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COMPLIMENTARY

JUNE 2019 | VOL. 10, ISSUE 6

THE

P E T S

ISSUE featuring ONC's Pet Pic Horse Rescue in Perks of Adopting Contest Winners Cumberland County Senior Animals Serving the Sandhills & Southern Piedmont

JUNE 2019 |

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| OUTREACHNC.COM


Caregiver Support Group Join us for monthly meetings with a guest speaker and open discussion at the end. Share your experiences with other caregivers and create a network of support. Open to anyone in a caregiver role, including family and professional caregivers.

FIRST TUESDAY MONTHLY @ 4 PM

FOX HOLLOW SENIOR LIVING 190 FOX HOLLOW ROAD PINEHURST, NC 28374

MONTHLY PROGRAM TOPICS:

• MAY 7 • Understanding Palliative & Hospice Care Robin Lynn, LCSW, FirstHealth Palliative Care • JUNE 4 • Understanding Alzheimerʼs and Dementia Elizabeth Novak, Western Carolina Chapter Alzheimerʼs Association

• SEPTEMBER 3 •

Ian Inquimboy, PT, Genesis Therapy

• OCTOBER 1 • Kindness with a Front Porch; The Clara McLean House Rebecca Ainslie, R.N., Director Clara McLean House

Jennifer Tyner, AOS Care Management

• NOVEMBER 5 • Make Life Easier and Safer; Medical Equipment to Support Your Needs Scott Hooker, Scottʼs Medical Equipment

• AUGUST 6 • Five Wishes: A tool to share your personal, emotional, spiritual & medical needs Debi Dallas, Liberty Homecare & Hospice Services

• DECEMBER 3 • Caregiver Tips to Enjoy the Holiday Season Robin Hutchings, Fox Hollow Senior Living Crystal Fowler, AOS Care Management

• JULY 2 •

SPONSORED BY:

2

Contact Robin OutreachNC.com | JUNE 2019

Hutchings for Additional Information: 910.695.0011 | rhutchings@5ssl.com


Maintain Your Independence... Together, we can navigate your chronic care medical issues. Our Professional Aging Life Care™ Managers: •Make home visits to monitor results and coach clients on how to reach their goals •Manage medications for compliance •Provide support for doctor appointments •Provide information and referral services •Serve as a liaison for out-of-town family members •Provide support during a crisis

A N N I V E R SA R Y

th

THE EXPERTS IN AGING WELL SINCE 1999

676 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28387

Contact UsT oday!

910.692.0683 JUNE 2019 | OutreachNC.com 3 www.AOSNC.com


features CONTENTS

32 30

42

32

48

ONC BOOK CLUB: Where the Crawdads Sing ASSIGNMENT OUTREACHNC: PET PICS So many pets, so little time!

40

STRUTTIN’ THEIR STUFF: 2019 Silver Arts Showcase

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54 SAVING SANDY: Lessons in the Beauty of Adopting a Senior Pet ADVENTURE AWAITS: NC Animal Adventures for the Whole Family

54

CAROLINA CONVERSATIONS: Debbie Gillis, Owner of Leilani Mae Horse Rescue


Let’s Do This. Together.

Pinehurst (910) 715-1800

Raeford (910) 904-7400

Richmond (910) 410-0123

Sanford (919) 258-2100

Southern Pines (910) 692-6129

Troy (910) 571-5480

www.firsthealth.org/fitness JUNE 2019 |

OutreachNC.com 5 510-101-19


CONTENTS

departments 13

10 12 13

ASK THE EXPERT: Adapting to Change Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA BRAIN HEALTH: Pet Ownership & Dementia Maryanne Edmundson, PhD, LP

14

COOKING SIMPLE: Homemade Dog Biscuits Kim Gilley

22 24 26

DRIVIN’ FOR LUNCH: Fried Chicken like Grandma’s Ray Linville

28

BODY HEALTH: A Guide to Your Thyroid Laura Martin, PA-C

62

18 19

SCAM ALERT: Medical Identity Theft Patty H. LePage

EYE HEALTH: Cataract Surgery John W. French, MD

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PLANNING AHEAD: Charitable Giving Robin Nutting, Cert. Kingdom Advisor®, CLTC®, FIC

MENTAL WELLNESS: Body Image-Our Inner Critic Cara Herring, LCSW

VETERAN’S CORNER: Help with VA Claims Jim Pedersen

16

6

28

LAW REVIEW: Proper Estate Planning for Pets Margaret (Mia) Lorenz, Attorney

64 66

GREY MATTER PUZZLES Crossword, Word Search, Sudoku OVER MY SHOULDER: Well Done, Dads and Grads Ann Robson GENERATIONS QUESTION: If you could talk to an animal, which would you choose and why?


Itʼs that time of year again! WIOZ-550 AM & Sandhills Community College present a series of outdoor concerts performed by the Jazz Band.

2019

Free and open to the public! June 10 | July 8 | August 12 Starts at 6:30 pm

Food is served at 5:00 pm for $8.00 per plate HELD RAIN OR SHINE! (Moves inside on campus if thereʼs rain)

COMING THIS SUMMER... JULY

ADVENTURE & OUTDOORS

AUGUST TRAVEL

NATURE DEFICIT DISORDER TRAIN TRAVEL HOBBY FARMS LIVING ABOARD CRUISE SHIPS SUMMER COCKTAILS FAMOUS TRAILS BUCKET LIST

JUNE 2019 |

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from the editor

I am wearing open-toed sandals today... and pink pants. Y’all – summer is here. The air is muggy. I’ve got no less than five mosquito bites dotting my ever-alabaster legs. And Sandy, our beloved rescue pup, is flopped on the front porch, head resting on her front paws, waiting for someone to take her to the lake. We adopted Sandy just over a year ago, on a fluke really, and she’s the first dog our family has owned. Owned seems like the wrong word for the relationship we have with Sandy. Rather than feeling like her masters, we all seem to be wrapped around her 9-year-old paw, hustling to refill her water bowl or sneak her a scrap of steak from beneath the dinner table. We constantly coo over this dog, trying to discern the meaning of her looks, attempting to win good favor with a pet or a potato chip, fighting over who gets to rub her ears, sit beside her on the bed (she has full access to all furniture) or hold the leash on a walk. We sit with her in the car, narrating her movements as she leans into a turn or whimpers as we pass another dog in another car on another adventure: pet store, park, school drop-off. Sandy has, to put it mildly, changed our lives. As a military family, it never felt right to own a pet and haul it all over the country with our constant moves. By ‘it never felt right,’ I have to be honest and fess up: I never felt like I had the energy or patience to care for another living thing while my husband deployed, while we packed up another house or while I struggled to maintain a clean kitchen with two kids constantly eating meals outside of meal time (that’s a rant for another day). When we finally settled here in the Sandhills, my kids and husband decided it was time for a dog, and though I wavered, I knew they

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were right. I had images of myself picking up poop in the back yard and feeling vexed that I was alone in caring for yet another thing, but the opposite has proved true. We all love this dog, care for her, feed her and love on her, and she has brought us more joy than I could have imagined. As if the Universe isn’t ironic enough in how most of my life plays out, Sandy actually is most attached to me, the woman who feared resenting feeding her and argued on more than one occasion that we simply could not possibly take care of an 80-pound dog. Yet she’s nuzzled her way into my heart, with her floppy ears and woeful eyes, one of which is half-blue. This month, we’ve devoted our issue to pets, the animal companions who make our lives richer, who nuzzle us and love up on us and run (or swim) circles around us. We explore the rewards of adopting an older pet (p. 42), one woman’s passion for saving horses – and humans (p. 54) and animal-themed adventures to visit with grandkids in tow (p. 48). Dads and Grads get a bit of love from columnist Ann Robson (p. 64), and we view the world through the eyes of Emily Dickinson’s cat (p. 63). And if that isn’t enough: our First Annual Pet Contest Winners are gracing pages 32-38 - all sorts of cuteness, sweetness and personality abounds. My own favorite animal is a pig, for which I have absolutely no good reason. I’ll go with Winston Churchill on this topic, however, who said,

“I am fond of pigs. Dogs look up to us. Cats look down on us. Pigs treat us as equals.” Happy animal loving,


Don’t miss out on getting your monthly copy of

Have it delivered right to you! Editor-in-Chief Amy Phariss | Editor@OutreachNC.com Creative Director Kim Gilley | The Village Printers

Subscribe today!

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Creative & Graphic Designer Sarah McElroy | The Village Printers Ad Designers Stephanie Budd, Cyndi Fifield, Sarah McElroy Proofreader Kate Pomplun Photography Morgan Masson, Diana Matthews, Mollie Tobias Contributors Maryanne Edmundson, John French, Cara Herring, Patty LePage, Ray Linville, Margaret (Mia) Lorenz, Laura Martin, Amy Natt, Crissy Neville, Robin Nutting, Jim Pedersen, Amy Phariss, Ann Robson, Jonathan Scott Publisher Amy Natt | AmyN@AgingOutreachServices.com Marketing & Public Relations Director Susan McKenzie | SusanM@AgingOutreachServices.com Circulation 910-692-0683 | info@OutreachNC.com OutreachNC PO Box 2478 | 676 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28388 910-692-9609 Office | 910-695-0766 Fax info@OutreachNC.com | www.OutreachNC.com OutreachNC is a publication of The entire contents of OutreachNC are copyrighted by Aging Outreach Services. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial, photographic or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. OutreachNC is published monthly on the first of each month.

Distributed within

Cumberland, Harnett, Hoke, Lee, Montgomery, Moore, Richmond, Robeson and Scotland Counties.

OutreachNC.com info@outreachnc.com 910-692-9609 or mail a check to: PO BOX 2478 Southern Pines, NC 28388 JUNE 2019 |

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advice

Our Aging Life Care ProfessionalsTM will answer any aging questions you may have.

Email us your questions! info@OutreachNC.com

ASK THE EXPERT

Adapting to Change by Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA

We moved to this area a few years ago so that my husband and I could enjoy time golfing together. Shortly after we arrived, he had stroke and has not been able to golf. We have had a hard time meeting people but would like to stay in the area. How can I get him to get out and socialize?

When we are in the prime of life, we create this vision of what we think our retirement years will be like. We make plans and look forward to a new phase of life. People may take up new hobbies, plan more time for travel and/or relocate to desired areas. When a personal or medical crisis changes those plans, it can be very difficult to adjust to a new reality. There is a grieving process that takes place when life doesn’t quite work out the way we thought it would. How long ago was your husband’s stroke? It can take time to regain functionality, so there may still be some improvement. There are physical therapy programs and golf-specific rehabilitation programs available, and that may help him regain some confidence in his game. Even if he tried in the past, maybe it’s time to try again. If he is open to the idea, encourage him and help provide him with the options and resources.

Anxiety, mental capacity or depression could be factors. Because he may have changes to the brain and be grieving the loss of his previous status, it is important that he talk to his medical team about changes in mood or mental function. Perhaps there is something they can offer to help him adjust and cope with the changes. If his team feels he has reached a plateau in recovery, it becomes important to establish the new normal. Perhaps talking with others who have suffered strokes would help. There may be a local support group he can attend or one-on-one counseling. Discuss ways the two of you could modify the golf game. Is it possible to play a shorter or easier course? Focus on putting? If the game is causing more frustration than pleasure, it may be time for something new. Try to focus on the positive. You still have the ability to enjoy retirement together, and you want to remain in the area. Serving residents of Scotland, Robeson, Richmond and Hoke counties in North Carolina, as well as Marlboro, Dillon and Chesterfield counties in South Carolina.

www.ScotlandHospice.org 10

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Make a list of things to do in the community. Look for community calendars and social media or print publications that highlight local events and activities. If he is resistant to getting out and trying new things, consider making a list of 3 options and asking him to choose one. Start simple: a movie, dinner out, community concern, or having another couple over for coffee. Social connections are important, but understand it may take him time. Keep encouraging him and choose activities that will set him up for success. Observe how he responds in different settings and what may be causing frustration or creating specific challenges for him. Set up a calendar and build activity into the routine. He needs to experience independence and success, so continue to motivate him. Lastly, recognize your own feelings. The stroke changed his life, but it also changed yours. Recognize your own grieving and find an outlet to deal with those emotions. Change is difficult and life seldom goes as planned, but together you can find new ways to embrace retirement.

