Page 1

1

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


2

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


3

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


4

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


5

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


FROM THE CHAMBER W

elcome to Greater Owensboro Business, the Chamber’s Quarterly Magazine. This quarter we proudly grace our cover with the Leadership Team of our Owensboro Chamber Young Professionals. Talent programs are a large part of the mission of our country’s leading chambers. Why? Because fostering and growing talent directly impacts the economy. Young people of today are job creators and job generators. They are tech savvy and they are innovators. They are informed consumers and they are hungry to volunteer and be involved in relevant community projects. What an asset! Our Chamber is committed to providing ways to connect Greater Owensboro’s business and community leaders of tomorrow with opportunities to grow, to lead and to play. Communities much like ours around the nation are withering. Their populations are declining. Personal income is falling as are educational levels. But not Owensboro! We are growing in population, our educational attainment level is going up and so is our

D

on’t blink, the first few months of 2016 have already blown by and spring is upon us. What a great way to start this time by showcasing our young professionals and spotlighting the amazing colleges that Owensboro has to offer. If you have had the pleasure of meeting some of these young professionals and college students, you immediately realize they have an energy and passion for this community that is second to none. This was apparent in January when I had the privilege of speaking at the first Chamber Young Professional luncheon of 2016 about my experience with CYP. There was an amazing turnout, despite the speaker,

6

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

CANDANCE BRAKE

President & CEO

personal income. Why? Because of a shift in strategy. Because we understood years ago that our riverfront was too valuable an asset to ignore and because we realized that in today’s economy jobs follow people. We have aggressively begun building a culture that values innovation and entrepreneurship. And we are investing in a quality of place. Build it and they will come… We have to continue to build so that they will continue to come (and come back). CYP and other opportunities will help them stay. Succession planning is an integral component to growth and sustainability in any successful corporation, business or organization. The 100 plus members of Chamber Young Professionals are a large part of our community succession planning. Thank you to the volunteers who are making it a success and to our board who understands why this is much, much more than a social group. It really is our community succession plan in action!

ADAM HANCOCK

Chairman

and I was very impressed with each and every one of them. While preparing beforehand, I did realize something: my career as a professional began with CYP and with my experience at Kentucky Wesleyan College. These organizations taught me how to make an impact not only in the community but also in my career through networking and leadership. The Chamber has stressed the importance of CYP’s success as a high priority in 2016 and I am happy to say that as you can tell from this magazine, the group now in charge is exceeding all expectations we had envisioned.


PUBLISHER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jason Tanner jason@tannerwest.com

FEATURES:

2ND QUARTER 2016

ADVERTISING SALES

Brock Quinton brock@tannerwest.com Robert Williams robert@owensboroparent.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

Taylor West taylor@tannerwest.com Andrea Roberson andrea@tannerwest.com

32

STAFF RETREATS & MEETING SPACES

COPY EDITOR

Ashley Murphy ashley@tannerwest.com

PHOTOGRAPHER

David Grinnell david@tannerwest.com

ON THE COVER

Andrew Howard, Dave Kirk, Erica Yartz, Jennifer Keller, Jessica Kirk, Taylor Edge, Kaitlyn Moore

28

REVIVING THE WONDER WHIP

PRINTING

Greenwell Chisholm Owensboro, Kentucky

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce 200 E. 3rd St., Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 chamber.owensboro.com

TANNER PUBLISHING CO.

30

SPECIALTY FOODS GROUP ARTISAN CAFE

8 15

THE CHAMBER REPORT

18 20

MEMBERS IN THE NEWS

24 28 30 32 36

LOCAL EDUCATION, LOCAL TALENT

CHAMBER YOUNG PROFESSIONALS RE-LAUNCHES WITH SOMETHING FOR EVERYONE

BUSINESS OF THE YEAR SPOTLIGHT Studio Slant, Hartz Contracting

REVIVING THE WONDER WHIP SPECIALTY FOODS GROUP ARTISAN CAFE STAFF RETREATS & MEETING SPACES 10 QUESTIONS John Marshall Moore

A Jason Tanner Design Group publication

7

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


THE CHAMBER REPORT

EVENT SCHEDULE: APRIL EVENTS LEADERSHIP OWENSBORO CLASS Quality of Life & Arts in Our Community April 21

NEW MEMBER BREAKFAST Old National Bank Conference Room April 21 // 8:30 a.m.

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Republic Bank April 21 // 5-7 p.m.

CYP TOUR UniFirst April 22 // 5:15 p.m.

MAY EVENTS ROOSTER BOOSTER BREAKFAST Speaker – Bracken P. Darrell, President and CEO of Logitech Owensboro Convention Center May 5 // 7:30 a.m.

CHAMBER BEHIND THE SCENES:

MEMBER MADNESS

LEADERSHIP OWENSBORO GRADUATION & ALUMNI RECEPTION Old National Bank Conference Room May 5 // 5-7 p.m.

CYP LUNCH MEETING Old National Bank Conference Room May 12 // 11:30 p.m.

T

here was excitement all around as

went over the playbook with each player

the Chamber of Commerce office

(ambassador) while handing them a list of

was transformed into a party atmosphere

twenty members to visit over the next two

for its annual Member Madness kick-

weeks. “Assistant Coach” Elizabeth Griffith

off on Thursday, March 17. Chamber

handed packets to ambassadors while

Owensboro Convention Center June 2 // 7:30 a.m.

Ambassadors mingled with board members

Daniel Deno worked the room, greeting

and staff while March Madness buzzer-

people, serving drinks, directing traffic and

CYP NIGHT

beaters played on the big screen and the

doing whatever else was needed.

conference room was turned into a pizza

Several new changes made the process

and wings buffet.

more efficient this season. To show just one

“This is a team effort,” says Shelly

example of many, it used to take the team

Nichols, who organizes Member Madness.

three days to put the packets together. “We

“There’s no ‘I’ in this office. We all work

were organizing them geographically so

together. And we’re a heck of a team!”

it was easier on the ambassadors to visit

At a corner table, “Coach” Nichols

members in the same area,” Deno said.

CYP HAPPY HOUR May 19 // 5:30 p.m.

JUNE EVENTS ROOSTER BOOSTER BREAKFAST

Friday After 5 June 3 // 5 p.m.

CYP HAPPY HOUR June 16 // 5:30 p.m.

*Events are added daily. See our website chamber.owensboro.com for an updated calendar of events.

8

DURING TWO WEEKS EACH MARCH, CHAMBER AMBASSADORS, BOARD AND STAFF VISIT ALL 1,000 CHAMBER MEMBERS.

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


But that effort used to take the Chamber staff two or three weeks. “This year we sorted the list of members alphabetically, which was a game changer.” That tweak in the game plan allows ambassadors to visit new members, rather than the same members every year, so the ambassadors and the members see new faces, which is better for both sides. During their visits, ambassadors hand members a packet of information while presenting them with new 2016 Chamber Member decals.

SOMETHING NEW, SOMETHING OLD

DIANE’S BAKERY DELIGHTS

Member Madness used to be known as “Operation Thank You,” where ambassadors went out and thanked Members for their investment in the Chamber. As Candance Brake likes to remind us, a Chamber membership is more than simply paying dues. It’s an investment in the community by supporting an organization that builds up and pours into the local economy. “This is our one chance a year to really get out and connect with the members on their turf - in their office or place of business,” Brake explained. “Most of our members are very active so we see them all the time, but for some, this is how we see them at least once a year.” Three years ago, the Chamber rebranded the event as Member Madness and tied it into March Madness

MAC ESTES FARMS - OLDEST DECAL FOUND

by adding a competitive element to it. Ambassadors, board members and staff get bonus points for trading out old decals during visits, which is important since prizes are awarded to whoever visits the most Chamber members, whoever returns with the most information sheets completed from their visits, the person who turns in the single oldest decal, and the person who collects the most decals from previous years. The theme for 2016 is “We Believe in Owensboro” because the Chamber believes in the spirit that makes Owensboro great. So, with flowers in bloom and blue skies chasing the winter away, ambassadors, board members and Chamber staff criss-cross Owensboro/Daviess County to drop in on Chamber members one by one as the two-week game clock ticks away. 9

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


THE CHAMBER REPORT

MEET THE

CHAMBER STAFF

JESSICA KIRK

Role/title at Chamber: Program and Events Manager and Executive Director of Leadership Owensboro. Hometown: Lexington, Kentucky. How long have you lived in Owensboro: 4 years. It still feels new, but the Chamber has given me a connection to the community. What brought you here? My husband, Dave. We met at the University of Kentucky. He ended up back here in his hometown and I followed after graduating a year later. College alma mater: UK - GO CATS! Favorite song to sing along to in the car: “Blank Space” by Taylor Swift. All time favorite movie: Elf. Or anything Disney. Favorite Disney character and why: I love the Disney Princesses. Each of them set an example of a strong woman fighting for something she believes in. Best vacation you’ve ever taken: When I was growing up we look at 30-day trip out west in our motor home. We started in St. Louis from Lexington and went all the way to Seattle, down to San Francisco and back through the Grand Canyon. We hit all of the major National Parks – sometimes more than one in a single day. It was truly a once in a lifetime family vacation.

