Melanistic Magazine - Vol 5

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melanistic L IF E I N B LA C K

I Returned

a journey to ghana 25 Years of black

history month

A LO O K AT FI V E O F Y E G ’ S Y O U N G E NTREPRENEU R S O N T HE R ISE

VOL.V · WINTER 2021

TO MY YOUNG, BLACK ENTREPRENEURS 2021


DISTILLED AND AGED IN THE HEART OF JAMAICA CRAFTED WITH JOY

Please Enjoy Responsibly. ©2021 Campari Canada


melanistic T A BL E O F C O NT E N T S

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MELANISTIC F I T NES S

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O U R L A N GU AGE I S NO T BROK EN

46-47 “1 98 4 ” T ODAY: T E C H T ALK

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E D IT OR 'S W E L COME

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THANK YOU, E D MON TO N

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CE L E B R A T IN G OUR B L A CK C A N A D IA N S

D A T ING W H IL E B L ACK

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T OP 5 D E A D OR A L IVE

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ME L A N IS T IC A CT IVIT IE S

53-54 P U B L ISH IN G P A RT N E R S

T H I S I S S U E M A DE P O S S I BLE BY

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BLA CK HI STO R Y M O NTH I N CANADA

22-27 TO M Y YO U NG, BLA CK ENTR EPR ENEU R S

I R E T UR N ED: D IS COVE RI NG GH A N A

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ME L A N ISTI C S IP S

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AR TI ST SPO TLI GHT

R E S O U R C E GUI D E

M E LAN I S T I C MAG AZINE VOL .5 Publisher Greg Davis Editor Taneya Rogers Creative Director Nigel Williams Artistic Director JoAnne Pearce Marketing Director NiLo Public Relations Robert Tyndale Sales Manager: Rod Charles C O N T R I B U T OR S Sunn M’cheaux, Kyle Smith, Patrina Duhaney, Lebene Lawuu, Laurel Sabur, Charlene Smith Cover Photo: Haley Shandro Special thanks to: JANA CO NT ACT : melanisticmagazine@gmail.com www.melanisticmagazine.com


In the Know 2k21

BE IN THE KNOW

Here are your top 5 good news items for the first quarter of this new and hopeful year.

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Oprah opened up her “Favorite Things” to Black owned beauty brands and shared some of our Instagram faves. Rashida Jones becomes MSNBC’s first Black Female President.

Sherrexcia “Rexy” Rolle becomes the president of the largest private airline in the Bahamas.

Annamei Paul was elected as the new leader of The Green Party of Canada, making her the first Black leader of a federal party in the history of Canada.

Shonda Rhimes ditches Disney and signs a historic $150 million deal with Netflix which was, at it’s signing - Netflix’s highest grossing deal.

Annamie Paul Leader of the Green Party of Canada Image Courtesy of Rebecca Wood

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EDIT O R ’S W E LC O ME

Taneya Rogers There is something invigorating about the start of a new year - the ability to take stock of your prior year’s accomplishments and the thirst for the potential that lays ahead. In this issue we are channeling that energy, reflecting on our history and sharing the inspirational stories and perspectives of young Black entrepreneurs in our city. Sit back with another Melanistic cocktail as you get inspired to travel again, delve into tech, uncover connections in our language and learn of fitness practices that are deeply rooted in our ancestry. The Melanistic team welcomes you to 2021.


Intuitive Invested Exceptional

Practicing In:

Family Law Criminal Defense Law Civil Law Immigration Law Wills and Estates

Tinarwo Law #402, 10154 104 Street NW Edmonton Alberta T5J 1A7 780-702-1077

reception@tinarwolaw.com www.tinarwolaw.com


WOW!! The turbulence of 2020 was staggering, however, it was all of YOU - from Sponsors to Readers, from Frontline Workers to Black Business Owners that kept us going. You are the “Real Heroes”. Thank you for making Black Excellence a priority! Nigel Williams, Creative Director Thank you, Edmonton, for supporting Melanistic’s first year of circulation! Let’s stay collaborative and creative in 2021. The Melanistic adventure is just beginning! JoAnne Pearce, Artistic Director

It’s been a great ride from CBC questioning our sanity to now being the leader in our media category. Cheers to the moments and memories to come. Greg Davis, Publisher

For some 2020 was the best year, for others the worst. I saw a community coming together to support, uplift, rally, organize, educate, and thrive. Thank you to everyone who supported us. Thank you to our community. NiLo, Marketing Director Thanks to all the Albertans who did their best to bend the curve to help us get back to awesome. Stay safe, stay blessed. Rev.Rod, Sales

We started with an idea to tell our own stories from our community, and four issues later we have engaged thousands of Black Canadians - Thank You. Robert Tindale, PR Director

kou, n ha y T O N

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Edmonton, thank you for the opportunities to connect, for trusting us to reflect the breadth and depth of the Black community, and for having the grace to allow us to grow and learn each step of the way. Taneya Rogers, Editor


Senator Donald Oliver, First Afro-Canadian to be seated in the Senate Image Courtesy of The Senate of Canada

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Acknowledging and Embracing

BLACK HISTORY Month In

CANADA A Crucial Step

By: Patrina Duhaney, Rachel Van Ee & Keisha Smuk

February is recognized as Black history month and is celebrated each year across Canada. The origins of Black history month dates back to 1926 when first introduced by Carter G. Woodson and other prominent Black Americans. Originally known as Negro History Week or Black History Week, these celebrations were later expanded into Black History Month. Honourable Jean Augustine, the first Black-Canadian woman elected to the House of Commons and Senator Donald Oliver, the first Black Canadian man appointed to the Senate, played a significant role in proclaiming February as Black History Month. On December 14, 1995, Honourable Jean Augustine proposed the motion to recognize February as Black History Month. Senator Donald Oliver put forward a similar motion on February 14, 2008 to formally recognize February as Black History in the Senate, solidifying a long-lasting tradition in Canada. The month of February is set aside to acknowledge and promote the achievements, contributions, and accomplishments of Black people. There is also a heightened awareness of Black people’s historical oppression, marginalization, resistance and ongoing struggles. Despite its historical presence in Canada, Black History Month was only recently recognized in Alberta on February 1, 2017.

