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FROM THE CHAMBER CANDANCE BRAKE

W

elcome to Volume II, Quarter 1 of our Greater Owensboro Business Quarterly! This volume kicks off a bright 2016 after a tremendous 2015 for the Greater Owensboro region. Our Chamber is in full swing working on tracking legislation and policy issues in Frankfort. Our community priorities will be our focus in Frankfort, particularly with our transportation infrastructure needs. We will also be keeping a close eye on any new legislation that may impact our membership. To that end, we are hosting a West Kentucky Thank You Night in Frankfort on February 11. Our goal is to work with our partners to communicate with legislators and the Executive Branch as a group for a louder

I

President & CEO

voice and for more influence. Agriculture will be the focus of our February Rooster Booster with Ryan Quarles, our Agriculture Commissioner, serving as our guest speaker and Kentucky Farm Bureau as our sponsor. February will close out with our iconic Farm-City Breakfast on the 27th. In the mean time, we continue to work every day for our members and to remind our community how important it is to keep our money in Owensboro. Thanks for reading! I hope you enjoy this publication. Sincerely, Candance

ADAM HANCOCK

t is astonishing that we are now operating in the year 2016. Time flies at the Chamber, as it does in life, so it is important that we reflect on the success of the past while striving to improve the future. We were fortunate to experience a bevy of success throughout 2015 including continued membership growth and retention, a wildly successful Small Business Saturday, highly attended events, and continued success with advocacy efforts on behalf of our members. These successes were the result of an outstanding team. Candance, Shelly, Jessica, Susan, and Daniel are the dream team. They are an all-star starting lineup that, under the direction of Chair Mark Martin, truly excelled. The Chamber Board would like to thank them for all their efforts. It would be easy to sit back and enjoy this success, but we know there is much more to be done and we plan to build on that success. In the first quarter of 2016, we will focus our efforts on advocating for the business community at the local and state

Chairman

levels in order to support our membership on key issues that arise. This will be an eventful year with the presidential election, as well as state and local elections, and we will provide our members with access and information. The Chamber Young Professional group has laid the foundation to their continued success in 2015 and I will commit to continued success before I am kicked out for old age. They are our future, so encourage your contacts under the age of 40 to participate and attend their excellent activities. The 2016 Leadership Owensboro class is an impressive group as well; look for those individuals to do great things throughout their careers. Most importantly, our success relies on our membership and we are thankful for every single one of our members. We strive to provide you with a Chamber that is here for you and that will always do what is in your best interest. Please feel free to contact us if there is anything that we can do to help your business succeed. Bring it on, 2016!

A LOOK BACK AT LAST QUARTER’S COVER STORY:

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016

Adams & Sons’ Blue Bridge Tie project (featured on the 4th Qtr cover of GO Business) sold out before Christmas! Eric Adams presented a check for $7,500 from the 75 ties commemorating the 75th anniversary of the Blue Bridge to Pat Searcy on behalf of the Owensboro Health Foundation

on December 10. The donation will be used to offset medical care expenses for disadvantaged patients. Adams is already planning next year’s themed tie for charity. “We’ve got a date that ties in nicely for year three as well,” Adams said. (PHOTO PROVIDED BY OWENSBORO HEALTH)


PUBLISHER/CREATIVE DIRECTOR Jason Tanner jason@tannerwest.com

FEATURES:

1ST QUARTER 2016

ADVERTISING SALES

Brock Quinton brock@tannerwest.com

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Robert Williams robert@owensboroparent.com

GRAPHIC DESIGNERS

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Taylor West taylor@tannerwest.com

A CLEAR VOICE

COPY EDITOR

Ashley Murphy

Downtown TIF Project

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ON THE COVER

Photo by David Grinnell

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EXECUTIVE ANSWERS On the Record

EVENT SCHEDULE CHAMBER BEHIND THE SCENES Rooster Booster

MEMBER MILESTONES

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HAND-PICKED

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THREE WAYS A LAW FIRM COULD HELP YOUR BUSINESS

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MEMBERSHIP SPOTLIGHT

PRINTING

Greenwell Chisholm Owensboro, Kentucky

CONTACT INFORMATION:

Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce Effective brand interactions. 200 E. 3rd St., Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 chamber.owensboro.com

Shelly Nichols

BY THE NUMBERS

Andrea Roberson andrea@tannerwest.com

Natasha Gaw, Owner of Bella Ragazza Boutique

MEET THE CHAMBER STAFF

Favorite non-profits from a few of our favorite local leaders

TM

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SPEND YOUR MONEY WHERE YOUR HEART IS

A Jason Tanner Design Group publication

Health & Fitness Facilities

10 QUESTIONS Kirk Kirkpatrick

Effective brand interactions.

TM

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MEET THE

CHAMBER STAFF

SHELLY NICHOLS Best thing about working for the Chamber: The people. Being out in the community.

Role/title at Chamber: Membership Development Manager. I retain and recruit members. Hometown: Lebanon, KY. In Marion County. How long have you lived in Owensboro: 9 years.

On Saturday, I’m most likely: Spending time with my family. Just hanging out.

What brought you here? Terry Woodward bought my husband’s business and hired him, so we moved to Owensboro. High school & mascot: Marion County Knights. I was a cheerleader, of course! And I was voted “most school spirit.” College alma mater: UK C-A-T-S!

Netflix or theater? Theater. Definitely. Favorite board game? We’re a Monopoly family. My boys are 10 and 16 so they try to beat me. Best Christmas memory this year? Being together with both sides of our family all together at our house.

Favorite song to sing along to in the car: Me and Bobby McGee

What would the Chamber staff say is your real talent? My curtsy is pretty awesome.

All time favorite movie: The Sound of Music

Hidden talent not even they know: Hmm...I’m an open book. They know me pretty well.

Favorite Disney/Pixar movie character: Woody from Toy Story. He’s loyal. PHOTO BY DREAM COPY PHOTOGRAPHY

Proudest moment in your job? When members tell me that what the Chamber does makes a difference.

Best concert you’ve ever seen: James Taylor. We sat right in front.

