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COMPLIMENTARY

Our 8th Anniversary Issue

FEBRUARY 2018 | VOL. 9, ISSUE 2

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Family Affair

Serving the Sandhills & Southern Piedmont

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Brought to You by

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March 2 - 4, 2018 | The Fair Barn 200 Beulah Hill Road S, Pinehurst, NC

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OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018


THE 2018

Holly & Ivy Dinner

Celebrating

Mardi Gras at The Holly Inn Tuesday, February 13, 2018

Cocktails at 6:30pm • Dinner at 7:30pm $125 Per Person Tickets available January 5, 2018 A Special Benefit for the Given Memorial Library & Tufts Archives MARDI GRAS attire is encouraged, but optional Make your reservations at www.giventufts.org For more information call 910-295-6022 FEBRUARY 2018 |

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features FEBRUARY 2018

26 Carolina Conversations: Dr. Ellen Willard by Michelle Goetzl

34 NC Birding Trails Series: Hinson Lake by Ray Linville

40 Identifying Resources by David Hibbard

42 Navigating Healthcare Dilemmas by Jennifer Webster

56 6 Ways to Strengthen Your Village by Rachel Stewart

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A Family Affair Issue


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departments February 2018

“Family means no one gets left behind or forgotten.” – David Ogden Stiers, actor, “Lilo & Stitch”

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advice & health

50 life

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Ask the Expert by Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA

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14

Planning Ahead by Tim Hicks, RICP, APMA

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Lessons Learned by Ann Robson

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Brain Health by Taeh Ward, PhD

22

Cooking Simple by Scott Margolis & Leslie Phillips

Tech Savvy Adding Your Phone Number to the National Do Not Call Registry

50

The Reader’s Nook by Michelle Goetzl

54

Did You Know? National Donor Day

61

Over My Shoulder by Ann Robson

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32

Role Reversal by David Hibbard Heart Health by Ellen Cooper

62

39

Resource Marketplace Find the resources you need.

52

Eye Health Arghavan Almony, M.D.

66

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Genealogy by Ashley Eder

Grey Matter Games Sudoku, word search and crossword puzzles Generations by Nancy Pardue & Michelle Goetzl

FEATURING FOOD, FAMILY, AND FUN!


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from the publisher

A

s we embark on our eighth year of publishing OutreachNC Magazine, we are excited to celebrate the journey with you, our readers and advertisers. What began as a newsletter to educate the community has grown into a 68-page publication we are extremely proud of. OutreachNC magazine is a part of the Aging Outreach Services family, where our vision is to help older adults and their families navigate aging with success. We have discovered that the variety of educational columns in OutreachNC, combined with entertaining features, recipes, puzzles and amazing photography, appeals to all ages. Our reader feedback has helped to guide our path and we are thankful to each of you. We welcome your continued emails, letters, questions and comments. One of my favorite things about the magazine is its the ability to reach those in more rural areas who are in need of resources and information. The advertisers who support the magazine make this possible. They share our passion for making the most of life and facing challenges with the tools needed to successfully navigate each one. This journey we have been on has taken us to every corner of North Carolina and we continue to find people we want to get to know better, things that delight us, and places worthy of exploration. The content we provide is timeless, and can be read over and over again. Our expert team is here to serve, learn, educate, and draw you in with our stories. We hope you enjoy reading the magazine as much as we delight in bringing it to you each month. As we continue down this path, we will be introducing you to guest editors who have agreed to share their talents and experiences. We thank Editor Carrie Frye for her many years of dedicated service and wish her well as she continues on her own journey. We also are excited to welcome Kim Gilley and her talented team at Village Printers as our Creative Director. Kim has been an OutreachNC reader since the first issue. Her enthusiasm and talents will provide us with a visual product that will help us continue to grow and evolve. Great things are ahead, and we sincerely thank you for eight wonderful years.

Media Award Winner 2012

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Media Award Winner 2014

OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018

Merit Award Winner Magazine Editorial

—Amy Natt

Merit Award Winner Magazine Editorial

Bronze Award Winner Magazine Editorial


Reader Letters Guest Editors Nancy Pardue | Editor@OutreachNC.com Creative Director Kim Gilley | The Village Printers Creative & Graphic Designer Sarah McElroy | The Village Printers Ad Designers Stephanie Budd, Nikki Lienhard, Cyndi Fifield Proofreaders Ashley Eder, Ray Linville, Kate Pomplun, Rachel Stewart Photography Brady Beck, Diana Matthews, Mollie Tobias Contributors Ellen Cooper, Ashley Eder, Michelle Goetzl, David Hibbard, Tim Hicks, Ray Linville, Scott Margolis, Leslie Philip, Ann Robson, Rachel Stewart, Taeh A. Ward, PhD, Jennifer Webster

Y Publisher Amy Natt | AmyN@AgingOutreachServices.com Marketing & Public Relations Director Susan McKenzie | SusanM@AgingOutreachServices.com Advertising Sales Executive Ashley Haddock | AshleyH@OutreachNC.com 910-690-9102 Advertising Sales Executive & Circulation Manager Butch Peiker | ButchP@OutreachNC.com 904-477-8440 OutreachNC PO Box 2478 | 676 NW Broad Street Southern Pines, NC 28388 910-692-9609 Office | 910-695-0766 Fax info@OutreachNC.com

W

e’d love to hear from you!

Email letters to Editor@OutreachNC.com, or mail to P.O. Box 2478, Southern Pines, NC 28388.

“My children made the decision to place me in the facility where I currently reside, after it became obvious that living alone was no longer a healthy or workable option. … I despised it at first. … I was wrong. Being in this world has greatly enriched my life. “Having the stress in my life reduced has allowed me to have a richer, even deeper experience with my children. They don’t have the worry about me to cloud their visits, and I don’t have the stress of resisting their efforts at caretaking to cloud mine. I have made true, engaging, fun friends that I can’t imagine having missed out on. I thought I had done it all, that growth was behind me. Now I understand it is always possible. Most of all, my time here has allowed me to deepen my faith, allowed deeper meditation and reflection. “If you need to find assisted living for a loved one, or are thinking about it for yourself, take it from me, it’s a very good option. … Do your homework. Check the background of the facility you are considering. Drop in, meet the staff. Make an informed choice. “… These are true homes, where living, learning, happiness, joy and lots of laughter are very present. Assisted living IS living, assisted.” — Imogene Holmes, Lillington, age 91 Editor’s note: Submitted comments may be edited for length or clarity.

www.OutreachNC.com

OutreachNC is a publication of The entire contents of OutreachNC are copyrighted by Aging Outreach Services. Reproduction or use without permission of editorial, photographic or graphic content in any manner is prohibited. OutreachNC is published monthly on the first of each month.

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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advice

Our Aging Life Care ProfessionalsTM will answer any aging questions you may have.

Email us your questions! info@OutreachNC.com

ASK THE EXPERT

Pre-planning For Peace of Mind by Amy Natt, MS, CMC, CSA I have a trip planned to play golf with some old college friends and my wife prefers to stay at home. I am concerned about leaving her for four days, as she has some memory issues. Our daughter offered to come stay, but my wife does not want to bother her and insists she will be fine. What can I do to make sure she is ok while I am gone?

A golf trip with the boys sounds like great fun. We all need to get away and reset at some point. Your wife is probably more comfortable at home, where she has her routine and familiar things around her. Memory issues can be tricky, because a person can be fairly independent and high functioning, but still forget to eat or take a medication, get lost while driving, or have difficulty managing an unexpected event. There are some basic safeguards you can put in place to ensure you have peace of mind while away and ensure she enjoys her time at home. Planning for a crisis can often be the best way to avoid one. Here are some things to consider doing before you go: 1. Post your phone number and location on the refrigerator, so that she can easily contact you if necessary. This will also serve as a reminder if she forgets you are away and is looking for you. You can post it in a couple of locations with a reminder of when you will be home. The bathroom mirror or beside the phone can be good places as well.

2. Find a neighbor or friend who can check in daily to make sure things seem to be going well. If your daughter was willing to come, she would most likely be able to call her mom at the start and end of each day to check in. Make sure your daughter has the name and number of the local friend or support person, so she has someone to call if her mom does not answer. 3. Consider an emergency alert pendant. This would give your wife a quick

and easy way to call for help, if she were to fall or need assistance. 4. Preplan meals and leave them clearly labeled with instructions to heat them up. This will make it easy for her, and the friend (or caregiver) checking in can see if she is eating routinely. 5. Pre-plan social outings. If your wife enjoys socializing with friends, arrange several outings to keep her active while you are away. 6. Consider setting up a medication box or ask the pharmacy to set one up, for

the week you are away. This will be an easy way to monitor or prompt medications to be

Readers may send questions to Amy Natt, an Aging Life Care ProfessionalTM, certified senior advisor and CEO of Aging Outreach Services. She can be reached at amyn@agingoutreachservices.com .

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taken on the correct schedule. 7. Provide an extra key to a friend or neighbor, so that if she accidentally gets locked out, someone has a way to let her back in. 8. Check with the hospital and make sure all Power of Attorney and Living Will / End of Life planning documents are on file with medical records. If an emergency did occur, this would enable you to act from a distance. 9. Create a current medication, medical history and health care provider list for your wife. If she

does require medical attention while you are gone, she may not be able to quickly come up with those answers. Leave a copy at home and bring a copy with you. 10. If your wife no longer drives, you should put the keys up where she cannot find them. You can leave her a note with contact information for a friend, caregiver or local transportation service. Let those resources know that you are away and that she may be calling. You have an opportunity to enjoy a weekend away, so the most important thing is that you take advantage of that time. Reduce your risk of worry as much as possible with some pre-planning and back up support in place.

Home Care Confidence From The Name Built On Trust. You want the best for mom and dad. Talk to us. After all, we’ve been building a foundation of trusted companionship for over 60 years, so you can be confident of our care and comfort. Call us. We’re here when you need us. Always.

