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tung-sheng

1620 HAZELWOOD DRIVE路NORMAN.OK 73071 路405.641.3482路TONY.OU@GMAIL.COM

TONY WU

M.ARCH II - 2010

THE UNIVERSITY OF OKLAHOMA BACHELOR OF ARCHITECTURE - ARCHITECTURE BACHELOR OF ARTS - MATHEMATICS


TABLE OF CONTENTS ACADEMIC REMAINDER THE QUEST FOR IDENTITY KERMAN STUDIO

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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS 坂 茂 建 築 設 計 NINE BRIDGES GOLF COURSE - CLUB HOUSE PAVILION THE OPMAN RESIDENT

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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE PELLI CLARKE PELLI ARCHITECTS AUSTIN MUSEUM OF ARTS - TOWER TOKYO AMERICAN CLUB - BALLROOM BILL AND MELINDA GATES COMPUTER SCIENCE COMPLEX ARTIC DESIGN COMPETITION

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ACADEMIC


REMAINDER [2005] INSTRUCTOR: ADAM LANMAN LOCATION: NORMAN, OKLAHOMA

Project Description This studio is orchestrated by examining various stages of design analysis and the implementation of these analyses in design. The studio concludes with an understanding of how design and continual analysis mutually function in a performance installation. There are several phases to this studio: 1. Cyborg design 2. Body and Space 3. Analysis of Imagery and Space 4. Puppet Show 5. Performance Installation: Remainder

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REMAINDER CYBORG: VISION PHONE

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LED LENSES FRAMES WIRES HEADPHONES EAR PLUGS MICROPHONE VELCRO

This first project challenges students to revisit the complexity of societal communication and its interaction with the environment. Understanding the environment and its influences, students are asked to design and construct a functioning cyborg that will enhance human ability. The design of a cyborg requires students to understand the interchange between their design objective and current technology.

ELECTRONIC DEVICE BOX TO LED TO HEADPHONES

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VISION-PHONE Vision-Phone is for the enhancement of human hearing. This cyborg is mainly for people with hearing impairments. Having previously learned sign language as main source of communication, “VisionPhone” users wear a device that electronically enhances their communicative experience

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The “Vision-Phone” is an electronic device which uses a small microphone and computer chips to analyze the frequency of sound. The analysis changes the color of the lenses in the headset by the sending of various LED light signals. The changes in color then indicate the various pitches in communication. This allows users to experience tonality in communication based on these color changes.

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REMAINDER

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BODY+SPACE, ANALYSIS, AND PUPPET SHOW

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This is a series of successive analysis and design:

BODY + SPACE IMAGE + SPACE POSITIVE + NEGATIVE PLAY: PUPPET SHOW

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A. Body and Space: This exercise requires each student to take a photograph of a person in a nondescript space. The purpose of this photographic process is for students to understand the impact of human body in space. (Image 1) B. Analysis and Transformation: This is a two-phase process. Taking the previous Body and Space exercise, all 3-D spaces are converted to two-dimensional space. The first phase of the analysis is the transformation of the 2-D photograph back into 3-D (a 1 ft3 model). Then, the second phase of the analysis performs a series of positive and negative space out of the newly created 3-D space. (Image 2+3) C. Puppet Show: This is the preliminary synthesis of all the analysis that has been previously performed. The challenge is in understanding how the 3D-2D-3D-2D analysis influences a design. The purpose of this event is to develop a dialogue between the social and physical impact of the cyborg. This puppet show describes the communication of an element with its different environmental factors. (Image 4)

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REMAINDER PERFORMANCE INSTALLATION: REMAINDER LOCATION: NORMAN, OKLAHOMA

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PLAN AXON - CONCEPT SECTION SHOP DRAWING

Following the previous project, the performance installation is the conclusion of this studio. Each student is to design and construct a full scale installation.

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REMAINDER This installation is an illustration on communication process. The series of panels direct all visitors towards a computer at the end of the corridor. This computer is equipped with internet chatting software and one user on the other end of this terminal. 5

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The intimacy of two individual has a direct impact on the depth of communication. The development of a relationship requires a series of gives and takes. This installation also illustrated the complexity within communication. As each panel’s opening decrease, the difficulty in progression has also increased. With the complication, only the most interested one will be able to achieve the computer at the end of the pathway. All relationships are based on these filtering of communications. Throughout our various relationships, we will continue to refine our own characters in order to become a well-rounded individual. This is the growth and development of communication and relationship.

