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A SIX窶船AY TRIP TO HONG KONG SEE PAGES 28/29

ツ」4.95 | April 2010 | Issue 68

Incorporating

GET READY FOR THE FLAT St Nicholas Abbey heads our cast of potential stars in 2010

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HENRY CECIL EXCLUSIVE INTERVIEW | CHELTENHAM FESTIVAL IN PICTURES


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WELCOME FROM THE EDITOR Edward Rosenthal

It’s no disgrace to get carried away by racing e got it wrong. The Gold Cup showdown between Kauto Star and Denman – and there may be some people who are a little tired of hearing those two names – as previewed in last month’s issue never materialised. Perhaps we did get carried away with these two horses, overlooking the claims of others, including Imperial Commander, who deserves to take the plaudits after delivering a stunning performance on the day. Yet one of the joys of racing, and indeed any sport, is identifying the superstars, enjoying their brilliance and celebrating their achievements. Time will tell if the new holder of jumping’s Blue Riband can elevate himself to the status of the famous Ditcheat duo. One thing is for sure: Cheltenham provided four days of top-notch drama, wonderfully captured by George Selwyn and Patrick McCann (pages 20-27). The Festival may be over for another year but such is the nature of racing that there is always something exciting around the corner, with Aintree and the Grand National now moving into focus. One man who will forever be associated with the event is Bob Champion, whose recovery from cancer to win the great race on the fragile Aldaniti in 1981 is one of sport’s great moments. Champion is now embarking on a journey that will see him visit all 60 British racecourses in 60 days to help raise money for his cancer trust and the Injured Jockeys’ Fund. Tim Richards talks to the ex-jockey to find out what his latest challenge is all about (pages 40-41). The new Flat season is upon us and the horse that most people are looking forward to seeing reappear is Coolmore’s St Nicholas Abbey.

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Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder incorporating Pacemaker is published by a Mutual Trading Company owned jointly by the Racehorse Owners Association and Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association Chief Executive Michael Harris Editor Edward Rosenthal Bloodstock Editor Emma Berry Design Fruit Design www.fruit-design.co.uk Editorial 1st Floor, 75 High Holborn, London WC1V 6LS

Tel: 020 7152 0200 Fax: 020 7152 0213 editor@ownerbreeder.co.uk www.ownerbreeder.co.uk Advertising Giles Anderson Tel: 01380 816 777 USA: 1 888 218 4430 Fax: 01380 816 778 advertise@anderson-co.com Subscriptions Keely Brewer Tel: 020 7152 0200 Fax: 020 7152 0213 subscriptions@ownerbreeder.co.uk Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder

Comparisons with the incredible Sea The Stars may be unfair at this stage of his career but such was the manner of his two-year-old victories that he is a strong favourite to emulate that champion and win both the 2,000 Guineas and the Derby. St Nicholas Abbey is set for a big year, as are Hayley Turner and William Buick (pages 49-55). Turner, now established as a top jockey – not just a top female jockey – was forced to miss a major part of last season after being signed off following a fall on the gallops. She is keen to make up for lost time and is raring to go on the turf. William Buick, meanwhile, has made the transition from promising apprentice to stable jockey with John Gosden in the blink of an eye. Comparisons with Frankie Dettori will only add extra pressure but Buick has what it takes to become a headline act in his own right. Henry Cecil has been writing his own headlines for 40 years. The title ‘legend’ is easily handed out in sport but seldom deserved; however, with Cecil, it is entirely appropriate. The dip in stable numbers and winners at Warren Place which occurred during the previous decade resulted in speculation that Cecil could be about to walk away from the sport. So did the ten-time champion trainer consider calling it a day when he was down to a handful of moderate runners? “Never,” he tells Julian Muscat (pages 42-46). “At that time what I really needed was inspiration. My wife Jane has been a great help, very supportive in lots of ways. And I also needed one or two decent horses, which I got.” Cecil’s resurgence is evidenced by a yard topping the 120-mark, containing a number of Group 1 winners and a host of promising youngsters. It looks like being an exciting year.

incorporating Pacemaker can be purchased by non-members at the following rates: 1 year 2 years UK £55 £90 Europe €85 €135 RoW £99 £154 Racehorse Owners Association Ltd 1st Floor, 75 High Holborn, London WC1V 6LS Tel: 020 7152 0200 Fax: 020 7152 0213 info@roa.co.uk www.racehorseowners.net

“Identifying the superstars and enjoying their brilliance is one of the joys of this sport”

Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association Stanstead House, The Avenue, Newmarket CB8 9AA Tel: 01638 661321 Fax: 01638 665621 info@thetba.co.uk www.thetba.co.uk The Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association is a registered charity No. 215752 Editorial views expressed in this magazine are not necessarily those of the ROA or TBA

Cover: St Nicholas Abbey Photo: George Selwyn

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No other publication is better equipped to represent the wishes and interests of ALL owners and breeders. We’d love to hear your views: editor@ownerbreeder.co.uk

CONTENTS

42 Henry Cecil: all is looking rosy again for Britain’s best-loved trainer 49 Hayley Turner can prove to be one of the stars of the Flat season

NEWS AND VIEWS 06 News Focus Latest developments in Racing For Change project 10 Changes News in a nutshell 13 ROA Leader Levy scheme needs reform, not another rollover 15 TBA Leader Yearling Bonus Scheme can act as stimulus for market 16 Tony Morris The career and legacy of Bull Hancock 18 The Maxse Factor Why racing is not like marmite 40 Aldaniti’s rider Bob Champion faces another daunting challenge

30 NEW The Great Owner/Breeders New series starts with Dick Hollingsworth 96 Your Say Sheila Bailey: what the Pony Club can do

INTERNATIONAL SCENE 32 View From Ireland New owner but same old success for Moyglare Stud 34 Continental Tales Fabre’s starlets: Maxime Guyon and Mickael Barzalona 37 Going Global Rachel Alexandra defeat means no Zenyatta showdown

FEATURES 20 Cheltenham Festival The story in pictures 28 Win a fabulous holiday to the Hong Kong International Races 4 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

28 WIN! Reader Competition Win a trip to Hong Kong with Horse Racing Abroad


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Industry agreed measurement Our proven average monthly circulation is certified by the Audit Bureau of Circulations at 10,183* *based on the period July 1, 2008 to June 30, 2009

20 Imperial Commander wins the Totesport Cheltenham Gold Cup

FEATURES continued 40 Talking To... Grand National legend Bob Champion 42 Henry Cecil Back where he belongs – at the top of the tree 49 COVER STORY Focus on the Flat Is St Nicholas Abbey Flat racing’s new equine star? 56 First-season stallions The sires’ championship that attracts plenty of interest 64 Sales Circuit Goffs’ Kempton sale kicks off 2010 breeze-up season

FORUM 66 ROA Forum Professional Riders Insurance Scheme so important 70 Racecourse League Table On the basis of contributions to prize-money 72 TBA Forum Hailing the heroes of the Stud And Stable Staff Awards 79 Breeder of the Month Geoff Brown, for Silver By Nature 80 Vet Forum Infectious diseases

DATA BOOK 86 Caulfield Files Japan on the global stage 88 Global Stakes Results Graded scorers and analysis of Group/Grade 1 winners 91 Stallion Statistics He’s 29 but Bob Back is still doing well THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 5


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NEWS FOCUS The big stories in the racing world

Yearling Bonus Scheme races under way with pot of £2.6m Bonus races spread throughout mainland Europe with 200 to be run in Britain and Ireland he first of at least 260 races carrying one of the £10,000 (or equivalent) prizes from the Racing Post-sponsored Yearling Bonus Scheme (YBS) was run at the Curragh on March 21. The owners of 2,450 twoyear-olds have opted to pay the £250 required for eligibility to the scheme, just short of 60% of the number of yearlings originally entered by breeders and/or consignors ahead of last year’s yearling sales. David Redvers, a member of the YBS committee, said: “Beforehand, if anyone had been brave or silly enough to predict that we’d raise £2.6 million they’d have been laughed at. We’d hoped we’d get maybe £1 million, so for the bonus fund to be nearly three times that is tremendous. “I think it will have a positive effect on this year’s sales as there will be a huge PR push throughout the year. There’s a real feel-good factor to it.

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“I suppose we were hoping that more of the eligible yearlings would have been kept in the scheme but these things take a bit of time to bed in and I hope that vendors who didn’t sell their yearlings will see the benefits of keeping them in the scheme.” Of the total number of races, 150 are set to be run in Britain, 50 in Ireland and the remainder throughout mainland Europe, with around 10% of the races to be reserved for next year’s maiden threeyear-olds. From the recent Goffs breeze-up sale at Kempton, 70 of those catalogued were eligible for the Yearling Bonus Scheme, while Tattersalls’ Craven breeze-up on April 13 to 15 features 90 eligible twoyear-olds. The following week’s DBS breeze-up has 138 of its 186 horses catalogued in the scheme. The deadline for yearling purchasers to maintain a horse’s eligibility for the scheme passed in December,

David Redvers: delighted that bonus pool has exceeded expectations

but potential breeze-up buyers should be aware that not all horses in the sales, even if marked as eligible, are fully paid-up for the scheme. “We gave concessions to breeze-up consignors, who also have to pay for the Breeze-up Bonus Scheme,” said YBS co-ordinator Kerry Murphy. “Some have paid the final £250 to keep the horses

in the scheme but not all. Purchasers of those horses will have up to seven days after the sale to make this payment if they wish to retain eligibility for the bonus scheme.” She added: “Where possible, it will be announced on the sales companies’ websites and lists will be put up on boards at the sales. People can also enquire directly to me.”

Next Generation Committee takes active role in Racing For Change Daniel Polak: representing NGC in talks

THE 14-strong TBA Next Generation Committee has become involved in ongoing talks with Racing For Change (RFC) regarding ways to attract the younger generation to become regular racegoers and industry participants. “The Next Generation Committee is part of the team of people we’re talking to

in order to ensure we’re on the right wavelength,” said RFC’s PR Director Nick Attenborough. “We really appreciate their input and ideas in formulating our strategy going forward.” Vice-chairman of the Next Generation Committee, Daniel Polak, was one of four members to attend a recent meeting with RFC and representatives from the Racecourse Association (RCA). He said: “Our presence is only in an advisory capacity but it has been great to be involved and one of our main topics of discussions was the student market. “I think the fact that the meeting took

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place out of office hours and that everyone there was doing this out of goodwill legitimises what RFC is about. “It’s racing and breeding and the RCA getting together to iron out ways in which we can work together. It was productive.” Attenborough added: “The Next Generation Committee is coming at it from the perspective of what will get young people to engage with racing as a sport and then in the longer term hopefully encourage them to be owners and breeders. “Their ideas are very valid as a means of connecting with that age group.”


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NEWS FOCUS

Calls to delay Tattersalls’ October Sale

Goodwood’s May 1 fixture will be free to attend as part of a week-long Racing For Change initiative

Top tracks to open doors for free ASCOT and Goodwood are among nine racecourses that will offer a day of free admission as part of the Racing For Change initiative to attract more people to the sport. The fixtures, over six days between Monday, April 26 and Saturday, May 1 provide a mix of both afternoon and evening meetings, and Flat and jump racing. Ascot’s card on Wednesday, April 29 features the Group 3 Sagaro Stakes, while the highlight at Goodwood on Saturday, May 1 is the Listed EBF Conqueror Stakes. Racing For Change Chairman Chris McFadden said: “These fixtures give the public a real choice. The

quality of the racing is great. “With three of the fixtures being in the evening and one on Saturday afternoon, they are at times that are convenient for people to come along with their families.”

A number of trial initiatives will be launched during the week, including a new display of photo-finish results on big screens, modernised raceday announcements and improved raceday programmes.

THE Federation of Bloodstock Agents (FBA) has made a request to Tattersalls that Books 1 and 2 of its October Yearling Sale start a day later than has been the case in recent years. October Book 1, usually a three-day sale, is scheduled to start on Tuesday, October 5 which, in the opinion of agents, does not allow enough time between the Arc meeting and the start of the sale for viewing yearlings. Tom Goff of Blandford Bloodstock, who represented the FBA at a recent Tattersalls Liaison Committee meeting, said: “I hope there is a degree of concensus that it would be

Free admission fixtures Monday Tuesday Wednesday Thursday Friday Saturday

April 26 April 27 April 28 April 29 April 30 May 1

Towcester and Wolverhampton Sedgefield (evening) and Nottingham (evening) Kempton Park (evening) and Ascot Huntingdon (evening) Doncaster Goodwood

For more information, email tryracingforfree@ racingenterpriseslimited.co.uk stating which course you are interested in attending. A reply will be sent with full details when tickets become available.

Bloodstock Racecard now available WEATHERBYS have launched a new racecard aimed at owners, breeders, stallion owners, agents and consignors. It contains breeding and sales information on each horse, including its sire and first three dams. The Bloodstock Racecard is free to subscribe to and free to receive. It will be produced for all Group races in the European

Pattern and selected international Group races such as the Dubai World Cup meeting at Meydan, the Breeders’ Cup, Hong Kong International and the Japan Cup. Each issue will contain the following day’s Group races and is delivered by email. To find and subscribe to the Bloodstock Racecard, visit www.bloodstockracecard.com.

Tom Goff: bigger gap needed

beneficial to have a bigger gap between two very significant events. It would be more desirable for all parties to have more time to scrutinise 600 or more of the best collection of yearlings in Europe. Tattersalls have been very helpful and have listened to our ideas.” Tattersalls’ Marketing Director Jimmy George said: “There has been discussion about whether it would be a good idea to start the sale on the Wednesday instead of the Tuesday but there are logistical issues as consignors and agents won’t want only two days between Books 1 and 2.” Book 2 of the October Sale is scheduled to start on Monday, October 11. ● See TBA Leader, page 15

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NEWS FOCUS

Sales at Keeneland and Arqana altered eeneland and Arqana have both announced significant changes to the format of this autumn’s yearling sales. Keeneland’s September Sale, which starts on Sunday, 12 September, will feature a slimline Book 1, with around 200 select yearlings catalogued to sell on Sunday and Monday evening. Book 2 consists of a more comprehensive catalogue of 1,300 yearlings, selling from Tuesday, September 14 through to the Friday. The remaining sessions of the mammoth sale, which traditionally features more than 5,000 yearlings, will continue on the following Sunday (September 19). “This new format allows us to offer 1,500 yearlings prior to the sale’s ‘dark day’ which benefits both consignors and buyers,” said Keeneland’s Director of Sales Geoffrey Russell. “At the same time, we are doing it within a format that allows us to sell fewer yearlings each day.”

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He added that he hoped the new-look sale would “help create more stability and continuity for the marketplace as economic conditions begin slowly to rebound both at home and internationally.” Deauville-based Arqana has instigated a grading system for its October Yearling Sale, which runs from October 18 to 20. The sale is now in two parts, with the first to be conducted over two consecutive afternoon sessions starting on Monday, October 18, and featuring yearlings considered to be more commercial. Part two is a full-day session on Wednesday, which will include around 250 lots. The deadline for entries to this sale has been extended to April 15. Arqana’s President Eric Hoyeau said: “Our October Yearling Sale has done extremely well over the last few years in a particularly challenging environment. “However, it is vital to innovate if you want to keep progressing in this fastchanging bloodstock market.”

Singspiel’s fertility setback DARLEY’S multiple Group 1-winning stallion Singspiel has encountered a problem with his fertility since the start of the covering season. This is thought to be the result of an illness the 18year-old suffered in January, from which he has fully recovered. A statement from Dalham Hall Stud said: “It is hoped that Singspiel’s fall in fertility is temporary so he remains

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covering a reduced book of mares and will continue to be assessed as the breeding season progresses.” A son of In The Wings and half-brother to Rahy, Singspiel was responsible for three Group 1 winners last year, Dar Re Mi, Eastern Anthem and Hibaayeb.


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NEWS FOCUS

Changes

In association with

Racing’s news in a nutshell People and business Investec Paddy Power Alexis Murphy Smurfit Kappa Brian Rothwell William Hill David Myerscough Racing For Change Cathy Gannon Wertheimer brothers Sam Thomas Stuart Messenger Polly Gundry

Derby sponsor to back all six races at Epsom’s first fixture of 2010 on April 21 Reports 15% decline in pre-tax profit in 2009, from £79m to £67.2m Chief Executive of Tote Ireland to step down Sponsor of the Champion Hurdle since 1991 will no longer back the race Returns to training ranks in Yorkshire having spent the last two years working with Aidan O’Brien at Ballydoyle Pre-tax profit for 2009 fell by 8.6% from £216.1m to £197.5m 28-year-old calls time on training career citing financial pressures; he sent out 31 winners including Listed scorer Bruges Proposes new dates for Flat and jumps championships at British Horseracing Conference Jockey will have Andrew Sheret booking her rides after split with agent Neil Allan Top-ranked owner/breeders on Forbes’ Billionaires List; Goldikova’s owners are said to be worth $7.5b, which places them 93rd overall Gold Cup-winning jockey cracks neck vertebra after schooling fall on Paul Nicholls’s gallops Head Lad to Sir Michael Stoute named Employee of the Year at the Godolphin Stud and Stable Staff Awards Becomes winning-most female point-to-point rider of all time riding Ned The Post at Wadebridge, her 288th success in that sphere

Racehorse and stallion – movements and retirements Whiteoak Eagle Mountain Vodka (pictured) Desert Code Candy Creek Lord Shanakill Windsor Castle Snoopy Loopy Manighar Red Element Big Brown Marchand D’Or Anasheed Medaglia D’Oro Soneva Life Is Sweet

High-class mare, winner of the inaugural David Nicholson Mares’ Hurdle at the 2008 Cheltenham Festival, retired owing to injury 2008 Hong Kong Cup winner suffers tendon injury and is retired to stud Outstanding Japanese mare retires as the second highest money-earner of all time; the seven-time Grade 1 winner will be covered by Sea The Stars Breeders’ Cup Turf Sprint winner of 2008 retired to stand at Harris Farms in Coalinga, California Six-year-old daughter of Definite Article, winner of the Listed mares’ bumper at Aintree in 2009, is retired Group 1 winner when trained by Karl Burke joins Henry Cecil from Richard Mandella in the US Son of Generous, winner of the 1997 Queen’s Vase and Northumberland Plate, to stand at John Jones’s Gwernau Ganol Farm near Caerphilly for £500 2008 Betfair Chase winner retired for a second time after pulling up in the Blue Square Gold Cup at Haydock Group 2 winner joins Luca Cumani’s stable from Alain de Royer-Dupre, having been sold by the Aga Khan Multiple stakes winner and brother to star Australian racemare Typhoon Tracy to take up stud duties at Glenlogan Stud, Queensland Vinery Australia acquires significant shareholding in 2008 champion three-year-old male, who will stand southern hemisphere season at Hunter Valley farm Multiple Group 1-winning sprinter moved from Freddie Head to Mikel Delzangles by owner Carla Girla after winless 2009 Ten-year-old AP Indy horse out of Flagbird, by Nureyev, is sold by New York-based Anasheed Syndicate, to stand in Russia Rachel Alexandra’s sire will shuttle to Australia from the US for the first time this year, based at Darley Triple Group 3 winner retired to the paddocks after being beaten on Super Thursday at Meydan; she will be covered by Galileo Zenyatta’s Breeders’ Cup-winning stablemate retired after recurrence of muscle cramps; she will be bred to Smart Strike

People obituaries Age Sue Lamyman Linda Sheedy Simon Scrope John Mulhern Sam Waller

69 57 75 69 92

Horse obituaries

Age

Chief Oscar Rocky Marriage Changingoftheguard Aqaleem Casey Jones Laroche Coe Flanders Citizen Vic

9 30 4 6 9 19 8 18 7

Lincolnshire trainer whose best horses included multiple winning stayers Jamaican Flight and Victory Quest Former amateur jockey who partnered eight winners under Rules and rode in Aldaniti’s Grand National in 1981 Member of the York race committee for 24 years who was also Director and Chairman of Pontefract racecourse Trainer of Galmoy, winner of the Stayers’ Hurdle in 1987 and 1988, and 1995 Irish Grand National victor Flashing Steel Secretary to the Levy Board, Director General of the Racecourse Association and Senior Steward of the Turf Club

Gallant son of Oscar collapses just moments after winning the Ulster Grand National South-African based stallion who began his racing career in Britain before moving to America, where he won a Grade 2 David Hayes-trained colt, formerly in the care of Aidan O’Brien, who was a Melbourne Cup hope for his new Australian connections Australian import who ran third to Authorized in the 2007 Derby dies soon after stablemate Changingoftheguard Won the 2008 Grade 1 Knight Frank Novice Chase at Leopardstown for the Noel Meade stable Germany Derby winner of 1994, defeating Overbury, who later sired three Listed winners Trevor Hemmings-owned staying chaser trained by Sue Smith Daughter of Seeking The Gold who won three Grade 1s in the US Grade 1-winning chaser trained by Willie Mullins

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ROA LEADER

Levy scheme rollover simply not acceptable Level of funding required to reflect fair return to racing from betting industry a cornerstone of levy submission which has the approval of top economists here is something about the next annual levy process that smacks of it being horseracing’s last throw of the dice. Industry commentators will argue that we have been here before; that this is just another round in the interminable squabble between racing and bookmakers. There are, however, a number of factors that suggest things are now reaching such a pitch for British racing that a simple ‘rollover’ of the current scheme would be completely unacceptable. Like many levy schemes before it, the 50th scheme, which relates to funding for the fiscal year 2011/12, will hinge on racing’s ability to convince the Levy Board and probably the Government that racing’s needs and the bookmakers’ capacity to pay are both greater than ever before. If the route for an agreement between the two parties cannot be found by the Levy Board by October 31, then the outcome will be determined by the Department for Culture, Media and Sport, or whatever the appropriate Government department will be called if the Conservatives are in power. In the past there has always been an attitude that, if getting a deal between the two sides requires Government intervention, this is somehow seen as a failure. The BHA is, however, determined to change this perception, believing that unless there is significant movement from the bookmakers’ position then it is right that the Government should be brought into the decision-making process. The consequences are, after all, extremely significant, not just for racing but also for the rural economy. With the levy yield currently dropping like a stone and prize-money levels for 2010 set to decline sharply as a result, it is small wonder that the racing industry is impatient for change. This has been reflected in racing already putting its case to the Levy Board well in advance of the usual opening salvo that comes from the betting industry. This submission was presented at the last Levy Board meeting and, although a confidentiality agreement prevents any detail from being discussed, I am breaking no confidences when I say that top economists have been wheeled in and no stone left unturned in racing’s efforts to present its case.

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The extent to which British racing’s economic standing has deteriorated and the level of funding that is required to reflect a ‘fair return’ to racing from the betting industry are the cornerstones of a document that penetrates the mysteries of racing politics and finance. There is, of course, already much we do know about this industry without seeking the help of economists. Any owner or trainer will tell you about increasing costs and deteriorating prizemoney, while public accounts will reveal the huge growth in profits generated by the betting industry during the last decade. We also know that, despite the wide diversification within betting shops, racing remains the biggest attraction to entice punters in, though racing does not share in the profits generated by non-racing betting products. We know that two of the major bookmakers have reneged on an undertaking to Government to keep their businesses in the UK by setting up their online operations overseas to avoid paying tax and levy, and that this trend is likely to continue. We know the fixture list has greatly expanded in recent years, largely to satisfy the wishes of the betting industry. We know that this has cost racing – and particularly owners – much, much more than it has received back from betting and that, to rub salt into our wounds, the levy yield in 2009 dropped by 20% from £115m to £92m and continues to be in freefall. Most of all, however, we know full well that the 50-year-old levy system is in desperate need of reform, its statutory framework requiring immediate modernisation to reflect today’s realities of racing’s relationship with bookmakers. We know that this is going to be very difficult to achieve with an overloaded post-election legislative programme. Yet failure to find a route through will simply accelerate the widening disparity between British racing and other major racing nations which enjoy the advantages of pool betting monopolies and funding for their respective industries on a scale we can only dream of. We know that, despite all the disadvantages that British racing has endured for many years, it continues to put on the best racing in the world, but we also know that its position on the global stage is simply not sustainable unless a new funding model can soon be found.

Paul Dixon President Racehorse Owners Association

“Given the levy yield and prizemoney, it is small wonder the industry is impatient for change”

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TBA LEADER

Self-help crucial in stimulating market TBA and BBM have roles to play in raising awareness of Bonus Scheme races, so creating stimulus for retaining owners and attracting new ones aul Dixon’s column in the March issue of this magazine continued on the theme of declining prize-money and quite rightly he concluded that even the British racehorse owner has a limit to which he can continue to be relied upon to fund the sport. At a current rate of 23% cost recovery, which is likely to show an increased decline as racing’s income from the levy is further eroded, those racehorse owners who invest in our sport purely for the ‘craic’ are becoming thinner on the ground. The Racing For Change (RFC) initiatives are of little help in the short term in boosting ownership numbers. The outcome of the breeders’ selffunded marketing initiative – the 2009 Racing Post Yearling Bonus Scheme – will be rolled out in the coming months. We need to see these races creating a stimulus to retain our existing sporting owners, whilst also driving future and wider appetite for ownership. I hope the Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association and British Bloodstock Marketing can play a part in disseminating information and raising awareness. Yearling consignors will be invited to contribute to the 2010 scheme over the coming months and, whilst analysis of the 2009 outcome is some way off, I understand that consignors may be more selective in their future support. The breeding industry has always recognised the importance of self-help to stimulate the bloodstock market. The European Breeders’ Fund is a fine example of how effective channelling support through enhanced prize-money can be, but funding via selfhelp measures must be an enhancement to prizemoney levels, not a subsidy. The responsibility for maintaining an adequate level of prize-money should not fall upon the participants. After the British Horseracing Conference, accusations were flying in the press regarding racecourses’ contributions to prize-money. Horsemen and racecourses must accept that they need to work together to find a solution, with each recognising and respecting the other. The TBA is fully supportive of the Horsemen’s Group’s Chairman’s determination to find a solution. In the meantime, however, this leaves the industry relying more heavily on traditional owner/breeders, and those commercial breeders who have transferred a number of their own stock into training after disappointing sales results. This situation may not be sustainable.

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Whilst our recent survey of a representative sample of TBA members showed that 80% had horses in training, 53% of this sample had or were considering relocating their interests overseas, where the recovery percentages were significantly higher. Britain’s racing calendar could have a significantly different look in years to come if Racing For Change proceeds with its aim to shorten the Flat and National Hunt seasons via tailored championships. No firm outline has yet been given but if, as suggested, the Flat championship is decided before the major two-year-old Group races of the year are run, not to mention other key autumnal contests, this appears to pose a threat to the sires’ tables if races such as the Racing Post Trophy, run at Doncaster in October, do not apply. One would hope that common sense will prevail and that even if new methods of identifying the champion jockey and trainer are formulated, the traditional ways of deciding stallion championships will remain unaltered. Returning to the subject of the importance of owners, at an industry meeting at Tattersalls, the TBA representatives gave their full support to the bloodstock agents’ requests that Tattersalls delay the start of their 2010 October Books One and Two Yearling Sales. Coming straight after the Arc weekend, where attendance is nigh on vital for all professionals, there is a strong view that agents, trainers and prospective owners do not have sufficient time to view all lots, and that this year starting the sale a day later (Wednesday, October 6 to Friday, October 8), would be an enormous help to the industry. The obvious turnaround before the second week would then necessitate Parts Two and Three to be held from Tuesday, October 12 to Friday, October 15. It was accepted that there will be some logistical issues to address, but if not in 2010, certainly 2011 and beyond, the reduction in the number of yearlings presented for sale will ease these issues. Crucially, in the meantime, our priority must be to ensure that there is ample viewing time for prospective purchasers and that breeders and consignors are given the opportunity to show and promote their stock to as many people as possible. Anything less would be unacceptable.

Kirsten Rausing Chairman Thoroughbred Breeders’ Association

“Responsibility for maintaining an adequate level of prizemoney should not fall upon participants”

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THE MAN YOU CAN’T IGNORE Comment

Tony Morris Under the guidance of Bull Hancock, Claiborne rose to become the standard bearer of American stud farms any factors were involved in the establishment of the USA as the dominant power in thoroughbred breeding, but if there was one man who might be said to have been chiefly responsible it was surely Arthur Boyd Hancock, Jr – Bull Hancock, as he was invariably known. The presiding genius of Claiborne Farm from 1949, when he assumed control from his ailing father, until his sudden death in 1972, Hancock was an exceptional horseman with outstanding business acumen. A man of vision whose accomplishments earned him universal respect and recognition, he took Claiborne to new heights, following some of his father’s practices and initiating some of his own. It was acknowledged he had no peer when it came to assessing the potential of a prospective stallion.

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“It was acknowledged Hancock had no peer in assessing the potential of a prospective stallion” In the years immediately after the end of World War II there was a measure of gloom in Britain and Ireland over the regular successful raids by French horses. But few in Europe could conceive America as any kind of threat; besides, the mere breadth of the Atlantic meant direct competition was rare. Just to confirm the European complacency in that respect, Citation, America’s Triple Crown champion of 1948, hailed as his nation’s best since Man o’ War, suffered defeat in four clashes with Noor, third in England’s Derby, when they were five. On the last occasion, at Golden Gate Fields, Noor conceded 1lb and won by three lengths. While Europe celebrated the ‘proof’ that its superiority remained intact, Hancock was in the process of buying Noor’s sire, Nasrullah, a deal 16 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

that would soon have enormous repercussions. Ireland’s loss was Claiborne’s – and America’s – gain. A year later Nasrullah would head the AngloIrish sires’ list; in the coming years he would head the North American table five times, and among his sons was supersire Bold Ruler. Hancock was following his father in looking to Europe for sire power; the old man’s acquisitions included Sir Gallahad, Blenheim and Princequillo, all tremendously successful. But he had his own ideas about breeding, culling the broodmare band developed by his father, acquiring fresh blood (in some cases, again from Europe, including blue hen Rough Shod), abandoning the policy of selling yearlings at auction, preferring instead to sell some privately, while operating a racing stable. Hancock’s touch was certain from the start. He was North America’s leading breeder four times, but more significant was his impact in the selection and management of Claiborne’s stallions. For 15 consecutive seasons to 1969 a Claiborne horse finished top of the sire list – Nasrullah five times, Princequillo twice, Ambiorix once, and Bold Ruler seven times in a row. During that period there were never fewer than three Claiborne residents in the top 20; on three occasions there were half a dozen. Six times the farm had winner and runner-up, and in 1960 Nasrullah, Ambiorix and Turn-to registered a remarkable one-two-three. Born to be wildly successful

The next two champion sires after Hancock’s death were Round Table and – for the eighth time – Bold Ruler; the pair had been born in the same foaling barn at Claiborne within seven hours of one another one April morning in 1954, both won Horse of the Year, both followed outstanding careers at the track with doughty deeds as stallions at their first home. Among horses not already mentioned who stood at Claiborne in Hancock’s day were, Sir Gaylord, Herbager, Tom Rolfe, Buckpasser, Forli, Damascus, Sir Ivor and Nijinsky. The early success with Nasrullah set the pattern. Claiborne would syndicate the horses among prominent breeders and provide the management for the consideration of four free nominations annually. What was certainly a good deal for Hancock also suited others, who had every reason to express faith in his judgement. More often than not Hancock’s judgement was right – usually spectacularly right. Throughout the world he was recognised as the leading authority where the selection and management of stallions were concerned, so it was hardly surprising others paid keen attention to his pronouncements on the subject and endeavoured to follow his principles. Years after Hancock’s death, in an era when stallion syndication had fallen out of fashion and marketing had become the studmaster’s allimportant tool, advertisements for new horses commonly featured quotes from the old man. Many new recruits to the stallion ranks seemingly possessed a lot of the qualities Hancock had cited as necessary for success at stud, or so the advertisers


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claimed. From beyond the grave the maestro was apparently offering recommendations about horses of whom he had no knowledge. Whether the practice was ethical did not signify. Nobody in the modern world was so naïve as to believe every word they read in an ad; on the contrary, it was known marketing folk regularly made assertions that stretched credulity. Ad the result of 40 years of hurt?

So a full page ad placed by Hancock’s older son, Arthur Boyd Hancock III, in a recent edition of Thoroughbred Daily News came as some surprise. Under the heading: “What Bull Hancock Really Thought”, the man who operates Stone Farm and is himself a renown breeder revealed: “One morning in 1969 in a conversation with my father, I asked him why he didn’t take a few more mares to Bold Ruler, whose stud fee was $100,000 and who was getting about 38 mares, and he said, ‘Because, son, overbreeding a stallion compromises the quality of the offspring. It has been tried with stallions who got a couple of stakes winners in their first crops and were never heard from again.’ “He would not double a stallion two days in a row because he believed it diminished semen vitality and was not conducive to producing the soundest and most robust offspring. He said that a stallion should make around 100 covers a year. In the early 1970s before the days of palpation and ultrasound, that was about 40 mares at 2.5 covers per mare. Today that would be about 75 mares at 1.3 covers per mare.” And the ad ended with the observation: “Now those who quote Bull Hancock know the rest of the story.” This was a curiosity. Was the son incensed by the long-established practice of advertisers exploiting his father’s name? Why had he waited 40 years to reveal what he considered his father’s real message? Were we to believe the explanation he wanted to initiate a debate over big books, which have been common throughout the industry for decades? Notwithstanding Bull Hancock’s genius, the opinion that he expressed in 1969 was of its time, for its time. While many would favour a reduction in book sizes for the most active stallions, there is now any amount of veterinary evidence to refute the notion that more than 100 covers in a season necessarily diminishes semen vitality and results in more unsound stock. Had Hancock lived ten years longer, he would surely have changed his mind. What Hancock got right was that he managed his stallions properly. He knew his clients, and he knew their mares well; he knew how they should be mated for their own benefit and to enhance the profiles of his stallions and the interests of the owning syndicates. What he would deplore today is the lack of management in the stallion industry. It is the quest for quantity and the neglect of quality control that results in the unsoundness in the 21st century breed, and ensures that no stallion will ever match Nasrullah’s ratio of 23% stakes winners to foals. THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 17


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JOHN MAXSE Comment

THE

MAXSE FACTOR The good, the bad and the downright ugly from Cheltenham, served with some marmite

All Power to Paddy ploy The Cheltenham Festival this year was not only abuzz with which horses were supposed to win, there was also much talk about a couple of striking PR and marketing initiatives. Not surprisingly, the Paddy Power sign on Cleeve Hill provoked most debate. I thought it was a clever stunt, albeit one not without ramifications for the company’s relationship with Cheltenham through their sponsorship at the Open Meeting in November. Paddy Power is no stranger to controversy and the sign was in keeping with their reputation for courting publicity through shock tactics. From their perspective, no doubt, it was deemed a success; seen and debated by over 200,000 racegoers, as

Clever or distasteful? The controversial ‘Hollywood’ sign on Cleeve Hill

well as millions of TV viewers and newspaper readers. Ruby Walsh was again leading rider at Cheltenham and this spring at Pitch we have been working with Racing UK on their sponsorship of the jockey. It won’t come as a surprise to many to learn that Ruby is a complete professional to work with.

Indeed, both Ruby and AP McCoy deserve credit for the manner in which they conducted themselves throughout their rollercoaster rides at the Festival. Time and again they showed their true sportsmanship, highlighted by the joint interview they gave after being defeated in the Gold Cup. Racing is lucky to have them.

