680 Farm 2 Fork 2021 Annual Special Issue!

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Special Issue No. 680 • September 9, 2021 outwordmagazine.com

RedRover Helping Care for Caldor Fire Animals page 3

Ford Distributor In Germany Creates “Gay” Cars

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Pickler And Owner Of Boone’s Red Onions page 12

From Farm to Fork, Across Sac page 16



New HIV Mobile Testing Unit for Sacramento

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olden Rule Services (GRS) is a nonprofit, minority-based organization established in January 2000. The mission of GRS is to resolve health, education, employment, and criminal justice disparities within People of Color communities by providing culturally competent programs and services. Since then, GRS has evolved from a small HIV prevention pilot to one of the most respected, successful and award-winning HIV prevention service providers in Sacramento County. By implementing on-the-ground services that prevent and treat sexually transmitted infections in communities that experience disparities in care, GRS is credited with saving thousands of lives by working to remove stigma, creating a safe and understanding community of care and providing access to cutting-edge pharmaceutical prevention and treatment.

GRS is actively involved with ending HIV. GRS seeks out those with the greatest risk but are the least likely to pursue or receive adequate care including Black, Indigenous, and People of Color (BIPOC), lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, intersex and questioning (LGBTIQ) and people living with HIV (PLWH) communities. With the support of donors and volunteers, GRS is able to reach them to provide: • H IV, Hepatitis C and STD prevention, testing, care and counseling • Mobile testing

• Pre-exposure prophylaxis (PrEP: biomedical prevention for high-risk, sexually active, HIV-negative individuals) • Condom distribution • Sexual health education • Community outreach • Non-medical HIV case management GRS exists because racial disparities persist in rates of new STD diagnoses and along all stages of the HIV continuum of care. Public health officials recognize this trend and have made specific recommendations to combat it. In fact, California Department of Public Health (CDPH) and Sacramento County Public Health recommend increased and improved HIV testing and noted that improving PrEP utilization will reduce the number of new HIV diagnoses.

RedRover Back Helping Care for 550+ Caldor Fire Animals

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Outword Staff PUBLISHER Fred Palmer A RT DIRECTOR/ PRODUCTION Kristy Harris Ron Tackitt GRA PHIC DESIGN Kristy Harris Ron Tackitt EDITOR editor@outwordmagazine.com A RTS EDITOR Chris Narloch SA LES Fred Palmer

edRover Responders volunteers are back on the ground now through September 4 to help El Dorado County Animal Control for the second time provide daily care for animals displaced by the Caldor Fire. The team returned to the temporary emergency animal shelter in Diamond Springs where they will now help care for more than 550 evacuees’ animals.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Christopher J. Beale Faith Colburn Kristy Harris Diana Kienle Chris Narloch Lauren Pulido Ron Tackitt

RedRover staff and at least 14 volunteers are traveling from New York and across California to help during this crisis. The team will help walk, feed, clean, and care for these evacuated animals. Additionally, RedRover offers urgent care grants for emergency veterinary care to pet guardians struggling with economic hardship when pets are in life-threatening situations. Applications are accepted online at redrover.org/relief. Distinguished by their red shirts, RedRover Responders volunteers are a compassionate workforce specially trained to care for and shelter large numbers of animals after they have been rescued from natural disasters or cruelty and neglect cases. With more than 4,600 trained volunteers in the United States and Canada, RedRover can deploy its volunteers quickly when communities become overburdened by a

PHOTOGRA PHY Chris Allan Ron Tackitt

crisis involving large numbers of animals. In its 34-year history, RedRover has responded to 243 natural disasters and other crises around the country, including the Trinity, Camp, Carr, and Wall fires, Hurricanes Harvey and Katrina, the Oroville Dam crisis, and many more. To learn about our free online training to become a RedRover Responders volunteer, visit: redrover.org/volunteer. About RedRover RedRover is a national animal welfare nonprofit based in Sacramento, California. Since 1987, RedRover has focused on bringing animals out of crisis and strengthening the human-animal bond through emergency sheltering, disaster relief services, financial assistance, and humane education. To learn more about how RedRover is creating a more compassionate world, please visit www.RedRover.org.