Favorite Chamber event to work? Shop Owensboro Saturday. It was a blast! I went to 20 stores who participated. To see how happy the store owners were was a lot of fun, even with the rain.

BY THE NUMBERS

DOWNTOWN TIF PROJECT THIS TIF (TAX INCREMENT FINANCING) PROJECT SUBSIDIZES A DOWNTOWN DISTRICT THAT WILL ENCOMPASS THE ENTIRE RIVERFRONT FROM THE RIVERPARK CENTER TO ENGLISH PARK AND SOUTH TO BRESCIA UNIVERSITY

11 1600 580 3RD major projects

1.2

construction jobs will be created

billion dollars is the estimated economic regional impact during the TIF’s life

jobs sustained annually

80

million dollars in new taxes will be created

Music Center I N A D D I T I O N : -- International Mixed Use Projects on 2nd St.

- Improvements to RiverPark Center - Riverbank Stabilization

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new hotel will be built

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new buildings on Brescia’s campus

- New Parking Garage - Extending the Riverwalk to English Park


EXECUTIVE ANSWERS

ON THE RECORD

With this being the new year - in terms of business, what do you find more beneficial: looking forward to the future or learning from the past? WADE JENKINS

GUS C. SMITH II

JESSICA MCKINLEY

I guess I would have to say a little of both. When I start thinking about 2016 and making our business plans at Old National Bank for the upcoming year, I can’t help but look at how 2015 shaped up and measure our wins, losses and how each situation might have been made better. I always want my team looking to the future because we want to be proactive with our clients and potential clients, but I have always felt throughout my life that you definitely learn from your past, both good and bad.

Tis the season to wax poetic about the year that is coming to an end and the one that is approaching. There are opportunities to reflect, as well as time to prognosticate as to what the New Year will bring. I find that it is sound business practice to account for past performance while establishing goals or a vision for the future. By incorporating past performance into a business plan, you avoid wasting time and resources. I find it to be very advantageous for businesses to use past success or failure as an analytical tool, or even a road map (so to speak).

To quote Dale Carnegie, “Develop success from failures. Discouragement and failure are two of the surest stepping stones to success.” For me, it is hard to focus on the future without carefully considering the past. I can say, with certainty, our success lingers under a cloud of mistakes. Learning and growing are integral parts of my personal life, as well as in the life of my business. We are in no way the same store that opened twelve years ago. The day Blossoms stops evolving should be the day we close the doors.

There is an oft-used adage regarding the past and the potential consequence for those who do not remember it. I agree with this sentiment, as it transcends the business world into our own personal lives/community, as well as society in general. The past will almost always directly or indirectly affect the future. We are at our best when we build upon past success and learn from past failures.

2015 was a year of risks. We had gains, along with growing pains. We constantly roll the dice and wish for the best possible outcome. One day I hope to have all the answers, to have someone quote me on ways of success! Until then, I will take the lessons of past and use them to build a hopeful future.

MARKET PRESIDENT, OLD NATIONAL BANK

As your parents always said, you have to learn many things the hard way, and I do believe that helps us all grow and become the person we strive to be. In Old National’s strategic planning meetings we discuss both but the emphasis is definitely toward our future and how we can make each client experience better, how we can grow individually and how we can continually educate ourselves in this rapidly changing world we live in. I am excited to see what the future holds because I do believe change is the great equalizer for all of us and how we can maneuver in our businesses. As we all know, change is the ONLY constant, so we have to be ready to move toward our future as efficiently as possible.

DIRECTOR OF OPERATIONS, HAMPTON INN & SUITES DOWNTOWN / WATERFRONT

MANAGER, BLOSSOMS APPAREL & GIFTS AND THE SHOE GARDEN

May you all have a prosperous New Year!

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EVENT SCHEDULE: JANUARY EVENTS LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Commerce Center (200 East 3rd Street) Old National Bank Conference Room January 30 // 8:00 a.m.

FEBRUARY EVENTS ROOSTER BOOSTER BREAKFAST Speaker – State Commissioner of Agriculture Ryan Quarles. Owensboro Convention Center Feb 4 // 7:30 a.m.

BUSINESS AFTER HOURS Junior League of Owensboro at the Owensboro Museum of Science and History Feb 9 // 4:00-7:00 p.m.

WESTERN KENTUCKY UNIVERSITY THANK YOU NIGHT Frankfort, KY Frankfort Convention Center Feb 11 // 5:00 p.m.

2016 ATHENA AWARDS Speaker – Lieutenant Governor Jenean Hampton. Owensboro Convention Center Feb 24 // 11:30 a.m. EST

CHAMBER BEHIND THE SCENES: ROOSTER BOOSTER EDITION

2016 FARM CITY BREAKFAST Speaker – Brent Burchett, Director Division of Value-Added Plant Production with the Kentucky Department of Agriculture. 37th Annual Farm City Breakfast will be held in the newly renovated cafeteria at Daviess County High School. Feb 27 // 7:30 a.m.

MARCH EVENTS ROOSTER BOOSTER BREAKFAST Owensboro Convention Center March 3 // 7:30 a.m.

LEGISLATIVE UPDATE Commerce Center (200 East 3rd Street) Old National Bank Conference Room March 26 // 8:00 a.m.

ROOSTER BOOSTER BREAKFAST Owensboro Convention Center March 31 // 7:30 a.m.

W

ith Chad Benefield at the helm, Rooster Booster breakfasts might seem like

amount of work goes into keeping the breakfasts fun, informative and, hopefully, on schedule.

bios and logos for introductions at RB. Monday before Rooster Booster: •

pull off a successful Rooster Booster.

JESSICA’S ROOSTER BOOSTER CHECKLIST: Three weeks before Rooster Booster: Finalize and edit Chamber Matters for

Meet with Chad to brainstorm how we can make the breakfast fun, special

Here’s a glimpse behind the scenes of what it takes for Jessica Kirk and the Chamber staff to

Reach out to all new members from the previous month to gather their

to happen. But behind the scenes, a tremendous

publication. GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016

organized chaos. You never know what’s going

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Week before Rooster Booster:

things that we can add, etc. •

Finalize agenda for the morning.