Readers may send questions to Amy Natt, an Aging Life Care ProfessionalTM, certified senior advisor and CEO of Aging Outreach Services. She can be reached at amyn@agingoutreachservices.com .

BIRDS ARE CHIRPING, FLOWERS ARE BLOOMING,

And Our Residents Are Flourishing 190 Fox Hollow Road • Pinehurst, NC 28374

910-695-0011

At Fox Hollow Senior Living, you’ll discover a lifestyle dedicated to your health and wellness. New friendships are around every corner, exceptional dining awaits you at every meal, and our care team is here to cater to your needs. With activities and events personalized to your interests, it’s easy to see how our residents flourish here.

CALL 910-695-0011 TO EXPERIENCE AN EXCEPTIONAL SUMMER. www.FoxHollowSeniorLiving.com ASSISTED LIVING • MEMORY CARE RESPITE/SHORT-TERM STAYS ©2019 Five Star Senior Living

JUNE 2019 |

Pet Friendly

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health

B R A I N H E A LT H

What to Know About Pet Ownership and Dementia

by Maryanne Edmundson, Ph. D., L.P. Pets are integral to many people’s lives, but what do you care facility, careful planning and coordination with staff need to consider when your life also begins to include is essential for any animal-related activity. Also, the death dementia? In general, research has shown that older adults of a pet can be particularly difficult when people have who own pets are likely to have better cardiovascular memory-related dementias because they may constantly health (partly related to increased physical activity, such be missing their furry companion yet may not be capable as dog walking), recover faster from mental stress, have of holding onto the memory that their pet has died. While lower rates of depression, anxiety, and loneliness, and family and caregivers may want to remind their loved one have better quality of life. Pet owners may also feel a sense that their faithful companion has died, if their loved one of community either through sharing the identity of pet will not be able to remember this reminder, then it tends ownership (think of how you feel when meeting other “cat to be more helpful to redirect your loved one’s attention to people” or “dog people”) or because having a pet may help something else instead. Finally, individuals with dementia them to strike up a conversation. may have difficulty caring for themselves, let alone a pet. When considering long-term care options for your loved All of these general benefits hold true for people with Alzheimer’s disease and other forms of dementia, whether one with dementia, you should consider whether facilities have pet-care assistance options or if a family member can the animal in question is their pet or part of a pet therapy provide general pet care but bring their loved one’s pet to program – these potential benefits are particularly the long-term care facility for visits. important because people with dementia may be at risk for developing depression, anxiety, social withdrawal, and loneliness. Plus, studies indicate that people with dementia who have a pet or are involved in pet therapy have lower rates of apathy, agitation, and aggression, and increased feelings of relaxation. Individuals in long-term care also may have general improvement in their social interactions when pet therapies are utilized. Even adding an aquarium to a long-term care center’s dining room may increase how frequently residents will go to the dining room and how much they eat. Having a pet can also help reduce caregivers’ stress levels. However, there are several risks associated with pet ownership to be aware of. A big concern for older adults can be the increase in risk of falls and other injuries. Even the best-behaved pet can sometimes accidentally get underfoot. Individuals with dementia are also more prone to become upset when tired or overstimulated – you may find it most effective to have animal-related activities early in the day and/or for short periods. When choosing a pet for an older adult and/or someone with dementia, you may consider pets that are less hyper, have calmer temperaments, and are already well-trained (e.g., no jumping or excessive barking). For anyone in a long-term

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Pet ownership is not always feasible for people with dementia – either they may not have an option for someone to care for their pet or they may live in a facility that cannot accommodate animals. Technological advances have been made in robotic pets that appear to provide some of the same benefits of pet ownership (such as lowering depression and agitation) yet do not require the same level of care that a live pet would. Some of the fanciest varieties have realistic looks and the ability to recognize your loved one’s face and respond to their behavior patterns, but may be prohibitively expensive. Some companies and programs (e.g., Ageless Innovation’s “Joy for All”) have less realistic looking yet more affordable robotic companions. If you have questions about pet ownership for your loved one who has cognitive difficulties and/or dementia, consult with your local neuropsychologist. Dr. Maryanne Edmundson is a clinical neuropsychologist at Pinehurst Neuropsychology Brain & Memory Clinic. She can be reached at 910-4208041 or through the website at www. pinehurstneuropsychology.com.


life

COOKING SIMPLE

Homemade Dog Biscuits Ingredients (makes 2-3 Dozen depending on size) Mix these first 5 ingredients very well: 1 ½ C. cold water ½ C. veg. oil 2 eggs 2 T pure vanilla extract 5 T  heaping peanut butter Next, mix these together: 3 ¼  C. all purpose flour 1 ¾  C. rolled oats 1 ¾ C. cornmeal or potato flakes (I do potato flakes since many dogs have allergies to corn)   Directions: 1. Preheat oven to 400 degrees 2. Combine the wet and dry ingredients 3. Mix / knead until blended 4. Roll out dough until approximately 1/4 inch thick (thicker dough takes longer to bake) 5. Use cookie cutters to create the desired biscuit shape/size for your dog 6. Place biscuits on a greased baking sheet 7. Bake for 20 minutes (10 minutes - switch racks 10 minutes more) 8. Remove from oven 9. Let cool overnight or at least a few hours 10. Store in an air-tight container for up to 1 month (if refrigerated)

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advice

VETERANS CORNER

Advocating for Veterans: Moore County VSO Helps Navigate VA Claims by Jim Pedersen, VSO & Director of Moore County Veterans Service Office

Over 10,000 veterans of all ages call Moore County home. Many of our county veterans live with military service-related disabilities that may qualify them for compensation from the Veterans Administration (VA). The Moore County Veterans Service Office in Carthage helps our county vets navigate the confusing, and often frustrating, VA system so they can take advantage of the benefits they earned through their military service. Moore County’s Veterans office is one of 93 such offices throughout the state. These local offices are not part of the Federal Veterans Administration, but are funded through county property taxes. Because the county office is independent of the VA, staff members cannot make any decisions on disability claims or determine monetary benefits or disability ratings, nor do they provide any medical services. Rather, the county office plays a unique role as an advocacy agency for veterans and their families. Through face-to-face appointments, Moore County’s three full-time, nationally-accredited Veterans Service Officers (VSOs) help veterans identify disabling service-connected health conditions which may qualify them for VA benefits. The VSOs gather and organize needed information, complete the proper forms and file the claim directly with the appropriate VA department. VSOs follow each claim as it makes its way through the VA system, providing assistance and information throughout each step of the journey and advocating on the veteran’s behalf when there is a glitch in the process.

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Filing a VA claim is a lengthy process that can be frustrating and trying. Veterans can expect a waiting period of six months to a year after filing their initial claim before a decision is granted. Sometimes the wait is longer than a year, but providing all the necessary information and documentation when the claim is filed may help to shorten the wait time. Additionally, filing a claim through the Veterans Service Office can ensure that all the paperwork is complete, correct and filed in a timely manner, which can alleviate additional delays. Moore County’s Veterans Service Office files just under 3,000 claims for county veterans each fiscal year. During the first eight months of the current fiscal year, the office logged 1,700 claims, so it appears this year’s numbers are on track to meet or exceed recent years. The number of claims may increase as more Vietnam veterans who are experiencing issues due to Agent Orange exposure come forward to file claims under newly expanded eligibility regulations. All services are provided free of charge. In fact, federal law prohibits Veterans Service Organizations and other similar advocacy programs from charging for these services. Listed below are some of the many services available through the Moore County Veterans Service Office: • Filing veterans disability compensation claims including Combat Related Special Compensation (CRSC) for Retired Military; • Assisting surviving spouses and children with filing survivor’s benefit claims, obtaining death certificates and ordering VA grave markers and headstones;


• Filing non-service connected pension claims; • Filing paperwork for Aid and Attendance home care assistance for homebound veterans and their spouses; • Facilitating enrollment in the VA Medical System and filing paperwork for the CHAMPVA medical insurance for qualifying spouses and family members; • Making referrals to local, state and national organizations that can assist veterans with specific needs not covered through the Veterans Administration; • State Benefits and services including providing applications for a lifetime hunting and fishing license (50% or higher) and forms to get a veterans or disabled veterans license plate; • Filing property tax reduction forms for veterans who have a 100 percent permanent and total VA disability rating. If you are a veteran who needs information or wishes to file a claim, a family member inquiring about survivor benefits, or need a referral to a veterans service organization, the Moore County Veterans Service Office can help. Hours are 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. Monday through Friday at their office in the Moore County Agricultural Center, 707 Pinehurst Avenue, Carthage. Walk-in service is available for property tax reduction forms, hunting and fishing license applications and automobile license applications. For all other services, appointments are necessary. For information or to schedule an appointment, call 910-947-3257.

Open Arms

Retirement Center “Making a Difference in the Lives of Others”

Assisted Living | Memory Care Music & Memory Certified

Let us help you in making a decision about the care you are seeking. 612 Health Drive | Raeford | 910-875-3949

Jim Pedersen, director of the Moore County Veterans Service Office, is an accredited Veterans Service Officer and U.S. Marine Corps veteran. He holds a bachelor’s degree in management from UNC Pembroke and has been employed at the Moore County Veterans Service Office since 2011. Previously, he held positions at the Food Bank of Central and Eastern North Carolina and Situs Companies in Robbins. JUNE 2019 |

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health

B O D Y H E A LT H

A Guide to Your Thyroid

by: Laura Martin, PA-C, FirstHealth Family Medicine, Pinehurst The thyroid gland is a small, butterfly-shaped gland located in the base of the neck just below the Adam’s apple. Although relatively small, the thyroid gland plays a huge role in our body. It releases hormones that control metabolism—the way your body uses energy. The thyroid’s hormones regulate vital body functions such as breathing, heart rate, body weight, muscle strength, body temperature, cholesterol levels and more.

Hypothyroidism is a condition in which the thyroid gland is not able to produce enough thyroid hormone. Since the main purpose of thyroid hormone is to “run the body’s metabolism,” it is understandable that people with this condition will have symptoms associated with a slow metabolism. While the estimates vary, approximately 10 million Americans are likely to have this common medical condition. In fact, as many as 10 percent of women may have some degree of thyroid hormone deficiency. Symptoms of hypothyroidism include: • Fatigue • Weakness • Weight gain or increased difficulty losing weight • Coarse, dry hair • Dry, rough pale skin • Hair loss • Cold intolerance (you can’t tolerate cold temperatures like those around you) • Muscle cramps and frequent muscle aches • Constipation • Depression • Irritability

Ensuring that the thyroid gland is healthy and functioning properly is vitally important to the body’s overall well-being. The thyroid gland uses iodine from foods that you eat to make two hormones called triiodothyronine (T3) and thyroxine (T4). These hormones affect nearly every organ in your body. It is important that T3 and T4 levels are neither too high nor too low. Thyroid Conditions and Treatments: Hypothyroidism

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• Memory loss • Abnormal menstrual cycles • Decreased libido

Hypothyroidism can often be diagnosed with a simple blood test to check the level of TSH (thyroid-stimulating hormone) and can be treated with medications that supplement the body’s natural thyroid hormones. Hyperthyroidism Hyperthyroidism, which affects about one percent of the U.S. population, is a condition in which the thyroid gland is overactive and makes excessive amounts of


thyroid hormone. When the thyroid gland is overactive (hyperthyroidism) the body’s processes speed up and you may experience nervousness, anxiety, rapid heartbeat, hand tremor, excessive sweating, weight loss, and sleep problems, among other symptoms.