ON THE COVER Photo by Fred Palmer from a Rainbow Chamber of Commerce Farm to Scholar event DISTRIBUTION Michael Crawford

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ilicon Valley Pride went ahead as scheduled during the last weekend of August. SVP is unique because it is always held in August, and often features (what else?) tech companies. This year, IBM, Bill.com and Norcal Tiktok Creators were a few of the companies that participated, as well as a large “Glamazon” contingent. Despite its large East Bay population base, SVC is very much a hometown affair, not that different from Sacramento’s. Besides the Sunday parade, it also features a Saturday evening and Sunday afternoon Pride festival, which was held at Cesar Chavez park, in the heart of San Jose’s downtown, on Aug. 28 & 29.

Sisters Mel and Genesis “MJ” pose in front of the Silicon Valley Pride sign with a transgender flag. Photo by Chris Allan

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September 9, 2021 - September 23, 2021 • No. 680

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Ford Distributor In Germany Creates “Gay” Cars

By Chris Narloch

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n a video posted to social media, Ford shared online comments that called one of their truck’s Performance Blue color “very Gay.” Other haters demanded Ford paint the car black and gold. Ford clapped back by releasing animation of the car being painted in gold and rainbow colors and wished viewers a happy Pride. The video was released to chastise people who use the word “gay” as an insult. Next, a Ford distributor in Germany went further and actually produced a rainbow truck like the one in the video. The company also wrapped a 1998 Ford KA in rainbow colors to commemorate the first year they participated in a LGBTQ Pride parade. Both vehicles were then used in the Christopher Street Day parade in Cologne. Way to go Ford!

Lesbian Nominated To Federal Appeals Court

By Chris Narloch

Photo courtesy of Ford

Beth Robinson of Vermont has been nominated to the Second Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals.

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hen Congress returns after Labor Day, the U.S. Senate Judiciary Committee will begin deliberation of the first nomination of an LGBT person to serve on a federal appeals circuit court bench. President Biden this month nominated two LGBT people to serve on federal court benches: Beth Robinson of Vermont to the Second Circuit U.S. Court of Appeals and Charlotte Sweeney of Denver to the U.S. District Court for Colorado. Both are historic nominations.

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44th Annual Jewish Food Faire

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t’s time to get your “yum” on! The 44th annual Jewish Food Faire is currently taking orders for traditional homemade Jewish foods. Check out the homemade baked goods and frozen foods, along with mouthwatering deli sandwiches, blintzes and matzah ball soup. There is also a tasty selection of kosher desserts and specialty breads from Grand Bakery, one of the top Jewish bakeries in Northern California. This year you can purchase bialys - a chewy roll with a savory onion filling from the Bagelry. And to top off your bagels, bialys, corn rye or challah, you can purchase organic cream cheese from the Sierra Nevada Cheese Company. Yum! The last date to order online at www.cbshalom.org is October 14, 2021 and this year’s pickup date is October 24, 2021. Orders are delivered to your car in a safe drive-through pickup system at this location: 4746 El Camino Avenue, Carmichael, CA 95608. Treat yourself to classic Jewish foods you can order online from the comfort of your home.

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The Story of a Professional Pickler And Owner Of Sacramento-Based Boone’s Red Onions

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hen I slice into an onion, I think about my ancestors who smelled that same pungent aroma, touched the same papery exterior, perhaps admired the symmetrical layers, and felt the first sting overwhelm the eyes. The experience of food connects us through time. Food entrepreneurship runs deep in my family. My Great-Grandfather had a legendary confectionery business in Athens that exclusively provided sweets to the King of Greece. My Greek grandparents ran a family restaurant in upstate NY for their entire working life; my “Papou” was the chef and “Yiayia” managed the front of the house. I loved visiting my grandparents’ restaurant as a little kid. They lived upstairs and when we visited, we would stay there too. I’d slide down the grandiose banister in the entryway, made of thick polished wood, and land on the carpeted floor next to the hostess station. Like most kids, I liked feeling useful, part of the team. I’d try to help my Yiayia fold cloth napkins into perfect swans, until we gave up and decided I would just do a more simple fan. I’d help the waitstaff set tables and arrange the chairs in the dining room so everything looked perfectly symmetrical before the rush and bustle of the busy evening ahead. I found the ceiling fans mesmerizing and made a game where I would stare at them, isolate one of the blades and see how long my eyes could stick with it as it spun around and around. I remember my Papou’s hands clearly, his thick strong fingers that were so critical to his

