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COMPLIMENTARY

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JULY 2018 | VOL. 9, ISSUE 7

booming lifestyles: the issue

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Serving the Sandhills & Southern Piedmont

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Lovore Money For

Personal & Professional Insights into the Music Industry

July 12 at 3:30 pm th

Given Memorial Library 150 Cherokee Road, Pinehurst

In partnership with OutreachNC magazine, Rooster’s Wife venue owner Janet Kenworthy and singer-songwriter Laurelyn Dossett discuss the realities of working in the music industry. OutreachNC editor Corbie Hill moderates, and Laurelyn will perform.

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

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features JULY 2018

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Birding in NC: J. Bayard Clark Park by Ray Linville

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Rock is Dead... Again

by John Schacht

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I am Aging but I am Still Somebody by Art Menius

Booming Lifestyles: The Music Issue

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Carolina Conversations with Spiritual Awakening Producer Dona Jackson Anderson by Spencer Griffith

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Happy Merlefest by James J. Hatfield

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Janet Kenworthy’s Musical Conduit by Corbie Hill

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www.firsthealth.org/ortho

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departments July 2018

12

“You don’t know what you don’t like if you’ve never heard it.” - Janet Kenworthy, page 54

18 advice & health

life

10  Ask the Expert

12  Regional Culture

14  Brain Health

18  Cooking Simple

16  Role Reversal

21  The Reader’s Nook

19  Home Staging

41  Resource Marketplace

20 The Triumphant Elder

62  Grey Matter Games

by Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA

by Heather Tippens, LPC

by David Hibbard by Kasia McDaniel by Tim Keim, EYT 500, Yoga Therapist

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by Ray Linville

by Leslie Philip

by Michelle Goetzl

Find the resources you need.

Sudoku, Word Search & Crossword Puzzles

65 Over My Shoulder by Ann Robson

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66  Generations

by Corbie Hill & Michelle Goetzl

Cover Image by Diana Matthews


ADT® Helps Save Ohio Woman Stung by a Hornet When Ray and Julie Kissel purchased their ADT monitored security system in January, they never imagined it would help save Julie’s life in July. The couple wanted monitored protection for their Mansfield, Ohio home so they called Defenders, an ADT Premier Provider which sold and installed the system. Six months later, Julie was pulling a weed in her front yard when a hornet suddenly stung her in the back, triggering a severe allergic reaction. A former nurse, Julie knew she was in trouble when her face turned fiery red, her breathing became difficult and she started drooling. “I was woozy and weak,” Julie said. Unable to drive, Julie stumbled inside the home. She collapsed on the floor, far from the phone. Julie’s life line for help was the ADT key fob in her hand. She pushed it, activating the panic alarm which immediately signaled ADT Dispatcher Sally Boutwell at ADT’s monitoring center in Rochester, New York. Following ADT procedures, Sally first called the home. Julie heard the ringing but couldn’t pick up. Sensing something was wrong, Sally then contacted local authorities. At the 911 Dispatch Call Center in Richland County, OH, Jolene Zehner answered Sally’s call and immediately dispatched Sheriff’s Deputies Jeff Myers and Reggie Ganzhorn. “We arrived and looked around to see if there were any signs of criminal

activity,” Deputy Ganzhorn said. “We saw a car in the garage so we suspected someone was inside the house.” After knocking on the door and not receiving an answer, the deputy went next door where a neighbor provided a cell phone number for Ray Kissel who rushed home from work when called. As Ray and the deputy entered the house, they heard a faint cry from Julie, “Please help.” They saw Julie on the floor in need of emergency care so they called an ambulance and Julie was taken to the hospital where she was treated and released. Without ADT, Julie doubts she would have survived being home alone for hours. “ADT saved my life,” she said. To celebrate the happy ending, Julie was given an opportunity to meet Sally at the annual ADT Authorized Dealer convention. Several hundred people watched as Julie embraced Sally for the first time and thanked her for saving her life. Two Defenders employees received LifeSaver Awards for selling and installing the Kissel’s system. And Sally was presented a LifeSaver Award, the

*BASIC SYSTEM: $99 Customer Installation Charge. 36-Month Monitoring Agreement required at $27.99 per month ($1,007.64). 24-Month Monitoring Agreement required at $27.99 per month ($671.76) for California. Offer applies to homeowners only. Offer valid for new ADT Authorized Premier Provider customers only and not on purchases from ADT LLC. Cannot be combined with any other offer. The $27.99 Offer does not include Quality Service Plan (QSP), ADT’s Extended Limited Warranty. Equipment shown may require additional fees. Form of payment must be by credit card or electronic charge to your checking or savings account. Offer applies to homeowners only. Certain packages require approved landline phone. Local permit fees may be required. Satisfactory credit history required. Termination Fee applies. Certain restrictions may apply. Offer valid for new ADT Authorized Premier Provider customers only and not on purchases from ADT LLC. Other rate plans available. Cannot be combined with any other offer. ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services, which help you manage your home environment and family lifestyle, requires the purchase and/or activation of an ADT alarm system with monitored burglary service and a compatible computer, cell phone or PDA with Internet and email access. These ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services do not cover the operation or maintenance of any household equipment/systems that are connected to the ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services/Equipment. All ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services are not available with the various levels of ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services. All ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services may not be available in all geographic areas. You may be required to pay additional charges to purchase equipment required to utilize the ADT Pulse Interactive Solutions Services features you desire.

second time she has won it during her nine-year career at ADT. “Winning the LifeSaver Award is the ultimate honor at ADT,” Sally said. “I love how all of us at ADT work together to help our customers when they need us most.” Also recognized was the Richland County Sheriff’s Department which received a $5,000 check from ADT. “It will be used for equipment in our department,” said Sheriff Steve Sheldon. “I’m proud of the fine work of our office and for the quick transport of Mrs. Kissel.” As for the hornet nest, it was removed from the Kissel’s front yard when the tree it was hanging from, was cut down.

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from the editor

The surround sound system in our living room isn’t connected to the TV.

Don’t get me wrong – I like TV fine – but I’m not all that concerned about sound fidelity when I’m watching Jim Gaffigan, Bob’s Burgers or Parks and Recreation. What does matter to me, though, is what I’m hearing when I have music on. So our surround sound system is hooked up to a record player, a cassette deck and an iPod. I put a lot of attention into speaker placement, too, and created a balanced sonic environment in the living room. No matter where you are in the room, the music plays at a consistent volume. It’s quite nice. There are several sweet spots where the sonic balance is perfect, and I find myself standing in them when I’m getting to know a record, leaning into the sound like a skier leaning into the wind. Here are two things I believe. One: good music deserves good speakers. And two: good music is timeless. To the second point, you hold in your hands our music issue, which I am particularly excited about. See, when I started as OutreachNC’s editor at the beginning of 2018, I inherited a year’s worth of themes. When I saw the words “Booming Lifestyles,” I knew it would be our music issue for one simple reason: the Baby Boomers invented rock and roll. The premise expanded from there, and in these pages we hear from label owners, music journalists and folk music professionals on the other side of 50 (and one rock and roller approaching 50). There’s Spencer Griffith’s enlightening interview with WRAL-TV Sunday morning gospel music show Spiritual Awakening’s longterm producer Dona Jackson Anderson. And then there’s my feature about Janet Kenworthy of Aberdeen’s own nonprofit music venue The Rooster’s Wife. So please, enjoy our July music issue. As for me, my work is done here, so I think I’ll head home and put something good on the record player – some Joan Armatrading, say, or some Keith Jarrett. Or maybe I’ll pick up one of my guitars or get behind my drum set. Writing is fine and all, but music is the supreme art form. Thank you for picking up OutreachNC, and I’ll see you in August.

-Corbie Hill

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READER INPUT Editor-in-Chief Corbie Hill | Editor@OutreachNC.com Creative Director Kim Gilley | The Village Printers Creative & Graphic Designer Sarah McElroy | The Village Printers Ad Designers Stephanie Budd, Cyndi Fifield, Nikki Lienhard, Sarah McElroy Proofreaders Ashley Eder, Kate Pomplun Photography Brady Beck, Diana Matthews, Caitlin Penna Contributors Michelle Goetzl, Spencer Griffith, James J. Hatfield, David Hibbard, Corbie Hill, Tim Keim, Ray Linville, Kasia McDaniel, Art Menius, Amy Natt, Leslie Philip, Ann Robson, John Schacht, Heather Tippens

Y Publisher Amy Natt | AmyN@AgingOutreachServices.com Marketing & Public Relations Director Susan McKenzie | SusanM@AgingOutreachServices.com Advertising Sales Executive Ashley Haddock | AshleyH@OutreachNC.com 910-690-9102 Circulation 910-692-0683 | info@OutreachNC.com OutreachNC PO Box 2478 | 676 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28388 910-692-9609 Office | 910-695-0766 Fax info@OutreachNC.com

Here’s the thing about putting out a magazine: as a reader, you know so much about us, yet we know so little about you! That’s one reason we at OutreachNC love letters and feedback. This time around, we’re pleased to share the poetry of Barbara Stoughton of Southern Pines, who sent several pages of verse our way. These are poems she wrote when she first moved into a retirement home, and they address aging gracefully and adjusting to a new way of living. Pick up future issues to read more of Stoughton’s poetry. For now, though, we encourage you to pour a hot cup of coffee or tea and ponder these two poems: Be joyful, be joyful! What kind of possibility is that? My face is covered in wrinkles; My walker needs repair; and my burial site is picked. I’m old for heaven sake! And yet a ray of hope shines forth, a smile comes through the wrinkles, and that’s a miracle I call real joy. -Barbara Stoughton The white coming down will soon melt away. The white on my head will stay. -Barbara Stoughton If you have any thoughts or suggestions you’d like to share, contact OutreachNC editor-in-chief Corbie Hill at editor@ outreachnc.com or at PO Box 2478. Southern Pines, NC 28388.