U N C R E X H E A LT HC A R E P R ESENTS

Hyperthyroidism is diagnosed based on symptoms, physical exam, and blood tests to measure levels of thyroid stimulating hormone (TSH) and thyroid hormones T3 and T4. Your doctor may also decide to order either an ultrasound or a nuclear medicine scan of your thyroid to see if it has nodules, or whether it is inflamed or overactive. Hyperthyroidism can be treated with antithyroid medications that interfere with the production of thyroid hormones. Another option is radioactive iodine therapy to damage the cells that make thyroid hormones. In rare cases in which women do not respond to or have side effects from these therapies, surgery to remove the thyroid (either one part or the entire gland) may be necessary. Don’t Ignore Your Symptoms Treatments for thyroid issues are very effective and can be life-changing. If you experience any of the symptoms described above, it’s important to talk with your provider.

Flex Lawn Pass 10-pack just $225!* Plus, kids 12 and under are always admitted free on the lawn! Family Fun Event!

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SAT, JUNE 1 | 7:30PM

CONCERT SPONSOR: RESIDENCE INN RALEIGH DOWNTOWN

Piazzolla’s Four Seasons FRI, JUNE 7 | 7:30PM

Vivaldi’s Four Seasons SAT, JUNE 8 | 7:30PM

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SAT, JUNE 22 | 7:30PM

CONCERT SPONSOR: BLUE CROSS BLUE SHIELD OF NC

Broadway’s Greatest Hits Laura Martin, PA-C, is a family medicine provider at FirstHealth Family Medicine located at 150 Ivey Lane, Suite B in the Harris Teeter shopping center in Pinehurst. After earning her B.A. with university distinction and highest honors in psychology from UNC-Chapel Hill, Martin spent three years working in the mental health field at a treatment facility in Denver, Colorado. She received her Masters of Physician Assistant Practice from Campbell University in Buies Creek, North Carolina, in December 2016, and is a member of the North Carolina Academy of Physician Assistants. She is certified by the National Commission on Certification of Physician Assistants. For an appointment with Laura Martin, PA-C, call (910) 215-5120.

SAT, JUNE 29 | 7:30PM

BEN FOLDS

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Annual Beach Party starring The Embers SAT, JULY 20 | 7:30PM

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JUNE 2019 |

OutreachNC.com 17


advice

SCAM ALERT

Medical Identity Theft by Patty LePage

Medical identity theft is one of the lesser-known types of identity theft. However, health care data theft is fast becoming one the most prevalent scams in the United States (US). According to the HIPPA Journal, between 2009 and 2018 there were 2,546 healthcare data breaches resulting in the exposure of 189,945,874 healthcare records. More than 59% of the US population has unknowingly had their health care data compromised. Medical identity theft occurs when someone uses your information to receive medical care and prescriptions. Scammers file claims with your insurance provider for medical treatment or leave unpaid medical bills that appear on and damage your credit report. Unlike other types of identity theft, medical identity theft is much harder to stop. You can’t cancel your social security number the way you can a credit card or bank account. In addition to hurting you financially, your medical record could now contain information that is not related to your health. You can detect the warning signs of medical identity theft by proactively checking your Explanations of Benefits (EOB) statement or the Medicare Summary Notice sent out by your insurance plan after treatment. You can also check with you doctor’s office to ensure that your medical records are accurate and only contain information that relates to your health. You can help to protect your information by taking precautions before sharing your medical and insurance information with anyone via email or over the phone and by reading the privacy policies of medical websites to ensure they can keep your information safe. You should protect your health care information with the same diligences as you would your credit cards and bank accounts. For more information on protecting yourself and your loved ones from identity theft, visit https://www.consumer.ftc.gov/topics/identity-theft.

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If you have been the victim of medical identity theft, you should obtain copies of your credit report from all three credit reporting agencies in order to identity any inaccuracies. You should also contact any one of the credit bureaus and have a fraud alert placed on your credit. This will ensure a fraud alert on your credit with all three agencies. You could also place a freeze on your credit to ensure that no new accounts can be opened with your information, preventing further damage to your credit. It is also important to contact your health care and insurance providers to obtain copies of your medical records and ensure that any inaccuracies are corrected. Contact information for the national credit bureaus: Equifax Equifax.com/personal/credit-report-services 800-685-1111 Experian Experian.com/help 888-EXPERIAN (888-397-3742) Transunion TransUnion.com/credit-help 888-909-8872 Reporting medical identity theft to the Federal Trade Commission (FTC) can be done at https://www. identitytheft.gov/. In addition to reporting, the FTC will help you to initiate a plan for recovery and support you through the entire process. Patty holds a Bachelor of Science from UMUC, a Master of Social Work from the University of Southern California and is pursuing her Doctorate in Business Administration at UMUC. She also holds an executive certificate in the Principles of Leading Transformational Nonprofits from the University of Notre Dame. 


E Y E H E A LT H

health

Cataract Surgery: Little Risk, Great Rewards! by: John W. French, M.D., Cataract, Cornea & LASIK Surgeon, Carolina Eye Associates A cataract is a clouding of the natural lens inside your eye. This lens, located behind the iris, works just like the lens of a camera: focusing light images on the retina, which sends images to the brain. A cataract causes the human lens to cloud, which decreases the light and images from focusing on the retina. In fact, cataracts are the leading cause of vision loss in adults 55 and older. Cataracts can cause images to become blurred and bright colors to become dull. It can also make seeing at night more difficult. If you are diagnosed with a cataract, your early symptoms may be improved with new glasses, brighter lighting, antiglare sunglasses or a magnifying lens. If these changes don’t help, surgery is the only effective treatment. Many people believe cataracts have to be “ripe” before they can be removed. This is no longer true. Today, cataract surgery can be performed as soon as your vision interferes with your quality of life. Generally, cataract surgery is a safe, outpatient procedure with little discomfort. Phacoemulsification, or “phaco”, is the most common cataract surgery procedure used today. It was developed to reduce recovery time as well as the risks involved with larger incisions. You will be given an anesthetic to numb the nerves in and/or around the eye. A small incision is made on the side of the cornea, the clear, dome-shaped surface that covers the front of the eye. Your surgeon will insert a tiny probe into the eye. This device emits ultrasound waves that soften and break up the lens so that it can be removed by suction. The incision is so small that it seals itself, so stitches are rarely necessary. Once the cataract is removed, a new, artificial lens is inserted through the same incision. This lens is known as an intraocular lens or IOL. An IOL is a clear, plastic lens that requires no care and becomes a permanent part of your eye. Based on your test results, your surgeon will recommend the best IOL for you.

Be sure you understand all the options available to you. If your surgeon determines you have cataracts in both eyes, he or she may recommend operating on the eye with the denser cataract first. If surgery is successful and your vision improves substantially, you may elect to forgo surgery on your other eye. However, most people get significant benefits from having the second eye operation, including better depth perception and improvements in their ability to drive and to read. People usually have the second surgery once the first eye has healed and their vision is stable. If you are extremely far-sighted or nearsighted and need cataract surgery in both eyes, you may want to have the second surgery soon after the first surgery to avoid problems with double vision and depth perception due to the difference in vision from eye to eye. Most think cataracts only affect seniors. In reality, cataracts can affect anyone! Although most people do not show symptoms of cataracts until at least the age of 40, cataracts can also affect young adults or even children. There is no proven way to prevent age-related cataracts. However, choosing a healthy lifestyle can slow the progression of cataracts. Some ways to delay the progression of cataracts include avoiding smoking, reducing exposure to UV rays, eating healthy foods and wearing proper eye protection to avoid eye injury.   John W. French, M.D. is ophthalmologist specializing in the cataract, cornea and LASIK surgery. For more information on cataract surgery contact our cataract counselor at (910) 2952095 or (800) 733-9355 toll-free.

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NOT SO Bone Appetite? FAST!

JUST BECAUSE WE CAN EAT IT, DOESN'T MEAN THEY CAN! HERE ARE SOME FOODS TO AVOID FEEDING TO DOGS AND CATS

SICKLY SWEETS XYLITOL

SUGAR SUBSTITUTE IN GUM, CANDY, TOOTHPASTE, CHILDREN'S VITAMINS, SOME PEANUT BUTTERS Vomiting. Diarrhea, Seizures Liver Failure

CHOCOLATE

THE QUALITY & LEVEL OF COCOA WILL VARY TOXICITY Vomiting. Diarrhea, Seizures Tremors, Hyperactivity

DAIRY DISCOMFORT MILK & DAIRY PETS LACK LACTASE, THE ENZYME NEEDED TO DIGEST LACTOSE Upset Stomach. Diarrhea

OHYEAST NO DOUGH DOUGH

EXPANDS IN DIGESTIVE SYSTEM Vomiting. Diarrhea, Nausea Stomach Bloat

HOMEMADE PLAY OR SALT DOUGH

MAIN COURSE MENACES FATTY FOOD & FAT TRIMMINGS BURGERS, PIZZA, RIBS, CHICKEN WINGS, ETC. Upset stomach, Nausea, Vomiting

BONES, COOKED

CAN SPLINTER, CAUSING INTERNAL INJURIES, CHOKING Vomiting, Lethargy, Diarrhea, Abdominal Pain

AW NUTS! ALMOND PECAN WALNUT PISTACHIO MACADEMIA NUT HICKORY NUT

RAW MEAT & FISH

High fat content causes upset stomach & pancreatitus *Moldy walnuts can cause seizures, vomiting, tremors

RAW SALMON

DEADLY DRINKS

CAN CONTAIN SALMONELLA & E. COLI Vomiting, Fever, Enlarged Lymph Nodes FRESHWATER FISH CARRYING PARASITES CAN POISON PETS IF EATEN RAW Vomiting, Fever, Diarrhea, Swollen Lymph Nodes

RAW EGG

MAY CONTAIN HARMFUL BACTERIA & RISK OF SALMONELLA TOXICITY

PERILOUS PRODUCE APRICOT, PEACH, PLUM, CHERRY STEMS, PITS AND LEAVES CONTAIN CYANIDE Difficulty Breathing, Panting, Shock

GRAPE & RAISIN

JUST A FEW CAN CAUSE KIDNEY FAILURE IN DOGS Vomiting, Lethargy, Diarrhea

ONION, GARLIC, SHALLOT, CHIVE, LEEK SMALL AMOUNT CAN DAMAGE RED BLOOD CELLS Panting, Weakness, Drooling, Pale Gums

SALT TOXICITY CAN BE LETHAL MUSHROOMS Vomiting. Diarrhea, 20 OutreachNC.com | JUNE 2019 WILD VARIETIES CAN TRIGGER NUMEROUS ORGAN SYSTEMS Seizures, Tremors Seizures, Coma, Vomiting

WINE, LIQUOR, BEER LIQUOR-INFUSED DESSERTS CAN ALSO BE A CULPRIT Seizures, in-coordination respiratory depression, altered activity

CAFFEINE

COFFEE, TEA, ENERGY DRINKS, ENERGY BARS, DIET PILLS Hyperactivity, panting, seizures, muscle twitching, increased urination LEVELS OF TOXICITY DO VARY. FOODS WITH A ARE CONSIDERED VERY TOXIC. CONTACTING YOUR VET IS HIGHLY RECOMMENDED IF YOU THINK A PET HAS CONSUMED ANY OF THESE LISTED FOODS. DISCLAIMER: THIS INFOGRAPHIC IS MEANT TO BE USED AS A GUIDE ONLY. PLEASE CONTACT YOUR VETERINARIAN IF YOU HAVE ANY QUESTIONS OR YOU ARE CONCERNED ABOUT TOXIC FOODS AND YOUR PETS.