Begin working on the presentation.

Send out a “points sheet” to the Ambassadors to see who will win Ambassador of the Month.

Contact speakers and sponsors to finalize details for the breakfast.

Touch base with the event manager at the Convention Center to go over


numbers, layout and anything specific we might need to review for RB. Tuesday before Rooster Booster: •

Continue to work on the presentation as we receive new member bios and logos along with the presentations from the sponsors and/or speakers.

Contact the secret shaker and ask someone to give the invocation.

Determine the Ambassador of the Month, then contact them to congratulate them and ask where they would like to receive a gift card from.

Day before Rooster Booster: •

Print all materials for RB: agenda, new member bios for Chad, special guests list, name tents for the head tables, reserved table signs, Leadership Owensboro sign-in sheets, and no reservation sign-in sheets.

Print hard copy of the presentation and make notes.

Move presentation to the laptop and check all sound, videos, etc.

Run by the Convention Center if there is anything that needs to be checked for the layout, or if any of the sound and videos need to be checked in the venue.

Take all items to the Convention Center by noon for their staff to set the items on the tables.

Purchase the gift card for the Ambassador of the Month as well as the Secret Shaker gift.

Gather all iPads and credit card scanners to take home.

Night before Rooster Booster: •

Charge iPads and computer.

Do any updating or additional downloading/formatting for the presentation.

“SETTING UP FOR ROOSTER BOOSTER IS A FULL 24 HOURS OF PREP FOR US. IT’S OUR GOAL TO HAVE TABLES AND CHAIRS SET UP WEDNESDAY MORNING SO THE FOOD AND BEVERAGE STAFF CAN PREPARE PLACE SETTINGS.” -RHETT JONES Event Supervisor, Owensboro Convention Center

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BY THE NUMBERS •

Canteen prepares 50 gallons of coffee

Average attendance is 300-350

Largest Rooster Booster of the year is generally January, where attendance spikes to nearly 800 for the “State of the City and County” addresses

For breakfast, Food & Beverage Staff at Convention Center prepares:

1,000 pieces of bacon

100 pounds of scrambled eggs

500 biscuits

6 gallons of gravy

HAND-PICKED

Day of Rooster Booster Timeline: (for December’s RB) 5:00 Jessica’s alarm goes off 5:30 Convention Center food and beverage workers arrive 6:15 Canteen sets up coffee stations 6:15 Jessica arrives at the Convention Center to begin last minute preparations: (e.g. taping gifts under the chairs for the December RB) 6:30 Jessica buzzes around: hooks up the computer and checks the screens and mic volume; places agendas, glass of water and name tents at each seat of the head table; place new member bios at Chad’s seat; puts Ambassador of the Month gift and special guest list at the podium, and sets out reserved table signs 6:45 Jessica grabs a cup of coffee from canteen, heads to Registration Tables to set up iPads and credit card swiper, and sits with a smile, ready to greet and check in all of our wonderful members! 7:00 Chad arrives and prepares to wow the crowd. He gathers his thoughts at podium and gives “one minute warning” at 7:29 7:30 Welcome and Invocation 7:33 Mingle Minute 7:35 Standing room only, so staff puts more chairs out 7:40 Candance awards Ambassador of the Month, recognizes new

members and gives Chamber update 7:50 Chad does something totally random. For December, it was demonstrating the “12 Days of Christmas” on stage with Shop Owensboro business owners. In October, it was a fashion show with Adams & Sons’ Blue Bridge Tie. 8:00 Guest speaker takes podium 8:30 Santa gives out door prizes 8:35 Dismiss. Members leave full of food and information. Cleanup begins Immediately Following Rooster Booster: • Clean up; clear tables from any promotional items that weren’t taken • Clean up everything from the head tables and any reserved table signs • Write thank you notes • Upload presentations and videos to dropbox for OCTC to stream all month long Day After Rooster Booster: • Contact the sponsor and speaker for the next month’s Rooster Booster with details for the breakfast. Request their logos, bios and articles for the Chamber Matters Publication that comes out in the Messenger-Inquirer the Monday of Rooster Booster week.

Favorite non-profits from a few of our favorite local leaders:

GIRLS, INC.

CASA

DANIEL PITINO SHELTER

BOYS & GIRLS CLUB

UNITED WAY

EMPOWERMENT ACADEMY

-Darrell Higginbotham

-Claud Porter

-Adam Hancock

-Jack Wells

-Jerry Morris

-Carl Greenwell

INDEPENDENCE BANK

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DAVIESS COUNTY ATTORNEY

RINEY HANCOCK CPAS PSC

WELLS HEALTH SYSTEMS

SOUTHERN STAR

GREENWELL CHISHOLM


The Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce’s mission is to provide leadership, advocacy and member services that foster growth and economic prosperity for our region. For years, the Chamber has achieved that mission by being the primary voice for members and pro-Owensboro efforts on the legislative front.

BY JASON TANNER 13

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“One

of our goals is to support

clearly and concisely identifies projects for the

the

by

region. These priorities are divided into two

promoting our local economy. We work hard

categories, Capital and Transportation, which

to advocate for our entire membership, which

comprise either side of the card.

whole

community

includes so many different sectors,” Candance

The end goal of the card is for elected officials

Castlen Brake, Greater Owensboro Chamber of

and influence-makers in Frankfort to hear “one

Commerce President & CEO, says.

voice” from the people of Greater Owensboro.

The Chamber believes that as the local

The cards can be passed out like a business

economy grows, the community succeeds. Or,

card any time someone from Owensboro goes

as Brake puts it, “a rising tide lifts the boat.”

to Frankfort or sees a legislator.

This viewpoint is why the Chamber has

The hope, according to Brake, is to make a

been so closely involved with the Community

consistent effort every two years during the long

Priorities initiative.

session when the state budget is set.

