-Apr-12

08-May-12

08-May-12

0026

025

43,025.09

36,025.09

25-May-12

05-Jun-12

05-Jun-12

Dr. Edi Purwanto

125


WB/Trans No

WA # by OWT

WA Amount in USD

WA Paid Amount in USD

Date Received

3.3. Financial Management. Value Date

Date Closed

0027

026

35,812.67

35,812.67

01-Jun-12

06-Jun-12

06-Jun-12

0028

027

35,184.51

28,184.51

25-Jun-12

27-Jun-12

27-Jun-12

0029

028

55,115.88

39,115.88

12-Jul-12

18-Jul-12

18-Jul-12

0030

029

49,181.70

34,181.70

17-Aug-12

22-Aug-12

22-Aug-12

0031

030

10,000.00

10,000.00

10-Sep-12

13-Sep-12

13-Sep-12

0032

031

44,394.98

44,394.98

21-Sep-12

27-Sep-12

27-Sep-12

0033

032

45,116.02

45,116.02

15-Oct-12

17-Oct-12

17-Oct-12

0034

034

48,228.69

48,228.69

29-Jan-13

31-Jan-13

31-Jan-13

TOTALS PAID IN USD

1,332,407.80

The Summary of Fund disbursement anually to Operation Wallacea Trust from November 2007 until 31 October 2012 can be seen as below table: Date From

Date To

30 November 2007

6 December 2007

69,050.00

01 January 2008

31 December 2008

86,445.75

01 January 2009

31 December 2009

230,000.00

01 January 2010

31 December 2010

250,000.00

01 January 2011

31 December 2011

475,600.00

01 January 2012

30 November 2012

355,504.25

01 October 2012

Total Disbursement of TF090977 from Nov 2007 untill 31 Oct 2012

126

31 October 2012

Planned Cumulative

48,228.69

Actual Cumulative 69,050.00 68,521.56 194,535.80 240,031.28 341,831.27 370,209.21

The Financial Management system of Operational Wallacea Trust in running G-KDP in Sulawesi TF090977 was well managed. The Separation of duties between Financial Management staff had been implemented through the following structure of Management staff: 1.

Finance Manager/Procurement Manager; Main responsibilities are preparing of daily Expenses Report, recording Outstanding and settlement advance, Project procurement issues

2.

Accountant/Operation Manager: Main responsibilities are preparing of Interim Financial Report (IFR) to The World bank quarterly, to ensure funds disbursement and an adequate of budget, coding system of TF090977 G-KDP in Sulawesi, budget and realization report to Team Leader, Human Resources Development issues

3.

Petty Cashier 1/Assistant to FM for G-KDP in Southeast Sulawesi Province: Main responsibilities are to assist Finance Manager, day to day bookeeping, responsible for petty cash management and payment of office utilities, stationery and consumable

4.

Petty Cashier 2/Assistent to OM for G-KDP in South Sulawesi Province: Main responsibilities are to assist Finance Manager, day to day bookeeping, responsible for petty cash management and payment of office utilities, stationery and consumable

Logistic Assistant/IT Database staff: Main responsibilities are to assist Procurement Manager in collecting accurate quotation and vendor information, update and maintenance of Program database and regularly maintenance and updating of OWT`s website During conducting G-KDP in Sulawesi, accounting and reporting system of Operation Wallacea Trust has been running well in which Interim Financial Report had been reported regularly in time to The World Bank quarterly. External Auditor had been contracted for annualy Audit period. Since November 7, 2007 total Annualy Audit serise was 4 times. The Audit Reports were sent to The World Bank regularly. The following external auditor for TF090977 G-KDP in Sulawesi:

48,228.69 No.

1,332,407.80

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Name of KAP/External Auditor

Period of Audit

01.

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR) Registered Public Accountants

November 7, 2007 until December, 31 2008

02.

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR) Registered Public Accountants

January 1 until December, 31 2009

03.