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life

DRIVIN’ FOR LUNCH

Fried Chicken Like Grandma Made by Ray Linville

There’s fried chicken, and then there’s … (drum roll) … f-f-fried chicken-n-n. You can order it at a fast-food restaurant, a diner, a food truck, or the deli of a grocery store. When desperate, you might even pick some up at a gas station with a retail mart. Or you can find a place that makes it like Grandma did and linger a few extra minutes at lunch to enjoy something special that brings back memories from childhood. This is the fried chicken served at Magnolia 23 in the heart of downtown Asheboro in Randolph County. It’s the draw for regular customers as well as traveling guests who stop in for what Don and Doris Simmons, the owners, call “a good, down-home, Southern meal.” “You’re at the right place if you want fried chicken,” says Dr. Charles Stout, who ordered it as did his wife Barbara. “We come here about once a week,” he says. For Barbara, eating fried chicken at Magnolia 23 reminds her of growing up in Guilford County. “My mother was a good cook, but we had meat – usually fried chicken – only on Sundays. It was vegetables on the other days. This chicken is just like what I ate as a child,” she says. Eating at Magnolia 23 for the Stouts is also like being with family. Don Simmons was the little league football 22

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coach for the Stouts’ two sons, and Dr. Stout was the family doctor for the Simmonses’ two daughters when they were growing up. The Wards are another family that appreciates the family atmosphere. Danny and Shirley plus their three adult sons, their wives and children regularly order the fried chicken at Magnolia 23. “We average eating here twice a week,” Danny says. “It’s just like Mama’s cooking. It’s truly down-home cooking.” Shirley adds, “My boys were raised on this food. Whether we come in jeans or in our Sunday best, we’re always welcome.” Recently her sister had a stroke, and Shirley took an extra plate to go for her. “Don wouldn’t charge me for it,” she says. Danny and Shirley each also had open heart surgery last year. “When we were taking food home, Don wouldn’t charge me for the carryout. He probably gives away more food than he sells. He’s a very compassionate and friendly person,” Danny adds. Magnolia 23 doesn’t have printed menus. The choices of the day are written on blackboards at the front, middle and back of the restaurant. In addition to fried chicken,


entrees often include meatloaf, turkey and dressing, stew beef, and ham. The sides are extensive, usually eight to ten each day, and are regional favorites such as yams, mac ‘n’ cheese, green beans, potato salad, collards, butter peas and corn, limas, and slaw. For the uninitiated, limas and butter peas are different. “They’re in the same family,” Don Simmons explains. “Limas are flat and green, but butter peas are round and green. Corn is served with the peas.” For anyone saving room for dessert, Magnolia 23 usually has four specials each day that, like the entrees and sides, evoke childhood memories for many guests. “The most popular is probably the fried apple pie,” says Don. Persimmon pudding, blackberry cobbler and pound cake are regularly on display in the dessert case. Although Nicky Tartaglia comes to Magnolia 23 for the fried chicken, she smiles when she sees persimmon pudding on the menu board. “My grandma, who had a persimmon tree, used to make it for me, but it was too hard for my mom to make. She made it once and said, ‘Never again.’ It’s hard to get the pulp out,” she says. The fried chicken is such a favorite of hers that Tartaglia often brings friends to Magnolia 23 just to taste it. In preparing Austin Mesa for his first visit, she “raved about the fried chicken and the homemade Southern style of cooking,” he says. After his first few bites, he described the fried chicken this way: “It’s crispy, has a good crunch, and is moist.” (For his first meal, Mesa also enjoyed creamed potatoes and gravy, green beans, and mac ‘n’ cheese and was thinking about ordering a fried apple pie to go.) Beverages – tea, lemonade and water – are served in small Mason jars. The lemonade is popular because it comes with ice cubes that have strawberry and orange flavors. All the recipes at Magnolia 23 link to family traditions. “They all are from my mom and my wife’s mother. It’s good ol’ Southern food. It’s what we grew up eating,” Don says. In the warm months, many customers choose to eat outside in the adjacent courtyard. Easy breezes are channeled by tall oaks that provide a canopy over the outdoor tables and cover them with abundant shade. “We serve outside from late April until September,” he adds.

Open for ten years, Magnolia 23 is the first venture in owning a restaurant for the Simmonses, although they had previously operated a catering business, and they have hit a home run. Don notes with pride that the popularity of the restaurant’s fried chicken is recognized by TripAdvisor, the online travel forum, which ranks it as 63rd in the top 100. (How many restaurants serve fried chicken? KFC alone has 18,875 outlets.) Another point of pride for Don is that 60 years ago, as an African-American, he was not able to walk in the front door of most restaurants, and today he owns one. Located at the intersection of Sunset Ave. and Fayetteville St. in the center of Asheboro’s business district, Magnolia 23 occupies one of the historic downtown buildings. The tin ceilings, beadboard along the walls and original floor create a classic setting for an enjoyable lunch. An intimate atmosphere is created by the pictures of the Simmonses’ families that adorn the walkway leading to the back entrance. They are placed among sayings painted on the wall that summarize Don and Doris’ values such as “Family … where life begins and love never ends.” Lunch begins at 11 a.m. on Wednesdays through Fridays and on Sundays. Dinner is also served beginning at 5 p.m. on the three weekdays. Call ahead (336-672-2300) if you want to know the daily selections. National Fried Chicken Day is July 6, so you have plenty of time to plan your adventure. Got extra time? Stroll down Sunset Ave. and enjoy the facades of classic buildings that five-and-dime stores such as Roses once occupied. Check out the antique shops, consignment stores, arts gallery and center, resale boutiques, and flea markets now in these spaces.

Ray Linville writes about local connections to Southern food, history and culture. He can be reached at linville910@gmail.com .

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advice

PLANNING AHEAD

Charitable Giving

by Robin Nutting, Certified Kingdom AdvisorÂŽ, CLTCÂŽ, FIC When developing your estate plan, you can do well by doing good. Leaving money to charity rewards you in many ways. It gives you a sense of personal satisfaction, and it can save you money in estate taxes. A few words about transfer taxes The federal government taxes transfers of wealth you make to others, both during your life and at your death. In 2019, generally, the federal gift and estate tax is imposed on transfers in excess of $11,400,000 and at a top rate of 40 percent. There is also a separate generationskipping transfer (GST) tax that is imposed on transfers made to grandchildren and lower generations. For 2019, there is a $11,400,000 exemption and the top rate is 40 percent. The Tax Cuts and Jobs Act, signed into law in December 2017, doubled the gift and estate tax basic exclusion amount and the GST tax exemption to $11,180,000 in 2018. After 2025, they are scheduled to revert to their pre-2018 levels and cut by about one-half. You may also be subject to state transfer taxes. Careful planning is needed to minimize transfer taxes, and charitable giving can play an important role in your estate plan. By leaving money to charity the full amount of your charitable gift may be deducted from the value of your gift or taxable estate. Make an outright bequest in your will The easiest and most direct way to make a charitable gift is by an outright bequest of cash in your will. Making an outright bequest requires only a short paragraph in your will that names the charitable beneficiary and states the amount of your gift. The outright bequest is especially appropriate when the amount of your gift is relatively small, or when you want the funds to go to the charity without strings attached. Make a charity the beneficiary of an IRA or retirement plan If you have funds in an IRA or employer-sponsored retirement plan, you can name your favorite charity 24

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as a beneficiary. Naming a charity as beneficiary can provide double tax savings. First, the charitable gift will be deductible for estate tax purposes. Second, the charity will not have to pay any income tax on the funds it receives. This double benefit can save combined taxes that otherwise could eat up a substantial portion of your retirement account. Use a charitable trust Another way for you to make charitable gifts is to create a charitable trust. There are many types of charitable trusts, the most common of which include the charitable lead trust and the charitable remainder trust. A charitable lead trust pays income to your chosen charity for a certain period of years after your death. Once that period is up, the trust principal passes to your family members or other heirs. The trust is known as a charitable lead trust because the charity gets the first, or lead, interest. A charitable remainder trust is the mirror image of the charitable lead trust. Trust income is payable to your family members or other heirs for a period of years after your death or for the lifetime of one or more beneficiaries. Then, the principal goes to your favorite charity. The trust is known as a charitable remainder trust because the charity gets the remainder interest. Depending on which type of trust you use, the dollar value of the lead (income) interest or the remainder interest produces the estate tax charitable deduction.


There are costs and expenses associated with the creation of these legal instruments. Why use a charitable lead trust? The charitable lead trust is an excellent estate planning vehicle if you are optimistic about the future performance of the investments in the trust. If created properly, a charitable lead trust allows you to keep an asset in the family while being an effective tax-minimization device. For example, you create a $1 million charitable lead trust. The trust provides for fixed annual payments of $80,000 (or 8 percent of the initial $1 million value of the trust) to ABC Charity for 25 years. At the end of the 25-year period, the entire trust principal goes outright to your beneficiaries. To figure the amount of the charitable deduction, you have to value the 25-year income interest going to ABC Charity. To do this, you use IRS tables. Based on these tables, the value of the income interest can be high — for example, $900,000. This means that your estate gets a $900,000 charitable deduction when you die, and only $100,000 of the $1 million gift is subject to estate tax. Why use a charitable remainder trust? A charitable remainder trust takes advantage of the fact that lifetime charitable giving generally results in tax savings when compared to testamentary charitable giving. A donation to a charitable remainder trust has the same estate tax effect as a bequest because, at your death, the donated asset has been removed from your estate. Be aware, however, that a portion of the donation is brought back into your estate through the charitable income tax deduction. Also, a charitable remainder trust can be beneficial because it provides your family members with a stream of current income — a desirable feature if your family members won’t have enough income from other sources. For example, you create a $1 million charitable remainder trust. The trust provides that a fixed annual payment be paid to your beneficiaries for a period not to exceed 20

years. At the end of that period, the entire trust principal goes outright to ABC Charity. To figure the amount of the charitable deduction, you have to value the remainder interest going to ABC Charity, using IRS tables. This is a complicated numbers game. Trial computations are needed to see what combination of the annual payment amount and the duration of annual payments will produce the desired charitable deduction and income stream to the family. The information provided in these materials, developed by an independent third party, is for informational purposes only and has been obtained from sources considered to be reliable. However, Thrivent Financial does not guarantee that the foregoing material is accurate or complete. The material is general in nature and does not purport to be a complete description of the products, securities, concepts, services, markets, or developments referred to in this material. This information is not intended as a solicitation or an offer to buy or sell any product or service referred to herein. The information does not take into consideration your personal financial or account information. Products mentioned may not be suitable for all individuals. Hypothetical examples are for illustrative purposes only. Past performance may not be indicative of future results. Thrivent Financial representatives and employees cannot provide legal, accounting, or tax advice or services. Work with your Thrivent Financial representative, and as appropriate, your attorney and/or tax professional for additional information. Thrivent Financial and its respective associates and employees have general knowledge of the Social Security tenets; however, they do not have the professional expertise for a complete discussion of the details of your specific situation. For additional information, contact your local Social Security Administration office. THRIVENT FINANCIAL IS THE MARKETING NAME FOR THRIVENT FINANCIAL FOR LUTHERANS. Insurance products issued or offered by Thrivent Financial for Lutherans, Appleton, WI. Not all products are available in all states. Securities and investment advisory services are offered through Thrivent Investment Management Inc., 625 Fourth Ave. S., Minneapolis, MN 55415, a FINRA and SIPC member and a wholly owned subsidiary of Thrivent. Thrivent Financial representatives are registered representatives of Thrivent Investment Management Inc. They are also licensed insurance agents/producers of Thrivent. Fee-based investment advisory services are available through qualified investment advisor representatives only. For additional important information, visit Thrivent.com/disclosures. A Thrivent Financial representative may contact you and financial solutions, including insurance may be solicited. Thrivent Financial representatives who hold the Certified Financial Planner (CFP) the Certified Financial Planner Board of Standards Inc. owns the certification marks CFP®, CERTIFIED FINANCIAL PLANNER™, CFP® (with plaque design) and CFP® (with flame design) in the U.S., which it awards to individuals who successfully complete CFP Board’s initial and ongoing certification requirements. 2068321-032518