COMMUNITY PRIORITIES

(Owensboro) and knows that we come to them

Every other year, in preparation for the Kentucky General Assembly’s Budget Session, the Chamber, the Economic Development

with a clear and focused message that they can address more easily, with no confusion. “We in Owensboro-Daviess County and our

Corporation (EDC), the City of Owensboro and

surrounding region are very fortunate to be

the Daviess County Fiscal Court collaborate

represented by a dedicated delegation that truly

to create the Greater Owensboro Community

cares about issues facing our community. They

Priorities List so the community can speak with

are accessible and open to our concerns.

one voice.

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“Hopefully, Frankfort expects to hear from us

“With our legislative delegation, our lobbyist,

This year, after compiling results from

our local elected officials, such as Judge Al

membership surveys, hosting a community

Mattingly, who dedicates an inordinate amount

forum, on-going input from city and county

of work and time making sure the people of

officials and a host of other organizations, the

Daviess County are heard, and our Chamber

Community Priority List was compiled and

and EDC reps, Owensboro is present each day

formatted into a Community Priority Card that

in Frankfort.”

GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


PAST PROJECTS FROM THE 2013 PROCESS INCLUDE: CAPITAL PRIORITIES • OCTC Advanced Technology Center •

Phase II Western Kentucky University Owensboro Classroom Building

• • •

Phase II Graduate Medical Center Downtown Parking Garage International Bluegrass Museum

TRANSPORTATION PRIORITIES • Upgrades to future I-67 corridor • Continued I-69 upgrades, including • • •

spurs to Owensboro-Daviess County Highway 60 out of flood plain

PROCESS TO DESIGN/PRODUCE CARD: • • • • • • • •

Started in June 2015 Series of meetings to consolidate projects Projects submitted Survey to membership to find out where members stand on variety of issues Chamber-facilitated public forum at Kentucky Wesleyan Chamber and EDC boards have input and take action City and county officials weighed in with feedback from their constituents Lastly, card is compiled and printed, blending all those voices together

UPCOMING LEGISLATIVE FORUMS:

for Owensboro

JAN 30, 2016 8 A.M. MARCH 26 (TENTATIVE)

Widening of Thruston-Dermont Road

Both are free and open to Chamber members

Study and design of an Outer Loop

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THREE WAYS A LAW FIRM COULD

HELP YOUR BUSINESS By Danny May

Business owners and executives have an endless list of responsibilities and decisions to make, especially during the startup phase. Then there are additional considerations as the business grows. Law firms can be a great resource for businesses when navigating new areas in times of growth. In this feature article, several Chamber members offer tips for protecting your business while minimizing risks if litigation were to occur. Here are three things to consider from a legal perspective:

BUSINESS ENTITY FORMATION In the startup phase, a company needs to decide what type of entity best suits their business or organization based on the governance and tax implications of that entity. There are many things to consider when making this decision and each scenario has its own advantages and disadvantages, which is why an attorney can help you determine the best entity for your business. For example: • Sole proprietorship – The owner is the business, so he or she can be personally liable for losses • Partnership – Each partner may have limited liability. Therefore, if someone sued partnership, your personal assets may not be jeopardized • LLC & Corporations – Completely protected personally (except in cases of gross negligence or fraud) Business governances of each entity are also something to consider. For example, if a corporation wants to buy a building, many times a bank needs a resolution from the corporation to ensure approval from the board of directors to secure financing. Law firms can assist with the drafting of those resolutions. There are also tax implications for each entity: • Sole Proprietorship – Income filed under individual taxes

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016

• Partnership - Can be taxed as a partnership; partnership could be taxed separate from the individuals • LLC – Taxed separately from the individual • Corporation – Two types: • SCORE = Corporation’s earnings are taxed, and individuals are taxed • CCORE = No corporation tax, individuals are taxed In addition to consulting a legal firm, it’s also wise to consult an accountant before filing articles of organization/ incorporation with the Secretary of State.

EMPLOYEE POLICIES As a company is growing and adding employees, employee policies are an important aspect of protecting the business. Most law firms would be happy to assist companies with drafting employee policies that can help protect your business from discrimination, disability claims and wage and hour claims.    “We see a number of employee claims based on discrimination, disability claims and wage and hour claims,” says John Wathen, with Sullivan, Mountjoy, Stainback & Miller P.S.C. “The best defense is having clear employee policies in place and applying those policies consistently.” In sports, they say the best offense is a good defense. 


Similarly, in a legal context, being proactive and having a clear plan in place is the best way to protect yourself when conflicts or disagreements arise.   “If you have a clear policy, and you follow that policy in a consistent way, you can protect yourself from a number of claims,” Wathen says. “For a well-prepared employer, defending employee claims can be much simpler and cost-effective.” A few examples of these situations may include: FMLA (Family Medical Leave Act), ADA (Americans with Disabilities Act), workers’ compensation, claims of discrimination and wage and hour.

CONTRACT GENERATION AND REVIEW   As a business grows, contracts are likely to become common practice, whether it’s a lease agreement, a sales contract with a client or supplier, a contract entering into a working relationship with another business to perform services, or a non-compete or non-solicitation agreement. In the case of a lease agreement, “it’s important to make sure you understand your rights and responsibilities as a business tenant while also ensuring the flexibility that you may need in the event of growth or other changes in your business needs,” says Terra Knight, with Thacker, Hodskins, Searcy & Knight.     Whatever the case, if a written contract is needed, a law firm can assist in drafting and producing contracts that are clear so that if a disagreement arises, it is clearly dictated by the contract. Knight

says, “Business relationships certainly have an element of trust in them, so it is very important in building trust that both parties know exactly what the terms of the business relationship will be and what is to be expected of each of them. Attorneys can help by conducting arms-length negotiations so that both parties are able to reach a fair agreement that addresses their specific needs, and which hopefully minimizes future disagreements.” On the other end of the spectrum, most law firms also offer contract review if a business is presented a contract by a customer or client.  A contract review can help your business understand the terms in the contract, identify what changes can be made, and advise if negotiations need to be made. For example, most vendors and suppliers who have been in business for any period of time often have their own standard contracts or agreements.  These contracts often use “boilerplate” language, which might seem standard.  However, Knight says this standard language could include recent court cases or legal developments on how the language has been interpreted or applied. “Also, it is important to understand that those standard contracts have been drafted by that company (or its attorney) for that company’s purposes.  It is intended to address and focus on their needs.” A thorough review with an attorney will help you identify areas of concern for your business that may need to be modified through negotiations. 