Jeeves’ Input

www.OutreachNC.com

OutreachNC is a publication of The entire contents of OutreachNC are copyrighted by Aging Outreach Services. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial, photographic or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. OutreachNC is published monthly on the first of each month.

“The birds are chirping, the concrete is warm. The days are long. It is my favorite time of year.”

“The humans like to complain but they know nothing of life in July with a permanent fur coat. I spend my afternoons lying on the9 JULY 2018 | OutreachNC.com air conditioning vents.”


advice

Our Aging Life Care ProfessionalsTM will answer any aging questions you may have.

Email us your questions! info@OutreachNC.com

ASK THE EXPERT

Fewer Secrets Now, Fewer Headaches Later Crisis Planning for Aging Parents Can Involve Breaking Down Some of the Parent/Child Boundaries by Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA How well do I really know my parents? I have asked myself this question a lot lately. My dad was hospitalized recently, and I was contacted by a neighbor to help make some decisions about the house and his mail while he was in the hospital. I found that I really didn’t know some of the basic things about his life, like how the bills are paid, who his doctors are and where the spare key is kept. It is not because I don’t care, but because I have never wanted to intrude in his personal life. Now that we are dealing with health care issues, how can I better prepare to help him? This is such an important question and one that most adult children to do not think about until something triggers the need, like a hospitalization. Often parents have maintained parental boundaries with adult children and not wanted to burden them with their own lives. The fact is, we are all aging and at any time could have a crisis that requires someone else to step in and help. Planning ahead and documenting information regarding the day to day operations of our life is not only important, but really helpful to those who might be stepping in.

A good starting point is to ask if your parents have designated someone to act on their behalf through advanced directives, like power of attorney documents. These are important and if a specific person is named, they will want to have a clear idea of what planning has been done and will want their parents’ wishes documented. Aside from having legal affairs in order, there are some good things to know. If your parents are not comfortable disclosing certain information, you can provide them with a list of questions or planning guide that can be accessed by the family only when needed. Information can be obtained at different levels. There are the high-level questions, such as:

1. What setting do you prefer to live in as you age? Home? A retirement community? 2. What type of care would you want if something were to happen? 3. Have you done any end of life planning? Estate planning? Funeral planning? 4. What do I need to know if you end up in the hospital? 5. How do you see yourself paying for care if it is needed? Insurance? Long-term care? Savings? 6. Who would you want to care for you if you could not live alone?

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Then there are much more detailed questions that provide information you would need if you were stepping in to assist with daily tasks. Checks & Balances

1. How do you currently manage bills? Online? Checks? Auto-pay? 2. What financial accounts do you maintain? Is one primary? Do you have a contact at the bank? 3. Where do you keep important documents? File cabinet? Safe? How would I access them? 4. Who are your professional providers? Attorney? Accountant? Financial advisors? 5. Who are your medical providers? Pharmacy? 6. Is there a spare key to your home? Safe deposit box? Who has access? 7. Is there a pet at home that we need to plan for? Veterinarian? 8. What insurance policies do you carry? Who could access them? Where are cards kept? 9. Where is a current medication list kept? Medication bottles?

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10. Do you write down passwords? A book of contacts? Important information? 11. Are there local friends or neighbors that should be called if something happens? 12. Do you have any allergies that we should document?

Once you open the door for communication, it becomes easier. You want to establish a safe dialogue in a confidential environment. There are a variety of planning guides available online that can be ordered or printed and provided to your parents or filled out with them. Ultimately, if your parents have not done any planning for this stage of life, it is time. If they have put thought into what is important and what they would want or don’t want, it is important that this information be communicated to the correct people so that those wishes can be honored. Lastly, don’t worry if you don’t have all the answers – just showing up is a step in the right direction. If your dad sees you there, he knows you care. The rest can be figured out!

2018

Teachers in K-12 classrooms are encouraged to apply for a grant up to $2,000 for the 2018-19 school year. Grants are available for all subjects and teachers can apply individually or as a team. This year, Central Electric will award Bright Ideas grants totaling approximately $15,000 to local educators. The final deadline for all grant applications is Sept. 19 but don’t wait to apply! Applications submitted prior to the early-bird deadline on Aug. 15 will be entered to win one of five $100 Visa® gift cards.

Readers may send questions to Amy Natt, an Aging Life Care ProfessionalTM, certified senior advisor and CEO of Aging Outreach Services. She can be reached at amyn@agingoutreachservices.com . JULY 2018 |

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life

R E G I O N A L C U LT U R E

A Tow Mater Sandwich Is For More Than Just Kids by Ray Linville

“Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is not putting it in a fruit salad,” quipped British journalist Miles Kington.

grown on local farms. Because we lose them to squirrels and insects before they ripen, tomatoes this month may have to be bought.

Southern knowledge is knowing that this month is the perfect time to enjoy a tomato in a sandwich. When I first mentioned to my wife one July that a tomato sandwich would be a great idea for lunch, she looked quizzically at me. “With what else?” this native of Minnesota asked.

My favorite place is a farmers market where the produce is guaranteed to be local. A roadside stand is another option (even more justifiable if it has homemade ice cream like Ben’s at Kalawi Farms in Eagle Springs or Highlander Farms near Whispering Pines).

Obviously she thought (and still does think) that a tomato by itself cannot constitute a sandwich. For her, bread with tomato slices is incomplete until bacon and lettuce are added. I’ve been trying to indoctrinate her about foods of this region and have made some progress now that she’s spent almost a third of her life in the South.

Select tomatoes based on their flavor, not appearance. Heirloom tomatoes are good ones to buy. The local favorites seem to be German Johnson, a variety that turns deep red-pink as it ripens on the vine, and Cherokee purple, which uninformed shoppers skip because it has ungainly bulges and tones of brown, green and purple. However, each one is dynamite in a sandwich.

But where to get tomatoes that can be the centerpiece of a sandwich? The ones we grow on the back deck just don’t compare favorably to those

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A century ago the youth of our state would have recognized only these varieties, not the modern ones sold today at supermarkets. Tomato clubs, started in 1911 by the N.C. Department of Agriculture, involved young girls in the production of agricultural crops and would have heightened their appreciation for these flavorful varieties.


Because some modern hybrid varieties have been bred for specific characteristics, such as transportability, uniform color, long shelf life and resistance to disease, they don’t convey the rich flavors of varieties enjoyed by earlier generations. In contrast, heirloom tomatoes, which are not grown in modern largescale agriculture, have been around since 1950 (or earlier) or their seeds have been passed down through multiple generations. These tomatoes still have an old-fashioned taste and bring forward flavor from the past. For the sandwich, some folks want the white bread (yes, it has to be white; save multigrain for another occasion) toasted. Not me. Tomato slices won’t make good bread like Merita or Wonder soggy if it’s been spread lightly with mayonnaise. Even if they do, never complain about juicy tomatoes. And no regular mayonnaise will do. In this region most oldtimers insist on Duke’s, a brand that has been made for more than 100 years and is the secret ingredient in many local kitchens. The first time that I offered a tomato sandwich to a grandson, he heard “Tow Mater” (the tow truck in the Cars movie series). He shook his head “no” until he saw what I had on my plate and then wisely reconsidered. My wife, on the other hand, is still shaking her head “no.”

Tomatoes, Fruits, Veggies, Jams, Meats, Flowers & Plants, Crafts, Chicken, Baked Goods, Prepared Foods, Goat Cheese, Watermelons, Peaches, Blueberries, Cantaloupe and Microgreens

Open through 10/29

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The next time that you see BLT on a menu, ask the server if the kitchen can hold the bacon and lettuce. You might be surprised at how something so simple can be so good. Ray Linville writes about local connections to Southern food, history and culture. He can be reached at linville910@gmail.com.

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health

B R A I N H E A LT H

The Power of Music as a Therapy by Heather Tippens, LPC

Music therapy is a growing field within healthcare and can be offered in a variety of settings including hospitals, rehabilitation hospitals, retirement facilities, senior centers, psychiatric treatment centers and private practices. It can be used to assist with pain management, alleviate depression, promote movement, enable relaxation and reduce muscle tension. Music therapy has been shown to improve emotional functioning in patients with a wide array of diseases and disabilities by reducing symptoms of anxiety and depression. Music has been found to enhance certain areas of brain functioning by engaging emotion and enhancing memory, learning and attention. The American Music Therapy Association identifies the following benefits of music therapy on older persons and patients living with Alzheimer’s disease: Music is a source of sensory stimulation that produces positive responses due to the familiarity, predictability and feelings of security associated with music. In a music therapy setting, the power of music can be quite healing by stimulating positive social interactions and emotional intimacy among participants and their caregivers. Music therapy provides opportunity for memory recall and positive changes in mood; a sense of control and awareness of self and the environment; anxiety and stress reduction for both the patient and caregiver; stimulation of interest and movement by stimulating parts of the brain linked to dancing and singing.

Music has an impact on enhancing mood by reducing symptoms of depression and anxiety. Listening to music with an uplifting sound increases levels of dopamine, a chemical that is linked to the brain’s reward-motivation and pleasure centers. A combination of music and talk therapy can create an opportunity to improve mood and develop an overall healthy sense of self. The benefits of music therapy for persons with depression and anxiety include reduced muscle tension, increased self-esteem and decreased anxiety, improved interpersonal relationships, increased motivation and successful and safe emotional release. Music has a profound effect on the body and mind, and incorporating it into our lives is the simplest way to manage everyday stress. Utilize music as a healthy distraction from current stressors. Upbeat music can increase optimism, clear the mind and create positive energy, which can allow us to have alternative perceptions of current stressors and improve our decision-making. Through the connection of song and personal experience, music can be a tool to initiate healing and to release emotional pain, such as deep feelings of grief, sadness, fear and resentment. Music can activate and maintain motivation, so turn on your favorite tunes to get moving with exercise or to make a dreaded task more enjoyable. More information on music therapy can be found by the American Music Therapy Association website: www. musictherapy.org.