Thrivent Financial Robin Nutting, Certified Kingdom Advisor®, CLTC®, FIC 750-A NW Broad St Southern Pines, NC 28387 910-692-5570 robin.nutting@thrivent.com connect.thrivent.com/robin-nutting/

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health

M E N TA L W E L L N E S S

Body Image: Making Peace With Our Inner Critic by Cara Herring, LCSW

Here we are at the beginning of the summer. What does that mean for you? For some it may mean exciting times including travel, nurturing a garden or visits with family. For others, it can be daunting- the dreaded swimsuit season. The inner critic wakes up and yells at you for not losing the weight you planned to lose over the winter or for not exercising as much as you promised yourself you would last year. That inner critic, the inner voice, whom you know so well, though try to ignore when it shames you about your body, can be loud. We learn what body image is early on in childhood. What do our friends look like? What do the movie stars, models and athletes look like? Why do I not look like them? I SHOULD look like them, you tell yourself. Maybe you were teased as a child for being heavier or smaller that your peers. Think back about what you learned from your parents, grandparents, peers and media regarding body sizes and what should and shouldn’t be. These ideas become beliefs and are carried with us throughout our lives. We view others and ourselves based on these beliefs. How do you view someone who is, in your mind, heavier or too thin? Do you think of a certain size person as healthy or unhealthy?

take some time and think what your body has done for you, how it has protected you; how it has healed from accidents; how it is managing medical conditions; how it has birthed your children; or how it has allowed you to have some wonderful experiences. We need to look at our overall health- not just our body size. Considering lab results, well balanced nutritional intake, hydration, moderate exercise, emotional health, social/family support and connections are all inclusive when it comes to our health. Listening to your body is key. Your body is the only one you have so getting to know it, no matter your age, is vital. Having awareness of what your body looks like is healthy as long as there is a balance in how you view your body. What does listening to your body mean? Your body gives you physical cues when you feel hungry, full, tired or when you have enjoyed a nice walk.

Go for it!

It is important to understand your own perception of body image. All bodies are different shapes and sizes, and that’s okay. The size of a person’s body does not necessarily indicate health. Consider shifting your perspective in how you may think of your body: “I’m too heavy.” “I’m too thin.” “I don’t have enough muscle.” “I wish my stomach was flatter.” I encourage you to

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Educating ourselves in order to shift perceptions and making friends with that inner voice will create empathy and move us towards acceptance and a positive attitude towards the only body that we have.

Cara Herring, LCSW, is a Health Coach and Counselor at Pinehurst Medical Clinic, Inc in Pinehurst. She can be reached at 910-235-3347 or cherring@ pinehurstmedical.com.


“

He adopted a role called being a father so that his child would have something mythical and infinitely important: a protector. TOM WOLF

“

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advice

L AW R E V I E W

Proper Estate Planning for Pets: The Pet Trust by Margaret (Mia) Lorenz, Attorney

I have furry children, do you? More than ever, our pets are considered part of our family. Do you ever wonder what would happen to your pet if you become disabled? Or die? Many pets of seniors end up in a shelter upon their owner’s disability or death. These pets are especially hard to rehome because they are usually older and perceived to potentially cost more to care for, and will pass away too soon. Clients of all age express concern to me regarding options for their pets if they are no longer able to care for them, or they die. Many of the estate plans I help create involve provisions for pets upon death or disability. Many clients, upon visiting an estate planning attorney, have clearly thought about their pets and maybe have even identified a person to “take” their pet upon their death. These clients may have thought of a sum of money to give to that person upon the condition that the identified person actually takes the pet. But what if the person takes the pet, gets the specified sum and then dies? – or becomes disabled?– or simply can’t handle the pet after all and gives the pet to a shelter? That person has received money for the purpose of pet care, but that money is not going to “follow the pet.” 28

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A properly drafted North Carolina pet trust can force the money to “follow the pet.” As you probably know, you cannot leave/give money to a named pet; such a bequest is unenforceable in the law. And so, if your will leaves $10,000.00 to your dog, Brandy, the court will not enforce the provision and the bequest will fail. This is because your pet is considered tangible personal property under the law, and such a thing cannot receive money. The law looks at such a bequest as leaving money to a car or piece of furniture – it’s not legally possible. However, in North Carolina, you can leave money to a Trust for the benefit of your dog, Brandy. North Carolina pet trusts are specifically allowed by our North Carolina law. Although certain statutory requirements must be met, there is flexibility in approach, and therefore, I have created varying types of pet trusts in my years of practice. As an example, a client will name a specific amount of money to be distributed to the pet trust for the benefit of the pet. It is important to consider the lifespan of your pet – an exotic bird like a parrot can live a very long time and may need more money in its trust; a dog like a German shepherd that is predisposed to certain hind quarter issues may be worthy of more


money for potential medical costs. Moreover, the pet trust will identify a trustee – the person who manages and controls the money – and a caregiver – the person who actually cares daily for the pet. There is also an “enforcer” who will check in on the pet to make sure the pet is being properly cared for. A client will identify different people for all roles, as well as alternates in the event one of the persons identified dies or resigns. Additionally, the trust directs that the trust monies are distributed by the trustee for the pet’s veterinary bills, food, grooming, medicine, supplies, equipment, boarding, and more. Sometimes clients want the caregiver to receive a stipend. Ultimately, you can direct the circumstances for which the money is used for your pet’s euthanasia (usually only upon the trustee’s receipt of confirmation from a licensed veterinarian that the pet is incurably ill and the pet’s quality of life is minimal). Upon the death of your pet, you direct where remaining funds go – perhaps to your favorite pet charity or to your remaining family. Properly drafted trusts may even begin when you become disabled. Knowing that your move to a nursing facility without your beloved pet will not cause the abandonment of your pet (a trust is funded for the benefit of your pet; therefore your pet’s options of rehoming are better than normal), is a very comforting feeling.

2019

Simply put: Pets can be considered as carefully as family members in a client’s estate plan. If you desire to carefully plan for your pet, be sure to talk with your estate planning attorney about it! There are legal ways to ensure your money follows your pet! Margaret (Mia) Lorenz is an attorney in Southern Pines at Lorenz and Creed Law Firm PLLC, where she helps people with many legal needs such as preparing their wills and/or trusts, helping when a loved one dies, and helping purchase or sell real estate. She has been assisting people with their legal needs for 26 years.   In addition to her husband, John, to whom she has been married for 27 years, she has two children (Matthew and Nicole); three furry children (Brandy (basset beagle hound mix), Mickey and Minnie (cats); and is grandmother to two furry grandchildren (Clif the dog and Aurora, the cat).

2019-2020

Sept. 23.

Ryley Osentoski, at 919-708-1639

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OutreachNC’s 2019

Book Club

This month we’re all abuzz with love for Delia Owens’ Where the Crawdads Sing. Published just a year ago, in August of 2018, Owens’ novel has topped must-read lists across the nation including Reese Witherspoon’s very own book club. The New York Times calls Owens’ debut novel “painfully beautiful,” and People magazine describes Where the Crawdads Sing as “fierce and hauntingly beautiful.” Our staff enjoyed the book so much, our very own Kate Pomplun agreed to provide this month’s

10 Thoughts on

Where the Crawdads Sing

THIS MONTH

1. This book should come with a warning: you will get nothing done until you’ve finished it. Cancel your bridge game; tell your kids it’s pizza for supper. Seriously, you won’t want to put it down. 2. The author, Delia Owens is actually a wildlife scientist and has written nonfiction books about her work. Although her wildlife expertise from which her descriptions come is apparent, it reads like a novel written by someone who has been writing them for years. 3. The way Owens brings the reader into nature and the North Carolina marsh setting will have you packing your bags and longing to head to the coast. 4. Crawdads, also known as crayfish, are actually the fresh water version of lobster…somehow, Jeeves doesn’t think they sound as appealing. 5. The detailed descriptions of birds, their behaviors and their various feathers had Jeeves licking his chops, but is intrinsically woven into the plot of the story so well that even non-bird-lovers can appreciate the importance. 6. In an interview with Owens, she recounts that growing up, her mother encouraged her to be out in nature. In fact, she quotes her mother saying, “Go way out yonder where the crawdads sing.” 7. Subthemes of the parallels of the animal world and human instinct, especially without a flock or pack, are woven creatively into the murder-mystery plot, enriching it to another level. 8. As if her writing wasn’t rich enough in content, suspense and descriptions, Owens also creatively weaves poetry of stars such as Edward Lear and James Wright as Kya, the protagonist, learns to read as a young adult.

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9. Yes, there is a movie being made – it will be produced by Reese Witherspoon, who has long been one of the book’s biggest champions, promoting it to fans of her book club recommendations. We’re thinking this will be an office thing... ending in cocktails. 10. If Jeeves had thumbs, he’d give this one two thumbs up. You’ll be telling all of your friends to read it. That’s it for us this month. We’re looking forward to some adventure and time outdoors in July, when we’ll be reading A River Runs Through It and Other Stories, Norman Maclean’s much-praised collection of short stories. We love sharing books with everyone and anyone who’s got a review, comment, thought, critique or favorite quote to send along. Feel free to write to us at editor@outreachnc.com and let us know your thoughts on Owens’ debut novel and bound-to-be classic.

- Attention Young Writers Get ready for our upcoming

Assignment OutreachNC

Interview a Veteran! This writing contest is open to all school-aged children (5-18 years old).

The winning interview will be published in our November ONC issue. Be sure to pick up our July Issue for the official launch of the contest, along with more information on the rules and prizes!

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Assignment OutreachNC: Pet Pics

WINNERS!

As die-hard animal lovers over here at OutreachNC, we tossed out the idea of a pet pic contest for our June issue. It was one of those random suggestions, at one of those meetings where everyone is fueled on multiple cups of coffee and pastries. Little did we know when we put out the call for pictures how fun it was all going to be. We have spent hours pouring over adorable, clever, endearing pictures of all of your pets. There are cats, dogs, horses and the occasional rabbit, bird or even insect. It’s all a wonderful reminder that pets aren’t always a cat or dog, that animals impact our lives in a myriad of ways and that the love of an animal shines through even in a picture. We struggled immensely choosing the three winners. We had multiple staff meetings, sighed heavily as we narrowed our list and finally invited our First Place Winner to the cottage for what turned out to be an adorable photo shoot. We are excited to announce OutreachNC’s Pet Pic Contest Winners.....(drum roll, please).........

First Place

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Remy is a one-year-old rescued bulldog with personality to spare. He flops in the heat, his tongue slung out the side of his mouth, as he pants, sighs and eventually lowers his entire head to the pavement and gives us sad-sack eyes, pleading for a treat. He was a joy to capture on film, and we are thrilled to know that Remy has a loving home now after a hard start in life.


Second Place

Fiona is another rescued pet. She came to her family from Animal Advocates of Moore County. Originally named Snowflake, her proud new moniker is Fiona Snow Taylor. Her owners tell us Fiona is VERY playful, super cuddly, and a bundle of energy. Guiness is a seven year old male German Shepherd. He is a very athletic boy. Guiness is discerning when it comes to play things; his favorite ball is a lacrosse ball.  He loves to play frisbee. His other favorite activity is swimming.  He loves people especially when they play with him!!  He lives with his brother Cole, a lab/Hound mix, two cats and two horses, so he’s a social pup.

Third Place Here are some of our favorite honorable mentions...