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Project Description This project was originally created for each student to design their dream house, requiring the students to: 1. understand needs of a client 2. site selection, analysis, and environmental design

THE QUEST FOR IDENTITY [2004] INSTRUCTOR: MARJORIE CALLAHAN LOCATION: HUALIAN, TAIWAN

Instead of designing a dream house, I designed a house for my extended family in Taiwan. The building will serve as a place for family reunion 2-3 times a year. As a modern Hakka family, the reunion will mainly consist of the 10 siblings between the age of 60-80 and their immediate family members. Site The site is located in Feng-Lin Town, HuaLian County, Tawian, with two interesting facts about the site: 1. West side of the site is a series of mountains over 3000M in height. 2. East side of the site overlooks a valley, continuing to the Pacific Ocean. Project Difficulties 1. Understand Hakka culture and values 2. Minimal existing direct day-light and strong wind on site.

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MOUNTAINS

MOUNTAINS 186 184 SOLAR PATH

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TRAFFIC

SOUND

SITE ANALYSIS

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WIND


Concept From the knowledge of Hakka culture, the house will be designed with an emphasis on family unity. Each family member has the freedom of expressing their own interests; however, all decisions should be made together as a family.

Design Due to the minimal direct sunlight, all north and south faรงades utilize corrugated plastic (Panelite), thereby enhancing the amount of natural light into the building. The opacity of the material will be alternated based on the necessary privacy of adjacent spaces. The humidity, strong wind, and local materials also direct the project into using concrete for its main structure and all east facades.

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FRONT FOYER BED ROOMS (X4) LIVING + DINNING STORAGE BATHROOMS KITCHEN LAUNDRY WORK ROOM

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LEVEL 2 FLOOR PLAN

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LEVEL 2 AXON

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LEVEL 1 FLOOR PLAN

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LEVEL 1 AXON

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SECTION DIAGRAMS

The main gathering hall is the center of the house, serving as the center of this unified family. With one aspect of Hakka culture being the serving of the elderly by the younger members, the large gathering hall is therefore used as a dining room. The four bedrooms are for members of the family, acting as branches of a larger familial body. The stacking and stepping of different spaces are in direct relationship to the hierarchy of programmable spaces.

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Project Description This is a yearlong studio consisting of two phases: 1. Urban Analysis and Master Plan design 2. Individual Architectural Design Phase 1: Master Plan The studio divides into several design teams to complete the master plan. The Master Plan focuses on 20 new buildings in 4 different site variations: Commercial, Entertainment, Educational Institutions, and Housing. Design Team: M. Hagan, L. Lucas, W. Milligan, J. Moore, N. Nguyen, R. Varghese, T. Wu (Team Leader) Site City of Kerman is located in central Iran. Kerman plays an important role in the history of Persia. It was founded as a defense outpost throughout the years, then become part of the Silk Road connecting the east and the west. Kerman is not merely an important location for trading, but also a cultural center. Kerman is internationally known for its Persian Rugs. In 2003, many cities in the Kerman Province were damaged due to a 6.5 degree earthquake. The central bazaar in Kerman had also been damaged due to this earthquake. The

project is seeking a Master Plan that can revitalize the City of Kerman and bring life and excitement for the surrounding cities in Kerman Province.

KERMAN STUDIO [2006-2007] INSTRUCTOR: DR.KHOSROW BOZORGI LOCATION: KERMAN, IRAN

Phase 2: Individual Architectural Design As the studio finalized the Master Plan, each student was then given a building to design. New Bazaar The new bazaar is joined with a new hotel at one end and a winter garden on the other. Throughout the site, the new bazaar is also accompanied by a bath house and a restaurant. Project Difficulties The long and narrow linear site has a parallel axis to the existing Bazaar. To design a new bazaar that is a compliment to the existing one is one of the many challenges on this project. The new bazaar needs to be respectful to the original mosque, damaged by the earthquake, which is still situated in the middle of the site.

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KERMAN STUDIO MASTERPLAN

MASTER PLAN The design team for this master plan put an emphasis on respecting the existing site. The identification of various open spaces and axes within the site parameters had been carefully considered. The development of the new master plan was based on the historical Persian planning precedents.