910.246.1011 Nurse aides, companions & registered nursing services A Trinity Senior Living Community continuing the legacy of the Sisters of Providence Moore • Hoke • Cumberland Robeson • Harnett • Lee Counties sjp.org

Where’s Betty Builder? When it comes to building houses our “Betty Builder” is quite skilled, But with only a tool belt and hardhat now a wardrobe she must build. The “Hard Hats and Heels” fashion show, held at CCNC this spring, Will benefit the 2018 Women Build Project and that’s a very good thing! Our models will be wearing fashion from eleven boutiques in town And each shop Betty visits she’ll be dressed in a different gown. So for all of us the challenge is to find Betty each time she moves, But don’t get in a tizzy because she’ll give us several clues. For a chance at the prize, Solving the clues is all you need, You can find them on our website Or Sunday’s Pilot you can read. Now once you know where Betty is Ask the clerk for your entry card, Then for ten more weeks, find Betty again!! Have fun......it’s not that hard.

Save the Date Hard Hats and Heels Fashion Show Thursday, March 15th 2018  6:00 pm Country Club of North Carolina General Admission $60  VIP Seating $80 Vendor Tables $100 Visit our website to purchase tickets or tables www.sandhillshabitat.org

Weekly Clues: Find Betty at one of our participating boutiques. Tell them “Sally Sent Me” Register to Win!

$250.00 Shopping Spree Weekly clues can be found at www.sandhillshabitat.org, Facebook @sandhillshabitat, and The Pilot on Sunday www.sandhillshabitat.org (910) 295-1934

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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life

GENEALOGY

Determining Ethnicity Leads to More

O

by Ashley Eder

ne of my favorite aspects of genealogy involves using DNA analysis to estimate your ethnic background and connect with unknown relatives. I have always been profoundly interested in confirming my ethnicity, as it has been a highly contentious topic among friends and relatives. My father’s side of the family adamantly proclaimed 100 percent German ethnicity, whereas my mother’s side of the family claimed a Heinz 57 mixture of Irish, Scottish, English and Italian. Most people I meet assume I am of Hispanic origin or Middle Eastern descent due to the combination of my olive complexion, dark hair and dark eyes, and rarely do they believe me when I tell them otherwise. What is even more surprising is that my brother is my polar opposite, with dark blond hair, blue eyes and a pale complexion. Since DNA is inherited randomly, I assumed I had inherited more Italian genes, while my brother inherited more of the Irish, Scottish and English side. I decided to put the speculation to rest and ordered a DNA test. While I anxiously awaited the results, I prepared myself for what I might find. Would I prove or disprove my family’s claims? How seriously would I shake the family tree if I found an unexpected ethnicity?

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After six long weeks, my questions were answered with the arrival of the test results. Ancestry.com estimates my ethnicity as 41 percent Europe West, which includes countries such as Germany, France and Luxembourg; 19 percent Ireland/Scotland/Wales; 17 percent Europe South, which includes areas such as Italy and Greece; and 11 percent Great Britain. The remaining 12 percent of my DNA was split among several regions, including Europe East, Finland/Russia, Scandinavia and the Iberian Peninsula. However, the percentages are so small I may have matched purely by coincidence. Honestly, I was disappointed that my results bore no surprises. Confirming my suspected ethnicity, I decided to order additional DNA tests for my parents and maternal grandfather. Ancestry.com not only provides DNA ethnicity estimates but also DNA matches to other people who have tested using one of their kits. This service can match you to others sharing your DNA, from immediate family members up to fourth and sixth cousins. With my new results netting more than 250 matches — most of them unknown relatives — I decided to reach out to several to connect and determine our closest shared ancestor. These matches have been a fundamental part of confirming my family tree. My most unexpected discovery was a new first cousin match that I decided to investigate. After viewing our shared matches, I determined he was a closer match to my maternal grandfather.


Much to my surprise, I had matched to my grandfather’s only son — my half-uncle — who was adopted in a closed adoption. My grandfather had searched for years but was never able to identify or locate his biological son. This discovery brought many questions, but it also brought closure to both my newfound uncle and my grandfather. A simple search connected my uncle with our family, including his five new sisters. We are all thankful that DNA testing has advanced and become accessible to everyone, as we would not have made this wonderful discovery otherwise. There is much sensitivity surrounding DNA testing, so be sure to ask yourself these questions prior to embarking on this part of the journey: Am I prepared to encounter an unexpected result, such as a non-paternal event or ethnicity surprise? Will I share the unexpected result with other family members, or keep the information to myself? You may uncover uncomfortable information, so it is important to take the time necessary to process your results. Keep an open mind on your journey to discovering your ancestry; there may be a welcome surprise as you begin to turn over each new leaf.

Ashley Eder developed a passion for genealogy while researching her own family tree and is always happy to discuss and help others delve into the process. Email her at ashleye@agingoutreachservices.com . FEBRUARY 2018 |

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advice

PLANNING AHEAD

Communicating With Your Siblings About Money and Aging Parents by Tim Hicks, RICP®, APMA® Many adult children are called upon to help their aging parents as life changes set in, yet only 65 percent of siblings report talking about money with one another, according to research by Ameriprise Financial. While only 15 percent of siblings have conflicts over money, when siblings do spar over finances it’s usually about their parents’ situation. Financial conversations between siblings become inevitable, as brothers and sisters manage their parents’ money matters, including estate planning, healthcare, retirement income and wills. In the event that you have shared responsibilities with your siblings down the road, it’s important to make sure your family is on the same page. Here are some tips to help you have civil conversations about money-related family matters. Set aside your differences. When your parents need help, don’t waste your time re-hashing old family feuds. Keep yourself in check if you are tempted to fall into old patterns of behavior that may alienate grown-up siblings. You may not be able to control how your siblings behave, but you can control your own actions. Determine key priorities. You’ll accomplish more — and potentially spar less — when everyone is committed to common goals. Assess what financial matters you and your siblings will need to manage together. If your parents’ safety is a primary concern, find agreement about the support and services they need to remain safely in the family home. If it’s time for your parents to move to an assisted living facility, put your energy into seeking a solution. Schedule time to talk. Schedule regular check-ins with your siblings to discuss pressing topics related to your parents’ care, including how finances are being managed. 14

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Frequent conversations can help diminish anxiety and improve collaboration. Ongoing dialogue will help prevent misunderstandings from blowing up into full-fledged battles, and help keep your parents’ best interests top-ofmind. Divide and conquer. It’s important to set responsibilities, with the understanding that each sibling may be able to contribute different amounts of time, money and expertise. Be forthright about what you can reasonably handle and open to taking on more tasks if you have the capacity. Keep in mind that responsibilities may shift over time, as circumstances change for you and your siblings. Be open to advice. Bringing outside sources into your inner circle can help provide unbiased guidance as you enter this new phase of life. Your parents’ tax preparer, financial planner and other trusted advisors could provide an important bridge to understanding their current financial situation. Once you’re ready to plan the next steps for your family, consider working with a single financial advisor. This approach allows the advisor to help you create a comprehensive plan that addresses everyone’s needs and concerns. Money conversations can be emotional and hard to initiate, but there are benefits to having open communication. Families who are willing to tackle money-related topics are often more confident about their ability to handle financial challenges and work toward their goals. Tim Hicks, an RICP®, APMA® and financial advisor with Ameriprise Financial Services Inc. in Southern Pines, can be reached at tim.hicks@ampf.com or 910-692-5917.


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FEBRUARY 2018 |

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health

B R A I N H E A LT H

Tips to Improve Communication in Dementia by Taeh A. Ward, Ph.D.

D

ementia is characterized by declines in thinking abilities which impact an individual’s everyday functioning over time. Dementia tends to impact how one communicates as the disorder advances. It is natural for these changes to evoke frustration in patients, their family and others. OBTAIN INFORMATION In dementia, individuals may struggle with losing their train of thought, word-finding, organization of words, and slowed speed of processing, impacting comprehension and expression. It can be difficult to differentiate problems with language from memory loss. It may be helpful to seek neuropsychological evaluation to better understand cognitive strengths and weakness, even after a formal diagnosis of dementia. Knowing more about an individual’s diagnosis and function helps others understand how best to communicate, for example, to avoid speaking too slowly or simplistically, too rapidly or with overly-complex content. MINIMIZE BARRIERS Declines in hearing and vision, as well as pain or other physical discomfort, should be evaluated and treated if possible; pain and poor hearing can affect new learning, causing difficulty recalling conversations. Within the residence, consistency is helpful for reducing confusion. Keep familiar items in the same locations, and follow routine daily activities. It is also helpful to reduce distractions in the environment; turn down the TV, and speak one-on-one instead of in a group. STYLE OF COMMUNICATION Based on what you learn about the patient’s hearing, speed of thinking and memory, you can appropriately modify your style of communication. In general, it is helpful to: • Introduce yourself • Ensure the patient can observe your hand gestures and facial expressions if they do not recognize you immediately. • Speak clearly and distinctly • Focus on one topic, question or instruction at a time • Focus more on past events if the individual has poor memory for current events • Speak in simple sentences or phrases • Use specific and yes or no questions • Speak about others using names and relationship instead of pronouns, i.e., Jennifer, your granddaughter • Allow time to respond without interrupting • Use visual or written cues or refer to photographs as needed • Use reflection listening if you have difficulty understanding the patient. This involves repeating back what you heard and asking for clarification if necessary.

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PICK YOUR BATTLES Others sometimes try to help with word-finding and memory difficulties by filling in words and correcting memory mistakes. This is helpful for more impaired individuals, but can sometimes cause embarrassment or learned helplessness. It is generally best to allow adequate time to speak before providing assistance, only fill in words if it will reduce frustration without evoking distress, and only point out repetition or memory errors if not doing so would result in harm or additional embarrassment. Individuals with dementia may have good and bad days, as well as times of day

they may be better able to communicate. Simple strategies to minimize repetition of questions can reduce frustration; for example, use of a dry-erase board with the date, day and simple schedule. Learning more about the individual with dementia and communication strategies can help reduce frustration and enhance quality of life in patients and their loved ones.