...but wait! There’s more! Just turn the page to see JUNE 2019 | OutreachNC.com 33 more of our reader Pet Pic Contest entries.


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The AOS Staff loves to show off their pets as well. Thank you to everyone who participated in this contest!

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Of course, no Pet Issue would be complete without our fabulous, feline co-editor Jeeves. Here is just a sampling of Jeeves’ photogenic moments.

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Struttin Their Stuff by Jonathan Scott

When Denise Coleman took the stage at the John D. Fuller, Sr. Recreation Complex in Fayetteville and began to sway to the rhythm of Wilson Picket’s “In the Midnight Hour,” she did it with the hip-shaking sass and self-confidence of a woman forty years her junior. That’s because she’s earned her self-confidence from a lifetime of dancing for pleasure. Coleman was taking part in the 2019 Silver Arts Showcase, a part of the NC Senior Games, which is a program sponsored by the NC Division of Aging and Adult Services. Many of us who may have heard of the Senior Games might not know that, in addition to their 27 different sports competitions, the Games also include the Silver Striders walking program and the Silver Arts, a competition with categories for performing arts, cheerleading, visual and literary arts, and crafts. Denise Coleman has lived in Spring Lake, NC since 2004. 40

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As she gradually retired, she started attending classes at the Spring Lake Senior Enrichment Center. There she learned to draw, play pickleball, and make jewelry. It just so happened that the Center’s long-time Director, Doris Snider, was the region’s Silver Arts Coordinator for the Talent Showcase, an annual event put on by the Mid-Carolina Area Agency on Aging. The Showcase brings folks from Cumberland, Harnett and Sampson Counties together to compete and enjoy each other’s special performance skills. Snider discovered that when Coleman went to Cross Creek Mall, she would often dance outside a store where she heard music playing. “I can get all the exercise I want,” Coleman told her. “It’s free and a great way of making friends.” So Snider encouraged Coleman to take to the stage and strut her stuff.


Sharing the event with Coleman were two excellent solo singers, an intense and gifted poet, two lively dance groups, a stand-up comedian, and a rousing choral group that seemed to inspire the audience as profoundly as a zealous preacher. Seven judges were on hand to score each performance. The top scorer from the day was awarded the Gold Medal and will represent the three-county area in Raleigh at the State Finals Silver Arts Follies. Even though Coleman won a first-place prize for her solo act, the pure joy of dancing was the most fulfilling reward. “As we get older, we need to remember when we were kids,” she says.

Ethelyn H. Baker recites her original poem, “Prestigious Sheroes.”

Roma Regis sharing one of her favorite spirituals.

Lorenzo Jones, a bass baritone, singing one of his favorites hymns.

William Doherty performs a standup comedy routine about getting older.

Tokay Rockers, a dance group often invited to perform at community events.

Denise Coleman solo dancing to “In The Midnight Hour.”

“Think back to when you were told, ‘Go outside and do something!’ That’s the best advice now, too.” Coleman, 65, shakes her hips like a 25-year old. “I keep repeating that old saying,” she says with a laugh. “Move it or lose it.”

If you live in either Cumberland, Harnett, or Sampson County and would like to participate in the NC Senior Games for 2020, contact Tracey Honeycutt, Aging Director for the MidCarolina Area Agency on Aging at (910) 3234191, ext. 27, or email her at thoneycutt@mccog. org. In addition to sports and performance arts participants, judges and event sponsors are always needed—as well as folks to just come to the events and support with their appreciation and applause.

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g n i v a S dy n a S

Lessons in the Beauty of Adopting a Senior Pet by Amy Phariss | Photography by Morgan Masson & Mollie Tobias 42

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Years ago, my children began what all children eventually begin: they began asking for a pet. We started small: two fish and a crab. The crab spent his entire life sitting on a spatula stuck outside the fish tank, apparently not at all interested in water. He died one day, a few months after we brought him home, and my son said, “I think he was depressed.”

backyard, me in a 50s housewife dress serving my husband a Tom Collins in a snapshot of Leave it to Beaver bliss. The reality was far less dreamy. That Lab had the energy of a three-year-old after two sheets of birthday cake and an orange soda. The dog ran up and down the yard of the shelter, and all I could think was: dear Lord....no.

The two fish also eventually ‘died’. One was buried in our backyard in a ceremony filled with the angst and tears that only a 9-year-old girl can bring to the table, and the other fish was returned to PetSmart before a move north, which I believe we actually lied to our daughter about. It was not our finest parenting moment.

Just as I began perspiring, watching my son furiously pet this rambunctious Lab and look at me with hopefilled eyes, a volunteer walked in with a dog so quiet, so calm that she looked like royalty. While the Labrador maintained her zest, this dog looked upon us all with what can only be described an air of discernment.

So when my children asked for a dog, an animal that could poop in the yard and slobber on the walls and tear up shoes, I recoiled. I couldn’t imagine taking care of yet another living thing. Two children and an Army husband had me tapped out, and I was certain that if I consented to getting a dog, I’d be in the backyard (probably in my bathrobe), picking up dog poop at the crack of dawn and threatening my children with over-zealous punishments if they didn’t help me out.

I loved her immediately and said, “Can we talk about this dog?”

I said no over and over again. Then, I said no more. My family showed me sad pictures of dogs in need of homes on Facebook, on television, on handmade flyers they found in the neighborhood. I shook my head. Then, one night while putting my son to bed, I said, “Isn’t our life lovely? We are so warm and safe and have everything we need.” He agreed, with one caveat. “The only thing I need is a dog at the end of my bed. Then my life would be perfect.” And there, in the dark of my 11-year-old’s bedroom, my mother’s heart softened just enough to say yes. We headed to Caring Hearts for Canines, a non-profit canine rescue in Southern Pines. We specifically went to look at a 4-year-old Lab, all golden and fluffy. I had images of my children frolicking with a Lab in the

That night, with our daughter still wearing her ballet leotard, we brought Sandy home, and our lives have been forever changed. What drew me to Sandy, beyond her dignified persona, was her age. She was, at the time of her adoption, 8 years old. She had a gray face, and when she moved, it was with the gracefulness of a woman of a certain age. My sister had just adopted a pair of Labs who were older, one of them blind, and I saw the beauty of adopting older dogs. They blended into her home, flopped on the kitchen floor, Duke leading Casanova around the house with his stillworking eyes. They didn’t tear up shoes, cover anyone in slobber or run circles around houseguests, so I figured that if I had a chance at all of becoming a legit dog-mom, an older dog might just be the ticket. Sandy fit the bill perfectly, and in the year she’s been with us, my only regret is that we didn’t find her sooner and don’t have the rest of our lives to love her. There are many reasons to adopt older animals, something I’m not sure I would have considered if I hadn’t watched my sister’s experience. Adopting older pets may be particularly appealing for those of us who have less energy than we did in our youth, when we could take dogs on long runs (hahaha.....I could never do that) or haul a puppy to a lake and keep up with it for hours. As we all live longer and turn the corner on the second half of our lives, a pet with a similar pace and appreciation for life might just be the best decision we’ve ever made. JUNE 2019 |

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Here are 5 Perks to Adopting Older Pets:

No Puppy Phase

While some people adore the puppy phase, many of us don’t have the time or energy to care for a pet who is still hauling our unmentionables outside or gnawing on the edge of the sofa. Older pets are often house-broken, so the all-night-potty-parties of puppyhood aren’t a thing with many older dogs. Older animals can be far less demanding that younger animals, which might just be right for your stage of life or particular situation.

Socialization

Many senior pets have lived with families, spent time with children and have lived with other animals. This means they’re often better socialized and have less anxiety around people and animals. When searching for an older pet to adopt, reputable organizations can help match you with a dog who is good, for example, with other dogs or who is used to being around children. This can be helpful if you have grandkids who visit often or still have children at home.

Less Expense

One of my worries with adopting an older dog was the expense. Would an older dog cost more for veterinary care? According to PetMD, the opposite is true. Puppies cost far more to adopt than older dogs, as puppies need multiple rounds of vaccinations, deworming and often spay/neuter surgeries. For many adult dogs, these issues have already been addressed. Also, adoption fees are often less for adult animals, as they are less in demand. Adoption fees for younger animals can be significantly higher.

What You See is What You Get

Older dogs come with a bit of background and history, which isn’t a bad thing. It means owners can know a little ahead of time about the dog’s temperament, likes and dislikes, fears and openness to other animals and people. Adopting older animals can mean fewer surprises. An animal’s personality is much clearer as an adult, which can be comforting for people (like me) who are new to pet ownership.

The Love and Gratitude

People say older animals and rescue animals know they’ve been helped. I didn’t know if I believed that until we rescued a pet, but I believe it now. Sandy looks at us with eyes that tell a story, the details of which I don’t know but the heart of which I can feel. She says thank you every single day with those eyes, when she reaches out with her paw, when she rests her head against my leg and pushes her nose underneath the arm of my chair. According to the American Animal Hospital Association (AAHA), “Too often, senior pets are euthanized or live out their final days in discomfort and loneliness in shelters because of their age.” Sandy was one of these dogs, spending more time than others in the shelter awaiting adoption. My sister’s dogs were those dogs, their owner having died, with nowhere to go. Animals, like humans, are aware of kindness and are grateful to be loved, and older pets have their own way of showing that love and gratitude. 44

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Our entire family knows how lucky we are to have found Sandy, and we appreciate the time we have with her, knowing she’s older and realizing she has fewer years left to spend with us. We look at her in much the same way she looks at us: with gratitude, love and appreciation. Adopting an older animal has been a blessing for our entire family and enabled me to enter into the pet-owning world in a way I could manage. I’m so grateful for Sandy’s calm demeanor, life experience, patience with a 12-yearold boy and willingness to tag along in our lives without even realizing she’s become the center of it.

Senior pets are often the last to be adopted, putting them at increased risk for euthanasia. Dogs and cats are considered seniors at 7-10 years old. According to the ASPCA, senior dogs make up about 12% of intake at shelters, but the adoption rate is lower than for all other ages combined. Senior dogs are adopted at about a 25% rate; while younger dogs have a 60% adoption rate. Approximately 1.5 million shelter animals are euthanized each year, but 3.2 million shelter animals are adopted each year, with an equal split between cats and dogs. The primary reasons senior dogs end up in shelters include divorce, death of owners, economic hardship (the family can’t afford to continue care), conflict between pets and children, senior dogs are given up in exchange for puppies and Animal Control involvement (hoarding cases, abuse/ neglect, puppy mill raids). Cats and dogs are not the only animals up for adoption. Horses, rabbits, chickens, hamsters, birds and other animals also need loving homes. Websites like www.adoptapet.com allow you to search based on pet type, including reptiles/ amphibians, small animals, farm animals, horses and more. JUNE 2019 | OutreachNC.com 45


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Adventure Awaits! North Carolina Animal Adventures for the Whole Family by Crissy Neville

School is out and you know what that means: long days to fill and special memories to make before you blink and fall is here. For good family fun that is both educational and entertaining, it’s time to let the cat out of the bag: kids love animals! With zoos, aquariums and more from Manteo to Murphy, North Carolina offers a wide range of choices for visiting native, exotic and domestic specimen alike. Not sure where to go? Well, grab the kids or grandkids and come along to take a walk on the wild side this summer. Eleanor Talley, Public Relations Manager for Visit North Carolina, the tourism and marketing arm for the state, likes to see families enjoy our state’s natural resources. “North Carolina offers a wide variety of opportunities for families to experience activities that will generate lasting memories whether it is the first time you see an elephant, a jellyfish, a black bear, or an elk,’ she said. “These experiences are incredibly educational and allow visitors to see the animals up close and personal and often in what is considered their natural habitat.”