Written by: Christopher Boone (He/Him/His) www.boonesredonions.com IG: @boonesredonions

livelihood and our family’s success. And I especially loved that he had an endless supply of rice pudding. On the Polish side of my family, my grandmother was an admired cafeteria chef who could make dishes taste delicious despite a meager budget and less-than-quality ingredients. She taught me about bacon and buttered egg noodles, both of which became somewhat of a childhood obsession, to my mother’s chagrin. Her sister, my Great Aunt Mary, was like another grandmother to me and taught me how to cook important staples, like pancakes. Aunt Mary would always have a giant jar of her pickled red onions in the fridge and she seemed to put them on every meal. She would say her good health was due to her long brisk walks and her special red onions. My beloved grandparents and Aunt Mary While I can’t attest to the health claims, I can have been gone for years, but when I’m making confirm her onions were so delicious, they pickled red onions, I bring them into the became the inspiration for Boone’s. kitchen with me. As I work, I often wonder what they would say to me today, what would they think of me? I was the little girl they loved and showered with attention. None of them knew me as Christopher, as “he.” Even as a child, I would have to change for them. When we visited Yiayia and Papou, my basic t-shirts, pants with grass stains, and sneakers were replaced with patterned dresses and girly shoes. My 80s bowl cut got barrettes. I liked dressing this way for them because it was my ticket to their praise, approvals, and warm attention. My grandmother was tickled pink to see me, around age 12, in her old Carmen Miranda outfit on Halloween. It’s one of those childhood photos many of us trans people have, where we can see past the smile and in our eyes the uncomfortable conflict of genders. They could not have imagined in their wildest dreams that I would become the person

Christopher Boone (He/Him/His)

I am today. I wonder, as I’m working in the kitchen, would they still love and embrace me? Would they be proud of me and my carrying on the food tradition? And if so, would they be proud despite me being trans or because I am trans? I’m not the only queer person who has reflected on the limitations passed relatives may have put on their love; the painful possibility that a beloved, deceased grandparent would not love me today, as I am. Had they lived through my gender transition, I very well may have been rejected by my grandparents and Aunt Mary. They were all traditional and religious. It is perhaps the greatest solace of their death that we will never have that conflict. I will always be their darling granddaughter and niece, and somehow that helps me embrace that awkward little kid in the dresses and the Carmen Miranda costume just a bit more. You can find Boone’s Red Onions at Visit Sacramento’s upcoming Farm to Fork Festival!

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Book Review: “How We Do Family: From Adoption to Trans Pregnancy...” by Trystan Reese Review by Terri Schlichenmeyer

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here is no picket fence in front of your house. There’s no singing milkman to bring your breakfast and the next door neighbor doesn’t coffee-klatsch with you every morning after your two-pointfive kids go to school. There’s not, in fact, one 1962-normal thing about your home or your family but as in the new memoir, “How We Do Family” by Trystan Reese, what you’ve got is better.

Parenthood was never on the table. Finding love seemed hard enough for Trystan Reese, perhaps because he “came out as transgender at age nineteen” and hadn’t had “any models for healthy nonheterosexual relationships.” Still, Reese knew he “was a boy who liked other boys” and he “fell in love... almost immediately” with a man named Biff. They decided to weigh their relationship deliberately – no rushing – but there ended up being a complication: Biff’s sister was having problems, and his baby niece and toddler nephew were caught up in the situation. Though Reese and Biff had only been dating for about a year and they were living together in a non-child-proof apartment, there was no questioning what to do. They stepped in to care for both children. It was not all instant Mary Poppins. Biff’s niece had a nasty case of diaper rash. His nephew was “profoundly traumatized” and couldn’t handle loud noises. Communication was basically via hand signal. But the longer the kids were with

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them, the deeper in love Reese fell for them, and for Biff. The two men got engaged in the middle of a small concert, and although marriage wasn’t legal in the area in which they lived, they married anyway before formally adopting the kids and then settling down to a happily ever after. And yet, there was something nagging at Reese. He’d always dreamed of a darkeyed baby, and felt that it was meant to be his; though he’d been a trans man for about a decade, it was still possible for him to give birth. He’d have to convince Biff, but... baby? Maybe? Not to be a spoiler, but you know the answer. The story itself might even be

familiar, too. When there are so many trans-man-gives-birth books on the shelves today, why should you read “How We Do Family”? Because author Trystan Reese goes beyond. This isn’t just an angsty, tizzied, nervous story of boy-meets-boy, boominstant-family. It’s also somewhat of a guidebook, going beyond with hints and reminders for LGBT parentcaretakers, and pages of advice snuck between chapters in a gentle, nonintrusive manner that feels like an arm around the shoulder. This, plus Reese’s unabashed willingness to be frank and his work as an activist give readers the ability to trust the veracity of what they read. Win-win. One thing: be warned. In “How We Do Family,” Reese details his first pregnancy, which ended in miscarriage, and the account follows the rest of the books’ no-holds-barred frankness. It’s graphic, but it’s a part of the story – maybe your story – so if you’re doing family your own way, then pick it.

