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FROM THE EDITOR

Publisher/Creative Director Jason Tanner Editor Steven Wilson

CHARM OF SUMMERTIME

S

Ad Sales Rudy Strahan

ure, the calendar says that the first day of summer doesn’t come until

Robert Williams

June 21. But for me, turning the calendar page to the first day of June always signals the unofficial arrival of my favorite season. As

Ad Designs

a kid, of course, summer meant the end of the school year, and the

Andrea Roberson Taylor West

beginning of three months of limitless possibilities: long, sunny days filled with swimming, bike riding all over town, and all the popsicles our stomachs

Contributors

could handle. Even for a child who didn’t mind school that much, summer

Bryan Leazenby

brought with it an unmatched feeling of freedom that no other time of year

Danny May

Greg Eans

Adam Paris

could duplicate.

Stuart Peck Jaime Rafferty

As I grew up, my endless free time during the summer began to dwindle.

Ashley Sorce

During college, I suddenly found myself working during the summer, instead

Melody Wallace Lora Wimsatt

of lying by the pool all day. Day camp counselor and lifeguard certainly

Printing

weren’t the most strenuous of summer jobs, but working during the summer

Greenwell Chisholm

still marked a big shift away from my former days of endless freedom. Of course, like every adult must eventually do, I soon came to realize that the summers of my youth were gone. But even with that realization, I resolved to still enjoy my favorite season as much as I had when I was younger. Now, with a wife and a son (and another on the way) I have a whole new perspective on summer. Even though I always had fun, I now appreciate family vacations much more than I did before. As a child, our annual trips to Florida meant taking a break from swimming long enough to drive to

Owensboro, Kentucky

“EVEN FOR A CHILD WHO DIDN’T MIND SCHOOL THAT MUCH, SUMMER BROUGHT WITH IT AN UNMATCHED FEELING OF FREEDOM THAT NO OTHER TIME OF YEAR COULD DUPLICATE.” -JASON TANNER

Online www.owensboroliving.com facebook.com/owensboroliving twitter.com/owensboroliving issuu.com/owensboroliving Offline Owensboro Living Magazine PO Box 23237 Owensboro, KY 42304

Destin and swim there. These days, family vacations to the beach represent

(270) 314-5240

a welcome week off from the daily duties of adulthood. And while I may not gorge myself on icees anymore, a cold bowl of ice cream on a hot day still tastes just as good. So while grown-up summers, like every part of getting older, may take some getting used to, I’ve come to find that not even being an adult can

Subscribe Delivery of Owensboro Living is available by visiting owensboroliving.com/subscribe

rob the summertime of its charm.

Advertise Owensboro Living is a FREE magazine because of community support. Thank

Steven Wilson

you to the great group of businesses &

Editor, Owensboro Living

organizations who advertise.

A Jason Tanner Design Group Company

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www.OwensboroLiving.com Effective brand interactions.

TM


JUNE JULY

2014

[08]

[18]

THE BUZZ

THE REAL PEOPLE, PLACES AND EVENTS THAT SHAPE OUR COMMUNITY

[12]

THE PULSE

NO BONES ABOUT IT MAKE SUMMER FITNESS FUN

FEATURES [18] ROMP [30] OUR RED, WHITE & BLUE COMMUNITY [36] CSI:OWENSBORO [42] SHE WAS MADE FOR THIS

[58]

[49] OWENSBORO’S NEW SKATEPARK

[30]

[54] BUILDING HOPE [58] A NEW LIFE AT NEW LIFE

[62]

THE DISH

SWEET TIPS FOR THE 4TH OF JULY

[68]

THE SCENE

YOUR GUIDE TO WHAT’S HAPPENING IN AND AROUND OWENSBORO

[36]

[62] www.OwensboroLiving.com

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THE

BUZZ

Owensboro’s annual weekend concert series kicked off on May 16 with a performance by The Pits at the RiverPark Center’s BB&T Plaza. The kick-off event also saw performances from Heath & Molly and the Josh Merritt Band. The series continues to grow each year, and attendees this year will get to

experience food, fun and music from the RiverPark Center to the Convention Center. Friday After 5 will continue its season through August 29, with at least three acts set to perform each week. The series also features gospel performances in Canon Hall on select Fridays.

PHOTO BY AP IMAGERY

OFFICIAL HEALTH SPONSOR

NEW TENNIS COMPLEX UNDER CONSTRUCTION 8 OWENSBORO LIVING

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Owensboro Health and the Owensboro Convention Center have entered into a partnership, establishing Owensboro Health as the “Official Health Sponsor” of the Owensboro Convention Center for the next three years. Officials with the two organizations said they hope the partnership will offer new opportunities for health and safety initiatives at the Convention Center, as well as continue to push the hospital’s philosophy of wellness and fitness, as community leaders work to make improved health a priority.

The City of Owensboro, Daviess Fiscal Court, Owensboro Public Schools and the Owensboro-Daviess County Tennis Association have broken ground on an indoor/outdoor tennis facility at Shifley Park. The four entities will share the $4 million cost of completing the complex.

PHOTO BY GREG EANS

FRIDAYafter 5

SPRAYPARKS OPEN FOR SUMMER The City’s SprayParks at Legion Park, KendallPerkins Park, and Smothers Park officially opened for the season on Saturday, May 24. A great summertime addition to our city’s outstanding parks system, the SprayParks are free to the public. Each of the SprayParks will remain open from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. daily through Labor Day. After Labor Day the SprayParks will be open daily from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. until the end of September.

The facility is set to include a sixcourt indoor facility, nine outdoor courts, bathroom facilities and a large paved parking lot next to Bittel Road. Hafer and Associates of Owensboro designed the complex. Construction should be completed by the end of this year. www.OwensboroLiving.com


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THE

BUZZ

COUNTRY LEGENDS TO PERFORM AT THE BIG O MUSIC FEST

Charlie Daniels Band along with Hank Williams, Jr. will perform at the 2014 Big O Music Fest. The legendary country stars will take the stage on Saturday, August 16, at Reid’s Orchard. Also appearing this year will be Locash Cowboys, The Lacs, JT Hodges, and Brasher Bogue.

SWINGING SHIP LANDS AT HOLIDAY WORLD

New for summer 2014, Holiday World & Splashin’ Safari debut the Mayflower, its newest attraction. The Mayflower is a classic “swinging ship” ride whose arc swings up to 54 feet! Located in the Thanksgiving section of the park, the ship can hold up to 60 riders and has an awesome light package for riding after dark.

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DCPS TEACHER APPOINTED TO NATIONAL COUNCIL Heidi Givens, itinerant teacher of the deaf and hard-of-hearing for the Daviess County Public Schools, has been appointed to serve on the Teacher Advisory Council. Sponsored by the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, the Council is made up of educators from across the United States who meet with the foundation’s education team in Seattle twice a year. Givens was honored with the Kentucky Elementary Teacher of the Year award in 2013, and she serves as president of the Kentucky Educators for the Deaf and Hard of Hearing association.

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PHOTOS BY AP IMAGERY

2014 International

BAR-B-Q FESTIVAL

On May 9 and 10, downtown Owensboro hosted the 36th annual International Bar-B-Q Festival. The Festival featured carnival rides, vendors, entertainment, and seven cooking teams competing for the Governor’s Cup. Despite the rainy weekend, attendance for the weekend totaled between 12,000 and 15,000 people. Precious Blood Parish was crowned as the grand champion of the cooking competition. The victory marked their second win since 2011.

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THE

PULSE

BY ANTHONY MCBRIDE, MD OWENSBORO HEALTH ORTHOPEDICS

NO BONES ABOUT IT joint pain is a serious problem Your favorite activities are no longer enjoyable because

it hurts to do them. Getting things done around the house is difficult, if not impossible. One of my patients told me joint pain essentially made him a prisoner in an easy chair, because it hurt too much to do anything. 12 OWENSBORO LIVING

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I

n 2006, 30 percent of people in the United States reported experiencing some type of joint pain within the previous month, according to statistics from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention in Atlanta. Fortunately, modern medicine means there are a wide range of options for people suffering from joint pain. But before you can solve the problem, you have to know what’s causing it.

P L AY I N G H U R T One of the top causes of joint pain is injury, whether from overexertion, an accidental fall or strain, or some other factor. In addition to pain, joint injuries are typically accompanied by swelling and stiffness. Sometimes it’s a problem you can handle on your own. An easy way to remember how to handle injury pain is “RICE.” • Rest – Take a load off and let that injury heal; • Ice – Cold compresses or ice packs help bring down swelling (always wrap your bag of crushed ice or cold pack in a towel to prevent frostbite); • Compression – Elastic bandages or ACE wraps can help control swelling;

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• Elevation – Keeping the injured area raised higher than your heart also helps with swelling. These measures generally help within a few days, but if they don’t, then it’s time to seek medical attention. Another way to know if you need medical attention is what we call “mechanical instability.” An example of instability is if your knee was injured and it buckled or gave out when you tried to put weight on it. Instability usually means a more serious injury, and that’s a sign to see a doctor.

WEAR AND TEAR Another common cause of joint pain is arthritis. According to 2013 data from the CDC, one of every five adults in the United States reported being diagnosed with arthritis by their doctor. That same report found that half of adults aged 65 or older reported being diagnosed with arthritis. Arthritis happens when the natural padding and cushioning cartilage in our joints deteriorates as we age. The pain gets worse over time, with increasing stiffness and mobility problems as the joint wears out. One of the first steps that I recommend for my patients

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with arthritis is to take over-the-counter medications and supplements. One supplement in particular that I recommend is glucosamine. Clinical trials have demonstrated that about 60 percent of patients are helped by this. Compressive braces and hot packs can also treat the symptoms and pain associated with arthritis, but they ultimately do not remedy the underlying problem. We also have the option of treating arthritis pain in joints with anti-inflammatory drugs like corticosteroids, or by using a therapy called “viscosupplementation.” This treatment involves injecting Hyaluronan into the joint spaces. Hyaluronan is a natural component of the cartilage in your joints and injecting it there allows it to act as a natural lubricant. Lastly, when other measures are unsuccessful or unfavorable for someone with a deteriorated joint, we can replace it with an artificial joint. Replacement of knees, shoulders and hips is a common surgery, and at Owensboro Health Orthopedics, we make use of the best non-invasive procedures. These procedures include the reverse shoulder replacement method and the direct anterior hip replacement method. We utilize these methods because they’ve been shown to be less-invasive procedures. A less-invasive surgery means less blood loss and less tissue disturbance, and that translates into an easier, shorter hospital stay and recovery time. However, because any surgery is a major procedure, we don’t ever undertake it lightly, and it’s always used as a last resort.

SLEEP ON IT In addition to the major causes of joint pain listed above, there are other signs and symptoms that everyone should know about. One of these symptoms is persistent, worsening pain over time, especially pain that wakes you up at night. A good rule of thumb is that if it’s a joint pain that interferes with your sleeping, get it checked out. Pain under any circumstance is not a good thing, but nighttime pain is something we consider to be a special warning sign because it’s typically a more pathologic pain. That means that it’s a more intense, serious pain associated with a disease process or other problem, such as infections, tumor growth or other rare conditions that require attention.