URBAN ANALYSIS

Several “POINTS OF INTEREST” were identified as key nodes for the space. As these nodes hold strong values to the site, the spaces that these nodes create will have a direct impact on the design. The manipulation of these relationships paid homage to the Persian pattern progression methods. The simple repetition and rotation of geometry played a key element in the master plan design process.

MASTERPLAN PROGRESSION

MAJOR PEDESTRIAN AXIS MAJOR GREEN SPACES MAJOR VEHICULAR PATH NEW DESIGN PATH TRANSFORMATION OF SPACES DIRECT CONNECTION INTEREST ZONING POINT OF INTEREST RUINS EDUCATIONAL BUILDINGS COMMERCIAL BUILDINGS

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SITE ANALYSIS


1 INFORMATION CENTER 2 HOTEL 3 HAMMAN + BATH HOUSE 4 NEW BAZAAR 5 WITNER GARDEN 6 THEMATICAL RESTAURANT 7 THEATER 8 FINE ARTS LIBRARY 9 PARADISE GARDEN 10 RUG MUSEUM 11 SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE 12 SCHOOL OF ART 13 ARCHITECTURAL MUSEUM 14 ART MUSEUM 15 VISUAL ARCHIVE 16 JAZZ RESTAURANT 17 AMPHETHEATER 18 STRUCTURAL RESEARCH CENTER 19 SUSTAINABILITY RESEARCH CENTER 20 APARTMENTS

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KERMAN STUDIO J.ANDERSON, L.AURRECOECHEA, P.BOOTH, S.EGAN, R.ESPINOSA, B.EWING, M.HAGAN, L.LUCAS, W.MILLIGAN, L.MONTANO, J.MOORE, J.OREAR, P.OREFICE, P.PATEL, C.RICHARDSON, K.SPURGIN, R.VARGHESET.WU, C.YATES

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KERMAN STUDIO NEW BAZAAR

NEW BAZAAR The Bazaar was designated as a place for the exchange of goods. Trading occurred when an individual provided a service in exchange for a price, which was then exchanged for a different service or goods. In the historical bazaars, the bazaar layout was divided upon variety of zoning for different specialties. This zoning helps one to understand the meaning of trading started from abroad and not merely at the place of trading. When an individual travels to the bazaar, an exchange of history and culture accompanies the exchange of goods. This cultural interaction is at the heart of the trade. The development and history of a bazaar is no longer merely a transaction of goods, but also the making of history. A bazaar celebrates the excitement of such an event taking place.

CONCEPT MODEL

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NEW

ADDTION OPTION A

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NEW TRADE

ADDTION OPTION B

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NEW ADDTION OPTION C PRECEDENT ANALYSIS

CONCEPT DIAGRAM

There are at least three ways to approach this Old and New Bazaar. The three methods are indicated on left as Option A, B, and C. The new bazaar adopts Option A as an underlying method. This option is decided due to the complexity of the site, historical precedents, and the possibility to create exciting public pedestrian pathways. The new bazaar thus acts as an extension of the existing bazaar, while the two join together to celebrate the revitalization of Kerman.

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GREEN SPACES

NEW BAZAAR DESIGN PROCESS Similar to the design process of the master plan, the design of the new bazaar also considered the various access points and nodes on site. Since every individual traveling through the site bears a unique character and history, this connection of access points also became an important factor on the massing development of the new bazaar. If the connection among these points and nodes were viewed as vectors, then a variance between values was created. These values were determined based on the ease of accessibility and its path in relation to the existing axis. As these vectors represented various values and history, the path of the vector also created a history on the development. The general massing of the new bazaar was then completed. However, the values of these vectors are greater than just a 2-dimensional vector. The third dimension of these vectors, as well as the intersections of vectors, causes an additional push and pull to the faรงades. As the new bazaar identifies its own character, this series of analysis and design places the bazaar in harmony with the essence of the historical bazaar.