Lazy comparisons no help to racing Radio 5 Live host Peter Allen recently described racing as the sporting equivalent of marmite. His point being that people either love or hate it. Yet this is complete rubbish. Racing may not be as popular as some other sports, but few people actively dislike it. On the contrary, research has shown that many people enjoy a day at the races and that it is other factors which prevent them from becoming more regular racegoers.

At the British Horseracing Conference, REL’s Chief Executive Rod Street (pictured) made another food/racing comparison when he said implementing the recommendations put forward by the Racing For Change board was like wading through treacle. He’s right, and for the sport to, er, spread its appeal sufficiently to deter the Peter Allens of this world from making similar marmite claims in the future, we need to put aside our vested interests and deliver material change, starting with a properly tiered fixture list. Otherwise there’s a risk that by the time we get to agreeing on a diluted compromise, racing’s ‘best by’ date will have come and gone.

Single strikes bum note This year I have to say I was very relieved when the curtain came down on the Festival as it meant not having to suffer another airing of the song ‘Cheltenham’, the version of Downtown put together to coincide with this year’s meeting and played seemingly at every opportunity during the meeting. It might have been for a good cause – four charities benefitted from any proceeds generated by sales, including Racing Welfare, of which I am a trustee – but just because something is for charity does not mean we have to like it. Without wishing to appear too cynical, the actual objective of the project is still lost on me. The cost of renting out various recording studios, with a film crew at each, and production costs for the song and video would have bought a nomination or two to Sea The Stars. The resulting version of a 46-year-old song reminded me of the varied musical efforts football clubs used to impose upon the public to celebrate a Wembley Cup Final appearance. A practice which always seemed odd, if not redundant, as other than a die-hard supporter, who would ever want to buy such a thing? John Maxse is Associate Director at Pitch

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One Fantastic Festival Racing’s annual Cheltenham spectacular didn’t disappoint in the excitement stakes, with a host of upsets, dramatic finishes and high-class performances to delight the watchers Photos George Selwyn and Patrick McCann

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Binocular looked set to miss the meeting but there was no doubting his well-being as he powered home in the Champion Hurdle under Tony McCoy, to the delight of his jockey, owner J P McManus (above left), and Nicky Henderson, who was to finish the meeting as top trainer

Menorah (top) collected the Supreme Novices’ Hurdle under Richard Johnson, with odds-on Dunguib and Brian O’Connell only third, while Sizing Europe (below) jumped superbly to take the Arkle Trophy under Andrew Lynch


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CHELTENHAM FESTIVAL 2010

Colm Murphy (above left) is congratulated by fellow Irish trainer Paul Nolan after Big Zeb (right) saw off Master Minded and co to win the Queen Mother Champion Chase. Peddlers Cross preserved his unbeaten record in the Neptune Investment Management Novices’ Hurdle (below), while Weapon’s Amnesty landed the RSA Chase

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DAY TWO

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CHELTENHAM FESTIVAL 2010

Big Buck’s (above right) wins his second World Hurdle under Ruby Walsh at the expense of Time For Rupert, as the crowd watches on

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DAY THREE

First Festival winners for Hadden Frost on Buena Vista (right) in the Pertemps Final and Danny Cook riding Great Endeavour in the Byrne Group Plate

Below: Albertas Run and Tony McCoy see off all challengers in the Ryanair Chase

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CHELTENHAM FESTIVAL 2010

Imperial Commander delighted trainer Nigel Twiston-Davies and jockey Paddy Brennan with victory over Denman in the Gold Cup; favourite Kauto Star fell, but he was well enough to be hacked back to the stables by Ruby Walsh (right), who ended the Festival as leading jockey

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DAY FOUR

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READER COMPETITION

CATHAY PACIFIC HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL – DECEMBER 8‑14, 2010

WIN A SIX‑DAY TRIP TO THE HONG KONG INTERNATIONAL ● This holiday for two, from leading tour operator Horse Racing Abroad, is worth more than £3,500 ● See the top‑class racing action on December 12 at the magnificent Sha Tin racecourse, with four Group 1s on the card ● Enjoy one of the worldʼs most exciting cities The fantastic prize on offer to readers of Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder is this very special opportunity to visit Hong Kong to enjoy the Cathay Pacific Hong Kong International Races on Sunday, December 12. In addition, there are free days to explore all the sights of Hong Kong. The superb dayʼs racing includes four Group 1 championship events, worth a combined HK$62 million. The highlight is the richest race in Hong Kong, the HK$20 million Group 1 Hong Kong Cup. HOW TO ENTER

Simply answer the three questions opposite and submit your entry by email or freepost mail.

SUBMIT ANSWERS TO:

Reader Competition Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder Freepost WD1194 London SW1A 1BR or competition@ownerbreeder.co.uk (include name, address and contact telephone number).

TERMS AND CONDITIONS

The closing date for entries is midnight on May 1, 2010. Entrants must be aged 18 or over. The winner will be selected at random from all correct entries. The prize is not transferable and there is no cash equivalent. The competition is not open to the staff of Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder magazine, the ROA, the TBA, Horse Racing Abroad, or their families. The Editorʼs decision is final.

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Enjoy five‑star accommodation at The Peninsula Hotel, with Rolls Royce transfers to and from the airport, hotel and racecourse

The Peninsula Hotel, Hong Kong has long been hailed as one of the finest hotels in the world. Created in the glamorous 1920s, the legendary “Grande Dame of the Far East” continues to set hotel standards worldwide, offering a blend of the best of Eastern and Western hospitality in an atmosphere of unmatched classical grandeur and timeless elegance.

Itinerary

Wednesday 8 December Depart London Heathrow for your evening flight with British Airways. Thursday 9 December Arrive Hong Kong late afternoon and transfer by Rolls Royce to The Peninsula Hotel for 4 nights on a bed and breakfast basis. Friday 10 & Saturday 11 December Two days at leisure in and around Hong Kong – time to discover the city with optional excursions/tours. Sunday 12 December Racing at Sha Tin racecourse for the Cathay Pacific Hong Kong International Races, with full hospitality.

The opulent guest rooms are comfortable and stylish, and equipped with advanced technology for the convenience of hotel guests. The restaurants and bars are among the most exclusive and elegant in Hong Kong. High tea at The Lobby is a Hong Kong institution and the best authentic Cantonese food in town is served at Spring Moon. The hotel features a state of the art fitness centre and a huge Roman‑style swimming pool. The pool opens onto the hotelʼs sun terrace, providing an incredible view of Victoria Harbour and Hong Kong Island. Monday 13 December Depart hotel and transfer to the airport for overnight return flight from Hong Kong to London. Tuesday 14 December Morning arrival in London.

INCLUDED IN THE PRIZE

● Return Economy Class scheduled flights with British Airways ● Four nights accommodation on a bed and American breakfast basis, in a twin/double deluxe room at The Peninsula Hotel, Hong Kong ● Full hospitality at Sha Tin racecourse ● Assistance of Horse Racing Abroadʼs local agent ● Transfers by Rolls Royce to and from the hotel, airport and racecourse ● All Airport Passenger Duties and Taxes

Cut out form and send to Reader Competition, Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder, Freepost WD1194, London SW1A 1BR or email your name, address and answers to competition@ownerbreeder.co.uk The winner will be selected at random from all correct entries

To enter answer these three questions:

Entrant details:

1 Sha Tin is one of two racecourses in Hong Kong. Can you name the other?

Name:............................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................

Address:.......................................................................................................................

2 Which Italian‑born jockey rode Falbrav to win the 2003 Hong Kong Cup?

...........................................................................................................................................

...............................................................................................................................

...........................................................................................................................................

3 Who was the Lord Derby‑owned supermare who won the 2005 Hong Kong Vase?

............................................................... Post Code:...............................................

...............................................................................................................................

Contact tel no:........................................................................................................

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THE GREAT OWNER/BREEDERS By Jeremy Early

NEW SERIES

Dick Hollingsworth

PHOTOS: GEORGE SELWYN

Proud staying tradition the cornerstone of Felucca’s influential dynasty

n its purest form, the art of the owner/breeder involves gaining considerable and consistent success over a lengthy period with horses bred at a single stud, from a broodmare band of no more than a dozen, tracing to just one or two foundation mares. These criteria have never been easy to fulfil and arguably they are virtually impossible nowadays, but Dick Hollingsworth achieved the feat magnificently at Arches Hall Stud in

I

Hertfordshire, which he inherited on the death of his father in 1951. There were several mares to start with but the one her owner focused on, and who left an indelible mark, was Felucca. By Nearco, she won over seven furlongs and ran second in the Cambridgeshire in 1944, but speed was not what Hollingsworth was looking for. Although he sometimes used pacy sires, getting major winners at up to a mile, his principle target was middle-distance performers capable of staying further.

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His methods are perfectly illustrated by the stallions who sired Felucca’s ten foals once he took over the stud. Big Game, sire of Kyak, was the only one who showed his best form at distances short of a mile and a half. The others – Acropolis, Aureole, Borealis (three), Donatello II, Precipitation, Straight Deal and Tenerani – were all suited by a mile and a half or more. The results were spectacular, with Ark Royal, Kyak and Cutter all landing the Park Hill Stakes over a mile and threequarters between 1955 to 1958. Ark Royal also won the Ribblesdale Stakes and Yorkshire Oaks, while Cutter won the Yorkshire Cup. With three mares of that quality to go to war with at stud, it came as no surprise that Hollingsworth’s runners excelled in the following years. Ark Royal’s offspring included Ocean (Coronation Stakes) and Hermes (Dante Stakes, Great Voltigeur Stakes and Jockey Club Cup). Ocean was by a speed influence in Petition, while Hermes was by Aureole.

Bedeni went against the norm by getting Sky Ship, who landed the July Stakes and Vintage Stakes, but Pirogue and Cutle were much more in the staying tradition. Pirogue’s 1981 colt Longboat notched the stayers’ Triple Crown in 1986 for Hollingsworth, but Cutle’s Classic scorers, Sharp Edge (Irish 2,000 Guineas) and Cut Above (St Leger), were both bred by old friend Jakie Astor after an exchange of mares between the two that brought no success for Hollingsworth (Pirogue was also grandam of Bolas, winner of the Irish Oaks for Khalid Abdullah in 1994). Kyak’s progeny included Mariner, winner of the King Edward VII Stakes, but it was her daughter Ripeck, a stakesplaced winner effective at 12 furlongs, who shone brightest. Exceptionally, she was mated with at least as many speedy stallions as those who required further, notably Grey Sovereign, Habitat, Major Portion, Petition and Welsh Pageant, and this boosted her prospects no end. Her two best winners were

“Speed was not what he was looking for; his target was middle-distance horses” Nothing much followed on from Ark Royal at Arches Hall, but the same cannot be said for Cutter and Kyak. The former foaled four stakes winners at the equivalent of Group 3 level, including Gold Cup runner-up Torpid, while three of Cutter’s daughters produced top winners.

from the old school, with Buoy, who won the Coronation Cup in 1974, and Bireme, successful in the 1980 Oaks, respectively by Aureole and Grundy. But to Grey Sovereign she foaled Fluke, winner of the Duke of York Stakes and Jersey Stakes, and to Major Portion she foaled


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Anchor, on the mark in the Nell Gwyn Stakes. Bireme was no great shakes at stud, though she did produce Yawl, who was Hollingsworth’s last Pattern winner in the 1992 Rockfel Stakes. Anchor went on to produce top-class stayer Sea Anchor and was grandam of Adelaide Cup winner Water Boatman, while Boathouse (by Habitat), a smart filly at up to ten furlongs, foaled Chester Vase winner Dry Dock and Showboat (by Warning), a sixlength winner of the 1999 Royal Hunt Cup. Showboat was trained by Barry Hills, one of only four trainers used by Hollingsworth in 40 years. The others were

George Colling, John Oxley (Hills was apprenticed to the former and head lad with the latter) and Dick Hern. Good advisers can help a stud, but continuity in training can help even more, especially when, as with the Felucca line, there could be quirks of behaviour (Kyak had a Timeform squiggle) and a tendency for leg problems. Hollingsworth died two years after Showboat’s Royal Hunt Cup victory. His success over the previous decade had been well below that gained earlier in his illustrious career, but this removed none of the gloss from the reputation of a truly exceptional breeder.

Recent stars adapt to modern trends It may seem odd that although some of them stayed further, all the Group 1 winners this century tracing to mares based at Arches Hall were able to win at up to a mile. This probably just confirms what was shown with Ripeck’s matings analysed alongside: the dynamism of a family which, with an injection of pace, has been able to adapt to modern trends. Kyak is fourth dam, via Packet, of Dash For Cash (VRC Australian Guineas) and fifth dam, via Ripeck’s Classic hope Steinbeck traces to daughter Anchor, of the family of Arches Hall’s Ripeck Nannina (Fillies’ Mile and Coronation Stakes). Via Ripeck’s daughter Boathouse, Kyak is fourth dam of Norse Dancer, who won no Group 1s but showed fine form from a mile to a mile and a half. Boathouse is grandam of Good Faith (six-furlong Ellerslie Sires Produce Stakes) and Mail The Desert (seven-furlong Moyglare Stud Stakes), and third dam of Daffodil (New Zealand 1,000 Guineas and Oaks). Ripeck was also third dam of 2002 Grand National winner Bindaree and the next big-race winner from the family may be to hand, though not at Aintree. Irish 2,000 Guineas hope Steinbeck’s dam Castara Beach is a sister by Danehill to Nannina’s dam Hill Hopper.

Next month: Jim Joel THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 31


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VIEW FROM IRELAND From Leo Powell, Managing Editor of The Irish Field

Moyglare Stud looks to build on past success with new owner One of the few Irish stud farms to publish their stud book is Moyglare Stud in County Kildare, close to the town of Maynooth. Established by Walter Haefner in 1962 and set among 450 acres, the stud had a good year in 2009, welcoming its 16th homebred Group 1 winner in the shape of Casual Conquest, successful in the Tattersalls Gold Cup at the Curragh. That success was supplemented by Group wins for Mad About You and Profound Beauty, the first named being among the new recruits to the broodmare band for 2010 and she will visit Oasis Dream. Profound Beauty remains in training with Dermot Weld. Lady Luck, the dam of Casual Conquest, will be among the stellar group of matrons visiting Sea The Stars in his first season at stud. There has been some changing of the guard at Moyglare, though much remains the same. The ownership of the stud has passed on to Walter Haefner’s daughter, Eva-Maria BucherHaefner. She is taking a very keen interest in the stud and can rely on the wisdom of manager Stan Cosgrove, and also of Fiona Craig, who looks after sales and breeding. A policy change in 2006 saw the stud re-enter the sales market as vendors, selling a number of young stock each year. For buyers, this has brought instant reward with the likes of Love Lockdown and Aahaykid among the gems offered. Love Lockdown, a son of Verglas trained by Ger Lyons, is out of a daughter of Trusted Partner. Sold for just €12,000 as a weanling, he has now

PHOTO: PETER MOONEY

Kildare-based operation started nearly 50 years ago continues to go from strength to strength

Eva-Maria Bucher-Haefner has taken over the running of Moyglare Stud in County Kildare from her father

earned some £90,000 and capped a fine juvenile season in 2009 when he landed the Group 3 Sirenia Stakes at Kempton to bring his record

while the yearlings are made up of seven fillies and 16 colts. A total of 22 two-year-olds will go into training (13 fillies, nine colts), while the three-

“The stud has bred 16 Group 1 winners, plus sires Be My Guest and Big Shuffle” to four wins from seven starts. Aahaykid was a Group-placed juvenile in 2008. The current broodmare band at Moyglare comprises 35 mares, with a quarter of them based in the USA. There are 28 foals due this spring,

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year-olds of 2010 in training will number 13, all but three of which are fillies. They include a single winner, the Navan maiden heroine Sense Of Purpose, a daughter of Galileo. The 12 other horses in training are older stock.

While 16 Group 1 winners is a most admirable achievement, the stud has bred some 64 stakes winners, and notable non-Group 1 winners include Be My Guest and Big Shuffle, who went on to become successful sires. In alphabetical order, the stud’s winners at the highest level have been Again Tomorrow, Assert, Bikala, Brief Truce, Carwhite, Casual Conquest, Dance Design, Dress To Thrill, Go And Go, Market Booster, Media Puzzle, Refuse To Bend, Relaxed Gesture, Stanerra, Trusted Partner and Twilight Agenda.


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INTERNATIONAL SCENE

NEWS IN BRIEF Alexis Murphy, the Chief Executive of Tote Ireland, is leaving his position at the beginning of April to take up a role with the parent company of betting exchange Betdaq.

PHOTO: GEORGE SELWYN

Plans for a proposed air show at Punchestown racecourse in early June have met with opposition from local stud owners and farmers. Choisir is not to shuttle to Ireland for the 2010 season, though a new name on the Coolmore roster is Fastnet Rock, a Group 1-winning son of Danehill. Indian Ridge, bred by Averil Whitehead, excelled on the track and at stud

Death of renowned Irish breeder One of the most successful breeders of the last half a century in Ireland, Averil Whitehead, has died. She was 86. Though she and her late husband, Captain Bill Whitehead, bred many top winners from both Owenstown and Broadfield studs, she will forever be associated with the top-class sprinter and influential sire Indian Ridge. Owenstown Stud, not far from Moyglare, was bought in 1936 by Averil Whitehead’s father, Frank Tuthill. He had managed the stud for Daniel Dixon and later purchased the farm. There he bred Classic winners Musidora, Cavan, Barclay, Christmas Island, Indiana and Humble Duty. Whitehead took over the stud in 1988 and today the family tradition carries on through her nephew John Tuthill. A long list of other major stakes winners from Owenstown includes the Group/Grade 1 winners Gala Event and Sondrio, the champion two-yearold filly Negligent and the Group 3 winner Sedulous, grandam of the champion Shirocco.

Whitehead bought Broadfield Stud with her husband in 1959 and it was there that Indian Ridge was born and reared. He won the King’s Stand Stakes and Jersey Stakes, and sired ten Group 1 winners, including Breeders’ Cup Mile winners Ridgewood Pearl and Domedriver, and Irish 2,000 Guineas victor Indian Haven. In recent years, Whitehead enjoyed great success with two fillies she had in training with Kevin Prendergast. Evening Time was a dual stakes winner, while Choose Me, the last horse to carry her colours, won the Tattersalls Ireland Sales Race in 2008. Tributes were paid to her by many people in the industry. Kevin Prendergast said: “She had horses with me for over 40 years, as did her father before her. She was a very good supporter of mine and a lovely lady. I couldn’t speak more highly of her.” Fellow trainer Dermot Weld added: “Averil was a wonderful lady, one of the outstanding Irish breeders. She was a great ambassador for Irish racing.”

Tattersalls Ireland is to introduce a €100,000 bumper next year at Fairyhouse. The race will be confined to graduates of this year’s Derby and August Sales. The 1989 Irish Derby winner Old Vic has been retired from stud duties. His leading winners include Kicking King, Our Vic, In Compliance, One Cool Cookie and Comply Or Die. The dual Champion Hurdle winner Hardy Eustace is to come out of retirement and compete in the charity race at Punchestown on Saturday, April 24, the final event of the festival meeting. Moscow Flyer did likewise a few years ago. A dispute between the Turf Club and its officials was unresolved as we went to press, though a day of threatened action failed to materialise when both sides agreed to further talks and to a binding resolution of the problem. A reduction in funding from Horse Racing Ireland has forced the Turf Club to cut salaries of its staff. A star was born on February 6, when the unbeaten Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe winner Zarkava foaled a filly by another winner of the Arc, Dalakhani. Zarkava visits the 2009 Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe winner Sea The Stars this year.

The number of trainers with a full licence fell by 10% when figures were revealed at the end of February. The number of licences was 328, down from 364 a year earlier. David Myerscough (pictured) was one trainer who decided to call it a day, aged just 28. He held a licence for four years and sent out the winners of more than 30 races, including Bruges, a two-yearold Listed winner at

Leopardstown in 2007. His final winner was at Wolverhampton in December. The grandson of Vincent O’Brien has not ruled out the possibility of returning to training in the future. “In five or six years, if the picture looks better, I might try again,” he said. Other trainers are known to face difficulties with unpaid bills, coupled with a reduction in the numbers of owners and

horses in training. Even financing the cost of renewing a licence is proving difficult. The Irish Racehorse Trainers Association Chief Executive Jim Kavanagh explained: “Between the two licences (Flat and National Hunt) and the subscription to the Irish Racing Calendar – which is compulsory – there is little change out of €2,000 when you add in the cost of stable staff cards and other extras.”

PHOTO: PETER MOONEY

Myerscough quits as trainers feel heat

The number of horses in training in Ireland was down 5% in the latest figures issued by Horse Racing Ireland, though it is believed that they have fallen further since then.

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CONTINENTAL TALES By James Crispe, International Racing Bureau

FRANCE

Fabre duo set for big time

PHOTO: WWW.SCOOPDYGA.EU

Chantilly trainer employs two future riding stars in Maxime Guyon and Mickael Barzalona

Listening to Monsieur Fabre: Maxime Guyon (left) and Mickael Barzalona

Not so long ago, French jockeys were regularly ridiculed by British and Irish racing fans alike. Freddy Head, so stylish at Longchamp, never got to grips with the Epsom rollercoaster, while those old enough to remember Philippe Paquet still grimace at the ride he gave the subsequently-disqualified Nureyev to ‘win’ the 1980 2,000 Guineas. How times have changed. Nowadays, if injury, unavailability or suspension robs them of their regular pilot for a big race, trainers on this side of the Channel reach for the phone to secure the services of Christophe

Lemaire, Olivier Peslier and Christophe Soumillon. Admittedly, there is still the occasional aberration, especially when the idiosyncrasies of Epsom need to be conquered. Soumillon’s embarrassing defeat aboard Alnadana in the Princess Elizabeth Stakes on Derby day 2009 springs to mind. But, from limited opportunities, Lemaire has snaffled five British Group 1s, including back-to-back renewals of the Champion Stakes, since 2005. Peslier has fared even better during the same period, with six top level British triumphs augmenting his 2007 Irish 2,000 Guineas victory aboard Cockney Rebel.

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Stephane Pasquier also deserves a mention as he boasts a strike-rate of over 20% on his British raids over the past three seasons. His 32 rides have gleaned seven victories, all in stakes races. The strength in depth of talent in the French weighing room has surely never been greater. And there is every indication that a new generation of Gallic riding superstars is set to burst onto the scene. Last year the man to grab the headlines was 20-year-old Maxime Guyon, who made it to third place in the French jockeys’ championship with 113 wins and enjoyed his first Group 1 triumphs aboard Cavalryman in the Grand Prix de Paris and Shalanaya in the Prix de l’Opera. Guyon has been privileged to be granted the job as number one jockey to the peerless Andre Fabre. But he may yet be overtaken in the rankings by another Fabre protégé in Mickael Barzalona. Grandson of Corsican trainer Christian Barzalona and nephew of the jockey Armand Barzalona, Mickael was always going to continue his family’s connection with the sport. Having spent four years at the French Jockeys’ School at Gouvieux, near Chantilly, he began working for Fabre at the beginning of last season, partly thanks to the recommendation of former jockey Sylvain Guillot. His progress since has been rapid. On October 24 he rode out his claim when reaching the 70-winner mark aboard Lasos at Clairefontaine. His score for the season eventually reached 72, leaving him just outside the top ten in the standings.

Fabre found Barzalona a six-week winter placement with Godolphin in Dubai. He ended his stay in the Emirate in the best possible fashion, his ninth and final ride bringing a first foreign victory. He did it in the grand surroundings of a spankingnew Meydan and it was no ordinary contest, but the £108,000 DRC Gold Cup. Unfazed by the presence in the field of three better-fancied stablemates, Barzalona impressed onlookers with a polished display, bringing Sabotage through to collar Frankie Dettori’s mount, Age Of Reason, in the last 100 yards of the two-mile test. “It was fantastic and there was an amazing atmosphere at Meydan,” the 18-year-old said of the biggest victory of his nascent career. “If I can go out there again next year I would love to.” Barzalona is adamant that he and Guyon can work well in tandem, even though the age gap between the pair is little more than two years. “There is absolutely no rivalry between Maxime and myself, we get on really well and he is a very good jockey,” he stressed. “I have absolutely no idea how Mr Fabre chooses who will ride each horse, he just tells us when it is necessary to know.” With regards to the 2010 Flat season, he revealed: “My aim for the year is to win a Listed race or a Group 3. “As for the future, I haven’t yet set a goal but I would like to continue to work with the Wertheimer Brothers [for whom he has been retained as second jockey behind Peslier since September] and, of course, win a Group 1!”


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PHOTO: DUBAI RACING CLUB/ANDREW WATKINS

INTERNATIONAL SCENE

Selim Kaya drives Pan River to a length success from Lucky Find at Meydan on February 11

TURKEY

Pan River showcases Bosphorus form Turkish racing in general and the Bosphorus Cup in particular gained a boost at Meydan on February 11 when Halicarnassus and Pan River, first and second in that mile and a half contest in Istanbul last September, won consecutive races on day four

of the Dubai International Racing Carnival. Despite being named after the ancient Turkish city that is now Bodrum, the teak-tough Halicarnassus is in fact trained in Berkshire by Mick Channon. But Pan River, winner of the 2008 Turkish

Derby, is Turkish-owned, -trained and -bred, and was giving the nation its fourth Carnival success. The Bosphorus Cup will be run on Sunday, September 5 in 2010 as, after a two-year midweek experiment, the twoday Turkish International

SWEDEN

PHOTO: STEFAN UPPSTROM

Scandinavian scene hot to trot Sweden can expect an upsurge in overseas runners this year, with racing having enjoyed a 20% prize-money increase since 2009. Thoroughbred racing has a lot to be grateful to trotting for, as the current boom has a lot to do with the success of gambling on the sister sport. “Betting turnover went up by 5% last year and the daily multiple trotting bet is bigger than the lottery,” said Bo Gillborg, Director of Swedish Racing. This bet, called the V75, V65 or V64, is similar to the Scoop 6, except that it has a very low unit stake of 5p or 10p. Gillborg added: “The low unit stake allows major gamblers to cover the entire field in three or four legs, while small players like it as they believe it can make them multi-millionaires.”

The Stockholm Cup (won last year by Touch Of Hawk, pictured) has overtaken Norway’s Marit Sveaas Minnelop as the most valuable race in Scandinavia – indeed, it is now the most valuable Group 3 in Europe. Run over 12 furlongs at Taby on September 12, its first prize will be 1 million Swedish krone for the first time, which equates to £86,580.

Racing Festival reverts to a weekend date. Sadly, this means that it will clash with the Haydock Sprint Cup, the Irish Champion Stakes, the Prix du Moulin and Grosser Preis von Baden. Despite strong betting turnover and an extremely high tote take-out, the festival’s four thoroughbred races have suffered a 40% drop in prize-money since last year. However, they are still more than worth winning and the Bosphorus Cup and the same day’s Topkapi Trophy have become the first Turkish events to feature in the European Pattern Book – both having been awarded Group 2 status. Even at the reduced levels, the Topkapi boasts a first prize of almost £240,000, while the Bosphorus winner will take home almost £160,000. A day earlier, the European Capital of Culture Trophy (1m, fillies and mares) and the Anatolia Trophy (1m2f on the Polytrack) each offer a £100,000 winner’s cheque.

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GOING GLOBAL The worldwide view from Michele MacDonald

Zenyatta wins again but defeat for Rachel scuppers match-up Oaklawn’s $5 million showdown bites the dust after Rachel Alexandra is turned over at 1-20 Chances for the most anticipated American racing showdown in decades were shattered on March 13 when Horse of the Year Rachel Alexandra suffered her first defeat since November 2008, while her champion rival, Zenyatta, kept her career record perfect. In the immediate aftermath, plans for the $5 million Apple Blossom Invitational at Oaklawn Park on April 9 disintegrated when Rachel Alexandra’s majority owner, Jess Jackson, said she would not be ready to compete, and the race reverted to its original purse of $500,000. After watching Zenyatta toy with seven rivals in the Santa Margarita Invitational Handicap at Santa Anita Park, her owner, trainer and jockey are forging ahead to Oaklawn, continuing an unstated campaign to prove voters who chose Rachel Alexandra for America’s top 2009 award were wrong. Owner Jerry Moss said: “We’re disappointed that we’re not going to be able to face [Rachel Alexandra] in the Apple Blossom. Hopefully, we can meet down the line. We respect both [trainer] Steve [Asmussen] and Mr Jackson as horsemen and they’re going to do what’s right for their horse.” Rachel Alexandra’s camp has voiced concern that the rigours of her 2009 campaign, which comprised eight races, all victories, including three in Grade 1s against males, may have drained her. Asmussen called her performance when finishing second to Brazilian-bred Grade 2 winner Zardana in the $192,000 New Orleans Ladies

Collector’s item: all the more so perhaps as the clash will not happen

Stakes at the Fair Grounds “extremely disappointing.” “Obviously, that’s a concern of ours,” he said when asked if her Horse of the Year

Stakes so that she could regain her strength and be refreshed for the 2010 season. Following the New Orleans race, Asmussen and Jackson

“Zenyatta is a super athlete. How are you going to be better than perfect?” season might have affected her physical prowess. So far, however, no specific medical issues have emerged. “I’m hoping it’s only fitness we’re waiting for and dealing with,” he added, noting that Rachel Alexandra was given a long vacation from racing after her win last September over older males in the Woodward

had no specific targets, with Jackson saying it may be months before the daughter of Medaglia d’Oro races again. “Instead of trying to make a date, we’ll let her tell us,” Asmussen said. “Me telling her did not work.” Jackson said: “We tried and we really wanted to go [to the Apple Blossom]. It’s

unfortunate but the timing just wasn’t right for the health of the horse. It’s obvious she’s not in top shape. I repeatedly told people she was only 80% or 85% of what I thought was up to her top condition last year. That race proved it.” Ironically, the horse who beat Rachel Alexandra, Zardana, is trained by John Shirreffs, who stayed in California to saddle Zenyatta for the Santa Margarita, which became her 15th victory. Fans at Santa Anita, who are devoted to Zenyatta, cheered as they watched Rachel Alexandra’s loss on television just prior to the running of the Santa Margarita. Jockey Calvin Borel said of Rachel Alexandra: “My little filly tried hard. She needed the race more than anything. She was so tired when I pulled her up.” Zenyatta looked anything but tired. Jockey Mike Smith had predicted the six-year-old was training better than ever and he expected her to run that way, despite carrying the high weight of 127 pounds in her first competition since winning the Breeders’ Cup Classic on November 7. “This was a great race for her and it wasn’t taxing at all,” Smith said. “We got enough out of this race to move forward.” Smith never had to raise his whip and he added: “I wish I could say I contributed. I might have done a little steering, but that was about it. … It’s as easy a race as she’s had. It’s phenomenal.” “Isn’t it amazing?” said Shirreffs. “She’s a super athlete. She can do it all. How are you going to be better >> than perfect?”

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INTERNATIONAL SCENE

Hope returns at Calder as median and average rise Even though the Fasig-Tipton Calder two-year-olds in training sale – America’s flagship juvenile auction – marked yet another thoroughbred sale decline since the overall market’s peak in 2007, some flickers of hope brightened stormy skies in Florida and the industry overall. By the time the hammer came down for the final time on March 2, two important statistics had risen significantly from 2009 results. Median price jumped 33.3% from $150,000 last year to $200,000, and average price increased by 9.3% to $257,473. Turnover of $23,430,000 represented a 10.4% decline, yet there was some consolation in that fewer horses were catalogued and sold this year. On the flip side of that topic, the ominous auction trend of many late withdrawals continued, with only 145 of the 237 juveniles consigned actually getting to the ring and then only 91 being reported sold (including a dozen listed as sold privately after failing to meet reserve prices). In short, only 38.4% of the horses entered for the sale were sold. Yet one of those horses sent sparks through the sale grounds. A strapping chesnut son of Distorted Humor out of Tomisue’s Delight, a multiple Grade 1-winning full sister to Mineshaft, elicited bids from a deep but discerning international buying bench. Eventually, Jess Jackson snared the colt for $2.3

Jess Jackson bought the top lot at Calder, a half-brother to Mr Sidney

million. In comparison, last year’s top price was the $1.6m John Ferguson paid for Godolphin’s Al Zir, a son of Medaglia d’Oro. Jackson’s bloodstock agent, John Moynihan, said the Distorted Humor colt reminded them of 2007 and 2008 Horse of the Year Curlin. Jackson also owns a majority interest in current Horse of the Year Rachel Alexandra. “We didn’t want to have to run against him,” Moynihan said of the colt, who was consigned by Jill Julian and Stacy Yagoda, and is a half-brother to Grade 1 winner Mr Sidney. “We love the horse. He has an amazing mind. He has it all.” The Distorted Humor colt worked a strong furlong that caught the attention of many, including trainer Paul Cole and his client Jim Hay, who according to Cole’s son Oliver were in the bidding up to $2.1m. While there were no other sevenfigure juveniles this year, Demi O’Byrne and the Coolmore team were welcome return buyers after skipping the sale last year following Fasig-Tipton’s acquisition by the Dubai-based Synergy Investments. O’Byrne signed the ticket for the sale’s second highest-priced horse, a son of Smart Strike out of the Dixieland Band mare Southern Swing, who has produced two stakes runners. However, Ferguson cut back from 2009, buying two juveniles against six last year, namely a $750,000 Medaglia d’Oro colt and a $375,000 War Front colt. Cole, who signed tickets on four juveniles last year, spent $400,000 each on two fillies by Yes It’s True and Dixie Union. Japanese buyers were again prominent, continuing to capitalise on the yen’s strength. The most intriguing Japanese buy was the sale’s highest-priced filly, a daughter of champion Bernardini and a half-sister to young sire Tapit, purchased by Katsumi Yoshida of Northern Farm for $520,000.

Japan goes global with Sheikh’s first licensed runner Japanese racing entered a new international era on February 20 when the first runner for Sheikh Mohammed under his new Japan Racing Association licence competed at Kyoto racecourse. John Ferguson, who has overseen the growth of the Darley Japan stallion business, travelled to see the race in person. The record will show that the first starter for Sheikh Mohammed, who was the first nonJapanese person living outside Japan to receive a coveted JRA licence, was Notorious, a threeyear-old son of Wild Rush, bred in Japan by the Hattori Bokujo. Although Notorious had the services of Yutaka Take in the saddle, he could finish only eighth of 15 on his debut. Darley Japan spokesperson Hanako Sonobe said that seven horses have been designated to run under the JRA system for Sheikh Mohammed and his wife, Princess Haya of Jordan, and his son, Dubai Crown Prince Sheikh Hamdan bin Mohammed al Maktoum. In addition to Notorious, who is trained by Takayuki Yasuda, Sheikh Mohammed also has Lunar Legacy in his JRA stable. A three-year-old son of Godolphin’s Dubai World Cup winner Moon Ballad, Lunar Legacy is trained by Yasutoshi Ikee, the conditioner of Dream Journey, Japan’s 2009 champion older male. Ikee is also the trainer of Sunday Muse, a three-year-old filly from the first crop of Darley Japan’s Japan Cup winner Alkaased who will be in Sheikh Hamdan’s stable. The crown prince’s other horses are Coup de Wonder, a son of Grass Wonder from the family of Sadler’s Wells, and Principality, a son of King Kamehameha. Ananda, an Alkaased filly trained by Kenichi Fujioka, and Epic Journey, a colt by Afleet trained by Kenji Nonaka, make up Princess Haya’s stable. More horses will be added in the future under terms of the JRA licenses, which restrict foreign-breds.