YOU CAN CALL ON US If you have questions or concerns about joint pain, talk to your doctor. They can refer you to our office or you can simply call us up and make an appointment without a referral. You can reach us at 270-417-7940, and we’re located on the fifth floor of the Pleasant Valley Center at Owensboro Health Regional Hospital. Our number one focus is taking care of our patients, restoring their mobility and getting them back to living their lives. We want to make sure that your pain is a temporary thing and that we get you back to living your life as quickly as possible. www.OwensboroLiving.com

MAKE SUMMER FITNESS FUN

F

or most people, there is typically one main motivator for wanting to get in shape for the warmer weather months they want to fit into the smaller, more revealing clothing of the season. Whether it’s a new swimsuit they’d like to purchase in a smaller size or they just want last year’s shorts to fit more comfortably, getting a beach-ready body can often seem unattainable. But summer boasts an abundance of outdoor activities that take away the “chore” of getting in shape. Focus on the fun of the season, and before you know it, you will be fitting into your favorite summer wardrobe staples. “Now that the weather is warmer, people are outside training more,” said KT Tape Founder Jim Jenson. “It is important to have the proper training gear and equipment to avoid injury.”

GO TAKE A HIKE Nothing allows you to take in the peace and tranquility of nature more than a long hike. This summer, incorporate many long hikes into your weekly routine and build up your endurance with this beneficial cardio exercise. Check with your county and state parks for trails and expand on your hiking skills, advancing in difficulty levels and length as the season progresses. What it works: Hiking engages the quadriceps, hamstrings, calves and gluts. This activity also strengthens your abdominal core, especially while carrying a heavy pack.

B R E A K A S W E AT, C O U R T S I D E All you need to increase your heart rate is a basketball and an empty court at the local park or school playground. Practice shooting, normal dribbling, dribbling while doing sit-ups and dribbling behind the back of your legs. What it works: Basketball can be a full-body workout, but it mainly targets your triceps, shoulders, biceps and pectoral muscles.

GO FOR A SWIM While the summer days often bring about occasions to relax by the pool, there’s no reason not to jump right in. Take refuge from the sun’s heat and burn calories at the same time by swimming. This exercise is a top choice for those with physical limitations or who find simple cardio activities - such as walking, hiking or jogging - difficult or painful. What it works: Swimming works all major muscles groups, especially the shoulders, abdominals, legs, hips and back. J U N E / J U LY 2 0 14

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When the weather warms up and spending hours at the gym sounds less appealing, give a few of these fun activities a try. For more fitness tips, visit www.elivingtoday.com.

muscle groups. This type of cross training prevents overly stressing one area of muscle.

ALLOW THE BODY TO REST TAKE CARE OF YOUR MUSCLES By engaging in a workout routine, you’ve already proven that you care for your body. But do you have a care plan for the muscles that take you to your next level of fitness? Here are some ways to keep those hard working muscles in top shape so you can give it your all at every workout.

In order to achieve the maximum benefit of your workout, your muscles need proper nourishment. This means sleep is extremely important, but it also means resting for a few days in between workouts. A proper rest period will give muscles time to heal.

TO DAY ’ S T R E N D S I N F I T N E S S WARM UP AND COOL DOWN Regardless of the sport or activity you pursue, it’s always best to ease into it slowly and build your endurance as you go. Warming up can include light jogging, walking or performing the activity at a very slow pace. At the end of your routine, be sure to lightly stretch out each major muscle group you worked.

LISTEN TO YOUR BODY If you should experience any sharp or sudden pains while exercising, don’t ignore the warning signs. Working out through the pain may make a small injury much worse. As a general rule, if it feels wrong, stop the workout.

ENGAGE IN VARIOUS ACTIVITIES

For those who long for a little variety in their fitness routine, here are some new trends taking shape - for indoors and outdoors - that may be just what you need to take your fitness to the next level.

BODY WEIGHT TRAINING This new trend in fitness works by using your own body weight as resistance, which can help you shape muscles, tone, increase flexibility and ultimately, burn fat.

INTE RVAL TRAINING This routine is great for those who are short on time, requiring extreme exertion in short intervals followed by a shorter recovery time.

A body involved in different exercises will call on different

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ARTICLE BY

DANNY MAY PHOTOS BY

BRYAN LEAZENBY

What can you expect at ROMP? Excellent musicians, beautiful surroundings, friendly people, non-stop music, and 10,000 new friends.

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ROMP is more than banjos & dulcimers. This isn’t your granddaddy’s bluegrass! Well, strike that.

20-year old hipster cousin and your 10-year old kid and

Actually, part of it is. But it’s also progressive, folksy

paper, but it makes perfect sense at ROMP.

bluegrass like “Wagon Wheel” that you can hear on

Top 40 radio right now. In the 11 years since the River

this award-winning festival hosted right here in our

of Music Party (as it was originally called) began, folk

own backyard at Yellow Creek Park June 25-28th.

music has become the fastest growing musical genre in

The Roots

the world. “All we’ve got to do now is capitalize on that

they will also have a blast. That may look strange on

In this feature article, Owensboro Living highlights

“What we’re trying to do with ROMP is establish

popularity, and those who made it popular,” says

it as the go-to festival for the best emerging young

festival founder Gabrielle Gray. That is exactly the

musicians and pair that with the legends,” Gray says.

idea behind the name ROMP: Bluegrass Roots and

It’s that pairing that makes ROMP truly unique.

Branches Festival – honoring the roots and celebrating

ROMP takes special effort to pay homage to the

the offshoots. You can take your granddad and he

founding fathers of bluegrass in several ways, even

would feel right at home. But you can also take your

giving the remaining first generation musicians public

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recognition on stage. First of all, the lineup each year is a mix of traditional bluegrass pioneers, up-and-coming contemporary artists, and bands representing emerging genres. (Those would be the “branches.” We’ll get to them in a minute.) Then, to kick off the festivities, all the first generation musicians who are still able to travel and play will be invited to the “Legends Jam” to be held at the museum on Wednesday night from 6-8 p.m.

ROMP officially begins immediately

following the “Legends Jam.” Another reason that ROMP reaches out to the pioneers of bluegrass is to include them in “The Pioneers Project” video archive, which is being filmed at the International Bluegrass Museum. So far, the museum has filmed interviews with 268 out of the 270 original bluegrass band members.

The pioneers who can make it to ROMP will also perform

together on stage Thursday when the museum staff unveils this year’s hall of fame plaques.

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Right in their midst - literally at their feet - will be the

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new students at the museum, known as “The Kentucky Bluegrass All-Stars.” The Bluegrass Museum’s “house band” is composed of new beginners who are learning an instrument by taking lessons at the museum on Saturdays. Since the lesson program started in 2005, over 3,500 students have participated. Each year at ROMP, the All-Stars get a chance to perform a song on stage. It’s the museum’s way to regenerate those roots by bringing new players into the fold.

The Branches

Attracting a younger crowd is as equally important to ROMP organizers

as paying tribute to the forefathers of bluegrass. One of the first things Gray did to grow the festival was to form a street team mostly comprised of college

For a full schedule and lineup visit www.rompfest.com or call 270-926-7891.

students. “I simply asked them what bands they thought were cool. Who

To get a glimpse: start by watching the

would you and your friends love to see?” Gray explained. Once the “wish

video for “Satisfied” by the Boston Boys.

list” was formed, they got on the phone and started inviting those bands.

All the color shots were filmed live at

ROMP. All artists who are playing this

That kind of forward thinking has helped ROMP grow from the beginning.

Gray knows what she’s doing. She coordinated another festival before coming to the International Bluegrass Museum, so when she came to Owensboro, she

year have videos on the ROMP website by clicking on “lineup.”

brought that experience with her, plus a few new ideas. In its early years, the “River Of Music Party” drew crowds of up to three to four thousand fans.

The festival got a major boost in 2010, when Gabrielle proposed the idea

to broaden the scope by changing the name to “ROMP: Bluegrass Roots and Branches Festival,” rounding it out with jam bands, more big-name acts, and several lesser known bands that had a strong following of younger fans. With

Ticket Pricing: Advance weekend passes are available online or at IBM. Price goes up June 15th. Wednesday, June 25 - $15 Thursday, June 26 - $45

that approach, attendance grew from 4,000 in 2009 to 15,000 in 2010.

Friday, June 27 - $50

This year, Gray is implementing another new idea to attract college

Saturday, June 28 - $55

students: anyone enrolled in a university or college that has a focus for Americana or folk music can come to ROMP for free, provided they bring their instrument. The goal is to attract a large core group of young established

Award-Winning Event:

musicians, because that’s what will sustain ROMP in the future.

Kentucky Travel Industry “Top 10 Kentucky

“We want the brightest and the most talented up-and-coming musicians to

fall in love with ROMP,” Gray says. “We want them here, and we especially want them to meet new friends and play with other musicians while they’re

Festival or Event” Southeast Tourism Society “Top 20 Events in the Southeast”

here.” Hopefully, those students from all over the country will go back to their

2012 IBMA Event of the Year (International

campuses and tell all their friends about ROMP so the word keeps spreading.

Bluegrass Music Association) award out

By changing the name and broadening the focus, ROMP has greatly

of over 1,500 festivals.

widened its audience. With the worldwide surge in popularity of folk acts like

2013 Governor’s Award for the Arts

Mumford & Sons and Old Crow Medicine Show (who is playing this year!), ROMP truly has struck gold.

The Experience

Ask anyone who’s been to ROMP and they’ll tell you there’s nothing like

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A ROMP FEST love story

B

luegrass musicians are known for

the heart and soul behind their music,

so it’s no surprise this passion is passed from the musicians on stage to the heart “strings” of those around them. Many of you have undoubtedly felt the magic of ROMP, or have heard from others the joy this music can instill in your soul.

For past ROMP attendees Isaiah

and DeAnna King, this joy pulled them together and formed what is now a beautiful harmonic marriage.

Their story is sweet and organic;

having mutual friends and both attending ROMP, it seems like they were destined to meet.

“We had just set up camp and were

all hanging out when I first saw him,” she explained, “I thought, ‘he has a really nice smile and energy.’”

Hanging out during the festival, the

it! That’s music to the ears of festival organizers, who work extremely hard to make ROMP a one-of-a-kind experience. The result is a premier music

couple realized just how much they had

festival that has become a fan favorite to thousands of folk, roots, Americana,

in common. It didn’t take long until they

and Bluegrass fans that can’t wait to return year after year.

knew they were made for each other.

“There is no one who isn’t happy at ROMP,” says Katie Keller, who’s

been to ROMP five times. “It’s such a positive, fun atmosphere. I just

“We got married in the same spot that

we first set eyes on each other less than

love being there.” Keller now works in marketing for the International

five months after we met.”

Bluegrass Museum and gets a behind the scenes perspective into the work

and planning that it takes to make ROMP so memorable. Now she says it’s

Great taste in music, a drive for

life, and a spiritual connection that

one of her favorite weekends of the year and she wouldn’t miss it.

continues to bring them closer together

She’s not alone.

has provided Deanna and Isaiah with a

“I get excited about seeing my favorite bands, but my greatest excitement

lifetime of happiness and a foundation as they create their new life together in Colorado.

Open your hearts to the possibility of

love this June, and join the fun at ROMP

is getting to watch all the enjoyment that everyone else is having,” says Chris Langdon, who works at the Bluegrass Museum and volunteers every year at ROMP. “Knowing that we’ve all worked together to put on this event and then seeing people show up from near and far to enjoy it is the best feeling!

fest!

It’s just great!”