Dr. Ward, a clinical neuropsychologist at Pinehurst Neuropsychology, can be reached at 910-420-8041 or by visiting pinehurstneuropsychology.com

Put Your Mind at Ease with the Right Care for Your Loved Ones. We care for your loved ones with the same commitment and compassion you do. You can rest assured that you’re doing the right thing when you choose the Right Care.

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910.684.6400 | wake-rah.com

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advice

T E C H S AV V Y

Adding Your Phone Number to the National Do Not Call Registry

I

by GCFLearnFree.org

f you’ve ever had a home telephone line, you’ve probably received unwanted telemarketing calls. You can curb these calls by signing up for the National Do Not Call Registry. When you add your phone number to the registry, telemarketers are obligated to remove you from their calling lists.

How to sign up You can add your phone number to the National Do Not Call Registry online or over the phone. To register online, go to https://donotcall.gov and open the registration form. Enter the phone number you want to add to the list and your email address for confirmation. You’ll need to check the verification email to complete your registration. To register over the phone, call (888) 3821222. Follow the phone menu prompts to the registration option, and it will ask you to enter your phone number. Then you’ll hear a brief message about how the registry works. There are also options to file a complaint, remove your number from the registry, and get more information.

Once you’re on the list Telemarketers are required to check the list every 31 days, so they may still call until that time. Some organizations are exempt from the National Do Not Call Registry, like nonprofits and political campaigns. The registry isn’t perfect, though. You might get some calls by mistake, and some unscrupulous organizations may ignore the list and call you anyway. If you believe you’re receiving calls in violation of the National Do Not Call Registry or general telemarketing laws, you can file a complaint.

Get tips on technology and more by visiting https://www.gcflearnfree.org. Serving residents of Scotland, Robeson, Richmond and Hoke counties in North Carolina, as well as Marlboro, Dillon and Chesterfield counties in South Carolina.

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OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018 www.ScotlandHospice.org


life The Heart You Save May Be Your Own LESSONS LEARNED

T

by Ann Robson

he last thing I remember before being wheeled into the operating room at St. Joseph Mercy in Ann Arbor, were instructions about a breathing tube and soft restraints. The next thing was a nurse in the middle of the night, flipping on the bright overhead lights, telling me they could take the tube out now and remove the restraints. What tube? What restraints? Have they already done the surgery? And I made it! Now what? My throat was so sore I couldn’t get my questions out. That’s why we have husbands and daughters. While I was in never-never land, a team of surgeons had cracked open my chest, put my heart on by-pass, and repaired three pretty good size blockages in my cardiac arteries. They also left behind a leg-long scar marking where they’d gone in to retrieve some good arteries. That was 25 years ago this past December. The scars are still there, but not quite so ugly and barely visible. We are constantly being told that women tend not to take care of their hearts. They tend to ignore what their bodies are telling them. I was exceptionally lucky. I had a wonderful young woman as my primary care physician, and when I started mentioning a few symptoms like pain between my shoulder blades while on the treadmill, shortness of breath, etc. she immediately placed a call to a cardiologist. Within a week I’d had a heart catheterization where some bright young person makes a small slit in your groin and slips in a catheter and some dye so he/she and you can watch what’s going on as the dye heads for the myriad of blood vessels around your heart. I could watch it on television, but in those days I needed my glasses, which they’d taken away from me.

I could tell by the expression on the cardiologist's face and the conversation with whoever was watching that they didn’t like what they saw. They explained everything to me. Could you absorb the information, lying flat on a cold table, with a tube running up to your heart? When I was more or less coherent, it was all explained to my husband and me. This time it made sense but still didn’t sound like how I wanted to spend Christmas week. But it did sound serious and needing to be fixed. It was fixed, and whatever they used to put me back together again must be great stuff to have lasted this long. Now I hear they glue your sternum back together instead of staples. Heart attacks are the leading cause of death for women. We tend to ignore that chest pain that feels like indigestion. We figure the shortness of breath is because we were carrying too many packages. If something like this happened to a spouse or friend, we’d be after them in a minute to get help. National Women’s Heart Week is Feb. 1-7, and you’ll be hearing a lot about heart disease and the warning signs. For your own health, and for the peace of mind of those around you, please listen to the information and see your doctor just to be sure. It just might add at least 25 years to your life. Ann Robson is the author of “Over My Shoulder: Tales of Life and Death and Everything In Between.” She may be reached at overmyshoulder@charter.net .

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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advice

ROLE REVERSAL

Setting Basic House Rules by David Hibbard

L

iving under the same roof as someone else — a spouse, a roommate, or a parent — requires a certain amount of cooperation and deal-making. And it can become more complex when life brings a child back around to living with their parent(s) for a second time -- sometimes, many years later, and after both parties have assumed they would live on their own forever. The reasons parents and their adult children wind up living together again are numerous, and the way that arrangement looks varies from family to family. Are you moving into your parents’ home, or vice versa? Do your parents still enjoy good health, or are they facing challenges and need more help? Is everyone receptive to the idea of cohabitating again, or is there reluctance to fully embrace this new configuration? The answers to these questions will have a say in how you determine some of the basic rules for living together. In my case, my mother continues to enjoy the good health she had when I moved back to live with her nearly 10 years ago. So with that in mind, we both tend to view our living arrangement as a partnership — we help each other with the day-to-day tasks that keep the house running. From my perspective, I think there are several keys things, as an adult child, to living harmoniously with your parent: • Take on your fair share of the responsibilities.

Whether it’s taking out the trash, making the coffee each morning, helping out financially, or doing projects around the house, identify the ways you can contribute.

• Offer to go above and beyond. Even after

you’ve settled into a routine and established an understanding of who will do what around the house, offer to do more. Can you help with exterior maintenance like window washing, even if that’s something you don’t normally handle? Is there an errand you can run that would be particularly helpful to your parent on a certain day? From time to time, do that extra something to help. —Your parent will appreciate it, and you will find it rewarding.

• Agree on finances. Everyone’s situation is different,

so what works for one family may not work for another. But be clear with each other about the way household bills and other finances will be handled. If you are an adult child who has moved back into your parent’s house, offer to help financially in ways beyond the normal monthly expenses. Can you go in half to pay for home repairs or upgrades, such as new shrubs for the yard or new flooring in the den?

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• Don’t forget, they’re still your parents. Whether

you’re 10 years old or 50, the fact never changes that your mom is still your mom! She will still have “suggestions” on how to do things, and she will still worry about you when you’re on the road traveling. You can’t change this fact (and why would you?), so embrace it and be grateful for it!

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• Respect each other’s time and space. Find the

right balance in your day so that everyone has some time together and some time to themselves. You may find that it’s nice to share dinner together, but then have some time to read or watch television separately before bed. Decide what works best for your situation.

Keep the lines of communication open and make mutual decisions about your living arrangements. A healthy respect for each other and a few basic ground rules will help you and your parent reap the rewards of once again living together. Share your role reversal stories with contributing writer David Hibbard. Email him at hib1967@gmail.com .

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life

COOKING SIMPLE

Redeye-Glazed Pork Tenderloin by Nancy Pardue | Photography by Mollie Tobias Chef Scott Margolis knows that redeye gravy is big in the South, as is pork. Put them together, and you have a main course recipe that pairs well with, well, just about anything. “This recipe is easy to do at home, and has a lot of flavor,” said Margolis, the proprietor of Scott’s Table, which opened in June 2017. “I’ve paired the tenderloin here with lemon tarragon rice and fresh French-style green beans with roasted red bell peppers, but you can use roasted red potatoes or fingerlings; any vegetable is perfect. And the sauce stands up to anything.” Scott’s Table offers a quick workday lunch or a more leisurely take, plus dinner and anytime catering services. Everything on the menu is made from scratch, starring freshdaily North Carolina ingredients whose farm-to-table sources are pinpointed on a wall mural in the cozy dining room. The point? “When food doesn’t travel far, it tastes better right from the beginning,” Margolis said.

Ingredients: Makes 2 servings 3 ounces ham, chopped into small dice 1 tablespoon oil 2 tablespoons shallots, chopped 1 clove garlic, minced ¼ cup strong coffee, or espresso 2 tablespoons honey ¼ teaspoon thyme, dry 1 cup chicken broth 4 teaspoons cider vinegar 1 teaspoon salt ¼ teaspoon pepper ½ teaspoon light brown sugar, packed 1 pinch thyme, dry 1-pound pork tenderloin, trimmed 3 tablespoons oil

Scott Margolis is executive chef and owner of Scott’s Table in downtown Southern Pines, and a graduate of the Culinary Institute of America; (910) 684-8126 or facebook.com/scottstablesouthernpines 22

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Pork Tenderloin: Combine salt, pepper, Redeye Glaze: Heat 1 tablespoon oil in

saucepan over medium heat. Add ham and sauté until golden brown. Add shallots and cook for 2 minutes, stirring often. Add garlic and cook 30 seconds, stirring constantly. Stir in coffee, scraping up any browned pieces from bottom of the pan. Add honey, ¼ teaspoon thyme, stock and vinegar. Bring to a boil. Reduce to a simmer and cook until sauce coats the back of a spoon, about 10 to 15 minutes. Strain and reserve.

brown sugar and pinch of thyme in a bowl. Rub spice mixture on pork and let marinade for at least one hour. Preheat oven to 325 degrees F. Heat oil in a sauté pan until hot. Place seasoned pork in pan and brown on all sides. Transfer pork to a baking pan with sides, brush with glaze, and place in oven. Continue roasting pork and brushing with glaze until done, about 15 minutes or to internal temperature of 145 degrees F. Remove from oven and let rest, lightly covered with foil, for 10 to 15 minutes. Slice on the bias. Bring any remaining glaze to a simmer in a small pot and serve with pork.