JRA licensed: Sheikh Mohammed and Princess Haya

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TALKING TO... Bob Champion

How did the idea come about? I am always trying to think of different fund-raising stunts for the Bob Champion Cancer Trust and I am doing this one for the Injured Jockeys’ Fund as well. The IJF were so good to me when I was ill with cancer. I had this idea of riding to all 60 courses, but realised it would be virtually impossible on horseback. So I decided to go by car and discovered that the only 60 consecutive days when you could visit each course on a raceday was within our chosen dates of April 18 and June 16. Is there a plan when you get to each course? The idea is to get people interested in racing. Anyone who donates at least £50 will be able to visit the weighing room, stewards’ room, walk the course with a jockey, go down to the start; see what goes on behind the scenes. John Hurt (who played Bob in the 1984 film ‘Champions’) lives near Fakenham and is keen to come along when he can. What is the outstanding memory you have of Aldaniti’s 1981 Grand National victory? Aldaniti fulfilling the confidence I had in him. A few years before Aintree I got off him after winning at Leicester and told Josh Gifford he would win a National. Had I not made that statement he would have been put down as he broke down so badly at Sandown afterwards. The Embiricos family cherished this hope of winning a National and with Josh nursed him back. Aldaniti was confined to his box for six months and in plaster for God knows how long. We were a couple of crocks together!

No challenge too big for Champion Bob Champion and Aldaniti negotiated 30 fences to win the National; the ex-rider now has 60 tracks in his sights Words Tim Richards What is the 60:60 Challenge? I’ll travel to the 60 British racecourses within 60 consecutive days when they are racing. I’ll cover the 10,000 miles by car, occasionally with a driver, but mostly on my own. There will be some severe excursions like the five days in April when I go up and down from the north east to the south west, from Newcastle to Wincanton to Kelso to Hereford to Musselburgh. 40 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Bob Champion and Aldaniti won the Sports Personality Team of the Year Award in 1981. Did racing enjoy a higher profile in those days? Yes, particularly when you consider that last year AP [McCoy] wasn’t in the top ten nominations for Sports Personality of the Year. And he’s the most fantastic jump jockey ever! There was much more written about racing when I was riding; nowadays there are umpteen pages on football, while racing is lucky if all the cards are published in some papers. The problem is too much racing. It is often said that fences are easier now than when you were riding. Has the Grand National lost some of its appeal because of this? It is good for the sport because nobody likes to see horses fall. In any case, the horses have changed; they are all from Flat pedigrees. I don’t think the National has lost its appeal; it always attracts a huge audience and is still the greatest race in the world. Who was the best jockey you rode against? I rode against ten different champions, including Stan Mellor, Terry Biddlecombe, Bob Davies, Tommy Stack, Ron Barry, Graham Thorner, Jonjo O’Neill, John Francome and Peter Scudamore. People forget what an amazing jockey Jonjo was. But the one that stands out is John Francome, who was such a great horseman. He had everything; you couldn’t fault him. Today it’s got to be AP.


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TALKING TO...

Will McCoy ever win the Grand National? Yes, if he’s on the right horse on the right day! He is keeping pretty good company with the likes of John Francome, Jonjo O’Neill, Ron Barry, Stan Mellor, Terry Biddlecombe and Josh Gifford, who never won the National. What do you think of the idea to alter the dates of the Flat and jumps championships as part of Racing For Change? Both should run for the full calendar year. Both codes race 12 months of the year and if they keep changing no one will know where they stand. If they start the Flat with the Guineas, what happens to the Craven and Greenham? A season without these Classic prep races doesn’t make sense. Do you speak publicly to fellow sufferers about your experiences with cancer? I have done for years. Hopefully, it gives them a little bit of hope. I do functions and also speak to those who ring up just for a chat. Discussing illness and looking for positives can often be a big help. What great advances have you seen in the fight against cancer since you had the disease? Amazing progress has been made. If I had got testicular cancer 18 months before I did there would have been no cure. I was given a 40% chance of recovery, whereas now there is a 90-95% chance of recovery, as long as it is caught early enough. My cancer trust at the Royal Marsden Hospital is currently working on cures for prostate cancer, which is the biggest killer of men at the moment. You give talks on cruise liners. Where have you been and what do you talk about? My life in racing and different aspects of the sport.

I did nine cruises last year, each one about five days. Though my latest in the Pacific lasted three weeks and I ended up sailing from Hong Kong to Sydney, where I had a couple of days at the races. What was your personal highlight of 2009? Going back to the Royal Marsden to be told all my tests were clear. That’s my highlight every year. Tell us a funny story about someone in racing? Brough Scott had a fall early on in a three mile novice chase at Wye and got tangled up in the electric fence, which kept the sheep penned in the middle of the course after they had been cleared from the weighing room, where they lived on nonrace days. Passing him on the second circuit he was jumping up and down trying to free himself from the electric shocks. On the third circuit he was still there. We just couldn’t stop laughing! Who is your racing hero? Lester Piggott, who was responsible for getting me interested in racing. Whenever he was at my local course, Redcar, the crowds seemed to be bigger than ever and there was a certain buzz about the place. The fact that younger race fans today know all about him, but never saw him ride, tells you something about the man. If you could be someone else for a day who would it be and why? The Prime Minister so I could ensure that all MPs were over 45 with successful experience in business or commerce. How many of today’s MPs could run a corner shop? What’s the best thing about your life? Waking up every morning.

“To be told at the Royal Marsden all my tests are clear is my highlight of every year”

FINGERS ON THE BUZZERS How do you relax? I don’t What annoys you? Traffic jams Four guests for dinner? John Francome, Nigella Lawson, Celine Dion, John Hurt Best advice you’ve been given? Always have pride in yourself and never give up Most difficult thing you’ve done? Trying to kid the clerk of the scales when I was weighing in with my weight problems Sum yourself up in four words... Stubborn, resilient, forthright, quick-tempered

FAVOURITES Holiday Florida Sport Twenty20 cricket Meal Dover sole Journey Flying anywhere as long as the airports are running to time

Grand National-winning jockey Bob Champion is planning to set off from Ascot to start an epic journey on April 18. For information about Bob Champion’s 60:60 Challenge visit www.champions6060.org.uk

TV programme CSI

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HENRY CECIL

Back at the top table Henry Cecil endured a tough few years after three decades of continuous success but a thriving stable filled with quality bloodstock has the legendary trainer in buoyant mood

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Words Julian Muscat

Photos George Selwyn

t is invigorating to drive up Warren Hill for an audience with he who lives at the summit. Only a mile from the urban sprawl of Newmarket High Street, it feels like a different world. And a very different reception is assured. Henry Cecil does not disappoint. A vexing work morning might render him brusque, when he is best left to recover his equilibrium, but that’s certainly not how he is on this occasion in March. He wears that distinctive, mischievious smile as he emerges with greetings from the house. His sequinned suede mocassins could be straight from an Indian plantation. And despite his welldocumented fight against cancer, he looks younger than his 67 years. To tell him so is to make a mistake. “I hate age,” he replies. “I was constantly reminded that last year was my 40th as a trainer, which makes me seem quite old. I don’t feel it. I’ve got masses of energy. I get up at five o’clock every morning and never seem to get tired. Mentally, I’m very young.” So how old is that in years? “Sometimes he’s like a teenager,” insists Jane, whom Cecil married two years ago after a lengthy courtship. Plainly pleased by the comparison, Cecil is quick to vindicate it. It isn’t long before he is behaving like a high-spirited sixth-former with his whole life ahead of him. Moving behind his desk, he imagines he is sitting before the photgrapher he’d maintained he simply couldn’t entertain and pulls a series of comical faces. His arms, akimbo at first, start gyrating as though he is conducting the London Philharmonic. It is a charming sequence. And all the while Jane smiles the benign smile that says she has seen it all before. Welcome to Warren Place, the land of fantasy within racing’s deadpan parish. “Jane thinks that occasionally I am like Mr Bean,” Cecil reveals. “I do silly little things and maybe people need to take that with a pinch of salt. Underneath it I’m quite determined and serious, but there’s no point going around with a long face. It’s boring. And some people are just too heavy.” Fair enough. Except that it isn’t the sort of conversation one expects to have with a ten-time champion trainer whose haul of 23 British Classics far exceeds the best of his contemporaries. And no other man in Newmarket would welcome being likened to a television caricature who amuses by his >> uncoordinated helplessness.

I

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HENRY CECIL

Cecil says wife Jane “has been a great help, very supportive in lots of ways” as he looks forward to working with a team of 120 horses this year

>>

It’s not as if Cecil’s life has been a parody, either. It has done its best to chew him up and spit him out. And despite Frankie Dettori’s profile, Cecil remains the one that really excites the newspapers’ saucier sections. Inside a man of unrobust physical appearance is a fighter who will not be counted out. Mind you, Warren Place, from where Cecil has trained for more than 30 years, is certainly worth fighting for. It is not just cement that binds the red bricks. Its walls have absorbed memories by turn exhilarating and debilitating, yet Cecil in the present tense flourishes in a way that seemed utterly implausible four years ago.

“I never doubted myself. I just needed inspiration and one or two decent horses, which I received” Back then, he was up against the wall. His oncemighty string had dwindled to 50. He hadn’t won a Group 1 race, never mind a Classic, for six years. It was an unrelenting slide into oblivion, which was pretty much where he stood when Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder visited him in spring 2006. Although he spoke defiantly, his words lacked conviction. All around him was evidence of a crumbling empire. Warren Place had been split into four separate units; horses trained by Ed Vaughan, Paul Howling and Jonathan Jay filled boxes that once housed horses of aristocratic lineage. “Mentally, I got quite down,” Cecil said then, 44 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

“but I’ve come out of that now. I’m no longer struggling and I’m just working on picking the whole thing up. I would like to build it up to 80 horses that I really like and hope to be training more successfully in five years’ time.” He is ahead of schedule. Cecil starts the imminent season with a team of 120 – itself the legacy of a successful 2009 campaign, when he returned to the top ten on the trainers’ list for the first time in seven years. He won three Group 1s, including his first Breeders’ Cup bauble with Midday, who’d come within a whisker of winning Cecil his ninth Oaks in June. The transformation would encourage many in Cecil’s shoes to dwell on it. Not him, though. He isn’t particularly comfortable talking about himself, especially not his catalogue of professional achievement. Yet the burning question is whether he genuinely believed he could reverse his fortunes. Whether he doubted himself. “Never,” he maintains. “At that time what I really needed was inspiration. Jane has been a great help, very supportive in lots of ways. And I also needed one or two decent horses, which I got from Khalid Abdullah and the Niarchos family. Without them, I’d be struggling to exist.” If Cecil’s words are taken at face value, frustration must have poisoned his blood. There he stood, convinced of his ability yet hamstrung by 50 predominantly slow horses that would collectively earn less than £180,000 – the equivalent of one Group 1 race – in 2006. “There was a little frustration, maybe, but it was


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HENRY CECIL

more about the challenge,” he replies. “I like a challenge, but now our numbers are up and there is a bit more quality through the string. Hopefully things are going up rather than down.” Once again, his synopsis concludes with the future rather than the past. Instead of smelling the roses, he prefers the nascent promise of this year’s buds. One final effort to prompt him on some of his finest training achievements is unavailing. Does he not recognise that thousands of racing fans would love him to take them down memory lane? “I don’t agree,” he says. “It’s like a lot of racing books; I find them boring. They write about how they won this race and that, how they would have won by a short head but for this and that, so many years ago... it’s pretty dull, I think.” A trademark smile betrays that he is warming to the theme. “There’s got to be some excitement about the stupid things we do in life,” he continues. “When a trainer is interviewed [on television] he goes on about the ground, it’s a lefthanded course or right, and so on. That’s when I go and pour myself a cup of coffee.” So much so that Cecil does his best to avoid the pre-race television “window”. “It’s difficult to know what to say,” he explains. “Then people say that I often answer a question by asking one of my own; it’s probably because I don’t know the answer, so I ask them. Two heads are better than one – don’t you think?” There is probably another facet at play here, since Cecil is extremely superstitious. “All sorts of things,” he says. “Magpies: Jane and I both on that one. And I never fill my car up with petrol the evening before; always on the way to the races. I did that for years and years.” No longer? “Actually, when I went into the doldrums, when I couldn’t win an egg and spoon race, I realised it wasn’t working. So I stopped. And those windows: whenever I have talked about a horse before a race it has never, ever won it. Why should I continue getting my own horses beat?” Ironically, television has been the conduit for Cecil’s intimate relationship with a doting public. The format is well established: it’s plain for any viewer to see that he is intoxicated by a big-race winner. His eyes soften like a teenager tipsy on punch. That’s when he is most inclined to draw the eccentric analogies for which he is cherished. When he once described a backward filly coming to hand as akin to growing roses (neither can be forced), the media portrayed him as a master-gardener for 20 years. In that respect he is an interviewer’s dream. They know that to entice Cecil down the yellow-brick road is a journey of untold promise. This is the essence of live television, yet Cecil is not always a willing participant. He is often pushed to elaborate on an exquisite one-liner when there is nothing more to add. And by his admission, he has to be in the mood. He is a lot like that backward filly: he can’t be coerced. A perfect vignette arose at the Breeders’ Cup in

October, when Cecil, a source of endless fascination to the American media, was asked how he was enjoying his first trip to California. “I can’t really say; I’ve only just arrived,” Cecil replied. “Your first impression?” his interviewer persisted. “It beats Wolverhampton on a rainy day.” “Oh, I haven’t been to Wolverhampton,” the man went on. To which an increasingly perplexed Cecil responded: “Now that you come to mention it, neither have I.”

“People talk about how they won this race and that so many years ago...it’s pretty dull, I think” An uplifting 2009 season means that Cecil isn’t about to become a regular at the Black Country circuit. Banished to the memory is the year when he went to the sales with “one or two orders for yearlings costing a few thousand pounds.” Last October he shopped for yearlings in the boutiques, from where so many of his clothes originate. That, too, has enjoyed a renaissance. “I do enjoy it but I hate it if I’m not able to afford it financially,” he says. “I’ve experienced some lean times when I could only do window-shopping. It was hopeless.” All in all, he approaches the new season with the kind of ammunition he could only have dreamt about four years ago. He has handsomely defied the odds. Numbers are up, some new and influential owners are in the books, and this at a time when the economic outlook remains bleak. >>

Cecil, pictured with top filly Indian Skimmer, is reluctant to talk about past triumphs

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 45


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HENRY CECIL

>> Which is just as it should be. The day will come when Cecil no longer cradles the game in his arms. Racegoers will not experience that unique frisson when he lands a major prize. It will be a sad day. Cecil’s assurance that those days are distant promotes a comforting feeling. And there is every reason to believe him. His demeanour is that of one who cannot wait for the Craven meeting, where he traditionally announces his stable strength. But perhaps the most encouraging portent is that laughter and jollity have returned to Warren Place. It’s impossible to imagine the depths to which Cecil sank, just as there’s no denying the zest with

which he clamboured from the wreckage to rebuild his galleon. He has left the doldrums with sails full and compass set. He is clear about where he is heading, and how to get there. “You’ve got to be in the right frame of mind to succeed at training,” he says. “You’ve got to be positive. If you’re negative nothing is any good, and I wasn’t any good, health-wise and in other ways, for a while. “Now I’m trying to do things sensibly. Jane has me on a great diet, which I’m trying to stick to, and at the moment I am holding my own. I feel pretty well and intend to be here for a long time. That’s the way I look at it.” ■

“With luck this year will be better than 2009” The worst Newmarket winter for 30 years has done nothing to dampen Henry Cecil’s expectations for 2010. His team of older horses is headed by Group 1 winners Twice Over and Midday and he has been sent around ten horses – including Lord Shanakill – from Mark Gittins’s Mogeely Stud. Cecil is guardedly optimistic that he can advance on his achievements last year. “Prince Khalid Abdullah has always supported me,” he says, “but I very much like the collection of juveniles he has sent me compared to previous years.” Although his horses have done plenty of conditioning work, they are a jigsaw in progress. “This season we start the campaign with around 120 horses. There seems to be more potential than in recent years and we have a nice cross-section of horses, with around 55 two-year-olds.

“Last season was very encouarging. With the luck one needs, this year will hopefully be as exciting, if not better. Midday has grown and seems to have strengthened; she is a good prospect over ten and 12 furlongs. “Tranquil Tiger has been the lead horse for Twice Over this winter. He is a tough horse who should pay his way, while Manifest, Father Time and Blizzard Blues could be interesting horses this season. Lord Shanakill has joined us and if we can get his form back he could make his mark. “It is early days but some of my three-year-old colts could be worth following. And some of the fillies have the potential to make their mark in better company. They started their faster work in mid-March after some pretty bad winter weather, although they have done plenty of work in the

indoor ride and have had a lot of grounding.” Cecil’s riding arrangements mirror those of last year. “Tom Queally will be backed up by Eddie Ahern, Ian Mongan and Jimmy Quinn,” he says. “They all come here and ride work for me twice a week. “I have always been happier using my own jockeys, rather than picking who is available on the day. I don’t like using

jockeys that haven’t ridden my horses before and will probably be unable to ride them next time. I like having continuity and working as a team. “My two-year-olds look encouraging, even though at this stage they are only cantering. We bought 12 nice yearlings at the sales, which I’m greatly encouraged by, as they have some quality about them. It should be an exciting year.”

Cecil’s horses to follow in 2010 Three-year-old colts Pedigree

Owner

All Action

Storm Cat – Wandesta

Khalid Abdullah

Bullet Train

Sadler’s Wells – Kind

Khalid Abdullah

Corporal Maddox

Royal Applause – Noble View

Mogeely Stud

Ebony Boom

Boreal – Elegant As Well

PKD Partnership

Honest Strike

Smart Strike – Honest Lady

Khalid Abdullah

Out Of Eden

Monsun – Eden

Sheikh Al Nahyan

Moose Moran

Lemon Drop Kid – After All

Raymond Tooth

Protaras

Lemon Drop Kid – Seven Moons

Niarchos Family

Rodrigo De Torres

Bahamian Bounty – Leonica

Mogeely Stud

Rigidity

Indian Ridge – Alakanada

Thomas Barr

Aviate

Dansili – Emplane

Khalid Abdullah

Jacqueline Quest

Rock Of Gibraltar – Coquette Rouge

Noel Martin

Kithonia

Sadler’s Wells – Ratukidul

Niarchos Family

Principal Role

Empire Maker – Interim

Khalid Abdullah

Timepiece

Zamindar – Clepsydra

Khalid Abdullah

b c Empire Maker – Reams Of Verse

Khalid Abdullah

Three-year-old fillies

Two-year-olds Unnamed Breeders’ Cup winner Midday stays in training as a four-year-old

46 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Unnamed

br c Empire Maker – Valentine Ban

Khalid Abdullah

Unnamed

br f Dansili – Clepsydra

Khalid Abdullah


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Back at the top table Henry Cecil endured a tough few years after three decades of continuous success but a thriving stable filled with quality bloodstock has the legendary trainer in buoyant mood

42 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER


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Words Julian Muscat

Photos George Selwyn

t is invigorating to drive up Warren Hill for an audience with he who lives at the summit. Only a mile from the urban sprawl of Newmarket High Street, it feels like a different world. And a very different reception is assured. Henry Cecil does not disappoint. A vexing work morning might render him brusque, when he is best left to recover his equilibrium, but that’s certainly not how he is on this occasion in March. He wears that distinctive, mischievious smile as he emerges with greetings from the house. His sequinned suede mocassins could be straight from an Indian plantation. And despite his welldocumented fight against cancer, he looks younger than his 67 years. To tell him so is to make a mistake. “I hate age,” he replies. “I was constantly reminded that last year was my 40th as a trainer, which makes me seem quite old. I don’t feel it. I’ve got masses of energy. I get up at five o’clock every morning and never seem to get tired. Mentally, I’m very young.” So how old is that in years? “Sometimes he’s like a teenager,” insists Jane, whom Cecil married two years ago after a lengthy courtship. Plainly pleased by the comparison, Cecil is quick to vindicate it. It isn’t long before he is behaving like a high-spirited sixth-former with his whole life ahead of him. Moving behind his desk, he imagines he is sitting before the photgrapher he’d maintained he simply couldn’t entertain and pulls a series of comical faces. His arms, akimbo at first, start gyrating as though he is conducting the London Philharmonic. It is a charming sequence. And all the while Jane smiles the benign smile that says she has seen it all before. Welcome to Warren Place, the land of fantasy within racing’s deadpan parish. “Jane thinks that occasionally I am like Mr Bean,” Cecil reveals. “I do silly little things and maybe people need to take that with a pinch of salt. Underneath it I’m quite determined and serious, but there’s no point going around with a long face. It’s boring. And some people are just too heavy.” Fair enough. Except that it isn’t the sort of conversation one expects to have with a ten-time champion trainer whose haul of 23 British Classics far exceeds the best of his contemporaries. And no other man in Newmarket would welcome being likened to a television caricature who amuses by his >> uncoordinated helplessness.

I

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Cecil says wife Jane “has been a great help, very supportive in lots of ways” as he looks forward to working with a team of 120 horses this year

>>

It’s not as if Cecil’s life has been a parody, either. It has done its best to chew him up and spit him out. And despite Frankie Dettori’s profile, Cecil remains the one that really excites the newspapers’ saucier sections. Inside a man of unrobust physical appearance is a fighter who will not be counted out. Mind you, Warren Place, from where Cecil has trained for more than 30 years, is certainly worth fighting for. It is not just cement that binds the red bricks. Its walls have absorbed memories by turn exhilarating and debilitating, yet Cecil in the present tense flourishes in a way that seemed utterly implausible four years ago.

“I never doubted myself. I just needed inspiration and one or two decent horses, which I received” Back then, he was up against the wall. His oncemighty string had dwindled to 50. He hadn’t won a Group 1 race, never mind a Classic, for six years. It was an unrelenting slide into oblivion, which was pretty much where he stood when Thoroughbred Owner & Breeder visited him in spring 2006. Although he spoke defiantly, his words lacked conviction. All around him was evidence of a crumbling empire. Warren Place had been split into four separate units; horses trained by Ed Vaughan, Paul Howling and Jonathan Jay filled boxes that once housed horses of aristocratic lineage. “Mentally, I got quite down,” Cecil said then, 44 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

“but I’ve come out of that now. I’m no longer struggling and I’m just working on picking the whole thing up. I would like to build it up to 80 horses that I really like and hope to be training more successfully in five years’ time.” He is ahead of schedule. Cecil starts the imminent season with a team of 120 – itself the legacy of a successful 2009 campaign, when he returned to the top ten on the trainers’ list for the first time in seven years. He won three Group 1s, including his first Breeders’ Cup bauble with Midday, who’d come within a whisker of winning Cecil his ninth Oaks in June. The transformation would encourage many in Cecil’s shoes to dwell on it. Not him, though. He isn’t particularly comfortable talking about himself, especially not his catalogue of professional achievement. Yet the burning question is whether he genuinely believed he could reverse his fortunes. Whether he doubted himself. “Never,” he maintains. “At that time what I really needed was inspiration. Jane has been a great help, very supportive in lots of ways. And I also needed one or two decent horses, which I got from Khalid Abdullah and the Niarchos family. Without them, I’d be struggling to exist.” If Cecil’s words are taken at face value, frustration must have poisoned his blood. There he stood, convinced of his ability yet hamstrung by 50 predominantly slow horses that would collectively earn less than £180,000 – the equivalent of one Group 1 race – in 2006. “There was a little frustration, maybe, but it was


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HENRY CECIL

more about the challenge,” he replies. “I like a challenge, but now our numbers are up and there is a bit more quality through the string. Hopefully things are going up rather than down.” Once again, his synopsis concludes with the future rather than the past. Instead of smelling the roses, he prefers the nascent promise of this year’s buds. One final effort to prompt him on some of his finest training achievements is unavailing. Does he not recognise that thousands of racing fans would love him to take them down memory lane? “I don’t agree,” he says. “It’s like a lot of racing books; I find them boring. They write about how they won this race and that, how they would have won by a short head but for this and that, so many years ago... it’s pretty dull, I think.” A trademark smile betrays that he is warming to the theme. “There’s got to be some excitement about the stupid things we do in life,” he continues. “When a trainer is interviewed [on television] he goes on about the ground, it’s a lefthanded course or right, and so on. That’s when I go and pour myself a cup of coffee.” So much so that Cecil does his best to avoid the pre-race television “window”. “It’s difficult to know what to say,” he explains. “Then people say that I often answer a question by asking one of my own; it’s probably because I don’t know the answer, so I ask them. Two heads are better than one – don’t you think?” There is probably another facet at play here, since Cecil is extremely superstitious. “All sorts of things,” he says. “Magpies: Jane and I both on that one. And I never fill my car up with petrol the evening before; always on the way to the races. I did that for years and years.” No longer? “Actually, when I went into the doldrums, when I couldn’t win an egg and spoon race, I realised it wasn’t working. So I stopped. And those windows: whenever I have talked about a horse before a race it has never, ever won it. Why should I continue getting my own horses beat?” Ironically, television has been the conduit for Cecil’s intimate relationship with a doting public. The format is well established: it’s plain for any viewer to see that he is intoxicated by a big-race winner. His eyes soften like a teenager tipsy on punch. That’s when he is most inclined to draw the eccentric analogies for which he is cherished. When he once described a backward filly coming to hand as akin to growing roses (neither can be forced), the media portrayed him as a master-gardener for 20 years. In that respect he is an interviewer’s dream. They know that to entice Cecil down the yellow-brick road is a journey of untold promise. This is the essence of live television, yet Cecil is not always a willing participant. He is often pushed to elaborate on an exquisite one-liner when there is nothing more to add. And by his admission, he has to be in the mood. He is a lot like that backward filly: he can’t be coerced. A perfect vignette arose at the Breeders’ Cup in

October, when Cecil, a source of endless fascination to the American media, was asked how he was enjoying his first trip to California. “I can’t really say; I’ve only just arrived,” Cecil replied. “Your first impression?” his interviewer persisted. “It beats Wolverhampton on a rainy day.” “Oh, I haven’t been to Wolverhampton,” the man went on. To which an increasingly perplexed Cecil responded: “Now that you come to mention it, neither have I.”

“People talk about how they won this race and that so many years ago...it’s pretty dull, I think” An uplifting 2009 season means that Cecil isn’t about to become a regular at the Black Country circuit. Banished to the memory is the year when he went to the sales with “one or two orders for yearlings costing a few thousand pounds.” Last October he shopped for yearlings in the boutiques, from where so many of his clothes originate. That, too, has enjoyed a renaissance. “I do enjoy it but I hate it if I’m not able to afford it financially,” he says. “I’ve experienced some lean times when I could only do window-shopping. It was hopeless.” All in all, he approaches the new season with the kind of ammunition he could only have dreamt about four years ago. He has handsomely defied the odds. Numbers are up, some new and influential owners are in the books, and this at a time when the economic outlook remains bleak. >>

Cecil, pictured with top filly Indian Skimmer, is reluctant to talk about past triumphs

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 45


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HENRY CECIL

>> Which is just as it should be. The day will come when Cecil no longer cradles the game in his arms. Racegoers will not experience that unique frisson when he lands a major prize. It will be a sad day. Cecil’s assurance that those days are distant promotes a comforting feeling. And there is every reason to believe him. His demeanour is that of one who cannot wait for the Craven meeting, where he traditionally announces his stable strength. But perhaps the most encouraging portent is that laughter and jollity have returned to Warren Place. It’s impossible to imagine the depths to which Cecil sank, just as there’s no denying the zest with

which he clamboured from the wreckage to rebuild his galleon. He has left the doldrums with sails full and compass set. He is clear about where he is heading, and how to get there. “You’ve got to be in the right frame of mind to succeed at training,” he says. “You’ve got to be positive. If you’re negative nothing is any good, and I wasn’t any good, health-wise and in other ways, for a while. “Now I’m trying to do things sensibly. Jane has me on a great diet, which I’m trying to stick to, and at the moment I am holding my own. I feel pretty well and intend to be here for a long time. That’s the way I look at it.” ■

“With luck this year will be better than 2009” The worst Newmarket winter for 30 years has done nothing to dampen Henry Cecil’s expectations for 2010. His team of older horses is headed by Group 1 winners Twice Over and Midday and he has been sent around ten horses – including Lord Shanakill – from Mark Gittins’s Mogeely Stud. Cecil is guardedly optimistic that he can advance on his achievements last year. “Prince Khalid Abdullah has always supported me,” he says, “but I very much like the collection of juveniles he has sent me compared to previous years.” Although his horses have done plenty of conditioning work, they are a jigsaw in progress. “This season we start the campaign with around 120 horses. There seems to be more potential than in recent years and we have a nice cross-section of horses, with around 55 two-year-olds.

“Last season was very encouarging. With the luck one needs, this year will hopefully be as exciting, if not better. Midday has grown and seems to have strengthened; she is a good prospect over ten and 12 furlongs. “Tranquil Tiger has been the lead horse for Twice Over this winter. He is a tough horse who should pay his way, while Manifest, Father Time and Blizzard Blues could be interesting horses this season. Lord Shanakill has joined us and if we can get his form back he could make his mark. “It is early days but some of my three-year-old colts could be worth following. And some of the fillies have the potential to make their mark in better company. They started their faster work in mid-March after some pretty bad winter weather, although they have done plenty of work in the

indoor ride and have had a lot of grounding.” Cecil’s riding arrangements mirror those of last year. “Tom Queally will be backed up by Eddie Ahern, Ian Mongan and Jimmy Quinn,” he says. “They all come here and ride work for me twice a week. “I have always been happier using my own jockeys, rather than picking who is available on the day. I don’t like using

jockeys that haven’t ridden my horses before and will probably be unable to ride them next time. I like having continuity and working as a team. “My two-year-olds look encouraging, even though at this stage they are only cantering. We bought 12 nice yearlings at the sales, which I’m greatly encouraged by, as they have some quality about them. It should be an exciting year.”

Cecil’s horses to follow in 2010 Three-year-old colts Pedigree

Owner

All Action

Storm Cat – Wandesta

Khalid Abdullah

Bullet Train

Sadler’s Wells – Kind

Khalid Abdullah

Corporal Maddox

Royal Applause – Noble View

Mogeely Stud

Ebony Boom

Boreal – Elegant As Well

PKD Partnership

Honest Strike

Smart Strike – Honest Lady

Khalid Abdullah

Out Of Eden

Monsun – Eden

Sheikh Al Nahyan

Moose Moran

Lemon Drop Kid – After All

Raymond Tooth

Protaras

Lemon Drop Kid – Seven Moons

Niarchos Family

Rodrigo De Torres

Bahamian Bounty – Leonica

Mogeely Stud

Rigidity

Indian Ridge – Alakanada

Thomas Barr

Aviate

Dansili – Emplane

Khalid Abdullah

Jacqueline Quest

Rock Of Gibraltar – Coquette Rouge

Noel Martin

Kithonia

Sadler’s Wells – Ratukidul

Niarchos Family

Principal Role

Empire Maker – Interim

Khalid Abdullah

Timepiece

Zamindar – Clepsydra

Khalid Abdullah

b c Empire Maker – Reams Of Verse

Khalid Abdullah

Three-year-old fillies

Two-year-olds Unnamed Breeders’ Cup winner Midday stays in training as a four-year-old

46 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Unnamed

br c Empire Maker – Valentine Ban

Khalid Abdullah

Unnamed

br f Dansili – Clepsydra

Khalid Abdullah


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FOCUS ON THE FLAT

This is our year As the new Flat season kicks off we look at some of the names who are set to make a big impact in 2010 Words Graham Dench of the Racing Post Photos George Selwyn

St Nicholas Abbey It is St Nicholas Abbey’s misfortune that he will inevitably be compared with Sea The Stars, however brilliantly he performs. However, he already has one distinction that sets him apart, for, unlike Sea The Stars, he was unbeaten at two and ended the year the undisputed champion of his generation, his impressive defeat of the highly regarded Elusive Pimpernel in the Racing Post Trophy earning him a mark of 124 on the World Thoroughbred Rankings – not quite head and shoulders clear of his contemporaries, but a clear 4lb ahead of closest rival Passion For Gold. St Nicholas Abbey was favourite for the Derby even before he ran at Doncaster, having already won a decent maiden and the Group 2 Beresford Stakes, but he was immediately cut to around 5-2 afterwards and one can see why. His 2,000 Guineas odds are a little longer, but while some wonder whether he will have the speed to be still effective at a mile in May there must be a good chance he will. He travelled smoothly through the Racing Post Trophy under a patient ride and once he was asked to go and win his race he responded immediately and sprinted away in style. It’s true that most of Montjeu’s best sons have excelled over middle distances, but St Nicholas Abbey is not short of speed and there is encouragement on the dam’s side too, with Leaping Water a Sure Blade half-sister to Starborough and Aristotle. Besides, credible opposition is in fairly short supply. Aidan O’Brien is in no hurry to commit himself and indicated that he will know more once his

Classic hopes have had their traditional racecourse spin after racing at the Curragh one day. However, the best Ballydoyle colts regularly run in both the 2,000 Guineas and the Derby, and there is a real chance St Nicholas Abbey might emulate Sea The Stars and win both races – a feat we waited 20 years for after Nashwan.

“The best Ballydoyle colts often run in the Guineas and Derby, and St Nicholas Abbey might win both” And should he do that, there might even be a temptation to have a crack at the Triple Crown. Nijinsky was the last horse to pull it off, in 1970, and it was not seriously contemplated for Sea The Stars, but you never know. >> THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 49


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FOCUS ON THE FLAT

Hayley Turner >>

Hayley Turner’s big year was going to be 2009, but a head injury suffered on the Newmarket gallops in March kept her out of the saddle until July. In the circumstances a final tally of 60 winners was more than creditable. Big winners were in short supply, but she had the honour of captaining Great Britain in the Shergar Cup. Having wintered well and kept herself ticking over on the all-weather she says she has looked forward to the resumption of turf racing feeling “very fresh and very excited”. Talking at a minor Polytrack meeting at Lingfield she said: “This time last year I was really excited and had some good horses to look forward to, but the head injury meant four months off and it was hard to get going again, even though I had a lot of support.” Michael Bell, who has more than 100 horses, is likely to be Turner’s principal source of ammunition once more, but she rides for a broad range of stables and, besides Bell, expects to ride out for the likes of Ed Dunlop, James Fanshawe and Gerard Butler. Turner said: “I’ve been riding out at Michael’s and he has some really nice two-year-olds. It would be great to get on a really good one.” 50 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

She is also excited about resuming her partnership with two three-year-old colts by Bell’s Derby winner Motivator. She said: “I’m particularly looking forward to riding Prompter for the Royal Ascot Racing Club, after his head second in a Group 3 at Ascot, and Tactician, who ran well at Doncaster and Newbury, for the Queen. “If I could ride a Group 1 winner that would be perfect – I might have had one last year but for the injury, you just don’t know – but I’d also like to get to get 100 winners again, to show that 2008 was no fluke.”