PHOTO BY DREAM COPY PHOTOGRAPHY

Best thing about working for the Chamber: Not being from Owensboro, the relationships I’ve built while working for the Chamber have made “ T HR OU G H A PART NERS H I P WI T H OW E N S B OR O HE ALT H, T H E UO FL S CH O O L OF N U R S I N G OF F E R S T H E T RADI T I O NAL BAC C AL AU R E AT E N U RS I NG PRO GRAM ( B S N ) IN OWENS BO RO.”

me more invested in the community. Proudest moment in your job so far: Planning and executing our Annual Celebration – I get to create moments where the community celebrates our members and that ultimately makes me the proudest. Recently, the opportunity to be the Executive Director of Leadership Owensboro was a very proud moment for me personally as well. On Saturday morning, I’m most likely...sitting on the couch drinking coffee with Dave and Hopsen, our dog. Usually watching Last Man Standing and Girl Meets World recorded from Friday night. Netflix or theater? Theater. With popcorn and a Cherry Coke. What would the Chamber staff say is your real talent? Probably being organized. Hidden talent not even they know: Playing the violin. I started in 4th grade. But it just sits in my closet now. Favorite Chamber event to work? I really enjoy all of the planning and attention to detail that goes into all of our big events. The Golf Classic is always a fun and satisfying day for me because I get to sit back and watch everyone having a good time at an event that I planned. What have you come to appreciate most about Owensboro? I like the small town feel. I enjoy the simplicity of things here, like walking around downtown with our dog. Everybody knows everybody here and people genuinely look out for one another. And no traffic!

BY THE NUMBERS

OWENSBORO HEALTH E M P LOY E E

E D U C AT I O N

1.2

9.4

million dollars spent by OH on tuition assistance during 2015

230

percent increase in BSNs at Owensboro Health since June 2014

current employees engaged in pursuing some form of nursing degree

IN ADDITION: 10

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

185

current employees pursuing a BSN or higher

Also partnering with WKU-Owensboro to provide our managers and directors an opportunity to get an organizational graduate leadership certificate.


EXECUTIVE ANSWERS

ON THE RECORD

As a millennial, what gift do you bring to your business/organization? Also, what do you find to be a challenge as a young professional? JENNIFER KELLER

JOHN S. WATHEN

MIANN FERISON

CHRISTINE COY FOHR

As a millennial, my entrepreneurial spirit and extreme drive to be the best are great gifts to my business at Aflac. Millennials would much rather work for themselves and find effective ways to the solution than have to work in an environment where we have to do something or perform a process a certain way because that’s the “way we have always done it.” Our outsidethe-box thinking provides many opportunities to achieve more in less time. Our technical abilities and skills add to the effectiveness of our business; we are more likely to turn to technology to provide solutions than any other generation, and that adds to your bottom-line! As there are many advantages to being a millennial, there can also be the challenge of being labeled as the “entitled era.” When looking at my business and myself, I replace the perception of “entitled” with independence. I am not blind to a large population of my generation falling into that description, but for those of us who honor the past and drive for a big and prosperous future, we are sometimes not taken seriously. As a millennial, I want to be a part of a generation of entrepreneurs and learn from all that came before me! We as the millennial generation are the future.

One specific thing that I have brought to the firm is an emphasis on how important it is to have a robust and sophisticated internet presence. If I am interested in a product or service, like most people in my generation, the internet is the first place I go. A company’s website has become an important first impression, and this is no different for legal services. In the past year, our firm has dedicated significant resources to updating and optimizing our web presence, and a complete rollout of our new website is scheduled in the next few weeks. As a millennial, I can offer insights on the layout or content of our website that may appeal to members of my generation. When it comes to challenges as a young attorney, I think one of the most important things I have realized is, no matter how much I learned in college or law school, attorneys who have been practicing for a number of years know so much more than I do. I am thankful to have been hired by such a great firm with experienced attorneys. At SMSM, I am encouraged to seek out guidance if I have questions about anything. Not only does this ensure that I can represent my clients to the best of my ability, but it also gives me extra confidence in my position if I have discussed the issue with a more experienced attorney who can offer insights that can only come from years of practice.

Being a millennial helps me connect more to the new generation consumer. Marketing your business has changed completely over the last 10 years. The current generation is all about social media and feeling a part of something. Moving into this market back in August was a test for our organization, but we used a basic grassroots marketing model to develop our fan base and it did us very well! Communication is the biggest key to having a successful business. Being a prime example of a leader means still being willing to learn and grow with your staff, admitting you never know it all, and communicating with your employees. Being a young professional is challenging at times, especially when you are the youngest in the room calling the shots, but when you are yourself, assertive, prepared, not afraid to admit that you do not know it all, and willing to absorb knowledge of those that have been in the business, it gets easier. One of my favorite quotes is, “Your life is your message to the world, make sure it’s inspiring!” When I feel like giving up, I just think of the all the young professional men and women who can take inspiration from my story.

As a Presbyterian pastor, I find time and time again that being a millennial is a huge help. Ours is a generation of men and women who are passionate about making the world a better place. We volunteer, join movements and lead mission at incredible rates. We hear Jesus’ lessons on caring for the poor, welcoming the stranger and offering hospitality as clear teachings on how we are to live our lives as people of faith. As a millennial, I am excited to help people “put flesh to our faith,” living what we believe in both word and deed. Being a younger minister, people often assume that relating to various generations may be a challenge. In this calling, I am invited to participate in the whole span of a person’s life, from baptizing babies to sitting at a person’s bedside as they are dying. And yet, studies show that millennials are particularly gifted with relating to people across generations. They are as at ease speaking with a “tween” as they are with a member of the silent generation. The real challenge is simply to help break down people’s assumptions and minister with love, compassion and authenticity.

REGIONAL SALES COORDINATOR AFLAC KENTUCKY

SULLIVAN, MOUNTJOY, STAINBACK & MILLER P.S.C.

DIRECTOR OF MARKETING KENTUCKY MAVERICKS

PASTOR FIRST PRESBYTERIAN CHURCH

11

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


THE CHAMBER REPORT

MEMBERS ON THE MOVE Riney Hancock CPAs PSC is pleased to announce Taylor L. Edge, CPA recently received her Certified Public Accountant’s license by successfully completing the CPA examination and experience requirements. Edge is a Staff II Accountant in the Audit & Assurance Division at Riney Hancock CPAs. Edge is a Magna Cum Laude graduate of Kentucky Wesleyan College with a bachelor’s degree in Accounting and a minor in Economics. She is a member of the Alpha Chi National Honor Society and is a Sigma Beta Delta Inductee. She also received the 2013 Jerry Trinkle Accounting Award from Kentucky Wesleyan College. While attending KWC, Edge served as vice-president of Phi Beta Lambda and served as captain of the Kentucky Wesleyan College PEAK Accounting Competition Team. AssuredPartners, Inc. has announced the promotion of Larry Schaefer, President of Assured Neace Lukens, to an expanded role within AssuredPartners, Inc. as Regional President. Larry has proven his leadership abilities within his own organization and will now take on corporate and regional responsibilities. Larry shares in this promotion with Randy Larsen from Assured SRA and Kyp Ross from Dawson Insurance as they each move into their roles as Regional Presidents. Larry Schaefer is the President of Assured Neace Lukens, overseeing the strategic growth and expansion of the company while maintaining the day-to-day operations. Larry brings more than 37 years of insurance related experience to Assured Neace Lukens, with a background in property and casualty operations, including commercial lines, large accounts, captives and alternative markets. Larry supports the mission statement by leading the activities that contribute to Assured Neace Lukens becoming the leading and most trusted supplier of cost-effective insurance, risk management services, surety bonds, and third party administration in the region. In this expanded role with AssuredPartners, Larry will be responsible for Kentucky, Southern Ohio, Indiana, Michigan, Tennessee, Virginia, North Carolina, South Carolina, Alabama, Mississippi and Louisiana regions. “The passion and devotion of these three individuals is unsurpassed as they are truly insurance professionals.” said Jim Henderson, CEO of AssuredPartners, Inc. “Randy, Kyp and Larry without a doubt bring their experience and drive with them to work every day and that spirit is helping to guide the growth of our culture and our overall organization.” “It is a great pleasure to work with this team of individuals who work tirelessly to continue to cultivate our organization.” said Tom Riley, President and COO of AssuredPartners, Inc. “AssuredPartners is pleased to promote Randy, Kyp and Larry to a level that is in alignment with their achievements.” Congratulations to our Kentucky Mavericks, who won their 100th consecutive home game. No team at any level of basketball has ever won 100 straight consecutive home games until the Mavericks accomplished that feat on Thursday, March 17 at the Owensboro Sportscenter.