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FACADE ARTICULATION

CIRCULATION

MASSING FORMATION 2

MASSING FORMATION 1

GENERAL MASSING


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WATCH TOWER DESIGN PROCESS

CENTRAL PLAZA DESIGN PROCESS

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FLOOR PLAN: LEVEL 1

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FLOOR PLAN: LEVEL 2 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9

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BUILDING A COMMERCIAL BUILDING B COMMERCIAL BUILDING C COMMERCIAL BUILDING D COMMERCIAL BUILDING E COMMERCIAL MEDITATION PLAZA CENTRAL PLAZA ROOF TOP TERRACE WATCH TOWER

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FLOOR PLAN: LEVEL 3

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BUILDING A MEDITATION PLAZA MEDIA FACADE WATCH TOWER CENTRAL PLAZA


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PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS 坂 茂 建 築 設 計


NINE BRIDGES GOLF COURSE CLUB HOUSE PAVILION [2007] LOCATION: CHEJU, SOUTH KOREA SIZE: 387 m2

Project Description This world class golf course is located in Cheju, South Korea. The golf course requested Shigeru Ban to design a pavilion for hosting the golf course’s various events. The pavilion is located in a courtyard within the existing Club House. Personal Involvement Prior to my involvement with the project, most of the design work was already completed. My specific design task was to determine a sub-structure pattern to provide a taut membrane surface.

PROJECT TEAM: S. Ban, K. Sugai, M. Ninomiya, and T. Wu

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坂茂建築設計


VISITOR SERVICE

MAIN ENTRANCE

SERVICE AERA

HALL/POOL

PRE-FUNCTION

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STAGE

MEMBRANE COLUMN SHUTTER GLASS DRAIN PIPE HVAC

BANQUET HALL

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DRIVING RANGE

FLOOR PLAN ELEVATION

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SUBSTRUCTURE CONCEPT DIAGRAM

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MEMBRANE SUBSTRUCTURE PAPARE TUBE Ø120 JOINT PIECE DRAIN PIPE TENSION CABLE STEEL BEAM AIR CONDITIONING

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PLEASE SEE DIAGRAM ABOVE FOR DETAIL. 7

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HALL/POOL

SECTION

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坂茂建築設計

BANQUET HALL


1 GUTTER 2 SUBSTRUCTURE 3 PAPARE TUBE Ø120

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ROOF PLAN

SUBSTRUCTURE PATTERN 1

SUBSTRUCTURE PATTERN 2 SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS

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坂茂建築設計


Project Description The client requested Shigeru Ban to design an addition to their existing home. The client is currently living in the existing house, and recently purchased the adjacent property. This acquisition allowed the client to expand their existing house to the nearby lot.

THE OPMAN RESIDENT [2007] LOCATION: BEVERLY HILLS, CALIFORNIA SIZE: 12,670 SF

Personal Involvement This was a new project when I joined the design team. I was working closely with the project manager throughout the conceptual design phase of the project.

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PROJECT TEAM: S. Ban, G. Suzuki, Y. Kuwahara, M. Inoue, and T. Wu RESIDENT EXPANSION DIAGRAM SHIGERU BAN ARCHITECTS

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SHUTTER GLASS 11

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TERRACE 15

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11 GUEST BEDROOM 12 GUEST BEDROOM 13 OFFICE 1 14 OFFICE 2 15 KITCHEN 16 DINNING 17 MAID 18 LAUNDRY

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CANOPY ABOVE

1 UPPER LIVING ROOM 2 LOWER LIVING ROOM 3 MASTER BEDROOM 4 MASTER BATHROOM 5 CHILDREN BEDROOM 6 CHILDREN BEDROOM 7 GARAGE 8 PORCH-COCHERE 9 POOL 10 COURTYARD

ENTRY GALLERY 5

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坂茂建築設計


PROFESSIONAL EXPERIENCE PELLI CLARKE PELLI ARCHITECTS


AUSTIN MUSEUM OF ARTS - TOWER [2007] LOCATION: AUSTIN, TEXAS SIZE: 800,000 SF

Project Description The project was in conjunction with Austin Museum of Arts. The developer requested Pelli Clarke Pelli Architects to design a 30-floor, 800,000 ft2 office tower. Due to the limitation of lease depth, the building required an advanced curtain wall system to provide eloquent form and function. To design such a building, PCPA decided to explore options using a faceted curtain wall. Personal Involvement The Design task was to study and understand how to apply a faceted faรงade onto the tower. The objective utilized the diagonal facets, thus reducing the overall mass of the building. Complications in the faรงade occurred as the curtain wall system reached its corner. The desirable vantage point existed mainly where an individual, looking up, would see that the existing corner of the building gracefully disappeared into space.