“Michael Bell has some really nice two-year-olds. It would be great to get on a really good one” Few can seriously believe that there was any fluke about Turner’s first century and a Group 1 win will surely come her way sooner rather than later. Never mind being the best female jockey on the scene: she is among the very best of either sex.


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FOCUS ON THE FLAT

“The two-yearolds that stand out are Coconut Ice, and a Proclamation colt. It’s a very exciting time”

Tom Dascombe In around ten years as a jump jockey Tom Dascombe rode fewer than 100 winners, but his time attached to Martin Pipe’s stable certainly was not wasted and he is by no means the first journeyman rider to make a name for himself as a trainer. Dascombe reckons he learned more in his first five years with Pipe than he would have learned in 15 years with any other trainer, and he furthered his education with Ralph Beckett and Mike De Kock. He has stepped up his winning totals markedly from season to season, following a 2006 tally of ten with totals of 26, 42 and 58. Now, following last autumn’s move from Lambourn to Malpas,

Cheshire, where he enjoys the benefit of state-ofthe-art facilities and the financial backing of both footballer Michael Owen and Betfair founder ‘Bert’ Black, he has the firepower for another clear personal best and possibly as many as 90 or 100 winners. For having taken the vast majority of his old owners with him to Cheshire and inherited most of Owen’s, he is listed in Horses In Training as having 102 horses, having had just 57 in 2009. Among them are around 70 juveniles, comprising an ideal blend of relatively precocious types and more Classically-bred youngsters who will benefit from more time. Dascombe said: “We’ve got a lot of nice horses to look forward to. Among my older horses I’d single out Prince Of Dance, who has won three from three and will be aimed at the Group 2 over a mile at Sandown and then the Lockinge, while the pick of the three-year-olds on the figures is Party Doctor, who was placed at Royal Ascot and York. He could go for the Dee Stakes and even the French Derby once he’s won his maiden, but it will be up to his owner Sir Robert Ogden. “As for the two-year-olds, the ones that stand out at this stage are the sharp ones and I’d nominate the unnamed Proclamation colt out of Shaieef and a very nice Bahamian Bounty filly >> called Coconut Ice. It’s a very exciting time.” THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 51


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FOCUS ON THE FLAT

“There will be a lot to learn, and I’m looking forward to getting to know Mr Gosden’s horses”

William Buick >>

The appointment of William Buick as stable jockey to the powerful John Gosden stable caught many of us on the hop. It should not have done. The 21-year-old was impressing good judges on the Kingsclere gallops even before he had his first ride in public in 2006, and his rise through the ranks has been little short of meteoric. The joint champion apprentice in 2008, he rode a first Group 1 winner on Lahaleeb in the EP Taylor Stakes in 2009, when he also enjoyed significant success for such shrewd judges as Luca Cumani and Barry Hills. Many were hailing him as a future champion and although he had never even ridden work for

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Gosden at the time of the appointment, his progress had clearly not gone unnoticed. When he made the announcement, Gosden compared Buick to Frankie Dettori, the only other rider he has ever retained, pointing out that he has “a similar profile” and has been “brought up in the right school”. Praise does not come much higher than that, and bookmakers reacted by quoting Buick as short as 1-2 to ride a Group 1 winner in the United Kingdom, 6-1 to ride a Breeders’ Cup winner at Churchill Downs, and only 10-1 to be champion jockey in 2010. Buick, whose father Walter was an eight-time champion jockey in Scandinavia, had another good winter in Dubai and hit the ground running when he returned to the UK briefly early in March to start getting to know the Gosden horses and staff, winning a Lingfield maiden for long-time fan Marcus Tregoning on his first ride back. His ambitions for 2010 are simple. He said: “I’ve got a lot of nice horses to look forward to and I want to ride as many winners as possible. A Group 1 winner in Britain would be fantastic, but in my first year with Mr Gosden there will be a lot for me to learn and I’m just looking forward to getting to know the horses and the way things are done there.” With multiple Group 1 winner Dar Re Mi and Gimcrack winner Showcasing heading the list of 172 names in Horses In Training for his new boss, he is unlikely to be disappointed. >>


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FOCUS ON THE FLAT

David Simcock >>

If losing his Doncaster Cup and Cesarewitch winner Darley Sun to Godolphin was a blow, David Simcock put a very brave face on it. In truth, Darley Sun raced under the Rabbah Bloodstock umbrella, which is something of a nursery for Sheikh Mohammed, and so it was almost inevitable. In any case, while Simcock would have dearly loved to have prepared Darley Sun for the Ascot Gold Cup, he has plenty of other irons in the fire. Now in his seventh season at Trillium Place in Newmarket, having learned the ropes with such distinguished trainers as Dick Hern, Ian Balding, Luca Cumani and William Muir, Simcock revealed: “I’ve acquired some new owners this year and my numbers are up to around the 75 to 80 mark. I’m very happy with that.” A rare realist in a sport in which many of his contemporaries raise expectations to unrealistic levels, Simcock admits that last year’s two-year-olds were “very ordinary” on balance, so even though some of them look to have improved significantly over the winter he is looking more to his two-yearolds and older horses for the bigger wins this year. He said: “I’ve got a lovely bunch of two-yearolds and I’ll be very disappointed if they aren’t a lot better than last year’s. It’s difficult singling out

individuals at this early stage, but if you twisted my arm I’d go for the Cape Cross colt out of Easy To Love and the Medaglio d’Oro out of Bourbon Blues. Neither is named yet, but they are particularly nice. “So far as the older horses are concerned, we’ve still got the likes of Bushman, who is very solid and a good horse on soft ground, as well as Suruor, who I hope might get his head in front in one of those valuable seven-furlong handicaps, but we’ve also got some new blood. Among the new arrivals are Nasri, a talented horse who used to be with

“The two-year-olds are a lovely bunch, particularly the unnamed Cape Cross and Medaglia d’Oro” Brian Meehan, Georgebernardshaw, who will be one of our better horses but probably wasn’t at Coolmore, and Block Party, who was with Roger Charlton last year and might still be well handicapped.” ■ THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 55


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FIRST-SEASON SIRES

QUICK OFF THE MARK‌ The fight is on to be the champion first-season sire yet the title is not always an indicator of greater things to come Words Sue Montgomery

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FIRST-SEASON SIRES

hough most visitors to Doncaster on March 27 would not have been aware of it, the 2.20 race signalled the launch of the battle for one of the most desirable and keenly fought crowns of the season. As the traditional opening two-year-old contest of the season, the Brocklesby Stakes is the earliest opportunity for a first-season sire to make his mark. Despite its lowly status (its fame is more historical than anything else), the five-furlong dash is often a pointer to something better. Twelve months ago Hearts Of Fire, for instance, not only started the year in style for his sire Firebreak, but ended it in the same fashion when he took the Group 1 Gran Criterium at San Siro, beating subsequent Breeders’ Cup Juvenile winner Vale Of York in the process. And four years ago, Spoof Master was the first notch on the breeding shed door for Invincible Spirit in his record-breaking championship season.

T

Fortune and fame are the hopes for every horse when he starts his second career but a freshman crown is more often the precursor to a good honest living and a respectable reputation than to brilliance. It falls to few to emulate Sadler’s Wells, the last first-season leader to progress to the overall championship, or Kris and Vaguely Noble, who both followed in the hoofprints of St Simon nearly a century earlier by taking the two titles in consecutive years. Of course, since their time, the goalposts have moved. The title is traditionally decided by earnings and once, just as the champion jump sire used to be identified by the winner of the Grand National, a single high-class juvenile would seal victory. An extreme example was Vaguely Noble, whose only success in 1972 was Noble Decree's Observer Gold Cup (now Racing Post Trophy). Sheer weight of numbers, though, now means that quantity can muscle in on quality, and not only >>

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FIRST-SEASON SIRES

“There seems to be no foolproof formula to produce a first-season champion”

>> as far as representation is concerned. The programme book offers a plethora of lucrative opportunities and here there is a sense of the wheel having turned. The last two leading freshmen each owed their success to one huge pot, earned by the winner of one of the ubiquitous sales-related races. There seems no foolproof formula to produce a first-season champion. Some assets seem to be must-haves: talent as a runner (nine of the last ten won at least one Group 1 contest and five achieved a Timeform rating of more than 125), precocity (all scored at two, eight over five or six furlongs, five at the top level), speed (four were top sprinters, four were top milers, none scored beyond ten furlongs), opportunity (seven had first books of more than 100), pedigree (six were sons of topclass sires) and heritage (five have been sons of leading freshmen) are all part of the jigsaw. But none of those qualities offer a guarantee; plenty of sires with similar profiles failed to make a mark. Using the trends as a guide, this year’s likeliest lads should be Ad Valorem, Holy Roman Emperor, Proclamation, Diamond Green and Araafa. But in the end, it will come down to a few serendipitous shakes of the genetic cocktail and it is that very unpredictability that underpins the industry. Some stallions progress from their early promise, others do not and often the best of a given vintage emerges later. But of the last ten champion freshmen, most are still providing a valuable service of some sort to the industry. Tagula had been fast and pretty classy as a juvenile – he won the July Stakes and Prix Morny – and headed both the earnings and races-won list in 2000, in the latter instance following the example of his own sire Taufan, whom he replaced at Rathbarry Stud. His first crop, conceived at Ir4,000gns, produced a pair of Group 2-winning juveniles and he has since compiled a solid record with speedy two-year-olds and tough handicap types, some of whom stay farther than he did. His fee, currently €4,000, has never been more than €7,500, and he remains a sound commercial prospect for the smaller breeder. The best may yet be to come, too; Canford Cliffs, last year's runaway

Canford Cliffs could be the one to provide a deserved Group 1 win for his sire Tagula

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Coventry Stakes winner, has the 2,000 Guineas in his sights and is an exciting prospect to break his sire’s Group 1 duck. The star among the 2000 freshmen has proved to be Pivotal, who finished eighth in the table. Royal Applause, the 2001 champion, was unbeaten at two, progressing up the Group ladder via the Coventry, Gimcrack and Middle Park Stakes, and a champion sprinter at four. Though his sire Waajib was a miler, he was from a family of speedsters – notably his half-sister Lyric Fantasy, the first juvenile to win a Nunthorpe in 40 years, and brilliant July Cup hero Pappa Fourway – and fast, precocious juveniles were expected as his due when he retired to the Royal Studs at £6,500. He did not disappoint on that score. His first crop produced 18 individual winners of 24 races and his prize-money total of £526,453 would have seen off runner-up Danehill Dancer, who topped the numerical list, even without Acclamation's valuable sales-related prize at Doncaster. Royal Applause has held his own as a reliable source of above-average two-year-old talent, consistently in the top 20, with last year’s star the Royal Ascot winner Habaayib. He is not onedimensional; his sole top-grade winner, Ticker Tape, won an American Oaks over ten furlongs and last season's older performers included Finjaan, winner of the seven-furlong Lennox Stakes at Goodwood; Battle Of Hastings, winner of the ten-furlong Virginia Derby at Colonial Downs; and Crime Scene, second in the two-mile Melbourne Cup. But through his own efforts and with the might of Coolmore behind him, Danehill Dancer has, of course, gone on to true greatness; he is the reigning overall champion, has topped the juvenile list for three of the last four years and now trades at six figures. Not bad for a horse who started out at Ir4,000gns. Air Express, winner of two European Guineas and the Queen Elizabeth Stakes at three, came in from left field to top the 2002 table, thanks to his daughters Airwave (Cheveley Park Stakes) and Presto Vento (Super Sprint). But how the son of Salse, who retired to the National Stud at £5,000, might have progressed will never be known, as he died after his second covering season. It was an illfated year; third-placed Danetime also died young. Fasliyev and Cape Cross made such a sensational start in 2003 that they headed not only the firstcrop leaderboard but also the overall two-year-old list. The former had the better earnings; they tied on races won, with a better percentage for the latter. Their racing careers were a marked contrast; Fasliyev retired injured after a brilliant unbeaten juvenile campaign; Cape Cross was a slower burner, a high-class miler at four and five with wins in the Lockinge and Queen Anne Stakes. The pattern was rather repeated at stud. Fasliyev started with two high-class juvenile fillies, Much Faster and Carry On Katie; Cape Cross's first big earner was sales race winner Cape Fear. But there is no doubt who has made the greater impact since. Fasliyev, by Nureyev, left the Coolmore roster for >>


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FIRST-SEASON SIRES

Middle Park Stakes winner Amadeus Wolf is a member of the sole crop of Mozart

>> Japan after the 2007 season. Cape Cross, by a much better sire of sires in Green Desert, remains at Kildangan where, from a modest start (£Ir8,000), he progressed first to excellence, as flagged by Ouija Board and a high winners-torunners percentage, and then to immortality through the outstanding Sea The Stars. The 2004 table was unusual for the fact that the first two, the Coolmore pair Giant's Causeway and Montjeu, had both proved themselves top-class over middle distances. Giant’s Causeway flipped between a mile and ten furlongs for his famous five Group 1s in a row at three, and served only one season in Tipperary (at IR100,000gns) before decamping for America, where he had finished his career with a narrow defeat on dirt in the Breeders’ Cup Classic and where his sire Storm Cat shone. His chief earners from that first crop were Shamardal, winner of the Dewhurst Stakes, Maids Causeway and Footstepsinthesand. He is now established as a leading sire on all surfaces and, after three European Classic winners (Shamardal, Footstepsinthesand and Ghanaati) has a Kentucky Derby contender in Eskendereya this year. From a

high of $300,000, he now stands at $100,000. The 2,000 Guineas winner King’s Best headed the numerical list as a freshman, his 18 winners helping him to tie for third place on the overall two-year-old table with Danehill Dancer, just two winners behind the leader, Pivotal. King’s Best’s first-crop son Proclamation, winner of the 2005 Sussex Stakes, added to his tally of winners for the year and is now one of the sires in contention for this year’s title. There was another Coolmore inmate at the top of the table in 2005, but July Cup winner Mozart, by Danehill, was another short-lived champion, with a sole crop that included smart sprinters Dandy Man and Amadeus Wolf. His runner-up Bertolini, by Danzig, did best numerically and although Green Desert’s close relative had Cheveley Park Stakes heroine Donna Blini in his first crop, juvenile quantity has continued to be his trademark from his various bases. Irish National Stud resident Invincible Spirit, by Green Desert, played the numbers game in 2006, but to much better effect. A record 50 races came from 28 individual winners, very nearly half his runners, and quality went along with quantity, with the Group 2 winners Conquest and Captain Marvelous. His own talent had been as a sprinter; he won his sole Group 1 prize, the Haydock Sprint Cup, as a five-year-old in the last stride of what was his last race. His best runner has been the blindingly fast filly Fleeting Spirit, but he can get those who stay farther, notably Lawman at the top level, and has another such prospect this season in Vale Of York. A year later Acclamation, a high-class sprinter who failed to win at the top level, was another to head both the earnings and races-won lists, the former thanks mainly to Middle Park Stakes winner Dark Angel and the efforts in sales races of Hitchens, second at the Curragh, and Exclamation. Like his sire Royal Applause, he delivers speed and it will be interesting to see if a Classic contender can emerge from classier mares booked to him after his first-season success. >>

Leading contenders for the 2010 championship Betfair offers a market on the outcome of the first-season sires’ title. At the time of writing, the favourite Holy Roman Emperor had just notched his first winner, High Award, in the first juvenile contest of the Irish season. This list shows the number of live foals from the first crop of this year’s freshmen: Ad Valorem Araafa Aussie Rules Byron Diamond Green Holy Roman Emperor Hurricane Run Iceman (deceased) Iffraaj

88 69 72 64 105 111 146 105 107

Indesatchel Ivan Denisovich Kodiac Layman Librettist Phoenix Reach Proclamation Shirocco Sleeping Indian

48 77 78 61 105 32 84 110 99

Holy Roman Emperor: leading first-season sire fancy

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FIRST-SEASON SIRES

Shamardal (second left) followed his sire Giant’s Causeway when winning last year’s freshman title

>>

The runner-up in 2007 has proved not only the best sire of that intake, but of most others as well. Oasis Dream (like Pivotal and Danehill) is one of those paragons, a top-class sprinter who gets elite performers over all distances. For Elusive City, the 2008 champion, and Shamardal, last year's top freshman, it is still very early days. Elusive City (best at two, when he won the Morny, and now based at Haras d’Etreham after starting in Ireland) owed his title entirely to Soul City’s Goffs Million winnings. But he did

consolidate last year when his talented daughter Elusive Wave took the French 1,000 Guineas and beat all bar Goldikova in the Prix Rothschild. He is from the first crop of US-based sire Elusive Quality, since responsible for such as Raven’s Pass, Smarty Jones and Quality Road, and his fee has risen from €8,000 to €20,000. Kheleyf, by Green Desert, led the numbers in 2008 and continued in that vein last year (though not quite as well as his fellow Darley horse Exceed And Excel, freshman runner-up in both categories), when his best to date, the speedy Sayif, ended his season in style by winning the Diadem Stakes. Two more Darley stallions, Shamardal and Dubawi, scrapped at the top of the earnings and quantity tables last year, with Dubai Millennium’s son Dubawi, who also had an excellent percentage, just shading the numbers battle. The pair more or less matched each other in terms of quality, too: Shamardal’s Group winners were Shakespearean and Arctic, and Dubawi’s Poet's Voice and Sand Vixen. Shamardal followed his sire Giant’s Causeway to the title when Shakespearean won the Goffs Million and Dubawi clinched second place with the help of Dubawi Heights, runner-up in sales races at Ascot and Newmarket. But last year’s moral victor is perhaps Oratorio, who started his second career with a one-two in the Dewhurst Stakes, courtesy of Beethoven and Fencing Master. He is in exalted company: the last to make that sort of instant impact was none other than Sadler’s Wells, whose first-crop sons Prince Of Dance and Scenic deadheated for the Dewhurst in 1988. ■

Is prize-money the best way to decide the leading first-season sires’ title? JULIAN DOLLAR Manager of Newsells Park Stud, home of 2010 first-season sire Mount Nelson “There is no perfect way to decide the leading first season sire. Prize-money can be skewed by the high value sales races for example, while deciding purely on number of winners does not respect the quality of the races. “I think it’s important that the leading first-season sire produces the best twoyear-olds and that means a balance of having won lots of races and them being high quality races. Similar to the way Bill Oppenheim’s APEX figures work, I think that prize-money is the best way to decide the title, although by no means perfect.” JOE FOLEY ITBA Chairman and boss of Ballyhane Stud, which stands freshmen sires Diamond Green and Majestic Missile “Firstly, whatever system is used should represent all of Europe and not just Britain and Ireland due to the many two-year-olds running in the rest of Europe. There’s not

a simple solution to come up with: prizemoney is a good system but can be skewed by sales races; number of winners doesn’t work due to the variety in book and runners numbers. “Percentages of winners to runners is a good indicator. Perhaps it’s time to invent a new system which would include winners to runners percentages and also quality of runners.” BRIAN O’ROURKE Managing Director of the National Stud in Newmarket, base of Phoenix Reach “I’m not sure that prize-money is the best way these days, with the massive sales race pots. Perhaps a points system, with points awarded according to the level of the race. A horse would get more points for a Group 1 winner than for an ordinary winner.” MALCOLM BASTARD Leading breeze-up consignor “I think the money list is fine. Yes, the sales prizes can make a difference but

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they’re very competitive races so why shouldn’t they be worth a lot? The horses that do well in them are usually pretty good; they’re worth so much that trainers now save some of their better horses for them. They’re comparable to or better than a lot of Group 3s. “Numbers are probably essential, so you get representation on the track and the pace to have won at two. But if a horse is a good first-season sire he’s usually a good sire anyway – they’re not normally a flash in the pan. Even if they do have a flat couple of years, they usually come back.” MARK JOHNSTON Trainer of Shamardal as a two-year-old “The traditional prize-money system for recognising top sires is flawed but only because of varying levels of prize-money in different countries and, in particular, due to restricted races (especially sales races and bonus races). Nonetheless, it probably still tells a more accurate story than number of winners.”


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SALES CIRCUIT The breeze-up season

Goffs’ turnover up as market braces for flagship auctions Satisfactory start to breeze-ups but Maktoum investment will be key as season progresses Words Edward Prosser

s breeze-up consignors count down the final weeks until this year’s flagship two-year-old sales in Newmarket, Doncaster and SaintCloud, one thought more than any other preoccupying their minds is whether Sheikh Mohammed will be buying on the same scale as last year. John Ferguson didn’t sign for a single lot at the European breeze-ups in 2009, yet the Darley team used a whole swathe of different agents to almost singlehandedly hold the market at Tattersalls together. Regular Darley buyers such as Dick O’Gorman, Anthony Stroud, Blandford Bloodstock, Mark Johnston and Borje Olsson were joined on the buying team by the likes of David McGreavy, Bobby O’Ryan, Hugo Lascelles, John McCormack, Richard Frisby and McKeever St Lawrence. Various wild figures have circulated about what percentage of the 2009 Craven Breeze-Up Sale turnover was accounted for by Godolphin, Sheikh Mohammed and Darley subsidiary Rabbah Bloodstock, but – just from ownership registrations – it’s fair to say that it was at least 40% of the sale’s 8.56 million gns turnover. Additionally, there were several private purchases, including subsequent Breeders’ Cup Juvenile Turf winner Vale Of York (who was unsold in the ring) to go with the likes of Group-winning juveniles Passion Of Gold and Sand Vixen. Vendors certainly seem to be banking on the sheikh’s team holding together this year’s breeze-ups. Of the 166 lots catalogued at the 2010 Craven Sale, 31% are by Darley stallions and, if adding those by sires such as Invincible Spirit and Pivotal, in which the Dubai ruler owns an interest, that figure rises to 40%. Likewise at Doncaster, exactly a third of the 186 two-year-olds are the progeny of Darley stallions. There have been economic problems in Dubai since last year’s sales, leading to

A

Many consignors feel that a later date for Goffs’ breeze-up at Kempton would increase interest

fears from consignors that the Maktoum family would reduce their racing investment this year. But they can take some heart from the fact that Sheikh Mohammed’s bloodstock advisor John Ferguson told Thoroughbred

difficult for the sheikh’s team not to have some involvement at the Craven Sale. “It will be very hard for them to ignore the sale and I’m sure they won’t,” said Con Marnane of Bansha House Stables. “That is where they have had most

“Of the 166 Craven Sale lots, 40% are by Darley stallions or sires in which Sheikh Mohammed owns an interest” Owner & Breeder that his team will be on the lookout at the upcoming sales. “The 2009 breeze-up sales were very lucky for us with Mendip, who is going for the UAE Derby, and Al Zir in America and Vale Of York and Passion For Gold, both from Newmarket,” said Ferguson. “Naturally, the team will be looking forward to working the 2010 breeze-up sales and making recommendations to Sheikh Mohammed.” And vendors believe that it will be

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success, I think four of their highest-rated two-year-olds came from the European breeze-ups. It’s where they have had most Group 1 success from.” Ferguson made two purchases for $1.125 million at the year’s first flagship US breeze-up, held by Dubai-owned Fasig-Tipton at Calder, although the Darley team predictably didn’t make their mark at the lower-key Goffs Kempton Breeze-Up Sale, which kicked off the British campaign in mid-March.


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SALES CIRCUIT

Goffs

2010 European Breeze-Up dates

KEMPTON BREEZE-UP

April 14-15 April 21 April 30 May 15 May 21 June 4

Aggregate £863,500 (+30.2%) Average £15,991 (-14.6%) Sold 54 (67% clearance)

Tattersalls Craven Doncaster Tattersalls Guineas Arqana, Saint-Cloud Goresbridge BBAG, Baden-Baden

Median £12,500 (-16.7%)

Goffs Kempton Breeze-Up Top Lots Sex

Pedigree

Vendor

Price (£)

Buyer

c

Street Cry–Inspired Kiss (Inspired Prospect)

Oak Tree Farm

55,000

Zawawi Racing

f

Exceed And Excel–Fingal Nights (Night Shift)

Mocklershill

50,000

Bobby O’Ryan

f

Kheleyf–Monarchy (Common Grounds)

Tally-Ho Stud

36,000

Stephen Hillen

f

Royal Applause–Pearl Venture (Salse)

Oaks Farm Stables

30,000

Peter Doyle BS

f

Holy Roman Emperor–Queen Of Palms (Desert Prince)

Harefield Lodge Stables

30,000

Bobby O’Ryan

f

Librettist–Dunloskin (Selkirk)

The Bloodstock Connection

28,000

Marco Bozzi

c

Silver Train–Endless Sea (Mt Livermore)

Mocklershill

26,000

BBA Ireland

f

Oasis Dream–Vallee Blanche (Zafonic)

Bansha House Stables

25,000

Gay Kelleway

f

Exceed And Excel–Innclassic (Stravinsky)

The Bloodstock Connection

24,000

Aidan O’Ryan

c

Majestic Missile–Xena (Mull Of Kintyre)

Bansha House Stables

23,000

John Quinn

c

Layman–Miss Dish (Marju)

Bansha House Stables

23,000

Emerald BS

f

Marju–Tashyra (Tagula)

Keyhouse Stud

23,000

Marco Bozzi

c

Diamond Green–Tranquil Sky (Intikhab)

Bansha House Stables

23,000

Robert Mills

Goffs Kempton Breeze-Up (since it began in 2007) Year

Cat

Off

Sold

Clear

Agg (£)

Av (£)

Med (£)

Top (£)

2010

94

81

54

67%

863,500

15,991

12,500

55,000

2009

75

57

36

63%

663,100

18,728

15,000

58,000

2008

101

86

64

74%

1,944,500

30,383

25,000

105,000

2007

100

82

65

79%

2,074,000

31,908

26,000

110,000

The Kempton sale provided a satisfactory but far from spectacular start to the European year. Although turnover for an increased catalogue rose by 30% to £863,500 and the clearance rate improved from 63% in 2009 to 67% this year, this event has struggled to progress since it first took place in 2007. The average and median prices, this year respectively £15,991 and £12,500, have fallen each year since the sale was inaugurated and the 2010 figures were only half of those at the inaugural Kempton auction. The sale’s top price has similarly gone down each year, with an outlay of £55,000 proving enough to head trade at the 2010 sale. That was paid by Swedish trainer Lennart Reuterskiold for a Street Cry colt who will race for Dr Omar Zawawi. The colt’s new owner is one of Oman’s most successful businessmen, chairing over 75 companies under the banner of his Omar Zawawi Establishment LLC. He has owned horses with Reuterskiold

since the latter started training around ten years ago. Former jockey Norman Williamson’s Oak Tree Farm sold the top lot, who had been picked up for $17,000 as a yearling at Keeneland. As last year, only two lots made £50,000 or more, compared to 14 in 2007 and 11 in 2008, and this was the first sale where the new-look Breeze-Up Bonus Scheme, sponsored by the Racing Post, was in operation. Darley-sired fillies steal the limelight

The prize for winning a race has been reduced from £10,000 to £5,000 this year, something that drew a mixed reaction from buyers. Surprisingly, five of the top six prices at the Kempton Sale were for fillies and all but one of the six dearest lots was by a Darley stallion. Goffs, prompted by several leading vendors, are keen to move the sale to a later date, possibly the week before Tattersalls’ Craven Breeze-Up Sale, when

Norman Williamson sold the top lot for £55,000

Goffs’ subsidiary DBS previously held its sale. DBS has this year moved its sale to the week after the Craven. “I’ve not got a problem with it being in March but it would be good if it could move to even a week after Cheltenham – I just think nobody is thinking about Flat racing when the sale is on at present,” said Con Marnane of Bansha House Stables. “There were a lot of trainers missing and we need to get more buyers there. “As I’d say 90% of the vendors are from Ireland and it’s an Irish sales company, it could be a good opportunity for Irish Thoroughbred Marketing to join forces with their British equivalent and really push the sale. It’s probably the best breeze-up in the world in terms of percentage of winners sold. “But most of ours actually sold above expectations at Kempton; maybe something cost £7,000 as a yearling and we got £25,000 for it. That’s what this year will be all about, we need to move horses on, hopefully leave a couple of quid behind and pay our bills.”

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ROA FORUM The special section for ROA members

PRIS provides income benefits to riders after incidents on and off the racecourse

Ensuring that riders are looked after in the event of disablement Professional Riders Insurance Scheme is a lifeline to professional jockeys The ROA office has received a number of enquiries from members about the sum which is paid in addition to the riding fee to the Professional Riders Insurance Scheme (PRIS). PRIS was set up in 1974 to provide licensed jockeys, apprentice jockeys and conditional jockeys with income benefits in the event of temporary disablement, and capital benefits in the event of death or permanent disability. It is a fixed benefit scheme underwritten by insurance for the benefit of currently licensed jockeys and is governed by a strict set of rules. PRIS is an entirely separate operation from the Injured Jockeys’ Fund. Although PRIS and the IJF work closely together through their almoners, they have different trustees and there is no direct link between the two groups.

Each time a riding fee is charged, an additional 13% is automatically earmarked for PRIS. In monetary terms, this amounts to £13.45 per ride for a Flat jockey and £18.36 for a jump jockey. Christopher Sporborg, Chairman of the trustees, explained: “PRIS ensure there is a capital fund, in the event of the death of a jockey, permanent total disablement, or the loss of a limb or eye. The insurance company then pay whatever the designated amount is in terms of the claim. “Benefits cover jockeys for incidents on the racecourse and also on the gallops or schooling. A jockey who suffers an accident on his or her way to the races may also be eligible for compensation. A jockey who suffers a fall which leaves him or her unable to ride again is paid for up to 18 months.

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“A jockey who is temporarily injured and signed off is paid a benefit until fit to resume race-riding. The temporary benefit payments are graded by a scale of 1-9, according to the jockey’s number of rides in the previous season. “A jockey whose number of rides falls in the Grade 9 category (over 600 rides) contributes considerably more than a rider in Grade 1 (up to 74). The temporary benefits are designed to keep jockeys going when they are medically unfit to ride.” The day-to-day running and administration of the scheme is undertaken by PRIS’s only paid member of staff, Irene Rogers, who is based at Oaksey House in Lambourn. She receives a daily red entries list from Weatherbys, which details any jockey who has had a fall or suffered a bodily injury and is medically

unfit to ride. Where a jockey has suffered an injury, Rogers makes contact to check on their condition and establish whether they need a claim form. Claims are completed by jockeys with the input of their GP or specialist, and returned within 21 days of the incident. Rogers explained: “The scheme covers any professional jockey, but doesn’t cover illness or sickness, e.g. swine flu. The jockey must suffer a bodily injury to qualify for a claim.” Any licensed jockey who suffers a significant injury such as concussion or a fracture needs the approval of Dr Michael Turner, the BHA’s chief medical adviser, before returning to race-riding. Jockeys suffering less serious injuries, e.g. soft tissue, can be passed fit to ride by a racecourse doctor. Grade 1 conditional riders


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and apprentices who suffer an injury at the stables, on the gallops or schooling make claims under a separate scheme, the Racing Industry Accident Benefit Scheme (RIABS), for paid stable workers, which is funded by licensed and permitted trainers and by contributions from stable staff. During 2009 PRIS paid out £1,303,888 in total: £628,888 in temporary benefits and £675,000 in capital (career ending) benefits. The capital benefit payments were reclaimed from the scheme’s insurers and related to two permanent total disablement claims and one loss of vision claim. Due to the nature of the terms of the

insurance policy, these claims related to accidents in previous years. The sums insured under the capital benefits include £500,000 for death, £750,000 for permanent total disablement and £75,000 for 10% of total disablement. Trustees meet three times a year and, with the assistance of almoners, monitor the performance of the scheme closely. Kevin Darley, Chief Executive of the Professional Jockeys Association, said: “The Professional Riders Insurance Scheme is a lifeline to jockeys when they’re sidelined through injury. “The scheme covers jockeys for loss of riding fees at a time when the bills keep coming in.

It gives them some peace of mind whilst they are recuperating. “It would be unthinkable for professional jockeys to be riding without this cover and the PJA values the scheme and the excellent support it gives to our members.” The total sum paid to PRIS last year was £1,458,219, with 57% awarded to Flat jockeys and 43% to National Hunt riders.

The data in the table below does not include the details of jockeys who have not been signed off as fit to ride, or reached 78 weeks of claiming PRIS, as of February 25 this year. There are another ten jockeys who are currently being paid by the Professional Riders Insurance Scheme for injuries that they suffered in 2009 who are not included in these statistics.

Riding injuries that occurred in 2009 Injury type Concussion Dislocation Fracture Soft tissue

No of cases 12 5 39 27 Total 83

Days off racing 554 211 2,440 360 Total 3,565

ROCS Now is an ideal time for racehorse owners to take advantage of the Racehorse Owners Compensation Scheme (ROCS). With two-years-olds in full training, and the tempo increasing for older horses, it makes perfect sense to insure against veterinary costs and disability. This ground-breaking scheme, launched in February, is designed specifically for ROA members. It allows owners to insure horses in training against injury and veterinary treatment from £2 per day, with payments ranging from £2,000 to £8,000. Michael Harris, ROA Chief Executive, said: “We’ve received an overwhelming response from members to the launch of ROCS. “We hope the scheme will provide some financial cushioning to owners when they are faced with the frustrating prospect of their horse being sidelined after suffering an injury.”

Designed specifically for ROA members ROCS PROVIDES:

For further information and a full description of the insurance cover, please contact Lycetts’ offices in Newmarket or Marlborough. Lycetts www.lycetts.co.uk NEWMARKET

✔ Financial compensation for the owner of a racehorse that is injured, either temporarily or permanently ✔ The costs of treating the horse at a top veterinary clinic ✔ The value of the horse if it dies

The Coach House, 168 High Street, Newmarket, Suffolk CB8 9AQ. T: 01638 676700 F: 01638 664700 charles.hamilton@lycetts.co.uk MARLBOROUGH

1 Stables Court, The Parade, Marlborough, Wiltshire SN8 1NP. T: 01672 512512 F: 01672 516660 richard.chugg@lycetts.co.uk

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 67


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AGENDA The February ROA Council Meeting Michael Harris, Chief Executive

ROCS

The Council was informed that the month’s marketing focus had been on the Racehorse Owners Compensation Scheme (ROCS) insurance. There had been an excellent initial response with over 600 expressions of interest and this number continues to increase. New ownership guide

There was discussion on a new book that the ROA had decided to publish. Work had now commenced on a ‘Guide to Racehorse Ownership’, for which a sponsor would be sought. Levy Scheme

The Council noted that prizemoney for 2009 was at a record high, mainly because of the Levy Board’s outstanding contribution and because of the so-called ‘high-roller’ effect. Conversely, prizemoney for the current year would decrease substantially with a decline in levy contributions, due, in part, to some major bookmakers taking their online business offshore. Discussions then took place about various aspects of the levy process including the future of the Capital Fund, the Fixture Incentive Scheme and the general funding mechanism relating to fixtures. It was agreed that all the levy’s expenditure heads would have to be scrutinised to minimize cuts in prize-money. The huge importance of the 50th Levy Scheme (2011/12) was emphasised. The opening debate on this would commence at the forthcoming meeting.