Heather Tippens, a licensed professional counselor at Pinehurst Neuropsychology, can be reached at 910-420-8041 or by visiting www.pinehurstneuropsychology.com .

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advice

ROLE REVERSAL

Returning the Favor: Keeping Parents Safe Behind the Wheel by David Hibbard

I couldn’t have been more than 16 years old, and certainly had less than a year of driving experience, when my dad set me straight one afternoon in a parking lot in Richmond, VA. Thinking I could just zoom through the largely empty lot at breakneck speed, diagonally across the marked parking spaces, was my first mistake. The second was to believe I could get away with any sort of rebuttal to my dad’s appropriate comment: “You sure are young to be sounding so much like you know it all.” As I look back on it now, I think what my father was saying that day was that I hadn’t acquired enough maturity and experience for him to fully trust me with the responsibility of operating a car by myself. And he was exactly right. Then again, your average 16-year-old thinks they can rule the world on a daily basis. At that point, I had the ability to drive, but not necessarily the skills of safe driving that only experience can offer. My father appropriately acted as the parent that day, putting a check on my teenage hubris. But what do we as children do years later, when the proverbial shoe may be on the other foot? How do we intervene when we start to see changes in our parents that concern us, things that may impact their ability to drive safely, handle their finances responsibly or live independently? Use your own power of observation to see how your parent is doing. Sit in the passenger seat sometime and let your mom or dad do the driving. Are they still observant and able to drive safely? How is their reaction time? Your common sense, combined with your own innate sense of your parent and their well-being, will be your best guide to any changes you might see.

I would suggest something I’ve emphasized in some of my other columns on these pages the past several months, and that’s to have a discussion with your parent(s) well in advance of any issues that might arise. Talk about their current comfort level with things like bill paying and how you can help if they’re having trouble keeping up. Make it clear that you’re not trying to take over, but instead offering to help when needed. Your parent may realize they need some additional assistance, and it will be a relief to you both to address the situation. It can be hard for us, as adult children, to contemplate a time when our parents aren’t able to do all the things they’ve spent a lifetime doing. We don’t want to be the ones to tell mom or dad that they have to relinquish the car keys or control of their checkbook. In short, we don’t want to exercise the kind of parental discretion my dad used in that parking lot years ago when it comes to our own parents. We don’t want to believe that our parents have come to the point where they no longer have the skill to do certain things, even though they may still possess the ability. And undoubtedly, it’s equally hard for our parents to find themselves less independent and more reliant on their children. But with open lines of communication and an understanding that you will always act to protect your parents’ best interests, this moment of role reversal doesn’t have to be traumatic or contentious.

Share your role reversal stories with contributing writer David Hibbard. Email him at: hib1967@gmail.com

KAREN D. SULLIVAN, PHD, ABPP Board-Certified Clinical Neuropsychologist

TAEH A. WARD, PHD Clinical Neuropsychologist

MARYANNE EDMUNDSON, PHD Clinical Neuropsychologist

Personalized Treatment Recommendations that Emphasize Brain Health, Independence and Quality of Life 16

OutreachNC.com | JULY 2018 Schedule an appointment 910-420-8041

HEATHER TIPPENS, LPC Licensed Professional Counselor

45 Aviemore Drive | Pinehurst PinehurstNeuropsychology.com


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17


life

COOKING SIMPLE

Peach Upside-Down Cake

Ingredients Makes one nine-inch cake 1.5 cups self-rising flour

½ t vanilla

1 cup granulated sugar

¼ t kosher salt

½ t ground nutmeg

3 large eggs

by Leslie Philip

½ cup whole buttermilk at room temperature ¾ cup unsalted butter, softened and divided 1 cup firmly packed light brown sugar 1 ¼ cup ¼-inch thick sliced peeled fresh peaches (about 2 medium peaches)

Leslie Philip, chief egg breaker and owner of Thyme & Place Cafe in Southern Pines, can be reached at 910-684-8758 or leslie@thymeandplacecafe.com .

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Directions 1. Preheat oven to 350° F. Butter and flour a 9-inch round cake pan. 2. In bowl of a stand mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, whisk together flour, granulated sugar, nutmeg and salt. Add eggs, buttermilk and vanilla, and beat at medium-low speed until smooth. Add ½ cup butter. Continue to beat to combine. 3. Place remaining ¼ cup butter in the prepared pan. Place pan in oven until butter is melted, two to three minutes. Sprinkle brown sugar over melted butter. Top with peaches, arranging as desired in a single layer. Spoon batter over peaches, smoothing top with a spatula or back of a measuring cup. 4. Bake until a wooden pick inserted in center comes out clean, 40-50 minutes, covering with foil after 30 minutes to prevent excess browning. Run a knife around edges of pan to loosen cake. Invert cake onto a serving plate and let cool slightly. Serve warm or reheat briefly before serving.


H O M E S TA G I N G

Summer Staging Secrets

advice

by Kasia McDaniel Summer is the best time to enjoy the outdoors. When your house is on the market during this time, your buyers will be looking for a home that shows how they can enjoy the outdoors too. Not only do you have to make sure the inside is appealing, but the outdoor spaces need to be enticing too. Let me share some summer staging secrets you can use to make your home stand out above the competition. CURB APPEAL Summertime is when we spend most of our time outside, so make sure the outside looks appealing. If you have a front porch, provide some comfy seating so potential buyers can imagine themselves sitting there with a glass of Southern sweet tea. Colorful throw pillows, a side table and potted plants also make a great first impression. Don’t go overboard with too much lawn décor because this detracts from the home. Keep it simple and don’t crowd the front step with too many plants. If you have kids or grandkids visiting, make sure their bikes and outdoor toys are put away each day. Don’t leave them strewn about on the lawn but show where they can be neatly stored in your garage. SUMMER STORMS Summer storms are notorious around here and they can cause a lot of damage. When your home is on the market, be sure to quickly clean up any fallen debris or washed out flower beds after a storm. If you are no longer living in the home, make sure your lawn maintenance crew can get out there to clean it up. Weeds pop up overnight here too, so keep a bottle of weed killer handy to keep your driveway and walkways neat and tidy.

INDOOR COLORS When temperatures heat up, we naturally want to cool down. That is why it is best to use “cool” colors when decorating your home to sell in the summer. Avoid red items if possible because that color exudes warmth and makes it feel hotter in the home than it really is. White is also another good “cool” color to use in accents because it makes the interior feel light and airy. Use these colors with throw pillows, bed sheets, artwork and accessories. BACKYARD Finally, if you have a backyard, show buyers how they can entertain their friends. Use patio furniture and add cushions in fun summer colors with string lights around your patio to create a fun family atmosphere. If you have a pool, make sure it is cleaned every day. If you have a deck, make sure it is power washed and cleaned to make the space look new again. Fire pits are also a great way to entertain your friends, but make sure yours looks appealing. Add some chairs with new outdoor cushions. Clean the ashes out of the fire pit and leave it empty or stack some wood. By providing outdoor seating, adding some summer color to your porch or deck and keeping your property tidy, your home will stand out among the competition this summer.

Kasia McDaniel, a Home Stager and Certified Interior Decorator at Blue Diamond Staging can be reached at 910-745-0608 or by visiting www.bluediamondstaging.com

JULY 2018 |

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health

THE TRIUMPHANT ELDER

The Triumphant Elder Manifesto by Tim Keim, EYT500, Yoga Therapist

The premise of “The Triumphant Elder” is that men and women over 60 can live vigorous lives unafflicted by the common diseases of aging like hypertension, heart disease/stroke, cancer, kidney disease and cognitive decline. Furthermore, the triumphant elder is one who is independent, living on their own and pursuing life with zest and enthusiasm.

As you may have already found out, our economic model includes an unhealthy measure of ageism. Get to a certain age and you may be quietly assigned to the ranks of the ineligible for meaningful work just when you have the most to contribute. It’s a time when we might feel obsolete. I know many of us struggle with this insidious injustice.

The diseases above are mostly lifestyle maladies and can often be reversed or prevented. This column is a call and manifesto to you who aspire to live triumphantly, to you who want to put the gold in the golden years. That gold is the investment your life has deposited within you by decades of hard-won experience.

But the flip side of this is the liberty to transform ourselves into who we’ve always wanted to be in the first place with nothing to lose. And this new enterprise begins with a hearty, red-blooded determination to realign our lives with all that fortifies us as we assert who we want to be at this pivotal time in our lives.

The greatest legacy we can give our children and grandchildren is not our money and property, but our health, our wisdom, our love and affection. Indeed, the bequest of our lucid, vibrant presence is our most precious gift to the future.

Being a triumphant elder can take many shapes. The beauty is that you get to choose your own adventure.

Reversing disease to reassert our claim on health is challenging, but it can be done. Decrepitude is a choice. The adventure of reclaiming our vigor is not found in a pill or a procedure. It is found in our daily habits of eating clean, whole foods cooked with love and intention. It is in the way we move our bodies every day, the sweat that cleanses our tissues and the way that movement stimulates our organs and glands to metabolize waste to refresh the deep tissues of the viscera. It is found in moments of deep meditative silence each day to cultivate clarity of mind and regeneration of the brain. It is found in our desire to matter in a world where we are supposed to have “retired.”

As I have in these first few columns, I will be presenting ideas that may at first seem a bit unusual. Each month I’ll offer something of a blend of cutting edge health information within the context of the ancient, tried and true health practices that have carried the human species to this auspicious moment. This can be our finest chapter. The future is waiting to be written by the distilled vintage wisdom of the triumphant elder. Tim Keim is an IAYT certified yoga therapist, and has been teaching yoga for 15 years. Keim can be heard Saturday and Sunday mornings from 7 a.m. to 1 p.m. on 91.5-FM, WUNC. He can be reached at timkeim811@yahoo.com.