-Submitted by ROMP Festival

that spontaneously spring up are a trademark of bluegrass and folk festivals.

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ROMP is not just about the bands on stage. Impromptu jam sessions

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Several bands have actually evolved out of chance meetings

firemen are always on hand to keep everyone safe and handle

and jam sessions at the festival. (King’s Highway and Brotet

parking. Area chefs provide the food. Corporate sponsors love

for example.)

to bring their employees and friends to enjoy the festivities as

well. It truly is a community event.

The “After Party” is another great tradition at ROMP. Each

evening, following the performances on the main stage, the party continues with more bands playing on the front porch in the Pioneer Village section of the park.

Future Growth

To accommodate the growing crowds, the county is building

Between the main stage, the jam sessions, and the after

a permanent, covered stage that should be ready for ROMP

party, you literally can hear music somewhere in the park

2015. There is plenty of room to grow, but Gray says they

around the clock.

plan to cap tickets sales if attendance grows to 10,000 per day

Workshops

consistently.

As an added bonus, free workshops are offered throughout

explains. “We want to keep it manageable. It’s less comfortable

the weekend, covering everything from instrument lessons,

over 10,000 and it becomes more about making money and less

to songwriting, clogging, square dancing, yoga, and health

about the experience at that point. The way it is now, you can

seminars. The workshops have gotten more and more popular

work your way up to the front if you want, or you can set up

over the years and now have become one of the most sought-

a chair toward the back of the crowd or even set up a canopy

after features of the festival. Several of the world class musicians

along the very back if you want shade. You couldn’t do that

who perform on the main stage will present workshops, offering

if there were 20,000 people. We also couldn’t park them all.

fans a truly up-close-and personal experience to learn from the

There are several key elements that we want to keep nice.

masters.

Parking proximity is one, and also the other amenities like

Kids Too!

hand washing stations and really good food.”

Fred and Danielle Hillebrand coordinate the children’s area

other festivals. The extra attention by the volunteers and staff

and oversee a team of twenty volunteers who provide activities

makes a huge difference. There is also something for everybody;

for children, including puppet shows, storytelling, art projects,

from the family atmosphere to the late night after party, from

and a huge slip n’ slide.

traditional bluegrass to progressive bands, and everything in

Team Effort

between. No matter what you’re looking for, ROMP has it.

“We want it to be a good experience for everyone,” Gray

All of those elements are what make ROMP stand out above

It’s a winning combination, and anyone who has experienced

It takes a lot of dedicated people to make ROMP such

it is glad to share their little secret and invite you to join them.

a great event year after year.

The Daviess County Parks

Gabrielle Gray put it this way: “Creating an entire music scene

Department works incredibly hard to mow the grass, spray for

in a park setting that lasts several days, is all-intensive, and has

mosquitoes, take the trash away, and keep the park beautiful.

really good players from all over the world … what could be

EMTs, Yellow Ambulance, and Thruston Dermont volunteer

better?”

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CAREER HIGHLIGHTS 1999 AMA Supersport Champion & Grand National Dirt Track Rookie of the Year 2002 AMA Superbike Champion 2003 MotoGP Rookie of the Year 2005 Third in MotoGP World Championship 2006 MotoGP World Champion 2007-2013 Finished in Top Ten in Championship standings 6 times Total of 28 Podium Finishes in MotoGP

NICKY TRIVIA Favorite Film: Days of Thunder Favorite Actor: Denzel Washington Favorite Athlete: Michael Jordan Favorite Musical Artist: Jay-Z Favorite Vacation Destination: Florida Beach

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

MURPHY’S SEWING

QUALITY MACHINES, &CUSTOMER SERVICE A

re you looking for a great sewing machine at a great

Serving Owensboro from Triplett Street since 1951,

price with outstanding, personalized customer service?

Murphy’s is also well known for employing a friendly,

Then look no further than 420 Triplett Street, right here in

experienced staff. With the purchase of any sewing machine,

Owensboro. That’s where you’ll find Murphy Sewing Machine

the customer also receives unlimited operating instructions. So

Company. Since M.R. Murphy entered the sewing machine

whether you’re interested in sewing clothing, craft projects or

business in the 1930’s, Murphy’s has consistently provided the

quilts, the experienced team at Murphy’s can point you in the

residents of Owensboro with the area’s best selection of quality

right direction. Murphy’s also repairs and services all brands of

sewing machines, coupled with knowledgeable customer

sewing machines and vacuum cleaners.

service.

This year, Murphy’s Sewing Machine Co. is proudly

Murphy Sewing Machine Co. blazed an innovative trail

sponsoring the Owensboro Area Quilters Guild 2014 Quilt

when it introduced the zig-zag Necchi BU sewing machine

Show, “Every Quilt Tells A Story.” Held Friday, June 27 from

to the Owensboro area in 1947. Machines have come a long

9 a.m. to 5 p.m. and Saturday, June 28 from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. at

way since 1947. If you’re picturing an old Singer machine in

the Owensboro Convention Center, the show will feature over

your house, you might be surprised by the new machines that

300 quilts on display, as well as special guest speakers. During

can recommend the proper presser foot, determine the right

the show, Murphy’s will be hosting guest Janome Educator Lou

thread tension and stitch length, size and sew a buttonhole,

Ann Hartley. Ms. Hartley will conduct a demonstration each

and automatically cut the thread. Even with all the changes

day during the show at the Convention Center.

in sewing technology, Murphy’s proud tradition of staying at the forefront continues to this day. The store is now operated by M.R.’s son, Mort, and his wife, Barbara. They carry a wide variety of machines, so anyone from a novice to a professional is sure to find what they’re looking for. Basic sewing machine models start at $119 for the beginner, and top-of-the-line machines can be found for as much $11,999.

All new household machines come with a 2-year warranty,

as well as a 1-year 100% trade-up option. For example, if you pay $500 for a machine, Murphy’s will give you $500 credit for the machine to upgrade to a more sophisticated machine within the first year.

In addition to carrying several lines of quality sewing

machines, Murphy’s also proudly sells Sanitaire vacuums. With Sanitaire products, the consumer can achieve commercial cleaning performance in their home. The Sanitaire company only entrusts the retail sale of their vacuums to a select group of stores that provide high-quality products and service.

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EVEN WITH ALL THE CHANGES IN SEWING TECHNOLOGY, MURPHY’S PROUD TRADITION OF STAYING AT THE FOREFRONT CONTINUES TODAY. www.OwensboroLiving.com


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“WE WANT OWENSBORO TO BE KNOWN AS AN ALL-AMERICAN CITY… SMALL TOWN USA. WE WANT TO EMBRACE THE MILITARY AND OUR ARMED SERVICES. WE WANT TO BE A RED, WHITE AND BLUE COMMUNITY.”

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OUR RED, WHITE &BLUE COMMUNITY BY ASHLEY SORCE

I

ndependence Day, the most American of holidays, will be marked by parades, fireworks and backyard barbecues across

the country. This is typically no different for Owensboro, but this year we will have an even more special Fourth of July.

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The City of Owensboro has collaborated with other

organizations, including Friday After 5 and the Owensboro Convention Center, to offer families a truly spectacular evening of events.

“We want Owensboro to be known as an All-American City…

small town USA,” said Tim Ross, Director of Public Events. “We want to embrace the military and our armed services. We want to be a red, white and blue community.” Dean Dennis, General Manager of the Owensboro Convention Center, says the location of the new facility makes them the perfect partner to offer family fun on July 4.

“I think it’s important because of our location right on the

river with the fireworks happening literally right in front of the

OWENSBORO FOURTH OF JULY CELEBRATION: 4:30 P.M. – 9:30 P.M. 

LIVE MUSIC IN MCCONNELL PLAZA 5:00 P.M.

FRIDAY AFTER 5 Independence Day only falls on Friday every seven years, and Friday After 5 is sure to contribute to the Downtown celebration. Bands will play at the RiverPark Center outdoor plaza and courtyard and Kroger will sponsor a water balloon toss and hula hoop contest.

City’s new venue,” Dennis said. “With all the things the City has planned already, we are in the perfect spot to program some

5:30 P.M.

additional fun family things on that day. Venues like this provide

KIDS BIKE PARADE

a perfect opportunity to support these types of local events. We are

The City will host a bike parade for children aged 12 and

excited to be producing this event in conjunction with the City.”

younger. The parade will begin at 2nd Street and Locust

The events that the City has planned will be sure to offer

Street in Downtown Owensboro. Any non-motorized

families across the community a fun, safe celebration of our

modes of transportation, like bikes, scooters, strollers and

nation’s birthday.  

wagons are welcome to participate. Children are encouraged

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to dress up and decorate their bikes in everything red, white and

river, there will be a food and beverage area set up with seating

blue. (Owensboro Living has provided some tips for bike decorating

for the general public. A full service bar and food stands will be

below.) Secret judges will be looking at all of the decorated bikes,

available.  The Convention Center will also have some great All-

wagons, etc. to select one girl and one boy with the best decorations

American 4th of July treats, like fried chicken, mac and cheese,

for a special prize. It is the hope of the City that this event will tie

apple pie and much, much more. You can reserve an eight-person

kids to the patriotic spirit of Independence Day.

table inside the air conditioning and then walk out to watch the

Parents need to check-in for the parade at the tent by the video

fireworks, or rent your table outside on the terrace. Inside or outside

marquee at 2nd and Locust Streets to register their kids for the

tables are $40 (or $5 per chair). There will also be an alcohol-free

parade.  Goodies will be handed out to parade participants (12 yrs.

family section available for renting a table.

and younger) at the conclusion of the parade.

Upstairs, the Convention Center will host a wonderful VIP

viewing area that will offer valet parking, buffet dinner, great views

6:00 – 6:15 P.M. (AFTER THE KIDS BIKE PARADE)

of the fireworks, restrooms, air conditioning and a full cash bar

THE OWENSBORO CONVENTION CENTER 4TH FEST

for only $30 per person, tax included. Also, there will be a limited

At the end of the parade, families will be able to enjoy 4thFest,

hosted by the Owensboro Convention Center, which will last until

supply of corporate hospitality tables available. It will be the premier viewing location for the fireworks!

the fireworks begin. Participants will get a free drink and hot dog and then come inside and enjoy a wide variety of fun activities in

9:15 P.M.

the exhibit hall. There will be a lot of fun things for kids in a safe,

FIREWORKS OVER THE RIVER

air-conditioned environment.

Enjoy a spectacular firework display over the Ohio River!

On the lower terrace, outside of the exhibit hall and facing the

Ohio River

KIDS BIKE PARADE ROUTE - DOWNTOWN OWENSBORO

Smothers Park

W. Veterans Blvd.

Owensboro Convention Center FINISH W. 2nd St. START

Daviess St.

Allen St.

St. Ann St.

Frederica St.

St. Elizabeth St.

Locust St.

Cedar St.

Walnut St.