September 9, 2021 - September 23, 2021 • No. 680

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From Farm to Fork, Across Sac

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acramento is America’s Farm-to-Fork Capital, which means that when you’re here, you’re getting the best food straight from the source.

When you wake up and throw open the curtains to let in the warm California sunshine, the foods you’ll eat for dinner may have just been plucked from the ground and are on their short trip to one of Sacramento’s amazing restaurants – 12 of which are Michelin-rated. Our chefs work directly with our farmers, in many cases purchasing the night’s menu items directly from them at one of the 28 regional farmers markets, so you can expect to see ever-changing menus depending on what’s available. In this city, a restaurant’s daily special does not mean “we’re trying to get rid of this before it goes bad” – it’s more likely to mean it’s the freshest item on the menu. So, what does Sacramento do best? You’ve probably heard about our tomatoes, or even maybe a sometime-nickname for the city: Sacratomato. But it’s well beyond that. Summer is stone fruit season, and in the springtime, asparagus reigns supreme. The fertile agricultural land surrounding the city on all sides makes for some of the best fruits and vegetables you’ll ever eat – far more than we can list here, but it’s more than just what grows in the ground. Sacramento produces 80 percent of the domestic caviar, thanks to the sturgeon that come from the region, and we grow so much rice that we ship it around the world, including to Japan for sushi. Blue Diamond Almonds are processed in downtown Sacramento, and local ranches provide poultry, beef, pork, lamb and so much more. So how can you experience the culinary bounty of America’s Farm-to-Fork Capital? Visit a farmers market. We have the largest Certified Farmers Market in California every Sun-day, and you can go to the Midtown Farmers Market on Saturdays, or hit up the communal atmosphere at Winn Park for Wednesdays at Winn, where 16 Outword Magazine

September 9, 2021 - September 23, 2021 • No. 680

it’s not just about food, but items crafted by local artisans as musicians play to the locals who come and sit on the grass to pic-nic and catch up with friends. Of course, you can dine at one of our restaurants, and while most of them source food locally, some, like Mulvaney’s B&L, Ella Dining Room and Bar, and Grange Restaurant and Bar, and many more, make it a top priority. And it’s not just about food. Ruhstaller Brewing Company proudly grows hops in nearby Dixon to put in their bottles that have “Sacramento” emblazoned on them, and you’ll see their labels saying, “We Grow Beer.” Other local brewers send their mash to local pig farms to serve as feed, ensuring that as much stays local as possible. When it comes to wine, the Sacramento region grows so many wine grapes that many are ex-ported to other wine regions, and we produce excellent wines at wineries that have an ap-proachable yet sophisticated atmosphere. Make sure to book a tasting or two for your next weekend outing. And since it’s September, you’re in for a treat, as that’s when Sacramento celebrates every-thing farm to fork with a series of events from the Legends of Wine tasting event (Sept. 9, 2021) at the State Capitol to the Tower Bridge Dinner and culminating in the free two-day Farm-to-Fork Festival, which drew 155,000 people to Capitol Mall in 2019. This year’s festival is scheduled for Sept. 17 and 18, and Sacramento is looking forward to the return of fresh food festivities along with a full lineup of live music headlined by The Record Company, White Reap-er and Meg Myers, with Oakland’s Fantastic Negrito and Sacramento’s own Tré Burt perform-ing, among others. Visit farmtofork.com for more information, including festival hours, perfor-mance times and Covid-19 safety measures and requirements. outwordmagazine.com


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Coral Seas: The Heritage of Our Reefs Exhibit

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By Matt Burlingame

he coral reefs are truly one of the most majestic wonders of the underwater world. Join us as we explore these endangered treasures in Kennedy Gallery’s “Coral Seas: The Heritage of Our Reefs” exhibit running Sept. 9-Oct. 3. Join us on Second Saturday until 10 p.m. Kennedy Gallery features work from over 20 resident artists inside three floors of open studios in the heart of Midtown’s entertainment district.