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The acknowledgement of Black History Month in Alberta is a positive step, however, the erasure of Black people’s experiences in Alberta and across Canada is still evident. In particular, their legacy remains largely absent from history books and school curriculum. Furthermore, there lies significant ignorance to the persistent and ongoing racism Black people face in Canada. From the early 1600s Black people were captured and enslaved by white settlers, until the abolition of slavery in 1833. In western provinces, the movement of Black peoples to

SAV I N G S T RAT E GI E S

I N SURA N CE PRO T E CT I ON

RETIREMEN T S T RAT E GI E S

M OR T GAGE OP T I ON S

INVESTMEN T S T RAT E GI E S

DE B T SOLU T I ON S

Yvonne and Ladell Bowen, 1945 Image Courtesy of Myrna (Bowen) Wisdom


the prairies resulted in harsh outcry and parliamentary disputes. Although slavery was outlawed, Black peoples were seen as inferior and unambitious, contributing to discrimination, economic marginalization and social isolation. In the early 1900’s, Black migrants were discouraged from entering Canada, and rigorous measures were enacted to prevent their entry. Although, the Black population has doubled in size over the last 20 years, the stark realities of ongoing discrimination and racism remain. Black children, youth and adults are overrepresented in the child welfare system and criminal justice system and face an upward battle receiving equitable pay in the workforce. With decreases in funding to public education and healthcare, and a retreat from collective interest, there seems to be a lack of attention to social issues such as racism and marginalization. In fact, Alberta has not made the intentional move towards acknowledging and addressing anti-Black racism. However, given our current social and political climate, it is time Albertans embrace Black History Month in our communities, schools, workplaces, and homes. Honourable Jean Augustine Canada’s first Black Female MP and Cabinet Minister Image Courtesy of The House of Commons

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MELANISTIC FITNESS: Kemetic Yoga

BY: Charlene Smith

BreathWork and Mindful Movement Specialist Insta: @innerverseconnect Kemetic yoga is a healing practice designed by the African ancestors who lived in Ancient Kemet, known as our modern-day Egypt. The very word kemet means, “the black land”. I first came across this in my personal healing journey, diving in to connect not only with the wisdom of my body, but also my ancestors whose DNA runs through my veins. I found the practice empowering yet restorative, as it guided me through the philosophy that everything in the universe emerges out of an all-pervasive order called Ma’at. Hieroglyphs serve as the textbook to Kemetic Yoga, found on the ceilings of the temples and tombstones dating as far back as 10,000 B.C.E. In comparison, this predates the Ancient Indian Yogic Philosophy (Hatha Yoga), dating 5000 years ago. While the postures are very similar to the yoga we see today, the main difference is characterized by its slower and more focused approach with intention for human evolution. The poses resemble many of the ancient carvings, and often follow a rule of four breaths with tongue connection to enhance mind-body alignment. Consider the quick series known as “Journey of Ra” and add this to your morning routine to experience the benefits for yourself.

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Advertorial

HOME

OWNERSHIP

101

With Errol Scott

Over the past few issues, we have discussed quite a bit in the home buying process, but I wanted to address something that is often overlooked: “Lifestyle”

Now, I am not saying this should be your core driving factor, but it is important to consider in your search… You’re buying a new house, but you are not going to be spending all your time inside your home (hopefully); so how does the overall location and environment fit into or support your lifestyle.

What do you like to do on your weekends? Where are your favorite places to eat out? What recreational activities do you enjoy? What are your commuting preferences?

For example, if you like to work out, would you prefer extensive running trails nearby or quick access to a gym? What type of facility is within proximity to where you are currently looking to purchase your next home? For those with children or potentially growing your family, consider the proximity to schools or if you will need to be on a bus route.


Also consider whether this property is going to be your forever home or a transitional property (3-5 yrs). For a transitional property, you have a bit more flexibility as you will be moving in the near future, whereas for your forever home, you really want to nail down these items. Even during Covid times, understand that these elements can also impact the future saleability of your real estate. My advice: Shop with a checklist to make sure you don’t miss anything! Follow me on IG @Hardbodyrealtor Connect with me 780 -271-1114 www.errolscott.com


Black Canadians

C E LE BRA T IN G THE A C H I E VE M EN TS OF

PAST TO P R E SE NT B Y: LEB ENE L AWUU

Donovan Bailey - 1996 Olympics Image Courtesy of CPImages.com

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Black Canadians have made enormous contributions to Canada throughout history. Sadly, these narratives are hardly mentioned or discussed. Diversity is part of our Nation’s incredible identity. In this segment, we showcase several people who have crossed barriers and paved the way for us.

Rosemary Brown

Rosemary Brown was an educator, feminist, writer, politician, professor, and the first Black woman to be elected to the Canadian provincial legislature. She was one of the founding members of the British Columbia Association for the Advancement of Coloured People (BCAACP), which aimed to free-up accommodation and

Image Courtesy of: © Canada Post Corporation, 2009

employment opportunities for Black people in British Columbia. She was also named chief commissioner of the Ontario Human Rights Commission. As a woman-rights advocate in Canada and worldwide, the Rosemary Brown Award for Women was created in her honour. It celebrates a BC-based woman or organization that advances the principles and beliefs that Rosemary Brown championed.

Donovan Bailey

Sprinter Donovan Bailey is one of Canada’s most influential and famous athletes. Becoming a professional sprinter in just a year, he soon became a world champion. In particular, he was known for his top speed in his 1996 Atlanta Olympics sprint; the fastest athlete ever recorded at the time. He was the first Canadian to officially crack the 10-second 100-metres mark. He was introduced to the Canada Sports Hall of Fame in 2004 and joined the Ontario Sports Hall of Fame in 2005. His athletic talent helped re-establish Canada as a competitor on the international stage.

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Lincoln MacCauley Alexander

Born to West Indian parents, the Honourable Lincoln MacCauley Alexander was a Canadian lawyer and an influential advocate for social inclusion in Canada. He was the first Black Parliament Member of the House of Commons and the first Black Federal Cabinet Minister. Alexander was an activist for the equal treatment of Black Canadians and also concentrated on issues affecting the youth. With all his honours, racial inequality remained his focus, accepting the appointment as chair of the Canadian Race Relations Foundation in 2000. He was elected as the 24th Lieutenant Governor of Ontario; one of Mr. Alexander’s career’s highest distinctions and a proud period in Canadian Black History.

Ms. Deborah Beaver

Ms. Beaver was born in Barrhead and is a descendant of the early Black pioneers. To inform Canadians about her remarkable family history, as a fourth-generation Albertan, she helped form the non-profit body, “In Their Own Words” . The collective gathers interviews with Black Alberta’s seniors to retain this history for current and future generations. She believes that it is vital that we The Honourable Lincoln MacCauley Alexander Image Courtesy of Office of the Lieutenant Governor of Ontario’s Archives

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respect Black immigrants’ early development, and that this information is included in the provincial school curriculum. This history is a critical aspect of the Canadian story and must be both preserved and communicated.