W. 3rd St.

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RIDE IN STYLE: TIPS FOR DECORATING YOUR BIKE Streamers are the most obvious way to decorate a bike. You could buy streamers in the bike accessory aisle at any big box store, but what’s the fun in that?! Make your own! You could use ribbon, strips of old fabric, party streamers, garland or small American flags.   Something you might not think to decorate are the spokes of your bike. One idea is to cover each spoke with a drinking straw. Simply slit the entire length of the straw so you can cover each spoke. Sparkly pipe cleaners could also work. Or, playing cards are a great option if you are looking for something that will make noise – and most cards will be in patriotic colors.   Don’t forget, safety first! Please wear helmets every time you ride your bike. These can be decorated too for more Fourth of July flair. Pipe cleaners can be used to make the helmet look like crazy hair or you could add flags and cut-out stars.   Be creative! Think about using balloons or battery-operated lights. Be sure to dress in red, white and blue for an even greater effect! And just because you are not riding a bike in the parade doesn’t mean you can’t participate. Decorate your wagon, scooter or stroller too!

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

MASTER’S DEGREES THAT FIT YOUR LIFESTYLE

A

re you considering furthering your education? Would a Master’s degree help you with a promotion or pursue a different career? If

so, consider the Master’s degree options offered at WKU in Owensboro.

“As a professional and mother of three, I chose WKU-O because it

offered the program I wanted to pursue in terms that accommodated my career and family. WKU-O is less than two miles from work. I can meet my responsibilities both at work and in the classroom with ease. It also provides me with access to computer labs, libraries and a smiling face when I have questions,” says Vicki S. Ellis, Master of Public Administration.

WKU-O MASTER’S DEGREES Master of Public Administration 39 semester hours | Face-to-face and online

Master of Business Administration 33 semester hours | Completely online

The MPA program is designed to prepare students for careers in the management of public and nonprofit organizations through a curriculum that emphasizes the study of organizational dynamics, the legal, ethical, and political context of public management, management techniques, and the analysis of public policies. The curriculum provides a balanced blend of both the practical and the theoretical approaches to the art and science of public administration. An internship is required of all students unless awarded credit based on previous professional experience. The goal of these courses is to help prepare students for a variety of professional positions. The strength of the WKU MPA Program is its versatility. It is a diverse program, which includes a full-time option and part-time option. This program is a perfect fit for students who are also employed in organizations including the military, law enforcement, other agencies of government, and nonprofits. Additionally, there are various opportunities for student engagement such as internships, networking opportunities, and professional conferences.

Many people, including many professionals and managers, cannot commit to a degree program where each class is 16 weeks, one night a week for two and a half hours for as long as two or three years.

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If taking your courses in a time-bound and place-bound program will not fit your busy lifestyle, the WKU Online MBA may be for you. The WKU Online MBA allows you to study part-time and/or fulltime, earning your degree in as little as 18 months or take up to 5 years. All Online MBA classes are bi-term – about 7 weeks. They are designed using “adult learning theory” - learners focus upon one class at a time. Many students take one course per bi-term (the equivalent of 2 per semester). Students who have more time on their hands can take one more course for a total of up to 3 in the 2 bi-terms that make up a semester at WKU. In a recent exit exam used nationally our Online MBA students scored in the top 10% in the nation for learning.

Professional Master of Business Administration 36 semester hourss | Face-to-face format; Saturday class meetings The WKU Professional MBA (PMBA) program is designed to help professionals and mid- to upper-level managers with 5+ years experience achieve their full potential as leaders. WKU’s PMBA program is ranked in the top percentages among MBA programs at US universities for the last two years for learning. The PMBA program includes both the WKU MBA degree and the WKU Leadership Certificate. The PMBA program is an AACSB accredited, “executive” MBA program WKU’s PMBA has just been ranked in the top 5% among MBA programs for a second time in three years. MBA programs across the US have their graduating students take the nationally standardized exam each year to see how their programs rank on learning. In 2011 PMBA students at WKU also scored in the top 5% on this national assessment of what students learned and can apply.

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ARTICLE BY

DANNY MAY

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I

t’s hard to imagine now, but the TV pilot for CSI:Crime Scene Investigation was actually passed over at first. But since the first CSI aired in 2000, it became so popular so fast that other CSI spinoffs began popping up left and right. Colleges and universities noticed a sharp spike in enrollment in forensic science classes. Jurors began expecting DNA results and hard forensic evidence at every trial. For better or for worse, all these unexpected outcomes became known as “The CSI Effect.” Owensboro Living decided to do our own investigation to see how Owensboro CSI practices compare to what we see on TV. Owensboro CSI Ken Bennett gave us a behind the scenes look into CSI at OPD.

THE PROCESS

THE GEAR

There are three CSIs at OPD. Any one of them

As for the equipment, OPD CSI vehicles are

could get a call to go to a crime scene at any time.

fully stocked with kits that are loaded with much

They are not assigned to a particular type of scene

of the same gear you see in the TV episodes: rub-

(like homicide, drug related, or burglaries, etc).

ber gloves, cameras, tape measures, tire track and

Instead, whichever CSI is in the office at the time

shoe print plaster kits, GSR (Gun Shot Residue)

of the call gets to investigate the scene.

kits, swabs to retrieve DNA or paint samples,

The CSI’s job is to locate evidence, collect it,

cones and markers to give perspective in photos,

process it, reconstruct the scene, and then docu-

tweezers and envelopes to preserve evidence left at

ment the evidence.

a crime scene, and various other things. They also

carry Tyvek suits that they wear if there is blood at

It’s also their job to process and catalogue any

evidence that comes in from a patrol officer, which

the scene.

happens a lot. This used to require a tremendous

So the bottom line is this, most of the gear and

amount of paperwork, but now it is done mostly

gadgets you see on TV are pretty much the same

by computer. Reports are sent to labs and results

things OPD uses as well. The difference is that

are sent back via computer.

OPD works on a very tight budget and isn’t quite

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as high-tech as CSI Las Vegas, Miami, or New York. Here’s

(automated fingerprint identification system) and get a

a comparison:

match immediately. WHAT THEY USE AT OPD:

WHAT WE SEE ON TV:

The same AFIS system, but they usually only run it

Fancy magic spray that detects blood.

through Kentucky and Indiana. A nationwide scan can be

WHAT THEY USE AT OPD:

done if needed. Most of the time it comes back within 15

Blue Star spray is standard operating procedure at OPD.

minutes but it can take up to a day. In real life, AFIS lists

It’s not too expensive and works like a charm. Even after

the top 20 most possible matches. It’s up to the analyst to

blood is wiped away, once the surface is sprayed with Blue

take that list and identify the match using minutia points.

Star, any trace of blood will turn bright blue and can be easily seen under low light.

WHAT WE SEE ON TV:

GSR swabs. WHAT WE SEE ON TV:

WHAT THEY USE AT OPD:

That really cool laser they use to determine a bullet’s tra-

Almost exactly the same as seen on TV. It comes standard

jectory

in every CSI kit at OPD. What it actually detects is bari-

WHAT THEY USE AT OPD:

um, antimony, and lead, which are found in gun powder.

String. Yeah, it works just as well and is a fraction of the

When the CSI swabs someone’s hand, or the barrel of a

cost. Actually, they also use a “trajectory rod” that is a long,

gun, etc., the kit is then sent to the lab for results.

metal, telescoping rod to help trace the bullet trajectory. It looks like an antenna off a CD player/radio. That, along

WHAT WE SEE ON TV:

with the string, will usually do the job.

DNA samples run through CODIS (combined DNA index system), which spits out results in a few minutes.

WHAT WE SEE ON TV:

WHAT REALLY HAPPENS AT OPD:

Fingerprints come back from the lab in 20 minutes.

In reality, DNA is sent off to a lab, which can take up to

WHAT THEY USE AT OPD:

6 months because they are so backlogged. That one hour

OPD gets bonus points for this one! They are very fortu-

stuff is just Hollywood.

nate to have their own print analyst on staff, which means they can process prints in-house instead of sending them

WHAT WE SEE ON TV:

off to the state lab like most police stations in Kentucky.

Bullets can be traced back to the gun that fired the round.

Because of that, OPD CSIs can actually get print results in

WHAT REALLY HAPPENS AT OPD:

as little as 30 minutes.

This is a little more complicated than TV. If a bullet fragment is found, along with the bullet shell and the suspected

WHAT WE SEE ON TV:

weapon, then ballistics can determine if the bullet was shot

Once you have a fingerprint, they run it through AFIS

out of that particular gun by matching the striations on

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the barrel and shell. That’s why CSI Bennett will sometimes

OWENSBORO LIVING

– What about the negatives?

spend all day reenacting a scene to trace the bullet trajectory to

KEN BENNETT

find a bullet or fragment out of a wall or ceiling. Very tedious.

pectations because they see it on TV, but they don’t understand

- People can be a little unrealistic about their ex-

why we can’t do it here all the time. Or, sometimes it’s the Next, I sat down with CSI Bennett for some Q&A.

opposite – they think if they see it on TV then it’s all garbage, which isn’t true either. The biggest negative is that prosecu-

OWENSBORO LIVING

- How does an officer become a CSI?

KEN BENNETT - Everybody starts out as a patrol officer for about

tors have to spend time explaining to the jury about the CSI effect. They didn’t have to do that before.

three years before they are eligible to transfer to another position. It’s not a promotion or a pay raise; it’s just a different job.

After a walkthrough at OPD, a tour of a CSI vehicle, and an in-

For an officer to make CSI, they go through a 10-week school

terview with CSI Bennett, it’s very clear that Owensboro CSIs

that is specifically related to evidence collection and crime

must always be on their game. They take their jobs seriously

scene reconstruction. We’ve all three got that certification.

and approach it with caution and thorough care. After all, this isn’t Hollywood - it’s the real thing.

OWENSBORO LIVING

– In your experience, what are some posi-

tives from the CSI effect?

If we’ve learned anything from the CSI effect over the last

– Because of these TV shows, people are more

14 years, it’s that interest in forensic science is at an all-time

aware of what we do, and it has caused departments everywhere

high. The evidence doesn’t lie, and those who find that evi-

to pay more attention to what’s done at crime scene investi-

dence must treat it as truth and protect it at all cost. If these

gations and reconstructions. It’s also brought more resources

three men are any indication, the truth is in good hands in

into evidence collection, which has helped all of us.

Owensboro.

KEN BENNETT

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

TRUN N E LL’S FAR M M AR K E T

CONSUMERS ARE IN SEARCH OF AN EXPERIENCE W

which allows us to meet their needs and form a relationship with them.“ That relationship is the cornerstone of the experience that Trunnell’s feels every consumer deserves and desires. The Trunnell’s mission is simple but meaningful: provide a “Remarkable Farm Experience” to every guest. At Trunnell’s, the team is working hard to develop lifelong relationships with their guests. Trunnell’s is continually expanding their locally-grown product selection, as well as

hether it’s the price of goods or the quality of

growing their farm entertainment area, “The Family Fun-

service, people are in search of value and an

Acre.” Trunnell’s co-owner, Julie Trunnell, states, “We pride

experience. People want to buy from places

ourselves in creating a truly entertaining farm experience

that make them feel good. Consumers are looking for

for every guest that visits our farm. We want our guests to

experiences for themselves and their families that will last a

become our fans, not just customers.”

lifetime. They are craving authentic, local experiences with

an emotional connection, whether through food, art, events

mile for each guest just comes naturally.  From the moment

or the combination of all three.

a guests steps out of their car, the farm should feel like it’s

Creating an experience that is memorable and

their own. Trunnell’s tag line is “Absolutely Fresh & Fun,”

enjoyable for every customer is just what one local business

which helps describe the atmosphere they create for their

in the Owensboro area is doing. Trunnell’s Farm Market,

valued guests.

located in Utica, Kentucky, is 100% focused on creating a

“Remarkable Farm Experience” for their customers. Noted

creating a pleasant customer experience. The project

for their consistent customer experience and exceptional

currently underway for the Fall 2014 will undoubtedly

service, Trunnell’s strives to provide their patrons with a

continue to take their “Remarkable Farm Experience” to

quality product. At Trunnell’s, consumers can be confident

the next level. Kevin Trunnell believes, “Our customers

that they will have a memorable experience, no matter in

are the reason we do what we do. We want every guest to

which season they decide to visit.

feel at home on our farm, and experience the beauty and

Owner Kevin Trunnell says, “Our goal is to listen to our

excitement it has to offer. Our aim is to always exceed our

customers and act upon the wants or needs they express.

guest’s expectations.” And they have certainly done so at

By listening to our customer, they know they are our guest,

Trunnell’s Farm Market!