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THE READER’S NOOK

The Patchwork Bride by Sandra Dallas

life

Book Review by Michelle Goetzl

The Patchwork Bride, a new novel by Sandra Dallas, is a page-turning historical romance following one woman in her quest to find love without losing herself. At the same time, it is also the story of a grandmother trying to help her granddaughter through an emotional struggle about marriage itself. The story starts in the 1950s at Ellen and Ben’s Colorado ranch. Ellen’s granddaughter, June, has fled her own marriage preparations because she is having doubts. June explains her fears to her grandmother: her fiancé is about to go fight in Korea, she isn’t sure about marrying a soldier and she is especially concerned with losing herself in marriage. June’s fears set the stage for Ellen to tell her the story of Nell, a woman who ran away from three marriages to three different men 50 years earlier. Nell’s story starts in 1897, when Nell decides to move from her grandparents’ home in Kansas to work on a ranch with her aunt in New Mexico. In those days, an unmarried woman of 22 was already considered an old maid. An opportunity to work as a biscuit-shooter was an answer to both her restlessness and her desire to find a husband. Like women of her age, Nell feels an intense need to get married. What sets Nell apart is that she is a strong, independent woman who refuses to settle for a life that won’t allow her to be her own person. While most women in her day are content doing whatever their husbands told them to do and pushing down their own opinions, Nell wants to have her own voice. Upon arriving at the ranch, she is quickly taken with a cowboy she calls Buddy. He is an anomaly on the ranch, being more educated than the other ranch hands and filled with ambition. However, both Nell and Buddy suffer from

jealousy and a tendency to jump to conclusions rather than talking things out. Ultimately, she runs away from their impending marriage. Her second venture out is as a waitress in Denver. Here the reader gets to learn why Nell runs away from her second fiancé, James. We also meet Betty, 20 years Nell’s senior, who has been through an abusive marriage herself and therefore distrusts men in general. As for James, he comes to Nell’s rescue one night and a relationship blossoms. There is more to him than she realizes and again she returns home to Kansas. The final failed engagement takes place after Nell had “lowered her standards.” Instead of looking for love, she is just looking for someone decent. She moves to Kansas City to work as a teacher and meets a man who knows her family. He isn’t exciting, but he is stable. However, even that proposal doesn’t work out, but it does lead her to the man she finally marries. In between each of the stories, Ellen and June talk about the decisions that Nell had made and consider what might have happened to both parties. Nell’s story helps Ellen connect with June and also helps June realize that she needs to trust her heart and her gut. Readers that enjoy historical fiction with a romantic bent are likely to enjoy this engrossing novel. Michelle Goetzl writes an online blog—“Books My Kids Read.” She loves books and sharing that love of reading with children. She can be reached at booksmykidsread@gmail.com .

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Flying and Singing Freely in a Park Birding in N.C.

J. Bayard Clark Park by Ray Linville

“No one is free; even the birds are chained to the sky,” penned singer-songwriter Bob Dylan. It’s hard to argue with an artistic genius who has received the Nobel Prize in Literature, but perhaps Dylan has never visited J. Bayard Clark Park in Fayetteville, where birds sing and flitter freely. More than 100 resident and migrating bird species enjoy freedom in this park, which is part of the North Carolina Birding Trail that links educational and historical attractions with communities and businesses across the state.

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Black-Throated Blue Warbler

BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER (MALE)

Several avian residents are warblers, including the black-throated blue warbler aptly named for the male’s color scheme. His midnight-blue back and head combine with a black face and throat; together they contrast sharply with his white belly. A female looks so different that she once was considered a separate species. She has blue tints on the wings and tail; otherwise, she is grayish olive overall. Both sexes have a small white square, sometimes called a handkerchief, on the wings. After these warblers return from wintering in the Caribbean, they can be found in hardwood and mixed hardwood-evergreen forests where they dine on insects in the understory and lower canopy of the trees. Like other warblers, they flutter from branch to branch in search of spiders, flies and caterpillars, often on the underside of vegetation, such as leaves and twigs. The males, aggressive defenders of their territories, sing to defend their boundaries, and occasionally females join in a song that consists of up to seven notes, described as “buzzy,” that rise in pitch at the end.

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BLACK-THROATED BLUE WARBLER (FEMALE)


LOUISIANA WATERTHRUSH

Louisiana Waterthrush The Louisiana waterthrush is another bird that migrates to Clark Park after wintering in the Caribbean and other points south. Although its name implies that it is a thrush – with its long legs and long body it looks like one – it is also a warbler. In fact, it is the second largest wood warbler. Unlike many warblers, the male waterthrush does not sing on its wintering grounds. When it arrives at its breeding territory, the male begins to sing immediately. Its song is a sweet, loud series of up to five slightly descending whistled notes that are followed by short, rapid phrases. In addition to its song, it’s also recognized by how it constantly bobbles its tail as it walks, particularly along small streams where it feeds on aquatic and flying insects and sometimes gobbles up tadpoles and small fish. It also likes to dine on insects and earthworms. Although this bird has Louisiana in its name, its breeding area ranges as far north as New England and west as Kansas. Its habitats are streams and other wet areas, where it nests in dense vegetation along the water’s edge in a small cavity or under a fallen log. This bird, less distinguishing in appearance than the black-throated blue warbler, has a brown back with white 24 OutreachNC.com | JULY 2018 undersides streaked with black. A white “eyebrow” stripe gives some stylish charm.


BLUE GROSBEAK (FEMALE) PHOTO BY BRADY BECK

Blue Grosbeak Another long-distant migrant that calls Clark Park home is the blue grosbeak. After it nests in our area, it flies across the Caribbean to reach its winter grounds. A stocky songbird, it has a large triangular bill that seems to cover most of its face. In fact, the bill inspires its name: “gros” means “large” in French, and when combined with “beak” aptly describes this bird. The male is deep blue overall, while the female and young are cinnamon. Both have sporty wing bars, brown for females and chestnut for males. Mating pairs breed in a mix of grass, flowering plants and shrubs with a few trees. Grosbeaks forage generally on the ground and in low vegetation where they find insects such as grasshoppers and crickets to eat, but the diet also includes seeds, grains and wild fruits. In July, they can be one of the few singing birds in shrubby or old-field habitats. In the summer, the males sing frequently from high, exposed perches, and they also sing to defend their nesting territories, which can extend up to twenty acres for each breeding pair. Their songs are rich and warble continuously for two or three seconds.

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BLUE GROSBEAK (MALE)

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Clark Park A bird appreciation walking group, open to adults and mature children, meets at 8:15 on the second Tuesday morning of each month in the park. As they walk park trails, they collect information about bird locations and behavior, listen for songs and look for species. Some participants assist park rangers with bird surveys. Participation is free; advance registration (call 910-433-1579) is recommended. Three unpaved trails, mostly level but not suitable for wheelchairs, wind through the park and along the Cape Fear River and afford ample opportunity to appreciate the freedom that birds enjoy on the park’s 76 acres. The short (0.3-mile) Laurel Trail traverses mature pines and young hardwoods. The Bear Trail (0.6-mile) passes through pine forest, old agricultural fields and an uplands habitat. The Wetlands Trail (0.6 mile) features hardwood bottomlands and native cane grass. Incidentally, the trail head for the 147-mile paved Cape Fear River Trail that continues all the way to the mouth of the river in Southport is in Clark Park. Named for a congressman who was an avid outdoorsman, the park on Sherman Drive about three miles north of downtown Fayetteville is a wonderful regional treasure. Maps and trail guides are available at the park’s nature center, which also has exhibits on local wildlife and information on birds. This month the center is open every day until 5 p.m., and the park grounds can be accessed daily during daylight hours. Other songbirds prominent in the park include several already described in this series such as the yellow-billed cuckoo, brown-headed nuthatch, hooded warbler, summer tanager and indigo bunting. Although the birds of Clark Park are not “Like a Rolling Stone,” they do have freedom like they’re “Blowin’ in the Wind.” Perhaps Dylan should visit soon. OutreachNC has embarked on a yearlong series that highlights regional sites of the N.C. Birding Trail. Enjoy the series as contributor Ray Linville explores beautiful landscapes and birds of our home state. He can be reached at linville910@gmail.com.

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Not Fade Away:

Music Careers After 50 “I hope I die before I get old,” Roger Daltrey of The Who famously sneered in the 1965 hit “My Generation.” Whatever Daltrey (who was 21 at the time) or songwriter Pete Townshend (who was 20) meant by “old,” neither rock icon got their wish. Yet they did contribute to the pervasive myth that music is an industry for the young. Musicians like Jimi Hendrix, Tupac Shakur, Hank Williams, Kurt Cobain, Brian Jones and Janis Joplin are mythologized largely for dying in their 20s. Then there’s the Neil Young lyric “It’s better to burn out than to fade away,” which is unfortunately taken at face value by the overly credulous side of the record-buying public. What we’ve ended up with is this sensationalist vision of music as a young person’s game which is, frankly, the result of lazy thinking. On the following pages, find stories of people whose music careers continue and grow well after their 27th birthday – and then another 27 years, and often another 27 years past that. Simple math tells us that 27 times three is 81, which is just a few years older than Roger Daltrey and Pete Townshend are today. So we really are t-t-t-t-talking ‘bout their generation after all.