PROJECT TEAM: C. Pelli, F. Clarke, B. Butler, E. Dionne, P. Elmer, R. Mehta, H. Ford, T. Wu

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STUDY MODEL CURTAIN WALL CORNER STUDY MODEL CURTAIN WALL STUDY MODEL CURTAIN WALL DIAGRAM

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TOKYO AMERICAN CLUB [2007] LOCATION: TOKYO, JAPAN SIZE: 26,000 m2

Project Description The Tokyo American Club is a private club house. It includes various commercial office, entertainment, and residential spaces. Personal Involvement My design task was to design the ballroom during the Schematic Design phase of the project. The ballroom was to have a faceted ceiling system that coordinated with the wood paneling on the wall and the Sky-Fold panels.

PROJECT TEAM: C. Pelli, F. Clarke, B. Butler, A. Zimborain, H. Ford, and T. Wu

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CONCEPT DIAGRAM CEILING PANEL STUDY CEILING PANEL SYSTEM COLUMN ENCLOSURE STUDY BALLROOM CEILING PERSPECTIVE

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EXISTING BALLROOM

NEW BALLROOM

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*RENDERINGS DONE BY PROFESSIONAL GRAPHIC CONSULTANT

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BILL AND MELINDA GATES COMPUTER SCIENCE COMPLEX [2007-PRESENT] LOCATION: AUSTIN, TEXAS SIZE: 233,500 SF

Project Description The University of Texas Austin initiated a design competition for the New Computer Science building. PCPA won the competition and began the design of this 7-floor educational facility. The building acts as the main structure for the Computer Science department at the university. Project Involvement My personal involvement with the project started from early Schematic Design to the current Value Engineering phase of Design Development. Since the early involvement into the project, I worked on all design phases of the project: Programming, Schematic Design, Design Development, Material Take-off and Cost Analysis, Value Engineering, etc. The involvement of the project also included consultant coordination.

PROJECT TEAM: C. Pelli, F. Clarke, B. Butler, A. Fraser, R. Mehta, A. Woods, M. Cucco, and T. Wu

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ROOF STUDY

ELEVATION STUDY

*RENDERING DONE BY PROFESSIONAL GRAPHIC CONSULTANT

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TYPICAL FLOOR PLAN 1

CORRIDOR STUDY 2

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ATRIUM STAIR STUDY 5

ATRIUM WALL STUDY 6

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ANAHEIM REGIONAL TRANSPORTATION INTERMODAL CENTER DESIGN COMPETITION (ARTIC) [2009] LOCATION: ANAHEIM, CALIFORNIA SIZE: 16 ACRES

Project Description This design competition called for a 2-phase design: - Phase 1: Transit Center - Phase 2: a 16 acre commercial-officeresidential mixed- use development. PCPA developed three schemes: River Promenade, Green Ribbon, and Crown Point. Each conceptual design included a specific response to Phase 1 and Phase 2. Project Involvement The design task was to design the entire Green Ribbon Phase 2 Development. The Phase 2 development utilizes the direct connection of the new transit center and the nearby Honda Center as a dominant axis. The massing of the development was then a branching off of the main axis. The façade and the massing articulate according to this action. My involvement with this project had also included graphic consultant coordination and quality control.

PROJECT TEAM: C. Pelli, F. Clarke, C. Toche, S. Curria, E. Figueres, J. O’Rear, B. Persson, N. Liu, A. Fung, A. Kovenat, and T. Wu 46

T.WU-[2009]-PELLI CLARKE PELLI ARCHITECTS


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RIVER TRAIN LOCAL PUBLIC TRANSPORTATION VEHICULAR PATHWAY MAJOR AXIS ON SITE MASSING DIAGRAM - SECTION MASSING DIAGRAM - PLAN MASSING DIAGRAM

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*RENDERINGS DONE BY PROFESSIONAL GRAPHIC CONSULTANT


*RENDERINGS DONE BY PROFESSIONAL GRAPHIC CONSULTANT

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TUNG-SHENG TONY WU TONY.OU@GMAIL.COM 405.641.3482


CROP 8.5x11

CUT THESE EDGES FIRST


Selected Work from 2002-10