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MEMBER MILESTONES

“The fact that Goodfellows has existed for 100 years says a lot about our community. We have a very caring community, and we act when we see children in need.” - Tracy McQueen, President BY CAITLYN MERRITT

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GOODFELLOWS CLUB Celebrating 100 Years

The Goodfellows Club began with a newspaper article during the bitterly cold winter of 1916, when a young newspaper reporter learned that the Christmas parties for needy children would cease. The young ladies of the Charity Girls, who hosted the parties since 1911, were now married with families of their own, and were disbanding the group. As he sat at his typewriter, the reporter – Lawrence Hager – decided to change that story. Rather than reporting that the parties would end, he decided to continue the tradition himself. On Christmas morning, he went to the local theatre where the party was to be held and found a line of children eagerly waiting. He was stunned to see children shivering in the cold, wearing thin shirts and trousers; some were barefoot. Hager quickly contacted local merchants, and loads of warm clothing, long underwear, shoes and jackets were swiftly delivered to the theatre. It was a Christmas never forgotten by those children – or by Lawrence Hager. The experience so touched him that he wanted to share it with others, and the Goodfellows Club of Owensboro was born. The Goodfellows Club has grown over the years to provide emergency dental and medical care for children and still provides an annual Christmas party.


The organization works closely with family and youth resource centers at area schools to identify children with the greatest needs, serving approximately 2,000 every year. The Goodfellows Club has been reaching out to Owensboro-Daviess County’s less fortunate children since 1916 to serve basic needs and give all children the chance to thrive at school and ultimately in life.

E.M. FORD

Celebrating 90 Years

E.M. Ford is a full-service insurance and financial planning firm. Their products span the insurance spectrum, and include home, auto, life, and business insurance, as well as group benefits, including health and supplemental insurance policies. With 30 employees to serve their clients’ needs, E.M. Ford also provides investment management and financial planning for both business owners and families. Founded in 1925 by Senator E. M. Ford as an independent insurance agency, the firm still remains family-owned. His two sons, the honorable Wendell Ford and Reyburn Ford, became the company’s secondgeneration owners. In the early 1980s, the agency transferred leadership to the third generation of Fords, Wendell’s son Steve and Reyburn’s son Rick. Steve’s sons Clay, Neel and Morgan now make up the fourth generation to operate the family business. Clay says, “My brothers and I have had the benefit and privilege of learning directly from the two generations prior to us, and we hope to continue their legacy of doing what is best for our clients.” E.M. Ford was selected as a “Business of the Year” by the Chamber of Commerce in 2015. They have been Chamber members since 1964.

CLAY FORD

VALOR OIL

Celebrating 50 Years

Valor Oil has been distributing petroleum products and services since 1966. The company, based in Owensboro and Bowling Green, is a thirdgeneration business that offers private label and major brand gasoline, diesel fuels, racing fuels, lubricants, antifreeze and other petroleum products. Although Valor Oil is based in Kentucky, they distribute to parts of Indiana, Illinois and Tennessee. Valor Oil’s racing fuels are also offered throughout the United States. Since opening, Valor Oil has pledged to offer the best products and services proven to be dependable and fairly priced. The Valor Oil team recognizes the importance in listening to their customers and tailoring their products and services to suit the needs of the customers. Valor Oil also works to continue to educate their staff to stay on top of today’s petroleum solutions and technologies. “It takes a long time for a business to grow. Valor Oil began by serving a few people in Hancock County. Now we serve regionally in Owensboro, Bowling Green, and Louisville. We have offices all over the place. Plus, our racing fuel is sold nationwide,” Gary Emmick, President of Valor Oil, said.

“THE SECRET TO BEING SUCCESSFUL FOR THE LAST 50 YEARS IS REMAINING A FAMILY BUSINESS THAT HAS STAYED COMMITTED TO FAMILY VALUES.” - Gary Emmick, President

JOSH EMMICK AND GARY EMMICK

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


CUSTOM AUDIO VIDEO Celebrating 40 Years

Celebrating their 40th anniversary, Custom Audio Video has continued to offer top quality services in audio and video technology and solutions. The company always strives to meet their primary goal of offering their customers the best services and products in the business. Custom Audio Video’s dedication to not only selling equipment, but delivering solutions to their customers has successfully bolstered their business and clientele. Since opening in 1976, Custom Audio Video has installed and serviced several systems, including access control systems, security systems, professional/residential sound systems, access control systems, telephone systems, and video systems. The staff of Custom Audio Video includes certified in-house technicians. They offer products from several authorized dealers, including Epson Video, Panasonic Video, Toshiba, Universal Remote Control, and many more.

“OVER THE LAST FORTY YEARS, WE COMMITTED TO BEING UP-TO-DATE WITH THE TECHNOLOGY AND SERVICES WE OFFER. DIVERSITY AND HONESTY HAS MADE THE COMPANY SUCCESSFUL IN MANAGING GOOD RELATIONS WITH THE COMMUNITY AND OUR CUSTOMERS.” – Larry Maglinger, Owner

LARRY MAGLINGER

CHAMPION FORD Celebrating 25 Years

At a recent anniversary celebration, Bruce Brubaker, owner of Champion Ford Lincoln Mazda, was presented a commemorative 25th Anniversary plaque from Ford Motor Company and a 25th Anniversary award from Ford Credit. Highlights of the celebration included a live performance by country artists LoCash Cowboys, live painting by Aaron Kizer and a compilation of 25 years of advertising. Brubaker, a former MLB pitcher, acquired the Ford dealership in 1990. In the summer of 2000, the dealership moved from its longtime location to its current, much larger, 10 acre site. Brubaker’s sons have followed into the automotive business. Bruce III, known as Duke, is the General Sales Manager of the Owensboro location. Tyler is the General Manager of the Champion Ford REO location in Rockport, IN. The Champion organization employs around 90 people, including their REO Ford dealership and two ChampionShip Used vehicle centers.