The key takeaway is that the contributions of Black Canadians haven’t been celebrated enough. There are so many stories to be told. There is much more information about individuals’ lives that need to be highlighted. This Black History Month, we encourage you to research more Black Canadians, understand what it took for them to break systemic racism and discriminatory barriers to give us today’s opportunities.

The Beaver Family, 1965 Image Courtesy of The Beaver Family

Annie Beaver, 1938/39 Image Courtesy of: The Beaver Family

Happy Black History Month 2m

WEAR A MASK

SOCIAL DISTANCING

WASH HANDS

We’re in this together. ALBERTA.CA/COVID-19

@DShepYeg

780-414-0743 Edmonton.CityCentre@assembly.ab.ca

DAVID SHEPHERD

MLA Edmonton - City Centre


DATING WHILE BLACK

Story: Nigel Williams Art: Kyle Smith

So I can’t believe Janet Russo said...

You mean Janet Russo from Clarview? Oh man, that’s my home girl... ...We grew up together. In fact, I had the biggest crush on her as a kid... ...She’s so funny, we even went to prom together... ...And she was my first date and first kiss. HAHAHAHAHA!..

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...She’s amazing. So how’s she doing?

WHAT? WHAT DID I SAY?

@melanisticmagazine @inkfable


Our conversations are changing. This is not just another Black History Month. For more than a decade we have been supporting events during Black History Month. But we need to do more. We are committed to engaging with Black communities to fight anti-Black racism. This month and every month after. Learn more at td.com/morethanamonth


TO MY YOUNG,

BLACK ENTREPRENEURS BY: TANEYA ROGERS

2021

I

f ever there were lessons to bring into 2021, they would be to hold steadfast to our dreams and to take no opportunity for granted. The Melanistic team, with some help from our readers, sought out those in our community that are persevering in unwelcoming environments and applying their talents to build enterprises. They are carving new paths as they celebrate their Blackness in the process. Nina Simone’s Civil Rights Anthem opens, “Young, gifted and Black. Oh what a lovely precious dream. To be young, gifted and Black; Open your heart to what I mean”… The 2021 caucus of Young Black Entrepreneurs have counted ‘young’ as a frame of mind; have committed to never squandering their gifts; and have made ‘precious dreams’ into realities. We salute them all and hope their stories inspire you.

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ivan touko Meet our Cameroonian King, Ivan Touko; the talented force behind La Connexional. This social enterprise empowers and promotes African, Black, Caribbean and Latinx (ABCL) cultures, maintaining a focus on building capacity within these groups. La Connexional’s work is closely tied to the cultures and communities they serve and identify with. His team consistently seeks a deeper knowledge of their own cultures while also de-colonizing their minds.

Today’s environment demands innovation and La Connexional is stepping up by developing a mobile app called LaTandao. The app will showcase the community’s diversity and is purposefully designed to promote growth and cash-flow for businesses, entrepreneurs and artists of ABCL ethnicities, while also creating new relationships across cultures. Sharing his skills through dance classes, workshops, involvement in non-profit boards and other initiatives such as Africa Unite, Yeg The Come Up and BLM Yeg, Ivan helps to create more platforms in Edmonton that allows the Black community to keep thriving.

contact Web: www.laconnexional.com Email: hello@laconnexional.com Insta: @laconnexional

Ivan Touko Image Courtesy of NiLo

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Our Yorùbá Queen, Moréniké Oláòsebìkan is a pharmacist, pharmacy owner and the founder of Kemet Advanced Manufacturing Ltd. She grew up listening to stories about entire villages being wiped out of parents by HIV, in part because people were taking counterfeit medications. She has since made it her life’s purpose to be part of the solution. Kemet addresses global drug shortages with drug manufacturing solutions designed to be set up in areas with limited resources. Her work extends to the development of The Ribbon Rouge Foundation for health equity. Now an entity of its own, it has successfully raised $1.1 million to employ up to 13 staff with preferential hiring of people

of African descent. Over the next three years, the foundation is staged to generate knowledge on health inequity in Alberta thus informing meaningful solutions for people of African descent in Alberta. Moréniké’s message to the Black community is simple yet impactful: Mobilize - Collaborate - Build.

contact Moréniké Oláòsebìkan Image Courtesy of Atilary Photography

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Email: Admin@kemet.care Insta: @arewacanada Phone: 1-800-761-0565


keenan pascal

Keenan Pascal Image Courtesy of NiLo

Keenan Pascal, sharing both Caribbean and Metis heritage, is the man behind Token Naturals. Injecting diversity and innovation into this new market, Token Naturals is a cannabis extraction and manufacturing company. Its sister company Token Bitters creates locallymade, handcrafted aromatic bitters. He boasts that his Token Bitters Ritchie Cherry would add the perfect finishing touch on a strong rum punch. If given the choice of mentors, Keenan would choose Barak Obama who inspired him to be a more thoughtful leader and to always seek the greater good. While he applies these lessons, he also implores

Black entrepreneurs to not shy away from asking for seat at the table. There is value for a company in adding diverse thoughts, backgrounds and experiences. “Ask for help; it is not a sign of weakness. The team you build through peers, mentorship, staff, and friends will pay huge dividends if you’re willing to put yourself out there in the community.”

contact Webs: www.TokenNaturals.com & www.TokenBitters.com Email: Keenan@TokenNaturals.com Insta: @TokenNaturals @TokenBitters

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LUngile tinarwo

Born in Lesotho and raised in Zimbabwe, Lungile Tinarwo known fondly as Lulu, is the founder of Tinarwo Law. Her firm practices in the areas of Family, Immigration and Criminal Law. As a Black woman, Lulu has beat the odds by sustaining her practice beyond 5 years and is currently boldly growing her firm with a commitment to Black professionals in this field. This tenacity runs in her blood; her mother’s own story of determination and achievements championed the way and provided lifelong lessons that continue to propel Lulu to greater accomplishments. Looking forward, her hope is for an equitable playing field – one that no longer demands the same output when the rules are not the same; one that removes socio-economic and systemic barriers allowing successes to be measured only by merit. She also hopes that the world eventually recognizes imbalances in the system that young Black professionals are forced to maneuver and still manage to thrive in.

contact Web: www.tinarwolaw.com Email: reception@tinarwolaw.com Phone: 780-702-1077

Lungile Tinarwo Image Courtesy of Haley Shandro

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ANISHA reindorf Canadian born with strong Trinidadian roots, Anisha Reindorf stands as one of the first Black women to break into the Cannabis market that has boomed since legalization. Her company, HighKu.Co creates natural, 100% vegan and common gluten free edibles that elevate your senses to a ‘Higher Level’.