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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Decadent Hot Chocolate

Nothing says winter like a good cup of hot chocolate. We can thank the Mayan Indians for first grinding up cocoa beans, though what we drink today is quite different from their recipe, which included cornmeal, chili peppers, and was served cold. Thankfully Spanish explorers refined the drink, served it hot and the French were introduced to it in Versailles. Over the years, it became commercialized and while easier to make, its original decadence was lost. Let’s bring it back.

Ingredients:

Yields 2 large, intense cups or 4 smaller ones • 8 ounces bittersweet chocolate, at least 70%, chopped (It’s important to use the best quality bittersweet chocolate you can find, with at least 70% cacao, which will be noted on the label.) • 1 1/2 cups whole milk • 1/2 cup heavy cream • 2 teaspoons powdered sugar • 1/2 teaspoon espresso powder (optional, but delicious for intensifying chocolate flavor, found in the coffee aisle) • Giant bowl of whipped cream, for serving In a medium saucepan over medium heat, whisk together the whole milk, heavy cream, powdered sugar, and espresso powder until small bubbles appear around the edges. Do not allow the mixture to boil. Remove saucepan from the heat and whisk in the chopped chocolate until melted, returning the sauce to low heat if needed for the chocolate to melt completely. Serve warm, topped with lots of whipped cream. Experiment with add-ins for your hot chocolate, such as vanilla, cinnamon, maybe a splash of cayenne pepper, schnapps or whiskey to really keep you warm. Enjoy! Recipe based off of Café Angelina’s Le chocolat chaud à l’ancienne dit “l’Africain,” as interpreted by several sources, including Tastebook and Cooking by the Book. Leslie Philip, chief egg breaker and owner of Thyme & Place Cafe in Southern Pines, can be reached at 910-684-8758 or leslie@thymeandplacecafe.com 24

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al i n n e i 4 B

e t a l o c o h C ! l a v i t s e F th

Sat, February 10th 2018 10:00 am - 3:00 pm

Fund Raising Event to Benefit: • Bethany House • • Moore Free & Charitable Clinic • • Prancing Horse Center • for Therapeutic Horsemanship Cupcake Competition

Open to the Community

Baked Goods & Confections

Yummy Sweets for your Valentine Gift Boutique

Unique Chocolate Themed Gifts

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Demonstrations

by Chef Martin Brunner & SCC Culinary Students

N H ot Chocolate & Doughnut Bar Will hit the spot on a February day!

Free Admission!

Contact Us for More Information 910.215.4559 or pinehurstumc.org

PINEHURST

UNITED METHODIST CHURCH 4111 AIRPORT ROAD PINEHURST, NC 28374

FEBRUARY 2018 |

OutreachNC.com 25


Carolina Conversations with Dr. Ellen Willard by Michelle Goetzl | Photography by Mollie Tobias

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N

orth Carolina native Dr. Ellen Willard, MD, has been practicing medicine in the Sandhills for 26 years, as an oncologist at Pinehurst Medical Clinic. She sat down with OutreachNC to talk about her journey from the family farm outside High Point to this difficult medical specialty, how she keeps her composure in a busy practice filled with emotional conversations, and the team effort that is oncology. ONC: When did you decide you wanted to become a doctor?

EW: It was probably in high school. I had an incredible biology teacher in the ninth grade. I’ve always liked science, I loved anatomy and physiology. My mother is a nurse, so I had some healthcare exposure. ONC: What led you to choose oncology as a specialty?

I graduated medical school and knew I wanted to do internal medicine. When I was a second year resident I wound up with a string of three out of four rotations in oncology/hematology. Initially, the hematology stimulated my interest and that’s when I made the decision. I’ve always liked the variety of organ systems, and the scientific process of evaluating. Oncology is a lot of different tumors, it’s a lot of direct patient care, and I’m happiest taking care of patients. ONC: How do you deal with presenting a difficult diagnosis to a patient?

First of all, you have to understand what you can do and what you can’t do. There are a lot of complicated discussions. Obviously you start trying to treat everybody for the best outcome, but you know you’re not always going to get one, so it’s a matter of adjusting and readjusting goals with patients. If they don’t get a good response or you recognize that you can’t cure them, then can you prolong their life, or what symptoms can you relieve? Secondly, most of what we do in oncology is part of a multi-disciplinary team and understanding how to use your support people, be it nursing staff, social workers, whomever. Trying not to shoulder all of the burden alone is another big part of it. I have a very strong faith, a very strong sense of calling to the field, and I think it helps me keep my perspective. ONC: How have advances in technology changed oncology?

Technology has definitely helped in some ways – minimally invasive surgery is a good example. Many of the operations that used to be disabling don’t require long hospitalizations as they used to, and there is not as much pain. And stereotactic radio surgery, some of the more focal radiation techniques, have allowed patients to get more definitive radiation with fewer treatments. I think the downside of the technology, at least with some of the marketing hype attached, is that it leads people to think there will always be a solution, and it sometimes keeps patients and families from focusing on the bigger picture. CONTINUED PAGE 28

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 27 ONC: You mentioned the team effort of oncology. How does that impact your work?

It really has to be that way, because cancer doesn’t happen in a vacuum. It happens in the context of a family, in the context of educational or socioeconomic issues, and it can be difficult to appropriately manage the patients without that group approach, whether it be a social worker to address personal stress or difficulty coping, or a grief counselor to address a family’s anticipatory grief. That’s the way the specialty has grown up. If you read any of the oncology literature you will see talk about patient navigators, distress screening, psychosocial support, early palliative care… that’s just the nature of the specialty. ONC: What keeps you going in this job?

Not infrequently there are cases where you look at the situation with which the patient presented and you gave them the best treatment at the time, knowing that the outcome probably would not be as good as you liked. And yet you look back years later and they are still doing well, and you make another decision based on the best science of the time and again it works. Those are the reasons you keep coming back. It’s also about wishes respected, it’s the thank you notes, the people you get to meet, because there are truly some amazing people you are privileged to take care of. ONC: How do you balance a demanding work life with your personal life?

It takes a lot of communication. Fortunately, my husband’s fantastic. He understands that sometimes I’m just not going to be home on time. I go to the gym, go home, do the things I enjoy doing, digging in my yard, whatever. I try not to box myself into the corner with too many obligations because it stresses me, so it’s just better in certain situations not to make plans. There are also times when I go home and it’s like, everything has to be straightened up because this life is unpredictable. Sometimes when I go home I want order. The dishes need to be washed, everything needs to look clean. ONC: What else helps you to destress?

Sometimes I like to sit still and just be quiet. I love to read; unfortunately, the amount of oncology that has to be read is pretty steep because it is changing so fast. But when I get a chance, especially to get away, I can devour books. I like to swim when I can. I have a very traditional, rural upbringing; I learned to cook and sew and all that stuff, so I actually do enjoy putting a meal together. Get together with some friends. Sitting down and having dinner with my husband, that’s a very important thing that we try to do almost every night, if we are both home. ONC: What words of wisdom do you offer people confronted with a cancer diagnosis?

Not all cancers are the same, not all patients who have the same cancer have the same experience, and so you’ve got to understand exactly what type of cancer you have, what stage of the disease, what your treatment options are, why certain things aren’t your treatment options. You have to choose your best option and try not to extrapolate from other people’s experiences, because a lot of the cancer fear out there is based on what they’ve seen with someone else who may have a completely different disease. Family members are welcome and probably should come to some appointments because it can be hard for patients overwhelmed by a diagnosis, to take notes, ask questions. Big families need designated spokespersons... then you avoid mixed messages and there is a contact person... CONTINUED PAGE 30 28

OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018


“

I

�

have a very strong faith, a very strong sense of calling to the field, and I think it helps me keep my perspective.

FEBRUARY 2018 |

OutreachNC.com 29


CONTINUED FROM PAGE 28 ONC: You said you feel a calling to this. Can you elaborate?

The longer I stay in this business, the more I understand some of the specific needs of this specialty, that some of it is more the art of medicine. I get a better understanding of where I use my skills, gifts and abilities, in this field. I think a big part of oncology and what patients want is for you to be faithful. They want to know that if things get worse or if something doesn’t work that you will explain their options, that the phone will be answered, that you are not going to abandon them. And I think the ability to understand that you are not God, that there is a larger purpose in this life, is important, to have a basis to understand that I can’t explain everything I see. My job is to do my best and to be there, to manage it and continue to ask what are our options. That’s where the integration all comes into place. When you talk about oncology and multi-disciplinary care, the model for a long time was bio/psycho/social, but it’s really a bio/ psycho/social/spiritual model. If you look at a hospice and palliative care team, you always see a chaplain as part of that. The questions that distress patients with oncology are not just how are we going to treat my cancer, but what’s going to happen to my family, what about my business, why is God doing this to me. You have to be comfortable with all of those dimensions in order to parse the stressors. Internal medicine is changing, too. People are recognizing that there are psychosocial reasons, there may be transportation issues, that patients might not be taking their medicines because their spouses might have substance abuse issues. We’re doing that more and more with early palliative care, not just with cancer, but also with other diagnoses, understanding that if you read about palliative care interventions, they are not simply symptom management. They are expanding that symptom management definition to caregiver distress, to financial issues, planning care giving. I think all of medicine is moving in that direction. ONC: Finally, what do you love about living in North Carolina?

Well, since I’ve lived here for all but six years of my life, that’s pretty easy. North Carolina is home. It’s easy to live here. You don’t have to drive a lot to get what you need. The medical community here is pretty amazing, especially for a community this size. I think that the support the medical community has enjoyed from the larger community in terms of participation on hospital and health system boards and philanthropic support has really given us a lot of opportunities. Like I said, it’s home.