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR) Registered Public Accountants

January 1 until December, 31 2010

Dr. Edi Purwanto

127


Dr. Edi Purwanto

Dr. Edi Purwanto

48,228.69

826.37

44,684.42

454,581,767.95

100%

100%

Total Statement of Expenditure - Current Quarter

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

0.00

7,854,646.85

420,893,481.60

100%

0%

0%

9,505.00

9,419.24

2,717.90 9,505.00 0% 100% 25,833,639.50 0.00 0.00

           

(USD eqv)      

to SA Rate paid % Incurred (IDR)

Charged Exchange Expenditures

Financing

WB portion

Amount Average WB

During October 2012 Operation Wallacea had financing G-KDP in SouthEast Sulawesi and South Sulawesi as of USD. 48,228.69. This amount received by The World Bank on 29 January 2013 and paid through reimbursement methode by 31 January 2013 in grace period of TF090977. The summary expenses of reimbursement to Operation Wallacea Trust can be seen as below:

128

Amount of

1,466,600.00

296,951.00

1,169,650.00

Management Fee

14 April 2012

(3)

2nd Amandment of additional funds

03.

1,169,650.00

405,000.00

764,650.00

0.00

1st Amandment of additional funds

(2)

02.

764,650.00

Consultant Service, Training/ Workshops,Goods and Other Operating Cost

0.00

764,650.00

Original Amount of GA TF 090977

01.

0.00

Current Total in USD

Dedicated staff time

Additional Funds in USD

(1)

Original Funds in USD

Date of Amandment

Amandment of GA TF 090977

No.

The Table of Amandment of Grant Agreement TF 090977 as below:

6,432.25

training

22,693.75

29,126.00

(USD eqv)

TF90977 MANAGEMENT FEE

3.

consultant/

105,752.37

covered

1,006,063.63

SOEs

1,111,816.00

Description

TF90977 CS.TRN,WKSHP,OP & GO

Cat No.

2.

22,007.58

supplier/

303,650.42

Payments

325,658.00

for

TF090977 DEDICATED STAFF TIME

1.

No.

134,192.20

Total Paid /

1,332,407.80

Country of

1,466,600.00

Number of

TOTALS

Balance of Unused Funds GA TF090977 (USD)

Disbursement Category

Category Description

Disbursement (USD)

Item

Category

Allocation of funds (USD)

Threshold

The Table of allocation funds per category, disbursement and balance of unused funds as per 31 October 2012

9

3.3.1. Provide a table of allocation funds per category, disbursement and balance of unused funds (if applicable); and any descriptions on the used of funds especially if there are any discrepancies.

TF 90977 - KDP and Environment in Sulawesi (OWT) Summary Statement of Expenditures (Sum-SOE) for those NOT Subject to Prior Review for the quarter ending 12/31/2012 currency: US DOLLAR

For details Audit and Management Letter can be found on annex 3.3

8

January 1 until October, 31 2012

7

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR) Registered Public Accountants

6

05.

5

January 1 until December, 31 2011

4

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR) Registered Public Accountants

3

04.

10

Period of Audit

2

Name of KAP/External Auditor

1

No.

129


3.3.2. Provide an overall review/summary of the following information: Quarters #

(a) The interim unaudited financial reports, which were furnished to the World Bank quarterly throughout the duration period of the Project implementation. The detailed reports will be attached into the Annex section. The Table of Summary of Interim Financial Report (IFR) submitted to The World Bank quarterly can be seen as below: Quarters #

Period of IFR

4th

November to December 2007

1st

January to March 2008

2nd

April to June 2008

3rd

Amount of Interim Financial Report (IFR) in USD Cat 1

Cat 2

Cat 3

-

-

10,928.54

33,297.12

8,378.82

15,917.08

July to September 2008

13,837.01

35,362.82

4th

October to December 2008

10,707.08

1st

January to March 2009

2nd

Period of Submiting

Total -

1st

January to March 2012

2nd

Cat 2

Cat 3

Total

1,763.85

112,486.56

15 – 20 Apr 12

April to June 2012

19,451.68

147,017.05

2,669.42

169,138.15

20 -25 Jul 12

3rd

July to September 2012

15,870.34

120,341.04

2,843.21

139,054.59

15 – 20 Oct 12

4th

October to December 2012

5,260.39

86,484.93

1,599.38

93,344.71

15 - 20 Jan 13

-

(b) The Financial Statements audited, which were furnished to the World Bank annually throughout the duration period of the Project implementation. The detailed reports will be attached into the Annex section.