While she does not recall the details of her father’s battle with Multiple Sclerosis, she does recall his use of marijuana to ease his pain before eventually succumbing to the disease. 20 years later, her closest friend facing this familiar battle, spurred her to explore infused foods. Combating ignorance and misconceptions, she’s breaking the stigma behind the amazing plant, through education and myth busting. Cannabis (marijuana) is a plant that contains biologically active substances in its leaves, flowers, and buds. She harnesses the benefits, through extracts that are incorporated in cooking. On her list of favorite cannabis-infused comfort foods are hummus, cookiedough and popcorn.

contact Web: www.HighKuCo.com (under construction) Email: Info@Highkuco.com Insta: @Level.Of_Ambrosia

Anisha Reindorf Image Courtesy of Adaeze Hubbard

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Advertorial

THE AFRICAN DIASPORA

COVID-19 RESPONSE — A Community United —

The Black community, particularly immigrants, have had a contentious relationship with health care and social support systems. These services are often provided through a distorted lens leaving minorities feeling othered, less than and at times blatantly neglected. There are stigmas prevalent within the community attached to newcomers seeking help. Couple this with a general distrust of healthcare providers, and we’ll find a significant impact on the overall willingness and ability to access critical services. Layer these issues with a global pandemic and the negative effect quickly snowballs.

were nearly three times as likely to report knowing someone who has died of the virus. The trend is further supported by reports from various international jurisdictions, all reflecting that ethnic minorities have a higher rate of exposure and mortality to COVID 19.

While Canada’s federal government has lagged in collecting race-based data, geospatial data from the City of Toronto showed high rates of COVID19 in predominantly Black populated neighborhoods. Montreal reported that immigrants, refugees, and lower-income people live in the hardest-hit regions. One research group noted that Black Canadians

FOOD SECURITY

The pandemic birthed an unprecedented collaborative effort by several non-profit organizations, academics and students, initiated by the Nile Valley Foundation and coordinated by Africa Centre. The African Diaspora COVID 19 Response provides vital support on two fronts:

MENTAL HEALTH


In the face of widespread job losses and illness, multiple community organizations combined resources to ensure that the most basic need is met - FOOD. Culturally specific food hampers... because even in the face of difficult times families should be allowed the dignity of preparing meals that preserve their customs and dietary needs. Hampers adjusted to the size of each family There are no ID or documentation requirements Scheduled pickups TO ACCESS THE EMERGENCY FOOD BANK PLEASE CALL 1-833-621-0736 Distributed through the Africa Centre located at Suite 106, 6770-129 Avenue, or apply online at www.africacentre.ca/foodbank


Advertorial

The African Diaspora COVID 19 Response did not end its efforts with the food bank. They also braved the front on an area that is often taboo within Black communities MENTAL HEALTH. Some of the topic covered in the series of emergency workshops include: Finding Strength & Resiliency During COVID Coping During Covid as an Immigrant & Refugee Mental Health for Students And Understanding Domestic Violence During COVID While the workshops under the African Diaspora COVID 19 Response program have ended, the Africa Centre currently has a mental health program funded by the Public Health Agency of Canada, and a counselling project funded by United Way that further meets the needs of the community.


“Disasters such as pandemics test people’s capacity and compassion. COVID19 pandemic is different - it requires collective measures but also demands social distancing as a strategy for containment. COVID19 was initially described as the “equalizer”, affecting everyone regardless of race and socioeconomic status. However, studies have shown that Black populations are disproportionately impacted by both exposure and impact. Preliminary macro data indicates that the worst rates of COVID19 infections in Edmonton and Calgary are in neighborhoods with high concentrations of racialized populations. We need race-based data for us to provide tailored programs that will inform our economic and mental health recovery stages of our response in 2021-2023. This will help our overall system efficiency, and it is the best means to equitable recovery post pandemic.” ~ Africa Centre

“UBUNTU - ‘I am because we are’. This is the essence of this program. The community response has been heartwarming; being able to help at the most vulnerable times of a person’s life” ~ Nile Valley Foundation THINKING ABOUT MAKING A DIFFERENCE? Sign up to volunteer at www.africacentre.ca/volunteer To those who have collaborated to make this project a reality, we say thank you. ~NILE VALLEY FOUNDATION ~LIBERIA FRIENDSHIP SOCIETY OF CANADA (“LFSC”) ~ZIMBABWE CULTURAL SOCIETY OF ALBERTA (“ZCUSA”) ~BERNADETT SWAN SOCIAL FOUNDATION (BSSF) ~SICKLE CELL FOUNDATION OF ALBERTA (SFA) ~CAMEROONIAN ASSOCIATION OF EDMONTON ~TREBI KUMA OLLENNU FOUNDATION FOR COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT ~FUSE IN WHO AM I ~BLACK STUDENTS ASSOCIATION UNIVERSITY OF ALBERTA ~ SIERRA LEONE ASSOCIATION OF ALBERTA ~FAMILY ADVANCEMENT ASSOCIATION ~JAMAICA ASSOCIATION OF NORTHERN ALBERTA ~COUNCIL FOR THE ADVANCEMENT OF AFRICAN CANADIANS IN ALBERTA AFRICA CENTRE (Coordinating Organiztion)


Sunn M’Cheaux Image Courtesy of Natalie Simmons

Gul·lah/g

l OUR LANGUAGE IS ee

NOT BROKEN BY: SUNN M’CHEAUX

In the years since I started teaching Harvard University’s first and only Gullah language course, there are still moments when it feels surreal to be at such an esteemed institution of higher learning teaching my native language that I was barred from speaking throughout my education in Lowcountry South Carolina schools. Adding insult to irony, Gullah is a language that is indigenous to my hometown; English is not.

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Yet, I am often asked how I learned to speak Gullah, never how I learned to speak English. In a predominantly English-speaking colonized region, it is presumed that I must have picked up Gullah—an English-based AfroIndigenous creole—by way of exceptional circumstances with English being learned by default of my immediate surroundings, schooling, and society at large. Yes and no. Mostly, no.