New Walk In Clinic Saturdays 8 am-11 am Open Monday-Friday 8 am-5 pm Accepting New Patients • Serving Newborns to Seniors • Only 12 Minutes from Pinehurst traffic circle • Accepting most insurance including: BCBS, First Carolina Care, Tricare Select & Prime, United Health Care & Medicare

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OutreachNC.com 31


health

H E A R T H E A LT H

Tips to Help Prevent Heart Disease by Ellen Cooper

A

lthough heart disease is a leading cause of death, that doesn’t mean you have to accept it as your fate. You may lack the power to change some risk factors such as family history, sex or age, but there are some key heart disease prevention steps you can take. By adopting a healthy lifestyle, you can avoid future heart problems. Here are a few heart disease prevention tips to get you started.

1

Get regular health screenings. High blood pressure and high cholesterol can take a toll on your heart and blood vessels. You probably won’t know whether you have these conditions unless you get tested. Regular screenings can tell you what your numbers are and whether you need to take action. Adults should have their blood pressure checked at least every two years. You may need more frequent checks if your numbers aren’t ideal or if you have other risk factors for heart disease. Adults should have their cholesterol measured at least once every five years starting at age 20 if they have risk factors for heart disease, such as obesity or high blood pressure. If you’re healthy, you can start having your cholesterol screened in your mid 30s. Some children may need their blood cholesterol tested if they have a strong family history of heart disease. Since diabetes is a risk factor for developing heart disease, you may want to consider being screened for diabetes. Being overweight or having a family history of diabetes are two major risk factors, so talk to your doctor and see if they recommend early screening for diabetes. If you are diagnosed with diabetes, speak with your primary care physician about diabetes and nutrition services like the ones available at the FirstHealth Diabetes & Nutrition Education Center. Working one-on-one with a Certified Diabetes Educator can help keep your diabetes manageable.

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2

Eat a heart-healthy diet. A diet rich in fruits, vegetables and whole grains can help protect your heart. Beans, other low-fat sources of protein and certain types of fish are also great for your heart. Try to eat at least five servings a day of fruits and vegetables. Most importantly, limit certain fats. Saturated fat and trans fat are the fats to limit or avoid. Add healthy heart fats into your diet. Healthy fats from plant-based sources, such as avocado, nuts, olives and olive oil, help your heart by lowering the bad type of cholesterol.

3

Try exercising for 30 minutes a few days a week. Physical activity helps you control your weight and can reduce your chances of developing other conditions that may put a strain on your heart, such as high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. Try getting at least 30 to 60 minutes of moderately intense physical activity a few days out of the week. Don’t give up if you can’t meet those guidelines: Working out even for shorter amounts of time still offers heart benefits. And don’t forget – daily household tasks such as gardening, cleaning the house or even walking the dog all count.


4

Maintain a healthy weight. Being overweight, especially if you carry excess weight around your middle, ups your risk of heart disease. Excess weight can lead to conditions that increase your chances of heart disease — high blood pressure, high cholesterol and diabetes. One way to see if your weight is healthy is to calculate your body mass index (BMI), which considers your height and weight in determining whether you have a healthy or unhealthy percentage of body fat. Even a small weight loss can be beneficial. Reducing your weight by a small percentage can help decrease your blood pressure, lower your blood cholesterol level and reduce your risk of diabetes. FirstHealth of the Carolinas offers several services to help you lead a heart-healthy lifestyle. For information on heart services or any of the services listed above, visit www.firsthealth.org or call (800) 213-3284.

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OutreachNC.com 33


Birding in N.C.

Hinson Lake Rockingham

by Ray Linville | Photography by Brady Beck 34

OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018


Sights and Sounds of Hinson Lake Beckon A cool, brisk February day is a perfect time to explore Hinson Lake in Richmond County, and discover its wonderful bird-watching sites that earn it a prominent place on the N.C. Birding Trail. It’s a place that inspires us to think and breathe poetically much like Maya Angelou, who said, “A bird doesn’t sing because it has an answer. It sings because it has a song.” CONTINUED PAGE 36

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 35

During the winter months, Hinson Lake is a place of inspiration because waterfowl are plentiful. Song and water birds that are transiting on migration patterns are attracted as much as people to the delightful scenery that includes a beaver pond, marsh, open water, and grass meadow. The forest areas of oak and longleaf pine create a shady canopy over the walking trails that loop around the lake and also branch into the uplands. Interpretative signs along the trails guide visitors and provide information about wildlife and habitats. Picnic tables and benches located conveniently around the lake are perfect places to watch birds perching on the numerous wooden bridges, including one that is 300 feet long with an attractive gazebo in the middle. A city park in Rockingham, the 300-acre wildlife conservation area is jointly managed by the city and the N.C. Wildlife Resources Commission. When the park opened in 2006, it immediately became a valuable part of the N.C. Birding Trail, although the history of the lake dates to much earlier and even includes a period in the 1930s when it was a site for the Works Progress Administration. The birding trail, begun in 2003, links educational and historical attractions with communities and businesses across the state. Hinson Lake offers frequent opportunities to see several species of interest, such as the brown-headed nuthatch, prothonotary warbler, American kestrel, red-headed woodpecker, and canvasback. The several habitats located adjacent to each other provide a variety of foods and covers important for songbirds with small home ranges, such as the brown-headed nuthatch. This tiny blue-gray songbird climbs up, down and around longleaf pine trunks with amazing swiftness. A social bird that travels in noisy family groups, its squeaky sound drifts down often through the canopy over the lake’s walking trails.

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Brown-headed Nuthatch


American Kestrel

Another songbird that enjoys the lake’s habitats is the prothonotary warbler. Although it has an olive back and blue-grey wings, its brilliant yellow head and body reflect sunlight so intensely that it looks like a golden flashlight. The mixed habitats of the lake also attract birds such as the American kestrel that hunts insects and small prey in open territory. This bird is North America’s smallest and most common falcon and is also amazingly colorful with a mixture of blue and rusty-red colors. CONTINUED PAGE 38 Prothonotary Warbler

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 37

In the forested areas, the red-headed woodpecker is common among other woodpecker species that nest in longleaf pines. With an entirely crimson head and a snow-white body, this bird has a skill that other woodpeckers do not have: It can catch insects in the air. It makes a variety of chirps, cackles and calls, particularly when chasing one another.

Red-headed Woodpecker

On the lake itself, the canvasback is regularly seen. The largest diving duck in North America, it builds its nest in the adjacent marsh. During mating season, the male serenades with cooing sounds and the female responds with a soft “krrr-krrr.� Canvasback Duck Pair Male (L) and Female (R)

Although lake facilities are open during daylight hours from a half hour before sunrise to a half hour after sunset, they may be closed during inclement weather or maintenance activities by the city. Kayak and boat rentals are also available. To confirm availability and schedule, contact Rockingham Parks and Recreation at (910) 895-6810.

OutreachNC has embarked on a yearlong series highlighting regional sites of the N.C. Birding Trail, as contributor Ray Linville explores beautiful landscapes and birds of our home state. He can be reached at linville910@gmail.com. 38

OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018


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Identifying Resources by David Hibbard

A

s the ranks of senior citizens grow across the country and here in North Carolina, so have the scope and types of services available to help them maintain independence, find appropriate caregiving support and enhance their overall quality of life. Programs such as adult day care, Meals on Wheels and home health have come a long way over the years, and no doubt improved the lives of seniors. But naviagating the choices available, and deciding which ones are right for you or your loved one, can be challenging and time consuming. The importance and gravity of these decisions has led to the growth of an entire profession devoted to helping seniors and their family members, says Amy Natt, president and CEO of Aging Outreach Services.

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“Families and older adults needed help navigating care, resources and services as they age,” says Natt, a certified Aging Life Care™ Manager. “These professionals help to develop and execute a plan of care that incorporates all of the resources they may need or that are available in the area.” If you’re searching for help — for yourself or someone in your family — Natt recommends an organization such as the Aging Life Care™ Association, ALCA. The group’s website, Aginglifecare.org, has a zip code-searchable database that makes it easy to find a local, certified professional who is an expert on the services available in your community. Natt recommends asking the life care professional to conduct a full needs assessment, usually done during a home visit. “This is a very comprehensive document that helps identify needs, and strategies to meet those needs,” Natt says. The Aging Life Care™ Association lists eight areas of expertise in which life care professionals are knowledgeable, and which all play a role in a full needs assessment: * Health and Disability * Financial * Housing * Families * Local Resources * Advocacy * Legal * Crisis Intervention

One of the benefits of working with a life care professional includes the holistic approach to meeting each client’s needs, and their intimate knowledge of the services in a particular community. By completing a needs assessment, the life care professional “creates the blueprint for families navigating care,” says Natt. A life care professional then helps clients and families gain access to the services they need, determines if they are able to pay for those services, and if necessary helps determine if alternative funding sources are available. A life care professional can be an important partner and resource for clients and their families, attending doctor’s appointments, helping with financial or insurance concerns, and identifying options for housing and living arrangements when necessary. For large families, or those with members who live out of town, a life care professional can also help resolve internal conflicts and address care concerns.

FROM THE BOTTOM UP WITH

Older adults and their families may also look for services on their own by contacting various state and local organizations. The North Carolina Division of Aging and Adult Services website, ncdhhs.gov/divisions/daas, provides a comprehensive list of links to services available to older adults. The local senior center and/or office of social services are also helpful resources to answer questions about services available in your local community.