Trunnell’s has created a culture where going the extra

Trunnell’s always tries to push the boundaries of

Visit www.trunnellsfarmmarket.com or follow them on Facebook to keep up with their 2014 remarkable experiences.

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BY STEVEN WILSON

SHE WAS MADE FOR THIS 42 OWENSBORO LIVING

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From a young age, Roxi Witt has been enthralled with the art of theatre. As a Rose Curtain Player at Owensboro High School, Witt was particularly drawn to musicals. In fact, after being a part of the production of Funny Girl, Witt says, “it was in my blood.” Still, after high school, Witt moved on to

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Murray State and aspired to pursue a political

career arc seemed to be moving away from

science degree and become a lawyer. But a

theatre and toward business, the opening of

drama class and some volunteer work with the

the Curris Center at Murray State coincided

school theatre reignited her passion for the

with Witt’s return to campus.

art. So Witt changed majors and graduated

opening, Witt was offered a job in the

with a degree in speech and theatre.

Curris Center office. This afforded Witt the

Logically, the next step was to find a job

opportunity to manage the operations of a

that utilized her theatre background, and

facility, including scheduling, working with

specifically, her passion for production. As

the custodial staff, and setting up and tearing

Witt put it, she liked to be behind the scenes,

down for events. While the position at the

“playing the king-maker instead of the king.”

Curris Center provided invaluable experience

But things didn’t go quite as she had planned.

in administration, Witt’s path to a career in

Having difficulty finding employment in her

theatre still wasn’t clear.

field, Witt obtained a teaching degree, and

After

returned to Murray State, where she earned

returning home to Owensboro, Witt began

a Master’s degree in business administration.

working for the West Kentucky Small

Unbeknownst to Witt at the time, her

Business Development Center. After eighteen

educational path was laying the groundwork

months, Witt then put her degree in business

for her future career.

administration to work as the economic

development director at GRADD, where

her

Master’s

and

“I IMMEDIATELY LOOKED AT MY DAD AND MY SISTER, AND SAID ‘THAT’S WHERE I WANT TO WORK.’”

PHOTO BY TAYLOR WEST

In a twist of good fortune, while Witt’s

obtaining

Upon its

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she stayed for eight years.

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During that period,

p.m. with casts totaling 180 kids, and “loving every

Witt enjoyed more free time, which she filled with

minute of it.”

volunteer work at Theatre Workshop of Owensboro

(“TWO”).

Though not paid for her time, Witt

when the City of Owensboro announced in 1988

willingly and happily performed the duties that a full-

that it had received a $4.5 million grant to erect a

time employee might otherwise have done. While

performing arts center. Upon hearing the news, Witt

volunteering at TWO, Witt staged and produced

recounts, “I immediately looked at my dad and my

six summer musicals. Seeing a need for a place for

sister, and said ‘That’s where I want to work.’” Once

children to become involved in the arts, she also

construction on the RiverPark Center was nearing

started the TWO youth theatre program.

completion, Witt wrote Rodney Berry the first of

In hearing Witt recount her volunteer days at

two letters, pitching herself as the ideal candidate

TWO, it quickly becomes clear that she cherishes

to work at the Center. Suddenly, everything was

her time there. As part of the youth theatre program,

coming full circle, as Witt found herself in a position

Witt says that two plays stand out, The Littlest Angel

to land her dream job as a result of her unique

and The Greatest Christmas Pageant Ever.

While

qualifications, including degrees in theatre and

organizing those productions, Witt remembers that

business administration. Apparently impressed with

she was working at GRADD from 8:00 a.m. to 4:30

her aggressive pitch, as well as with her educational

p.m., then rushing to rehearsal from 5:00 p.m. to 9:00

and career background, the RiverPark Center hired

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One of the turning points in Witt’s career came

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Witt in January of 1992 as director of operations.

up to the Center filled with school children eager to see

Since beginning work at the Center, Witt has also

a production. Often, their amazement at the RiverPark

worked as general manager, and is now the Executive

Center, and all that it has to offer, produces some pretty

Director of the RiverPark Center. Having been there

memorable quotes. Witt recalls one child in particular

from the start, Witt has witnessed countless unique

who, when walking over the brick pavers engraved with

events at the Center.

From hosting Broadway shows

the names of the Center’s patrons, asked “Are we walking

to wedding receptions to professional seminars, Witt

on graves?” Those candid moments, along with the joy

proudly proclaims that “No day is ever the same.” For

that comes with organizing events and productions at the

Witt, managing the operations of the RiverPark Center

Center, help Witt appreciate her job just as much today as

is akin to performing the duties she had previously done

when the RiverPark Center opened twenty-two years ago.

with TWO on a volunteer basis. And that same joy that

surfaced while she recounted her volunteer days at TWO

doesn’t always get to see all of the shows at the RiverPark

is apparent when Witt talks about her job today. In fact,

Center. And there are times when she admits to missing

she says “I can’t believe somebody’s paying me to do this!”

the hands-on aspect of producing a play or musical. Still,

Of all the events Witt has been a part of at the RiverPark

Witt says there’s never a dull moment, and if you ask the

Center, she unequivocally says that her favorites are the

Executive Director of the RiverPark Center what it’s like

school-day performances. For Witt, it is hard to match

coming to work there every day, she’ll tell you she “has the

the excitement that ensues when the yellow buses pull

best job in town.”

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Today, in taking on an administrative role, Witt

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PROMOTIONAL FEATURE

THE BAKERS RACK

THIS IS NOT YOUR mother’s china M

ost of us grew up in families where meals were shared around the table, using the “everyday” set of dishes. Everyday dishes were the inexpensive ones that, if broken, only caused a grumble from Mom and an order to clean up our mess. All the time, there was a display cabinet filled with “The China” - pretty plates and cups that saw limited action at best. In some instances, “The China” never made it out of the cabinet to serve or accent a meal. Mothers protected “The China” because it was fragile or historic, and children or husbands could not be trusted to keep from breaking it. Essentially, they became museum pieces, jogging memories of more refined times, or prompting imaginations of better living. Fear associated with the better sets of dishes caused us to avoid the use of handsome plates and cups to favor the plain and often boring sets we use everyday. Some people have given up on dishes altogether, and use only paper products to serve their meals. Not only is that wasteful, but our friends and family are important, and deserve better. With that thought in mind, a few of the leading china manufacturers have addressed their customers’ fears, and are now producing china that is far more durable than china from the past. So, after going years without use, china has now evolved to offer great-looking convenience to the modern home. Much of the modern china offered in today’s better stores is strong, chip-resistant and able to be cleaned in dishwashing machines without fear of damage or breakage. Many patterns may be used in microwaves, ovens and freezers as well (the ones containing metal in their decorative bands cannot be microwaved). In truth, modern bone china is more durable by far than stoneware-based “everyday” dishes. The end result is this: now you can use beautiful dinnerware that will make you feel better about your everyday life and your entertaining events without additional care or caution. Here is something few people know, but can change how we think about meal preparation: Many attractive serving pieces made of china, select earthenware and pewter (polished aluminum) can transport foods from freezer to oven to table, making meal preparation easy and appetizing. For instance, a casserole to be enjoyed later can be prepared ahead and put into its serving dish before going into the freezer for storage. From the freezer, it can be put into the oven for baking (350°F max), and then taken directly from oven to the table for serving. Very convenient! So, are you ready to make a change? Do you want a new atmosphere in your kitchen? Do you want to

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Bone china is much stronger than most people realize. Here, a medium-sized woman stands on a china teacup. It can support more than 200 pounds without breaking.

make your food look appetizing, your friends and family feel important when you join together? Check out your choices in modern tableware. Then treat yourself and others to everyday meals on real china. A life well-lived can be convenient as well! Another product that is starting to change is crystal. The beautifully clear, sparkling cut crystal prized for its beauty has also carried the reputation of being inconvenient, especially since the advent of the dishwasher. Many pieces of crystal have broken after going through hot wash cycles and returning to the relative cool of our kitchens. Broken crystal is disappointing and can be expensive to replace, so we place our best stemware on shelves to be admired for its looks alone. A transition is starting to take place that will change that practice. A few crystal producers are now formulating their crystal with titanium or platinum instead of the traditional lead. (The expansion of the lead in the heat of the dishwasher, and its contraction upon cooling causes breakage) The result is brilliantly clear crystal that can be cleaned in the dishwasher just like the rest of your tableware. You get great looks and easy convenience! Next time you visit The Bakers Rack, look for crystal displayed with Dishwasher Safe stickers on it. There are some beautiful new patterns waiting for you to enjoy. And they do not have to stay on your shelf to be appreciated.

This Kate Spade china is dishwasher safe, providing convenience along with its modern good looks.

Look for the Dishwasher Safe label before purchasing. The great majority of modern fine china should carry a similar label. J U N E / J U LY 2 0 14

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OWENSBORO’S NEW

SKATEPARK BY STUART PECK

SKATEPARKS ARE BECOMING A GROWING TREND ACROSS THE COUNTRY AS ADRENALINE SPORTS CONTINUE TO GAIN IN POPULARITY WITH SPORTING EVENTS LIKE THE X-GAMES AND OTHERS BECOMING MORE MAINSTREAM.

I

n a community that boasts a vibrant and booming

this population and creating this group a home and primary

riverfront, mountain biking trails, golf courses, soccer

location to practice and enjoy their sport is exciting!”

and softball complexes and other outdoor activities, soon

you can add skatepark to that list. A project that has been

but instead is a land of concrete, filled with hills, ramps and

in the making since 2012 is about to culminate with a grand

railings for the city’s skateboarding, BMX biking and inline

opening later this year.

skating community to rule.

“I believe it was time to give this user group a home,

is located on the corner of Parrish and Bluff Avenue in

as we have done with youth football, baseball and soccer,”

Chautauqua Park, and according to Rogers, the city intends

said Amanda Rogers, parks and recreation manager for the

to open it in June. A lot has happened to bring Owensboro to

Owensboro Parks Department. “Thinking about serving

this point. The idea of building a skatepark didn’t begin with

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The new park isn’t your typical grass and tree-filled space,

The $800,000.00 skatepark

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50 OWENSBORO LIVING

the first truckload of concrete.

pursue,” said Rogers. “Whether it is a park project,

After it was determined that the OZONE

sidewalk, street or other, there is always some level

wooden ramp being used by the skating community

of discussion and debate on priority.”

in Owensboro was not salvageable, some citizens

Then there’s the question of insurance and

requested that a new park be built. Rewind to April

what happens if someone is hurt. Rogers says the

26, 2012, when Mayor Ron Payne held a meeting

city’s insurance will cover the park, and city leaders

at the Sportscenter. The agenda for that meeting

consulted their insurance provider to get “direction

included gauging community interest and vetting

and input about design and operations” of the

the idea of a skatepark in Owensboro. Shortly after

park. In fact, according to Skatepark Association

the meeting, the City Commission decided there

International, skateboarding is safer than football,

was enough interest and support for the project to

basketball or baseball when you look at a total

provide the necessary funding. The Owensboro

number of injuries versus total participants.