Coral Seas: T he Heritage of Our Reefs Exhibit Sept. 9 - Oct. 3, Noon-6 p.m. T hursday Sunday, opens 10 a.m. for Saturday Market.

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Food

Beverage

Veraison, What Is That?

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and More

By Diana Kienle, Certified Specialist of Wine

eraison is a pivotal time in the vineyard. It is when the grapes change color and rapidly begin to store sugar. The time is notable as it is a predictor of harvest. The time for each varietal is variable yet you can look forward to harvest some 40 to 60 days from veraison.

Veraison itself means “change of color of the grape berries”. For red grapes, it is most obvious when the young green grapes become a red hue. White grapes also change in appearance, they remain green yet become translucent or golden. The grapes soften and enlarge as sugar is deposited. It never happens all at once for a bunch as you will see in the picture. (This is a cabernet vineyard.) The grapes change color at varying times on the same bunch on the same vine. This time period denotes an evolution as the grapes themselves begin to become sweeter as sugar is being stored, acid falls and the seeds are developing. After veraison, the grapes continue to mature, soften and enlarge on the path to physiological maturity. Physiological maturity is when the level of phenolic compounds in the grape (including tannins and other compounds that enhance the color, flavor and aromas of the resulting wine) are optimum. That is a key word as optimum is dependent on the style of the wine and the process of the winemaker. Veraison may often herald a time for pruning the vines to ensure enough sunlight for the development of the grape’s richness and flavors. Depending on the climate, vintners

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will trim back the leaves to allow for more exposure while ensuring that enough leaves are in place to shield the bunches from too much afternoon sun and heat. All different varieties go through veraison at different times. Generally, white grapes and light reds are the first leading to the bigger, more tannic wines later. In sequence: first white grapes, followed by more delicate reds and finally the rich Cabernet Sauvignons. Harvest usually follows in that same sequence. Veraison took place in the northern end of the Napa Valley in mid to late July. The predominate variety is Cabernet as it is a heat loving variety and loves the hang time to develop phenolics. It has been only a month since the original photo was taken and all is developing beautifully into a deep purple. The final push for these grapes will be seed development (yes, the grapes seeds are important as well) as they are a contributor to the tannin in the wine and an indicator of phenolic development. The balance is key for the winemaker, bringing together the right level of sugar, acid, tannins and phenolics. All this is along the path to putting a beautiful bottle of wine on your table. Enjoy!

September 9, 2021 - September 23, 2021 • No. 680

Veraison itself means “change of color of the grape berries.”

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Food

Five Flicks For Film Fans

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alloween comes early this year, with several interesting horror movies in theaters this September to get us in the mood before the scariest month of the year. Also on the big screen, you can see an unusually good Marvel movie just out, and a classic film from 1941.

Beverage

and More by Chris Narloch

Candyman Sadly, the hype around this movie is not justified, although fans of the original 1992 “Candyman” will want to see how that film’s story has been brought into the era of BLM. A racially charged backstory involving the murder of a slave’s son was always the most interesting facet of “Candyman,” and it produced the finest Black bogeyman in movie history, played in four films by a terrifying Tony Todd. This fourth film is much better than the other two sequels, but it didn’t impress me as much as the first film, which I think is also overrated. The new “Candyman” does have Todd, and it also has an excellent performance by the hunky Yahya Abdul-Mateen II as an emerging artist who becomes obsessed with the urban legend of Candyman. Unfortunately, the depiction of the modern art world in the new script is laughably cliched and pretentious, and director Nia DaCosta doesn’t really earn her horror film chops until the shocking racial reckoning at the climax of this uneven movie.

“Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings” is just one of the fine films currently in theaters.

Shang-Chi and the Legend of the Ten Rings The hype around this new Marvel movie turns out to be justified, and I would even place it in my top three of the MCU movies so far, after “Black Panther” and the first “Avengers” film. It may be the most spiritual of the Marvel movies, thanks to an Asian setting and story that relies heavily on familial bonds, faith, and ancestry. “Shang-Chi…” also has a terrific, mostly Asian cast that includes Michelle Yeoh, Tony Leung, a new actor named Simu Liu in the title role, and a hilarious Awkwafina as his sidekick. An Asian-American director, Destin Daniel Cretton, gives the film a lustrous look, some marvelous monsters, and just the right Sissy Spacek stars in Brian De Palma’s 1976 classic horror film, “Carrie.” Carrie combination of action and humor. My respect for Brian De Palma’s original film adaptation of Stephen King’s “Carrie” has only grown over the years, as American horror movies have become increasingly derivative and dumb. The movie still shocks today, and its themes of bullying and religious extremism have only become more urgent. Almost everything about the movie is great, from its editing and music and cinematography to De Palma’s masterful direction and an incredible cast that includes Sissy Spacek, John Travolta, Piper Laurie, Betty Buckley, Amy Irving, William Katt, and Nancy Allen. You can see “Carrie” back on the big screen this Sept. 26 and 29. Visit www.fathomevents.com

Orson Welles’ “Citizen Kane” returns to theaters.