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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Navigating Healthcare Dilemmas by Jennifer Webster

H

ealthcare can seem like a labyrinth you venture into just when you’re least prepared. Sick, maybe injured or disoriented, you must figure out where to go, how to get the best care while managing the costs, and what to do after you’re discharged. An unexpected blessing of the healthcare system’s complexity is that now trained professionals are ready to help you navigate your healthcare journey smoothly, and land exactly where you need to be. CONTINUED PAGE 44

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 42

In the Moment: People, Procedures and Consent

This may be the worst part: The fall in the middle of the night. Or a nurse’s voice on the phone, telling you your loved one is in the emergency room. A relatively benign condition becomes suddenly worse. Whether you’re the cared-for or the caregiver, you’re caught off-balance, unsure what comes next. “These changes are so very hard to predict and are unique to each individual,” says Kate Pomplun, LMSW, CMC, who is certified as an Advanced Professional Aging Life Care™ Expert. “Some changes we often see include a fall resulting in a serious injury such as a broken hip or other bone important to ambulatory function and self-care, a chronic condition such as congestive heart failure, chronic obstructive pulmonary disease or diabetes causing hospitalization resulting in rehab or long-term placement, or infections such as urinary tract infections or pneumonia resulting in hospitalization.” A host of decisions must be made, and quickly. Where should the ambulance go? Should the patient be admitted to the hospital? Should life-sustaining measures be taken? Which child will represent his mother’s wishes to the medical staff, if she is unconscious? And at a more basic level: What medications was Mother taking? Who has the list? Does she have allergies? These situations may result in confusion and conflict, Pomplun says. “There are countless factors that can cause conflict when making decisions about the appropriate living and care environment,” she says. “In many instances, the individual wants to go home. A well spouse or partner may want to take on the caregiving role, but adult children may wish for the individual to find placement in rehab, skilled nursing or assisted living to keep both parents as healthy and safe as possible. There may be disagreeing opinions among siblings about where Mom or Dad should be. The role reversal of children making decisions for parents is in itself a stressor in many families.” Then, too, family and doctor may disagree. The doctor may want to admit the patient; he or she may want to finish the night in a familiar bed. While Baby Boomers often challenge doctors’ orders, Pomplun notes, Greatest Generation seniors may find advice more palatable coming from a professional source.

“a host of decisions must be made... and quickly.”

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“An older adult in her 90s may not want to comply with her son’s or daughter’s suggestions, but is likely to do something her doctor recommends, such as stay in rehab after a hospitalization,” she says. In such labyrinthine situations, a designated guide makes all the difference. The decision-maker — and his or her backups and advisors — should know who they are well before an emergency takes place. “If a person is cognizant enough to make his or her own decisions, he or she is the number one person with input,” Pomplun says. “Many will consult a spouse or partner, adult children, siblings, or a hired third party such as an Aging Life Care™ Expert, as well as the medical professionals they see regularly.” Since a family doctor may not be available for a consult in the case of an emergency room visit, talk with him or her in advance about possible emergencies. What should the patient or family member emphasize during a hospital visit? Are there treatments the patient should avoid due to a comorbid condition? In general, given a probable complaint, does the family doctor recommend the patient be admitted to the hospital or seek on-the-spot treatment only, then make a follow-up appointment with the family practitioner? Take notes from your conversation, and carry them with you. Pomplun also cautions against unwise use of designated powers of attorney or healthcare decision makers. Such powers should come into play only if the person undergoing care is cognitively unable to make decisions. A difference of opinion, even if painful to family members, does not indicate incompetence.

Ongoing Decisions: The Care Setting

Maybe mishaps slowly accumulate, or maybe an accident changes everything. However it happens, many people find they need to change their living situation swiftly in order to receive the care they need. They may leave the hospital for a rehabilitation or a long-term acute care stay, or move from their home to an assisted living setting. Robin Hutchings, sales and marketing director with Fox Hollow Senior Living, has guided many families through such transitions. “Changes come so subtly when we are living in our own homes, we may not realize what is happening,” she says. “An adult child may notice spoiled food in the fridge or that the parent is wearing the same clothes every day.” CONTINUED PAGE 46 OutreachNC.com 45

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CONTINUED FROM PAGE 45

Let Us Bring Things

Back Into Focus

An assisted living facility is a great option for people who need help with instrumental activities of daily living such as yard work or balancing a checkbook, and even hygiene and medication management, but doesn’t need round-the-clock medical care. “We have both situations — stepping up from the home, and stepping down from the hospital,” Hutchings says. “Sometimes a hospital may tell a patient it’s no longer safe to be by him or herself at home. For instance, they may not be taking their medication properly. Assisted living will keep track of medications for them.” While Hutchings encourages people to research assisted living options up to two years before they think they may need to move, the need for services may come unexpectedly. In this case, she says, a hospital discharge planner or social worker can help families through the sudden transition.

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Hutchings says a transition can be effected within two weeks if necessary. At the minimum, patients must obtain a tuberculosis test and Adult Care FL2 documentation from their physician, listing their diagnoses and recommending them for assisted living. While there is typically a waiting list for memory care, she says, it’s otherwise typically possible to get a place — if not the room you desire — in your chosen assisted living facility within two weeks.

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“After the discharge planner gives you a list of options, you should visit each community,” she says. “See whether the residents are happy and smiling. Does the staff speak to you? Does the place smell good? Is it appealing when you walk through the door? Are hallways wide enough?”

OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018

“Pay attention to warning signs, such as wearing winter clothes in summertime, and look for strange behavior and isolation,” she says. “Being proactive and introducing a relative to assisted living while they are still vibrant and wanting to have a social life makes the transition easier, rather than having a relative in the hospital and needing to find somewhere in a hurry.”


Dollars and Sense: Navigating Healthcare Finance Just when you’re at your worst for thinking about money, you may have to find your way through the maze of paying for medical care. Though most people age 65 and older qualify for Medicare, there are many services — especially ancillary care such as home health and skilled nursing — that Medicare does not always cover. Many of these details are covered at www.medicare.gov.

One point that may catch Medicare patients off-guard is the distinction between an observation visit and an admission to the hospital. Even an overnight stay may not constitute admission, which means the patient may pay higher rates for medicines and tests. And observation stays, even overnight, do not count toward qualifying for Medicare to cover a stay in a skilled nursing home. Another twist involves waiting periods and benefit periods to qualify for services. For instance, Medicare patients require three nights spent as an admitted hospital patient to qualify for skilled nursing or rehab coverage. After that, 60 days after they leave care their benefit period ends. To access additional skilled nursing or rehab care, the patient must requalify and pay a new deductible. In any event, Medicare will only cover such treatment in full for the first 20 days of care, and the burden is full on the patient after 100 days. A social worker or eldercare specialist can guide you to maximize your resources, such as insurance, and minimize financial pitfalls. And a financial planner can help you find Medicare Advantage policies that enhance your coverage. “Educate yourself early and plan ahead,” Pomplun says. “We all know every day we are getting older. It is much easier to make a confident decision, should a health crisis arise, once you are already familiar with the options and what care you can afford or qualify for. Use professionals, such as a certified financial planner or Aging Life Care Expert, to help you gather information.” By taking your questions to experts in your area, you’ll do more than collect knowledge — you’ll build a support network to personally help you navigate the healthcare maze.

FEBRUARY 2018 |

OutreachNC.com 47


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THE READER’S NOOK

‘Being Mortal’

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Book Review by Michelle Goetzl

ging can be a frightening thing: What am I going to do when I can no longer take care of myself? What is going to happen when I have a list of medications to take throughout the day? When is the right time to stop treatment? How do we help our aging parents? We all live longer now than in any time in history, but sometimes we wonder if that is a good thing or a bad thing. These are all concepts that Atul Gawande explores in his book, “Being Mortal: Medicine and What Matters at the End.” Gawande is a surgeon, author and professor at Harvard Medical School as well as the Harvard School of Public Health. “Being Mortal” was written after his own father was diagnosed with brain cancer and Gawande had to face a number of important questions. This book makes you think about how life changes when we age, and how to maintain quality of life. In Gawande’s own words, this book is “about the modern experience of mortality – about what it’s like to be creatures who age and die, how medicine has changed the experience and how it hasn’t, where our ideas about how to deal with our finitude have got the reality wrong.” He takes a hard look at the experiences of the elderly and how the medical world often fails the very people they are supposed to help. While this might sound like dry reading, Gawande makes his books eminently readable. Through many individual stories illustrating his various points, “Being Mortal” flows from topic to topic. A big portion of the book deals with how caring for our elders has changed in the United States, especially in comparison to how Gawande’s family in India approaches the same topic. He also focuses on the medical subspecialty of geriatrics, a field that doesn’t have nearly

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life

enough doctors or resources and yet is vitally important. Through interviews with an array of seniors no longer able to independently live in their own homes, readers get a glimpse into the realities that many adults are facing. Gawande also looks at the impact of caring for a parent in your own home in a world where most families need two incomes in order to survive. The part I found most fascinating was the history of nursing and assisted living facilities, including the individuals who are striving to improve the quality of life of those who live in residential facilities. Autonomy and a sense of purpose are important to us all. The point that Gawande returns to again and again is how vitally important open communication about the aging process is. When Gawande brings in the notion of hospice and palliative care, he does so to show how important they can be to improve your final weeks or even years. But when we talk about reducing lifesaving measures in order to promote the quality of life we have left, he touches on a subject that makes many people uncomfortable. This book should be read by anyone who loves someone who is aging. Life is a journey that changes along the way. “Being Mortal” helps us acknowledge how we treat those last few miles.

Michelle Goetzl writes an online blog—“Books My Kids Read.” She loves books and sharing that love of reading with children. She can be reached at booksmykidsread@gmail.com .


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health

E Y E H E A LT H

What is AMD? by Arghavan Almony, M.D.

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ge-related macular degeneration (AMD) is the leading cause of blindness in people age 50 and older, so it pays to know the facts and take action to protect yourself and your loved ones. AMD affects part of the back of the eye called the macula, the central part of the retina. With AMD, you lose your central vision. You cannot see fine details, whether you are looking at something close or far. However, your peripheral (side) vision will still be normal. For instance, imagine you are looking at a clock with hands. With AMD, you might see the clock’s numbers but not the hands. You should pay special attention to prevention if you already have a diagnosis of macular degeneration, or if you are older and the disease runs in your family. AMD is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss among elderly people. In time, a person with macular degeneration may find it difficult or impossible to read, drive or recognize familiar faces.