HAND-PICKED

ALABAMA

-Colby MacQuarrie

COLBY’S FINE FOOD AND SPIRITS

12

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

Favorite spring break destinations from a few of our favorite local leaders:

FLORIDA

-Kathy Oliver

UNITED WAY OF THE OHIO VALLEY

ALABAMA

-T. Fred May US BANK

-Steve Winkler

CLIFF HAGAN BOYS & GIRLS CLUB, INC.

-Rick Hobgood HILLIARD LYONS

-Bart Darrell

KENTUCKY WESLEYAN COLLEGE


NEW MEMBERS JANUARY NEW MEMBERS • • • • • • • • • • • • •

BIG PICTURE

DOWNTOWN PARKING 846

41

street parking spots

169

spots in the Convention Center lot

spots in the Allen St lot

21

spots in the shared boardwalk lots

spots in the Locust Lot

• • • • • • • • • • • • •

(BETWEEN TRAINING CENTER AND HOLIDAY INN)

195

27 114

FEBRUARY NEW MEMBERS

spots in the Maverick Lot

(FROM 1ST / VETERANS TO 3RD & BETWEEN POPLAR TO FREDERICA AND FROM 1ST / VETERANS TO 4TH & BETWEEN FREDERICA TO JR MILLER)

spots in the City lot off Frederica (BEHIND OLD EL TORIBIO)

325

spots in the parking garage

(NEXT TO GRITS GARAGE)

*NOT COUNTING PRIVATE LOTS

FLORIDA

-Claud Porter

DAVIESS COUNTY ATTORNEY

FLORIDA

-Adam Hancock

RINEY HANCOCK CPAS PSC

FLORIDA

-Jerry Morris

SOUTHERN STAR CENTRAL GAS PIPELINE

Soak-N-Wet Car Wash Pizza by the Guy Edward Jones, Dathan Diesher Commonwealth Title and Mortgage, Inc. Keavin Hayden Appraisals VES, Inc. Commonwealth Ag Service Modern Office Sagamore Home Mortgage O.Z. Tyler Distillery Riverwalk Properties Casey Callis, D.M.D Media Works Advertising

FLORIDA

- Dean Dennis

OWENSBORO CONVENTION CENTER

Big O Bike Shop, LLC Fastek Services, LLC Sam Estes Painting, Inc P&K Professional Klean Team, LLC Drew Insurance Agency, Inc. Community Dental Clinic Beef O’Brady’s Rose Realty Wonder Whip Right to Life of Owensboro Robins Resale and Boutique Kidstop Children’s Boutique Richard House, Daviess Co. Clerks Office Arby’s Restaurant Group

SOUTH CAROLINA

-Darrell Higginbotham INDEPENDENCE BANK

DOMINICAN REPUBLIC

-Jack Wells

WELLS HEALTH SYSTEMS

13

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


THE CHAMBER REPORT Book Title: Good to Great Author: Jim Collins Reviewed by: Tim Hess, Beltline Electric Recommended by: Our current CEO and Owner, Jason Siener. Overview: The subject of the book is how some “good” companies become “great” and why some “good” companies do not. The Takeaway: 1) Get the right people on the bus and get them in the right seats 2) Face and deal with the brutal facts

Tim Hess

THE

READING LIST

Getting the right people on the bus and getting them in the right seat pertains to surrounding yourself with people who are intelligent, highly motivated self-starters, and effective leaders. Getting them in the right seats means empowering them and arming them with the tools and resources to do what you need them to. Just as important, is to allow/ assign them to do what they are the best at and/or most capable of doing successfully. The second part is about looking at, accepting, and facing the brutal facts. Markets, economies, industries and even companies are ever-changing. It is imperative that companies continually analyze

ANNUAL CELEBRATION SCRAPBOOK

14

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

what is going on both in their internal and external environments, understand and accept that what they are seeing is not always pleasant (accept the brutal facts), set about changing the course of things to protect against the threats, and capitalize on the opportunities in their environments. Sometimes this means abandoning/changing a long time strategy/practice, even though a great deal of time, effort and resources were committed to develop and execute said strategy. This is where vision and leadership come into play and become key to survival. Leaders have to face those facts, step outside that comfort box, and bring about the necessary change in order to transform and move the organization forward. These two concepts are what I have used to guide my decision-making process and what I believe are very crucial keys to my success in the greater Owensboro, KY market.


The Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Young Professionals (CYP) program is back with a fresh-faced group of individuals who are ready to take the city by storm — and they’re changing perspectives on the word “professional.”

BY JACQUELINE JORDAN

S

everal years ago the Chamber had a thriving Young

target demographic being one of the largest in Owensboro.

Professionals following that functioned both as a

“Many people who grew up here are returning to Owensboro,

networking and social group; as the 20-40 something crowd

or others who aren’t from here are coming here for jobs and

that made it succeed found themselves starting families, the

they’re so excited to be involved,” she said.

group dissipated. But that’s no longer the case for CYP.

Last year, the Chamber started hosting meet and greets

like this are essential for the growth of Owensboro.

to gauge interest in re-launching the CYP program. They

“Everyone is a professional in some form or fashion,” he

found that there was an overwhelming desire for the group to

said. “Whatever profession it may be, it serves a purpose to our

reconvene.

world. Having a group like this will help keep and attract the

talent we have here, and we’re only as strong as our members

“There’s a group of people here who really have a passion to

Executive Committee Chair, Andrew Howard, said groups

be involved,” said Jessica Kirk, Programs and Events Manager

make us.”

for the Chamber. “When they got together, they were from all

And there’s a strong focus on welcoming all backgrounds

industries, so many didn’t know each other.”

and kinds of professionals.

“Teachers, nurses, agriculture — people who might not

And that was the beginning of the new CYP, and many new

relationships.

necessarily see their titles as professionals — are welcome,”

The group is open to 21-40-year-olds who are employed in

said Kirk. “We need everyone working together. Each industry

Owensboro and are looking to get involved in the community,

plays such an important part in our community, we want that

network and socialize. The response has been great.

buy-in in the group. We have to think about what we want the

community to be like 5,10,15 years from now, and we need

Kirk said enthusiasm for the program is largely due to the

15

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


ANDREW HOWARD

everyone to shape that.”

where they’re asked and hope to be called upon

To that goal, President & CEO, Candance

when organizations need volunteers.

Brake, sees CYP as an important aspect of

succession planning for the entire community.

and some people say our generation is lazy,”

“Succession planning is an integral component

Kirk said. “But this group is taking a lot of

to growth and sustainability in any successful

ownership in where they want the community

corporation, business or organization. The

to go.”

100 plus CYP members are a large part of our

Chair, Andrew Howard, echoed her

community succession planning.”

sentiment, saying the group just wants to give

To appeal to everyone, CYP provides a

back. “I know for me, there’s been a lot of folks

variety of involvement opportunities. There’s a

who have helped me get to where I am, and I

lunch meeting every other month that features

just want to give back to as many organizations

a speaker, for those who can join an event

as I can. And I think many can utilize our

during the day, a monthly happy hour and

help,” he said.

other organized social events for those who

Howard said for those who want to get

would rather get together during the evening,

involved in the community but don’t know

plus industry tours so the group can learn what

where to start, CYP is a great place.

happens in the community.

Kirk said local organizations understand

contact the Greater Owensboro Chamber

that this generation is the future of Owensboro

of Commerce at (270) 926-1860. If you’re

and are supporting the program with special

employed by a Chamber member, annual dues

events. In March, the Owensboro Symphony

are $50. Unaffiliated dues are $100 per year.

Orchestra hosted CYP night with buy-one-

Chamber Young Professionals is overseen

get-one tickets for members and an after party

by a seven-member board. What do they have

sponsored by Glenmore Distillery.

to say about CYP?

“They see the need to get this generation to

support the symphony, and it’s a great way to

KAITLYN MOORE

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

CHAIR

Andrew Howard

Independence Bank | Age: 28

The Chamber hopes more businesses take

advantage of the opportunity to reach such a

Howard wants everyone to understand

targeted demographic.

that they’re welcome. CYP is a networking

Besides learning about businesses in the

opportunity, but there are different areas for

region and professional development, the

different groups. “We’ll hit work hours, hit

group is a great way to form relationships and

things for hours for family events and reach

give back to the community.

out to everyone.”

business), that’s the cherry on top, but it’s about

16

To join the Chamber Young Professionals,

start that interest,” Kirk said.

“Whatever you get out of it (besides

DAVE KIRK

“Millennials tend to get looked at negatively,

FINANCE

friendship and growth,” said Howard.