24,295.90

July 08

0.00

49,199.83

October 08

5,524.94

0.00

16,232.02

January 09

20,279.56

34,408.02

2,614.38

57,301.96

April 09

No.

April to June 2009

21,682.63

14,326.57

481.44

36,490.63

July 09

3rd

July to September 2009

22,278.79

11,368.86

336.48

33,984.12

October 09

4th

October to December 2009

23,427.14

19,647.97

430.75

43,505.86

January 10

1st

January to March 2010

24,278.39

27,813.98

520.92

52,613.29

April 10

2nd

April to June 2010

23,793.52

42,148.23

659.42

66,601.17

July 10

3rd

July to September 2010

30,907.52

13,037.57

439.45

44,384.54

October 10

4th

October to December 2010

21,533.98

51,782.55

444.82

73,761.35

January 11

1st

January to March 2011

0.00

71,895.42

817.00

72,712.42

April 11

2nd

April to June 2011

0.00

77,196.34

673.41

77,869.75

July 11

3rd

July to September 2011

14,049.53

124,702.20

6,668.34

145,420.06

October 11

4th

October to December 2011

10,169.65

80,167.40

1,050.00

91,387.05

January 12

130

Cat 1

Period of Submiting

102,406.87

April 08

0.00

Amount of Interim Financial Report (IFR) in USD

8,315.84

44,225.66

0.00

Period of IFR

Dr. Edi Purwanto

The Table of Summary of Financial Statements audited were furnished to The World bank annually can be seen as below:

Period of Financial and Management Audit

Name of External Auditor

01.

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR)

Nov 7, 2007 until December, 31 2008

See annex 3.3.2

02.

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR)

January 1 until December, 31 2009

See annex 3.3.2

03.

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR)

January 1 until December, 31 2010

See annex 3.3.2

04.

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR)

January 1 until December, 31 2011

See annex 3.3.2

05.

Drs. A. Salam Rauf & Rekan (SAR)

January 1 until October, 31 2012

See annex 3.3.2

Summary of Financial Statement

(c) Issues and concerns related to FM, and avenue(s) used to manage these issues. The financial management review was conducted on 28 - 29 March 2011 in the OWT Bau-Bau office, with the focus being on following up on the previous mission’s findings and conducting a transaction review.

Dr. Edi Purwanto

131


Segregation of Duties Recommendation: The mission would like to reiterate its recommendation from the previous mission. The project needs to appoint two staff members with different job descriptions -one responsible for managing cash and bank transactions (finance), and the another responsible for recording transactions (accounting) in order to fulfill the segregation of duties requirement. This should be carried out by May 31, 2011. OWT Management response: In August 15, 2011 OWT has recruited an accountant to responsible for recording transaction, prepare Interim Financial Report (IFR), Prepared DA for Withdrawal Application by client connection, Budget realization report, and HRD issues as her main tasks Internal Control Recommendation:

The project should conduct regular and surprise cash counts at both head office and in the smaller offices, and document the results of such cash counts, starting in May 2011.

OWT Management response: Since September 2011 OWT has established cash count procedure monthly and gradually to effor it weekly between finance manager and accountant Assets Recommendation:

The mission would suggest that management tag all assets with the relevant reference codes by May 2011 at the latest. Such tagging is essential to allow accurate identification of assets.

The project needs to improve its filling system. Access to documentation should be properly arranged by May 31, 2011.