There are ways to help reduce your risk and prevent or slow the progression of AMD, including: • Do not smoke. • Know your family history. If you have a close relative with AMD, you have a 50% chance of developing the condition. • Eat plenty of dark, leafy green vegetables. • Eat fish or take a fish oil supplement. • Exercise regularly and maintain a healthy weight. • Eat fruit and nuts daily. • Reduce your intake of refined carbohydrates. • Keep blood pressure and cholesterol under control. • Have regular eye exams. • Wear appropriate sunglasses outdoors to block UV rays that may cause eye damage. If you have AMD, ask your doctor about one of the AREDS vitamin formulations, such as FocusSelect. The good news is you can help protect your sight from AMD-related blindness by showing your eyes some TLC with regular eye exams and lifestyle changes. Dr. Almony, a retina and vitreous specialist at Carolina Eye Associates, can be reached at (800) 733-5357 or by visiting www.carolinaeye.com. 52

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did youknow?

February 14th is National Donor Day Too!

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he Donate Life North Carolina website, donatelifenc.org, reminds us that “every ten minutes another person is added to the organ donor waiting list.” This statistic confirms the need to raise awareness and to encourage the community to consider organ donation. There is a need for both living donors and donors who wish to donate their body to science. The process is simple and is a valuable gift to so many families. Anyone from newborns to senior citizen can join the organ, eye and tissue registry can be a living donor and can donate their body to science. The website states, "If you are between 16 and 18, your parents would make the ultimate decision, but you can still have that cute, red heart on your license!” HOW TO JOIN THE REGISTRY. There are several easy ways to join the registry:

1. Join the registry at your nearest DMV office 2. Register yourself online at donatelifenc.org/register/new 3. If you have an iPhone with iOS 10, you can register from your phone using the Health app! HOW TO BE A LIVING DONOR. Living donors not only save lives, but they get to see the beauty of their gift in action!

Did you know that living donors can donate the following? • Kidney • Lung • Partial liver • Intestine • Pancreas Typically, recovery times are much shorter for living donors than for recipients and many living donors can get back to their regular, active routines in weeks! Links to the five North Carolina living donor transplant hospitals can be found on the Donations FAQS page: donatelifenc.org/ content/frequently-asked-questions • Carolinas Medical Center (Charlotte) • Duke University Medical Center (Durham) • UNC Health Care (Chapel Hill) • Wake Forest Baptist Medical Center (Winston-Salem) • Vidant Health (Greenville) 54

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HOW TO DONATE YOUR BODY TO SCIENCE. Donating your body to science is a generous way to make a difference in the medical research that could save lives. It is NOT covered under the organ, eye and tissue donor registry and it is not included in the heart on your driver’s license.

Individuals wishing to make a gift of their whole body to a body donation program in North Carolina should make advance arrangements with a specific medical school or research program. Links to the programs in North Carolina can be found on the Donation FAQS page: donatelifenc.org/content/ frequently-asked-questions • UNC School of Medicine • Duke University School of Medicine Anatomical Gifts Program • East Carolina University Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology of the Brody School of Medicine • Wake Forest University Whole Body Anatomical Bequeathal Program, Wake Forest School of Medicine • Fayetteville Technical Community College Mortuary Science Program Based on reader questions and comments, OutreachNC will provide more information on organ donation in future issues. We invite you to share with us your personal experiences and how the gift of organ donation has touched you or the lives of your family members. Send your comments to editor@outreachnc.com.

And We Ensure That Buying Your Home

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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6

Ways to Strengthen Your Village by Rachel Stewart

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he old adage, “It takes a village,” usually applies to raising children. However, this sentiment can also ring true for building a strong support network as you age. According to the American Psychological Association, seniors who deal with chronic loneliness are at greater risk for health conditions such as heart disease, cancer and infectious diseases. Taking steps to strengthen your personal “village” means that when challenges arise, you’ll have someone by your side to champion you.


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et family be on the front lines. Weekly phone calls with a family member or Sunday suppers at a loved one’s house are great ways to forge deeper bonds. Visits shouldn’t be limited to birthdays or holidays, though. Find reasons to catch up with your loved ones. Also, the definition of family doesn’t have to rely on blood relatives. “Family is great to have as part of a support system, but with an increase in older adults living farther away from adult children and siblings, face-to-face support from family nearby may be limited,” explains Kate Pomplun, LMSW, CMC, Aging Life Care Professional™ and Geriatric Care Manager at Aging Outreach Services. “There is also a growing number of older adults who don’t have the option for family members to be part of their support system. Either they never had children, or their adult children are caring for their own families and do not have the emotional or fiscal ability to support anyone else.”

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Pomplun advises that older adults expand the “family” circle to include close friends from work, church or other social settings because these relationships may be as strong, or stronger than, family ties. “Having close friends as part of your support system is extremely beneficial,” Pomplun says. “They may know you better than family members, they may live closer to you or share your same interests, values and goals. They may enjoy the reciprocal idea of having another person who isn’t family who they can also rely on for support.”

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one in on a hobby. Whether it’s a lifelong interest or a new activity, having a hobby connects you with like-minded individuals and lets you build your network. If you’ve been waiting to sign up for that dance class or weekend spiritual retreat, ask yourself what you could gain from the experience. Find a local craft group you can participate in or hold a craft night at your place where you and your friends can work on your current projects. Hobbies can take a virtual turn, too. Wanting to write your memoir or the great American novel? There are many online forums through Facebook or the internet where you can connect with fellow writers or find a proofreader to give you feedback on your first draft.

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ethink “socializing.” In the past, socializing involved elaborate events and planning, which may feel overwhelming for this stage of life. Pomplun says there are a multitude of health benefits from simple socialization. “Researchers have conducted many studies suggesting that social engagement and leisure activities may play a role in maintaining cognitive function in late adulthood, and even in delaying or preventing dementia,” she says. “This doesn’t mean you have to attend large parties or grand affairs — simply getting out, even to each other’s homes to have a cup of coffee with a neighbor or friend, has health benefits.”

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The next time someone wants to have lunch or drop by, make the time, and see how you feel afterward. Family far away or overscheduled? Carve out some Facetime on your smartphone, or chat via text message or voice-activated texting.

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everage support from medical specialists. Including your primary care physician or other specialists in your village can help you feel more at peace when acute or chronic health issues arise. “You may only be seeing your primary physician once or twice a year for routine check-up appointments,” Pomplun explains. “Maybe you have a specialist or two, but even in good health, knowing who is part of your team and building a history is important, and can help establish trust and make decisions easier in the future should your health care needs change.” Do your part to be an engaged patient: Keep important numbers, past visit details, or questions for future visits in a notebook. If your provider uses an online portal, use it to check on prescription refills or send questions to your doctor’s office staff. Take a family member or trusted friend with you if you need additional help understanding your care.

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ut bad connections. Good relationships can provide growth and support, but toxic relationships can hinder progress or cause mental strain. Your village should include people you trust and who understand and support your wishes. Strong, loving relationships are built on respect and thoughtfulness. If you find yourself feeling worn out or out of sorts after spending time with certain people, reconsider the relationship. Perhaps you’d be better acquaintances instead of close friends. Your social network is very much like a garden — it needs pruning as well as nurturing.

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onsider your needs. The point of diversifying your village is to ensure you feel confident and supported. Sometimes friendships and family ties may not be enough to bolster more complex issues or problems, and that’s where Pomplun’s team comes in, connecting people to additional resources such as structured support groups, counselors, therapists, financial planners or coaches, or personal trainers.

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“An Aging Life Care Professional™ could be a valuable asset to meet with in order to determine your needs and options both for now and in the future,” she said.

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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life

OVER MY SHOULDER

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Winter’s Best by Ann Robson

his month the Olympic Winter Games are being held in Pyeonchang, South Korea. For 17 days we can watch the best and brightest performing winter sports that have both beautiful and daredevil aspects. When the winter Olympic Games were introduced in 1924 at Chamonix, France, there were five events: bobsleigh, curling, ice hockey, Nordic skiing and skating. The events list has been expanded considerably over the years but the original five remain. Those who grew up in areas where winter brought lots of snow and ice are ardent followers of most events. The general public usually tunes in to see the ice skating in all its forms. This year we have a woman speed skater from North Carolina so perhaps there will be increased interest in that sport.

‘Bobsleigh’ has morphed into ‘bobsled’ with twoman and four-man segments for both men and women. We went to the Winter Olympics in Lake Placid, New York, in 1980 and ventured close to the track for the two-man event. The sled barrels over a raised ice track and sounds like a huge bowling ball rumbling down the track at breakneck speed. My husband and daughter ventured to the top of the track where the race begins. I held back and was on the press platform which gave a wide view of the sled coming and going but if you blinked you missed it. Curling seems to be the most misunderstood of the sports. I’ve been told it’s akin to watching paint dry. Not so. There is considerable skill involved in getting a 14-pound stone from one end of the sheet to the other while trying to score points with your placement of your rock as compared to that of your opponent.

The target area is referred to as the ‘house’ and getting more of your rocks in the house, closer to the crosshairs is the basic point of the game. How you get there takes planning, skill and hard work. Some compare curling to shuffleboard on ice but that doesn’t come close to all of the nuances of curling. The last winter Olympics were held in Sochi, Russia. The time difference allowed television to cover almost all events for airing in both daytime and prime time here. Wall Street became intrigued with curling as it usually ran on CNBC just after the closing bell when Wall Street was glued to see the final count for the day. When we lived in Kingston, Ontario we belonged to a country club that featured golf in the spring, summer and fall seasons and curling in winter. It’s a serious sport and has now reached North Carolina with the formation of the Triangle Curling Club a few years ago. You don’t have to be born in a cold weather place to enjoy this winter sport. Attending the Olympics was a great adventure. We were able to go in our RV and camp very close to the base of Whiteface Mountain where many of the ski events were held. I got hooked on collecting Olympic pins when I saw a portly gentleman from Austria wearing a cape almost completely covered in pins from various events at different sites over the years. Best of all, it’s wonderful to see athletes from around the world come together every four years for peaceful, friendly competition. Ann Robson is the author of “Over My Shoulder: Tales of Life and Death and Everything In Between.” She may be reached at overmyshoulder@charter.net .