The 50th scheme would be organised in a different way to previous years. Instead of bookmakers putting in their opening position, racing would be putting forward the amount of money it considered the industry needed to function, taking in all economic and social considerations. The levy part of the meeting ended with an update on the levy position with regard to offshore operators and betting exchanges, while further concern was expressed over the balance of racing’s income shifting from the levy to racecourse picture rights. The fact that owners had no control over the latter was a matter that needed to be addressed in terms of racecourse prize-money contributions. Racecourse figures

Discussion moved on to prizemoney agreements with racecourses. These related to a 48-hour declaration agreement and a general prizemoney agreement. It was clear a significant majority of racecourses had fallen below the required level of prizemoney contributions for 2009, although it was recognised that most of these courses would produce so-called ‘justifiable reasons’ for their shortfall. A reduction in sponsorship and income from corporate entertaining would be among them. The Council agreed that these very disappointing figures further emphasized the need for a more robust prizemoney agreement between the Horsemen’s Group and racecourses.

68 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Racing For Change

There was further debate on Racing For Change, in particular the plans for putting a stronger emphasis on racing’s premier events and the Flat championship. It was explained that although there would not be a qualification link between the major events and ‘Champions’ Day’ itself, the championship races throughout the season would receive better marketing and signposting so the public could better relate to them. Racing Syndicates

A report was heard on the new Racing Syndicates and Clubs Association (RSACA). Its purpose is to provide accreditation to those syndicates that traded fairly and adhered to a code of practice. While the Council believed this was a worthwhile aim, some members queried why this was not a function being carried out by the BHA, under whose wing all matters relating to integrity fell. Handicap weights proposal

The Council received this information on Race Planning: A proposal to increase the basic weight in standard handicaps by 3lb was rejected on the grounds that it would be too disadvantageous to lightweight jockeys. An analysis of non-runners, which showed a deteriorating picture, was also discussed and the Council noted that the BHA would continue to monitor the numbers before taking any action. Also discussed was the idea of establishing a maximum overweight that a jockey should be allowed to declare.

NEWS IN BRIEF ROA office move As of Thursday, April 1, the ROA will be at a new address: 1st Floor, 75 High Holborn, London, WC1V 6LS T: 020 7152 0200 F: 020 7152 0213 Rasen loses Gold Standard Market Rasen, which first received the Gold Standard Award in 2007, is no longer among the ranks of present holders, due to a sustained decline in their executive and sponsorship contributions to prize-money. The Gold Standard Committee and ROA Council took the decision not to renew the Lincolnshire course’s current award after several months of discussions with the course management. The stipulated threshold of 15% has not been achieved, even allowing for mitigating factors such as abandonments. The Gold Standard Committee will continue will continue a dialogue with the Market Rasen team with the aim of working towards restoring the award when their prize-money contributions improve. Late arrival penalty increase The BHA Board has approved an increase to the fine imposed on those entering the parade ring late for Group and Grade 1 races. Connections of any horse that arrives after the time stipulated on the Timetable Plan for Start Times will be fined 0.5% of the total prize-fund for that race. Raise £100 for TRC in May The Thoroughbred Rehabilitation Centre is encouraging as many people as possible to hold a fundraising event during May, with a target of at least £100. Suggestions of ideas to do this are available on the TRC website, which will also post details of planned events. For details email fundraising@ thoroughbredrehabilitationcentre .co.uk


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Totesport-sponsored winners in January

Priority booking for private boxes at Royal Ascot Ascot racecourse is delighted to offer ROA members the following benefits when booking private boxes: ■ Priority booking of private boxes ahead of the Royal Ascot 2010 waiting list. ■ Option to upgrade guests, free of charge, to Royal Enclosure Guest Badges (Sat only). ■ Facilities to book a minimum of six packages (subject to availability). Usual minimum number is ten per box. With a waiting list approaching 650 people, private boxes for Royal Ascot are selling fast. In order to be offered boxes ahead of this list please contact Susan Thomsett for availability, quoting reference ROA Boxes. Tel: 0870 726 3042, Fax: 0870 460 1253 or email: susan.thomsett@ascot.co.uk

Peopleton Brook

Lingfield

02/1

GS Thompson & P Banfield

Near The Water

Plumpton

03/1

Ms Jane Southall

Shake On It

Wolverhampton

04/1

Mrs L Bangs

Miss Taken

Southwell

07/1

K & D Racing Partnership

Black Falcon

Southwell

10/1

Mrs A E Harris

Noble Jack

Lingfield

14/1

M K George

Formidable Guest

Lingfield

14/1

Macniler Racing Partnership

Head To Head

Wolverhampton

14/1

Mrs M Doherty

Rince Donn

Folkestone

19/1

R P Behan

Munich

Kempton Park

20/1

R P Behan

Peopleton Brook

Lingfield

22/1

GS Thompson & P Banfield

Ballyfoy

Lingfield

25/1

M K George

Augustus John

Wolverhampton

25/1

Arthur Clayton

One Cornetto

Lingfield

25/1

Mrs Carrie Zetter-Wells

The City Kid

Wolverhampton

25/1

Luke McGarrigle

After The Show

Lingfield

29/1

Miss L Thompson

Karky Schultz

Uttoxeter

30/1

Harold Nass

Total runs – 287; Total wins – 17 (6% wins/runs)

There were no Group or Graded winners this month, however Totesport-sponsored runners achieved an across-the-card four-timer at Lingfield and Wolverhampton on January 25, and a treble at the same tracks on January 14

DIARY DATES & REMINDERS

Package prices start from £505 per person plus VAT. They include: Private hire of the box Grandstand admission One car park label per couple Morning coffee and biscuits Champagne Reception with canapés Four-course luncheon Selected fine wines Port or brandy with coffee Afternoon tea Complimentary bar throughout the day consisting of selected fine wines, house champagne, Grey Goose vodka, Bombay Sapphire gin, Famous Grouse whisky, Ruby port, Courvoisier brandy, Heineken, Fullers London Pride, mixers, orange juice and mineral water until 30 minutes after the last race Betting facilities close to the box Racecards Racing papers Floral arrangement

Epsom 2-for-1 offer The opening fixture of the 2010 season at Epsom racecourse takes place on Wednesday, April 21. The Investec spring meeting stages a thrilling card of racing including the first of the official Derby trials, the Investec Blue Riband Derby Trial. The Grandstand and Queen’s Stand will be open as one enclosure, allowing racegoers to enjoy all of the facilities and viewing areas. Tickets cost £15 in advance and £20 on the day; tickets booked in advance with promotional code ROASP10 will validate a 2for-1 offer for ROA members. Call 0844 848 0197 or visit www.epsomdowns.co.uk to purchase your tickets. Bookings close at midnight on Tuesday, April 20. Epsom is also offering 13 fixtures as part of the Racecourse Badge Scheme for ROA members this year. This policy means the course’s series of race evenings, which are followed by concerts, are also included. Only the Investec Derby and Oaks meeting is excluded from the scheme this year.

April 20-24 ROA members who purchase tickets for any of the four days, April 21-24 (Wednesday to Saturday) of the Punchestown Irish National Hunt Festival will receive the equivalent booking for Tuesday, April 20 free of charge. To book, email ticketsales@punchestown.com or call Stacey on +353 45 897704, quoting your ROA membership number. Prices: General Admission €30, Reserved Enclosure €40, Senior Citizen €18 (optional €10 R.E upgrade). Payment can be made by credit card or Euro Bank draft. June 24 ROA AGM followed by members’ and guests’ lunch at the Jumeirah Carlton Tower Hotel, Knightsbridge, London. July 27-31 Special service for ROA members to order badges for the Richmond Enclosure at Glorious Goodwood.

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 69


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Racecourse League Table Ptn Racecourse

Racecourse ownership

Exec + Sponsors (£)

% of Total

Levy Board (£)

1 Aintree JCR 2 Cheltenham JCR 3 York I 4 Ascot I 5 Epsom Downs JCR 6 Haydock Park JCR 7 Chester I 8 Goodwood I 9 Sandown Park JCR 10 Newmarket * JCR 11 Hamilton Park I 12 Doncaster Arena 13 Newbury I 14 Musselburgh I 15 Ayr I 16 Ripon I 17 Salisbury I 18 Stratford-on-Avon I 19 Beverley I 20 Newcastle North 21 Pontefract I 22 Windsor Arena 23 Thirsk I 24 Bath North 25 Leicester I 26 Carlisle JCR 27 Sedgefield North 28 Fakenham I 29 Ffos Las North 30 Wetherby I 31 Chepstow North 32 Yarmouth North 33 Ludlow I 34 Cartmel I 35 Lingfield Park Arena 36 Bangor-On-Dee I 37 Nottingham JCR 38 Perth I 39 Kelso I 40 Kempton Park JCR 41 Exeter JCR 42 Market Rasen JCR 43 Redcar I 44 Uttoxeter North 45 Catterick Bridge I 46 Warwick JCR 47 Taunton I 48 Fontwell Park North 49 Huntingdon JCR 50 Wincanton JCR 51 Folkestone Arena 52 Brighton North 53 Hereford North 54 Plumpton I 55 Newton Abbot I 56 Towcester I 57 WolverhamptonArena 58 Southwell Arena 59 Worcester Arena 60 Hexham I Total

1,652,752 2,952,783 2,041,777 4,015,615 1,191,553 1,234,956 480,147 1,174,931 1,013,235 2,994,179 224,282 1,115,649 1,051,519 334,450 519,448 211,040 216,935 202,515 175,638 317,871 202,764 236,486 144,504 143,186 229,986 144,640 78,205 63,980 110,287 129,364 196,103 136,432 100,278 31,670 571,727 93,342 106,637 79,462 81,905 559,670 84,654 103,758 88,061 106,492 79,405 99,271 50,542 77,502 67,310 68,677 48,335 46,472 20,209 20,256 21,911 10,631 46,783 29,753 5,409 -1,881 27,635,452

50.1 49.8 42.6 42.2 40.4 34.1 32.1 31.3 28.2 28.1 27.0 26.3 26.3 26.2 26.0 23.7 21.7 21.3 20.7 20.4 20.1 19.8 19.7 19.4 18.6 18.4 18.0 17.2 17.2 17.2 16.6 16.2 16.1 14.4 13.4 13.1 12.9 12.8 12.3 11.3 10.5 10.4 10.3 10.2 10.1 9.8 9.7 8.7 8.3 8.2 7.7 7.2 4.3 3.7 3.2 1.9 1.4 1.2 0.8 -0.4 25.3

1,185,950 1,990,610 1,596,550 3,117,910 998,360 1,811,950 887,710 1,997,170 2,060,500 3,731,210 513,800 2,005,029 2,208,180 812,250 1,141,840 583,990 623,180 664,870 574,590 1,035,930 692,640 785,250 476,840 515,667 844,647 564,140 299,680 308,395 460,200 541,210 809,030 571,720 481,490 162,360 3,175,440 571,750 539,510 488,770 536,460 3,764,225 633,693 791,030 534,200 787,170 624,543 770,750 422,170 725,460 645,850 666,350 514,410 529,070 389,130 492,410 627,240 499,480 2,848,252 2,299,600 588,062 434,900 61,954,772

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In order of racecourses’ percentage contributions to overall prize-money % of Total

Owners (£)

36.0 459,890 33.6 897,106 33.3 1,116,316 32.7 2,323,888 33.8 737,857 50.1 485,187 59.3 80,560 53.2 512,426 57.3 478,907 35.0 3,742,521 61.9 55,777 47.2 1,033,458 55.3 569,123 63.5 96,000 57.1 285,932 65.5 66,175 62.5 84,684 69.9 66,201 67.6 62,172 66.4 185,341 68.7 63,887 65.8 120,568 64.9 79,251 69.8 67,034 68.4 100,386 71.8 76,385 69.0 51,415 82.8 0 71.7 59,545 71.9 59,586 68.6 131,940 67.8 100,714 77.1 42,720 74.0 25,370 74.5 344,391 80.2 36,333 65.1 114,287 78.9 45,857 80.6 37,341 76.1 455,676 78.9 82,205 79.6 93,083 62.6 221,739 75.2 142,661 79.1 58,388 76.1 112,035 80.6 32,649 81.0 92,678 79.5 84,005 79.3 85,704 81.7 62,415 81.7 66,035 82.0 62,023 89.6 32,650 93.0 5,264 89.2 49,655 86.7 292,438 89.4 199,975 83.3 84,096 89.2 47,681 56.8 17,259,586

% of Total

Total 2009/10 (£)

Total 2008/9 (£)

% total Up/ 2008/9 down

13.9 3,298,592 3,273,598 15.1 5,924,499 5,562,823 23.3 4,791,143 1,995,325 24.4 9,524,913 10,180,849 25.0 2,952,770 2,965,662 13.4 3,620,093 3,285,870 5.4 1,497,417 1,510,940 13.7 3,752,527 3,832,910 13.3 3,594,142 3,677,965 35.1 10,650,410 11,182,239 6.7 830,359 823,744 24.3 4,247,135 4,819,031 14.2 3,996,322 4,052,921 7.5 1,278,200 1,205,425 14.3 1,999,220 2,127,603 7.4 892,205 792,366 8.5 997,499 957,818 7.0 951,086 865,124 7.3 849,650 849,115 11.9 1,561,292 1,225,403 6.3 1,008,791 866,664 10.1 1,193,304 1,127,677 10.8 734,195 632,050 9.1 738,886 678,639 8.1 1,234,019 1,179,837 9.7 785,165 708,400 11.8 434,300 529,896 0 372,375 373,284 9.3 642,032 N/A 7.9 753,160 986,446 11.2 1,179,073 1,118,100 12.0 842,966 753,942 6.8 624,488 675,800 11.6 219,400 203,383 8.1 4,262,258 3,723,434 5.1 712,675 714,916 13.8 828,934 691,927 7.4 619,089 677,900 5.6 665,206 543,720 9.2 4,949,621 4,636,764 10.2 803,052 812,136 9.4 993,371 905,400 26 854,000 876,300 13.6 1,047,323 997,350 7.4 789,336 735,842 11.1 1,012,306 777,909 6.2 523,611 554,355 10.4 895,640 834,402 10.3 812,165 721,623 10.2 840,731 1,068,900 9.9 629,660 768,142 10.2 647,877 569,025 13.1 474,662 454,188 5.9 549,316 485,484 0.8 674,715 604,666 8.9 559,766 604,000 8.9 3,287,073 2,848,427 7.8 2,572,428 2,047,074 11.9 705,566 626,214 9.8 487,500 333,100 15.8 109,169,510 105,766,025

50.4 ▼ 50.1 ▼ 37.9 ▲ 46.7 ▼ 39.1 ▲ 31.4 ▲ 37.9 ▼ 38.4 ▼ 33.8 ▼ 30.7 ▼ 38.7 ▼ 33.2 ▼ 23.6 ▲ 23.8 ▲ 26.7 ▼ 30.0 ▼ 26.1 ▼ 25.4 ▼ 20.6 ▲ 30.5 ▼ 23.9 ▼ 27.3 ▼ 32.4 ▼ 30.4 ▼ 18.5 ▲ 25.9 ▼ 6.8 ▲ 25.1 ▼ N/A N/A 23.0 ▼ 17.4 ▼ 26.5 ▼ 11.9 ▲ 16.4 ▼ 20.0 ▼ 14.9 ▼ 14.7 ▼ 15.1 ▼ 16.4 ▼ 15.0 ▼ 8.0 ▲ 18.0 ▼ 16.5 ▼ 10.4 ▼ 13.3 ▼ 12.2 ▼ 6.1 ▲ 13.3 ▼ 17.4 ▼ 14.1 ▼ 10.7 ▼ 15.6 ▼ 6.7 ▼ 2.3 ▲ 6.7 ▼ 6.2 ▼ -0.3 ▲ 4.3 ▼ 2.0 ▼ 26.4 ▼ 28.3 ▼

Figures relate to prize-money for the 12-month period March 1, 2009 to February 28, 2010

EXPLANATION OF TABLE This table sets out the three main contributors to prize-money with percentages of the total: 1 Racecourses’ executive and sponsorship; 2 Levy Board; 3 Owners. A small additional contribution is also made by the Divided Race Fund and the BHA Development Fund. The order is taken from the percentage in the second column of figures. This shows how much each racecourse has contributed to prize-money, expressed as a percentage of their overall prize-money. The arrows at the end of each line are based on a comparison between the percentages for the two rolling year periods. If a racecourse has improved its position by this criteria it receives a green ‘up’ arrow. If the year-on-year percentage has decreased it receives a red ‘down’ arrow. Note: All of the figures are produced on an ‘as originally programmed’ basis, i.e. where any transferred fixtures were originally programmed rather than where the fixtures have actually taken place. However, any transferred BHA ‘National’ fixtures and ‘Regional’ fixtures are attributed to the courses where the fixtures have actually taken place.

RACECOURSE OWNERSHIP KEY JCR Jockey Club Racecourses

North Northern Racing Ltd Arena Arena Leisure Ltd I Independently owned racecourse Gold Standard Award (*July Course)


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Stud staff to the fore at the Godolphin Stud and Stable Staff Awards Great success enjoyed by Hascombe & Valiant and Whitsbury Manor Stud employees This year’s Godolphin Stud and Stable Staff Awards proved a great success for stud staff, with finalists in the David Nicholson Newcomer and High Achiever categories, as well as the Stud Staff Category. Generously sponsored by Godolphin, and run by the British Horseracing Authority and the Racing Post, the awards have now established themselves as a truly inspiring event in the industry calendar. Roy Gedge, of Hascombe and Valiant Stud near Newmarket, scooped the award in the Stud Staff category. Having put retirement plans on hold twice, this award is due recognition of his dedication and long service to the stud, where he has worked for 44 years, the last 25 as stud groom. Gedge’s winning attributes include an impressive knowledge of the industry that he is more than willing to pass on to others, and an exceptional attitude, temperament and willingness to help. Speaking at the awards lunch, he was delighted and grateful to have won his award and felt the event was “a great opportunity for stud staff, who may not always be in the limelight, to be recognised for the work done behind the scenes on a stud farm”. In addition to a trophy as a memento of the occasion, Gedge received a cash prize of £5,000, which was matched by £5,000 to be shared amongst his colleagues. Deserving runners-up in this category, David Cartledge, stallion man at the Royal Studs, and Hazel Woods, yearling foreman at Kirtlington Stud, both took

Roy Gedge, pictured at Hascombe and Valiant Stud, was successful in the stud staff category

home trophies and £2,000, with an additional £2,000 for each of their studs. Just starting out in his career, James Gray from Whitsbury Manor Farm and Stud, Hampshire, took the David Nicholson Newcomer Award. Having joined Whitsbury Manor from the National Stud’s apprenticeship course, Gray spent a season learning the ropes at leading South African Stud Klawvlei, after which he returned to Whitsbury, taking up the position of second head man in 2009. Gray has a strong and abiding passion for the industry and a determination to make it up the ladder by experiencing as many aspects of the industry as he can. He collected a trophy and £5,000, with an additional £5,000 going to staff at Whitsbury Manor, and is pictured receiving his award from

72 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

former Derby-winning jockey John Reid. Catherine Morse, stud groom at Overbury Stud in Gloucestershire, was a strong contender in the High Achiever category, and as a runner-up to eventual Employee of the Year Stuart Messenger in this category, received a trophy and £2,000 for herself and a further £2,000 for the stud.

Judges of all categories commented on the strength and depth of the nominations this year, and the event benefited from nearly twice as many entrants in all categories. All the finalists enjoyed their stay in London, praising the organisation of the event, the hospitality at the Jumeirah Carlton Tower Hotel and the friendly manner in which they were interviewed by judges.

Whitsbury Manor’s James Gray (right) receives his award from John Reid


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An interview with Michael Owen is one of the Yearbook’s highlights

New BBM Yearbook available free of charge The recently published British Bloodstock Marketing Yearbook for 09/10 is available free on request. The publication includes over 100 pages packed full of useful information on the British racing and breeding industry. It is presented by calendar month, combining forthcoming race fixtures and sales in 2010 with a racing and sales review of 2009. It also includes monthly features and exclusive interviews from Michael Owen, Richard Fahey and National Hunt breeder Paul Murphy, together with useful statistics and stallion fees. The yearbook can be viewed online, where specific pages can be directly downloaded, emailed or printed. Please visit www.bbm.gb.com. Alternatively, please contact BBM to receive a hard copy in the post by emailing info@bbm.gb.com.

TBA/RCA Breeders’ Badge Scheme 2010 -2011 Membership to the Breeders’ TBA members were sent a Badge Scheme (BBS) entitles form in the send-out from complimentary access to the Stanstead House at the end of racecourse for the TBA February; the form should member plus one guest at over have now been completed and 1,300 participating fixtures returned to Weatherbys. If you throughout the year. do not have a photocard, please However, if you do not send a passport-sized photo update the breeding details with your renewal application. held on your TBA/RCA If you have misplaced the Horseracing Privilege card, it form, or have any questions, will automatically de-activate please contact Samantha on April 30, 2010. Knight at Stanstead House. All members of the BBS now need to have the official Horseracing Privilege photocard, or access will be E denied at the racecourse. NOW DU L A W E N The old style maroon cards RE and TBA membership cards are not accepted. THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 73


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NOTES FOR EMPLOYERS

March TBA Stud Staff Award

Statutory pay rates From April 4, the rate of statutory maternity pay will rise from £123.06 to £124.88 per week. This is payable after the first six weeks of leave, when 90% of employees’ average weekly earnings should be paid. Statutory sick pay will remain at the current level of £79.15 per week. For further information on managing maternity leave go to the Employers’ Area of the TBA website – www.thetba.co.uk – and log-on or register to access the relevant Fact Sheet.

Health and Safety Stud owners often forget that, as directors, they and their partners are also employees of their business. Hence, most will probably have reached the ‘5+ employees’ threshold and therefore need to have documented risk assessments and policies. The guidance publication ‘Health & Safety in the British Racing & Breeding Industry’, otherwise known as the ‘Red Book’, is available on the TBA website and should help you to meet this legal requirement. The TBA Employers’ Area of the website also provides free templates that can be downloaded and completed to save time. If, however, you are too busy at present to do this and would like some support, our retained Safety Consultant, Tony Payne, of ‘adams-payne safety ltd’, offers assistance with the production of a Health and Safety policy, risk assessments and supporting documents that will help employers comply with the law. To qualify for the TBA members rate, contact Payne on 01353 698767 or 07739 709767 and quote your TBA number.

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TBA Stud Staff Award winner David Gardner (right) with Derek Christopher

The TBA Stud Staff Award for March goes to David Gardner of New England Stud. With nearly 25 years service under his belt at Meddlar Stud, Gardner joined New England ten years ago, initially as a stallion man. Owner Peter Stanley describes Gardner as a wonderful asset to the Stud, citing his immense dedication and reliability. Always a willing volunteer for

any additional role, Gardner is in early each morning to do the feed round and on duty at night when needed. He is a top-class horseman able to handle any animal, and his calm temperament is highly valued by Team New England. Gardner is pictured receiving his certificate and cheque for £100 from TBA Stud Satff Award Co-ordinator Derek Christopher.

Racing Welfare helpline Racing Welfare’s recent success at the Helplines Association Awards was well deserved and highlighted the benefits of a 24/7 national number that anyone in the industry can call for confidential advice and support. The TBA supports this valuable initiative and we urge employers to make their staff aware of it. Posters and mugs displaying the number – 0800 6300443 – are available from Racing Welfare or Stanstead House.

New face at the TBA Lesley O’Shea will be joining the team at Stanstead House in April and brings with her a wealth of experience in the bloodstock industry, including eight years in Dubai. Lesley is employed on a one-year contract to cover Samantha Knight’s maternity leave.


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Next Generation Committee A back-to-basics approach can help young breeders to countermand the fickle fates of stallion fashion Words Kevin Sommerville Breeding racehorses is not an activity to be taken lightly: only 3% of all horses will become stakes winners and only about 60% will win a race. We can, however, try to push the odds in our favour with a few basic breeding principles aimed at producing good, sound racehorses. As a small breeder in South Africa, now working in the UK, I’m amazed at the influence ‘fashion’ can have on breeders when their bloodlines are the envy of the world. I can understand the word fashion being used in conjunction with racehorses and the races, but how can the notion of what is ‘in one season, out the next’ be applied to the breeding of racehorses? Breeding requires a minimum of two years’ investment if you plan to sell as a weanling, or three if you sell as a yearling. The most fashionable stallion of 2007 was probably the Cartier Horse of the Year. Can anybody actually remember who that was? So why are we breeding for a fashionable market place when we are breeding yearlings that are at least two or three years out of fashion? Cardinal sin

Many breeders make the cardinal sin of breeding maiden mares to first-season sires, with no idea of the type of stock the mare will produce or, indeed, the stallion. Breeding is such a tough game in the first place that one has to try to eliminate the unknowns. The Aga Khan once said that breeding racehorses is like playing chess with nature. It is a game of patience and understanding, of learning from mistakes and correcting them. It can hardly be the mistake of the stallion or the mare if breeders put two unknown quantities together and don’t end up with what was anticipated. The other surprising element of the market in Great Britain and Ireland is the current shortage of proven stallions in the £20,000 – £35,000 bracket. In South Africa we may lack the quality but we have around 20 proven stallions to choose from. The era of big books of mares must exacerbate this: 30 years ago the best 1,000 mares in Britain and Ireland were distributed between at least 20 stallions, but last year the top six stallions covered nearly 1,000 mares between them. The contraction of the gene pool devalues the product by having too many of the same.

Benefits of syndication

Another reason could be that high profile stallion prospects are now rarely syndicated, meaning that mare owners have no vested interest in stallions and are happy to jump from one to another. Thus, decisions are not based on what suits the stallion but rather on which stallion is more fashionable. Ultimately, small breeders who helped ‘make’ a stallion can’t then use him once he has become successful and his fee rises. Breeders work together to get a horse off the ground in South Africa, where stallions are still mostly syndicated. Stallions can’t survive without support and, while so many of them produce a fair amount of stakes winners in their first crop, they struggle in the post-fashionable years and never recover. Because of the lack of support in a stallion’s second, third and fourth crops, it takes a lesser stallion around eight years (four years for the first two-year-olds and four for the good mares’ progeny to hit the track) to see what they can finally do with good mares, but by that stage they are no longer fashionable anyway! It is my hope that breeders begin to reinvest in stallions and only when they do will we see a greater variety of high-quality proven stallions and less of a monopoly of mares for the horses at the top of the sires’ table. If this doesn’t happen breeders have little else to fall back on but their broodmares when it comes to making a profitable return. It is, therefore, absolutely imperative that we get breeding right. What is fashionable should not be a consideration: the most important maxim is to breed to a stallion that suits your mare. If she is a maiden use a proven stallion. Base your selection not on the best price or deal you can find, but on a sire whose pedigree and physical attributes are the best match for your mare. Even with the advent of the lucrative bonus schemes, the whole idea that buyers are looking only for early two-year-old types is absurd, especially when one considers the distribution of prize-money in Europe is greatly in favour of the Classic distances, not to mention the prestige attached to later-season races. Breeding is an inexact science but thorough research is vital. Be assured that at the lower end of the market pedigree is less important. Soundness, however, is of the utmost importance and a good looking yearling will always get a bid.

DIARY DATES Tuesday, April 13 Scotland Regional Day A visit to Lucinda Russell’s Arlary House Stables Thursday, April 15 Cheltenham Breeders’ Club Day (National Hunt Breeders’ Day) Friday, April 16 South West Regional Day Paul Nicholls’s Manor Farm Stables Wednesday, April 28 West Midlands Regional Day Tom Dascombe’s Manor House Stables Thursday, May 6 The North Regional Day Rose Dobbin’s Hazelrigg Racing Tuesday, May 11 East Anglia Sir Michael Stoute’s Freemason Lodge and Juddmonte Farms’ Banstead Manor Stud Wednesday, May 19 The West Regional Day A morning visit to Highclere Stud, followed by the afternoon at Highclere Castle Friday, May 21 Yorkshire Regional Day Dandy Nicholls Racing, followed by the Bedale Hunt Kennels and racing at Catterick Monday, June 21 Wales Regional Day Tim Vaughan’s Pant Wilkin Stables and racing at Chepstow Tuesday, June 22 Open to all members A visit to Jeremy Gask’s Horses First Racing, Wiltshire Monday, June 28 TBA Awards Dinner, Newmarket Application forms to apply for tickets will be sent to members in April; mark your diaries for what promises to be a great evening Tuesday, June 29 TBA AGM, followed by the TBA Annual Seminar, Newmarket Full details will be sent to members in April, together with an application form to apply for places at the TBA Annual Seminar Tuesday, July 20 South East Regional Day Gary Moore’s Cisswood Stables and Sir Eric Parker’s Crimbourne Stud

TBA NEW MEMBERS Litex Commerce, Somerset. R Crellin Esq, Gwent. Mrs S SteerFowler, Devon. Mrs I Wainwright, North Yorkshire. Miss L Philipson, Tyne & Wear. Mrs A Merry, Gloucestershire. R Tompkins Esq, Wiltshire. D Breen Esq, France.

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Breeders’ Prizes Based on dates money was paid

National Hunt HBLB Breeders’ Prizes worth £500 or more Breeder R J Francome G Brown The Earl of Halifax E Hanbury E R Hanbury R and J Micklethwait Coln Valley Stud E Briggs Cobhall Court Stud Mrs A L Merry

Prize (£) 10,000 10,000 5,200 2,600 2,600 2,600 2,600 2,500 2,500 *2,290

W E Philipson 1,500 P Murphy 1,250 J S Wright 1,250 W P Jenks 1,250 R and J Micklethwait 1,250 Mrs M J Matthey 1,250 Mrs Helen Plumbly *1,040 Mrs J A Gawthorpe *1,040 Sandicroft Stud *1,040 Hesmonds Stud Ltd *1,040 Mrs K Birchenhough *1,040 Minster Stud 500 Mr D G Ford 500 R J Tompkins 500 B J Griffiths *500 *second tier (40% of breeder’s prize)

Horse Restless Harry Silver By Nature Lease Lend

Sire Sir Harry Lewis Silver Patriarch Zilzal

Dam Restless Native Gale Moogie

Mighty Man The Hollinwell Over Sixty Ringaroses Last Of The Bunch Tara Royal Wishfull Thinking Playing With Fire

Sir Harry Lewis Classic Cliche Overbury Karinga Bay Silver Patriarch Kayf Tara Alflora Witness Box

Vanina II Action de Balle Free Travel Rose Ravine Elegant City Poussetiere Deux Poussetiere Deux Smokey Path

Miss Abbey Carole’s Legacy Kildonnan Pearlysteps Over Sixty Hidden Keel Wogan Daldini Bakbenscher Ogee Giles Cross Lesanda Lifestyle Gallox Bridge Black Jack Blues

Missed Flight Sir Harry Lewis Bob's Return Alflora Overbury Kirkwall Presenting Josr Algarhoud Bob Back Generous Saddlers’ Hall Hernando (FR) Karinga Bay Kayf Tara Definite Article

Little Brockwell Carole’s Crusader Celtic Tore Pearly-B Free Travel Royal Keel Fall About Arianna Aldini Jessolle Aethra Mystockings Wardeh Like Manner Explorer Melody Maid

Flat HBLB Breeders’ Prizes worth £400 or more Breeder Prize (£) Hesmonds Stud Ltd 1,800 London Thoroughbred Services Ltd 1,500 Horizon Bloodstock Limited 1,500 The Queen 1,400 Cheveley Park Stud Ltd 1,200 Mrs Y Dixon 1,000 Mrs J Gittins 800 Mrs L S Millman 800 The National Stud 800 Mrs N A Ward 800 C J Murfitt 400 Genesis Green Stud Ltd 400

Horse Dalradian Shadows Lengthen Exceedthewildman Full Toss Peace Corps Thunderball Abergavenny Mrs Boss Solstice Myplacelater Il Forno Arry’s Orse

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Sire Dansili Dansili Exceed And Excel Nayef Medicean Haafhd Dubai Destination Makbul Dubawi Where Or When Exceed And Excel Exceed And Excel

Date Course 30/1/10 Cheltenham 20/2/10 Haydock Park 05/2/10 Catterick Bridge 15/2/10 Catterick Bridge 27/1/10 Huntingdon 28/1/10 Warwick 09/2/10 Market Rasen 11/2/10 Huntingdon 17/2/10 Musselburgh 26/1/10 Sedgefield 14/2/10 Exeter 05/2/10 Bangor-on-Dee 26/1/10 Leicester 27/1/10 Musselburgh 28/1/10 Ffos Las 04/2/10 Towcester 04/2/10 Towcester 12/2/10 Bangor-on-Dee 24/2/10 Doncaster 29/1/10 Doncaster 08/2/10 Southwell 08/2/10 Lingfield Park 23/2/10 Southwell 29/1/10 Chepstow 26/1/10 Sedgefield 28/1/10 Ffos Las 07/2/10 Fontwell Park 10/2/10 Ludlow

Based on dates money was paid

Dam Aethra Bay Shade Naomi Wildman Spinning Top Tromond Trustthunder Welsh Dawn Chorus South Of Saturn Star Welcome Fred’s Dream Georgianna

Date 13/2/10 26/1/10 03/2/10 04/2/10 08/2/10 30/1/10 05/2/10 06/2/10 07/2/10 13/2/10 27/1/10 03/2/10

Course Lingfield Park Southwell Kempton Park Wolverhampton Wolverhampton Lingfield Park Lingfield Park Lingfield Park Southwell Wolverhampton Lingfield Park Lingfield Park


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BREEDER OF THE MONTH February 2010 Sponsored by Blue Chip Feed Ltd

Breeder of the Month

Geoff Brown (and partner) to Lucinda Russell, having previously been assistant to Captain Dibble’s trainer, Nigel Twiston-Davies. There is an equine connection too, as Captain Dibble and Dalkey Sound are both by the Busted horse Crash Course. Initially Brown patronised Irish-based stallions – in her first three stud seasons Dalkey Sound went to Strong Gale, King’s Ride and Good Thyne. “But I think things have altered since then,” he said. “Silver Patriarch looked an ideal National Hunt stallion. Second in the Derby, he retired sound and had plenty of bone.” Unfortunately he died last autumn. Brown has three horses in training (all Silver Patriarch

Words Alan Yuill Walker

The gutsy triumph of Silver By Nature in the Blue Square Gold Cup at Haydock earned Geoff Brown the February Breeder of the Month accolade, for which he wins six sacks of Blue Chip Original feed balancer and some Blue Chip clothing. Silver By Nature, who was gaining compensation for his second in the Welsh National on his previous start, is trained by Lucinda Russell in Scotland for his owner/breeder, who admitted that he has always had a soft spot for greys. “I suppose it’s the Desert Orchid effect,” mused Brown. “Somehow they always seem to race enthusiastically and to be enjoying themselves. Greys invariably race up with the pace and they seldom seem to come from behind.” Brown lives at Glencarse on Tayside, just outside Perth, not far from Lucinda Russell’s stable at Milnathort. Sometimes there is a conflict of sporting interests as he is also owner and Chairman of local Scottish Premier League side St Johnstone.

geldings with Russell) in the own-brothers Silver By Nature and Hurricane Jack, together with Do It For Dalkey. Silver By Nature and Hurricane Jack are out of unraced Gale, who is one of only two broodmares that Brown still owns, along with Gale’s half-sister, This Thyne. All the breeding stock are kept at Brown’s Castle Farm, a hill farm of 130 acres at Kinfauns, next door to Glencarse. “It’s all tremendously rewarding,” said Brown. “Anyone can go and buy a horse at the sales, but to do the matings, foal them at home, as we always do, and watch them develop as youngsters before they go into training, is very satisfying.”