Kaitlyn Moore

Since many of the group members are

Don Moore Chevrolet | Age: 25

anxious to give back to the community, there’s

Moore said CYP is a great balance

also a strong focus on philanthropy, starting

of

with a backpack project that will be a consistent

involvement. “Networking, in my opinion, is

program each year. CYP will be raising funds

the best part of CYP. The organization provides

for school supplies, blankets, nourishment

opportunity to meet young professionals in

and other items for children in need and

different lines of work within Owensboro. I

deliver them. They’ll also work with Habitat

think the future leaders of Owensboro will

for Humanity, in soup kitchens and wherever

come from this group, which is exciting to

they’re needed. Kirk said the group will go

think about.”

networking,

social,

and

community


SOCIAL

Dave Kirk Owensboro Public Schools | Age: 28

Kirk said he thinks the best part of CYP is

that it gives you a platform to have your voice heard and give back to the community. He also mentioned that the group is open to everyone who meets the age limits, but many times

He mentioned that the organization is member-driven, so the more members and ideas they can create, the more opportunities they have. Also, any committee member would be glad to discuss the group with any potential members.

PAST CHAIR

people think it’s only open to those who work

Jennifer Keller

in the business world. “Not only are some of

Aflac Keller & Associates, LLC | Age: 32

our members bankers and lawyers; they’re also

teachers, people that work in construction and

member is the ability to create a presence in

people that work for car dealerships,” he said.

the community as a driven and serious young

“It’s a very diverse crew. It doesn’t matter what

professional,” Keller said. She’s met and gotten

you do for a living. It’s what you can contribute to the group.”

PHILANTHROPY Taylor Edge

Riney Hancock CPAs PSC | Age: 23 Edge joined CYP as an opportunity to get involved in the business community, and said it’s a great way to network, meet people and have fun while doing it. The best part is that it

“In my opinion, the best part of being a CYP

to know many players in the community and that have, in return, catapulted her personal career

and

business.

“Relationships

are

everything, and the more opportunities you position yourself for, the more you will grow professionally,” she said. Keller said that her message to young professionals who are considering joining is simple — get involved. “Because if you’re not

allows you to connect with people you may not

involved in the community, you’re missing

have otherwise met.

opportunities to grow yourself both personally

MEMBERSHIP Will Higdon

and professionally.”

CHAIR ELECT

(not pictured)

Erica Yartz

Van Meter Insurance | Age: 25

Thacker, Hodskins, Searcy & Knight, LLP | Age: 29

Higdon was born and raised in Owensboro

Yartz said she joined for the social aspect of

and when he returned from college he saw

CYP because meeting people when you’re not from

momentum and energy building in town that he wanted to be a part of. He also saw a need for young individuals to step up and push Owensboro forward. “It’s an exciting time,” he said. “CYP is an organization that I expect to make a positive impact on the community.”

He believes the best part is the opportunity

to give back to the community while building lasting friendships along the way. “We live in

TAYLOR EDGE

JENNIFER KELLER

Owensboro can be difficult. However, the best part of being a CYP member is all it offers. “As a young professional group, CYP isn’t focused solely on the professional development of its members. In addition to professional development opportunities, CYP also focuses on philanthropy, community involvement, networking opportunities and hosts social events for its members.”

such a close knit community, and there are

“We’re really excited for everything we have

people coming from out of town to Owensboro

planned this year for CYP. We encourage everyone

to start careers. It’s our responsibility to make

who is interested in CYP to join us for a meeting

those individuals feel welcome and excited about

or an event and learn more about what CYP has to

their decision to come to Owensboro,” he said.

offer,” she said.

ERICA YARTZ

17

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


MEMBERS IN THE NEWS CONGRATULATIONS TO SOUTHERN STAR AND INDEPENDENCE BANK, WHO WERE BOTH RECOGNIZED AS WINNERS OF 2016’S 100 BEST PLACES TO WORK IN KENTUCKY. The Kentucky Chamber of Commerce and the Kentucky Society for Human Resource Management (KYSHRM) recently announced the companies that made the 12th Annual Best Places to Work in Kentucky list, presented by Kentucky Career Center and the State Information Data Exchange System (UI SIDES). Independence Bank and Southern Star Central Gas Pipeline, both Chamber members, were listed in the Medium Companies (150-499 employees) category. The winner rankings will be announced at an awards dinner Wednesday, April 20, 2016, at Heritage Hall in the Lexington Convention Center. By Danny May

SOUTHERN STAR CENTRAL GAS PIPELINE • •

470 employees, 180 in Kentucky 6,000 miles of pipeline throughout Missouri, Kansas, Oklahoma, Wyoming, Nebraska, Colorado and Texas

OTHER NOTABLE AWARDS: • •

Achieved Top 3 ranking for Large Pipelines in 5 of the past 7 years of Mastio Survey. Named an Industry Leader in Accident Prevention by the American Gas Association in 2014. Named a Patriotic Employer by the Office of the Secretary of Defense and the Small Business of the Year in 2012 by the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. President’s Award from the United Way of Owensboro-Daviess County for the past ten years, along with several other community awards.

OVERVIEW: Southern Star has been in business over 100 years, safely and reliably transporting natural gas through the midwest. Southern Star values long-term relationships with its employees and strives to provide them with an exceptional employment experience. It cares deeply about safety and each employee’s well-being, focuses on compliance while fostering a collegial environment, and provides as many learning opportunities as possible. The

18

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

company believes in being involved in the communities where it operates. It strongly encourages community involvement and giving among its workforce. You can find its employees serving on boards and as volunteers for nonprofit organizations throughout the country, and you’ll see Southern Star on many donor lists for those same nonprofits. “Southern Star’s vision is to be the Best Pipeline in North America,” said Jerry Morris, the company’s President & Chief Executive Officer. “That starts with having the best employees anywhere and providing them the best overall employment experience we can on a practical basis. We are honored and proud to be recognized as a Best Place to Work in Kentucky.” “It’s humbling to have the Kentucky Chamber and Kentucky SHRM recognize the accomplishments of our employees,” Morris continued. “We try to make sure each employee knows we honor and value them.”

INDEPENDENCE BANK • • •

20 locations serving 10 counties 305 employees $577,850 awarded in college scholarships since 2001

OTHER NOTABLE AWARDS: •

Recognized as a Best Bank to Work For by American Banker Magazine in September of 2015, ranking 14th in the nation out of 50. Recognized as a Top Performing Community Bank by Bank Director Magazine in 2014.


Platinum Choice for Financial Institution, Platinum Business That Gives Back, and Silver Place to Work in the 2015 “Owensboro’s Readers’ Choice Awards” by the readers of the Messenger-Inquirer.

OVERVIEW: Independence Bank’s roots can be traced all the way back to 1909, when Farmers & Merchants Bank opened in McLean County, Ky. In 1971, Charles A. Reid and Maurice E. Reisz purchased Farmers & Merchants Bank in McLean County as well as Providence State Bank in Webster County. In 1997, the two small banks were incorporated under one name, Independence Bank. Today, Independence Bank is a locally owned and operated community bank with 20 locations in Calloway, Daviess, Franklin, Hancock, Henderson, Hopkins, McCracken, McLean, Warren and Webster counties. Vice President, Human Resource Officer, Tawna Wright said, “Independence Bank is very honored to be a 2016 winner in the Best Places to Work in Kentucky program. We believe in creating a fun atmosphere where employees love their job and exceed customer expectations. We have a very special

group of employees who are considered family more so than co-workers, that go above and beyond each and every day and it’s rewarding to see those efforts being recognized.” Community involvement is incredibly important at Independence Bank. In one example of many, Independence Bank has committed to building a habitat home in each of the communities it serves. Employees have donated over 5,000 hours on recent Habitat for Humanity builds. “It is indeed a great honor to be recognized once again as a Best Places To Work in Kentucky. It is important to note the award is heavily weighted on employee survey responses. To be chosen as Best Places To Work by your employees is certainly one award we are proudest of,” says President, Darrell Higginbotham. “At Independence Bank, we have the best employees who are dedicated each and every day to providing extraordinary customer service and giving of their time and talent to the communities we serve. Each and every day, they are making a difference with each other, the customers they come in contact with, and our community through their involvement. That’s what makes us unique and why it’s such a great place to work. I’m honored to be a part of something so special.”

19

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


SPOTLIGHT

GENERAL MANAGER, NATALIE JOHNSON AND OWNER, KATHERINE TAYLOR

STUDIO SLANT

EMERGING BUSINESS “We host events in our building, volunteer throughout the community and believe that small businesses should stick together in order to survive.” - KATHERINE TAYLOR

The idea for Studio Slant traces back to a nine-hour drive to Florida when Christy Taylor Chaney asked her sister Katherine Taylor what she wanted to do with her fiber arts degree. The store opened October 23, 2010. Within a few months, the sisters decided to host an art show and East Bridge Art and Music festival was born, which came to fruition in August of 2011. The business has since expanded to five employees who oversee the retail space, art studio, and classes. “We are trying to provide art, whimsy, and individuality to a town filled with big box sameness,” says Katherine Taylor. The store focuses on unique, creative, and handmade or small batch gifts and home décor. Studio Slant also offers fun, event-style painting classes like Canvas and Cupcakes, Canvas and Cocktails, door hanger classes, and Paint What You Love. Kids also love painting canvases for their birthday parties. Being named a 2016 Small Business of the Year was a great honor for the studio. “We are very grateful to

20

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


have been named Emerging Business of the Year and

they are also intentional about training part time help,

feel so lucky to be a part of a community that continues

usually students, in communication skills, sales, and

to support small business!” said General Manager,

customer service, along with the art of beautifully

Natalie Johnson. “It is an honor to be a member of the Owensboro Chamber of Commerce, who has a huge impact on the success of small business in Owensboro, KY.” The staff works hard to promote their business through social media primarily aimed at their target demographic; women age 18-65. The studio is in the midst of a new marketing campaign. To stay fresh and keep growing, the staff sets daily, weekly, and monthly goals, along with a “stretch goal” to push themselves to go above and beyond.

wrapping a present! Since relocating from the downtown location to Wesleyan Park Plaza, the store has experienced immense growth. The extra space at the new location allows more customer parking and more class offerings. Studio Slant also recently added vinyl monogramming and custom embroidery, which Taylor says gives the studio “the possibility to customize gifts and offer unique, one-of-a-kind options to our community.” That kind of customer service is where Studio Slant

The staff also utilizes Dynamic Directions to

excels. “You know you’re doing a good job when the

enhance their leadership skills, their ability to “wow”

customer repeatedly comes back time and time again,”

and to help them think big in all they do. Taylor says

Taylor says.