FEBRUARY 2018 |

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GREY MATTER See Grey Matter Puzzle Answers on Page 64

Puzzle 1 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.54)

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14. Pang 15. Brews 16. Brawl 17. Bring up 18. When speaking of what already happened 20. “-zoic” things

OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018

Queen Rates Referring Rural Salty Scrape Seals Snaps State Statue Stems Still Stone Style Sweets Table Takes Thermometer Timer Trunk Trust Twins Usual Winds Writer

3 35. Express 37. Ring bearer, maybe 38. Acquiesce 39. “Bye now” 40. Famous TV collie 42. Animation 43. Small rodent pet 45. Coloration between blue and yellow 47. “Dig in!” 48. Craze 50. Hires competition 52. Dapple 56. Excellence 57. Cut, maybe 58. Creep around 59. Breathing 60. “... or ___!” 61. Ashtabula’s lake 62. All alternative 63. “The Catcher in the ___” 64. A little night music

1. Cicatrix 5. “Polythene ___” (Beatles song) 8. Poker action 12. Apple’s apple, e.g. 13. Attention

Jumps Kisses Lands Movie Pinch Pools

21. Clear, as a disk 22. Cap 23. Lively intelligence 26. Fine, sheer fabric 30. The “p” in m.p.g. 31. Pauper 34. Advertising sign

1. High-five, e.g. 2. Pepsi, e.g. 3. Long, long time 4. List of team players 5. Nuisances 6. Appeared 7. Allocate, with “out” 8. Kind 9. “Mi chiamano Mimi,” e.g. 10. Red ink amount 11. “Malcolm X” director 13. Come up with 14. Milk-Bone biscuit, e.g. 19. Extended family 22. Toni Morrison’s “___ Baby”

23. Age 24. Brown shade 25. Father of Paris 26. Blocks 27. Wait on 28. Slight forward convergence in a vehicle 29. Foe 32. Reverse, e.g. 33. Neon, e.g. 36. Plunge of an aircraft 38. Cliffside dwelling 40. Affranchise 41. Set aflame 44. Spoonful, say 46. Young raptor 48. “Love Her _____” 49. Come to mind 50. Kosher ___ 51. Bone-dry 52. Swerve 53. Halo, e.g. 54. Excursion 55. Barely gets, with “out” 56. “Welcome” site


Angels Blend Calm Course Data Dust

Eaten Evil Gaze Hall Helmet Hurt

Idea Illustration Item Joke Kissed Like

Lime Loom Mane Media More Nests

Oddly Onion Pear Pint Plate Race Regard Same Sent Sign Smack Soil Specimens Tend Tidy Trail Turn Ugly Vans Verb Weed Willow Woke Woolen Yarn

BONUS GREY MATTER See Grey Matter Puzzle Answers on Page 64

45. Grief 47. Comparative word 48. Common deciduous tree 49. PC linkup 50. “... ___ he drove out of sight” 51. Cat’s scratcher 53. Bats 55. Astronaut’s insignia 56. Bitter brown seed used in soft drinks 58. Crude stone artifacts 60. Killing oneself 61. Nordic and downhill accessory (2 wds) 62. ___ Monkey Trial 63. Muscular twitching due to calcium deficiency

DOWN

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1. Like some mushrooms 7. P  ertaining to a particular state, not the national government 13. Fur pouch worn with a kilt 14. Bears 16. Protozoan with microscopic appendages

17. Type of archery bow 18. Brews 19. In-box contents 21. The America’s Cup trophy, e.g. 22. Churchill’s “so few”: Abbr. 23. Babysitter’s handful 24. A pint, maybe 25. Woman’s ornamental case for holding small

tools 27. Profundity 29. Beehive, e.g. 30. Intensive researchers 32. Open 34. “___ moment” 35. Affranchise 36. Hungarian dance 40. Tannin extract from tropical Asian plants 44. Bank

1. Remove body hair 2. Causing grief 3. Western blue flag, e.g. 4. Car accessory 5. Delayed 6. Kind of list 7. Texts of a play or movie 8. Old Chinese money 9. Parenthesis, essentially 10. “How ___!” 11. Medium for radio broadcasting 12. Device used on furniture to avoid wobble 13. Chicken 15. Calm 20. Increase, with “up” 26. Key material 27. Apprehension 28. Relating to the scar on

a seed 29. Santa’s reindeer, e.g. 31. Armageddon 33. After expenses 36. Stew holders 37. Devoted 38. Having a pH greater than 7 39. The dissolved matter in a solution (pl.) 40. Dispute 41. To be unfaithful to one’s partner (2 wds) 42. In an unkind manner 43. Anxiety 46. Back muscle, familiarly 52. 1993 standoff site 53. Art subject 54. Bind 55. Palm tree with leaves used for thatching 57. Barely beat 59. On, as a lamp

FEBRUARY 2018 |

OutreachNC.com 63


CROSSWORD

WORD SEARCH

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Since its inception, the crossword puzzle has become one of the world’s most recognizable puzzles, attracting enthusiasts from all over the world, and now appearing in virtually all newspapers. Despite once publishing a statement describing crosswords as a “sinful waste in the utterly futile finding of words the letters of which will fit into a prearranged pattern” in 1924, The New York Times routinely produces what many consider to be the world’s most challenging crossword puzzles.

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4 8 1 7 2 6 5 9 3 Stanley Newman is credited with completing a New 7 3 than 5 9 anyone 8 1 4in history. 6 2 York Times crossword faster In 1996, Newman completed 6 9 a 2 crossword 4 5 3 in 7 two 1 8 minutes, 14 seconds. 3 6 4 8 7 2 9 5 1

Crossword puzzles appear 2 5 in 9newspapers, 3 1 4 6magazines 8 7 and kids’ activity books and are even used in school 1 7 8 5 6 9 3 2 4 lessons to supplement vocabulary lessons. Doing 3 2for9one’s 5 1health. 7 6 these puzzles also may8be4good According to a University 5 2of California 6 1 3 7at Berkeley 8 4 9 study, crossword puzzles may help in the fight against 9 1 7 6 4 8 2 3 5 Alzheimer’s disease. Researchers found that the more often someone engaged in mentally stimulating activities such as crosswords, the less buildup of betaPuzzle 7 (Medium, difficulty rating 0.49) amyloid plaques in the brain, which are hallmarks of 8 7 6puzzles 3 5 also 9 4may 2 offer 1 the disease. Doing crossword a distraction that helps people 3 5 9reduce 2 1 stress. 4 8 7 6 1

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WORD SEARCH

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Even though a type of word puzzle was found inscribed on the wall of an ancient Egyptian tomb, the first known crossword puzzles are credited to journalist Arthur Wynne, who designed his “wordcross” in 1913. Wynne’s puzzle appeared in a Sunday newspaper called New York World.

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CROSSWORDS PUZZLES: DID YOU KNOW?

SUDOKU

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Generations

by Nancy Pardue & Michelle Goetzl

OutreachNC asked adults and children our February question. Share your answer on our Facebook page!

What’s your favorite thing to do with your

The simplicity of just being together. – Maggie, 89 Sharing holiday dinners together. – Ruth, 83 I would love Sunday evenings with my family. We would all gather on our huge front porch, sing and tell stories. – Julia, 90 Going to church with my family. – Liz, 83 I was an only child and I loved spending time with my cousins. – Ellie, 93 Going to Wrightsville Beach. – John, 86 Spending time with them. They are all so special. – Mildred, 83 Going to the mountains together. – Jean, 90 Love playing board games and going to the annual Peach Festival in Candor, N.C. – Betty, 90 My parents were candy makers. Some of my greatest times were spent eating delicious homemade candy with them. – Catherine, 89 Going to Radio City Music Hall. We had fun singing and dancing! – Mae, 95

Traveling with my husband. We have been married 75 years and we have been all over. – Lucille, 96 Dancing with my wife! – Howard, 98

OutreachNC.com | FEBRUARY 2018

Opening presents on birthdays and Christmas is fun and exciting. – Colette, 7 Going to the movies. – Olivia, 6

I like to hunt with my family and we enjoy eating the meat together. – Sam, 7

Roller coasters. – Trevor, 6

Every December we have a big family reunion, and it’s so much fun to be all together. – Jordyn, 7

Going to the beach. – Neelix, 7

I like going with my family on road trips because we always go to amazing places. It’s always a surprise! – Olivia, 8 We like to play games together, especially video games! – Damien, 8 I like going skydiving in the wind tunnel with my family. We go a lot and it’s always fun! – Malia, 7 Snow tubing with my family is always fun. – Tyler, 7

“As kids, we didn’t get many treats. But on Sundays, my family would get together to make homemade ice cream. We enjoyed this treat.” – Carrie, 98 66

Once a year we go to Disney and we go to all the sections and we see Mickey Mouse. – Hannah, 7

Reading! – Evelyn, 7

Watching movies together! – Connor, 8


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A welcoming place for individuals with Alzheimer’s disease, dementia, brain disorders and mild cognitive impairment and their family member or friend.

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Questions?

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Upcoming Dates: Feb. 28 April 25 March 28 May 23

In addition to the Memory Café, AOS & Friends Care offers Direct Care grants FEBRUARY 2018 | OutreachNC.com 67 and programs, featuring Personalized Music Players and Robo Companion Pets.


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Outreachnc Feb 2018 issuu  

Carolina Conversations: Dr. Ellen Willard, NC Birding Trails Series Hinson Lake, Navigating Healthcare Dilemmas Identifying Resources, 6 Way...

Outreachnc Feb 2018 issuu  

Carolina Conversations: Dr. Ellen Willard, NC Birding Trails Series Hinson Lake, Navigating Healthcare Dilemmas Identifying Resources, 6 Way...