He explained: “I was born in St Johnstone’s Nursing Home, which is a bit of a coincidence in view of my football interests, and it is now a care home so I may well end my days there!” In the meantime, he has built up his family house-building firm, G.S. Brown Construction. He acquired his first horses in 1987 and they included Dalkey Sound, the grandam of Silver By Nature. “A friend of mine bought her for me in Ireland,” he recalled. “She had won a bumper and I sent her to Mary Reveley. We had to have her pinfired early on, but she did really well, winning ten times over fences.” Two of Dalkey Sound’s best performances came in defeat, when runner-up in the 1992 Scottish Grand National at Ayr, and in the AGFA Diamond Chase at Sandown. There was added poignancy at Ayr, as Brown recalls: “The winner was Captain Dibble ridden by Peter Scudamore, so he owes me one! I also think she is the last mare to be placed in a Scottish National.” Scudamore is now assistant THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 79


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VET FORUM: THE EXPERT VIEW Equine Infectious Diseases

Racehorses are fully vaccinated against equine influenza with injections recorded in passports

Infectious Diseases: Why prevention is so important Vigilance is paramount in containing the spread of infectious diseases, from mild respiratory infections to cases of ‘exotic’ diseases on the rise as a side-effect of global warming Words James Tate BVMS MRCVS he thoroughbred owners and breeders of the United Kingdom are used to preventing certain infectious diseases, either by vaccination or by the routine testing of horses coming into and out of the country. However, whilst the names of these diseases are well-known, their effects and why it is so important to prevent them is less wellknown. In addition, it is becoming even more important to prevent the ‘exotic’ infectious diseases as there is a fear that we are likely to see more of them in this country owing to global warming. Dealing with equine infectious diseases such as

T

ringworm or mild respiratory infections is a day-to-day task for anyone involved with thoroughbreds. However, there are also several important highly contagious diseases that, although rarely seen in the United Kingdom, can have devastating consequences when they do occur as they compromise horse welfare, disrupt racing and breeding, and are very costly to deal with. Thoroughbreds are routinely vaccinated against equine influenza and many are vaccinated against other diseases, for example, equine herpesvirus. Periodically, there are isolated outbreaks of important infectious diseases such as equine viral arteritis

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(EVA), contagious equine metritis (CEM), West Nile virus (WNV) and the recent detection of equine infectious anaemia (EIA) in two horses in Wiltshire on January 19. However, despite the fact that the names of these diseases are very familiar, little is written about what these diseases actually are and why it is so important to prevent them. This article aims to remedy this. Equine Influenza

Equine influenza is probably the best-known infectious disease because it has a near worldwide distribution. In some countries it is found frequently and localised outbreaks occur each year.

However, in the UK most competition horses are vaccinated against equine influenza, which means that outbreaks are rare and so, to some extent, the importance of the actual disease is easily forgotten, although there was an outbreak in 2003 during which at least 20 racing yards in Newmarket were affected. All thoroughbred racehorses and broodmares should be fully vaccinated for equine influenza, with all injections recorded in their passports. In Australia, quarantine and biosecurity precautions against equine influenza failed in August 2007, when a large outbreak occurred. The virus was spread from an infected horse in a quarantine station


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Vaccination against equine influenza is commonly carried out throughout the UK: outbreaks are rare but can still occur

Horses infected with equine herpesvirus, which is widespread throughout the world, often present with a severe nasal discharge

via human personnel to the domestic horse population of New South Wales (NSW). High temperatures, severe coughing, nasal discharges and poor performance were commonplace, and some young foals died as the disease spread rapidly in the states of NSW and Queensland. Strict and prolonged movement restrictions and vaccination in the face of the outbreak finally eradicated the infection by the beginning of 2008.

are relatively common and, in fact, a neurological case of EHV-1 was confirmed in a racing yard in England in January 2010 and in France at the beginning of February. The English outbreak was controlled by strict movement restrictions, which prevented horses going racing, and extensive laboratory testing of horses in the yard. The yard was given the all-clear in mid-

Equine Herpesvirus

Equine Herpesvirus (EHV) is widespread throughout the world and occurs in the UK. EHV-1 and EHV-4 cause the most important problems, with EHV-1 causing respiratory infection, abortion, neonatal death and neurological disease, and EHV-4 respiratory infection and occasionally abortion. EHV-2 and EHV-5 are thought to cause only minor problems and EHV-3 is a sexually transmitted virus that causes lesions on external genitalia. As EHV-1 and -4 are the most important equine herpesviruses, it makes sense that they are most commonly vaccinated against. Racehorses should initially receive injections four to six weeks apart, then every six months to

prevent respiratory problems and mares should also be vaccinated every six months as well as receiving booster vaccinations at five, seven and nine months of pregnancy in order to help prevent abortions. In practice, most mares are vaccinated against EHV-1 and -4 and this does seem to reduce the incidence of abortion ‘storms’, but the majority of racehorses are not vaccinated because many trainers simply do not find that vaccinating helps to reduce respiratory disease. If a horse becomes infected with EHV they can pass it on to others and they can also become latently infected, with the possibility that the virus can re-emerge whenever their immune system is suppressed, such as when they are stressed during weaning, mixing, transport and strenuous exercise. Therefore, if horses are going to be vaccinated against the disease, this should really begin at a young age before they get a chance to become infected with the virus. It is often underestimated how frequently EHV occurs – nearly all adult horses show evidence of exposure to EHV4 when tested and at least a third of all adult horses also show evidence of exposure to EHV-1. Localised outbreaks of EHV

disease is suspected and prohibit movement of horses into and out of the premises. EVA can be passed on by any horse via nasal discharge and stallions are capable of transmitting the virus via infected semen. Most infections either go undetected or present with only mild signs but it may cause abortion in pregnant mares. There was a big outbreak of

“Horses infected with EHV can pass it on to others and the virus can re-emerge” February, with no further neurological cases recorded. In contrast to equine influenza, vaccination in the face of neurological EHV-1 infection is not recommended and, in fact, EHV-1/-4 vaccines are not licensed for use against neurological disease caused by EHV-1 as they can exacerbate the problem and make interpretation of diagnostic tests difficult. Equine Viral Arteritis

Equine Viral Arteritis (EVA) is notifiable by law, which means that the Department for Environment, Food and Rural Affairs (DEFRA) will be required to carry out a veterinary inquiry where the

EVA in Kentucky in the 1980s and there was also a small outbreak in the UK in the mid-1990s related to an infected Anglo-Arab stallion that was being used for artificial insemination. In order to prevent EVA it is essential to stop carrier stallions from spreading the disease, which involves not only blood testing the stallion and his semen but also testing mares following covering or insemination. It is possible to vaccinate against EVA but vaccinated horses test positive for exposure to the disease and so it is then impossible to distinguish between a horse that has been vaccinated and a horse that has been exposed to EVA, unless a negative blood >>

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Mares and stallions should be routinely blood tested for Equine Viral Arteritis

>>

sample is obtained prior to administration of the vaccine. As a result, many thoroughbred stallions and teasers are vaccinated in order to prevent them becoming carriers of EVA, but mares in this country are not vaccinated because the incidence of EVA in the UK does not justify it, they cannot become carriers and we want to keep our population of mares as testing free from the disease. Equine Infectious Anaemia

Equine Infectious Anaemia (EIA) is an exotic viral disease that affects horses, mules and donkeys. It is usually transmitted via biting insects but can be spread by humans through contaminated needles, equipment and blood products, which is what occurred in Ireland in 2006. Like EVA, it is also a notifiable disease and horses are most likely to become infected when travelling abroad. It is usually a very severe disease which causes fever, anaemia, bloody diarrhoea, incoordination, weight loss and often death. Official diagnosis of the disease is by a blood test known as a ‘Coggins’ test and animals who test positive are euthanased to prevent spread of the disease. The UK had not had a confirmed outbreak of EIA since 1976 until the infection was detected in two horses in

Wiltshire on January 19, following importation from Belgium, but with the horses having originated from Romania, where EIA is a common infection of horses. As EIA is transmitted by biting flies, this was unlikely to develop into a large outbreak given the time of year and providing that poor hygiene practices, such as sharing blood-contaminated equipment, did not occur. However, if this had taken place during the summer then there is a risk that, due to global warming, the most important ‘exotic’ diseases such as EIA could become more of a problem in the UK, because the insects that transmit these diseases are becoming more common in the northern hemisphere. West Nile Virus

West Nile Virus (WNV) is a notifiable, emerging ‘exotic’ disease that mainly affects birds, horses and humans, and is spread by mosquitoes. It is a viral infection which causes neurological disease. The disease historically occurs in Africa, southern and eastern Europe, the Middle East and Asia but it emerged in the east coast of USA in 1999 and has since progressed to the west coast, causing many thousands of equine cases on the way. There have been discrete outbreaks of WNV in Italy since 1998 and France since

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the 1960s, but the disease has not yet been confirmed in horses in the UK. In 2001, a vaccine was licensed in the USA which has been very helpful in controlling the disease in North America and it has now been licensed in Europe and the UK but, as with all vaccines, it is not 100% effective. Piroplasmosis

Piroplasmosis is a tick-borne parasitic infection of the blood of horses, mules, donkeys and zebras which can cause anaemia and jaundice in infected animals. The infection is also spread via blood-contaminated equipment, such as shared needles, and from mares to foals through the placenta. Given the disease is usually found in countries where the transmitting tick species are common, it was surprising when there was an outbreak of the disease confirmed in Ireland in September 2009. Fortunately, the disease spread was limited and caused only minor inconvenience by means of extra blood sampling to ensure that the infection was not spreading more widely. Nevertheless, the outbreak does support those who are concerned that global warming will cause us to see many more of these ‘exotic’ infectious diseases in the UK. African Horse Sickness

African Horse Sickness (AHS)

is caused by a virus that is transmitted by midges and it affects horses more severely than mules, donkeys and zebras. There are nine different types of the AHS virus and the severity of the disease varies to some degree between each strain. There are broadly four forms of the disease: the pulmonary form, the cardiac form, a milder horse fever form and a mixed form. Affected horses generally recover from the milder horse fever form but the other three forms of the disease are often fatal. AHS has never been confirmed in the UK and the last outbreaks of AHS in Europe were in Spain and Portugal between 1987 and 1990 following the importation of infected zebras from Africa. Whilst the likelihood of the introduction of AHS virus to the UK via the legal importation of horses is considered to be very low, the outbreak of midge-borne bluetongue virus-8 in farm animals in recent years has shown the potential for the spread of such diseases into previously non-affected areas, which were presumed to be at low risk of maintaining the infection. As a result, DEFRA is finalising its plans for the introduction of a new AHS control strategy and associated legislation, which have been developed in collaboration with the equine industry. Strangles

Strangles is a highly contagious upper respiratory tract infection of the horse caused by the bacterium Streptococcus equi. It is easily spread directly by close contact between horses and indirectly through contamination of tack, stables, fences, water troughs, etc. Affected horses have high temperatures, nasal discharges and enlarged glands, leading to multiple abscesses, most commonly found under the jaw. Diagnosis is often made on the basis of these characteristic clinical signs but


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confirmation requires laboratory testing. Although most horses recover from the disease, it is extremely contagious and highly undesirable. A small proportion of horses become long term carriers and can act as sources of new outbreaks, without themselves showing clinical signs. Whilst strangles is not notifiable by law, interestingly, under the rules of racing, trainers must report likely or confirmed cases to the British Horseracing Authority. There is currently no strangles vaccine licensed for use in the UK, but a vaccine licensed in 2005 and later withdrawn from the market, is, according to the manufacturer, due to return to the market in 2010. Contagious Equine Metritis

Contagious Equine Metritis (CEM) is a notifiable, sexually transmitted, bacterial disease of horses that was first reported

in the UK in 1977. Infection spreads through direct transmission of bacteria from mare to stallion or vice versa at the time of mating, although it can also be spread by artificial insemination (AI) via infected semen and through veterinary personnel that fail to take appropriate hygiene measures between horses. In fact, CEM was spread into several US states last year by AI and the UK was again banned as a source of breeding stock imports to India for a prolonged period due to an outbreak of CEM last October in a mare who was thought to be infected by AI. Infected stallions usually show no clinical signs but infected mares may have a discharge a few days after mating. The disease is controlled by testing stallions and mares using swabs – something with which many owners and breeders are very familiar.

All mares should be swabbed before being mated to check they are not infected with Contagious Equine Metritis

Summary

It should be clear from the brief and selective outline provided here, along with other exotic diseases not covered (glanders, farcy, dourine, rabies, equine encephalitides, vesicular stomatitis among others), that equine infectious diseases remain a critical threat to equine activities worldwide. DEFRA and veterinary advisors to the equine industry are conscious of this threat and together continue to develop appropriate preventative control and eradication strategies to try to avoid the worst effects of these infections being felt by the thoroughbred industry.

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CAULFIELD FILES

PHOTO: DUBAI RACING CLUB/ANDREW WATKINS

Andrew Caulfield reports on the bloodstock world

Red Desire (red and white silks) denies Gloria De Campeao to win the last round of the Maktoum Challenge

Desire proves Japan’s worth on global stage Nation should export more sons of Sunday Silence to stand in Europe The UAE Classic victories of Musir and Raihana, two Australian-breds who arrived in Dubai via South Africa, were reminders that the thoroughbred world is becoming ever more international. Super Thursday at Meydan provided further evidence, with the first three in Round 3 of the Group 2 Al Maktoum Challenge coming from Japan, Brazil and South Africa. The same day saw second place in the Dubai City of Gold Stakes go to Turkish raider Pan River, while the placed horses in a Listed race were imports from Chile and Argentina. The Japanese winner of the Al Maktoum Challenge was the filly Red Desire. The fouryear-old is a daughter of Shadai stallion Manhattan Café. If that name sounds vaguely familiar it is probably because the son of the great Sunday Silence challenged for the Prix de l’Arc de Triomphe in 2002. Unfortunately he could only finish 13th behind Marienbard, failing to reproduce the kind of form which had previously brought

him victories at three in the Japanese St Leger and the Arima Kinen, and at four in the two-mile Tenno Sho. On two occasions Manhattan Café got the better of Jungle Pocket, winner of the Japanese Derby and Japan Cup in 2001, perhaps because he was the better stayer. Shadai have closely guarded the very best of Sunday Silence’s sons for the Japanese industry, much to the chagrin of pundits like myself who would have dearly loved to see Sunday Silence’s genes gain a strong foothold in Europe. As it is, Manhattan Café was one of no fewer than 14 sons of Sunday Silence in Shadai’s stallion team in 2009. Deep Impact and Agnes Tachyon were the highest priced, at 10,000,000 yen (£73,000 at today’s rate), but Agnes Tachyon died in June 2009, having had little time to capitalise on his 2008 sires’ championship. Consequently some of the other sons have climbed the pecking order, thanks to some notable successes in 2009, with the 2003 2,000 Guineas and

86 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Derby winner Neo Universe moving up 5,000,000 yen and Manhattan Café to 6,000,000 from 2,500,000, while Deep Impact’s fee has dropped to 9,000,000. The jump in Manhattan Café’s fee reflects his achievement of becoming champion sire in Japan in 2009, helped by the Group 1 successes of Red Desire and Jo Cappuccino.

remotely Japanese about her bloodlines. Manhattan Café is by an American-bred stallion out of Subtle Change, an Irish-bred Law Society mare whose dam, Santa Luciana, came from a German family. And Red Desire’s dam Great Sunrise is a reminder of the time when three consecutive boxes at Coolmore housed champion sires, as she was sired by one of them, Caerleon, from a daughter of another, Sadler’s Wells. Great Sunrise was bred in Europe but then headed for Japan, as did so many of Caerleon’s sons and daughters after the Group 1 Japanese successes of Shinko Lovely, LWay Win and Biwa Heidi. Incidentally, Caerleon sired Biwa Heidi, the top Japanese two-year-old filly of 1995, from a daughter of Santa Luciana, so it is easy to see why Great Sunrise, a daughter of Caerleon, ended up visiting a grandson of Santa Luciana. Biwa Heidi has also advertised the potential of the Sunday Silence-Caerleon cross, producing the 2009 Japanese 1,000 Guineas and Oaks winner Buena Vista to Sunday Silence’s son Special Week. Caerleon became champion sire in 1988 and repeated the feat in 1991, but then Sadler’s Wells began his recordbreaking run of titles.

“Sunday Silence’s best sons have been closely guarded for the Japanese market” He ranked alongside Agnes Tachyon, Dance In The Dark, Fuji Kiseki and Special Week as one of five sons of Sunday Silence in the top seven stallions, so there is no sign of Sunday Silence’s dominance coming to an end – and he still has sons of the quality of Deep Impact, Daiwa Major and Heart’s Cry still to face the racecourse test (the first crops by Deep Impact and Heart’s Cry race in 2010). While Red Desire was bred in Japan, there is nothing

It was natural that breeders should think of combining the two champion sires, even though mating Caerleon to Sadler’s Wells mares created 3 x 3 inbreeding to Northern Dancer. Only 14 foals were bred this way but three became stakes winners, the best of them being Fusaichi Concorde, winner of the 1996 Japanese Derby. It was a Fusaichi Concorde mare who produced the Grade 1 winner Jo Cappuccino to Red Desire’s sire Manhattan Café.


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CAULFIELD FILES

Australian runners pay Ransom biggest tribute Red Ransom’s death in Australia last November signalled that we are nearing the end of a remarkable story, which saw the lightly-raced son of Roberto sire major winners on three continents. The story certainly isn’t over yet, though. After five seasons at Dalham Hall Stud, Red Ransom has more than 100 three-year-olds, as well as 70-plus two-year-olds to represent him in 2010, and there are at least 26 yearlings from his final British season. It has been in Australia, though, where the most vivid epitaphs to Red Ransom are being written, by his daughter Typhoon Tracy and his son Charge Forward. After recording a couple of Group 1 victories against her own sex, Typhoon Tracy proved much too strong for the males in a pair of Group 1 contests at Caulfield in February, taking the CF Orr Stakes over seven furlongs and the Futurity Stakes over a mile. Charge Forward, for his part, defeated Fastnet Rock to take the title of champion first-crop sire in the 2008/09 Australian season, thanks largely to his daughter Headway, who is a Group 1 winner during the current season. Typhoon Tracy and Charge Forward are among a total of 14 toplevel winners sired by Red Ransom, who also supplied 12 winners at Group/Grade 2 level and another 28 at Group/Grade 3 level, making a total of 54 worldwide. Although his British crops have so far produced nothing better than the Group 3 winners Muthabara, Moiqen and Ouqba, several of his American foals, led by such as Electrocutionist,

The legacy of Red Ransom is assured

Casual Look, Red Clubs and Intikhab, showed that Red Ransom’s stock could be very much at home on European turf tracks, as might be expected of a son of a Derby winner. Although these figures have to be tempered by the fact that Red Ransom has around 1,250 northern hemisphere foals aged three or over, plus more than 500 Australian foals of racing age, they still represent quite an achievement for a horse who was forced into early retirement. Red Ransom had shown such speed as a two-year-old, despite his middledistance pedigree, that the revered Joe Hirsch once suggested that the colt had shown more potential than any two-year-old since Seattle Slew. Red Ransom’s famous trainer Mack Miller also paid him the considerable tribute of saying that he was “the most talented individual I have ever trained.” As with Red Desire, Typhoon Tracy’s bloodlines have little to do with the fact that she carries the AUS suffix after her name. Admittedly her dam Tracy’s Element was conceived and foaled in Australia but both her parents – the champion sprinter Last Tycoon and the Group-winning sprinter Princess Tracy – were bred in Ireland and raced in Europe. Tracy’s Element was sent to race in South Africa, where her Irish-born half-sister Topasannah had been a Group 2 winner. Tracy’s Element excelled in her adopted country, winning four Group 1s, and she was eventually returned to Australia, via the USA. One of Tracy’s Element’s unraced daughters produced a Group 2 winner to a son of Danehill – a stallion who enjoyed considerable success with Princess Tracy and one of her daughters. Princess Tracy’s Danehill colt Danasinga won the Group 1 Stradbroke Handicap and has since sired numerous Group winners from his New Zealand base. Incidentally, Typhoon Tracy is the last of four consecutive foals sired by Red Ransom from Tracy’s Element and this policy of repeat matings has paid off, with the smart filly Kylikwong and the Listed winner Red Element among her predecessors.

Soldatino: Triumph Hurdle winner by Graveron

Ever heard of Graveron? No, neither had I I like to think that there aren’t many notable winners whose pedigrees mean little to me, but I was somewhat confounded when Nicky Henderson unveiled his French import Soldatino in the Grade 2 Adonis Juvenile Novices’ Hurdle at Kempton in February. The non-thoroughbred, who duly scored by seven lengths and went on to win the Triumph Hurdle, is by Graveron, who turned out to be a grandson of the great Mill Reef – the stallion who appears twice in the pedigree of another notable French import, Kauto Star. Graveron is by Mille Balles, a very smart performer at up to a mile and a quarter, but Graveron proved much less talented than either his sire or grandsire. Despite racing 72 times (including once in Turkey) up to the age of eight, Graveron never attained the status of stakes winner, but he did score eight times, mainly over a mile. Unsurprisingly, Graveron hasn’t been extensively used as a stallion and Soldatino is one of only 30 foals by him, but he was also responsible for Sarako, a Listed crosscountry winner. Perhaps it is significant that Soldatino’s second dam is by Le Pontet. This winner of the French Champion Hurdle numbered the 1994 King George VI winner Algan among his best scorers, along with Le Pontif, the top French jumper of 1984, and As Des Carres, the top-earning four-yearold of 1991. Le Pontet’s broodmare daughters also made their mark, King George hero Edredon Bleu being just one of their good winners.

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 87


apr_68_international:Leader 21/03/2010 22:12 Page 2

DATA BOOK Listings of every worldwide Group or Graded stakes winner

Global Stakes Results Date Grade Argentina 06/03 G1 06/03 G1 20/02 G2 06/03 G2 06/03 G2 13/02 G3 21/02 G3 G3 03/03

Race

Dist

Horse

Gran Premio Santiago Luro Gran Premio Saturnino J Unzue C. Miguel Angel y Tomas Juarez Celman Clasico Otono Clasico Arturo R y Arturo Bullrich Clasico Horacio Bustillo Clasico General Viamonte Clasico Derli A Gomez

6.0f 6.0f 8.0f 10.0f 10.0f 8.0f 5.0f 6.0f

Villero Cat (ARG) Sembra Fe (ARG) Bouclette Gulch (ARG) Cafrune (ARG) Foggy Stripes (ARG) El Chapita (ARG) Que Felicidad (ARG) Grand Coquette (ARG)

Sembra Fe was a comfortable winner, sitting outside the leader until going on over one furlong out and scoring by two and a half lengths with Australia 13/02 20/02 20/02 27/02 06/03 06/03 13/02 13/02 13/02 13/02 13/02 20/02 20/02 20/02 20/02 26/02 27/02 27/02 27/02 06/03 06/03 06/03 08/03 08/03 13/02 20/02 20/02 24/02 27/02 27/02 27/02 06/03 06/03 06/03 06/03 08/03

G1 G1 G1 G1 G1 G1 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G2 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3

Pulse Pharmacy W Reid Australia Stakes Arrowfield Stud Blue Diamond Stakes Sportingbet Oakleigh Plate Rokk Ebony Futurity Stakes Newmarket Handicap Patinack Farm Chipping Norton Stakes Light Fingers Stakes Top Cut Alister Clark Stakes Schweppes Royal Sovereign Stakes Breeders' Classic Sportingbet Sunline Stakes D'Urban Autumn Stakes BMS Angus Armanasco Stakes Pure Blond St George Stakes Winning Edge Presentations Apollo Stakes Moonee Valley Classic Franklins Silver Slipper Yalumba 161 Autumn Classic Schweppes Hobartville Stakes Sires' Produce Stakes Tabcorp Kewney Stakes Jim Beam Surround Stakes Yallambee Classic Adelaide Casino Adelaide Cup Jim Beam Southern Cross F.Clissold Stks Rokk Ebony TS Carlyon Cup TBV Mannerism Stakes AAMI Launceston Cup Marsh Breeders' Stakes De Bortoli Wines Millie Fox Stakes Boag's Lord Reims Draught Stakes TBV Thoroughbred Breeders' Stakes V V Diggers Kindergarten Stakes Champion Fillies Stakes Bicentenary Liverpool City Cup Dunes Port Hughes R N Irwin Stakes

Wanted finally managed to get his name on to the Group 1 roll of honour after a hectic Autumn Carnival in Melbourne. Touched off by Nicconi in January’s Lightning Stakes, he suffered another narrow defeat to Turffontein in the William Reid Stakes, followed by a fourth place to Starspangledbanner in the Oakleigh Plate. But it all came right for the Peter Moody-trained Fastnet Rock Brazil 20/02 21/02 20/02 06/03 06/03 21/02 27/02 07/03

G1 G1 G2 G2 G2 G3 G3 G3

G. P. Henrique Possolo (1000 Guineas) Grande Premio Estado de Rio de Janeiro Grande Premio Hernani Azevedo Silva Grande Premio Presidente Guilherme Ellis Grande Premio Piratininga GP.Presidente Joao Carlos Leite Penteado C. Presidente Augusto Souza Queiroz G. P. Presidente Arthur da Costa e Silva

Dolly Max completed a four-timer in the Rio 1,000 Guineas. She led inside the final quarter-mile and ran on to beat Dear Nati by two and a half lengths. It was a one-two for Crimson Tide, a son of Sadler’s Wells who Chile 05/03 06/03

G3 G3

the minimum of urging. She had run second in a Group 2 over five furlongs but should stay further than this six.

Premio Thompson Matthews Premio Seleccion de Potrancas

6.0f 6.0f 5.5f 8.0f 6.0f 8.0f 6.0f 8.0f 6.0f 6.0f 8.0f 7.0f 7.0f 9.0f 7.0f 8.0f 5.5f 9.0f 7.0f 7.0f 7.0f 7.0f 6.0f 16.0f 6.0f 7.0f 7.0f 12.0f 6.0f 6.5f 13.0f 6.0f 5.5f 8.0f 6.5f 5.5f

Turffontein (AUS) Star Witness (AUS) Starspangledbanner (AUS) Typhoon Tracy (AUS) Wanted (AUS) Theseo (AUS) More Joyous (NZ) Linton (AUS) Shoot Out (AUS) Alverta (AUS) Zarius (NZ) Denman (AUS) Set For Fame (AUS) La Rocket (AUS) Danleigh (AUS) My Emotion (NZ) Chance Bye (AUS) Extra Zero (AUS) Monton (AUS) Shamrocker (NZ) Faint Perfume (AUS) More Joyous (NZ) Majestic Music (AUS) Capecover (NZ) Kenny's World (AUS) Rightfully Yours (AUS) Tootsie (NZ) Larry's Never Late (NZ) Shrapnel (AUS) Montana Flyer (AUS) Moment In Time (AUS) Shaaheq (AUS) Solar Charged (AUS) Le Plunge (AUS) Dreamscape (AUS) Augusta Proud (AUS)

colt (who was sold to Widden Stud during February) in the Newmarket Handicap, gaining revenge on the Aidan O’Brien-bound Starspangledbanner (third), Turffontein (fifth) and Nicconi (14th). The Newmarket was run in a frightening thunderstorm which saw 19mm of rain fall in 18 minutes and resulted in the other two Group 1s on the Flemington card being delayed by 8.0f 8.0f 8.0f 7.0f 11.0f 6.0f 6.0f 10.0f

Dolly Max (BRZ) Sal Grosso (BRZ) West Hope (BRZ) Vale da Lua (BRZ) Mr Nedawi (BRZ) Uva Preta (BRZ) Ed American (BRZ) Time For Fun (BRZ)

won Group 2 events in Germany and Italy for John Hills as a three-year-old, and went on to add the Group 3 September Stakes in 1998 when it was run at Epsom, rather than Kempton.

8.0f 6.0f

Papelon (CHI) Bagur (CHI)

88 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Age

Sex

3 3 4 4 4 4 6 3

C F F C F C M F

Sire

Dam

Broodmare Sire

Easing Along (USA) Manipulator (USA) Thunder Gulch (USA) Colonial Affair (USA) Equal Stripes (ARG) Not For Sale (ARG) Bernstein (USA) Grand Slam (USA)

Bien Rea (ARG) Siembra Pasion (ARG) Bouclette Champ (ARG) Ipacarai (ARG) La Boira Baixa (ARG) Chambota (ARG) Queen Tango (ARG) Vedette's Parade (ARG)

Contested Bid (USA) El Sembrador (ARG) Ski Champ (USA) Interprete (ARG) Gem Master (USA) Gem Master (USA) Lode (USA) Parade Marshal (USA)

Her time was 0.27s slower than Villero Cat, who is now unbeaten in four appearances. Que Chistoso (Southern Halo) looked dangerous

6 3 4 5 4 7 4 4 4 7 9 4 4 6 7 4 3 4 4 3 4 4 4 8 6 6 6 5 3 5 6 3 3 4 5 5

H C C M C G F G G M G C F H G F F C C F F F F G G H M G C M M F F F H M

Johannesburg (USA) Starcraft (NZ) Choisir (AUS) Red Ransom (USA) Fastnet Rock (AUS) Danewin (AUS) More Than Ready (USA) Galileo (IRE) High Chaparral (IRE) Flying Spur (AUS) Zabeel (NZ) Lonhro (AUS) Reset (AUS) Rock of Gibraltar (IRE) Mujahid (USA) Savabeel (AUS) Snitzel (AUS) Danzero (AUS) Catbird (AUS) O'Reilly (NZ) Shamardal (USA) More Than Ready (USA) Al Maher (AUS) Cape Cross (IRE) Kenny's Best Pal (AUS) Show A Heart (AUS) Pins (AUS) Pentire (GB) Charge Forward (AUS) Flying Spur (AUS) Archway (IRE) Redoute's Choice (AUS) Charge Forward (AUS) Tobougg (IRE) Choisir (AUS) More Than Ready (USA)

Spirit of Grace (AUS) Leone Chiara (AUS) Gold Anthem (AUS) Tracy's Element (AUS) Fragmentation (AUS) Ozone Sand (USA) Sunday Joy (AUS) Heather (NZ) Pentamerous (NZ) Grilse (USA) Sadlers Home (IRE) Peach (AUS) Northpoint (AUS) La Bella Dama (NZ) Graceful Lily (AUS) Midnight Rock (AUS) Rouge Femme (AUS) Extra Bubbly (AUS) Dynamic Flyer (AUS) Bohemian Blues (NZ) Zona (AUS) Sunday Joy (AUS) Regal Flute (AUS) Set Up (NZ) See The Stars (AUS) Academy Of Dreams (AUS) Hyades (NZ) Laebeel (NZ) Fragmentation (AUS) Montana Downs (AUS) Concluding (AUS) Damaschino (AUS) Soul Singer (AUS) Ski Lodge (AUS) Faith In Dreams (USA) Kadasha (AUS)

a week. Spooked by the subsequent hailstorm, fourth-placed King Pulse got loose in the tunnel on the way back to the stables and suffered serious injury. Moody is also responsible for the Futurity Stakes winner Typhoon Tracy. This was the first leg of the Asian Mile Challenge and the Red Ransom filly, who has now won three consecutive Group 1s, may travel to 4 4 5 3 6 3 3 6

F C M C H F C H

Crimson Tide (IRE) Our Emblem (USA) Crimson Tide (IRE) Torrential (USA) Nedawi (GB) Dodge (USA) First American (USA) Yagli (USA)

C F

Monthir (USA) Saddad (USA)

Dr Grace (NZ) Lion Hunter (AUS) Made of Gold (USA) Last Tycoon Snippets (AUS) L'Enjoleur (CAN) Sunday Silence (USA) Centaine (AUS) Pentire (GB) Rahy (USA) Sadler's Wells (USA) Vain (AUS) Dehere (USA) Desert Sun (GB) Dr Grace (NZ) Rory's Jester (AUS) Red Ransom (USA) Bellotto (USA) Marauding (NZ) Blues Traveller (IRE) Zabeel (NZ) Sunday Silence (USA) Royal Academy (USA) Zabeel (NZ) Mr Henrysee (USA) Royal Academy (USA) O'Reilly (NZ) Zabeel (NZ) Snippets (AUS) Bluebird (USA) Kenny's Best Pal (AUS) Last Tycoon Danehill (USA) Grand Lodge (USA) Ferdinand (USA) Langfuhr (CAN)

Hong Kong for leg three, the Champions Mile, on April 25. Theseo returned from injury at the age of six to claim his fourth career Group 1 following a thrilling duel with Rangirangdoo in the Chipping Norton Stakes, while the unbeaten Star Witness could be Australia’s top two-year-old judged by the way he overcame a poor draw in the Blue Diamond Stakes.

Shanay (BRZ) Ken de Saron (USA) West Night (BRZ) Prosperidade (ARG) Cryptic Crucial (USA) Lynx (USA) Cuca Legal (BRZ) Tarradine (BRZ)

Sal Grosso brought off a mild surprise in the Rio 2,000 the following day when beating the favourite Too Friendly (Signal Tap) by half a length. Too Friendly had been well beaten in the Sao Paulo version, but Vupt Vapt

4 3

entering the final furlong but Villero Cat opened up a bit of a gap and then held his late rally by a short neck. Jorge Dulom trains both colts.

Coax Me Clyde (USA) Kenmare (FR) Slap Jack (USA) Payant (ARG) Cryptoclearance (USA) Mountain Cat (USA) Cigar Toss (ARG) New Colony (USA)

(third of 20 here) had landed the second leg of the Triple Crown at Cidade Jardim, while Timeo (fourth here) had finished second in the Derby Paulista at that track in November.