The Night House

Rebecca Hall stars in “The Night House.”

The great British actress Rebecca Hall adds class to this scary movie, which is thankfully a psychological thriller and not a slasher film. Hall is terrific as a grieving widow who uncovers dark secrets after her husband kills himself on a boat near their beautiful lakeside home. When he returns to haunt Hall’s character, we can’t tell whether the ghost is real or if wifie is just losing her mind. If you don’t mind the fact that “The Night House” doesn’t tie up every loose end, and you want to see a dynamite lead performance along with some fun jump scares, this is the film for you.

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Citizen Kane

One of the finest American movies ever made, Orson Welles’ “Citizen Kane” returns to theaters for two days this month, to celebrate its 80th anniversary. This is a rare opportunity to see Welles’ fascinating, thinly veiled portrait of William Randolph Hearst on a big screen, where you can truly appreciate its groundbreaking and brilliant direction and cinematography, as well as the director’s towering performance as Charles Foster Kane, an outwardly successful newspaper magnate whose soulless quest for power and financial gain may remind you of a very recent, former U.S. President. “Citizen Kane” will be back on the big screen this Sept. 19 and 22. Go to www.fathomevents.com

September 9, 2021 - September 23, 2021 • No. 680

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“Hold These Truths” & “Hamilton” On Sac Stages

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by Chris Narloch

he big news in theatre circles is the long-delayed return of the Tony Awards, which will finally air on Paramount+ this Sept. 26, after being postponed last year due to the pandemic.

The Alanis Morissette musical “Jagged Little Pill” received the most nominations (15) for 2020, and “Moulin Rouge!” was close behind with 14. New York City’s Winter Garden Theatre, soon to be home to the highly anticipated revival of “The Music Man” with Hugh Jackman and Sutton Foster, will host the awards ceremony. After most of the awards are handed out, CBS and The Tony Awards will team up for “Broadway’s Back!,” a live concert event celebrating the return of Broadway that will feature Tony winners and other Broadway performers. Closer to home, the Broadway musical “Hamilton,” which won 11 Tony Awards in 2016, will finally debut in Sacramento this month, kicking off the 2021 Broadway Sacramento season and christening the newly remodeled SAFE Credit Union Performing Arts Center, formerly the Community Center Theater. If you’ve already seen “Hamilton” -- and even if you haven’t -- I urge you to also check out a dynamite one-man show at Capital Stage about the activist Gordon Hirabayashi, who took on the U.S. government after the internment of Japanese Americans during WWII.

Hold These Truths

Gordon Hirabayashi, a Japanese American sociologist born in 1918, spent 90 days in jail after defying internment so that he could take his case to the U.S. Supreme Court, with the backing of the ACLU. This superb one-man show details what happened before and after that landmark legal action, and it features a powerful performance by Jomar Tagatac, who not only brings Hirabayashi to vivid life but also every other character in Jeanne Sakata’s moving play. This is one of those challenging, high-wire roles that requires great skill and focus, and I marveled at Tagatac’s ability and stamina, keeping all the different voices and mannerisms straight for almost two hours without an intermission. Hirabayashi’s story is so compelling that it doesn’t need any theatrics, and director Jeffrey Lo wisely stages it very simply -- although I am sure that the production must have been much more complicated than it appears. With voting rights, abortion rights, and transgender rights all currently under fire in this country, “Hold These Truths” is a stinging reminder of how easily basic human rights can be trampled on when narrow-minded people choose fear over facts. Don’t miss the Capital Stage production of “Hold These Truths,” which runs through Sept. 26. For more information, visit https://capstage.org

Hamilton

Even if you’ve watched its filmed version on Disney+, you need to see the show live on stage to fully understand the “Hamilton” phenomenon. Sacramento theater fans will get that chance beginning Sept. 15, when the musical opens here for four weeks, through Oct. 10. Lin-Manuel Miranda’s hip-hop portrait of the life of Alexander Hamilton deserves all the hype and awards it received, so you better act fast before tickets are gone for the theatrical event of the fall in River City. For more information, visit www.broadwaysacramento.com To register for a lottery in which 40 tickets will be made available at every performance for just $10, go to http://hamiltonmusical.com/lottery