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A


Record label owners, music critics and the rockers themselves achieve longevity in an increasingly fickle industry A

by John Schacht

t 46, Raleigh’s Kenny Roby has been writing and performing rock and roll songs for three decades. The former punk rocker, solo artist and co-founder of recently re-formed 90s roots rockers 6 String Drag calls himself “a junior aging rocker” who figures he’s really “80 in curmudgeonly years.” He came up with that number using his own rock and roll metric: “Your rock and roll age is your age plus how many years you did hard drugs plus how many years you drank plus how many kids you have, how many labels you’ve been on,” he half-jokes during a phone interview, before resuming the list, “...how many marriages, how many musical styles you’ve done, how many times you’ve tried to go back and revive your career...” For Roby and many other rock and roll musicians — as well as the venue owners, record label personnel, rock critics and others in the genre’s cultural and financial orbit — career survival (let alone revival) appears more and more like a Sisyphean enterprise these days. Digital era pushback threatens most every institutional pillar rock and roll rests on: singles and playlists over LPs; personalized algorithm-streams over radio DJ and rock critic curation; demographic trends towards hip-hop and pop; and a depreciation in the value of live performance. Rough seas, for sure, with more likely ahead. But for Roby and two other North Carolina music scene fixtures — Avett Brothers manager and record label owner Dolph Ramseur and longtime rock critic Fred Mills — rock and roll is too much a part of their life-fabric to ever give it up based on aging demographics, financial headwinds or changing musical tastes. Of course, they’ve all had to make concessions to these tectonic cultural and business shifts, but to a man they’ve also doubled down on what brought them to rock and roll in the first place — that intoxicating sense of freedom and release, of artistic and cultural rebellion.

Kenny Roby (second from left) and 6 String Drag

Nor have they succumbed to the great leveler, aging, either, instead refining their young man’s exuberance into more wizened avenues of devotion. Roby’s band, for instance, has dropped one of 2018’s most solid rock and roll LPs, Top of the World. It’s their second since re-forming in 2015, and a showcase for Roby’s versatile songwriting skill set. The 11 tracks feature subtle—but stinging—finger-snapping takedowns of white privilege (“Top of the World”), male machismo JULY 2018 |

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That pretty well describes the founding principle of Ramseur Records, which its namesake established in 2000, just before the musical landscape really began shifting. But if you ask the 49-year-old Ramseur, he’ll tell Fired by a hard-charging veteran band which also includes you those cultural transitions are beyond his purview co-founder Rob Keller, 51, on bass, and spiced with Roby’s anyway. Going viral, to him, is a “rocket ship” to quick acerbic lyrics and occasional early-Elvis Costello snarl, obscurity; for longevity, he prefers to offer his acts “balloon rides.” the LP is chock-full of the

(“Let’s Fool Around ‘til the End of Time”) and racism in the criminal justice system (“Robert & Lucy”), reminding us that rock and roll can be more than just narcissistic navel-gazing or greatest hits nostalgia.

youthful angst and exuberance that was baked in at rock and roll’s origins, and which, until hip-hop’s 1990s rise, remained its greatest multi-generational draw. But Roby’s narratives are now more character- and storydriven, audio short stories with multiple perspectives. That’s captured best in the raucous “Small Town Punks,” where Roby’s narrator nods to his younger self from a slightly more settled place (Roby quit drinking in 2004), but does it with understanding rather than regret. Over a full-throttle tempo and a Billy Zoom guitar roar, Roby deftly conflates both points of view:

“SUDDENLY I FEAR/I’LL NEVER EVER EVER GET AWAY FROM HERE/ WASTIN’ ALL MY TIME/ON RUNNIN’ AWAY FROM NOTHIN’/BUT THE BACK OF MY MIND/NOTHIN’S EASY TO SEE/ WHEN YOU’RE LOOKIN’ BACK ON IT/ WITH A SMALL TOWN PUNK LIKE ME.” “Bitterness, restlessness, anxiety, angst—whatever you want to call it, that’s going to come out,” Roby says, citing less obvious but related examples. “I hear it in Guy Clark and in Townes Van Zandt’s music — I hear it in Nick Drake. It’s the chronic dissatisfaction with not being able to figure out what the (expletive) your perspective is. At least speaking for myself, I’m just trying to figure out what is going on in my brain and around me, and using art as that thing to try and get there.”

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“I’m really not even in the music business—I’m in the David Childers business, I’m in the Avett Brothers business,” Ramseur says of some of his roster in a familiar refrain. “They’ve got fan bases and we just try to put out great records and be good to the fans. We’re trying to win over new fans, but I’m just so outside the norms I don’t even know what’s fashionable or hip.”

Ramseur’s real-time mythologizing may read like boilerplate, but he’s a true believer with a track record. Major label recording guru Rick Rubin may now be in his phone contacts (the Avetts regularly record with him), but Ramseur built his label/management company by diligently championing home-brewed talent like Concord’s The Avetts, the Carolina Chocolate Drops and Mount Holly’s Childers. (For his ongoing regional advocacy, Ramseur will be inducted into the North Carolina Music Hall of Fame in October.) His roster now traverses genres to include bluegrass Grammy winners Steep Canyon Rangers and new signees like Brooklynbased roots rockers The National Reserve and the more pop rock-oriented Ruen Brothers (actually Henry and Rupert Stansall, who hail from Scunthorpe, an old steel town in Northern England). Yet when we speak in early April, Ramseur is readying a June radio station promotional blitz for the Ruens and offering his two cents on the band’s latest video. There’s even talk of a “crossover” hit for the band’s catchy single, “All My Shades of Blue,” which bottles Avetts-style emotionalism in a souped-up blend of brothers Everly and Righteous.


Taken out of context, it all sounds very old school; rock and roll circa 1955-1995. That’s by design, in part, and helps make Ramseur more immune to the vicissitudes of the digital age and the out-of-date expectations of a “rock star” system that, over the last 20 years, favors hip-hop and pop rather than rock. But it’s also an outlier for Ramseur, a “cart before the horse” scenario because, at least in the States, the Ruens skipped the one-fan-at-a-time method Ramseur espouses: They recorded with Ruben in 2013, signed to his American Records label, and hoped for viral lightning to strike. It didn’t. “They didn’t have fans for a career, really, they just had the talent and the songs,” Ramseur says. “So we’re trying to

re-engineer it to get them out there where they win over one fan at a time. It might take us five, six, seven years, but that’s how you build a long-lasting fan base.” Just a few years ago, the rock critic would’ve probably played an essential role in that process. Features on the Ruen Brothers and reviews for Top of the World would’ve populated influential rock and roll magazines and alternative weeklies, pushing CD sales and live audience gates, maybe even providing bank for full-band national tours. If an act were truly fortunate, playing rock and roll could be a full-time job and not the expensive hobby it is for most today.

Surrounded by success: Record label owner Dolph Ramseur (center), manager of the Avett Brothers.

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SEE YOUR WAY CLEAR

But in a remarkably short five-year stretch, says Mills, 60, the clout of the critic — never a beloved mediator to begin with — has largely vanished. Now that “every monkey with a typewriter has a music blog,” he says, and broadband streaming allows for instant audio gratification, music critics have been rendered largely “irrelevant.” Mills began writing about rock and roll in 1977 and at one point counted 15 go-to publications in his freelancing-fora-living quiver. But since 2015 he’s had a full-time, nonmusic journalism job in order to make up for the fact that most of his writing outlets have gone the way of the dodo and Blockbuster Video. Now, in his spare time, Mills still runs the website Blurtonline.com — which traces its name to iconic 70s rock critic Lester Bangs and its publication back to the much-loved indie rock magazine, Harp, in the early 2000s.

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But he’s under no illusion that critics drive the narrative anymore. Bringing up a similar point touched on by Roby and Ramseur, that’s now up to the musicians and their Instagram/Twitter/Facebook accounts. In a way, Mills finds himself back where he began in the late-70s, when he penned Xeroxed love notes to his favorite rock and roll bands for little or no money while hoping a few readers trusted his voice and put a few dollars in the artist’s pocket. “I think the critic’s job, in 2018, is to try to sift through the white noise, and then use the bully pulpit (such that it is…) to offer an honest, straightforward opinion in order to acknowledge the artists who he or she thinks are unique, important, and contributing to our culture,” he says. “If it helps move the needle of public opinion in some small way, fine, and if it in turn helps a label shift an extra unit or two (or helps a P.R. agent score a bonus), that’s okay, too. But from my point of view, my job is to simply tip my hat in the direction of the bands that I think are cool. Same as it ever was.” Music critic and Blurt editor Fred Mills


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The challenges and triumphs of working in folk music after 50, after 60, after 70, after 80... by Art Menius

A Conference in May in Montreat, I looked down

t the South East Regional Folk Alliance (SERFA)

the line of the 70 years and older panelists answering my questions about their lives in folk music. Legendary songwriter Billy Edd Wheeler (“Jackson,” “Coward of the County”) is 84. Both fiddler Tracy Schwarz and Jim Rooney, who has done everything in the music business, are 80, while Schwarz’ wife and noted Appalachian singer Ginny Hawker is, well, over 50. Me? I’m 63 and in my 36th year working in the music business. None of the four tended toward short answers, a delight for an interviewer, while all contributed a lot of humor. Younger than they, but hardly young, my mind would wander about working in the business during what Wheeler called “the back nine of life.” I had contemplated this as a young man way back in my second year in the music business, specifically the folk/ roots/bluegrass business, while not so far geographically from Montreat. Just to the north in Madison County, I had gone with public TV host David Holt all the way up to Sodom Laurel, to visit Dellie Norton. “Granny” in National Heritage laureate Shelia Kay Adams’ stories, Dellie was a primary source of the ancient ballads that predated the European conquest of America. Her songs told of brave knights, promiscuous queens, witches and murders – plenty of murders. Like most of what folklorists call tradition bearers who pass along the folkways to younger generations, Norton’s professional performing career started a good score after she passed age 50. Singing those ballads at festivals and on TV and recordings provided a bit of income after her work – moonshining, cooking in logging camps, harvesting and selling ginseng and farming – had become too physically demanding.