Encubierta (CHI) Best Fashion (CHI)

Edgy Diplomat (USA) The Great Shark (USA)


apr_68_international:Leader 21/03/2010 22:12 Page 3

DATA BOOK

Global Stakes Results Date Japan 21/02 20/02 28/02 07/03 14/02 14/02 20/02 27/02 28/02 06/03 06/03

Grade Race G1 G2 G2 G2 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3 G3

February Stakes Kyoto Kinen Nakayama Kinen Hochi Hai Yayoi Sho Kisaragi Sho Diamond Stakes Daily Hai Queen Cup Arlington Cup Hankyu Hai Tulip Sho Yukan Fuji Sho Ocean Stakes

Espoir City is Japan’s undisputed dirt champion after he followed up New Zealand 13/02 G1 13/02 G1 28/02 G1 06/03 G1 13/02 G2 20/02 G2 27/02 G2 20/02 G3 20/02 G3 G3 06/03

Peru 14/02

G3

South Africa 28/02 G1 28/02 G2 28/02 G2 28/02 G2 09/02 G3 09/02 G3 16/02 G3 20/02 G3 G3 27/02

Horse

8.0f 11.0f 9.0f 10.0f 9.0f 17.0f 8.0f 8.0f 7.0f 8.0f 6.0f

Espoir City (JPN) Buena Vista (JPN) Tosen Crown (JPN) Victoire Pisa (JPN) Neo Vendome (JPN) Forgettable (JPN) Apricot Fizz (JPN) Cosmo Sensor (JPN) A Shin Forward (USA) Shoryu Moon (JPN) Kinshasa No Kiseki (AUS)

December’s easy Japan Cup Dirt victory with an equally comfortable

Waikato Draught Sprint Darci Brahma International Stakes Fully Fledged Fairdale Otaki-Maori Cl. Telecom New Zealand Derby Cambridge Stud Sir Tristram Classic (f) NZ Equine Veterinarians Championship Stk J Swap Contractors Matamata Breeders S. Waikato Stud Taranaki Classic Hooker Pacific Taranaki Cup Homebush Partnership Lowland Stakes

Trainer Shaune Ritchie lifted the New Zealand Derby with Military Move 25 years after leading up the great Bonecrusher to land the same race for his father, Frank. Well ridden by Michael Walker, the Volksraad gelding got first run on the unlucky Corporal

Dist

7.0f 10.0f 8.0f 12.0f 10.0f 10.5f 6.0f 6.0f 10.0f 10.5f

Tavistock (NZ) Veloce Bella (NZ) Mufhasa (NZ) Military Move (NZ) Katie Lee (AUS) Zarzuela (NZ) Banchee (NZ) Icepin (NZ) Bruce Almighty (NZ) Posavina (NZ)

Jones. Runner-up in the 2,000 Guineas but unspectacular in two subsequent defeats, Military Move will soon head west to continue his career in Hong Kong. Mufhasa, last season’s Horse Of The Year, heralded a return to form

Age

Sex

5 4 6 3 3 4 3 3 5 3 7

H F H C C C F C H F H

Sire

Dam

Broodmare Sire

Gold Allure (JPN) Special Week (JPN) Opera House (GB) Neo Universe (JPN) Neo Universe (JPN) Dance In The Dark (JPN) Jungle Pocket (JPN) King Kamehameha (JPN) Forest Wildcat (USA) King Kamehameha (JPN) Fuji Kiseki (JPN)

Eminent City (JPN) Biwa Heidi (JPN) Sunday Brave (JPN) Whitewater Affair (GB) Princess Cut (JPN) Air Groove (JPN) Manhattan Fizz (JPN) Keiai Ballade (JPN) Wake Up Kiss (USA) Moon The Dream (JPN) Keltshaan (USA)

Brian's Time (USA) Caerleon (USA) Dancing Brave (USA) Machiavellian (USA) Tony Bin Tony Bin Sunday Silence (USA) Rivlia (USA) Cure The Blues (USA) Dance In The Dark (JPN) Pleasant Colony (USA)

success in the February Stakes. However, initial suggestions that he

5 7 6 4 4 4 3 3 7 4

H M G G F F F G G F

Montjeu (IRE) Volksraad (GB) Pentire (GB) Volksraad (GB) Pins (AUS) Zabeel (NZ) Oratorio (IRE) Pins (AUS) Deputy Governor (USA) Tiger Hill (IRE)

would head for the Dubai World Cup proved erroneous.

Upstage (GB) Wave To Lottie (NZ) Sheila Cheval (NZ) All Night Party (NZ) Miss Jessie Jay (NZ) Star Satire (NZ) Miss Jessie Jay (NZ) Ice Maiden (NZ) Striking Angel (NZ) Dance My Dance (IRE)

when third to Tavistock in the Waikato Draught Sprint and duly went two better a fortnight later in the OtakiMaori WFA. Tavistock had a similar profile, a mid-season slump following his October Mudgway Stakes win having

Quest For Fame Crested Wave (USA) Mi Preferido (USA) Just A Dancer (NZ) Spectacularphantom (USA) Volksraad (GB) Spectacularphantom (USA) O'Reilly (NZ) Straight Strike (USA) Sadler's Wells (USA)

been ended when runner-up in the Thorndon Mile on January 30. Veloce Bella finally gained a deserved Group 1 success in the International Stakes following three top level placings and four Group 2 triumphs.

Clasico Baldomero Aspillaga

10.0f

Bradock (PER)

4

C

Keseff (USA)

Samara (PER)

El Duce (PER)

L Jaffee Empress Club Stakes Gauteng Fillies Guineas Gauteng Guineas Hawaii Stakes Three Troikas Stakes Tony Ruffel Stakes Tommy Hotspur Handicap Riverworld Stud Prix du Cap Chairman's Cup

8.0f 8.0f 8.0f 7.0f 7.0f 7.0f 5.0f 7.0f 16.0f

Mother Russia (SAF) Isani (SAF) Pierre Jourdan (SAF) Braggadacio (SAF) Catherina Lady (SAF) Pierre Jourdan (SAF) Noble Heir (SAF) Sunsational (SAF) Hospitality (SAF)

5 4 4 7 4 4 5 5 5

M F G G F G M M G

Windrush (USA) Kahal (GB) Parade Leader (USA) Western Winter (USA) Anytime (IRE) Parade Leader (USA) Kahal (GB) Windrush (USA) Badger's Drift (SAF)

Russian Muse (SAF) Gypsey Spirit (SAF) Vin Fizz (SAF) Fair Bianca (SAF) Elegantka (USA) Vin Fizz (SAF) Irish Honour (SAF) Summers Sweet Song (SAF) Party Hostess (SAF)

Russian Fox (USA) Coastal (USA) Qui Danzig (USA) Priceless Asset (SAF) Conquistador Cielo (USA) Qui Danzig (USA) Kilconnel (USA) Model Man (SAF) Jallad (USA)

Mike de Kock, who has been enjoying a sensational Dubai

Carnival, has not lost his touch back home either judged by the Empress

Club Stakes victory of Mother Russia. Sent off long odds-on after

her fine second in the J & B Met, she scored by an easy two lengths.

United Arab Emirates 19/02 G2 Commercial Bank of Dubai Al Fahidi Fort 04/03 G2 Intikhab Sheikh Maktoum Chall. Round 3 04/03 G2 Marju Dubai City of Gold Stakes 04/03 G2 Haatel Derrinstown Stud Jebel Hatta 05/03 G2 Meydan Zabeel Mile 11/02 G3 Xpress Al Shindagha Sprint 18/02 G3 Shadwell Estate Maktoum Challenge 2 18/02 G3 Sakhee Shadwell Estate UAE 2000 Guineas 25/02 G3 Meydan Balanchine Stakes 04/03 G3 Elnadim Mahab Al Shimaal 04/03 G3 Alhaarth Burj Nahaar

8.0f 10.0f 12.0f 9.0f 8.0f 6.0f 9.5f 8.0f 9.0f 6.0f 8.0f

Bankable (IRE) Red Desire (JPN) Campanologist (USA) Presvis (GB) mbongi (SAF) War Artist (AUS) Allybar (IRE) Musir (AUS) Deem (IRE) Desert Party (USA) Cat Junior (USA)

6 4 5 6 6 7 4 4 5 4 5

H F H G G G C C M C H

Medicean (GB) Manhattan Cafe (JPN) Kingmambo (USA) Sakhee (USA) Russian Revival (USA) Orpen (USA) King's Best (USA) Redoute's Choice (AUS) Dalakhani (IRE) Street Cry (IRE) Storm Cat (USA)

Dance To The Top (GB) Great Sunrise (GB) Ring of Music (GB) Forest Fire (SWE) Garden Verse (SAF) Royal Solitaire (AUS) Irika (USA) Dizzy de Lago (AUS) Hijaz (IRE) Sage Cat (USA) Luna Wells (IRE)

Sadler's Wells (USA) Caerleon (USA) Sadler's Wells (USA) Never So Bold Foveros Brocco (USA) Irish River (FR) Encosta de Lago (AUS) Sadler's Wells (USA) Tabasco Cat (USA) Sadler's Wells (USA)

United States 13/02 G1 06/03 G1 06/03 G1 06/03 G1 13/02 G2 13/02 G2 13/02 G2 13/02 G2 14/02 G2 15/02 G2 15/02 G2 15/02 G2 15/02 G2 20/02 G2 20/02 G2 20/02 G2 21/02 G2 G2 27/02

8.0f 8.5f 10.0f 8.0f 8.5f 9.0f 7.0f 8.5f 9.0f 7.0f 7.0f 7.0f 8.0f 7.0f 9.0f 7.0f 12.0f 8.0f

Blind Luck (USA) Crisp (USA) Misremembered (USA) Proviso (GB) Caracortado (USA) Jeranimo (USA) Munnings (USA) St Trinians (GB) Striking Dancer (USA) Sidney's Candy (USA) Greenspring (USA) Sweet Goodbye (USA) Tuscan Evening (IRE) D' Funnybone (USA) Eskendereya (USA) Bob Black Jack (USA) Bourbon Bay (USA) Amen Hallelujah (USA)

3 3 4 5 3 4 4 5 4 3 5 5 5 3 3 5 4 3

F F C M G C C M F C H M M C C H G F

Pollard's Vision (USA) El Corredor (USA) Candy Ride (ARG) Dansili (GB) Cat Dreams (USA) Congaree (USA) Speightstown (USA) Piccolo (GB) Smart Strike (CAN) Candy Ride (ARG) Orientate (USA) Louis Quatorze (USA) Oasis Dream (GB) D'Wildcat (USA) Giant's Causeway (USA) Stormy Jack (USA) Sligo Bay (IRE) Montbrook (USA)

Lucky One (USA) Cat's Fair (USA) Beyond Perfection (USA) Binche (USA) Mons Venus (CAN) Jera (USA) La Comete (USA) Cherrycombe-Row (GB) Dancing Shoes (IRE) Fair Exchange (USA) Violet Lady (USA) Thirty Eight Steps (USA) The Faraway Tree (GB) Elbow (USA) Aldebaran Light (USA) Molly's Prospector (USA) Coral Necklace (USA) Sara's Success (USA)

Best of Luck (USA) Sir Cat (USA) Quack (USA) Woodman (USA) Maria's Mon (USA) Jeblar (USA) Holy Bull (USA) Classic Cliche (IRE) Danehill (USA) Storm Cat (USA) Seattle Slew (USA) Thirty Eight Paces (USA) Suave Dancer (USA) Woodman (USA) Seattle Slew (USA) Native Prospector (USA) Conquistador Cielo (USA) Concorde's Tune (USA)

Las Virgenes Stakes Santa Anita Oaks Santa Anita Handicap Frank E Kilroe Mile Handicap Robert B Lewis Stakes Strub Stakes Gulfstream Park Sprint Championship Santa Maria Handicap La Canada Stakes San Vicente Stakes General George Handicap Barbara Fritchie Handicap Buena Vista Handicap Hutcheson Stakes Fountain of Youth Stakes San Carlos Handicap San Luis Obispo Handicap Davona Dale Stakes

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 89

>>


apr_68_international:Leader 21/03/2010 22:13 Page 4

DATA BOOK Listings of every worldwide Group or Graded stakes winner

Global Stakes Results >>

Date Grade Race United States (cont) 28/02 G2 Mac Diarmida Stakes 13/02 G3 Sam F Davis Stakes 13/02 G3 Hurricane Bertie Stakes 13/02 G3 Endeavour Stakes 20/02 G3 El Camino Real Derby 20/02 G3 Southwest Stakes 20/02 G3 Risen Star Stakes 20/02 G3 Silverbulletday Stakes 20/02 G3 Canadian Turf Stakes 20/02 G3 Honey Fox Stakes 20/02 G3 Mineshaft Handicap 20/02 G3 Fair Grounds Handicap 27/02 G3 Sabin Stakes 27/02 G3 The Very One Stakes 06/03 G3 Sham Stakes 06/03 G3 Gotham Stakes 06/03 G3 Palm Beach Stakes 06/03 G3 Herecomesthebride Stakes 06/03 G3 Toboggan Stakes 06/03 G3 Razorback Handicap G3 Azeri Stakes 06/03

Blind Luck remains favourite for the Kentucky Oaks despite a surprise defeat in the Santa Anita Oaks. A dual Grade 1 winner as a juvenile, in the Oak Leaf Stakes at Santa Anita and Hollywood Starlet, Blind Luck made a winning return with a last-tofirst success in the Las Virgenes Stakes, also at Santa Anita, getting up right on the line to pip Evening Jewel. However, this come-from-behind

Dist

Horse

11.0f 8.5f 6.5f 8.5f 9.0f 8.0f 8.5f 8.5f 8.0f 8.0f 8.5f 9.0f 8.0f 11.0f 9.0f 8.5f 9.0f 9.0f 6.0f 8.5f 8.5f

Presious Passion (USA) Rule (USA) Kays and Jays (USA) Lomaki (USA) Connemara (USA) Conveyance (USA) Discreetly Mine (USA) Jody Slew (USA) Courageous Cat (USA) Wasted Tears (USA) Stonehouse (USA) Blues Street (USA) Aurora Lights (USA) Changing Skies (IRE) Alphie's Bet (USA) Awesome Act (USA) Paddy O'prado (USA) Khancord Kid (USA) Wall Street Wonder (USA) Win Willy (USA) Freedom Star (USA)

style proved her comeuppance in the Santa Anita Oaks, as a gap closed on her at the vital moment and she failed by two necks to reel in Crisp, who had been only fourth in the Las Virgenes and was wearing first-time blinkers. Crisp, handled by John Sadler, had previously won a Grade 3 at Santa Anita in January. Trainer Bob Baffert took the owner’s (via his wife, Jill) and breeder’s prizes following the Santa

90 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Age

Sex

7 3 4 6 3 3 3 3 4 5 6 6 4 5 3 3 3 3 4 4 4

G C F M C C C F C M H G F M C C C F C C F

Sire

Dam

Broodmare Sire

Royal Anthem (USA) Roman Ruler (USA) Macho Uno (USA) A P Indy (USA) Giant's Causeway (USA) Indian Charlie (USA) Mineshaft (USA) Slew City Slew (USA) Storm Cat (USA) Najran (USA) Chester House (USA) Street Cry (IRE) Pulpit (USA) Sadler's Wells (USA) Tribal Rule (USA) Awesome Again (CAN) El Prado (IRE) Lemon Drop Kid (USA) City Place (USA) Monarchos (USA) Street Cry (IRE)

Princesa's Passion (USA) Rockcide (USA) Lovin Spoonful (USA) Debit Account (USA) Satin Sunrise (USA) Emptythetill (USA) Pretty Discreet (USA) Trustbuster (USA) Tranquility Lake (USA) Wishes And Roses (USA) Jenny D (USA) Capote Blues (USA) Lady Lochinvar (USA) Magnificient Style (USA) Miss Alphie (USA) Houdini's Honey (USA) Fun House (USA) Confidently (USA) Kisses And Hugs (USA) City Fair (USA) Willie's Luv (USA)

Marquetry (USA) Personal Flag (USA) Dixieland Band (USA) Mr Prospector (USA) Mr Leader (USA) Holy Bull (USA) Private Account (USA) Housebuster (USA) Rahy (USA) Greinton Regal Embrace (CAN) Capote (USA) Lord At War (ARG) Silver Hawk (USA) Candi's Gold (USA) Mr Prospector (USA) Prized (USA) Storm Cat (USA) Kissin Kris (USA) Carson City (USA) Williamstown (USA)

Anita Handicap, in which Misremembered managed to hold off the late thrust of Neko Bay by half a length. Misremembered’s victory snapped a rather frustrating sequence, which had seen the roan finish runner-up in three successive races, including the Grade 1 Malibu Stakes. The Santa Anita Handicap was Misremembered’s first top-flight victory, as he had failed to shine behind Richard’s Kid in the Pacific

Classic the previous year. Proviso, a dual French Group 3 winner for Andre Fabre, finally broke her Grade 1 duck five months after the stewards robbed her of a topflight victory in the Spinster Stakes. The Juddmonte Farms homebred beat the boys too, nailing Fluke in the very last stride of the Frank E Kilroe Mile. It was her 19th start and will aid her cause immensely after she is retired.


apr_68_stats:Leader 21/03/2010 23:24 Page 2

DATA BOOK Exclusive stallion statistics

Leading National Hunt sires 2009-10 by earnings Name

YOF

Sire

Rnrs

Wnrs

%WR

Races

AWD

Earnings (£)

Top horse

Presenting Oscar Flemensfirth Old Vic Accordion Bob Back King’s Theatre Beneficial Saddlers’ Hall Supreme Leader Kayf Tara Anshan Alflora Dr Massini Bob’s Return Pistolet Bleu Sadler’s Wells Winged Love Zaffaran Montjeu Overbury Alderbrook Daylami Lord Americo Cadoudal Midnight Legend Tiraaz Sir Harry Lewis Turtle Island Kahyasi Roselier Village Star Luso Mansonnien Silver Patriarch Witness Box Key Of Luck Definite Article Alhaarth Solon Moscow Society Bahhare Mujahid Dushyantor Glacial Storm Sea Raven Double Eclipse Galileo Shernazar Lahint Taipan Portrait Gallery Saint des Saints Captain Rio Naheez Dr Fong Kalanisi Great Palm Hernando Rudimentary Norwich Carroll House Karinga Bay

1992 1994 1992 1986 1986 1981 1991 1990 1988 1982 1994 1987 1989 1993 1990 1988 1981 1992 1985 1996 1991 1989 1994 1984 1979 1991 1994 1984 1991 1985 1973 1983 1992 1984 1994 1987 1991 1992 1993 1992 1985 1994 1996 1993 1985 1991 1992 1998 1981 1991 1992 1990 1998 1999 1984 1995 1996 1989 1990 1988 1987 1985 1987

Mtoto Sadler’s Wells Alleged Sadler’s Wells Sadler’s Wells Roberto Sadler’s Wells Top Ville Sadler’s Wells Bustino Sadler’s Wells Persian Bold Niniski Sadler’s Wells Bob Back Top Ville Northern Dancer In The Wings Assert Sadler’s Wells Caerleon Ardross Doyoun Lord Gayle Green Dancer Night Shift Lear Fan Alleged Fairy King Ile de Bourbon Misti IV Moulin Salse Tip Moss Saddlers’ Hall Lyphard Chief’s Crown Indian Ridge Unfuwain Local Suitor Nijinsky Woodman Danzig Sadler’s Wells Arctic Tern Sadler’s Wells Ela-Mana-Mou Sadler’s Wells Busted Woodman Last Tycoon Sadler’s Wells Cadoudal Pivotal Critique Kris S Doyoun Manila Niniski Nureyev Top Ville Lord Gayle Ardross

281 241 200 158 129 139 129 212 199 144 122 142 146 60 95 53 82 46 47 76 89 106 57 87 26 55 14 57 98 40 14 1 115 20 74 60 32 77 54 2 70 15 14 34 40 17 11 35 58 2 53 22 11 18 14 38 21 65 38 67 52 41 100

68 63 49 41 37 39 49 44 38 27 36 31 33 20 23 16 26 12 9 16 24 19 14 16 9 20 6 16 13 14 5 1 16 4 14 21 11 20 16 1 5 4 6 6 9 4 2 10 10 1 9 10 6 3 5 11 8 7 12 9 8 8 16

24.2 26.1 24.5 26.0 28.7 28.1 38.0 20.8 19.1 18.8 29.5 21.8 22.6 33.3 24.2 30.2 31.7 26.1 19.2 21.1 27.0 17.9 24.6 18.4 34.6 36.4 42.9 28.1 13.3 35.0 35.7 100.0 13.9 20.0 18.9 35.0 34.4 26.0 29.6 50.0 7.1 26.7 42.9 17.7 22.5 23.5 18.2 28.6 17.2 50.0 17.0 45.5 54.6 16.7 35.7 29.0 38.1 10.8 31.6 13.4 15.4 19.5 16.0

93 85 66 55 52 56 75 58 51 35 44 43 45 33 32 26 33 20 14 25 32 26 17 20 16 31 12 22 17 16 6 2 20 7 19 29 14 23 20 3 7 6 8 12 10 6 4 16 13 2 10 13 8 6 6 14 17 9 14 12 8 12 17

21.0 19.7 19.4 20.3 19.5 19.7 18.0 19.8 21.0 20.7 19.8 19.6 18.8 20.0 19.3 19.6 18.6 18.9 20.5 18.6 20.0 20.8 18.9 19.8 21.6 20.5 19.8 20.9 19.6 17.7 23.3 24.0 19.9 22.1 19.8 19.6 18.3 19.2 18.1 16.0 20.1 20.6 18.6 18.9 20.5 18.2 17.1 18.6 20.0 20.5 22.5 20.9 19.4 16.4 22.9 17.3 18.4 18.4 19.1 19.7 18.4 18.6 19.5

1,430,783 1,162,919 875,936 818,134 760,078 645,914 621,270 559,363 517,363 507,374 469,618 440,158 425,548 386,297 372,694 355,758 336,412 331,298 328,148 327,680 306,893 290,251 282,030 274,377 270,446 257,610 253,624 248,023 244,873 237,016 235,274 226,680 220,800 219,217 212,946 211,042 197,562 196,317 194,069 184,927 180,670 180,437 176,920 171,039 166,934 165,349 163,360 162,618 162,472 148,910 148,316 146,258 144,373 144,273 143,369 139,278 138,792 137,511 137,140 136,096 133,279 131,046 127,451

Dunguib Oscar Time Pandorama Vic Venturi Get Me Out Of Here Burton Port Voler La Vedette Cooldine Operation Houdini Whinstone Boy Planet Of Sound Treaty Flyer What A Friend Fosters Cross Joncol Sizing Europe Judge Roy Bean Twist Magic Treacle Our Monty Ballyfitz Bygones Of Brid Zaynar Siegemaster Big Buck’s Winsley Hill Ballyholland Diamond Harry An Cathaoir Mor Kalahari King Monet’s Garden Kauto Star Chicago Grey Golden Silver Silver By Nature Wymott Starluck Tasman Lucky Wish Solwhit Forpadydeplasterer Bahrain Storm Khyber Kim Loosen My Load Valley Ride Tranquil Sea Go Native Celestial Halo Nudge And Nurdle Poquelin Calgary Bay Beat The Boys Me Voici Jumbo Rio Northern Alliance No One Tells Me Alaivan Donnas Palm Harry Tricker Duers Newmill Coole River Cool Dude Luke

Statistics to March 7

Earned (£)

117,437 104,413 112,848 92,312 98,477 69,137 73,316 30,265 45,749 72,668 54,522 59,087 133,071 53,445 170,276 100,091 38,928 152,694 66,320 50,194 28,064 38,412 84,032 62,100 68,104 22,833 157,639 95,588 59,930 43,372 119,837 226,680 28,768 101,470 104,935 22,457 61,950 25,681 32,560 184,331 41,357 160,263 142,525 40,166 34,206 144,984 157,374 69,211 26,214 148,910 19,515 47,888 42,124 71,575 101,359 23,963 41,673 76,327 31,199 42,733 32,777 60,066 12,294

At 29, Bob remains no back number Bob Back is still going strong at the ripe old age of 29 and he covered around a dozen mares as a 26-year-old in 2007. This is a comment on his constitution and on the quality of care he has received at Ballylinch Stud. He has always been in the top group among jump sires, handicapped to some extent by having fewer runners owing to the stud not letting its sires cover shedloads of mares. Over the years Bob Back has been responsible for such horses rated 160 or higher as Bacchanal, Back In Front and Thisthatandtother. He is in sixth place, with another promising performer on the books in Reynoldstown Chase winner and RSA Chase runnerup, Burton Port. Roberto Goldback has been doing well for him too. Although Burton Port is suited by a stamina test, Bob Back is not an out-and-out influence for staying power by any means, with an Average Winning Distance (AWD) of races landed of 19.7 furlongs. In that respect he mirrors the vast majority of British- or Irish-based stallions with their Flat backgrounds in pedigree and performance. To a degree, higher AWDs reflect the ability of the sire to get successful chasers so it is no surprise to see the leader, Presenting, with a figure of 21 furlongs.

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 91


apr_68_stats:Leader 21/03/2010 23:24 Page 3

DATA BOOK

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER XXX


apr_68_overseaswinners2:Leader 21/03/2010 22:18 Page 3

DATA BOOK Overseas winners

British and Irish-bred success abroad Breeder

Winner

Sire

Adams, R J E Adams, R J E Addison Racing Ltd Inc Agricola Dell 'Olmo Srl Al Khalifa, Sheikh Abdulla bin Isa Al Qatami & Hugo Merry, M Allan, D Allevamento Gialloblu S R L Alpha Bloodstock Limited Amizette Partnership, The Aston House Stud Avington Manor Stud Aylesfield Farms Stud Az Agr Razza Emiliana SRL Azienda Agricola delle Groane Azienda Agricola Francesca Azienda Agricola Ginestre SS Azienda Agricola Loreto Luciani Azienda Agricola Patrizia Azienda Agricola Rosati Colarieti Azienda Agricola Rosati Colarieti Azienda Agricola Rosati Colarieti Azienda Agricola Rosati Colarieti Azienda Agricola Rosati Colarieti Azienda Agricola S Giamcomo Srl Baggen, J H A Balding, P Balding, P Ballygallon Stud Limited Ballygrelihan Partnership Bandini Marino Barnett Ltd, W and R Barnett Ltd, W and R Barnett Ltd, W and R Barronstown Stud Barronstown Stud & Cobra Barton Stud Begley, M Bellaccini Gianluca & Joan Coburn Bergin, D & T Beston, Miss P Bourne, Mrs A D Brady, P Brickley, D Brinkley Stud SAS Brinkley Stud, Ficomontanino, Bego Blu Brivio Sforza, C Broughton Bloodstock Brunton, Sir Gordon Burns, A a M Burton Agnes Stud Co Ltd Butler, T C Byrne, P Carroll, Mr J M Cheveley Park Stud Ltd Chevington Stud Citadel Stud Colclough, Bernard Coleman, Mr W Compagnia Generale SRL Condon, Mr J C Conneally, Mr A L Conneally, Mr A L Connelly, T Cooke, B Corduff Stud Cullinan, J Cullinan, J Cullinan, J Dalton, M Dalton, M Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Darley Davin Investments Ltd Davison, Miss M Dayton Investments Ltd Delloye, P Fellous & T Clout, H

Bell Fess (GB) Bell Fess (GB) Royal Bergere (GB) Destination Place (IRE) Good Return (GB) Lord Peter Flint (IRE) Hardy Norseman (IRE) Gemonio (IRE) Choose Your Moment (GB) King Of Rome (IRE) Sapperton (GB) Papyrian (GB) Count Lucien (GB) Grand Sphinx (IRE) Regina Sprint (IRE) Famusa (GB) Brass Hill (IRE) White Oleander (IRE) Ludstar (GB) Bosco Ciliegi (GB) Tony's Power (GB) Ekin (GB) Yajala (GB) Ekin (GB) Ciano (IRE) Nolien (IRE) Isla Graciosa (GB) Mr Rigsby (GB) Madison Park (IRE) Super Refuse (IRE) Giulia Vis (IRE) Granary (GB) Granary (GB) Granary (GB) Around Me (IRE) Bankable (IRE) Key To Success (GB) Loving Choisir (IRE) Rojo Rajo (IRE) Winterwind (IRE) Joyride Of Love (IRE) Tamarah (GB) Tee Off (IRE) Super Ratatuille (IRE) Sevedum (GB) Boccadamo (IRE) Masaimara (IRE) Braccio di Ferro (GB) La Data di Giulio (GB) Rosso Med (IRE) Casemate (GB) Hawk And I (IRE) One Cool Mission (IRE) Bellinissimo (IRE) Carnival Queen (GB) Almaguer (GB) Mafra (IRE) Tornado City (IRE) Vasiliki (IRE) Landowner (GB) Importer (IRE) Overachiever (IRE) Gang Show (IRE) Camp Rock (IRE) Hawk Island (IRE) Acapulco Gold (IRE) Eldorado Days (IRE) Brexca (IRE) Brexca (IRE) Aiko (IRE) Miss Refuse (IRE) Cipher (GB) Cipher (GB) Cordon Bleu (IRE) Cordon Bleu (IRE) Targgis (GB) City Of Light (GB) Salt Man (GB) Country Dance (GB) Detonator (IRE) Swinging Sixties (IRE) Andina (IRE) Skysurfers (GB) Alexandros (GB) Uramazin (IRE) Bailey (IRE) Poincon de France (IRE) L'Auvergnat (IRE)

Lujain (USA) Lujain (USA) Royal Applause (GB) Dubai Destination (USA) Fasliyev (USA) Cadeaux Genereux Mull Of Kintyre (USA) High Chaparral (IRE) Choisir (AUS) Montjeu (IRE) Key Of Luck (USA) Oasis Dream (GB) Danehill Dancer (IRE) Gold Sphinx (USA) Desert Prince (IRE) Medicean (GB) Captain Rio (GB) Xaar (GB) Domedriver (IRE) Diktat (GB) Mujahid (USA) Mujahid (USA) Fasliyev (USA) Mujahid (USA) Fasliyev (USA) Nayef (USA) Bold Edge (GB) Forzando Montjeu (IRE) Refuse To Bend (IRE) Altieri (GB) Singspiel (IRE) Singspiel (IRE) Singspiel (IRE) Johannesburg (USA) Medicean (GB) Mujahid (USA) Choisir (AUS) Distant Music (USA) Orpen (USA) Fruits Of Love (USA) Beat Hollow (GB) Barathea (IRE) Desert Prince (IRE) Dansili (GB) Rakti (GB) Orpen (USA) Medicean (GB) Generous (IRE) Titus Livius (FR) Efisio Hawk Wing (USA) One Cool Cat (USA) Hawk Wing (USA) Carnival Dancer (GB) Spectrum (IRE) Kalanisi (IRE) Elusive City (USA) Antonius Pius (USA) Shamardal (USA) Efisio Exceed And Excel (AUS) Desert Prince (IRE) Tagula (IRE) Hawk Wing (USA) Azamour (IRE) Elusive City (USA) Diktat (GB) Diktat (GB) Intikhab (USA) Refuse To Bend (IRE) Reset (AUS) Reset (AUS) Key Of Luck (USA) Key Of Luck (USA) Mtoto Singspiel (IRE) Mtoto Machiavellian (USA) Fantastic Light (USA) Singspiel (IRE) Singspiel (IRE) E Dubai (USA) Kingmambo (USA) Danehill Dancer (IRE) Captain Rio (GB) Peintre Celebre (USA) Saddlers' Hall (IRE)

92 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Age/sex Dam

5h 5h 7h 4f 5g 5h 7g 4c 5h 5h 3c 4g 4c 3f 4f 3f 5h 7h 4c 8h 3c 5h 4f 5h 4c 5m 4f 7g 4c 3f 3f 6m 6m 6m 3f 6h 6h 3c 5m 5h 7m 4f 6m 3c 5h 3f 3c 4c 5m 3c 8g 5h 4f 4c 5m 8g 4f 3c 3c 3c 4c 4f 5g 3c 5h 3c 4c 5g 5g 4f 3f 4g 4g 5g 5g 8m 4f 7h 7h 5g 5h 3f 4c 5h 4c 5g 6h 8g

The Sun Also Rises (GB) The Sun Also Rises (GB) Filly Bergere (IRE) Pleasure Place (IRE) Fickle (GB) Bibi Karam (IRE) Miss Willow Bend (USA) Guardiagrele (IRE) Time Will Show (FR) Amizette (USA) Lebenstanz (GB) La Papagena Paquita (IRE) Grand Storm (IRE) Regina Saura (GB) Step Danzer (IRE) Susan Bold (IRE) Carmen The Best (IRE) Lyonette (IRE) Maid In The Shade (GB) Cuba Lady (IRE) Eye To Eye (GB) Desacara (GB) Eye To Eye (GB) Histoire d'Amour (GB) No Mercy (GER) Nine To Five (GB) Rain Splash (GB) Crystal Gaze (IRE) Panthere (GER) Vis Et Robur (GB) All Grain (GB) All Grain (GB) All Grain (GB) Moon Flower (IRE) Dance To The Top (GB) Shining Cloud (GB) Lovingit (IRE) Mugello (GB) Brickey Beech (IRE) Poly Dancer (GB) Valagalore (GB) Forget Me Not (IRE) Valluga (IRE) Avowal (GB) Holly Hock (FR) Jalcamin (IRE) Sleave Silk (IRE) Persian Victory (IRE) Go For Red (IRE) Flying Carpet (GB) Dos Talas (USA) San Luis Rey (GB) Princess Electra (IRE) Irish Light (USA) Cerita (IRE) Sovana (IRE) Top Story (IRE) Yaqoot (GB) Rentless (GB) Dwingeloo (IRE) Panglossian (IRE) Terry Jean (FR) Olympic Rock (IRE) Crimphill (IRE) El Rabab (USA) Blue Daze (GB) Hemaca (GB) Hemaca (GB) Royal Bossi (IRE) Advancing (IRE) Subtle Charm (GB) Subtle Charm (GB) Blue Note (FR) Blue Note (FR) Fair Shirley (IRE) Electric Society (IRE) Romaneh (GB) Gold's Dance (FR) Narwala Velvet Lady (GB) Fragrant Oasis (USA) Fortune (IRE) Arlette (IRE) Uriah (GER) Baileys Cream (GB) Poughkeepsie (IRE) L'Authie (FR)

Ctry

Ity Ity Ity Ity Mac Hk Swe Ity Hk Uae Ity Qtr Gny Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Bel Spa Spa Spa Ity Ity Qtr Qtr Qtr Fr Uae Kor Ity Ity Swi Swe Qtr Usa Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Qtr Swe Qtr Fr Usa Fr Fr Ity Ity Uae Qtr Spa Bah Ity Aus Fr Bah Bah Bah Ity Ity Bah Bah Bel Bel Bel Gny Qtr Jpn Uae Uae Usa Uae Uae Hk Swi Fr Fr

Date

14/1/10 15/2/10 02/3/10 25/2/10 06/2/10 21/2/10 20/2/10 25/2/10 07/2/10 04/2/10 17/2/10 27/1/10 28/2/10 22/2/10 13/2/10 07/3/10 10/2/10 04/3/10 24/2/10 24/2/10 10/2/10 18/2/10 05/3/10 05/3/10 01/3/10 26/2/10 21/2/10 21/2/10 07/3/10 21/2/10 21/2/10 07/1/10 11/2/10 18/2/10 17/2/10 19/2/10 06/2/10 18/2/10 23/2/10 07/2/10 28/2/10 07/1/10 26/2/10 23/2/10 21/2/10 15/2/10 16/2/10 10/2/10 17/2/10 28/2/10 14/1/10 27/2/10 25/2/10 05/3/10 30/1/10 22/2/10 27/2/10 28/2/10 15/2/10 14/2/10 18/2/10 21/2/10 05/2/10 21/2/10 06/2/10 05/3/10 22/1/10 01/1/10 15/1/10 11/2/10 20/2/10 05/2/10 29/1/10 19/2/10 26/2/10 26/2/10 21/2/10 11/2/10 19/2/10 28/2/10 26/2/10 29/1/10 19/2/10 04/2/10 16/2/10 24/1/10 13/2/10 20/2/10

Racecourse

Distance

Albenga Varese Rome Naples Taipa Sha Tin Taby Naples Sha Tin Meydan Pisa Al Rayyan Dortmund Varese Siracusa Pisa Albenga Pisa Pisa Pisa Pisa Naples Rome Rome Varese Mons Canarias Mijas Mijas Siracusa Rome Al Rayyan Al Rayyan Al Rayyan Cagnes-Sur-Mer Meydan Seoul Naples Albenga St Moritz Taby Al Rayyan Sunland Park Albenga Pisa Varese Albenga Albenga Pisa Siracusa Al Rayyan Taby Al Rayyan Deauville Santa Anita Cagnes-Sur-Mer Cagnes-Sur-Mer Siracusa Varese Abu Dhabi Al Rayyan Canarias Sakhir Pisa Rosehill Deauville Sakhir Sakhir Sakhir Naples Siracusa Sakhir Sakhir Mons Mons Mons Neuss Al Rayyan Funabashi Abu Dhabi Jebel Ali Santa Anita Meydan Meydan Sha Tin Arosa Cagnes-Sur-Mer Lyon La Soie