“THE KEY TO CHAMPION’S GROWTH IN 25 YEARS IS LEADERSHIP. WE’VE SUSTAINED THAT GROWTH BECAUSE OF OUR PEOPLE. WE HAVE EMPLOYEES THAT ARE TRULY ENGAGED WITH THE CUSTOMER AND EACH OTHER. SUCCESS TYLER BRUBAKER, DUKE BRUBAKER, RON TABER, GREG RUMINSKI, FORD MOTOR COMPANY REGIONAL MANAGER AND BRUCE BRUBAKER

ISN’T EASY, BUT WITH GREAT LEADERSHIP AND EMPLOYEES, IT’S EASIER.” – Duke Brubaker, General Manager/President

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


PAID ADVERTISEMENT

COLLEGE ENHANCES WORKFORCE AND CAN HELP GREATER OWENSBORO INCREASE ATTAINMENT LEVELS By Dr. Scott Williams,

OCTC President

SINCE 2000 OCTC HAS AWARDED THE FOLLOWING CREDENTIALS IN THESE CRITICAL AREAS OF NEED.

960

Office Systems Technology

134

Medical Information Technology

201

Computer Aided Drafting & Design

209

Air Conditioning Technology

The

673

1826 Electrical Technology

523 207

Registered Nursing

Automotive & Diesel Technology

Construction Technology

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Surgical Technology

Computer & Information Technologies

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Computerized Manufacturing & Machining Technology

1933

economic prosperity of our community is tied to a well-educated and trained citizenry. In the greater Owensboro area, we are fortunate to have civic and business leaders who promote educational attainment. Furthermore, Owensboro Community and Technical College (OCTC) truly values such attainment. We are committed to inspire and empower individuals to enhance their lives through progressive educational experiences. OCTC trains and educates thousands of students each year. Our College is the gateway to a baccalaureate degree, with more than 3,000 Associate in Arts and Associate in Science graduates since 2000. Furthermore, OCTC is the primary provider of skilled technicians and professional practitioners entering our regional workforce. Additionally, our Workforce Solutions team has trained more than 20,000 incumbent workers with short term, customized skilled training since 2000. We are proud that OCTC is an important contributor to the economic growth and quality of life for our community. Based on 2013 data from the National Center for Higher Education Management Systems (NCHEMS) the Owensboro region has a higher percentage of working age young adults (25-34 year olds) with some college or an Associate’s degree than the state of Kentucky or the US. Through strong partnerships with industry, civic, and economic development partners we are diligently working to prepare our citizens for skilled technician

495 597

Industrial Maintenance Technology

824 Welding Technology

528 294 777 256 162 Business Administration

Medicaid Nurse Aides and Kentucky Medication Engineering & Aides Electronics Technology

Emergency Medical Technology Practical Nursing

Radiography

careers. In fact, a recent article in the Messenger-Inquirer cited Owensboro as one of the small markets in Kentucky with the Best Manufacturing Workforce by Southern Business & Development Magazine. Our excellent faculty and staff are committed to the success of our students. With high quality instruction and flexible course and training offerings, OCTC is an exceptional value. Yet there is still much work to do to raise the bachelor degree attainment in our community. The percentage of all adults in the Owensboro region who have attended college is 3 percentage points lower than the state of Kentucky and 7 percentage points lower than the US. In addition, we are much lower in bachelor and graduate degree attainment when compared to the rest of the Commonwealth and US. Clearly we must do a better job of encouraging students to continue their education and complete a baccalaureate degree. Our mission is “to cultivate lifelong learning opportunities through career degree programs, workforce and community development, and transfer-to-baccalaureate degree programs”. We are here to serve our community by providing higher education to advance the economic prosperity and quality of life for the citizens we serve. This includes working closely with our local bachelor degree granting partner institutions, Brescia University, Kentucky Wesleyan College, and Western Kentucky University – Owensboro. Together we will help our community reach its potential.

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MEMBERSHIP SPOTLIGHT: HEALTH AND FITNESS FACILITIES In Shape for the New Year

F

By Danny May

itness is growing in Owensboro. It seems new health

will utilize 5,000 sq ft of the new facility. The Kentucky

and fitness facilities are opening every day while well-

Mavericks and several high school sports teams will be

established gyms and health clubs are sprucing up

training with Edge Elite.

their facilities, upgrading equipment and adding new

22

programs to meet the increasing interest in health and

EDGEFIT

fitness.

4036 Frederica St.

In this feature, GO Business is touching base with our

At EdgeFit, new equipment has been ordered in

Chamber members in the health and fitness field to see

preparation for the women’s only area, “lady fit,” which

what’s new for 2016.

will feature circuit training machines.

EDGEBODY BOOT CAMP

HEALTHPARK

3990 Frederica St.

1006 Ford Avenue

With the new year underway, there is a lot happening

The Owensboro Health Healthpark wants to help you

at EdgeBody Boot Camp. The boot camp is relocating

be the best you can be in 2016 with Your Life RE:MADE

to the former Sports Warehouse building (4617

Body and Life Transformation Challenge, a 3-month-

Sutherland Rd), which is set to open February 1. The

long challenge starting February 1. Whether you want

move will expand the square footage from its current

to quit smoking, lose 10 pounds or do that elusive

1,700 to 10,000 in the new location.

pull-up that you mastered back in high school, the

Along with the move, Edge has launched Edge Elite

Healthpark wants to inspire you to re-make your body

Sports Performance, a sports training program which

and yourself. Start again with RE:MADE. Find more

GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


details at owensborohealth.org/healthpark/remade.

workouts on a 65” TV screen at the click of a button.

The Healthpark is also hosting a Fitness and Wellness Education

“We have found that people like the flexibility that Fitness on

Series entitled “Understanding the Process of Change: How to be

Demand offers because you can work out whenever it’s convenient.