Gullah was the first and foremost language of my immediate surrounds, a familial village in rural Mt Holly, South Carolina. It was not until I started attending kindergarten that I was formally introduced to the English… and anti-Gullah linguicism. Even as a child, alongside mostly Gullah/Geechee classmates, I did not understand why communication gap between a teacher (who did not understand their students’ creolized English) and a classroom full of creolized English-speaking students (who did understand their teacher) was resolved by conditioning the many [students] to understand the one [teacher], never the one to understand the many. Terms such as “proper,” “standard,” “bad,” and “broken” were used to justify the practice of in-class linguicism (linguistic racism) under the guise of teaching Gullah/ Geechee students “correct” grammar. I wondered why other bilingual students’ native languages were not deemed “incorrect.” What I came to realize is that I was not considered bilingual. Because my native language, even in its native region, was not regarded nor respected as a “real” language.

“What I came to realize is that I was not considered bilingual. Because my native language, even in its native region, was not regarded nor respected as a ‘real’ language.”

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“I did not learn to speak Gullah, I was born Gullah; and speak it as my identity made manifest. The better question is how I learned to speak English.”

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I did not learn to speak Gullah, I was born Gullah; and speak it as my identity made manifest. The better question is how I learned to speak English. The hard way. It did not have to be that way, though. A Gullah/Geechee student does not have to erase Gullah to embrace English. In fact, a teacher knowing that their Gullah/Geechee student calls a peanut “guba” or dragonfly “jingabaga” should expand both the teacher’s and student’s vocabulary, not reduce the student’s to standard English words. While my primary purpose at Harvard University is to teach the Gullah language to students enrolled in my course, I hope the success of the course sets a promising precedent to other schools—particularly in the Gullah Geechee Cultural Heritage Corridor region that service Gullah/ Geechee students—and helps destigmatize Black English and creoles in learning any subject. It can be that way… if we make it so. Sunn will be a guest speaker at the We Lit Afro Indie Book Fair on March 6th. See www.afroindie.com for more info.

Images Courtesy of Discover South Carolina

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now open


Advertorial

Endowment Funds

SUSTAINABLE COMMUNITY SUPPORT

Call it a donation, philanthropy, corporate citizenship, charity or simply, giving back. These acts of kindness are essential to building stronger communities. In such difficult times, the work of non-profit organizations becomes even more important. These groups help the less fortunate, encourage innovation, support the arts and promote causes that shape a better Edmonton. Getting this good work done is no

easy feat and requires commitment. So how can individuals or businesses support their charitable efforts in a way that is sustainable? Endowment funds through Edmonton Community Foundation (ECF) are a proven tool. If you wish to give back, ECF can provide guidance and expertise in the charitable sector to ensure the longevity of your family’s interests.


Here’s what you need to know... How much does it cost to star t an endowment fund? An endowment fund can begin granting when it reaches $10,000 and you have up to 10 years to reach that target.

What happens with my donation? The money is invested and managed by a team of experts, so that it grows. Every year a percentage of the fund is issued as grants to support the community. ECF oversees the grants and provides ongoing guidance and accountability.

Who decides where the money goes? A simple written agreement between ECF and the donor outlines the donor’s intentions to support the causes and/or organizations that are most important to them.

Do I have to be a business owner to have an endowment fund? No. Donors can be a business, a business collaboration, an individual, a family or even a group of friends, who pool resources to support a cause.

How can donors grow their funds?

Donors can grow their funds by making annual gifts or engaging others to donate to the fund. Some companies use their team building challenges as fundraising activities while groups of friends have hosted annual barbeques or sports tournaments. Fundraising can take on any form.

Give. Grow. Transform. www.ecfoundation.org


Advertorial

“I feel very lucky to have conversations with donors who want to make a difference. Edmontonians are very charitable and there are so many interesting projects, organizations and causes that matter to them. Everyone has the capacity to give in their own way and we make starting an endowment as easy as possible. Going into 2021, ECF will be there to help the charitable sector to continue doing its good work — helping those that need it and being able to respond to the shifting priorities brought on by the pandemic.” -Noel Xavier Director of Donor Services

There is no limit on the impact that you can have on our community! Here are some of the areas currently supported through Donors and their endowment funds.

Contact ECF today to learn more about getting your endowment fund started: donorservices@ecfoundation.org


5

top by: Nilo

5

dead or alive

T h i s i s a s p ec ia l Blac k His t ory E p i so d e of T op 5, wh ere we w i l l r a t e t h e t op 5 Na t u ra ls ( wh a t t h e you n g p eop le c a ll “ Af r o s” ) in His t ory.

L ARGER THAN LIFE FRO:

This sp o t go es t o S i m o ne W I l l i a m s f r o m Bro o kl yn, Ne w Yo rk, wh o h as th e w o rl d ’ s l a r g e s t A f r o a t 1 . 4 8 m i n c i rc umf e re nc e . O u r o n l y q u estio n: I s t ha t wi t h o r wi t ho ut shri nkage ?

4

THE FRO FORMERLY KNOWN AS: Af te r ro c ki ng a s i l k y c o i f f o r t he maj o ri ty o f hi s c a r e e r , P r i nc e ’ s r e t urn to hi s Fro was g l o r i o us a nd l uc i o us .

3 2 1 40 MELANISTIC

HIS FRO-E XCELLENCE:

Mayo r B rando n S c o tt o f B al ti mo re starte d hi s po l i ti c al c are e r wi th a ne atl y l i ne d up c e sar; he has si nc e gro wn a gl o ri o us f ro that he sho we d o f f i n hi s o f f i c i al mayo ral pho to .

ENDLESS FRO:

Ms. D i ana Ro ss was kno wn as muc h f o r he r tal e nt and be auty as he r i nc re di bl e Af ro .

SAY IT LOUD:

Ms. Ange l a D avi s’ f ro has be e n a symbo l o f B l ac k Pri de si nc e S to ke l y C armi c hae l sai d: B l ac k i s B e auti f ul .

3


Please Enjoy Responsibly.

Wray & Nephew Overproof Jamaican Rum, 63% ALC./VOL. ©2021 Campari Canada

L WE ARE AL D CONNECTE

Calgarians make up .02% of the nearly 8 billion people on earth.

We’re outnumbered by identical twins, redheads and people born on a leap day. It’s why our shared geography is such a wondrous thing. The 1.28 million may not share views — but we are profoundly connected. Calgary Foundation’s work is to foster those connections. Last year,

we granted almost $55 million to 996 charitable organizations. As that funding spread across the city, our hope is it brought something else with it — the idea that someone you pass on the street isn’t a stranger, but someone who belongs to the same .02% as you do.