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Food

Beverage

and More

“Drag Your Balls” Celebrity Golf Tournament

A

By Diana Pretzlaff, Development Director, Sunburst Projects

re you ready to have some zany FUN in a Covid-safe environment while supporting a local HIV/AIDS non-profit? We’ve got just the event for you! You are invited to the Sunburst Project’s “Drag Your Balls” Celebrity Golf Tournament on Saturday, October 16, 2021 at the Haggin Oaks Golf Complex in Sacramento. It will be a day of wacky, crazy fun on the golf course! Golfers will play 9 holes while being entertained by drag queens impersonating celebrities! Marilyn Monroe and Divine will offer to wash golfers’ balls for $5 while Cher and Lucille Ball pose for photos. Judy Garland and Pink will perform their biggest hits! We have lots of surprises planned that you don’t want to miss! Tickets are $100 per golfer. This is sure to be a sellout event, so get your tickets now at www.sunburstprojects.org! We also have some awesome sponsorship opportunities available ranging from $100 to $1,500. It’s a great way to build brand awareness and help support our efforts to stop the spread of HIV in our community. Maybe you’d like to sponsor a drag queen for the day or purchase a hole sponsorship. We’ve got lots of options for you to help build your brand awareness and put your company’s name in front of hundreds of key audience members. If you aren’t a golfer but you like a lively party, head on over to our After Party reception and celebrity drag show located in the Haggin Oaks Arcade tent beginning at 2:30. We’ll have drinks, food, awards, silent auction, great prize drawings and many more surprises as golfers come off the course. All activities are outdoors and Covid safe. After Party tickets are $25. For over 33 years Sunburst Projects has supported the Northern California HIV/AIDS

community by providing medical case management, mental health services and enrollment in social service programs. In 2020 we began serving men with HIV in addition to women and children, and our client roster is growing every day. We’ve had a 40% increase in our medical case management program and an 87% increase in clients served by our mental health clinicians in the past 9 months alone. “We want anyone struggling with HIV to feel like family here at Sunburst Projects. Our staff responds immediately to help those newly diagnosed with HIV, and works very closely with all of our clients to support them in maintaining their health and wellbeing,” said Jake Bradley-Rowe, Executive Director. “Our staff has over 90 years combined experience in serving the HIV community in Sacramento. Whether it’s transportation to medical appointments, housing assistance, medication delivery, linkage to medical care, psychiatric and mental health services, emergency financial assistance, job placement, and support with basics like food and clothing, our team does it all,” Bradley-Rowe added. Help support Sunburst Projects and “Drag Your Balls” to our Celebrity Golf Tournament on Saturday, October 16! For tickets and sponsorship information, please go to our website at www.sunburstprojects.org or call Diana Pretzlaff at (916) 899-9173.

Sac Open Studios Returns In-Person This Month

By Chris Narloch

D

o you want to meet the talented artists in our region? Are you curious about how local artists make their artwork? During Verge’s largest community program, Sac Open Studios, the public is invited to visit artists in their workspaces and get a behind-the-scenes view into the artistic process. Pick up a Sac Open Studios guide at Verge or browse the online artist directory to plan your safe, self-guided Sac Open Studios tour, between Sept. 11 and Sept. 19. For more information, visit www.vergeart.com

22 Outword Magazine

September 9, 2021 - September 23, 2021 • No. 680

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YOUR Business Could Be Featured Across this Banner

To Sponsor this Page

Contact Fred at 916.329.9280 ext.1

Advertiser Directory ACCOUNTING/TAX PREP

HEATING & AIR

RUSSELL, CPAS Jason Russell, CPA Lic. 99177 Jason@RussellCPAs.com 916-966-9366

PERFECTION HOME SYSTEMS 916-481-0658 www.HotCold.com

ADULT STORES

HEALTH SERVICES

L’AMOUR SHOPPE 2531 Broadway, 916-736-3467l

AUTO DEALERS

ELK GROVE SUBARU 8585 Laguna Grove Dr., Elk Grove, 877-360-0259 ElkGroveSubaru.com ELK GROVE DODGE, CHRYSLER, JEEP 8575 Laguna Grove Dr., Elk Grove, 877-399-4262 ElkGroveDodge.com