The finance staff need to check the comprehensiveness of financial documents, such as the numbers and signatures of the recipients and checkers by the end of May 2011.

OWT Management response: OWT has improved its filling system to ease authorised and related staff to get related information. The established filling system consists of Monthly Expenses Reports per project activity; Financial Report (IFR and Monthly financial report) per project activity; Assests Update report, Bank documentations, HRD related documents, duty correspondence and Project Reports Interim Financial Reports Recommendation: The project should prepare quarterly IFRs as of December 2010 and submit them to the Bank not later than May 31, 2011. Subsequent IFRs should be submitted to the Bank one month after the end of each calendar quarter, as stipulated in the Grant Agreements.

OWT Management response:

OWT has prepared and submitted quarterly IFRs to The World Bank regularly since IFR period July to Septemebr 2011. OWT`s accountant has submitted to IFR specialist of The World Bank in advance for first review and correction before submitting to TTL formally External Audit Recommendation:

Accounting

Recommendation:

132

Bookkeeping and Filing Recommendations:

OWT Management response: OWT has been more disipline to tag all project assets with relevant assets code to allow acurate identification of project assests

OWT Management response: Finance Manager of OWT has implemented accurate advances recording by developing advance report monthly for project cash reconcilition. Duration of the outstanding advance was initially 2 weeks after activity done. However by considering to project allocation distances to main office then it has extended to 4 weeks settlement.

The mission recommends that the finance staff write the dates of the activities in the register of advances and amend the prevailing policy to extend the settlement period to 4 weeks, instead of 2 weeks at present.

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Segregation of duties may be brought about through the appointment of 2 staff members with different responsibilities -- one to serve as finance officer and the other to serve as accounting officer. This problem should be solved by May 31, 2011, at the latest.

Dr. Edi Purwanto

133


OWT Management response:

OWT has recruited an accountant since August 08, 2011 to overcome the segregation of financial duties. Since at the time, Finance Manager has responsibility to check every single receipt and compile the data to expenses report form before submitting to accountant for re-check, coding and compiling to financial report forms. Alson Accountant has responsibility to update Budget realization and report it to Team Leader monthly. 3.4. Procurement (a) Summary of the procurement plans; what methods were used. Include the latest (updated) procurement plan in the Annex section. Operation Wallacea Trust has conducted asset update and Procurement report regulalry and reported to The World Bank regularly. Some of high value procurements needed more advises from Procurement Specialist of The World Bank. Since November 2007 until october 31 2012 Procurement issues were well managed by Operation Wallacea Trust.

Procurement Methode

Review

700.00

IC

Post

1

1,000.00

IC

Post

APC

1

1,000.00

IC

Post

09.

Buton District Environmental Training and Awareness Coordinator

BDC

1

500.00

IC

Post

10.

Ass. Environmental Training and Awareness Coordinator for Buton District

AEC

1

200.00

IC

Post

11.

Field Facilitator SubDistric Mawasangka

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

12.

Field Facilitator SubDistric Pasarwajo

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

13.

Field Facilitator SubDistric Sampolawa

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

14.

Muna District Environmental Training and Awareness Coordinator

MDC

1

500.00

IC

Post

15.

Ass. Environmental Training and Awareness Coordinator for Muna District

AEC

1

300.00

IC

Post

16.

Field Facilitator SubDistric Tongkuno

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

17.

Field Facilitator SubDistric Napabalano

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

18.

Field Facilitator SubDistric. Lawa

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

19.

Kolaka District Environmental Training and Awareness Coordinator

KDC

1

500.00

IC

Post

20

Kolaka District Environmental Training and Awareness Coordinator (Lambandia & Ladongi)

KDC

1

500.00

IC

Post

No.

Activity

Ref

Quantity

06.

Environmental Awareness Coordinator

EAC

1

07.

Province Environmental Training and Awareness Coordinator

PEC

08.