IRETURNED BY:

LAUREL SABUR

Born on an island, only 10,992 km² with a population of 3 million, I grew up with the sense that I was a part of something bigger, however, I did not consciously know what that was. My Jamaican education programmed my mind with stories of being a descendant of slaves. I learned of the horrific journey that my ancestors were forced to take, forging a significant part of my Jamaican history. The movies repeatedly depicting Black people, tortured and packed on ships quickly grew old. Am I only a descendant of “African Slaves”?

I acknowledged my ignorance of African history and decided to explore more about myself as an African descendent. The sovereignty of my soul did not match the story of the gruesome pain that I was taught in school. I ought to be defined by more than a descendant of slaves. Upon landing in Ghana there was a great sense of belonging that I had not experienced before. For the first time I felt grounded - all my senses were heightened - I was more alive than ever. The genuine smile and welcome home from Ghanaians warmed the soul. I had to discover more of this place and the connection I have to this land. I journeyed from the bustling streets of the capital, Accra, hiked the lush mountains of the Volta region, visited slave castle dungeons in Cape Coast and Elmina, to gold mines of the Western Region, to African spiritual shrines and ceremonies. I travelled Ghana using local transportation to save money and to be fully immersed in the culture. I was mesmerized by the hustle and warmth of the people, the music playing on every corner and the cultural similarities to my homeland, Jamaica.

TD MINUTE:

This Black History Month, TD Bank is proud to support over 90 events across Canada that are changing the conversation. Visit td.com/morethanamonth to learn more.

42 MELANISTIC

Hosted by a Queen Mother in Accra, I was deeply empowered by my newfound awareness of the role of women in traditional governing structures. Before colonization, West Africa maintained bordered kingdoms led by Kings and Queens, now called Chiefs


“FOR THE FIRST TIME I FELT GROUNDED ALL MY SENSES WERE HEIGHTENED I WAS MORE

ALIVE

THAN EVER”

Laurel Sabur Images Courtesy of Laurel Sabur

43


and Queen mothers. Queen mothers are still responsible for selecting the chief of a village and for all matters of women and children. My time with a Queen Mother allowed me to embrace the leader within myself as a Black woman. Observing social challenges in certain sectors and wanting to activate my leadership abilities, influenced me to tap into the wealth of this land through the shea butter market. I’m able to enhance the lives of others while connecting North America to the creativity and resilience of Ghanaians. I now have ongoing ties to the continent through a viable business, giving me the joy of investing in Africa.

44 MELANISTIC

By travelling to Ghana, I began seeing myself as a descendant of royalty, having a lineage of leadership. It allowed me to have a profound appreciation of myself; knowing that I was not merely a descendant of pain but a product of sovereigns with the strength to move beyond tragedy. This changed my life forever and reflecting on my journey to Ghana, I am reignited, strengthened and reminded of our resilience.

Town of Elmina, ancient slave castle, Ghana


Advertorial

Sickle Cell Foundation of Alberta Meech’s Pint Size is a bold new app being developed by the Sickle Cell Foundation of Alberta to encourage the engagement of BIPOC youth in the medical system. The app will promote blood drives allowing users to find the locations closest to them, keep track of campaigns they’ve participated in, and see the progress of active campaigns. The app also provides an avenue to further educate users about the disease. The Alberta Sickle Cell Foundation’s goal of reaching out to the youth population to donate blood came from the realization that the best blood match is not only one that is similar in proteins (A, AB, O) but genetically similar as well. While it’s commonly believed that Sickle Cell affects only Black populations, it also affects people of Mediterranian, Middle Eastern, Asian South Asian, and South American heritage. Although there is a lot of media surrounding blood donation, it does not reach these populations of young people - resulting in a shortage in this demographic. Meech’s Pint Size App will help to attract youth, allowing them to be lifelong donors by promoting Blood Challenges, like the one coming up in February. During the month of February, the Sickle Cell Foundation is encouraging BIPOC people to donate blood under their Partner For Life number PFL#SICK0090807, ensuring the blood donations go to the Sickle Cell Foundation to service some of the over 500 people in Alberta who are affected by this disease. For more information visit www.ourscfa.org.


“1984” is a title of George Orwell’s book, published in 1949. Orwell’s figment of imagination, fictionally prophesied in “1984” has now become a naked reality. Yes, “Big Brother” is watching all of us. For real.

46 MELANISTIC

T E C H TA L K W I T H GAMAL A. HUMMAD Thanks to massive advances in telecommunications technology, we have become unwitting enablers in the surveillance of our daily activities for the benefit of “Big Brother”. And we are paying heavily to be spied on.


So, how does “Big Brother” do it? Via cellphones, tablets, laptops and other computing devices. A cellphone in your pocket, or purse is a perfect tracking device, which transmits your exact location at all times via its built-in GPS, even when it is turned off, as determined by Princeton University researchers. While in use, your cellphone will meticulously generate, record, save, catalogue and archive all content you create. Thinking of those selfies or intimate talks you had with a loved one? Yes, will be there for “Big Brother” to snoop on. With an active SIM card and Wi-Fi tools, your cellphone is wirelessly connected on demand to any of billions of other cellphones, tablets and computers worldwide. All it takes is the confirmation that you are the owner or the user of a cellphone of interest. This job is done by your telecom services provider, which knows a lot about you. Every cellphone has a 15-digit unique IMEI (International Mobile Equipment Identity) number. Your cellphone service provider, which does the actual spying, is identified by another unique MSIN (Mobile Subscription Identification Number). These two distinctive sets of numbers are combined to create an identity tag of the cellphone. If “Big Brother” wants you, all he needs is this tag number to easily access all content you generated since you first started using a cellphone. Google, Apple, Microsoft, Yahoo, Facebook, YouTube, Instagram, and other firms, collect large user data to determine your buying habits. But government-run security agencies worldwide have a different intent. I wonder if Orwell is bewildered in his grave by the spot-on realization of his fictional prophecy?

47


THANK YOU To everyone who submitted and supported Say It Loud Canada

Follow us on

and

to learn more about

the upcoming National Black Youth Summit in March 2021. www.sayitloudcanada.com


MEL ANIS TIC

ACROSS

XWORD

2. This Canadian was a member of parliament, lawyer and cabinet minister. Likely best known as the former Lieutenant Governor of Ontario 5. This highly touted Canadian Boxer was unable to compete for any major championships because of racist and discriminatory policies. 8. Owned Toronto’s Mansion Inn and Livery and stagecoach transport service that ran between Toronto and Kingstown. He rescues his daughter after her husband traffics her into Slavery. 11. Canadian baseball player who played for the Phillies and Cubs and was inducted into the Baseball Hall of fame in 1991 12. The first Black player in the National Hockey League. 13. This person escaped their captivity in 1830 and dedicated their life to helping people escape captivity and set up farms. He led a militia of Black men in the Upper Canadian Rebellion of 1837 14. The first Black woman ordained in Canada

15. ______ and _______ were enslaved people that escaped to Canada. After their human traffickers petitioned Canada for extradition, the courts refused.