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“All I went to school in my life was three months,” she told me at age 86 in 1984. “I used to hunt, raise a little tobacco, had four or five milk cows. Now I got to where I can’t work no more.” Norton had just making a few dollars as her goal. After 50, most folks set the bar higher, often unrealistically high. Even by folk music standards, few succeed in a new or reborn career in music as seniors. For most older musicians starting out, it leaves too little time to build a fanbase and the team (agent, manager, print and radio publicists, recording vehicle) needed. Or, like Autryville multi-instrumentalist Dennis Cash, they find transitioning to a new identity fraught with challenges. When working a day job, he had enjoyed a rewarding parttime career in a bluegrass gospel band. Post-retirement, he began working as a solo singer-songwriter. Despite his experience, excellent songs and relationships in the business, all too often promoters, who generally had hired his old ensemble Carolina Son, tell him how much they love his music, but they don’t think they can sell enough tickets to his solo shows. Even those who have remained in the music business since youth face obstacles as we age. This is my own story. When I stepped down from the helm of The ArtsCenter in Carrboro in 2014, I opened a boutique shop to do recording promotion and career advising for folk music artists, event production and marketing for folk festivals. Much like Cash and despite being a well-known figure in folk music circles, potential clients hold a complex of incorrect perceptions. They cover the whole gamut from “I thought you had retired,” “Don’t you work full-time for [insert-name-of-past-employer-here],” “You’ve been around, but your shop is new. I wanted to go with a betterestablished promoter” and perhaps most relevant here,


“How much longer do you see yourself doing this?” and “You’re a successful veteran, there’s no way I could afford you.” I’m both too new and too old at the same time. Keeping up with the young, emerging artists becomes a constant challenge with age. No longer do I go to a different festival every other week – in part because gigs as an emcee have become rare – nor out clubbing. Albums appropriate for my radio show take up my listening time. At conferences like SERFA, I encounter so many old friends and potential clients that I never see as many performances as I intend. Despite all my complaining, being in the folk music business post-50 is a good, if not particularly remunerative, life. I am aging, but I am still somebody. I enjoy the name-recognition that still opens doors. Younger people in roots music want to hear my stories about musicians they have only seen on YouTube and consume my free advice. I have deep relationships with business colleagues with whom I worked for more than 30 years. Conferences like SERFA remind me what a lovely community we older workers in folk music enjoy as we age in place in many different places.

As a gross generalization, the roots music community skews under 30 and over 50. As such, working therein can be both comfortable and stimulating. Those who have kept on pushing, especially as musicians, have experienced career breakthroughs as seniors or sustained success playing for those who respect all they have accomplished. Bluegrass Music Hall of Fame member Del McCoury, 79, seems just to get more popular as the years pass leading his eponymous band that itself is now 51 years old. He’s booked to be the singing voice of bluegrass music patriarch Bill Monroe in an upcoming feature film. Durham’s Alice Gerrard, once half of the now legendary duo Hazel & Alice, earned her first Grammy nomination at 80 and entered the Bluegrass Hall at 81. Banjo player Steve Martin, 72, better known as a comedian and actor in some circles, stands at the peak of his musical career as a player and composer. Some already noted musicians’ careers blossomed after 50. Folk icon Pete Seeger was just recovering from being blacklisted when he turned 50 in 1969. The best years of his long career in activism and music came over the next 40 years. Monroe was 50 when he hired

Wisdom Ovation - 2017 SERFA Wisdom of the Elders - Art Menius, Doug Orr, Reggie Harris, Patrick and Cathy Sky. Photo by Betty Friedrichsen for SERFA. JULY 2018 |

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McCoury in 1963. Still struggling to recover from the devasting impact of rock and roll on his business and starting to be rebranded as “the Father of Bluegrass Music,” Monroe had little idea how his career was poised to flourish again as the bluegrass festivals began in 1965. Following his rendition of “Oh, Death” in the Coen Brothers’ movie, O Brother, Where Art Thou?, Ralph Stanley became a star far beyond what he called mountain music a full quarter-century after he hit the half-century mark. Growing older has numerous challenges, physical, mental and professional that most people share. The folk music business reflects that, but offers a wonderfully supportive community and the opportunity to do meaningful, creative work so long as able. At SERFA, Rooney, Wheeler, Schwarz and Hawker swapped laughs and stories. Although he had enjoyed far more commercial success and did not previously know the other three, Billy Edd quickly fell right in with them since they spoke the same language and shared similar experiences. They showed the audience the vitality of those aging in the creative environment and loving community of folk music. Art Menius is a veteran folk music writer, promoter, and conference, concert, and festival producer. He was the first executive director of IBMA and Folk Alliance International. He lives in rural Orange County, just like his great-grandparents.

Art with the late Hazel Dickens - photo by Becky Johnson

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PRODUCER DONA JACKSON ANDERSON by Spencer Griffith | Photography by Caitlin Penna

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AAwakening has carried the torch for gospel

iring Sunday mornings on WRAL-TV, Spiritual

programming in central North Carolina since it began on WRAL radio as The Sister Gary Spiritual Program in 1942. For over 75 years, the program has provided a platform for performers from across the state, along with occasional Grammywinning national and international touring acts like California’s The Mighty Clouds of Joy, South Africa’s Soweto Gospel Choir and North Carolina’s own Shirley Caeser. Dona Jackson Anderson—a native of Huntington, West Virginia and a graduate of Raleigh’s John W. Ligon High School—has produced the show since 1990, continuing to book talent for Spiritual Awakening’s Monday night tapings even after her retirement from WRAL nearly a decade ago. On set, Anderson jokes with guests and crew while simultaneously running a tight ship, ensuring each half-hour episode is packed with multiple performances along with a brief interview by current host Bishop Terence Jenkins, the show’s fourth since Sister Mabel Gary Philpot’s passing— and thus the show’s name change— in 1978. Anderson also strives to uphold the legacy of Sister Gary, who, based on her powerful preaching at Raleigh’s Grace AME Zion Church, was tapped by WRAL-AM’s then-general manager Fred Fletcher as the first African-American to regularly host a radio show in the state capital. Even in its early days, Sister Gary’s program reportedly drew a significant number of listeners from both the black and white communities in the area, and Anderson constantly seeks out a variety of talent in an effort to appeal to broad audiences. “I don’t want to forget the show’s roots, but I would love for it to become more diverse because we’re all one in Christ,” Anderson says.

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OutreachNC: How did you get involved in working in television, and on Spiritual Awakening in particular? Dona Jackson Anderson: I went to college at Florida A&M where I majored in psychology and minored in music. I didn’t want to be a social worker, so I came to Raleigh—where I had finished high school—and got a job as a secretary in state government. I worked there for about two years but decided I really loved the arts. I liked TV and I liked acting, so I decided to go to the Carolina School of Broadcasting in Charlotte. I came back [to Raleigh] after finishing and was able to get my foot in the door at WPTF TV as a secretary for the programming department. There, I learned everything my supervisor did as a programmer. I was able to be a liaison between the station and the network, which was NBC at the time. I stayed there for about four years and then I was able to come over to WRAL in the same position. While here, they had this show called the Sister Gary Spiritual Program. This evangelist [Sister Mabel Gary Philpot] would do a little sermonette and her choir would sing gospel music. There was no producer, they just came in and the camera crew shot whatever they did. Meanwhile, I became minister of music at Watts Chapel Baptist Church in Raleigh, where I served for 23 years. As I watched the program and shadowed the producers in my department, I thought “I can do this,” so I raised my hand and said I could produce the show. I thought I could be an asset to it because of my knowledge of and love for gospel music, and they let me do it. ONC: What was your background in gospel music prior to being involved with the show? DJA: Well, I grew up in the church. I was in the junior choir and I played the piano. My mother and my grandparents were singers. Back in the 1950s, there was an organization called the National Convention of Gospel Choirs and Choruses that was headquartered in Chicago. Different cities would form chapters and there would be a big convention every year in Chicago, where delegates would go up and learn about music and form a big national choir. 44

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Meanwhile, the different states would have their own conventions as well and people from the headquarters would come down to those conventions. At that time, African Americans weren’t staying in hotels, so the church members would put them up in their homes. We had a big house and would always host about three delegates every time they came. This same man, who was friends with my grandfather, would always come. I liked him. He’d always wear this tweed suit and call me “little girl” and let me sit on his lap. When I went to college and took a music appreciation class, we learned about this musician named Thomas Dorsey, who wrote “Precious Lord, Take My Hand.” When they put his picture up on the screen, I said “I know him!” [I realized that] as a little five-year-old, I sat on his lap. ONC: How do you feel Spiritual Awakening has been important to gospel music and the African American community in North Carolina? DJA: I think it has had an impact, and I’m praying that it will continue to have an impact. It has really served the African American community in that it gave them a voice. It gave them a chance to expose their talents as well as their ministries so that they could lift their ministries higher and people would invite them to different places and things like that. Some have even gone national, a few, so it meant a lot [to those groups]. The show is a ministry itself, which I found out because I started hearing from people of all ethnic groups who watched it. They would write me or call me and tell me how much they appreciated it. There was an old Caucasian lady who told me she’s a Presbyterian, but she gets up every morning and gets dressed for church while listening to Spiritual Awakening. Another person, who worked at a lab at Duke, told me one of the Indian doctors passed them by, then backed up and said “Didn’t I see you on TV Sunday? Yeah, on Spiritual Awakening!” So it’s amazing the people that watch it and the [diversity] of the audience. ONC: How do you think the show has sustained an audience and resonated for over 75 years? Have you had to adapt very much to the times to keep it relevant?