Assistant Province Awareness Coordinator

Estimated Cost in USD

The Table of Summary of the Procurement Plan TF 090977 since November 2007 until December 31, 2011 No.

Activity

Ref

Quantity

Estimated Cost in USD

Procurement Methode

Review

Goods 01.

Printer

PR

2

300.00

NS

Post

02.

In focus

IF

1

900.00

NCB

Post

03.

Professional Camera

CAM

1

1,300.00

NCB

Post

04.

Vehicle

VH

1

13,000.00

NCB

Post

05.

Lasser Printer

PR

1

800.00

NCB

Post

06.

Generator

GE

1

300.00

NS

Post

07.

Laptop/Desktop

LP

2

1,200.00

NCB

Post

08.

Desk-chair

DS

1

700.00

NS

Post

09.

Filing cabinet

FC

2

700.00

NS

Post

10

Cupboard

CP

2

500.00

NS

Post

Individual Service 01.

Project Manager: Dr. Edi Purwanto

02.

PM

1

3,000.00

IC

Post

Assistant Project Manager

APM

1

1,000.00

IC

Post

03.

Finance Manager

FM

1

500.00

IC

Post

04.

Ass. Finance Manager/ Office Administration

AFM

1

150.00

IC

Post

05.

Office Manager/ Accounting

134

OM

1

500.00

IC

Post

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Dr. Edi Purwanto

135


No.

Activity

21.

Ass. Environmental Training and Awareness Coordinator for Kolaka District

22.

Ref

Quantity

Estimated Cost in USD

Procurement Methode

Review

No.

Activity

Ref No.

Quantity

Estimated Cost in USD

Procurement Method

Review

01.

Operation Manager

OM.2

1

18,700.00

competitive

post

02.

Finance & Admin Assistant

FA.2

2

4,400.00

competitive

post

AAC

1

300.00

IC

Post

Field Facilitator SubDistric Baula

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

03.

South Sulawesi Province Coordinator

PC.2

1

11,000.00

competitive

post

23.

Field Facilitator SubDistric Watubangga

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

04.

District Coordinator in South Sulawesi

DC.2

3

19,800.00

competitive

post

24.

Field Facilitator SubDistric Ladongi

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

05.

Sub-district Coordinator in South Sulawesi

SDC.2

9

19,800.00

competitive

post

25.

Field Facilitator SubDistric Lambandia

FF

1

200.00

IC

Post

06.

14,800.00

competitive

post

26.

Training & Awareness Materials Development & Data Base Specialist

Technical Support Consultant

TAS

1

400.00

IC

Post

27.

Documentary & Awareness Film Developer Specialist

DFS

1

300.00

IC

Post

28.

Communication Specialist

CS

1

350.00

IC

Post

29.

Office Boy

OB

1

50.00

IC

Post

TOR

Post

TS.2

Firm Consultant 01.

External Auditor

2

9,890.00

Prior

Firm Consultant 01.

External Auditor :Salam Rauf and Partner

3,800.00

EA

The Table of Summary of the Latest Procurement Plan TF 090977 since January until October 31, 2012 No.

Activity

Ref No.

Quantity

Estimated Cost in USD

Procurement Method

Review

01.

Furnitures

FUR.2

1

4,300.00

Shopping

Post

02.

Computer equipments (Laptop + Printers)

COM.2

3

3,000.00

Shopping

Post

03.

Photo Camera

CAM.2

3

1,000.00

Shopping

Post

04.

Projector

PRJ.2

1

1,000.00

Shopping

Post

05.

Printing (Poster & Brochures)

PR.2

1

3,300.00

Shopping

Post

06.

Printing (Publication Material)

PR.3

1

7,000.00

Shopping

Post

07.

Car Vehicle

CV

1

43,956.00

Shopping

Prior

Individual Consultants

136

Dr. Edi Purwanto

Dr. Edi Purwanto

137


Profile for Operasi Wallacea Terpadu

OWT_Completion Report_Green PNPM in Sulawesi  

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