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Water Wonders Since it is summer, let’s first head to the beach. No matter where you vacation along the North Carolina coast, choices of aquariums and aquatic attractions abound. A quintessential favorite is the North Carolina Aquarium system. With locations at four spots on the state’s shore, these family favorites help kids learn more about the freshwater and saltwater ecosystems of North Carolina. Youngsters will meet Luna, the albino alligator at Fort Fisher, hand wade in the Tidal Touch Pool at Pine Knoll Shores, count sharks to infinity at Roanoke Island and learn to fish or hang glide at the newest aquarium, Jeannette’s Pier in Nags Head. More water adventures await at the Greensboro Science Center where experiences with aquatic life from otters to stingrays should be met swimmingly well by all ages. They also offer much to see in the land animal world, too. There are fish and invertebrate exhibits at the North Carolina Museum of Natural Resources in Raleigh and for a bit longer road trip, take in the Sea Life CharlotteConcord Aquarium where over 250 species are exhibited. Down east there’s the Walter L. Stasavich Science and Nature Center in Greenville with a 10,000-gallon freshwater aquarium. Additionally, sea turtle enthusiasts will love the Bald Head Island Conservancy and Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center. It would be amiss to visit North Carolina’s seaside and not take a jaunt out to see the famed wild ponies. These feral horses are descendants of original Colonial Spanish Mustangs brought here in the 1500s by early explorers. The herds are found at the far fingers of the Outer Banks at Corolla to the north and Shackleford Banks to the south, along with a smaller, more contained herd on Ocracoke Island. Guided tours, beach walks, jeep safaris, and kayak excursions are all ways visitors enjoy seeing the wild ponies and learning about their history.

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Traversing the state, a must-see for its natural wonder and wildlife is none other than Grandfather Mountain. Towering 5,946 feet above northwest North Carolina, the mountain is a tourist attraction known for its mile-high swinging bridge and hiking trails. It is also a place with amazing biodiversity where one can see cougars, black bears, bald eagles, river otter, and elk in large environmental habitats. There’s even a water feature for viewing native river otters at play. While in the hills, don’t forget to add Western North Carolina Nature Center in Asheville and the Catawba Science Center in Hickory to your shortlist. A unique mountain bucket-list item is elk watching in Haywood County. Home of the Cataloochee Valley, this region welcomes plenty of elk-watching fans of all ages every year since the reintroduction of the elk population in 2001. There are good hiking trails and an Elk Festival coming this fall, though fields are your best bet for seeing one.

Mountain Mania

This natural theme continues at the world’s largest natural habitat zoo found in the center of our state. The North Carolina Zoo in Asheboro is home to more than 1,800 animals. The zoo is divided into the habitat regions of Africa and North America, plus a global desert and a tropical, free-flight aviary. With Zoofari tours, paddle boats, a high ropes course, and exciting events yearround, the NC Zoo is simply a top pick. The state has many smaller zoos dotting the map as well. In the east, some include Tregembo Animal Park in Wilmington, Imagination Station in Wilson, Neuseway Nature Park in Kinston, Clark and Lake Rim Parks in Fayetteville, Animal Edventures in Coats, Aloha Safari Zoo in Cameron, and Lynwood Zoo in Jacksonville. Central in the state, the Museum of Life and Science in Durham has one of the largest butterfly houses on the East Coast and over 6o species of live animals on exhibit. In Raleigh, the Museum of Natural History has an Arthropod Zoo, Living Conservatory and a Reptiles and Amphibian exhibit. Heading west there’s Lazy 5 Ranch in Mooresville, It’s a Zoo Life in Macclesfield, and ZootasticPark of Lake Norman.

Patrol the Parks

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More into birds than beasts? North Carolina also has some unique aviary centers that will leave you happy as a lark. Near the Virginia border, the Sylvan Heights Bird Park in Scotland Neck has over 2,000 waterfowl and exotic birds. Further west, the Carolina Raptor Center is the home of more than 700 injured or orphaned birds including eagles, hawks, owls and other birds of prey. There’s also Wing Haven Gardens and Bird Sanctuary in Charlotte. New to the NC Aquarium at Fort Fisher this spring is Lorikeet Landing, a free-flying bird area for these bright and beautiful tropical birds. For a more adventurous outing try the exotic flavor of the Conservators Center in Burlington, home to lions, tigers, leopards, wolves and jungle cats. In a similar fashion, the Carolina Tiger Rescue in Pittsboro is a non-profit wild cat sanctuary featuring a variety of cat species. The Duke Lemur Center in Durham keeps the drama of exotic going but with the less-threatening primates on stage.

Exciting Exotics Finally, lest we forget from whence we came, agritourism in North Carolina is a booming industry, and according to Talley, one that “highlights everything from the pick your own to the come interact with animals” themes. Agritourism farms with an animal interaction component include places like Crystal Pines Alpaca Farm in Carthage which offers hay rides, farm tours and encounters with alpacas, donkeys, goats, sheep and more. Other similar farms that welcome visitors are Dunn’s Educational Farm in Robbins, Flint Rock Farm in Cameron, Tyfton Acres in Hamlet, West Produce in Spring Lake, and countless others.

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Farm Fun


To find out more about the operating hours, prices and locations of all of these great venues go to Visit North Carolina’s website found at www.visitnc.com. Consider helping your young companions document their animalrelated travels through journaling, photography, or scrapbooking. Brainstorm questions to ask and research facts about the animals before you go. Take time as you go through a particular park or site to read the information together and learn something new. Enjoy your summer together, one animal at a time.

BONUS!

Just where are all of these adventures located in the state? This handy map will show you! 11 14 17

5 30 16 28 32 7

15

33 34

37 26

35

31 6 27

36 18 39 38 40 23 41

24 42

20

34

29 8 21

13

22

Water Wonders

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1. Fort Fisher Aquarium

Mountain Mania

2. Pine Knoll Shores Aquarium

14. Grandfather Mountain

3. Roanoke Island Aquarium

15. Western NC Nature Center | Asheville

4. Jeannette’s Pier | Nags Head

16. Catawba Science Center | Hickory

5. Greensboro Science Center

17. Haywood County

19 1 9

2 12

10

Exciting Exotics

6. North Carolina Museum of Natural Resources | Raleigh

Patrol the Parks

31. Sylvan Heights Bird Park | Scotland Neck

18. The North Carolina Zoo | Asheboro

32. Carolina Raptor Center | Huntersville

7. Sea Life Charlotte-Concord Aquarium

19. Tregembo Animal Park | Wilmington

33. Wing Haven Gardens | Charlotte

8. Walter L. Stasavich Science and Nature Center | Greenville

20. Imagination Station | Wilson

34. Bird Sanctuary | Charlotte

21. Neuseway Nature Park | Kinston

35. Conservators Center | Burlington

22. Clark and Lake Rim Parks | Fayetteville

36. Carolina Tiger Rescue | Pittsboro

23. Animal Edventures | Coats

37. The Duke Lemur Center | Durham

11. Corolla

24. Aloha Safari Zoo | Cameron

Farm Fun

12. Shackleford Bank

25. Lynwood Zoo | Jacksonville

13. Ocracoke Island

26. Museum of Life and Science | Durham

9. Bald Head Island Conservancy 10. Karen Beasley Sea Turtle Rescue and Rehabilitation Center.

27. Museum of Natural History | Raleigh 28. Lazy 5 Ranch | Mooresville 52

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29. It’s a Zoo Life | Macclesfield 30. ZootasticPark of Lake Norman

38. Crystal Pines Alpaca Farm | Carthage 39. Dunn’s Educational Farm | Robbins 40. Flint Rock Farm | Cameron 41. Tyfton Acres | Hamlet 42. West Produce | Spring Lake


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Debbie Gillis, Owner of Leilani Mae Horse Rescue 54

by Crissy Neville | Photography by Morgan Masson OutreachNC.com | JUNE 2019


With pony-tail bobbing to and fro, the bluejean clad horsewoman delivers hay and feed from barn to trough with the consistency of a pendulum. It takes a long while to get all 28 wards good and fed. From behind, her blonde hair and petite figure are a reflection of the young horse-crazy girl she was back in her native Ohio. Turning around, however, her furrowed brow, wise-to-the-world eyes, and calloused hands betray the youthful countenance. For Debbie Gillis, owner of Leilani Mae Horse Rescue in Linden, a small community in northern Cumberland County, the worry and work never seems to end. But yet, she wouldn’t trade any of it for the world. “Let’s just put it this way,” she explained matter-offactly. “If I had not started all of this, I would not be here right now.” Referring to the PTSD symptoms that follow her like a moth to light, Gillis says it took her years to admit she has the condition that she has seen in so many of the soldiers that come to her farm near Ft. Bragg seeking solace and peace and some four-legged therapy. Like so many, she finds help by taking her mind and attention away from her own troubles. As she helps others, in this case, horses, Gillis can better face her own struggles. Gillis started Leilani Mae Horse Rescue in 2009 in response to the inhumane treatment of horses she found prevalent in the US. Being the horse lover she

is, she could not turn a blind eye to the issue. The retired Army First Sergeant sat down at her country home with OutreachNC’s Crissy Neville recently to discuss her labor of love to help horses, others, and herself. Crissy Neville: You have a lovely farm here, with an even prettier name. Who was Leilani Mae? Debbie Gillis: She was my mother, named after the song Sweet Leilani that was popular in the 40s. She was a horse advocate, an animal advocate really. When she was a child in Minnesota she rode a Percheron to school every day in the fall and spring. Not in the winter, of course. This was in the late 1940s to early 1950s. She told me she would let Old Joe go and he would just wait for her outside the school. I said, oh yeah, right Mom, but then I realized those rural schools had nothing but grass around them so I am sure he did hang around. CN: Was it your mother who instilled in you a love for horses and riding? DG: Indirectly, yes, but I was raised by my grandparents. I started riding and working with horses at age 11. I lived in the city but my grandparents’ friends had horses. I rode my bike 5 miles out to their house all the time. I was out there about every night, and I knew someday I would have a horse of my own.

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CN: And now all these years later, after a distinguished Army career, here you are in the country with lots of horses. Ones you rescue. Did you buy this farm for that purpose? DG: No, it was an accident. Originally, after 24 years in the Army and over 100 missions, I was ready to settle into the quiet country life. I had been able to keep riding throughout my career and was ready to finally get my own horse. And, I had always wanted a wild Mustang. Right after moving here, I went to the online adoption site for the Bureau of Land Management and bought Red Cloud. I still have him; he’s 10 now. Through his adoption, I learned the plight of horses here in America. I learned what is really happening to horses. And I was shocked.

wormers, Phenylbutazone, (Bute) and different things that cause cancer if consumed by humans. So now they are trying to come up with new laws in Canada and Mexico that the horses have to be tested but it is only random. If it was not such a money maker for the kill buyers and such a big industry it would not be happening. CN: This cannot be legal for these buyers to purchase these horses for slaughter. This happens here in the US?

DG: It is illegal here in the U.S. for horses to be killed for human consumption so the horses that are in the kill pens get transported to Canada and Mexico where it is legal. And the horses are kept in appalling conditions until time for them to ship. No one in this CN: Shocked? state has a contract license to What did you discover? Canada or Mexico, so the killbuyers here are middlemen. DG: What I found out was “I think every They fill a trailer full of about that nearly 150,000 American 32 horses and take them to horse is horses went to slaughter back Pennsylvania or Virginia to in 2014-15. Last year it was deserving of one of the men that do have closer to 80,000. Of the ones the contract license, and this life or a that go to slaughter, 93% of happens about every two the horses are under the age humane death.” weeks. Many horses don’t of 10, healthy, and should survive this road trip. It is have never been there, but it awful. The horses are trucked is big money racket. I think for more than 24 hours at a every horse is deserving of time without food or water. A lot are trampled life or a humane death. We are not even talking to death. about a humane death; it is horrific. CN: Why are horses being slaughtered? Is that legal here in the States? DG: They are slaughtered for their meat to satisfy overseas diners in countries such as Germany, Italy, France, Belgium and Japan. They actually use all their parts; the kill-buyers even cut off their tails as they are going into the pen to be slaughtered. The kill-buyers will go to auctions and bid up to meat price on the horses, even a little above now. The only reason for the decline is that the Europeans have learned that American horses are carcinogenic; we give them

CN: What is the answer to this issue? You work so hard to save the ones you can, but you cannot save them all. DG: The answer is to stop horse slaughter; to stop the transportation of our horses to other countries and to require responsible horse ownership. Horses are treated by many like disposable objects and are considered livestock in our state, but they are raised by the human hand. Cows and pigs are not our pets, are not petted or ridden. Horses are coddled and loved. They are domestic and they think differently.