21

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


HARTZ CONTRACTING 50+ EMPLOYEES

Rapidly advancing technology impacts nearly every facet of

in October of 2012 (of which about 20 were retained from

business. Hartz Contracting (previously Hartz Construction,

retired Hartz Construction Corporation). They presently

now a division of Scott, Murphy and Daniel) is no exception.

have 55 team members working in Owensboro and the

“Changing technology grows our industry every day,” says

surrounding counties.

Vice President, Sarah Ford. “Our most innovative and laborsaving products are GPS units integrated into our heavy construction equipment, which guides every critical move to a fraction of an inch!” That integrated technology allows operators to be more efficient and accurate, which results in quicker, more economical, and higher-quality finished projects. Hartz’s open communication policy between everyone within the company also ensures high-quality work. “If anyone or anything is observed out of the norm, it is to be immediately brought to management’s attention,” Ford stated, adding that Hartz management has the depth and experience to quickly handle any challenge or adversity that might arise on a project. That attention to detail is one of the keys to Hartz’s growth over the past three years. Since Hartz Contracting began as a

22

To keep growing and improving, Hartz invests heavily in new equipment and technology, but more importantly, “we invest substantially in our employees in an effort to retain and grow our workforce,” Ford said. Over 60% of the construction team has been with the company for over 10 years and many have been with the company 20-35 years. Employees are rewarded with anniversary bonuses, recognition

on

their

landmark

anniversaries,

and

acknowledgment each year on their hire date anniversary. “It’s important to us that they know how important they are to our team,” Ford explained. Hartz is grateful to be recognized as a Business of the Year, Ford says. “We are truly honored to be named 2016 Business of the Year and cannot thank the Chamber enough for the recognition. We are grateful for the opportunities that the

division of Scott, Murphy, and Daniel in 2012, the company

great people of Owensboro/Daviess County have given us,

has grown from $2.3 million (in 2012) to an estimated $10.7

since beginning a new generation of Hartz and continuing

million in 2015, accounting for $28 million dollars of revenues

the tradition of quality contracting in the region. We look

out of the Owensboro operation over the past three years.

forward to continuing to grow with the community and

As far as personnel, the company began with 30 employees

giving back as it has given to us.”

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

THE INAUGURAL CLASS OF GO FAME STUDENTS

SOFT SKILLS VITAL TO SUCCESS By Scott Williams, Ph.D.

E

ven though there is sometimes debate in the media about the value of higher education the data is quite clear. Educational attainment and economic prosperity of regions, states and the nation are closely tied together. In fact, a report by Mark Snead “Small Differences in Education Drive Large Income Gaps Among States” shows in 2013 Kentucky was one of four states (Arkansas, West Virginia, and Mississippi) at the bottom of the income vs. level of education scale. Per capita personal income was just over $36,000 with about 12.9 average years of education. If we want to enhance the prosperity of our region, educational attainment must be addressed. What we often hear from employers is that they cannot find potential employees with the right skills. In a recent KY Chamber survey the number one challenge identified by employers in the state was they have difficulty hiring people with good “soft” skills. Twenty seven percent of employers identified employability skills such as attendance, communication, problem solving, and teamwork as the missing pieces when new hires come on board. While sharp technical skills are imperative for today’s workforce, it is also vital that “soft” skills are developed. Fortunately, when students earn an associate degree at OCTC it helps to close both the technical and “soft” skills gap for employers. Our associate degrees, including those in technical fields, require students to take courses directly related to soft skills. These are the general education or liberal arts courses. Associate degree graduates have learned skills in communications via English and Communication courses, teamwork skills via science and communication courses, and problem solving via science and math courses. In short, the associate degree graduate has been exposed and taught the skills of communication, teamwork, and problem solving. While students who earn certificates are well versed in technical skills related to their field, associate degree graduates go beyond the technical skills and develop those additional skills needed by employers. OCTC is widely recognized for providing outstanding student

achievement in general education courses or “soft” skill training. For instance, the graph shows OCTC transfer students transferring to one of the larger regional public 4 year institutions historically perform better based on GPA than entering freshman and transfers from other institutions (transfer students normally have completed either an AA or AS, or are General Education certified. In both instances the courses taken are mainly general education courses). Furthermore, our English departments Common Reading program has been recognized in a Columbia University article as one of the top common reading programs in the US. The only community and technical college in the country recognized in their article. Both illustrate the quality of general education training achieved by students at OCTC. It is the commitment of OCTC to educational quality and successful associate degree attainment that provides graduates better aligned with the workforce needs of our local employers, in both technical and employable skills. In fact, the latest census data illustrates OCTC has helped Daviess County make great strides in associate degree attainment. Census results show that Daviess County has 21% more associate degree graduates compared to the statewide average. It is no wonder that Southern Business & Development Magazine identified the Owensboro region as one of the small markets in Kentucky with the Best Manufacturing Workforce. However, the community still has a growing need for a skilled workforce and OCTC will continue to address the technical and “soft” skills gaps. Examples include the GO FAME initiative, which delivers employability skills with technical skill training, and we are developing additional initiatives to enhance soft skill development. Employers can assist by encouraging employees and new hires to complete their college education and obtain a degree. The result is a workforce that has the both the “soft” skills and technical skills employers need. A win-win for everyone in our region.

23

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


LOCAL EDUCATION, LOCAL TALENT

By Ashley Sorce

Owensboro is lucky to have not one, but three outstanding post-secondary education options—Brescia University, Kentucky Wesleyan College and Western Kentucky University Owensboro. Each school is unique in their choices of academic study, but each is committed to serving this community. Offering traditional, online, and hybrid course deliveries, these institutions guarantee the best fit for any student, whether right out of high school, returning to school from the workforce, in attempt to change careers, or just beginning college as an adult. Education has been and will continue to be a significant factor in the growth and development of Owensboro. These institutions provide qualified young professionals who innovate, manage, develop, educate, protect, heal, build, but ultimately lead. Here are a few graduates from these three schools who are true examples of this leadership.

GRANT COLLINS Financial Advisor, Ameriprise Financial | age 24 When Grant Collins began at Brescia University, he was pre-optometry. He had even completed a high school internship with an optometrist in his hometown of Leitchfield. Not long after that, he switched to education. It was the help of his advisor at Brescia University that helped steer him in the direction of finance, where he found his passion. Grant graduated on time in 2014 with a Bachelor’s of Science in Math with a minor in finance and economics. Although it took 18 to 20 hour semesters, Grant “buckled down,” which he said wouldn’t be possible without the caring faculty and staff at BU. Grant chose Brescia because it was close to home and offered smaller class sizes. “I like having that tight-knit community,” Grant said. And it was the one-on-one attention he received from professors that helped him find an internship with Ameriprise, which was quick to hire him after graduation.

ELIZABETH MAUZY-MARTIN Doctor of Optometry, RiverPark EyeCare | age 29 As a child, Elizabeth Mauzy-Martin grew up just down the street from Kentucky Wesleyan College and regularly went to basketball games with her family. “I always knew I would go there,” Elizabeth said. So it was no surprise when Elizabeth chose KWC after graduating from Owensboro High School. She completed degrees in Chemistry and Biology before moving on to Indiana University, where she obtained her Doctorate of Optometry. Elizabeth says the science program at KWC well prepared her for her doctorate degree. It was a chance run-in with a middle school teacher that led her to a summer internship with RiverPark EyeCare, a practice that the husband of her former teacher owned. She continued summer internships there throughout optometry school. When she graduated in 2012, she was able to join the practice with Dr. Robert Hamilton and Dr. Mike Shields. It was always Elizabeth’s goal to return to Owensboro. “This has always been a good place to live, but now it is great,” Elizabeth said. “There is more to do, but it is still safe and a nice place for families.”