Skatepark was born.

According to the site www.spausa.org skateboarding

As with any project, though, the skatepark

and inline skating injuries are more likely to occur

was met with dissatisfaction by some, especially

on uneven surfaces such as poorly paved streets or

community members who felt Owensboro’s money

crumbing sidewalks. Skateparks provide smooth

could be better spent someplace else.

surfaces to ride which creates a safer environment.

“As with any capital spending project, elected

officials are faced with tough decisions daily; as there

a new concept for Kentucky, and our city joins the

is no shortage of great ideas and worthy projects to

ranks of Louisville, Berea, Bowling Green and others

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Creating a skatepark for citizens to enjoy is not

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to offer this amenity for residents and visitors. In

contributes to Owensboro’s curb appeal because

fact, skateparks are becoming a growing trend

a skatepark wasn’t something the city had in its

across the country as adrenaline sports continue

park system. Expanding the parks to help find

to gain in popularity with sporting events like the

a home for the BMX bikers, skateboarders and

X-Games and others becoming more mainstream.

inline skaters adds to the value and flexibility of

Designed by Spohn Ranch, construction

the parks system, according to Rogers.

began in October 2013. The Los Angeles-based

company has created parks all over the country,

a parks system,” she stated. “They’re no longer

and even constructed courses for the Mountain

viewed as a passing fad for recreation, but have

Dew Tour and Red Bull. Now the company was

proven themselves to be a part of the recreational

challenged with creating a park that would meet

fabric of our world.”

the needs of our community.

Throughout the

Owensboro sees quite an economic impact

entire process, Rogers says the skating community

from sports and recreation tourism - an impact

has helped shape the look and design of the park.

to the tune of approximately eight million

“We wanted the body of users to help us determine

dollars ($8,000,000.00) a year from direct and

what elements and style would best suit our

non-direct revenue, according to Rogers.

community,” she said. “How the park layout and

the parks department plays a major role in that

elements should be prioritized and how the park

sector.

should flow.”

outdoor activities bring visitors to town who

She also says adding this amenity really

stay in Owensboro hotels and eat at Owensboro

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“Skateparks are no longer viewed as trends in

And

Tournaments and festivals and other

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restaurants. Those impacts have not gone unnoticed by elected officials. In addition to potentially bringing in out-of-town visitors, it will provide a place for kids to go and practice a sport they’re passionate about. Providing a skatepark could mean fewer kids skateboarding on private property or on busy public streets. Will it mean you’ll never see another skateboard outside the new skatepark? Probably not, but Rogers hopes it provides a safe place.

“Remember for many, skateboarding is a hobby, sport

and a mode of transportation,” Rogers said. “I do not think it will create a community where no one on a skateboard is ever seen on a public street or on private property. I do think there will be a significant shift.” There are still a few things to finish up with the skatepark, such as sidewalks and landscaping, but a grand opening for the new park is being planned and could be held as early as mid-June. Hours of operations and other rules and regulations are currently being developed and will be available as the park gets closer to its grand opening.

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“Every saint has a past...Every sinner has a future! ”

BUILDING HOPE

WE HAVE ALL DONE IT. WE HAVE LOOKED AT THE WEEKLY CHURCH ATTENDER AND ASSUMED THAT THEY HAD IT ALL TOGETHER, THAT THEIR LIFE BEHIND THE SCENES WAS PERFECT, AND THEIR PAST SPOTLESS. THEN WE HAVE LOOKED UPON THE ADDICT AND THE INCARCERATED WITH EITHER PITY OR DISDAIN. THE FRIENDS OF SINNERS MINISTRY WAS ESTABLISHED ON THE BELIEF THAT, REGARDLESS OF ONE’S PAST, “WE ARE ALL EQUAL AT THE FEET OF JESUS.” BY Y D O L E M E C WALLA

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F

riends of Sinners uses the lives of those who have overcome addiction, along with Biblical principles and discipleship, to come alongside those that have been consumed by drug and alcohol addiction. While most of the participants come directly from jail and are court-ordered to enroll in a recovery program, there is a set of detailed criteria and a structured evaluation process that each candidate must meet. In order to be considered for the program, candidates may not be violent or sexual offenders, and must complete a thorough application and interview process. The staff and board then pray about the candidates to ensure that they are committed to change and recovery and are not simply “going through the motions.” Born from a dream that founder Roger Chilton experienced over five years ago, Friends of Sinners functions more as a recovery center rather than a treatment center, as it has no certified counselors on staff. Instead, participants commit to a twelve-month

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residential program along with six months of aftercare. Rather than assign counselors, one of the real strengths of the program is that participants are paired with a recovered addict as well as a disciple of Christ, with whom they spend no less than an hour a week. Although the original vision for the program included having homes for both men and women, when the program was conceived in 2009, there were initially only homes for male participants. There are now four men’s houses in operation on Clay Street. In 2011, the first women’s house was established. The small, twobedroom, one bath home is situated on West 11th Street and houses five women. Friends of Sinners brings a wealth of hope to the men and women of our community in that it offers an over 70% success rate in one year in comparison to traditional recovery programs (such as Alcoholics

Hensley, a former addict who spent twenty-three years in and out of various recovery programs, is a testament to everything the program stands for. After experiencing multiple setbacks and enduring trials of great measure, Cindy did not feel truly healed and transformed until she experienced the Celebrate Recovery program (a faith-based version of the 12 Step Program) six years ago. Where the 12 Step Program believes that there is a higher power that one should seek, Celebrate Recovery teaches that Jesus is the only higher power. Following her recovery, Cindy felt an immediate pull to the Friends of Sinners ministry. At the time, there was no FOS women’s ministry, so Cindy began making and delivering food to the men in recovery. Then in 2011, she left her position in car sales to become the women’s ministry director. One of the many blessings

Anonymous and Narcotics Anonymous), which typically boast annual success rates in the first year of 30% at best. Their success is so evident in fact that “community leaders from other areas want to replicate what we are doing,” says Chilton. A large part of the success of Friends of Sinners is due to those individuals that have successfully overcome addiction and have felt called to become part of the ministry. Cindy

Cindy has experienced in her almost 6 years of recovery is that of reconnecting with her 26-year old daughter, who now occupies a small closet-sized bedroom in the women’s house in order to provide 24-hour support and supervision. Cindy has an incredible heart for the women that reside in the house as she understands so many of the struggles they are going through. Many of these women come from “generational addiction,” where a lifestyle of addiction is all

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they know. They do not know how to be a loving parent, were not taught how to balance a checkbook, pay their bills on time, or how to properly cook a meal. Friends of Sinners provides these women (and men) with those skills and so much more. Recently a resident was able to acquire her first driver’s license and, while visiting the house, I was able to see the smile beaming from one of the women’s faces as she proudly shared that she had learned how to mow the lawn for the first time. Cindy takes great pride in the fact that they are doing “more than teaching them how to live without drugs, (they

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are) teaching them how to live period.” Although the establishment of the women’s house has been incredibly successful, the biggest concern now is space. When five women are residing in the house, they are all bunked together in one bedroom. Just try to envision two sets of bunk beds, one twin bed, one armoire, and multiple plastic drawers all compacted into one bedroom of your home. Now imagine five grown women sharing that space. Even though the ladies seem to make the best of their circumstances, as it is so much better than other alternatives, “women have different needs than men…they are nesters (and) they take pride in their personal space.” The ministry has looked at homes all over the city that would be appropriate for the women and provide more space. However, by the time the work was put in to renovate these properties in order to ensure that they were ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act) compliant, the total cost would just be too high. Recently, the ministry received an incredible answer to prayer. A generous family in the community donated three adjacent lots located across from the Wendall Foster Center to serve as the location for the new women’s house. Tentative plans have been designed to build a two-story house with

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four bedrooms and a bathroom upstairs, and an open living and dining area downstairs. This open concept would allow families and children to gather and visit comfortably. Where the current house can tightly occupy five women, the new house will be licensed to accommodate twelve. However, it will initially begin with six residents and offer a transitional room, as well. A home of this size will greatly increase the current capacity of healing that this ministry provides, but a build of this magnitude cannot be accomplished without tremendous support from the community and compassionate individuals. This type of support has been the key all along to enabling the ministry to aid those who had been labeled as “potential hazards to society” and helping to transform them into “productive members of society.” According to Carol Adkins, a faithful supporter and former board member of the ministry, “Recovered addicts are very passionate people, especially when they find God.” And there is nothing like “seeing someone’s life transformed, seeing them get custody back, homes, jobs…their whole countenance changes.”

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WHAT YOU CAN DO TO HELP: The approximate cost of construction and completion on the new Friends of Sinners’ Women’s House is an anticipated $250,000. Since the ministry receives no state or federal funding, and depends solely on community and local church support, monetary donations are greatly needed and appreciated. There will be several upcoming fundraisers, including a “Purchase a Brick Paver” project. However, there are many other ways that you can support this meaningful endeavor. The following items and services are needed for donation: Construction supplies, such as: lumber, paint, materials, etc. Labor: Plumbers, contractors, electricians New furniture New appliances New carpet Although a general contractor has generously offered to volunteer his time to oversee the project, there is still a need for experienced individuals that are willing to donate their time and labor to assist with construction and installation. If you are able to donate or help to reduce the cost of any of these items, or provide labor, please contact Cindy Hensley at (270)683-7007.

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A NEW LIFE

NEW LIFE BY JAIME Y T RAFFER

Life adopted the mission of becoming a “Church for the Community.” Associate Pastor Jon Bailes arrived in January of 2014. Jon admits while his service in the position has only been a few months, the church has embraced him. Like many churches, New Life has small-group Bible studies and worship service opportunities, but that’s not necessarily what differentiates them from other congregations. It’s their desire to reach out through community programs that drives their endeavors. Those endeavors are going a long way toward helping people on the West Side of Owensboro and Daviess County. The outreach efforts of New Life Church include: A Simple Path; Adrienne’s House; New Life Thrift Store; Soup Kitchen; Food Cooperative; and Clothes Closet.

NEW LIFE CHURCH (NLC) MIGHT LOOK LIKE YOUR AVERAGE CHURCH, SITTING ON A BEAUTIFUL CORNER LOT OF 4TH STREET AND CRABTREE AVENUE. BUT WHEN YOU FIND OUT WHAT NLC IS ALL ABOUT, YOU KNOW THEY ARE ANYTHING BUT AVERAGE.