1m3f £1,315 1m2f110y £4,137 1m £2,632 7f £4,513 6f £7,303 7f £28,341 6f £2,943 1m2f £3,761 7f £52,148 1m2f £40,752 7f110y £1,880 1m1f55y £9,661 1m1f £3,540 7f110y £2,256 1m1f £1,504 7f110y £9,402 6f £1,504 7f110y £1,533 1m1f £3,008 6f110y £1,725 1m2f £4,513 5f £4,513 7f £5,641 6f £8,274 7f110y £1,533 1m6f £1,770 5f £354 6f £6,195 1m1f £4,425 1m2f110y £1,504 1m £5,641 5f £4,831 7f £9,661 5f £9,661 1m £8,850 1m £92,617 (Gr2) 1m1f110y £18,660 5f £4,513 1m £1,504 1m1f £5,030 1m4f £2,597 1m2f £4,831 1m £3,519 1m £2,632 1m1f £1,880 1m2f110y £1,880 1m £1,504 1m £3,761 1m1f £1,725 1m2f £2,256 2m £19,322 1m2f £2,943 5f £9,661 1m1f110y £14,602 6f £7,037 1m2f £6,637 1m2f £20,796 7f £1,504 7f110y £3,009 7f £6,040 7f £3,864 1m £354 1m £1,066 7f110y £3,761 1m2f £23,333 7f110y £10,619 7f £746 1m1f £852 1m3f £2,131 1m £3,008 1m2f110y £3,761 1m3f £852 1m1f £1,066 1m £1,327 7f110y £1,327 1m3f £1,327 1m1f110y £1,770 1m1f55y £3,864 7f110y £6,658 1m3f £7,046 7f £10,067 1m £17,778 1m £40,751 1m1f £74,094 (Gr3) 1m1f £136,038 (L) 1m1f £3,449 2m1f £7,965 1m4f £4,867

Prize-money


apr_68_overseaswinners2:Leader 21/03/2010 22:18 Page 4

DATA BOOK

The data in this section is restricted to breeders based in Britain or Ireland, as determined by the address used when the foal was first registered. Some foreign-based breeders may be included if the mare was boarded in Britain or Ireland and registered as being ‘care of’ a domestic breeder Ditta Nardi Raffaele Ditta Nardi Raffaele Donlon, B Donworth, P Dunne, F Egan, D and B Ezekiel, Mrs V Farrell, C and E Fattoria di Marcianella S R L Firman & Webster Bloodstock Gainsborough Stud Management Ltd Gainsborough Stud Management Ltd Gainsborough Stud Management Ltd Gainsborough Stud Management Ltd Gainsborough Stud Management Ltd Gainsborough Stud Management Ltd Gainsborough Stud Management Ltd Gallagher, Mrs M Gardiner, Mrs C G Gestut Sohrenhof Gianatti & Scuderia Patrizio Bertagri, P L Gillespie, Dr A J F Glending Bloodstock Glenview House Stud Gorman & B Gallagher, S Grace, P Graiguelin Stud Grangecon Stud Grogan, J Grundy Bloodstock Ltd Grundy Bloodstock S R L Hackett, Mrs Monica Hackett, Mrs Monica Hadi al Tajir Halligan, M J Harris, P Hartery, Mrs C Hartery, Mrs C Hascombe & Valiant Studs Haughey, Mrs M Hesmonds Stud Ltd Hesmonds Stud Ltd Highclere Stud Highclere Stud Hitchins, J C, J R & S R Hodgson, K and Mrs Houghton & J S Moore, E J and Mrs Hunt, P C Hunter, Mrs E L Hyde & S Millard, M Hyde Park Stud Hyde Park Stud Irish National Stud Irish Tours Thoroughbred Partnership James & Arnfinn Lund, J Jayeff "B" Stables Juddmonte Farms Inc Juddmonte Farms Inc Juddmonte Farms Ltd Juddmonte Farms Ltd Juddmonte Farms Ltd Juddmonte Farms Ltd Juddmonte Farms Ltd Kelly, Mrs L Kenilworth House Stud Kennedy, G Kennedy, P Kiernan, Mr C J Kildaragh Stud Kilfrush Stud Kilfrush Stud King Bloodstock Knocklong House Stud Lavington Stud, The Lawn Stud Leonard, Mr R Lightbody, M Loder, Sir E J Lodge Park Stud Lofts Hall Stud London Thoroughbred Services Ltd Lostford Manor Stud Lyons, Mrs Helen M3 Elevage & Haras d'Etreham M3 Elevage & Haras d'Etreham Madigan, P Malih Lahij Al Basti Mansergh-Wallace, Mrs P Martica Srl

Wangona (IRE) Satwa Street (IRE) Chinisesi (IRE) Bigi's Dream (IRE) Montmorency (IRE) Leahurst (IRE) Tombeur de Femmes (IRE) Adorabile Med (IRE) Montherlant (IRE) El Bolao (GB) Diwali (GB) Red Arrow Line (GB) William Blake (GB) First Queen (GB) Yirga (GB) Emirates Champion (GB) Sirocco Breeze (GB) Key Art (IRE) Kal Barg (GB) Val d'Espoir (IRE) Sugarello (IRE) Arlequin (GB) Issacar (IRE) Misano Lasen (IRE) Zenside (IRE) My Drop (IRE) Naked Ambition (IRE) To Believe (IRE) Vigna Rossa (IRE) Daylang (GB) Sheitan (GB) Global City (IRE) Global City (IRE) Green Coast (IRE) Pictor Optimus (IRE) Antinori (IRE) Ten Downing Street (IRE) Ten Downing Street (IRE) Tuscan Evening (IRE) Formula Rara (IRE) Sunny Peace (GB) Super Dubai (GB) Kloof (GB) Kloof (GB) My Aunt Fanny (GB) Winsome Hearts (GB) Lebowski (GB) Becher (GB) St Trinians (GB) Peggy's Pearl (GB) Gun In Hand (IRE) Gun In Hand (IRE) Indian Dumaani (GB) Stay Another Day (IRE) Flavin (GB) Mutheeb (USA) Common Purpose (USA) Common Purpose (USA) Birdbrook (GB) Intercom (GB) Autocue (GB) Intercom (GB) Greenwich Meantime (GB) Manhattan Beach (IRE) Pim Pam (IRE) Fichimori (IRE) Camilla Grey (IRE) Drunken Sailor (IRE) El Pib d'Oro (IRE) Venetian Dancer (IRE) Prince Elidane (IRE) London Wing (IRE) Scoglitti (IRE) Six Shots (GB) Tottie (GB) Bacco Perbacco (IRE) Fantast Win (GB) Days Of My Life (IRE) Albertinelli (IRE) Siyaadah (GB) Dream Of Kunda (GB) Tom Paris (GB) Calming Influence (IRE) San Martin (GB) Ballast (IRE) Captain Stock Alca (IRE) Egypt (GB) Serena Kay (IRE) Go Jo Black (IRE)

Okawango (USA) Elusive City (USA) Celtic Swing (GB) Entrepreneur (GB) Pivotal (GB) Verglas (IRE) One Cool Cat (USA) Iron Mask (USA) Desert Sun (GB) Vettori (IRE) Fantastic Light (USA) Red Ransom (USA) Rainbow Quest (USA) Rock Of Gibraltar (IRE) Cape Cross (IRE) Haafhd (GB) Green Desert (USA) Kheleyf (USA) Medicean (GB) In The Wings Mull Of Kintyre (USA) Rock Of Gibraltar (IRE) Traditionally (USA) Kheleyf (USA) Diktat (GB) Danetime (IRE) Royal Applause (GB) Elusive City (USA) King Charlemagne (USA) Daylami (IRE) Dalakhani (IRE) Exceed And Excel (AUS) Exceed And Excel (AUS) Green Desert (USA) Peintre Celebre (USA) Fasliyev (USA) Mujadil (USA) Mujadil (USA) Oasis Dream (GB) Orpen (USA) Vision Of Night (GB) Dubawi (IRE) Cape Cross (IRE) Cape Cross (IRE) Nayef (USA) Erhaab (USA) Beveled (USA) Vettori (IRE) Piccolo (GB) Ishiguru (USA) Bertolini (USA) Bertolini (USA) Indian Ridge Iron Mask (USA) Lujain (USA) Danzig (USA) Elusive Quality (USA) Elusive Quality (USA) Zamindar (USA) Dansili (GB) Dansili (GB) Dansili (GB) Royal Academy (USA) Captain Rio (GB) Verglas (IRE) Pyrus (USA) Clodovil (IRE) Tendulkar (USA) Oasis Dream (GB) Danehill Dancer (IRE) King's Best (USA) Hawk Wing (USA) Hawk Wing (USA) Josr Algarhoud (IRE) Fantastic Light (USA) Medecis (GB) Fantastic Light (USA) Daylami (IRE) Danehill (USA) Shamardal (USA) Oasis Dream (GB) Bertolini (USA) King's Best (USA) Oasis Dream (GB) Desert Prince (IRE) Captain Rio (GB) Dansili (GB) Trade Fair (GB) Desert Prince (IRE)

5h 4c 3c 8m 4c 4g 4c 5m 6h 4c 7h 4c 5g 4f 4c 4c 5h 3c 5h 6h 3c 3c 3c 3f 4f 6h 6g 4c 6m 5h 5g 4c 4c 7h 6h 4g 7g 7g 5m 4f 5m 3c 4c 4c 5m 4g 12 g 6h 5m 6m 4c 4c 3f 6m 6h 5h 6g 6g 4f 5h 5h 5h 10 g 5m 3f 3f 3f 5g 4c 6h 3c 5h 3c 6h 4f 4c 5h 7g 7h 3f 3c 6g 5h 3c 9g 3c 4c 3f 7h

Nalaya (IRE) Black Tribal (IRE) Angelico (IRE) Ardent Range (IRE) Clear Spring (USA) Badee'a (IRE) Nadayem (USA) Sin Lucha (USA) Meznh (IRE) Rion River (IRE) Zandaka (FR) Ya Tarra (GB) Land Of Dreams (GB) Orange Blossom (IRE) Auratum (USA) Janaat (GB) Baldemosa (FR) Gift Of Spring (USA) Persian Air Vert Val (USA) Margaretha Lay (IRE) Fairy Dance (IRE) Indolente (IRE) My Lilli (IRE) Zenith (GB) Notluckytochange (IRE) Model Bride (USA) Lure oO The Moon (USA) Go Likecrazy (GB) Kelang (GB) Biosphere (GB) Victory Peak (GB) Victory Peak (GB) Oriental Fashion (IRE) Individual (USA) Albavilla (GB) Karen Blixen (GB) Karen Blixen (GB) The Faraway Tree (GB) Dame Portia (IRE) Three Gifts (GB) Credit-A-Plenty (GB) Ravine (GB) Ravine (GB) Putuna (GB) Boulevard Rouge (USA) Sandkatoon (IRE) Hidden Meaning (GB) Cherrycombe-Row (GB) Sweet Compliance (GB) Berliese (IRE) Berliese (IRE) Mubadalah (USA) Plaintarra (SWI) River Coln (USA) Magicalmysterykate Kithira (GB) Kithira (GB) Chaffinch (USA) Dialing Tone (USA) Sing For Fame (USA) Dialing Tone (USA) Shirley Valentine (GB) Ruby Ridge (IRE) Pacy's Ridge (IRE) Dispol In Mind (GB) La Captive (IRE) Ronni Pancake (GB) Trinity Joy (GB) Venize (IRE) Albacora (IRE) Thaidah (CAN) Maydaymayday (IRE) Captive Heart Katy Nowaitee (GB) Fancy Boots (IRE) So Admirable (GB) Truly Yours (IRE) Sunset Cafe (IRE) River Belle (GB) Kunda (IRE) Nom Francais (GB) Idilic Calm (IRE) Suedoise (GB) Suedoise (GB) Glamour Stock (USA) Royal Flame (IRE) Lady Of The Inn (IRE) Karvis (GB)

Ity Uae Ity Ity Uae Uae Ity Ity Ity Spa Spa Jpn Bah Usa Uae Uae Uae Bel Uae Fr Ity Fr Fr Ity Fr Bah Qtr Ity Ity Ity Fr Uae Uae Uae Ity Uae Usa Usa Usa Ity Usa Ity Bah Bah Usa Qtr Ity Qtr Usa Swe Ity Ity Ity Fr Ity Uae Swe Swe Ity Gny Usa Gny Fr Usa Fr Ity Ity Uae Fr Bel Fr Jpn Ity Usa Usa Ity Jpn Hk Aus Uae Ity Mac Uae Fr Usa Ity Usa Ity Ity

10/2/10 26/2/10 02/3/10 10/2/10 09/2/10 18/2/10 21/2/10 20/2/10 09/2/10 21/2/10 21/2/10 11/2/10 08/1/10 03/2/10 12/2/10 18/2/10 18/2/10 05/3/10 05/2/10 14/2/10 28/2/10 13/2/10 28/2/10 28/2/10 03/3/10 05/2/10 24/2/10 13/2/10 19/2/10 14/2/10 26/2/10 04/2/10 19/2/10 19/2/10 20/2/10 25/2/10 02/2/10 21/2/10 15/2/10 27/2/10 28/1/10 11/2/10 01/1/10 29/1/10 31/1/10 24/2/10 12/2/10 28/1/10 13/2/10 14/2/10 15/2/10 25/2/10 09/2/10 07/3/10 22/2/10 04/2/10 24/1/10 07/2/10 11/2/10 14/2/10 20/2/10 28/2/10 26/2/10 31/1/10 20/2/10 04/3/10 28/2/10 19/2/10 03/3/10 19/2/10 13/2/10 20/2/10 11/2/10 20/2/10 06/2/10 23/2/10 09/2/10 10/2/10 17/2/10 11/2/10 02/3/10 06/2/10 18/2/10 23/2/10 20/2/10 27/2/10 29/1/10 14/2/10 15/2/10

Pisa Jebel Ali Rome Pisa Abu Dhabi Meydan Pisa Siracusa Rome Mijas Canarias Sonoda Sakhir Santa Anita Jebel Ali Meydan Meydan Mons Meydan Cagnes-Sur-Mer Pisa Cagnes-Sur-Mer Mont-De-Marsan Rome Toulouse Sakhir Al Rayyan Siracusa Grosseto Pisa Lyon La Soie Meydan Meydan Meydan Siracusa Meydan Sunland Park Sunland Park Santa Anita Siracusa Santa Anita Naples Sakhir Sakhir Santa Anita Al Rayyan Grosseto Al Rayyan Santa Anita Taby Varese Naples Rome Seiches-Sur-Le-Loire Varese Meydan Taby Taby Naples Dortmund Santa Anita Dortmund Lyon La Soie Santa Anita Angers Pisa Rome Meydan Lyon La Soie Mons Cagnes-Sur-Mer Kochi Naples Turfway Park Gulfstream Park Albenga Urawa Happy Valley Warwick Farm Meydan Rome Taipa Meydan Marseille Pont De Vivaux Tampa Bay Downs Siracusa Santa Anita Pisa Naples

1m3f £3,761 5f £6,040 1m1f110y £5,641 7f110y £1,725 7f £15,100 6f £55,570 6f £3,761 5f110y £1,504 1m3f £4,513 1m1f £4,425 1m2f £354 1m110y £1,664 1m £2,131 1m £5,185 6f £7,550 1m3f £40,751 7f £64,832 1m £1,327 1m1f110y £40,752 1m £6,637 1m2f £4,513 1m2f £11,947 1m2f £11,062 1m £8,274 1m £5,752 6f £2,131 6f £9,661 1m £3,761 1m165y £1,504 1m2f £11,283 1m1f £7,522 6f £44,456 6f £44,456 7f £44,456 7f110y £2,256 1m3f £40,751 6f £3,519 6f £3,704 1m £55,556 (Gr2) 1m2f110y £1,504 6f £3,704 1m110y £4,513 1m1f £852 1m £5,328 1m £11,852 1m2f £9,661 1m165y £1,533 1m £9,661 1m £92,593 (Gr2) 6f £4,329 1m1f165y £1,504 1m2f £1,880 7f £3,761 1m5f110y £2,655 1m1f165y £1,534 7f £44,456 1m2f £4,329 1m £4,329 1m2f £1,880 1m110y £2,655 1m £4,074 1m1f £5,310 1m4f £5,752 6f £17,037 1m £11,947 6f £4,513 1m £5,641 1m3f £44,456 1m1f £7,522 1m £2,212 1m2f £6,637 6f110y £666 1m2f £5,265 1m2f £3,481 1m1f £46,296 (Gr3) 6f £1,315 1m £6,658 1m55y £38,544 7f £9,750 1m £92,617 (L) 1m110y £4,137 1m1f £15,036 1m £40,751 1m2f £6,195 1m £6,556 1m £7,522 1m £7,407 7f110y £6,393 1m1f £4,513

THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER 93

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apr_68_overseaswinners2:Leader 21/03/2010 22:18 Page 5

DATA BOOK Overseas winners

British and Irish-bred success abroad >>

Martinezli, M McMahon Madden, Miss K Meon Valley Stud Millenium Partnership Millsec Limited Minch Bloodstock Minster Stud Minty, Barry Moratalla, Marquesa De Mount Coote Partnership Murphy, Miss M Myerscough & Charles O'Brien, P & J Nass, Fawzi Neary, J Nunn, S O'Brien, M O'Connor, J Oppenheimer, Mrs B D Ormsby, L Ormsby, L Ormsby, L O'Sullivan, G Oung, Madame L Penny, John and Mrs Caroline Phelan, M Plantation Stud (For Breeder's Prizes Only) Plumbly, Simon and Helen Puerari, Sunflower Int Ltd & Mohican Breeding, E Queen, The Quinn, K Rathasker Stud Redmyre Bloodstock & S Hillen Ridgecourt Stud Rima Stud Srl Robiati, Angelo Rockwell Bloodstock Round Hill Stud Roundhill Stud & Gleadhill House Stud Ltd Ryan, P Savill, P Savill, P D Sc Day Just Sas Schoeler, B Scuderia Cesare Turri Scuderia Cesare Turri Scuderia Golden Horse S R L Scuderia Golden Horse S R L Scuderia Golden Horse S R L Scuderia Sant' Ambroeus S R L Scuderia Tamara S A S Scuderia Tamara S A S Sexton, A Shadwell Estate Company Limited Shadwell Estate Company Limited Shadwell Estate Company Limited Shenkin, Ian Sig Luciano Arcolini Skymarc Farm Slatch Farm Stud Smith, Miss E M Snowdrop Stud Co Ltd Soc Finanza Locale Consulting SRL St Clare Hall Stud Stefania Giurelli Sunderland Holdings Ltd Swettenham Stud Swettenham Stud Swettenham Stud Swordlestown Stud Tally-Ho Stud Team Valor Theakston Stud Thoroughbred Farms Ltd Tumsich, G Tumsich, G Venner, P and Mrs A G Venturi, Dario Villa Dosia S R L Weld, J Wertheimer et Frere Wertheimer et Frere Wickfield Farm Partnership Wilson, Capt J H Wilson, Capt J H Wisbey, Miss D L Wood Hall Stud Limited Yeomanstown Lodge Stud Zanocchio, Gabrielle

Arakan Rose (IRE) Su Contadori (IRE) Primera Vista (GB) Pallodio (IRE) Super Barathea (GB) Porto Marmay (IRE) Al Shemali (GB) Flapjack (GB) Rixe Veto (IRE) Grey Latino (GB) Golden Fong (IRE) Tapio (IRE) Act Waif (GB) Saratoga Black (IRE) Southpaw Lad (GB) Blue Julia (IRE) Miss Singhsix (IRE) Saluki (GB) Delitto Perfetto (IRE) Delitto Perfetto (IRE) Wake Me Now (IRE) Train Deal (IRE) Kornei (IRE) Relative Order (GB) Virginia Med (IRE) Grand Prix (GB) Mr Day Off (GB) Zidane's Gold (GB) Highland Glen (GB) Sir Moretti (IRE) Part Timer (IRE) Radiohead (GB) Strike One (GB) Lucky Bielle (IRE) Pepper Popper (IRE) Eastern Empire (GB) Kingstand (IRE) Keyala (IRE) Folie Med (IRE) Firth Of Fifth (IRE) Collection (IRE) Queen Black (IRE) Sabine Wild (IRE) Martora (IRE) Eustachione (IRE) Golden Exclusive (IRE) Golden Acclamation (IRE) Golden Ramon (IRE) Shosholoza (IRE) Mister Ghiaccio (IRE) Mister Ghiaccio (IRE) Great Ambition (IRE) Naiazek (GB) Alwaabel (GB) Mukhber (GB) Gran Aguila (IRE) Sirod (IRE) Vestris (IRE) We'll Confer (GB) Mdawee (IRE) Doolin Dalton (GB) Pour Toujours (IRE) Giardini (GB) Cyclone Club (IRE) El Gouna (IRE) Progreso (IRE) Changing Skies (IRE) Progreso (IRE) Gold Neo (IRE) Pippiedda Aio (IRE) Hasay (GB) Golden Cashmere (GB) Fantastic Olmo (GB) Arenzano (IRE) Soglio (IRE) Marning Star (GB) Blow Up (IRE) Ul Zincarlin (IRE) Lorgan (IRE) Allybar (IRE) Allybar (IRE) The Twelve Steps (GB) Kool Katie (GB) Kool Katie (GB) Gaby North (GB) Burning Flute (GB) Halicarnassus (IRE) Nisri di San Jore (IRE)

94 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

Arakan (USA) Indian Haven (GB) Haafhd (GB) Medecis (GB) Barathea (IRE) Choisir (AUS) Medicean (GB) Trade Fair (GB) Storming Home (GB) Daylami (IRE) Dr Fong (USA) Forest Wildcat (USA) Act One (GB) Pyrus (USA) Diktat (GB) Fumo di Londra (IRE) Singspiel (IRE) Dubai Destination (USA) Elnadim (USA) Elnadim (USA) Almutawakel (GB) Camacho (GB) Shinko Forest (IRE) Diktat (GB) Antonius Pius (USA) Grand Lodge (USA) Erhaab (USA) Indian Ridge Montjeu (IRE) Trans Island (GB) Mujadil (USA) Johannesburg (USA) Danehill Dancer (IRE) King Charlemagne (USA) Indian Haven (GB) Dubai Destination (USA) King's Best (USA) Key Of Luck (USA) No Excuse Needed (GB) Traditionally (USA) Peintre Celebre (USA) Fasliyev (USA) High Chaparral (IRE) Verglas (IRE) Desert Prince (IRE) Pyrus (USA) Acclamation (GB) Captain Rio (GB) Soviet Star (USA) One Cool Cat (USA) One Cool Cat (USA) Great Exhibition (USA) Refuse To Bend (IRE) Green Desert (USA) Anabaa (USA) Hawkeye (IRE) Fantastic Light (USA) Vettori (IRE) Piccolo (GB) Choisir (AUS) Bertolini (USA) Almutawakel (GB) Vettori (IRE) Indian Lodge (IRE) Perugino (USA) Danehill Dancer (IRE) Sadler's Wells (USA) Danehill Dancer (IRE) Invincible Spirit (IRE) Redback (GB) Lomitas (GB) Kyllachy (GB) Fantastic Light (USA) Tagula (IRE) Monashee Mountain (USA) Diktat (GB) Daggers Drawn (USA) Definite Article (GB) Desert Style (IRE) King's Best (USA) King's Best (USA) Diktat (GB) Millkom (GB) Millkom (GB) Puissance Piccolo (GB) Cape Cross (IRE) Sri Pekan (USA)

3f 4g 4c 5h 3c 5m 6h 3f 3c 5h 3c 9h 5m 3c 5h 5m 5m 4c 4c 4c 4f 3f 7g 5h 3f 6h 5h 6h 4g 4c 6h 3c 6g 3c 4c 4g 4c 5m 5m 4c 5g 4f 4f 3c 5h 3c 3c 3f 5m 4c 4c 3c 4c 5h 5g 4c 6h 5g 6h 3c 5h 7h 7m 5h 8h 4c 5m 4c 6h 5m 3f 3f 4c 6h 7h 5g 3c 7h 6h 4c 4c 5g 5m 5m 6h 4c 6h 8h

Rose Tint (IRE) Mikes Baby (IRE) Colorvista Bent Al Fala (IRE) Vulnerable (GB) Nordicolini (IRE) Bathilde (IRE) Inya Lake (GB) Caldea (FR) Zarara (USA) Peeptoe (IRE) Lyric (GB) Waif (GB) Mary Martins (IRE) Ashantiana (GB) Julia Titus (IRE) Whatamiss (USA) Dog Rose (SAF) Black Jack Girl (IRE) Black Jack Girl (IRE) Shiyra Fanciful (IRE) Constantia (IRE) Aunt Ruby (USA) Cajo (IRE) Divine Quest (GB) Branston Berry (IRE) Danira (IRE) Daring Aim (GB) Vanity (IRE) Dame Laura (IRE) Security Interest (USA) Intellectuelle (GB) Santa Severa (GB) Armenia (IRE) Possessive Artiste (GB) True Crystal (IRE) Alwiyda (USA) Glencoagh Order (IRE) Wish List (IRE) Lasting Chance (USA) Grand Teacher (IRE) Stefania (IRE) Mia Pantera (IRE) Vaghezza (IRE) Golden Announce (USA) Nelly Golden (USA) Solid Golden (USA) Sagar Queen (USA) Mauricienne (FR) Mauricienne (FR) Ocean Bell (IRE) Elshamms (GB) Etizaaz (USA) Tarbiyah (GB) Heiress Of Meath (IRE) Yxenery (IRE) Parting Gift (GB) Medina de Rioseco (GB) Its All Eurs (IRE) April Magic (GB) Swinging Secret (IRE) Motto (FR) May Milton (GB) Kengar (FR) Castilian Queen (USA) Magnificient Style (USA) Castilian Queen (USA) Waltzing Around (IRE) Million At Dawn (IRE) Saralea (FR) Kind Of Light (GB) Puritanical (IRE) Artesina (IRE) Absintina (IRE) Mustique Dream (GB) Miss Buffy (GB) Flying Petrel (USA) Society Fair (FR) Irika (USA) Irika (USA) Polygueza (FR) Katie Komaite (GB) Katie Komaite (GB) Diamond Vanessa (IRE) Fiamma Royale (IRE) Launch Time (USA) Ninna Nanna (IRE)

Ity Ity Gny Fr Ity Usa Uae Spa Fr Ity Ity Usa Bah Ity Hk Spa Usa Saf Ity Ity Usa Ity Fr Hk Ity Bah Ity Saf Uae Gny Usa Usa Aus Ity Ity Hk Fr Bel Ity Hk Hk Ity Gny Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Ity Bah Uae Bah Spa Ity Fr Spa Qtr Ity Ity Gny Ity Swe Hk Usa Hk Jpn Ity Gny Ity Ity Ity Ity Bah Ity Ity Spa Uae Uae Bah Bel Bel Ity Bah Uae Ity

06/3/10 19/2/10 28/2/10 14/2/10 13/2/10 12/2/10 19/2/10 21/2/10 20/2/10 07/3/10 12/2/10 13/2/10 29/1/10 02/3/10 21/2/10 07/3/10 20/2/10 30/1/10 20/2/10 06/3/10 19/2/10 13/2/10 10/2/10 16/2/10 21/2/10 01/1/10 28/2/10 17/1/10 11/2/10 21/2/10 15/2/10 27/2/10 27/2/10 27/2/10 28/2/10 10/2/10 14/2/10 05/3/10 13/2/10 07/2/10 28/2/10 27/2/10 07/2/10 24/2/10 07/3/10 22/2/10 14/2/10 05/3/10 12/2/10 21/2/10 06/3/10 28/2/10 08/1/10 12/2/10 12/2/10 14/2/10 01/3/10 24/2/10 14/2/10 04/2/10 14/2/10 16/2/10 14/2/10 22/2/10 28/2/10 03/2/10 27/2/10 24/2/10 16/2/10 17/2/10 21/2/10 15/2/10 22/2/10 10/2/10 21/2/10 01/1/10 22/2/10 21/2/10 14/2/10 05/2/10 18/2/10 15/1/10 19/2/10 05/3/10 21/2/10 15/1/10 11/2/10 10/2/10

Siracusa Grosseto Dortmund Cagnes-Sur-Mer Siracusa Santa Anita Meydan Canarias Mont-De-Marsan Rome Grosseto Rillito Sakhir Rome Sha Tin Mijas Laurel Kenilworth Siracusa Siracusa Santa Anita Siracusa Cagnes-Sur-Mer Sha Tin Siracusa Sakhir Pisa Scottsville Meydan Neuss Turf Paradise Gulfstream Park Rosehill Casarano Rome Happy Valley Lyon La Soie Mons Siracusa Sha Tin Sha Tin Siracusa Neuss Pisa Pisa Naples Pisa Rome Grosseto Siracusa Siracusa Pisa Sakhir Jebel Ali Sakhir Dos Hermanas Varese Cagnes-Sur-Mer Dos Hermanas Al Rayyan Pisa Albenga Dortmund Naples Taby Happy Valley Gulfstream Park Happy Valley Nagoya Pisa Neuss Naples Naples Albenga Pisa Sakhir Naples Rome Dos Hermanas Meydan Meydan Sakhir Mons Mons Rome Sakhir Meydan Pisa

6f £3,761 1m3f £1,504 1m1f £1,770 1m2f £26,549 (L) 1m2f110y £2,256 6f £24,519 1m2f £44,456 7f £354 1m2f110y £6,195 1m3f £6,017 1m165y £1,880 6f £1,210 1m £1,066 1m3f £8,274 1m1f £38,544 1m3f £4,867 1m1f £18,519 1m £4,603 7f £1,504 7f £1,504 1m £13,333 7f110y £3,761 1m2f £7,080 6f £52,148 6f £2,256 6f £1,066 7f110y £1,880 7f £4,184 1m3f £40,751 1m1f110y £885 6f £2,037 1m £16,296 1m4f £23,333 6f £1,504 1m110y £11,283 1m1f £38,544 1m4f £4,867 7f £1,327 1m3f110y £1,504 1m55y £52,148 1m2f £362,769 (L) 5f110y £1,504 1m3f110y £2,301 7f110y £4,513 7f110y £21,061(L) 1m1f £2,256 7f110y £6,393 5f110y £8,274 1m £1,504 1m2f110y £1,504 1m2f110y £7,522 6f110y £5,265 1m1f £639 7f £6,040 1m2f £6,148 1m2f110y £3,982 7f110y £1,504 1m £10,177 5f £4,425 5f £3,864 6f110y £2,300 1m3f £1,504 1m1f165y £2,301 5f £3,008 1m £4,329 5f £28,341 1m3f £37,037 (Gr3) 5f £38,544 1m1f110y £3,795 6f110y £3,008 7f110y £2,301 5f £2,256 1m7f £3,761 1m3f £1,315 7f110y £3,761 7f £2,131 1m2f £5,641 1m2f110y £5,641 1m £14,159 1m2f £55,570 1m1f110y £74,093 (Gr3) 5f £746 1m2f110y £1,327 1m2f110y £1,770 7f £2,256 1m £1,066 1m4f93y £64,832 6f110y £1,692


apr_68_Your Say:Layout 1 21/03/2010 22:34 Page 112

YOUR SAY

Pony Club can inspire the next generation Racing For Change’s drive to recruit new participants to racing should not ignore those youngsters who have already shown an interest in horses Sheila Bailey Trustee of the Pony Club and ROA member

“Our members can become ambassadors for the sport as they go on to university and the workplace”

he ROA and the TBA have grasped the nettle and are actively looking for ways to make racing attractive to a new, younger audience. The next generation of racegoers will expect more from the experience and if we are to ensure that the numbers prepared to invest in both racing and breeding grow, we will have to utilise every opportunity to promote our great sport. One investor in inspiring ‘the next generation’ is the Pony Club. Often forgotten as the nursery for many of our top jockeys, trainers, breeders and officials, for over 80 years this charity has ensured that our young riders receive a thorough grounding in horsemanship and care of the horse. For many, the first real taste of the sheer joy of riding was learned at Pony Club camp. The standards set were high, both for horsemanship and discipline. Looking back, plenty of the friendships forged there have lasted longer than many marriages! Encouragement was always plentiful and the results are evident right across the racing and breeding industry. Liam Treadwell, rider of last year’s Grand National winner Mon Mome, spent many happy years as a member of Cowdray Pony Club. He said: “It really was where the first seeds of ambition to be a jockey came from. “Although I had a background in racing, I still loved going to Pony Club, especially to camp. I’ve always had a great love of sport so joining the tetrathlon team allowed me to compete in several disciplines. There was such camaraderie and we were really competitive. “The Pony Club is a great grounding for anyone who wants to forge a career with horses. After I won the Grand National I went back to give a talk to the branch and it brought back such great memories.” Champion jockey Ryan Moore and his brother Jamie both spent years as members of the Southdown East Pony Club. Trainer Sheena West attended the same branch and has also had success as a rider. The Pony Club introduced Pony Racing as a pilot scheme in 2004 and in 2006 it became an official discipline. This year the first instruction day was held at Aintree racecourse, where members, parents, officials and instructors learned about the fitness of horse and rider, and raceday procedures, and had practical demonstrations from the British Racing School and Northern Racing College.

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96 THOROUGHBRED OWNER & BREEDER INC PACEMAKER

This is a great opportunity for young riders to get a taste of the world of racing. Other racecourses are following this lead and will host instruction days later this year. Wincanton and Exeter racecourses are each hosting ‘Children’s Race Days’ which provide free admission to the racecourse on that day and provide an opportunity to meet jockeys before and after racing, walk the course, try out the equicizer, and generally feel part of the action. They have also set up a Junior Jump Club to keep the children and young people engaged over the whole season. The Pony Club was delighted to be included in this project and is sending 100 members along. In the not too distant future, members of clubs such as this will become our captains of industry and will rule the Square Mile, so such foresight will pay dividends over time. Hopefully, other racecourses will follow suit and we would love to be included in the planning process. There are 340 branches of the Pony Club throughout the UK, from the Orkneys to Land’s End, with 33,000 members up to the age of 23 years. This is most definitely within the Racing For Change project group’s target age group and it is clear that they all have a proven interest in equestrian sport, many at competition level. Working together with branches, racecourses have the potential to put together admission packages for their family and friends that would maximize the potential of these occasions. This can help to achieve the aspiration to bring in new customers and new spending for the long term benefit of racing. Despite the economic recession, membership levels in the Pony Club in both Ireland and the UK have held up well, demonstrating a commitment to horses, riding and sport. If each racecourse invited along the local branch to one meeting each year, that in itself would introduce a whole new captive audience to the thrills and spills of racing. Indeed, if the whole racing industry dedicated one day each year to inviting Pony Club members to join them and learn about their work, then the next generation will be ambassadors for the sport as they go on to university, into industry and the professions. Then we really will be racing ahead in the Racing For Change stakes.

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