JACOB BRYANT 6th Grade Science Teacher, College View Middle School | age 23 Jacob Bryant always admired the teachers and staff in the Daviess County Public School system that he says gave so much to him during his years in school. “They understood what it meant to do hard work in education,” Jacob said. It was these influences that helped him realize at an early age that he wanted to be a teacher. He began at Owensboro Community & Technical College, graduating with an associate of arts degree in order to transfer to WKU Owensboro. There he pursued a Bachelor’s of Science in Middle Grades Education, graduating in 2013. After graduation, DCPS hired him as a 6th grade teacher, but this didn’t slow Jacob’s pursuit of education. He complete his Master’s of Arts in Education Teacher Leader program in 2014 and is currently pursuing his Education Specialist Degree for principal licensure. In addition to teaching, Jacob serves as Athletic Director at CVMS and Academic Team Advisor. He gives credit for his success to WKU Owensboro, who helped guide him and affirmed his calling. “They gave me my career,” Jacob said. “They gave me the wind beneath my wings. At 20 years old, I needed as much guidance as I could get.”

24

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


JESSICA CECIL Director of TRiO Student College | age 27

Support Services, Owensboro Community & Technical

Jessica began her college career at Owensboro Community & Technical College with a pretty clear path in mind—a career in the mental health profession. After graduating with an associate degree in 2008, she transferred to Kentucky Wesleyan College, graduating with a BS in Psychology in 2010. Jessica then moved on to Western Kentucky University Owensboro to pursue a master’s degree in Mental Health Counseling. To help financially, Jessica began working as a graduate assistant at WKU Owensboro in both recruitment and career services. It was here that she found her passion for helping students navigate the college process. After one semester, she switched her master’s degree to Student Affairs and graduated with her Master’s of Arts in Education in 2012. She returned to her first school, OCTC where she has continued to shine and advance her career. She began as a STEM specialist, exposing students age 9 to 18 to STEM education and directing Lego league tournaments. She then became coordinator of Discover College, helping students from 14 area high school receive dual credit for college coursework. Jessica now serves as the Director of TRiO Student Support Services program, where she focuses to reduce barrier for first-generation, low income and disabled students. Jessica credits WKU Owensboro for helping her find her passion. She says without her graduate assistantship, she not only wouldn’t have been able to afford college, but she also would not have found her passion. It was the strong partnership between WKU Owensboro and OCTC that helped her find a community of low-income, first generation students like herself, that made her feel at home. It seems fateful that Jessica now holds a position helping these very students.

TAYLOR WEST Art Director, Tanner+West Design Agency | age 26 Taylor West graduated from Kentucky Wesleyan College in 2011 with a degree in Visual Communications. He, along with fellow Wesleyan grad, Jason Tanner, started Tanner+West three years ago. In those three years their team has grown to seven full-time employees and many part-time and freelancers. Taylor said their focus is to help businesses and organizations with advertising campaigns, branding, print media, video production and web development. After visiting schools across the state, Taylor, originally from Horse Cave, Kentucky, says what set Wesleyan apart was the people he met. “The admissions staff and students on campus made me feel at home right away,” Taylor said. “The small college experience was exactly what I needed, especially after graduating from a high school with less than 200 students. I had many opportunities to get involved and develop as a leader at Wesleyan.” Taylor enjoyed growing up in a small town and knew he would never want to live in a big city. “Owensboro is just the right size for me,” Taylor said. “I quickly grew to love it during my years at Wesleyan and really appreciate that the city is so innovative.” He and wife, Katelyn, also a KWC graduate, can’t imagine living anywhere else.

JESSIE SCHARTUNG Social Worker for the Commonwealth of Kentucky and Mental Health Associate for River Valley Behavioral Health | age 34

Not many people can say they are working in the exact job that they have been striving for since high school, but that is the case for Jessie Schartung, who has always felt a calling to work with juvenile delinquents. Jessie worked her way through an associate degree to transfer to WKU Owensboro, where she graduated with a Bachelor’s of Arts in Sociology in 2013 and a Master’s of Arts in Sociology in 2015. After graduation, she was offered a job with River Valley in the Psychiatric and Residential Treatment Facility group homes. She finally achieved her lifelong goal of helping at-risk youth; what could be better? Another job offer. Not long after accepting her position, she was offered another position with the Commonwealth of Kentucky as a social worker. Jessie felt called to serve in both jobs, knowing she was serving children in both places. She accepted the new position, on one condition: she could continue what she calls the “front line work” in the group homes. She now believes she can make the most influence in her position as a social worker, but can continue to help children face-to-face in the River Valley group home. Jessie says that her dreams would not have been possible without WKU in Owensboro. With a young son, Jessie needed a local, affordable degree. After research, she found that WKU Owensboro was her only local option for a degree in sociology, which allowed her to focus her studies in juvenile delinquency. “WKU Owensboro opened the doors for me,” Jessie said. “The degree is what gave me the opportunity to do the front line work that I’ve always wanted to do. WKU being in Owensboro made the difference for me. I wouldn’t have a degree if it weren’t here.”

25

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


AUSTIN TAPP Senior Technician in Research and Development, Kentucky BioProcessing | age 25 When Austin Tapp realized he wanted a career in science and research, he came to terms with the fact that he would have to move outside of Owensboro to pursue his career even though he wanted to stay close to family. It wasn’t until he began looking for an internship in his freshman year at Brescia University that he found Kentucky BioProcessing, who’s work is primarily aimed at producing plant-made pharmaceuticals. After graduating from BU in 2013 with a degree in biology and a minor in chemistry, Austin accepted his position with Kentucky BioProcessing in research and development. “I like to work on new ideas and new potential products,” Austin said, whose specific expertise is the science behind chromatography and purification. Austin actually worked on the ZMapp, the drug that made national news for saving the lives of two American missionaries infected with the deadly Ebola virus. The serum wasn’t manufactured, but grown, in a greenhouse full of genetically modified tobacco plants. Austin believes it was the smaller class size and the time his professors gave him that contributed to his success. “Brescia creates a relationship in education that I could not have gotten in a larger university,” Austin said. “I was able to explore different avenues in science and my professors were truly interested in what I wanted to learn and what was best for me.”

BC CHILDRESS Clinical Pharmacy Manager, Owensboro Health | age 34 Originally from Muhlenberg County, BC moved to Dayton, Ohio in high school. He returned to the area after deciding to attend Kentucky Wesleyan College, where he received the Brown Scholarship, providing him a full ride. BC says what sealed the deal on KWC was the school’s willingness to hold that scholarship for two years while he fulfilled a two-year commitment to a church mission to the Dominican Republic. “Kentucky Wesleyan shaped a lot of who I am and the decisions I have made,” BC said. It was his advisor who took him in and helped BC hone his love of science and math and ultimately steered him toward a career in pharmacy. It was this “one-on-one touch” that made the difference. After receiving his BA in Chemistry from Kentucky Wesleyan College in 2005, BC attended Mercer University in Atlanta where he received his Doctorate in Pharmacy. He then pursued a post-doctorate residency in Louisville and then a MBA from Sullivan University. It was a position at Owensboro Health that brought this Western Kentucky native back to his roots a year ago, and he couldn’t be happier with his decision. “I am excited to see the change in Owensboro in the last 10 years,” BC said. “This is a great place to raise a family.”

DR. TRASEY FALCONE Medical Director of Inpatient Medical Rehabilitation Facility, Owensboro Health | age 32 Originally from Deer Lick, Kentucky, a small community in Logan County, Trasey Falcone was recruited to Brescia University on a softball scholarship. When not on the softball field, Trasey was diligent to her studies, leading her to a degree in biology with a pre-med focus in 2005. From there Trasey graduated Lake Erie College of Osteopathic Medicine, finishing residency at the University of Pittsburgh in Physical Medicine and Rehabilitation. She and husband, John, also a doctor, wanted to settle close to Trasey’s family and found Owensboro to be the best fit, relocating to the community three years ago. Trasey says it has been interesting to have two perspectives of Owensboro, the first as a student at Brescia and now as a professional with the hospital. Regardless, she has been impressed with the growth Owensboro has seen since her days as a student at Brescia. The student to professor ratio is what Trasey appreciates most about her time at BU. She was always confident she could talk with her professors or seek tutoring if needed. And ironically, it was a scholarship provided by then Owensboro Medical Health Systems that financially helped Trasey with her education at Brescia. “They were a big part of getting me from point A to point B,” Trasey said. She has now come full circle, building her career as a doctor and young leader at now Owensboro Health.

26

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


27

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


REVIVING THE

WONDER

WHIP A SETH brings WOODWARD new sparkle to an old gem.