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DJA: No, not really. One thing about the African American community is that the church, and faith, is big and that’s where we are. We may be everywhere else, but the church is where we do a whole lot of things. We’re interested in [faith] and I think that’s why it has stayed that long, because we get into that. I am glad the show is on WRAL.com, because the people who don’t get up at 6:30 AM can just wait and watch it on there. I haven’t really felt an impact [otherwise from technology] and we’ve always had good ratings compared to who we’re up against at that time. I’m told that we’re holding our own. ONC: Do you think the show allows folks outside the African American community to have a window into the African American church? DJA: Yes, it’s great exposure. It allows others to hear what African Americans do and that there’s diversity within the African American church music. There’s gospel—traditional and contemporary—and then, within that, we include miming and praise and worship dancing as well, so there’s a whole lot [of different elements] that people can see. ONC: How has the music branched out from traditional gospel? DJA: We do get contemporary and we’ve had Southern gospel too. We’ve had Jeff Majors, who played gospel music played on the harp with a group of singers. We’ve had some country and we’ve even had bluegrass—a group called Gone Fishin’, with fiddles and everything. We had a band with a white guy playing harmonica and black musicians behind him. It was awesome! He said he was

brought up in a black church because his friend’s mama would drag him there, so that’s how he got a little soul in him. He could play that harmonica though! I don’t do a lot of rap. I’m not against it, but this audience is not up for 30 minutes of that, not the age group that watches this show. When I do get requests from rap groups, I’ve got to be able to understand what they’re saying. It’s got to be clear. When becoming diverse, I don’t want to shock anybody. I have to sift a little bit to make sure they fit in, but [the diversity in styles] has been coming, slowly but surely, and I’ve not gotten any negative comments on it. I mean, you have more interracial and non-denominational churches now and people are becoming more accepting. ONC: What keeps you still working on this show after retiring in 2009? DJA: I just love it! I love meeting people. I’m not going to work anymore, so it gives me something to do. This is a ministry and I use it as my ministry, because my greatest joy is to see the happiness on people’s faces and I love to hear their voices. In our community, we have programs at our churches and we’re always looking for somebody to perform, so [some viewers] watch Spiritual Awakening to invite these people to their program. So on Sunday morning, right before the show is over when [host] Terence [Jenkins] asks how people can get in touch with the performers, their phones start ringing. I ask [our guests] for a progress report and most everyone that comes here, they’ll tell me their phone didn’t stop ringing all day. That just makes me feel so good.

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Happy Merlefest MERLEFEST IS A LONGSTANDING ANNUAL MUSIC FESTIVAL ROOTED IN FAMILY by James J. Hatfield

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O

n a school bus taking my fellow festivalgoers and me from parking lot “C” to the main entrance, I lean forward and mention to the woman sitting in the seat in front of me that this is my first time attending Merlefest. Both she and her young daughter look at me with a disbelief, almost like they’re waiting for me to tell them I was joking. “It’s the biggest thing close to Christmas around here,” the mother said. “It’s like a holiday.” The first Merlefest took place in 1988 in memory of Merle Watson, son of legendary traditional musician Doc Watson and a talented guitarist in his own right. In the festival’s first year, 1,100 seats were scheduled to be available. Since then, every subsequent year’s attendance has increased. Last year, at Merlefest’s 30th anniversary, the aggregate involvement exceeded 83,000 participants. Merlefest is hosted yearly by Wilkesboro Community College, which shuts down its campus for several days every year in preparation for the Thursday festival kickoff. Joe Connelly, a returning volunteer for the festival since 1999, gave me the rundown on the lengthy list of attractions. I asked him about the demographic and how it seemed pretty spread out from seniors to infants with their parents, and almost everything in between. He shrugged and said, “It’s a different kind of festival.” He explained that people can come in early in the morning and put their chairs and coolers down, then leave them there all day until the band they want to see starts. This kind of thing would be considered careless at any other summertime music festival. Why it isn’t at Merlefest is a testament to the community attachment and involvement the people of Wilkesboro and the surrounding areas have had for the annual event for over three decades. I passed through the entry and was met by a setup that looked like a farmers’ market. Vendor tents stood side by side, taking up an entire parking lot. After taking a walk I passed a variety of pop-up shops that were predominantly North Carolinian, with a couple from Tennessee and Georgia. I bought

a sweet hat. It was in this market area of the festival I noticed the different age groups walking around. Not just college kids, but seniors and young children as well. Over the tops of the tents in the marketplace I could hear the sound of glass sliding on coiled wires – the familiar tone of a steel resonator guitar with bluesy attitude. I followed the sound. I wound up behind a sea of lawn chairs that led to a stage with two giant screens on each side. It was Dobro player Jerry Douglas, a prolific musician and record producer who has won multiple Grammys and prestigious awards from both the CMA and IBMA, and he was on his last song. Then an announcer strolled onstage to say that the showcase was starting. A girl who didn’t look or sound a day over 12 skipped to the microphone with a mandolin and began singing. After her twominute performance she smiled and waved and exited the stage to a roar of supportive applause. She and the others after her were participants of the young songwriters showcase that Merlefest puts on every year. Behind the mass of lawn chairs of the main stage is an open grass area. Kids were playing, throwing balls, playing tag or even napping with their parent or grandparent on a blanket as the sun went down. The entire campus grounds felt genuinely North Carolinian. A cross pollination of communal elements that really solidified the family vibe, like giant tents with food stands identical to the ones from the State Fair, giant round tables from barbeque restaurants, all with bluegrass reverberating in the background. On my bus back to parking lot “C” I sat next to an older lady who chatted happily with me. I told her I was writing a piece on the festival and she said, “Oh well you should let everyone know about Merlefest.” Then she stopped, thought her statement over in her head, and said what I took to be the most important ingredient to Merlefest’s winning formula. “Well, actually, don’t tell too many people,” she said. “It’ll ruin it all.”

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, Janet Kenworthy s 56

l t a i c u i d s n u o C M

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, The Rooster’ s Wife brings bands and artists – and a culture of music appreciation – to the Sandhills by Corbie Hill | Photography by Diana Matthews

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The Spot stands empty today. But last night The Spot was hopping. On that evening, the stage hosted folk duo Richie and Rosie. It was a good night, says Janet Kenworthy. The youngest audience member, she’s pleased to report, was a three-year-old kid who stayed in the front row for the entire concert. Again, it was a good night. Today it’s just Kenworthy in this small-town venue and event space with at least three names. It’s the Poplar Knight Spot – cleverly named for the nearby intersection of Poplar and Knight Streets in downtown Aberdeen – but this is often shortened to “The Spot.” It’s also commonly referred to as The Rooster’s Wife, which is Kenworthy’s nonprofit performing arts association. Standing in its comfortable listening room, Kenworthy is completely at home in the venue she has brought to the Sandhills. Consider the seats: some are antiques, others are simply used and well-worn; others are couches, building an overall vibe that is equal parts thrift store and furniture auction. Consider the stage: it’s low and close and easily seen from any seat. And then there’s The Spot’s warm weather potential. “The two back doors slide open. You can sit outside,” Kenworthy says. “If I had that view on my TV, I would get a TV. [The stage] is framed perfectly in that door.” For 13 years, Kenworthy has brought a slew of folk, bluegrass, jazz – you name it – musicians to Aberdeen under the Rooster’s Wife moniker. At first, she hosted these shows in her own home. Then, in 2009, Kenworthy and her mother Priscilla Johnson renovated what would become The Poplar Knight Spot, putting extra attention to insulation and acoustics. Though The Spot also hosts events like wedding receptions, poetry readings, birthday parties and showers, it is most consistently the primary venue for The Rooster’s Wife (there are also Rooster’s Wife shows the first Thursday of each month at Cameo Art House Theatre in Fayetteville). It’s a place for music. It’s a place to drink a local beer and make new friends. And it’s a place to 58

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bring the kids or grandkids – children under 12 always get in free. With The Rooster’s Wife, Kenworthy has worked hard to bring a culture of live music appreciation to Aberdeen, regardless of the audience members’ ages. “I do believe that you can tune your ear and you can definitely give [kids] a jumping off point,” she says.

“YOU DON’T KNOW WHAT YOU DON’T LIKE IF YOU’VE NEVER HEARD IT.” Kenworthy’s own love of music dates to childhood (“I would say birth, but that seems rather disingenuous,” she offers). She grew up on the east end of Lexington, Kentucky, in a household with a big flip top stereo console. Thanks to her mother’s eclectic tastes, Kenworthy was exposed to everything from Herb Alpert to bossa nova to classical to spoken word. One early memory is of turning off the lights and listening to Edgar Allan Poe’s The Tell-Tale Heart. No matter how many times Kenworthy heard this record, it still scared her to death. Kenworthy’s exposure to music only increased as she grew up. “The drinking age was 18, the driving age for a permit was 14 ½, so at a very young age you had access to going out to music,” she says. “There were always people picking and playing.” At her school, there was chapel every Friday, which was its weekly assembly. Some Fridays, juniors and seniors would play James Taylor covers. Other weeks, it was singer/songwriters from Nashville. Kenworthy went to college in Chicago, and while living there she caught shows by influential musicians including Steve Goodman, John Prine, Bonnie Raitt and Joan Armatrading. “I saw a live symphony for the first time with Sir Georg Solti conducting,” she says. “I was hooked on that genre of live performance, because that beats football every day.” From there, Kenworthy lived in Ireland, Miami and New York, with each stop contributing to her musical growth. Then, in 1991, Kenworthy


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moved to Aberdeen to be near family that had retired to Pinehurst. Soon, she was seeing music regionally. “The first show I saw was at the Carrboro ArtsCenter and we saw the World Saxophone Quartet – with three children. And it was fabulous,” she says. “Then [I] saw the Red Clay Ramblers for the second time, because I had seen them on Broadway.” Yet as the years passed, Kenworthy realized two things were missing. One was live music in the Sandhills: there were some opportunities, granted, but she wanted there to be more – and she wanted concerts to be inclusive for everyone, children included. The other was live music audience etiquette. “There is a dearth of that in today’s society, and I sound like a wicked old witch when I say that,” Kenworthy says. “You always need to be a respectful audience, even if it’s not your thing. “Common courtesy is always demanded here,” she continues. “This is a listening room.” Yet to have a listening room, you must have musicians. And Aberdeen isn’t traditionally a music destination. Bands or artists touring through North Carolina will typically route through one of the Triangle towns – Raleigh, Durham, Chapel Hill, Carrboro – or Asheville or Charlotte, where venues and clubs range from cozy dives to dedicated music clubs, nicely appointed theaters and outdoor amphitheaters. Yet it’s not a huge stretch, Kenworthy says, to coax these artists to the Sandhills. “We are positioned perfectly from Asheville to Wilmington,” she says matter-of-factly. Aberdeen is convenient to those traveling north to south as well. Touring folksingers or traditional bands have been receptive to Rooster’s Wife dates for these reasons, but also because an evening onstage at Kenworthy’s venue comes with lodging and a home-cooked meal at her home. Road food can be brutal – typically, touring artists subsist on chain restaurant fare – and musicians appreciate an evening eating well. Beyond that, until 2017, all Rooster’s Wife shows took place on Sundays – a day musicians have historically had a tough time finding work. On the business side, The Spot’s compact size and distance from other music venues works to its advantage. “It’s a rare music fan that will drive 70 miles for a show,” Kenworthy explains. “We only have 99 seats, so it’s not like we’re going to take business away from somebody generally.”