DOWN

1. This hairdresser refused to sit in the balcony reserved for coloured in New Glasgow, N.S. and sat in the section reserved exclusively for Whites 3. The first Black person to receive the Victoria Cross.

4. One of Canada’s most decorated athletes, once held the 100m world record 6. This is the first Black person to become a Canadian Senator 7. This poet, activist, journalist, writer founded the Clarion, Canada’s first Black-owned and published newspaper. 9. The first woman to become a publisher in Canada.

10. This acclaimed singer performs concerts across Canada, including performing for the Queen at Charlottetown’s Confederation Centre in 1964.

FOR ANSWERS TO OUR LAST CROSSWORD, CHECK OUT MELANISTICMAGAZINE.COM by: nilo

49


Melanistic

Sips

Melanistic Mojito Individual Servings

A refreshing blend of fruit with a Caribbean flair, a traditional Mojito is mixed with white rum, but our cocktail features the dark, smooth n’ sexy, aged to perfection, Eldorado 12-Year Rum.

Melanistic

INGREDIENTS 1 tsp white sugar (or to taste)

Mojito

Image Courtesy of NiLo

2 tbsp fresh lime juice 1 ½ tbsp maracuya passion fruit (has seeds) 3 whole strawberries (fresh) 3 pineapple chunks (fresh) 4 mint leaves 1 oz El Dorado 12-Year Rum 2 drops TOKENS Highlands Mojito Bitters ½ tsp crushed ginger (fresh) 1 bottle club soda Brown sugar & pink coarse salt for rim

GLASS PREP Dip rim in lime juice followed by brown sugar and pink coarse salt. Place in the freezer for 5 mins

GLASS PREP Fill a glass with club soda Gently crush ginger, mint, strawberries & pineapple (Tip: be gentle with mint) Add lime juice - let it sit for 2 mins. Add passion fruit, 2 drops of Token bitters & sugar. Stir and add rum. Add ice & serve in your garnished glass

50 MELANISTIC

Enjoy!


Artist Spotlight

elsa robinson

BY: TANEYA ROGERS

As early as grade one, Elsa Robinson recalls exploring the world of mixed media arts. Her work bares themes of identity, family and spirituality, tapping into elements of her rich Jamaican culture, particularly the African and Afrocentric spiritual practices of her homeland. Counted among her successes are her contributions to the local arts community through her service on two boards: Harcourt House and the Edmonton Arts Council. Her efforts aimed at bringing equity into the arts community for the benefit of artists from marginalized groups as well as strengthening the arts community. An Alberta certified teacher, Elsa noticed the need for content related to the history of

the African Diaspora, as well as inclusion of Afrocentric history in the school curriculum. To meet this gap, she designs and facilitates art workshops that teach some of this history in schools and in the community. Her advice to burgeoning artists: Be an artist first - your cultural roots will naturally find expression in your work. Find your own voice – discover your own reason for creating; this will guide your choice of medium, subjects and methodology. Join local arts organizations - learn more about the career; about your rights as a Canadian artist; about contracts; about appropriate pay rates; and about resources to get valuable advice pertaining to copyright. Seek out ‘older’ artists – they can provide advice and support in building your career. Elsa also encourages any of our readers seeking a mentor for their art career to reach out to her, “We all need to help each other out.”

Elsa Robinson B Ed, BA (Visual Arts), MFA (Visual Arts) Image Courtesy of www.elsarobinson.com

51


US

FOR BY

RETURN ON COLOUR BY: ROBERT TYNDALE Return on Colour is an online platform working to connect businesses, non-profits, professionals, students, entrepreneurs, and freelancers of African descent. We are working towards ongoing education, community building, eliminating anti-Black racism, and building a more successful economy within the Black community. We are a technologybased company that focuses on building platforms, amplifying stories, and turning data into useful information. We provide a directory of Black-owned businesses, professionals, and organizations as well as a directory of events happening in the Black community in Canada. We believe that justice and success are achieved not only by dismantling racist systems, but also by proactively creating opportunities for Black Canadians. We believe not only that Black

52 MELANISTIC

MEET THE TEAM

people should be given a seat at the table, but also that Black people must build our own table. Rather than remaining subject to the whims of governments and other external entities that have historically put Black people at a disadvantage, we need to take control of our futures. We need to care about our own health, community, education, economic security, safety, and justice. Return on Colour aims to organize Black Canadian businesses, professionals, and organizations to make them more searchable and accessible. We want to disrupt the platforms that don’t serve us; make it easier for Black professionals to support one another, and for non-Black professionals to connect and work with the Black community. @ReturnOnColour hello@ReturnOnColour.com


resource guide

dining

Blue Nile Authentic Ethiopian Restaurant 11019 107 Ave NW Edmonton, AB T5H 3G2 (780) 428-5139

Simply Irie Caribbean Cuisine 1510 6 St SW Calgary, AB T2R 0N2 (403) 454 - 7400 simplyirie.ca

Food N Vibes Caribbean Restaurant & Lounge 2316 27 Ave NE #6A Calgary, AB T2E 7A7 (403) 456 - 4149

The Tantalizers 2976 Ellwood Dr SW Edmonton, AB T6X 0W6 (587) 498 - 1028 thetantalizersca.com

Irie Foods 2807 Mill Woods Rd NW Edmonton, AB T6K 4A9 (780) 414-1341 iriefoods.ca

Tiramisu Bistro 10750 124 St, Edmonton, AB T5M 0H1 (780) 452 - 3393 www.tiramisubistro.ca

Island Grill 15203 Stony Plain Rd Edmonton, AB, T5P 3Y4 islandgrillalberta.com

RETAIL

Krazy Jerk 1715 52 St SE Calgary, AB T2A 1V1 (403) 691 - 1040 krazyjerk.com Koultures AfroContinental Restaurant 8803 118 Ave NW Edmonton, AB T5B 0T3 (780) 244 - 3500 Langano Skies Ethiopian Restaurant 9920 82 Ave NW Edmonton, AB, T6E 1Y9 (780) 432 - 3334 langanoskies.com Mumbai Dakar Restaurant 4322 118 Ave NW Edmonton, AB T5W 1A6 (780) 474 - 0833 Safron’s Caribbean Delight 8155 112 Ave NW Edmonton, AB T5B 0G1 (780) 474 - 9005