BY DANNY MAY

28

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

. PHOTO BY DAVID GRINNELL

fter 61 years in business, owner Bill Mulligan decided to close the Wonder Whip in August 2015, which caused a frenzy of comments and shares on social media. People love the Whip and many people were sad to see it go. But on February 1, 2016, new owner, Seth Woodward, caused a frenzy of his own when he reopened the Whip for a soft opening at 11 a.m. Within a minute they had their first customer, and they’ve been busy ever since. Mulligan and a few long-time employees were on hand for the soft opening, which Woodward says was much appreciated. The tradition has been successfully passed down. Seth has several years of experience in the food service business, operating restaurants in Bowling Green for five years and here in Owensboro for seven years before taking ownership of the Wonder Whip. “They’re not making 1955 drive-ins anymore,” he said, explaining his interest in reopening the Whip. “It would have been a shame to see it die and be bulldozed. This place has been here over 60 years. It has history and a heritage. It needed a new lease on life and I felt like I was the right guy.” Part of the appeal was because Seth is a local guy. He went to


Maceo Elementary, graduated from Daviess County High School and still lives on the east side. “This is my side of the county; I used to drive this highway every day,” he said. Beyond that, he also recognized it as a good business opportunity and looked forward to the “opportunity to be able to pump new life into something that’s been around for so long but needed a fresh set of legs.” The Whip has been a whirlwind of activity since Woodward took possession. Several improvements have been made to the lot: the old flea market behind the building has been demolished, new green spaces have been added, and the back fence has been moved to allow for more parking. But everything inside the store has been kept the same. “All the original equipment is still here, so we’re going to keep things exactly the same as they were when it closed in August,” Woodward said, pointing to the retro Pepsi menu board. The long term plan is to slowly make tasteful changes to the physical property and menu offerings. “There are many exciting things happening in the good food movement and there is no reason why they cannot be found at Wonder Whip,” Woodward said. One idea he’s considering is a black bean burger for those who want a healthier alternative. But for now, Woodward and his team are trying their best to keep up with the steady flow of customers, especially with sunny skies and warmer weather just around the corner.

HOW DOES IT FEEL TO BE A PART OF THAT LEGACY NOW? We’ve been busier than anyone anticipated, and that feels good. Bill Mulligan and I had high expectations, but our number one challenge has been meeting the demand that we had when we opened; that is a great problem to have. There was a lot of effort from the time I made that first phone call to the time we reopened and there were many road blocks and bumps along the way. So to get all that done, and then to see it succeed is a nice feeling.

to. Now, as we hire new employees, having that experienced core is very important.

WHAT DO YOU LOOK FOR IN NEW EMPLOYEES? I use my intuition a lot, but I’m looking for people who put in effort, who show some enthusiasm, and who present themselves in a professional manner. I’m looking for the way they present themselves on the phone or in person during interviews and how much effort they put into the application process - those intangibles can translate into how they function in the workplace after they come in and start the job.

SAME:

UPCOMING ADDITIONS:

Name Food Menu Prices Quality

“Shake of the Month” flavor that’s only available for that month. For example, a peach shake when peaches are in season at Reid’s Orchard.

Outdoor speakers and benches so customers can sit and enjoy music while they’re waiting.

Restoring

the

“Home

of

the

WonderBurger” logo on both sides of the building. •

New speaker system for drive-through.

WHAT IS YOUR LEADERSHIP/MANAGEMENT STYLE? Number one, I’m very hands-on. There’s not a day that goes by that I’m not involved in the business in some facet. I would say I’m tough but fair. My goal is always excellence. I want the best for our customers. So when I feel like we’re not meeting that then I can get a little edgy. But I would say my style is to be very hands-on and to be constantly mentoring, coaching, and guiding our employees to help them be their best. I’m definitely getting better at delegating. I’m obsessed with perfection in quality and timeliness of service, so I’m always trying to improve that.

IN YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH REOPENING THE WHIP, WHAT ARE THE BENEFITS OF RETAINING LONG-TIME EMPLOYEES? That’s been a huge benefit and a huge advantage. I knew that would be important, and thank goodness we had so many former employees with so much experience and talent stay on with us, along with the former owner aiding us. If we hadn’t had that, I don’t think we would have survived the amount of customers when we first opened. To have that knowledge available from day one was critical, especially because we wanted to keep the quality of the food the same as people were used

29

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


SPECIALTY FOODS GROUP

ARTISAN

W

BY JAIME RAFFERTY

hen you think of Specialty Foods Group (SFG),

up to $2.3 million from the Kentucky Economic Development

formerly Field Packing Company, you may think

Finance Authority. This allowed the company to bring on more

of the delicious products the company has been

employees to meet the growing demands of consumers.

supplying consumers for 101 years. Or you may recall it is one

of the top five largest employers in Owensboro/Daviess County.

Payne, Judge Mattingly, members of the Daviess County

However, if you look further, you will see a philanthropic heart

Fiscal Court and Greater Owensboro Economic Development

and a legacy of generosity to our community, and beyond.

Committee in securing the necessary funding for our recent ham

Charles Field began the business a century ago with

expansion. We are also extremely appreciative of the continued

quality products and the premise to take care of the communities

support and positive reaction we’ve received from the entire

where his people work and live. SFG is doing just that. Steve

community,” Wright says.

Wright, President, and Ric Herrera, Vice President of Sales

and Marketing, echo that Specialty Foods Group has a long

the Artisan Café, which opened in July 2015. Owensboro’s

relationship with this community and is honored to be a part of

Artisan Café is located in the Owensboro Convention Center

that continued growth.

(OCC), forming a win-win partnership. “We saw a blank canvas

One way SFG has given back to the Owensboro/

with the opportunity to connect with the community through

Daviess County area is in the recent hiring of 70 employees in

our food and expand the offerings through menu options,”

the last year. This resulted from the expansion of their flagship

Herrera says.

ham brand, Kentucky Legend – sold nationally, and made locally

at a facility on the Owensboro Riverfront.

as well as during Convention Center events.

This growth was made possible with $260,000 from the

Daviess County Kentucky Business Investment program, and 30

CAFE

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

“We are grateful for the help and support from Mayor

SFG brands can be found in their very own restaurant,

The café is open Monday-Friday from 10 a.m. – 3 p.m., However, the Artisan Café is more than just a place to

enjoy a delicious lunch. It also gives consumers the opportunity


to give back to local organizations through its “Make it Count Mondays.” Each Monday, the café donates 10% of food sales to local non-profits. Since beginning Make it Count Mondays, nearly a dozen organizations have benefited. SFG and OCC have also created a partnership with school systems by launching collections for clothing, coats and school supplies.

Beginning soon, Specialty Foods Group will

host an opportunity for consumers to taste some of their offerings and give their opinions on some of the products. This gives the community further ownership of the growing brand.

Specialty Foods Group may be best known for

its delectable products, but their goal is to also support Owensboro and Daviess County residents through quality employment and service to the community. Consumers can look for them to further deepen roots in the community through giving back, while continuing to grow the business that employs some of Owensboro’s finest. Good food and good people make SFG good for Owensboro.

31

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


STAFF RETREATS & MEETING SPACES SOMETIMES GETTING OUT OF THE OFFICE CAN BE A GOOD THING. NEW SURROUNDINGS CAN SPARK CREATIVITY, INSPIRE NEW VISION, AND HELP A TEAM OR STAFF REFOCUS. BY DANNY MAY

32

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

W

hen such gatherings are necessary, or even if it’s just time to shake things up a bit, there are several Chamber members with facilities and gathering spaces when businesses need to get the positive energy flowing for staff retreats or out-of-office meetings.

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH RETREAT AND CONFERENCE CENTER Just a short 15-minute drive from Owensboro, the Mount St. Joseph Retreat and Conference Center makes a great gathering space, getaway, or even an overnight retreat for staff or project teams. With 750 beautiful acres, “the Mount” has plenty of space to get out, go for a walk, and take a deep breath of fresh, country air. “The grounds offer an excellent opportunity to meditate and brainstorm during breaks,” said Adam Hancock, Managing Shareholder/President at Riney Hancock. The firm has held many management retreats


HOLIDAY INN RIVERFRONT BOARDROOM

MOUNT ST. JOSEPH RETREAT AND CONFERENCE CENTER

HAMPTON INN WATERFRONT TERRACE BOARDROOM

at Mount St. Joseph Retreat Center. “The staff is very accommodating and it is a great atmosphere where we can bring our two office locations together, away from the office, in a very tranquil environment to focus on the firm’s long-range, strategic plans.” Weekends stay pretty booked at the Mount for retreats, but weekdays are generally available for staff retreats or business meetings. For those gatherings, there are several spaces. Two smaller conference rooms accommodate up to 35 people comfortably. A larger conference room can hold up to 150, but a group around 50 offers the best sight lines to the screen. Each meeting space is installed with drop-down screens, Wi-Fi, an LCD projector, and sound system with wireless microphone. In other words, all you need to do is show up with a laptop. Lemonade, tea, and coffee are also included in the cost. Continental breakfast in the room or meals in the dining hall are extra. Overnight

accommodations are also available if needed. For more information about staff retreats, meetings, or conference room rentals, contact Sr. Mary Matthias at 270-229-4103.