I

f you look at NLC’s website (http://owensboronewlife.com/mission-statement/), you will find the following scripture and church mission: “And the King will reply, ‘I tell you the truth, when you did it to one of the least of these my brothers and sisters, you did it to me!’” Matthew 25:40 (NLT) “At New Life Church we believe that God has called us not only to meet the physical needs of the community, but also the spiritual. New Life Church exists to lead each person we come into contact with into a deeper understanding of and relationship with Jesus Christ.” New Life began as Crabtree Avenue Baptist in 1942 as a church plant by First Baptist Church. Pastor Todd Camp came to NLC in 2005, and began serving in the lead role. Upon Camp’s arrival, New

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A Simple Path is a non-profit entity that partners with NLC. The goal of Simple Path is to educate and equip the community’s homeless to be healthy and self-sufficient through food and nutrition training, as well as physical and spiritual nourishment. Each Friday, after two days of training and food prep, they serve the public a delicious lunch on a donation basis. All funds are put back into the program, and enables A Simple Path to grow their number of students. Adrienne’s House is operated by A Simple Path and housed on New Life’s property. It is Owensboro’s only walk-in emergency shelter for homeless women and their children in the community. The program accepts any woman who needs a place to sleep. The goal of the mission isn’t just to provide a bed, but to meet them with love and hope, not judgment, while providing them them a safe place to stay. The service doesn’t end with providing shelter. For those women requiring longer than an

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evening stay, Adrienne’s House utilizes their talents to find

taining foods. Members of the cooperative meet every other

work at A Simple Path’s kitchen, New Life Thrift, or one

week, unload the truck, sort the food, and engage in a time

of the other unique ministries within New Life Church.

of fellowship and education. Each member pays a one-time

The vision is to build this community and eliminate

fee of $5 to join the cooperative, and pay $3 every other

homelessness one person at a time. In the near future, the

week, when they receive between 40-50 pounds of food,

program is looking to provide resource classes that will

depending on family size. According to the NLC website,

teach each lady how to get back on their feet. Adrienne’s

applicants must receive an income within the Emergency

House exists on the donations of our community, and there

Food Assistance Program and USDA Limits.

are many needs. For more information on this ministry, go

to their website: www.asimplepath.wix.com

to those in need of clothing, each Thursday from 5-7pm.

New Life Thrift is a non-profit store that generates rev-

New Life is more than brick and mortar on Owens-

enue that is funneled back into the community. Through

boro’s west side, it has hands and feet that are reaching into

this mission, people are helped and are invested in. One

our community to provide for the spiritual, emotional and

person at a time, lives are changed and can be improved

physical needs of the people of our city.

through such ministries.

Associate Pastor, Jon Bailes, describes he and Pastor

New Life Thrift continues to grow while offering high-

Todd’s roles as utility pastors. Much like a Swiss Army

quality basic necessities to the community at a minimal

knife, “Sometimes you’re a file, other days you’re the

cost. New Life Thrift boasts a large inventory, due to gen-

knife.” They work to fulfill the needs of the people by be-

erous community donors, that includes clothing, house-

ing flexible in the ministry to which God calls them.

wares, small appliances, and furniture. Your donations al-

If you are looking for a church to become involved, look

low New Life to keep prices low and to invest in the lives of

at New Life. Not only do they provide a place to worship

those in need or using this ministry.

and grow in your faith, but also to put those principles into

The Clothes Closet, located inside the church, is open

Pastor Todd Camp is not only the pastor of New Life,

action through service with their many ministry opportu-

but he is also the founder of the thrift store. He says, “My

nities. Pastor Bailes, says, “We will find you something to

heart belongs to the west-end residents of Owensboro. My

do!”

life purpose & mission is to help those in poverty, whether

it is physical, emotional, or spiritual in nature!”

“Therefore, if anyone is in Christ, the new creation has come: The

Camp says, “Over the past 9 years we have fed and

old has gone, the new is here!”

clothed thousands of people. We strive to be a conduit for

grace, hope, and purpose. We have helped many with their

because at New Life they are in the business of provid-

faith journey. We believe that we are to be salt, light, and

ing people the opportunity to be enriched through faith,

leaven to our community. The thrift store helps us achieve

hope and love. They embrace the idea that Christ can use

these goals by providing much needed financial support for

your past to make a future. You are invited to help create

our ministries. You can help by donating your gently used

new lives or become a new creation in Christ at New Life

items, and volunteering your time.”

Church.

New Life also offers a Soup Kitchen, serving approxi-

New Life lives by 2 Corinthians 5:17:

There is proof that they indeed hold to this scripture,

New Life Church would like to thank the many volun-

mately 1,200 meals per month. Every Tuesday and Thurs-

teers from the community and other churches that make

day evening at 6:00 p.m., they invite anyone in need of a

all of the ministries at NLC happen. Without them, there is

hot meal to come. Volunteer opportunities are always

no way we could serve as effectively as we do. It is a blessing

available.

and we are so thankful for them!

New Life Church has also begun a Food Cooperative in

For more information or to visit: New Life Church,

partnership with Owensboro Christian Church. The pro-

400 Crabtree Ave., Owensboro, KY 42301, 270-683-5626,

gram promotes food security, educational opportunities,

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THE

DISH

{by: jaime rafferty}

SWEET TIPS FOR A FABULOUS

4TH OF JULY HOST A PATRIOTIC BASH WITH DAZZLING DESSERTS

It’s easy to throw a 4th of July party that looks like you worked on it for weeks, even if you just started the planning process. Celebrate the holiday in style by serving classic entrees everyone loves and focusing your attention on delicious, easy-to-make desserts. With the right recipes, your sweets will be as captivating as the colorful spectacle of fireworks above.

HOT CINNAMON FIREWORKS CAKE: Crushed cinnamon drops add color and a slight hot cinnamon flavor to the inside of the cake, while simple melted candy details make the cake look like a firework bursting.

NO-BAKE CHEESECAKE STAR POPS: Fun star-shaped pops of no-bake cheesecake will be a hit with adults and kids alike. Drizzled or dipped in melted Candy Melts candy, these festive star pops are easy to shape in star-shaped silicone treat molds.

MIXED BERRY AND LEMON MINI ICEBOX CAKES: Sweet, light and airy, these mini icebox cakes pack a refreshing burst of creamy flavor, perfect for the summer. Vanilla wafer cookies are stacked in a flavor-filled mixture of fruit and whipped cream and refrigerated until ready to serve.

QUICK PICKLED STRAWBERRY HAND PIES: Pies you can hold in your hand are perfect for a picnic, and this one has a special flavor. With the current love affair with all things pickled, we filled the pies with a pickled strawberry filling. The filling balances sweet and sour for an uncommonly delicious mini pie your party guests will love.

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HOT CINNAMON FIREWORKS CAKE NO-BAKE CHEESECAKE STAR POPS Yield: 12 servings

Yield: 6 servings

Ingredients:

Ingredients:

2 3/4 cups all-purpose flour

2

1

1/2 teaspoon salt

2

cups (4 sticks) butter, softened

2

cups granulated sugar

6

eggs

1 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract

teaspoons baking powder

1 bottle (6 ounces) Cinnamon Drops, crushed

envelope (2 1/4 teaspoons) unflavored gelatin

1/4 cup granulated sugar

3/4 cup boiling water

1

package (8 ounces) cream cheese, softened

1

teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1/8 teaspoon salt

1

bag (12 ounces) royal blue Candy Melts candy

Lollipop Sticks

1

box (1.5 ounces) Blue Colorburst Batter Bits

1

cup sifted confectioners’ sugar

3

to 4 tablespoons milk

Prepare 6-cavity Mini Star Silicone Mold with

Red, white and Royal Blue Candy Melts candy, melted

vegetable pan spray. In small bowl, combine gelatin, sugar and water; whisk until completely dissolved.

Red, white and blue colored sugars

In large bowl, beat cream cheese, vanilla and salt

YOUR PARTY PLANNING CONFIDENCE WILL SKYROCKET WITH THESE DELICIOUS DESSERT IDEAS FROM THE WILTON TEST KITCHEN. FOR MORE FUN AND FESTIVE PARTY IDEAS, VISIT WWW.WILTON.COM.

with electric mixer until smooth. Gradually add Preheat oven to 350°F. Spray Dimensions Cascade

gelatin mixture, beating well. Scrape bottom

Pan with vegetable pan spray.

and sides of bowl. Continue beating until fully

In large bowl, combine flour, baking powder

combined. Pour into prepared pan. Refrigerate 2

and salt. In second large bowl, beat butter and

hours or until completely set. Carefully unmold

sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs one at a

cheesecakes onto cookie pan. Melt small amount

time, scraping bottom and sides of bowl often.

of Candy Melts candy. Dip lollipop stick in melted

Add vanilla; beat until well combined. Add flour

candy and insert 3/4 way into cheesecake stars.

mixture and beat at low speed until just combined.

Freeze 30 minutes or until firm. In large bowl,

Fold in Cinnamon Drops and blue Batter Bits.

melt remaining Candy Melts according to package

Pour into prepared pan; smooth out top. Bake 60

directions. Drizzle or pipe candy over cheesecake

to 65 minutes or until toothpick inserted in center

stars as desired. Refrigerate 10 minutes or until set.

comes out clean. Cool in pan 10 minutes on cooling

Keep refrigerated until ready to serve.

grid. Remove from pan and cool completely. In large bowl, whisk together confectioners’ sugar and

Note: Some cream cheeses are firmer than others. Firm is

milk. Drizzle melted candy onto cake to look like

best for this recipe. Choose a brand name, full fat cream

fireworks. Sprinkle sugars onto melted candy.

cheese for best results.

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MIXED BERRY AND LEMON MINI ICEBOX CAKES

and liquid reduces to 1 cup, about 20 to 25 minutes. Gently mash berries with wooden spoon. Transfer to medium bowl

Yield: 12 mini cakes

and cool completely. In large bowl, whip

Ingredients:

cream on medium-high speed until cream

2

holds stiff peaks, about 4 to 5 minutes.

2/3 cup granulated sugar

Gently fold in berry mixture and zest

2

tablespoons fresh lemon juice

until completely combined. Place whipped

2

cups fresh or frozen mixed berries

cups heavy whipping cream

cream in decorating bag and cut off pointed

1

tablespoon lemon zest (about 1 lemon)

end. To assemble, pipe small amount of

1

package (4.9 ounces) vanilla wafer cookies

cavity. Lightly press a cookie into whipped

Blueberries, raspberries or blackberries, for garnish

and cookies until cavities are full, finishing

whipped cream mixture into each muffin cream. Continue layering whipped cream with whipped cream layer. You should have

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Line muffin pan with plastic wrap, pressing

3 layers of cookies. Cover with plastic wrap

plastic into each cavity and letting plastic

and refrigerate overnight. Remove pan from

hang over edge of pan. In large skillet,

refrigerator. Remove plastic wrap from top

combine mixed berries, sugar and lemon

and carefully flip out onto serving platter.

juice. Bring to a gentle boil over medium

Remove wrap from mini cakes. Garnish

heat. Reduce heat to medium-low and

with additional berries, if desired. Serve

continue simmering until berries soften

immediately.