Successful at Making Change,” featuring 30 minute sessions led

Moms love it. Shift workers use it at midnight. Plus, there’s

by the Healthpark’s fitness team on Wednesday, Jan 27. Whether

everything from yoga to P90x-style workouts,” says Hines Center

you are looking to adopt a more healthy lifestyle through exercise,

Director, Teresa Thomas, who has noticed an increase in the

improve your diet, lose weight, stop smoking, become a better

number of people working out at the Hines Center since the kiosks

student, or be successful at reaching any goal – it all involves

were introduced.

change. Sessions will be held at 8:30 a.m., 12:30 p.m. and 6 p.m. and are FREE to members and non-members.

The regular class schedule is still being offered, but now Fitness on Demand is included in the membership price as an added bonus. There is a description of each class on the kiosk. Classes

OWENSBORO FAMILY YMCA

are either 45 minute or 55 minutes long. “Sometimes people will

900 Kentucky Parkway

come to a scheduled class and do a Fitness on Demand class before

“A membership at the YMCA is so much more than working on

or after their scheduled workout,” Thomas said.

your personal health,” says Program Director, Chad Hart. “It allows us to inject programs and services into the community to alleviate governmental tax dollars, alleviate the demands of a single parent, alleviate the burdens of a child who is less fortunate and may not have enrichment activities at home.”

NEW CHAMBER MEMBERS

The Chamber would like to extend a special welcome to our two newest health/fitness members, Balance 54 and Planet Fitness.

In addition to the fitness center and aquatics center, the YMCA offers many programs like After School and Holiday Camp to help

BALANCE 54

parents in need of childcare while they are still at work. “All of

3115 Commonwealth Court B-7

our youth programs are structured and closely monitored to high

This unique, feminine fitness boutique offers BarreAmped, TRX

standards. Each day the children receive a character lesson around

suspension training, and yoga in a custom-built studio located on

Caring, Honesty, Respect, Responsibility and Faith,” Hart said.

Commonwealth Court right off Highway 54 behind Ole South

Throughout January, The Owensboro Y is having a “Pay the Day” joiner fee promotion: join for $15 on the 15th, $16 on the 16th, etc.

Barbeque. Wheatgrass Juice Bar & Kitchen is now co-located within the facility as well, which is perfect for grabbing a juice or snack after class!

PURE BARRE

Balance 54 is offering a new client special - $45 for two weeks

2680 Frederica St.

of unlimited classes or a single first-time class for $9. Monthly

During the month of January, Pure Barre is offering their “learn

memberships are $99 and members get 10% off at Wheatgrass.

to barre” special with two weeks of unlimited classes for $49. Pure Barre Platform combines quick bursts of high intensity, yet low impact, cardio work with periods of lower intensity musclesculpting movements. Pure Barre Platform will be added to class schedules at Pure Barre Owensboro in February. Platform classes will be offered 3-5 times per week. For more information, please visit

RENOVATIONS

STAYFIT24/FAMILY VIDEO 1212 JR Miller Blvd. Newly remodeled with new flooring, fresh paint, and new equipment.

www.purebarre.com.

ANYTIME FITNESS THE HINES CENTER One Wellness Drive, Philpot, KY The Hines Center launched their new “Fitness on Demand” kiosks in December, which offer 200 pre-recorded, guided

3332 Villa Point Drive, Suite 107 Recently renovated with new machines and new mirrors around the free weight area. Also hired a new personal trainer and added Zumba.

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


SPEND YOUR MONEY

WHERE YOUR HEART IS NOVEMBER 28 WAS A BANNER DAY FOR MANY LOCAL BUSINESSES AS OWENSBOROANS DECIDED SHOPPING SMALL IS A BIG DEAL. THE GREATER OWENSBORO CHAMBER OF COMMERCE AND INDEPENDENCE BANK UNITED TO TURN SMALL BUSINESS SATURDAY INTO SHOP OWENSBORO — AN ALL-DAY SHOPPING EVENT CENTERED AROUND THE CITY’S BOOMING BOUTIQUE SCENE. BY JACQUELINE JORDAN - PHOTOS BY DAVID GRINNELL

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016

“It

was an opportunity for us to make a difference with the small businesses who don’t always get the spotlight,” said Jessica Kirk, Programs and Events Manager of the Greater Owensboro Chamber of Commerce. Several of the shops are reporting it as their biggest business day ever. Shoppers kicked off their day at Independence Bank where organizers handed out more than 350 shopping bags full of information about participating businesses and passports to keep track of which stores they visited. Kirk said 36 businesses were listed on the passport. When shoppers made a purchase at one of the listed


NATASHA GAW, BELLA RAGAZZA

JESSICA MCKINLEY, BLOSSOMS APPAREL

KATHERINE TAYLOR, STUDIO SLANT

stores, they got their passport stamped. When shoppers finished their day, they dropped their passports off at the Chamber to win giveaways donated by the participating businesses. Social media drove the buzz of the day, with businesses using Instagram to promote not only a gift card giveaway, but each other. Each business posted the same photo, and to enter to win, participants had to follow all of the businesses on the social media app. “A lot of the businesses got 300 to 400 more followers (on social media) that day,” Kirk said. “And that’s how many of these stores do their marketing.”

Amy Nave of Peacocks and Pearls said social media is part of their day-to-day operations. “As soon as we open a box we’re putting it on a hanger and putting it on Instagram or Facebook. Sometimes we have customers in here before we have a price,” she said. “Moms and grandmothers come in with their phones and say ‘my daughter liked this and I need to get it.’” Natasha Gaw, owner of Bella Ragazza, agreed that the Chamber’s Instagram contest was a great boost for the small businesses. “I talked to a lot of my neighbors downtown and it was especially good for some who are 25

GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


AMY NAVE, PEACOCKS AND PEARLS

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016

newer to social media because they gained followers. We’re always looking for new followers, but more than that, people who are going to shop in our community.” Gaw said Shop Owensboro was Bella Ragazza’s “best day,” and she was pleased with the success of the event. “It promotes a community between the businesses,” she said. “We’ve got to lift each other up because we’re working for a common goal.” That goal is to keep shoppers patronizing the shops not only on Small Business Saturday but every day. Gaw said the effects are endless. “It leads to college students staying after they graduate, more job opportunities and fewer people saying there’s nothing to do here. We can only grow,” she said. Katherine Taylor of Studio Slant


also felt the love from the community, as the boutique and studio saw its best Small Business Saturday in five years. “I think people in Owensboro show their love for small shops more than in other cities because they get to know the shop owners as their friends,” she said. “They’re treated warmly and they’re cared for, so it becomes a personal relationship.” Taylor said if it wasn’t for the Chamber being a “cheerleader” for small business, they wouldn’t be as successful. The shop has participated in Small Business Saturday and tried to promote it since American Express launched the campaign five years ago, but there wasn’t much fanfare about it until recently. Kirk said that’s why the Chamber wanted to put a local focus on Small Business Saturday with Shop Owensboro. “It worked well because even though we’re doing it on a local level, there was still a national focus,” she said. “You would turn on the Today Show and see things about shopping small.” Jessica McKinley, who owns Blossoms, said many of the store’s patrons on Small Business Saturday were visiting family from out of town. They were impressed with Owensboro’s small business scene and remarked that they didn’t have “anything like this” in their own towns. McKinley was moved by how unifying the event was for the business community. “It’s important that we make it better every day,” she said.

W

hile it might be tempting to snag a deal at a big box retailer, it could cost you more in the end. A study by the research firm Civic Economics, in Salt Lake City, sheds some light on how shopping local impacts a community. The firm analyzed data from 15 independent stores and eateries and compared their impact on the economy with that of national retail stores in the same area. Their study shows that a locallyowned shop provides nearly four times as much economic benefit for the region as shopping at a chain. Local retailers return approximately 52% of their profits to the local economy, while only 14% of chain retail revenue comes back. Local restaurants recirculate a whopping 79% of their revenue, compared to only 30% for

chain restaurants. Why? Independent businesses spend more on local labor, they produce more goods for resale and they need other local businesses for things like printing services. When you spend your money at one local store, they spend that money at another local business, supporting more jobs and more growth for the area. Jessica Kirk, Programs and Events Manager

of

the

Greater

Owensboro

Chamber of Commerce, said money spent locally in Owensboro gets turned over three times in the community. “(Business owners) are your neighbors and friends, sending their kids to our schools. It’s all connected,” she said. “And they’re not saying ‘you have to shop with me,’ they’re just saying ‘shop in Owensboro.’”

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


10

QUESTIONS K IRK KIRKPATRICK

Executive Director, Friday After 5 BY DANNY MAY

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


W I TH THI S B EI NG JANUARY, WHAT A R E YOU R G OAL S/R ESOLUT IONS FOR T HE NEW YEAR ?

WHAT E X P E RIE NCES FROM CHILDHOOD L AT E R INFLUE NCE D YOUR CARE E R PAT H?

Completing my 2008 New Year’s Resolutions.

Losing. I came in last in a speech contest when I was in the 6th grade and I’ve never been in

W HAT AR E YOU MOST LOO KING FOR WAR D TO I N 2 0 16? It’s our 20th Anniversary for Friday After 5. I’m going to try to get over how old that makes me feel and with the help of all of our team, plan a memorable summer for everyone.

W HAT I S YOU R FAVOR I TE VACAT ION / DESTI NATI ON? Dianne and are just now starting to travel. No matter where we go, coming home is one of the highlights.

W HAT I S YOU R FAVOR I TE HOBBY OR WAY TO UNWI ND? Friends and family and grandkids. I love staying busy.

YOU HAV E BEEN MC F OR MORE T HAN A THOU SAND EV ENTS. NO NE OF T HESE G I G S PAY SO WHY DO YOU IT ?

front of an audience since without being fully prepared. Mistakes are our greatest teacher.

WHO ME NTORE D YOU? / WHO FIRS T RE COGNIZ E D YOUR GIFTS ? My mom always encouraged me but there were three great teachers during my formative years that stopped me and pointed me in the right direction. Life-changing. 1st grade teacher, Miss Hughes. This was her first and last year teaching. She caught up with me when I was a senior and said “Having you in as a first grader convinced me that teaching was not what I wanted to do.” Although, I felt guilty after hearing her say that, she continued, “But I want you to know that I named my first child, Kirk.” 6th Grade teacher, Mrs. Omer. She kept me after class for 15 minutes five days in a row. She told me that I had a real talent for writing and

All of us have skills or talents and giving them to

that if I would stay after class she would help me

people and worthwhile organizations is a small

with my handwriting and actual writing. I don’t

gift from me, but a worthy and appreciated gift

think I had any real talent but to this day, I have

for them. All of us will eventually learn that

beautiful handwriting and I take great pride in it

giving is more rewarding than receiving; the

thanks to her.

sooner, the better.

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


High School: Bob Godthaab as a kid right out of college (KWC) from New Jersey. He took over the Rose Curtain Players and immediately put me in my place, taking no guff and pointing me in the right direction regarding teamwork, importance of practice and a life-long appreciation for the arts.

W HAT I S SOMETHI NG THE FA5 T E AM WOUL D BE SU R PR I SED TO K NOW ABOUT YOU ( THAT THEY D ON’ T ALRE ADY K NOW ) ?

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016

WHAT S KILLS DID YOU DE VE LOP E ARLY ON T HAT YOU S T ILL US E EVERY DAY AS AN E X E CUT IVE ? I’m still working on the most important skill, listening. I’m getting better but have yet to master this skill.

WHAT IS YOUR FAVORIT E T HING ABOUT OWE NS BORO? I really do love my hometown. I had many chances to leave but I found the more vested I became in Owensboro, the greater the experience became. It’s safe, progressive,

Although I play the accordion, I’ve never

offers a high quality of life and great people.

performed in public. The few people who have

Even the challenges become worthy endeavors

heard me play have all encouraged me not to

to address and no community is as giving as

do so.

Owensboro is.


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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016


200 E 3rd St, Owensboro, KY 42303 (270) 926-1860 http://chamber.owensboro.com

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GO BUSINESS . FIRST QUARTER 2016

PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID OWENSBORO KY 42301 PERMIT NO 420

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