OWENSBORO CONVENTION CENTER For out-of-office meetings, the Owensboro Convention Center has a number of spaces that can be customized to fit business meetings of every size. In addition to traditional meeting rooms, attendees can have break-aways in the lobby or make use of outdoor space on the terrace overlooking the Ohio River, the front lawn, or The Pier. “In order to think outside of the box, you need to get outside the box,” says Sales Manager, J.T. Pedley, alluding to the idea that a change of environment can promote creativity, which is perfect for brainstorming sessions. The Convention Center’s sales and event 33

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


OWENSBORO CONVENTION CENTER

HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF OWENSBORO

operations team can handle all the details for you: catering and bar services, room rental, security, A/V, and room décor. The food and beverage team can coordinate custom lunch menus with diverse catering choices; everything from healthy and diet-restricted dishes to comfort foods and decadent desserts. Or, if you prefer your attendees to be on their own for lunch, they can always ride the escalator down to the Artisan Café by Specialty Foods Group. Chips, cookies, fruit, nuts, yogurt, soda or water can also be provided for breaks. For more information about a meeting space at the Owensboro Convention Center, contact JT Pedley at 270-687-8800 or JT_Pedley@ comcastspectacor.com.

HOME BUILDERS ASSOCIATION OF OWENSBORO The Home Builders Association of Owensboro building also makes a great venue for out –of-office meetings. The HBAO facility at 3515 Wathen’s Crossing has two rental options. The Atmos Meeting Room is roughly 60’ by 40’ and has a maximum capacity of 150. It is very accessible, with an outside entrance and ample parking. It also has a ceiling-mounted projector with a 7’ screen. The Kight Boardroom is a smaller facility with a capacity of 24 that is interfaced with a wall-mounted television. Both the meeting room and the board room have and kitchen and restroom facilities and free guest wi-fi. For more information about the boardroom or meeting room, contact Richard at 270- 688-0353 or Richard@ HBAO.com.

34

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


HAMPTON INN WATERFRONT If you’re looking for a meeting space with a view, the Terrace Boardroom at the Hampton Inn Waterfront features a large terrace for breaks and outdoor seating that showcases the riverfront. The Terrace Boardroom has floor-to-ceiling windows, complimentary Wi-Fi, storage, and a dry-bar. It’s the perfect setting for presentations, video conferences, or other intimate meetings for up to 12 people. The Riverview Meeting Room is sleek and modern, featuring a private terrace overlooking Ohio River, the Owensboro Convention Center, and Plaza. The Riverview Meeting Room is the ideal venue for smaller meetings or social events. The flexible meeting space features floor-toceiling windows, complimentary wireless Internet access, a dry-bar and projection screen. It can be set up with different seating styles for 30-40 people. The Riverwalk Meeting Room is the largest meeting room and features a spacious outdoor terrace for breaks and outdoor seating with great views of Owensboro and the Ohio River. It has floor-to-ceiling wrap-around windows, complimentary Wi-Fi, a dry-bar, lectern and projection screen. Like the Riverview, it can also be set up with different seating styles for 40-70 people. For more information about the meeting rooms at the

Hampton Inn Waterfront, contact Nicole at 270-685-2005 or nicole.ebelhar@hilton.com.

HOLIDAY INN RIVERFRONT Another great downtown option is The Rivermont Boardroom inside the Holiday Inn Riverfront, especially for smaller parties. It seats 10 people at the conference table and has full wi-fi capabilities as well as presentation abilities using a laptop direct connection to a 60 inch LCD TV. Two larger Executive Meeting Rooms can also be used for larger gatherings. The space also separates into two separate meeting spaces allowing separate meetings to be held at once. The meeting space has full audio visual capabilities with two 7 foot retractable projection screens at each end of the space and two 60in LCD tv’s mounted on the wall of each space. The Holiday Inn also provides full catering options for meeting attendees. “Many companies appreciate being able to book the space and rely on us to take care of all the set up and catering details, which allows them to focus on their business at hand,” says Lauren Worthington, Assistant General Manager. For more information about the Executive Meeting Rooms at the Holiday Inn Riverfront, contact Lauren at 270-6831111 or agm.owbdt@lin-gate.com.

35

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


10

QUESTIONS JOHN MARSHALL MOORE

CEO, Marshall Ventures BY DANNY MAY

36

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


W HAT I S SOMETHI NG YOUR S TAFF / E MPLOYEES WOUL D BE SU R P RIS E D TO KNOW AB OU T YOU ? I ran into a cow while skiing on a pond one time. Actually, they probably wouldn’t be surprised. There are a few things I wish they didn’t know, like all the mistakes I’ve made. I tell people all the time, with six kids I really don’t have many secrets.

W HAT I S YOU R FAVOR I TE VACAT ION D ESTI NATI ON? Being with family and being active are two keys to my happiness. I also love the water. Nothing is more satisfying for me than being on the lake at Rough River. Skiing, tubing, going for long swims, jumping off cliffs, or simply floating in the water, they all make for a great day. Plus it’s the only place my kids think it’s cool to hang out with their dad!

W HAT ’S STI L L ON YOU R BUCKE T L I S T? Swim the English Channel. Bike across the United States. Hike among the giant sequoias. Those all sound admirable but I don’t really have a list. Right now I’m focused on raising a family and growing my businesses. I do try to take advantage of every opportunity I have for a new life experience. Anything consisting of physical activity and a tinge of risk would be rewarding.

W HAT EXPER I ENCE( S) F R OM C H I L D HOOD L ATER I NF LUENCE D YO UR CAR EER PATH?

appreciated the impact the commercials had on the business. We were always talking about different promotions and what worked and what didn’t. He was building a brand that was fun. People still remember those commercials today. As for finance, one of my earliest childhood memories of my father is discussing the Rule of 72 (simplified way of determining how long for an investment to double). I grew up in Maceo, so on the drives home my father was always quizzing me on math. When listening to pitches and working on strategies the ability to do math in my head and determine returns on the fly often pays dividends today.

DO YOU RE ME MBE R YOUR FIRS T PAYCHE CK? HOW DID YOU E ARN IT ? My first real pay check was from bailing hay. I wouldn’t take 100 times that check to do it again. It was 100 degrees, 99% humidity, sunburns, bales hitting you in the back of the head, and hay all down your back. It makes me itch thinking about it! My brother David was smart enough to acquire the skill of tractor driver so he didn’t have to do as much physical labor. One of many lessons learned on the farm.

WHO ME NTORE D YOU? / WHO FIRS T RE COGNIZ E D YOUR GIFTS ? I was lucky to grow up with a loving family and a mother that was always supportive no matter what dream I was chasing. Not sure about any gifts but my wife, Julie, sure took a leap of faith with me. Her calm, laid back nature is a perfect balance to my energetic, often hyper ways. Her

Growing up in a family business certainly

trust in me certainly provides an enormous

provided me many advantages for a career as

amount of motivation.

an entrepreneur. The two areas it had the most impact were marketing and finance. My father

As for mentors, I could list many. As I have

was doing crazy tv commercials when not

started my latest venture in the raising capital

many people did. Though it was contrary to his

market a couple do stand out. Mitch Settle’s

personality and he shunned the attention, he

positive demeanor with honest feedback has 37

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


been greatly appreciated. He provides a great example of the importance of relationships in business transactions. Chris Reid has provided invaluable feedback and direction from a strategic perspective. He has been an enormous help in many ways. No doubt the person that has had the greatest impact as a mentor is my brother, Don Moore. He is always willing to provide an opinion whether I want it or not. Obviously, we have a special bond as brothers but it’s even more than that. Beyond the benefit of his experience and wisdom, I get a perspective from someone with the same upbringing and values.

W H AT S KI LL S DI D YOU D EV ELOP EARLY ON T H AT YO U S TI L L USE EV ERY DAY AS AN EXECUTIVE? I think growing up playing sports provided me a skill

WHAT LE GACY /IMPACT DO YOU HOP E YOUR BUS INESS ES LE AVE FOR FUT U R E GE NE RAT IONS ? Balancing profits with a positive impact on the welfare of our society is the key to real success. Do good for others and ultimately you will be rewarded.

WHAT IS T HE MOS T RE WARDING T HING ABOUT YOUR WORK WIT H MARS HALL VE NT URES ? Giving someone the opportunity to make their dream a reality. As an experienced entrepreneur, I realize things aren’t always going to go as planned but just having a chance provides the motivation needed to keep battling.

look for ways to get better. I’m ok with celebrating

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORIT E T HING ABO UT LIVING & WORKING IN OWE NS BORO?

accomplishments but I really enjoy growth and

Owensboro is a perfect town to raise a family. Great

improvements. My focus today is motivating others to

downtown, great restaurants, cool hangouts, events like

improve their unique talents and flourish.

ROMP. Better yet, its central location provides access to

of continually looking for ways to improve. I always

large markets, without the daily crime concerns.

38

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


39

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016


200 E 3rd St, Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 http://chamber.owensboro.com

40

GO BUSINESS . SECOND QUARTER 2016

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID OWENSBORO KY 42301 PERMIT NO 420

GO Business Q2 2016  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you