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QUICK PICKLED STRAWBERRY HAND PIES Yield: 8 hand pies Ingredients:

1

3/4 cup water

1

1/4 teaspoon salt

10

5

cup red wine vinegar cup sugar, plus additional for sprinkling black peppercorns sprigs fresh thyme, plus 1/2 teaspoon roughly chopped fresh thyme leaves, divided

1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract

1

pound fresh strawberries, hulled and cut into quarters (or eighths if berries very large)

3

tablespoons cornstarch

1

egg

1

package (14 ounces) refrigerated pie crusts In small saucepan, stir together vinegar, water, 1 cup sugar, salt and peppercorns. Add thyme sprigs. Cook over medium heat, stirring occasionally, until boiling; let boil 3 minutes. Remove from heat and stir in vanilla. Pour over cut strawberries, until fully submerged in liquid. Cover and let sit at room temperature 4 to 8 hours. Preheat oven to 400째F. Line cookie pan with parchment paper. Strain strawberries from pickling liquid and discard peppercorns and thyme. Toss berries with cornstarch until evenly coated. In small bowl, whisk egg with 1 tablespoon water until smooth. Unroll pie crusts and cut with 3 1/2-inch round cutter. Each crust yields 8 rounds. To assemble pies, top half of rounds with about 3 tablespoons of berry mixture each. Brush edges of rounds with egg wash. Cut out a hole or pierce remaining rounds with fork. Place on top of berries. Using a fork, press edges of crusts together tightly to seal. Transfer to prepared cookie pan. Brush tops of pies with egg wash and sprinkle with granulated sugar. Bake 18 to 22 minutes, or until pies are lightly golden and filling is bubbling. Cool slightly before serving.

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THE

SCENE

ACTIVE

LAKEWOOD VALLEY TRIATHLON June 14 | Whitesville Competitors swim 1/2 mile, bike a 15-mile ride over country roads, and run 3 miles around the lake in Whitesville, KY, just 18 miles east of Owensboro. For more information, visit www.owensboroymca.org or call 270-926-9622.

ARTS

ROMP: BLUEGRASS ROOTS AND BRANCHES FESTIVAL

TWO PRESENTS “GUYS & DOLLS”

June 26 – 28 | Yellow Creek Park The 11th Annual River of Music Party brings three days of bluegrass music! Thursday will bring jamming and storytelling at the Museum. Thursday, Friday and Saturday nights bring concerts by some of the best performers in bluegrass to Yellow Creek Park. This year’s lineup includes: Ricky Skaggs, Old Crow Medicine Show, Sam Bush, Del McCoury, Doyle Lawson, David Grisman Folk Jazz Trio, Railroad Earth, Wood Brothers, Sarah Jarosz, Pokey LaFarge, Noam Pikelny & Stuart Duncan. For a complete lineup, visit the festival website at http:// www.RompFest.com.

June 13 – 22 | The Empress Set in Daymon Runyon’s mythical New York City, this oddball romantic comedy — considered by some to be the perfect musical – soars with the spirit of Broadway. For more information, call 270683-5333 or visitwww.theatreworkshop.org

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DOWNTOWN

FRIDAY AFTER 5 Every Friday from 6 – 10 p.m. | RiverPark Center Owensboro’s signature summer-long, free music festival will feature 50 bands, five venues, more than two dozen Class “PreUnions,” and grows to include all of the resort-quality Smothers Park and McConnell Plaza on the Owensboro Riverfront.

FREE BLUEGRASS

ON THE BANKS

First and third Tuesday of each month through October Smothers Park Overlook The city of Owensboro brings back Bluegrass On The Banks, showcasing bluegrass music.

FREE DOWNTOWN

FREE LIVE

ON THE BANKS

Every Saturday through the summer | Smothers Park Enjoy a mixture of live music every Saturday on the Overlook Stage in Smothers Park.

FREE MARVEL

MOVIE MADNESS

June 28 from 9 – 11 p.m. | McConnell Plaza Movies featuring comic book superhero characters on an inflatable screen with surround sound. Food vendors will be available. Bring chairs or blankets and enjoy a movie in the night air. For more information, contact 270-687-8350.

CRUISE IN

Every first Saturday from 4 – 9 p.m. | Downtown Owensboro Head Downtown every 1st Saturday from April to October and enjoy classic cars! Free admission and fun for the whole family!

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THE

SCENE

FAMILY

DAZZLING DAYLILY FESTIVAL FREE

SUNDAY MOVIES ON THE RIVER “FROZEN”

June 1 from 8 – 9 p.m. | RiverPark Center Bring a lawn chair and enjoy “Frozen” on the BB&T Plaza at RiverPark Center. Concessions are available. Movies begin at dusk. For more information, contact RiverPark at 270-687-2770 or visit www. riverparkcenter.com

TRUNNELL’S FAMILY FUN-ACRE

open Daily thru June 30 Free Admission to the Family Fun-Acre & Animal Barnyard. Mining Sluice Adventure (Fossil, Gems, or Arrowheads).

MARKET DAYS

June 7 – 8 and July 5 - 6 | Preservation Station Preservation Station Market Days are held the first weekend of every month, Saturday 8 a.m. – 4 p.m. and Sunday 12 p.m. – 4 p.m. with over 65 vendors of antique, vintage, handcrafted, and customized items, live music, and food. Preservation Station Market and Event Center, 9661 Highway 56. Call 270-215-1045, go to www.visitpreservationstation. com, or find us on Facebook.

OWENSBORO FARMERS MARKET

Between 40-45 vendors are expected this season for fresh-from-the-farm produce at three satellite locations: Tuesdays, 1:30 - 4:30 p.m. | Owensboro Health Regional Hospital, 1201 Pleasant Valley Road Wednesdays, 7:30 - 10:30 a.m. | New Life Church, 400 Crabtree Avenue Fridays 2 - 5 p.m. | Nona’s Downtown Market, 126 E. 2nd Street

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June 21 – 28 | Western Kentucky Botanical Gardens The Dazzling Daylily Festival brings beautiful blooms plus multiple activities for everyone to enjoy! Balloons Over the Garden will return as well. Check the Western KY Botanical Garden’s website for a complete schedule.

LANHAM BROTHERS JAMBOREE

June 14 from 7 – 9 p.m. | Diamond Lake Resort This family-fun and interactive show will feature Bluegrass, Country, Clogging and Comedy. The Jamboree will be held in the Good Time Theater at Diamond Lake Resort. Tickets are general admission at the door and are $10 per person, $5 for ages 6-12 years and 5 years and under are free. Discounts offered for groups of 15 or more people. Group tickets may be purchased by calling 270-314-4331. For more information, visit www.lanhambrothersjamboree.com

MOONLIGHT RIDE

June 13 at 7 p.m. Calling everyone who enjoys riding a bike OR wants to supports an amazing cause! The first annual Moonlight Ride is a can’t miss event, and participants will have the opportunity to ride around Owensboro while impacting lives all over the country, and families right here in Owensboro. All proceeds go to benefit St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital. Start the evening with a party from 7 – 9 p.m., followed by a moonlit bicycle ride of 12 miles around the city beginning at 10 p.m. For more information, contact 270-687-8350.

OWENSBORO DANCE THEATRE’S SUMMER INTENSIVES

June 16 - July 18 A different teacher each of the five weeks, including guest teachers from Chicago and Atlanta. For intermediate to advanced dancers ages 11 to adult.

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KIDS

OPEN BOUNCE NIGHTS

Tuesdays, Wednesdays & Fridays | U-Bounce The perfect party place for kids. Amazing inflatables in an unbelievably cool bounce stadium. Private, clean and climate controlled. All children must wear socks. $7 per child, children under 2 are free, unless they are the only child, adults always free; On Toddler Tuesday, children 5 and under get in for $5 all night. Tuesday and Wednesday 5 – 8 p.m. and Friday 5 - 9 p.m. (270) 685-1255 or ubouncepartyhouse.com.

FREE

STORYTIMES

Mondays & Thursdays | Daviess County Public Library Wee Read for ages 2 and younger and Circle Time for ages 3-5; 10 – 10:30 a.m. (270) 684-0211 or dcplibrary.org.

FREE

SATURDAY MORNING LIVE!

Mondays & Thursdays | Daviess County Public Library Visit the library every Saturday morning for self-guided fun and educational activities with a focus on literacy and school readiness. 10 a.m. – 12 p.m. (270) 684-0211 or dcplibrary.org.

OWENSBORO LIONS CLUB SOAPBOX DERBY June 14 | Ben Hawes State Park

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KIDS IN THE KITCHEN June 3 and 17 from 10 – 11 a.m. | Owensboro Museum of Science and History Kids in the Kitchen is making fruit kabobs the first week! There will be other games, activities, and prizes as well to kick off the summer. The second week make your own veggie kabob and fresh ranch dip.

SUMMER PUBLIC SKATING Tuesday - Thursday noon to 4 p.m., Friday 7 - 10 p.m., Saturday 1 -4 and 7 - 10 p.m., Sunday 1 - 4 p.m. | The Edge Ice Center Summer Learn to Skate lessons begin June 7 and July 5. Classes take place on Saturday mornings; four classes per session. Only $20 per session, includes skate rentals. For more information on lessons or open skating hours, call 270-687-8720 or visit www.owensboroparks.org

WIGGLE, GIGGLE & PRETEND AND “FROZEN IN TIME” June 7 - 11 and 14 - 18 | Owensboro Dance Theatre Fun dancing, dressing up, creative play crafts, healthy snacks, “Frozen Delight” tea party, bouncy house followed by “Letting It Go” performance.

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THE LAST WORD BY LORA WIMSATT

SUMMER IS HERE

A

nother school year has come to an end, punctuated with end-of-course exams, K-PREP, and field days before that final bell rings and children are released to freedom for another summer. But the truth is, learning is not limited to sitting in a classroom between bells. Sometimes real learning – the best learning – has nothing to do with school at all. Like sprawling on your stomach, heedless of the grass stains on your t-shirt, while watching swarms of ants carry off crumbs from your peanut butter sandwich. Or leaning way forward to get every advantage in the contest to see who can spit watermelon seeds the farthest. Stomping your feet in puddles shimmering with gasoline rainbows. Picking clover blossoms – with as much stem as possible – and patiently twisting and knotting them together into necklace chains. Riding your bike down Dead Man’s Hill, skidding to a stop in the gravel at the bottom before you go into the ditch on the other side of the road. Nosing through those cardboard boxes in the garage and discovering that “Hardy Boys” and “Nancy Drew” mysteries are pretty darn good, even though the girls all wear skirts and nobody has a cell phone. Using up a whole notebook while trying to master how to fold the perfect paper airplane. Climbing higher, higher, higher into the tree in the back yard and looking through the leaves at a world you’ve never seen before while pretending you are an explorer escaping from prowling tigers in a jungle.

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Building forts with an elaborate system of tunnels all over the living room with couch cushions and blankets. Cutting up old dishrags to make fashionable outfits for your dolls, deciding pretty quickly that sleeves are overrated. Sitting for hours under the big tree – moving over every once in awhile to stay in the shade – playing cards with your big sister and the kids from down the block. Sneaking a bottle of dish detergent outside to turn your inflatable swimming pool into a giant bubble bath – and running away fast when Dad looks out the window and yells that you are killing the grass. Pretending the floor is quicksand or maybe lava, and jumping from one item of furniture to another in a harrowing effort to get through the house without touching the floor. Begging your parents to let you “camp out” in the backyard, which is fun until about an hour after dark when the beetle crawls into your sleeping bag and you start hearing weird noises that sound a lot like Hook Hand coming closer and closer ….. Day after day, from June to July to August, summer goes by. There are “organized activities” and lost hours spent staring at a screen, but the best times of summer … the times we remember when we look back, the times that teach lessons we never forget …. are those lazy, unscripted hours of imagination and pretend. And when we reflect on those hours, we learn the most important lesson of all: Summer – and childhood – can last forever.

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Owensboro Living June/July 2014