Azurys Jewellers 10072 Jasper Ave Edmonton, AB T5J 1V8 (780) 271 - 7272 www.azurys.ca Bamboo Ballroom 8206 104 St NW Edmonton, AB, T6E 2A2 (780) 439 - 1363 bambooballroom.ca Island Beat 2316 27 Ave NE #8 Calgary, AB T2E 7A7 (403) 291 - 2440 islandbeat.ca Kasoa Tropical Food Market Ltd 9340 118 Avenue Edmonton, AB, T5G 0N6 (780) 328 - 1751 kasoatropicalfood.com KlassicKoutique 10709 105 St Edmonton, AB stanfordnicola@yahoo.com Kny Apperal info@kynapparel.ca kynapparel.ca

Londonderry Mall 1-Londonderry Mall NW Edmonton, AB, T5C 3C8 londonderrymall.com Mama Afro Beauty Supply 9323 118 Ave NW Edmonton, AB, T5G 0N3 (780) 477 - 8511 Nyla Beauty Supply Inc. Creates connections and cultural experiences through conscious fashion, travel and spiritual support www.nayaa.ca Oluchi Nayaa Creates connections and cultural experiences through conscious fashion, travel and spiritual support www.nayaa.ca Spice Island 10058 163 St NW Edmonton, AB T5P 3N4 (780) 489 - 2738 Token Bitters An Edmonton original brand uses organically sourced ingredients from local farmers and businesses, and bottled without chemicals or preservatives. Token Bitters’ handcrafted artisanal aromatic bitters, adds a layer of flavour complexity to cocktails, mocktails and coffee. A few drops are guaranteed to elevate your bartending game. www.tokenbitters.com info@TokenBitters.com

services A1 Freight Forwarding 1 (800) 280 - 0277 a1freightforwarding.com Africa Centre 6770 129 Ave NW #106 Edmonton, AB T5C 1V7 (780) 455 - 5423 africacentre.ca

53


resource guide services

Afrodisiac Natural Shop 11445 124 St Unit 211 Edmonton, AB, T5M 0K4 (780) 964 - 7117 afrodisiacnaturals.com Allstate Insurance Richard Griffith - Agent Allstate Insurance is a leading home and auto insurer focused on providing its customers prevention and protection products and services for every stage of life. (587) 805 - 5359 agents.allstate.ca/ab/st-albert/2hebert-rd/richard-griffith.html On FB @RGriffithAllstate Asiri Beauty Inc (780) 860 - 3045 @asiriewarmakeup_pro Audrey French Photography audreynfrench@gmail.com

Dog Boarding Paradise Instagram: @dogboardingparadise Errol Scott Realty Group Full Time & Full-Service Real Estate Professional delivering world-class service and doing whatever it takes to make my clients’ Real Estate goals & dreams become a reality! Contact: Errol Scott (780) 271 - 1114 info@errolscott.com become a reality! Contact: Errol Scott Flawless Financial Services info@flawlessfinancial.ca (780) 860 - 0298

54 MELANISTIC

Genesis Control Systems LTD. Smart home systems (780)983-9877 info@genesiscontrolsystems.com genesiscontrolsystems.com GMD Auto Werks 10508 11010 166a St NW Edmonton, AB T5P 4H6 (780) 758 - 2691 gmdautowerks.com Insecure Fitness Insta: @insecure_fitness insecurefitness@gmail.com

Socafit – Caribbean Dance and Fitness Classes If you want to learn some new moves, get a great workout in, or you just want to have a fun night out, Socafit is here to bring you an authentic experience. Classes are open level and catered to all ages. Private and group sessions are available. Currently offering online only sessions. info@socafit.ca socafit.ca

Inspira Academic Consulting inspiraconsulting.org info@inspiraconsulting.org

Smooth By Sugar Edmonton based hair removal studio (587) 783 - 9816 smoothbysugar.com christine@smoothbysugar.com

Lawrence & Tkachuk Barristers, Solicitors & Notaries Crystal Lawrence #620 Ledgeview Building 9707 - 110 St, Edmonton Alberta, T5K 2L9 (780) 428 - 0777 familyandcriminallaw.ca

SMRT Health Center 14256 23 Ave NW Edmonton, AB T6R 3B9 (780) 705 - 0450 smrthealth.com

Legacy Barbershop & Salon 8930 Jasper Ave Edmonton, AB, T5H 4E9 (587) 928 - 2840 Memoris Photography by Abi (780) 220 - 0590 www.memorisphotography.ca MP Cubed Media Photography/ Cinematography/ Certified Drone Pilot Insta: @mp_cubed_media (647) 471 - 7637

Synergy Health 5117-55 Ave Edmonton, AB T6B 3V1 info@synergy-health.ca (780) 450 – 0507 synergy-health.ca The Bar 6009 86 Street Edmonton, AB T6E-2X4 (780) 468 - 6560 thebarfitness.ca

N.T.P. Mechanical (780) 903 - 9905

Yves Salon 10340 134 St NW Edmonton, AB T5N 2B1 (780) 604 - 0301 yvessalon.com

Online Tutoring English, French, Social Studies Contact Elsa Robinson www.elsarobinson.com elas@elsarobinson.com

Zoë Medical Clinic 6572 170 Ave NW Edmonton, AB T5Y 3X6 (780) 475 - 9635 zoemedical.ca


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Melanistic Sips

1min
pages 50, 55

Melanistic Sips

1min
pages 50, 55

Melanistic Magazine - Vol 5

2min
pages 42-44

TECH TALK WITH GAMAL A. HUMMAD

1min
pages 46-47

Melanistic Magazine - Vol 5

2min
pages 32-35

Melanistic Magazine - Vol 5

3min
pages 28-31

Melanistic Magazine - Vol 5

1min
page 13

Melanistic Magazine - Vol 5

2min
pages 8-11

TO MY YOUNG, BLACK

4min
pages 22-27

Gul·lah/gele

3min
pages 32-35

CELEBRATING THE ACHIEVEMENTS OF Canadians Black PAST TO PRESENT BY: LEBENE LAWUU

2min
pages 16-18

Melanistic Magazine - Vol 5

2min
pages 8-11

TO MY YOUNG, BLACK

5min
pages 22-27

Melanistic Magazine - Vol 5

1min
pages 1, 22-27
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