BANKING SAFE CREDIT UNION www.safecu.org WELLS FARGO BANK www.wellsfargo.com

BARBER MIDTOWN HAIRCUTTERS 2001 K Street, (above the Depot) Call Rick: 916-443-4924

BARS / CLUBS

BADLANDS 2003 K St., 916-441-6823 SacBadlands.com THE DEPOT 2001 K St., Sac, 916-441-6823 TheDepot.net SIDETRAX 2007 K St., 916-441-6823 facebook.com/sidetraxsac

CHIROPRACTORS

HEALING TOUCH CHIROPRACTIC Dr. Darrick Lawson, 1919 21st St, Ste. 101, 916-447-3344 www.FixMyBack.com

COUNSELING WEAVE 916-920-2952 (24/7) www.weaveinc.org

DENTISTRY

ERIC GROVE, DDS KENDALL HOMER, DMD 9216 Kiefer Blvd., STE 5 916-363-9171 • grovehomerdentists.com

DINING/BEVERAGES ROXY RESTAURANT & BAR 2381 Fair Oaks Blvd Sacramento, CA 95825 916-489-2000 SCOTT’S SEAFOOD - ON THE RIVER 916-379-5959 ScottsSeafoodontheRiver.com

EYEWEAR

STYLEYES 2231 J Street, Ste. 102, Midtown Sacramento 916-448-2220 • www.styleyes.biz

FINANCIAL PLANNING EDWARD JONES INVESTING Kelly Shultz, Financial Advisor 916-896-0428

MIDTOWN FINANCIAL Al Roche, 1750 Creekside Dr. Suite 215, 916-447-9220 MidtownFinancial.net STEELE FINANCIAL PARTNERS Judy Steele, Financial Advisor 916-846-7733 www.steelefp.com

CAPITAL CITY AIDS FUND 1912 F Street, 916-448-1110 ONE COMMUNITY HEALTH 1500 21st St., 916-443-3299 onecommunityhealth.com RIVER BEND MEDICAL ASSOC. www.rbmafamilydocs.com

HOUSING (ELDER)

MUTUAL HOUSING Lavender Courtyard www.mutualhousing.com/future-communities/lavendercourtyard/

IMMIGRATION LAW

LAW OFFICES OF PATRICK GIHANA 1600 Sacramento Inn Way, Ste #128 Sacramento, CA 95815 916-291-8940

INSURANCE

STATE FARM INSURANCE Ryan Maguire, Agent 916-572-0090 www.ryanmaguire.com

INVESTMENT MGMT.

LGBTQ+ Friendly DVD Sales & Rentals Magazines Toys

Leather

Lingerie

Novelties Gifts

Accessories

Knowledgeable & Helpful Staff

PRINCIPAL SECURITIES INC. Steven J. Wright 916-462-9009 Wright.Steve.J@Principal.com

2531 Broadway

LIBRARIES

(916) 736-3467

FRIENDS OF THE SAC. PUBLIC LIBRARY 8250 Belvedere, Ste. E, 916-731-8493

OPTOMETRY

(at 26th St. in Sacramento)

Open 9am-1am daily

CAMERON YEE, O.D. 6407 Riverside Blvd., 916-395-0673 DrCameronYee@aol.com

PLUMBING

BONNEY PLUMBING HEATING AND AIR 916-246-6785 www.bonney.com

PEST MANAGEMENT EARTH GUARD PEST SERVICES 916-457-7605 contact@earthguardpest.com

PET SITTING/CARE GRATEFUL DOG 430 17th Street, Sacramento 916-446-2501 gratefuldogdaycare.com LUCKY BUDDY PET CARE 916-505-4375 LuckyBuddyPetCare.com

PHARMACY

PUCCI’S PHARMACY 3257 Folsom Blvd., 916-442-5891 www.puccirx.com

REAL ESTAT E

COLDWELL BANKER Mark T. Peters, 916-341-7794 www.MarkPeters.biz MCMARTIN REALTY Brian McMartin, 916-402-4160 brian@brianmcmartin.com McMartinRealty.com

GRAPHIC DESIGN OUTWORD MEDIA 916-329-9280 graphics@outwordmagazine.com

HEARING

UNIVERSITY AUDIOLOGIC, INC. Deborah Powell, M.S., 1325 Howe Ave., Ste. 101 916-927-3137

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September 9, 2021 - September 23, 2021 • No. 680

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