With these pieces in place – not to mention Kenworthy’s deep knowledge of and support group within the music industry – she has been able to host something like 600 shows over 13 years. Accomplished folksinger Peggy Seeger, of the musically influential Seeger family, played a 2012 date with North Carolina native and thenCarolina Chocolate Drops member Rhiannon Giddens opening. (Giddens’ star has since risen even higher. In 2017, she was honored with a prestigious Macarthur “Genius Grant”). “Rhiannon had just written this song cycle, but never performed it publicly,” Kenworthy recalls. “She dried her banjo with a hair drier on my front porch because it was so humid.” Artists like Chris Smither and Mollie O’Brien stick out in Kenworthy’s mind, as does tenor sax player John Ellis. Ellis, Kenworthy says, grew up in Cameron, but had not been invited back to play. So Kenworthy hosted Ellis and his band Double-Wide at The Spot, and then Ellis played Cameron Elementary. He brought the house down, Kenworthy says, and the principal allowed the program to last longer than was initially planned. And all this music has come about organically, naturally, as word of this little listening room at the intersection of Poplar and Knight Streets in Aberdeen spreads throughout the music community. “It’s all concentric circles,” Kenworthy says. “One begets the next begets the next begets the next.”

The Rooster’s Wife At The Poplar Knight Spot 114 Knight St, Aberdeen 910.944.7502 TheRoostersWife.org At the Cameo Art House Theatre (First Thursday of each month)

225 Hay Street, Fayetteville 910.486.6633 CameoArtHouse.com JULY 2018 |

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GREY MATTER See Grey Matter Puzzle Answers on Page 64

Puzzle 7 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

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DOWN

ACROSS 1. ___-ski 6. “Wheel of Fortune” category 12. Set beforehand 14. Unvarying procedure

62

16. Slips of paper with gummed backs 18. Magazine 19. A pint, maybe 20. Peevish 22. Australian runner

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10. Without fixing a future meeting date (2 wds) 11. Paints that dry to a hard, glossy finish 13. Certain surgeon’s “patient” 15. Solution of solvent and dissolved matter 17. Beat 21. Container weight 24. Pertaining to Latvians 26. Stress, in a way 28. Bathroom item 30. Cut 32. “Tarzan” extra 33. Bunk 35. Boxers’ warnings 36. Pretense 37. Degrading 38. Having a pointed end 39. Ashtabula’s lake 40. Dry, red table wine 41. Jack Russell, for one 42. Built 44. One up 47. Adhesive 48. Squalid section of a city 51. Four gills 52. Biblical shepherd 55. Abbr. after a name 57. ___ Today, daily newspaper


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Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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WORD SEARCH

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2 to: 1 8 4PO 2 BOX 7 6 2478 9 5 3 Southern Pines, NC 28388 2 9 7 5 1 3 4 6 4 6

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“Generations” 9 4 2 ✴The Robeson 4 8 9 2 7 1 5 Planetarium 9 7 4and 5 Science 6 3 8 Center 1 2 7 3 from 4 9 our 6 grandparents ✴Lessons 8

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7 4 3Game” 5 6 8 1 2 “The Long 5 7 8 1 8 2 9 3 7 5 6 ✴Decluttering ✴Out-of-pocket healthcare costs

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SEPTEMBER

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“Living Healthy” 9 4 3 7 5 2 9✴Cancer 2 8 5 survival 6 3 4 stories 1 5 3✴The 7 1people 2 6 behind 8 9 3 The 7 2People’s 9 4 8Pharmacy 1 5 1 5 ✴Sleep 3 8 7 and 9 6aging 4 6

Moore, Robeson 9 6 5 Richmond, 4 2 8 1 7 and 9 6 Scotland 5 3 1 2 Counties.

7 9 7 6 5 AHEAD 1 8 4 3 2 9 LOOKING 5 3 6 1 2 9 4 5 7 3 8 6 1 TO 7 8 4UPCOMING 2 1 3 8Ahead 2 9 ISSUES 6 7 4 5 Looking 3

AUGUST

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5 Hoke, 1 7 8Lee, 6 3Montgomery, 9

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Puzzle (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54) 2018 64 10 OutreachNC.com | JULY

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OutreachNC.com Distributed within Puzzle info@outreachnc.com 2 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49) Puzzle 3 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.56) Cumberland, Harnett, 2 9 4 910-692-9609 3 6 5 8 1 7 8 6 1 3 9 2 7 5 4

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Subscribe today!

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OVER MY SHOULDER

Celebrate Democracy

by Ann Robson Birthdays are a time to take stock of a majority in the Electoral College – wins things. How was the past year? What the presidency.” do I want to see in the coming year? As Few of us appear to approve of the “tone we get ready for the 242nd birthday of of political debate,” which we don’t see our country, it seems like a good time to as “respectful.” It does seem that we are pause and take a good look at what we’ve growing farther apart instead of coming become as a nation and how we feel about together in the great melting pot. The idea our democracy. of agreeing to disagree and still have a Fortunately, the Pew Research Center people have done this for us. In an April 2018 report of “key findings on Americans’ views” of our political system they noted many trends in our thinking. For the most part we like our democracy, but think some significant changes should be made.

Certain values and ideals are the basis for our Constitution which was hammered out over a period of time and ratified in 1788, cementing the promise of 1776’s Declaration of Independence. Many think that these values and ideals are no longer part of American life. The Constitution has proven to be foundational for life in this country. It also has been adaptable, as various amendments were added to address important issues that were not considered in the Founding Fathers’ time. Amendments have given the vote to freed slaves and to women, have imposed prohibition of alcohol and later repealed it. We have been given many rights and with these rights come responsibilities. The survey revealed that while most of us are satisfied with our democracy we see the need for some changes. One of the major things we said we’d like to see is a revision of the way presidents are elected so that “the candidate who receives the most total votes nationwide – rather than

friendly debate is disappearing from our public discourse.

There is “cynicism about money and politics.” According to the Pew survey, Americans think that those “who donate a lot of money to elected officials have more political influence than others.” Seventyseven percent of those interviewed supported limits on the amount of money individuals and organizations can spend on political campaigns and issues. We see “democracy as working well, but most say significant changes are needed.” That’s the good news. We like our democracy and want to improve it to bring it into the 21st century. When we recognize the intentions behind the framers of the Constitutions we realize that some of their hopes and dreams are not quite as relevant today as they were 242 years ago. They could not have foreseen a world of instant communication, of tremendous growth or of our diversity. Suggesting change is not heresy but reality. In general, we want to see our country grow and prosper with opportunities for all. If we were to blow out all 242 candles with one wish, it would likely be that we continue to enjoy our freedoms and want to see them strengthened where needed and changed where necessary. Happy Birthday, y’all.

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Ann Robson is the author of “Over My Shoulder: Tales of Life and Death and Everything In Between.” She can be reached at overmyshoulder@charter.net .

JULY 2018 |

OutreachNC.com 65


Generations

by Corbie Hill & Michelle Goetzl

OutreachNC asked adults and children our July question. Share your answer on our Facebook page.

What

instrument do you wish you could play?

I wish I could play the drumset! I love the beat. It is candy to my ears. – Gavin, 8 Clarinet. – Wiley, 88 I wish to play guitar. The reason is I’ve always wanted to be in a band and make a song. – Avery, 8 Piano. I do play organ, but would like to play piano better. – Esther, 80 I wish to play the piano! It is grand and elegant. You play beautiful music on it too! – Isla, 8 I would like the flute. It whistles like the breeze. It sounds like the waves. – Layla Joyce, 7 Trumpet. – Ed, 88 I wish I would play a piano. The music sounds wonderful, amazing, fantastic. – Stella, 7

Drums. – Barbara, 80 Piano. I play guitar and drums and I’m a singer and a songwriter, but the piano has always outsmarted me. – Corbie, 36 I wish to play the banjo. The banjo sounds nice and is an old-school instrument. – Alexander, 8 Piano better than I do now. – Beverly, 80 I wish I could play the electric guitar. It makes a loud sound. You can be a rock star. – Kenyon, 8 Piano. I love Tchaikovsky. – Ethel, 79 I wish to play the violin. The reason for that is the notes are oh so lovely, it makes me drift away in my mind. – Caitlin, 8 I wish I could play the flute. It has a beautiful noise. Plus, it looks easy to play. – Ella, 8 Purrrrcussion. - Jeeves the Cat, 5

If you would like to submit an answer for an upcoming question, please email editor Corbie Hill at editor@outreachnc.com. Please be sure to include your first name and the age you will be the month that issue runs. The upcoming Generations questions are... August: What is your favorite activity to do with a friend? 66

OutreachNC.com | JULY 2018

September: If you could be a bird, which one would you be?


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July 2018 OutreachNC  
July 2018 OutreachNC