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There is a reason why they are used as therapy animals. One hope we have right now is the The Safeguard American Food Exports (SAFE) Act. It is federal legislation that would prevent the horse slaughter industry from reestablishing in the U.S. and prohibit the export of American horses abroad for slaughter. Of course, antihorse-slaughter bills have been introduced in each Congress for the past decade, but not one has passed into law. We’ll see what happens this time.

CN: Do you have any help? With so many horses to care for and ones with special needs at that, you must stay very busy.

DG: We have a wonderful neighbor who is a veterinarian, Dr. Brian Garrett. He helps us with the horses’ medical needs, and if it was not for him, we could not keep going. We also get schoolkids and soldiers from Ft. Bragg on the weekends but we could really use more volunteers during the week. They help with feeding, grooming, barn work, grounds keeping, fundraisers, social media, and things CN: Do you rescue horses in any other ways? like that. Anyone who What horses do you have would like to help can find right now for adoption? “As for the soldiers who out more at our website DG: I get calls locally about come regularly, being www.leilanimaehorserescue. horses that need homes. with the horses seems com. Some come from animal to be helping them too. CN: You mentioned before control and from auctions Sometimes they do not the horses are part of your but most are headed to kill pens. Some of the want to talk about their own personal therapy, ones we have are sick and feelings and problems but Leilani Mae is not never get better and will a therapy center. Is this but they just want to die here but others are a natural byproduct of come out here and very much adoptable. I working with horses? help and hang out.” have 25 rescues now and DG: Oh yes, they are my three of my own. We have therapy, and yes, horses are Arabians, Thoroughbreds, Paints, Haflinger, soothing. To me, doing all this is plenty worth Morgan cross, Appendix, Quarter Horses and all the work; I am lucky. As for the soldiers who Mustangs, all from age 2 to 36. We work on come regularly, being with the horses seems to medical issues, grooming and training to get be helping them too. Sometimes they do not all the ones that can be adopted able to go to want to talk about their feelings and problems a new home, but about half of the ones here but they just want to come out here and help are permanent residents. Take Lindsey, the and hang out. I understand. They just do what Quarter Horse mare (pointing), for example. they need to do, and I do, too. She has navicular, severe arthritis in the pastern bones. And then there’s Divinci, the Quarter Horse paint (pointing). He has what you might say is PTSD from past abuse. I cannot in good conscience let horses like these go.

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GREY MATTER See Grey Matter Puzzle Answers on Page 64

Puzzle 18 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49)

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DACHSHUND DALMATIAN DOBERMAN GREAT DANE GREYHOUND HAVANESE HOUND KEESHOND KOMONDOR MALAMUTE

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17. The Garden State ACROSS 19. __, myself and I 1. Ancient Rome had one 7. Engagement rings tend 20. Gets up 22. Type of meal to have them 23. Cavalry sword 13. Not the leader 62 OutreachNC.com25. | JUNE 2019 Proclaims 14. Decorated 26. Historic places 16. Morning

28. They go into space 29. Hostelry 30. Peter’s last name 31. Necessary for syrup 33. Kids’ channel 34. Take upon oneself 36. A bog

9. Small Eurasian deer 10. Ancient people 11. The Volunteer State 12. Academic term 13. Natives of Alberta, Canada 15. Cause to become insane 18. Feed 21. Crime organization 24. Acrobatic feats 26. Car mechanics group 27. Mustachioed actor Elliott 30. Inquired 32. S. Korean industrial city 35. Member of the cuckoo family 37. Test for high schoolers 38. Some nights are these 39. Helps you stay organized 42. Cool! 43. Genus containing pigs 46. An opinion at odds 47. Types of bears 49. Smartphones give them 50. Nobel physicist Hans DOWN 52. Where rock stars work 1. Resembling apes 54. Your car needs it 2. Famed TV host Sullivan 55. Dutch name for Ypres 3. Rare Hawaiian geese 57. Go after 4. Convicted traitor 59. Cold wind 5. Make into leather 62. Examines animals 6. Urge to do something 63. Popular island alcohol 7. Small town in Spain 66. Northeast 8. They promote products 68. Indicates position


SHE SIGHTS A BIRD – SHE CHUCKLES EMILY DICKINSON She sights a Bird — she chuckles — She flattens — then she crawls — She runs without the look of feet — Her eyes increase to Balls — Her Jaws stir — twitching — hungry — Her Teeth can hardly stand — She leaps, but Robin leaped the first — Ah, Pussy, of the Sand, The Hopes so juicy ripening — You almost bathed your Tongue — When Bliss disclosed a hundred Toes — And fled with every one — JUNE 2019 |

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life

OVER MY SHOULDER

Well Done, Dads and Grads by Ann Robson

Fathers raising children alone are becoming more numerous. They have to do the work of mother and father, learning on the job. Often the mothers of these single dads are their main backup. While we have praised and supported single moms for years, we’re just getting used to having single dads as part of our society.

In June we celebrate “Dads and Grads”, recognizing that without the former, the latter wouldn’t happen. Father’s Day has been an official holiday only since 1972 when Richard Nixon signed it into law. It has a long history of being a political football, starting with Woodrow Wilson who proposed a national recognition of fathers parallel to the recent proclamation of celebrating mothers on the second Sunday in May passed in 1914. His advisers discouraged him saying that commercial interests might enter into the celebration. Calvin Coolidge ran into the same opposition. The proposal to recognize fathers was defeated by Congress for several years. Lyndon Baines Johnson brought the matter up in 1966 but it took 6 more years to become official.

There’s a problem with any celebration. What if you didn’t have a great dad? We have to admit there are some cases where dads have not been loving, supportive role models. On Father’s Day it’s not easy to say “thanks, job well done” to such men. Usually the children of these fathers have found another role model. The card companies have cards for those who’ve been “like a father.” Grads have earned our appreciation for their achievements. High School grads going on to college will graduate again. College is not for every high school grad. We need to recognize there are many other worthwhile pursuits after high school which are just as important to society as a college degree. We applaud all our grads and wish them well.

Around the world many countries have celebrated fathers for centuries, often on March 19, the feast of St. Joseph. Several parts of our country held special services for fathers at different times of the year. The official proclamation set the third Sunday in June as a day to honor fathers.

Although they poured cold water on Wilson’s wish, it On June 16 let’s remember all the little things our dads have seems his advisors were correct in their predictionPuzzle about Puzzle 13 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.45) 14 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49) Puzzle 15 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.59) commercialization. There is no official day for grads so done for us --- reading us a bedtime story, getting up in 6 1 9 7 5 8 3 4 2 1 8 2 3 6 5 7 9 4 8 5 7 4 6 2 9 1 3 some crafty greeting card person decided to combine dads the middle of the night to rescue a pet cat in the pouring 5 double 8 3 4their 6 opportunity 2 1 7 9 for marketing 9 3 5 rain, 8 teaching 7 4 2 us6how 1 to drive, showing 9 1 6 us 3how 8 to5be 2a good 4 7 and grads and 7 4 2 3 9 1 6 5 8 7 6 4 citizen, 9 2 loving 1 3 our 5 moms. 8 3 4 2 9 7 1 6 5 8 and sales. 9 commercial 7 4 5 8 reasons, 3 2 honoring 6 1 4 and 1 Regardless of the fathers 5 are 1 graduating 6 2 9 7from 8 either 4 3 5 their children 3who high school or college is very 8 2nice 6 thing. 1 4 In7 all5 of 9the3 festivity, fathers 2 7 should still come first. They are the ones who went to 1 9 8 2 7 5 4 3 6 6work 9 every day to earn a living for their families. Fathers do much 4 3 5 8 1 6 9 2 7 5 4 more than earn a living; they are partners with their spouses 2 6 7 9 3 4 8 1 5 8 2 in raising a child or children.

GREY MATTER ANSWERS

Puzzle 16 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.50) CROSSWORD

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Ann Robson is the author of “Over My 7 2 7 8 4 5 2 3 1 9 Shoulder: Tales of Life and Death and Everything In Between.” 8 3 6 9 5 She 8 can 1 7be 3 2 reached at overmyshoulder@charter.net .

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ASK THE EXPERT – Age with Success

Educational Series

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Generations

OutreachNC asked adults and children our June question. Share your answer on our Facebook page.

If you could talk to an animal, which would you choose and why? I would talk to a horse. They are so calming and have such a presence; yet they can be scared of a real estate sign or piece of trash. I’d love to know more about that. – Amy, 43 A cow. I’d ask it what it feels like to just stand there all day. – Bryce, 7 I would talk to lots of animals, because they’re wonderful. – Margie, 77 I would talk to my own dog because she does a lot of weird stuff and I want to know why! – Dana, 43 A dog. Of course. They are the smartest animals and probably have the most to say about humans. – Timmy, 9 A red-tailed hawk, so it could tell me what it’s like to fly. – Bart 69 A panda. I’d ask if he can speak Chinese. – Bobby, 12 A snake. I’d ask it why it has to be so menacing and scary. – Ann, 72 If I could talk to an animal I think it would most definitely be Jeeves! I would love to know where he runs off to, how many different humans he has trained to feed him, why he randomly bites me sometimes, and I would be interested to hear his opinion of me and his life at AOS. – Erica, 32 I think there are much more interesting animals than dogs, but I’ve got decades of exposure, so I would talk to my dog. Dogs aren’t all that bright, but they have an unlimited amount of lying around time and can use that time to figure out a lot of things. Such as, how to escape the yard, how to get the chocolate out of a Hershey’s Kiss wrapper, how to express guilt and sorrow to stop a scolding. I’d like the dog to reveal how much if her behavior is motivated by emotion (escape the yard to find a person to hang out with?); by reasoning (droop the eyes and no more “Bad dog!”?); a combination (get the chocolate?). Most importantly: just what is going on in there, in the dog’s brain? – Jim, 69

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Giraffe. I want to know what it’s like to be tall. – Joseph, 9 I would talk to a cat to ask them why they like boxes so much. – Sheila, 68 An eagle because it would be a good source of reliable communication and I could get an areal view of what I can’t see. – Michael, 34 I’d talk to rescued dogs...about their lives before they were rescued and their thoughts on the families they live with now. – Bobbie, 72 I’d talk to a monkey. I love them. – Chase, 5 I would like to talk to a dog to ask them what their barks mean. – Rachael, 68 I would talk to a migratory bird and ask about their travels. How far have they come? What interesting things have they seen along the way? Why have they chosen to come to my feeder? – Ashley, 30 A cheetah. No, no. A horse because they are sweet and nice. I like to feed them. – Madison, 8 I would like to talk to a skunk about how dirty he is. – Sally, 84 A woodpecker. I’d tell it to stop pecking patterns into the tree outside my front window. – Sylvia, 59 A lambie. I love lambs. I’d say, “I love you.” – Louisa, 3 If I could talk to an animal I would choose to talk to a bird so it could be a spy for me. – Ashley, 23 I’d want to talk to the Easter Bunny. Maybe he’d give me more candy! – Jonah, 5 I’d want to talk to a giraffe. But the awesomeness of finding a talking giraffe would leave me speechless. – Elizabeth, 7


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